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Sample records for metastatic castration-resistant prostate

  1. Targeting Mitochondrial Inhibitors for Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    niclosamide and 7 hydroxy-β-Lapachone (7OH β-Lap) analog lipophilic mitochondria toxins (MT) to human serum albumin (HSA) via a PSA specific peptide... human serum albumin (HSA) via a PSA specific peptide linker sequence to systemically deliver these novel agents via the blood so that these cell...effect”. Keywords Metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, mitochondria toxins, human serum albumin , PSA-activated prodrugs Accomplishments

  2. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: time for innovation.

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    Tucci, Marcello; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio; Vignani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the mainstay of advanced prostate cancer treatment. Despite initial responses, almost all patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The understanding of the biology of CRPC and the evidence that CRPC still remains driven by androgen receptor signaling led to the discovery of new therapeutic targets. In the last few years, large Phase III trials showed improvements in survival and outcomes and led to the approval of a CYP17 inhibitor (abiraterone), an androgen receptor antagonist (enzalutamide), the taxane cabazitaxel, an α-emitter (radium-223), the bone resorption-targeting drug denosumab and an immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T). This article describes the molecular mechanisms underlying castration resistance, discusses recent and ongoing trials and offers some insights into identifying the best sequence of new drugs.

  3. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: new therapies, novel combination strategies and implications for immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drake, C.G.; Sharma, P.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, docetaxel has remained the global standard of care for frontline treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Until recently, there were limited options for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel failure or resistance, but now the approved treatment

  4. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra...

  5. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the fina...

  6. Drug development for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: current status and future perspectives.

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    Lassi, Kiran; Dawson, Nancy A

    2011-04-01

    Prostate cancer represents a third of all newly diagnosed cancers in men in the USA with an estimated incidence of 192,280 cases and 27,360 deaths in 2009. It continues to be a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality, and there is an urgent need for new treatments. Historically, systemic therapy options were limited after progression on docetaxel-based chemotherapy. This article reviews current data on the novel therapeutics demonstrating activity in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and their future role in the treatment of this disease with a poor prognosis.

  7. Enzalutamide for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Vida A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alejo Rodriguez-Vida,1 Myria Galazi,1 Sarah Rudman,1 Simon Chowdhury,1 Cora N Sternberg2 1Medical Oncology Department, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Medical Oncology Department, San Camillo and Forlanini Hospitals, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, several nonhormonal and hormonal agents, including enzalutamide, have been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC on the basis of improved overall survival in prospective clinical trials. The incorporation of these agents has revolutionized the treatment of CRPC but has also raised the question of what is the ideal sequence of administering them. Enzalutamide is a nonsteroidal second-generation antiandrogen that has been approved for the treatment of metastatic CRPC both in the post-docetaxel and chemotherapy-naïve settings. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics of enzalutamide, the efficacy studies which led to its approval, its safety profile, and quality of life-related parameters as well as its place in the sequential treatment and management of metastatic prostate cancer. Keywords: enzalutamide, antiandrogen, ADT, androgen receptor, castration resistant prostate cancer, overall survival

  8. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated......, back pain, constipation, and arthralgia. This final analysis of PREVAIL provides more complete assessment of the clinical benefit of enzalutamide. PREVAIL is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01212991. PATIENT SUMMARY: According to data from longer follow-up, enzalutamide continued to provide...

  9. Targeting Met and VEGFR Axis in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 'Game Over'?

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    Modena, Alessandra; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Santoni, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances that have been made in the therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), effective management of bone metastases remains a key goal not yet reached. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) seem to play an important role in prostate cancer progression and pathological bone turnover, representing potential targets for improving clinical outcomes in mCRPC. Studies evaluating agents that target one or both these pathways have demonstrated modest activity but no improvement in overall survival. Nevertheless, this therapeutic strategy seems to still be a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research and the interest in better understanding the MET/VEGFR axis and the mechanism of action of these inhibitors is growing. This review describes the rationale for targeting MET and VEGFR pathway in mCRPC and provides the clinical data available to date and an update on ongoing trials.

  10. New Biomarkers for Selecting the Best Therapy Regimens in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Heidenreich, Axel; Pfister, David

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. In recent years, several new targeted therapeutic agents for the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have been developed. These include androgen receptor targeting agents, new taxanes, radium-223, and immunotherapies. In this short review, we provide a summary of clinical and preclinical biomarkers for each of these new treatment strategies, also including new markers currently presented in conference papers only. Moreover, we address the role of these biomarkers in clinical routine with the aim to select best-personalized treatment strategies for patients. Finally, we provide a decision tree for selecting the proper therapy for patients with mCRPC according to the discussed biomarkers.

  11. Cabazitaxel Versus Docetaxel As First-Line Therapy for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), overall survival (OS) is significantly improved with cabazitaxel versus mitoxantrone after prior docetaxel treatment. FIRSTANA ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01308567) assessed whether cabazitaxel 20 mg/m(2) (C...

  12. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  13. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  14. Dendritic cell vaccination in combination with docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Borch, Troels Holz; Ellebaek, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Background aims  We investigated whether the addition of an autologous dendritic cell–based cancer vaccine (DCvac) induces an immune response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel.  Methods  Forty-three patients were randomized 1:1 to receive up......: 5.5 versus 5.7 months (P = 0.62, log rank) and 21.9 versus 25.1 months (P = 0.60, log rank). Nine (50%) and 14 (78%) patients treated with docetaxel and DCvac had a TAA-specific or vaccine-specific immune response in the ELISpot and DTH analysis, respectively. Vaccine induced toxicity was limited...

  15. Impact of treatment delay in Radium-223 therapy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Marie Øbro; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Daugaard, Gedske

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radium-223-dichloride (Ra-223) is an alpha-emitting, bone seeking radionuclide therapy approved for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the fall of 2014, a global temporary shortage of Ra-223 occurred for 2 months due to production irregularities....... The aim of this study was to assess whether prolonged interval between Ra-223 cycles to non-disease related causes had a negative impact on clinical outcome of therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective single-center study of mCRPC patients who initiated Ra-223 therapy in the period from March 2014......, respectively. Follow-up period was 18 months after first Ra-223 cycle. RESULTS: A total of 50 consecutive patients initiated Ra-223 therapy in the time period. Seventeen of 50 patients (34%) had prolonged interval between cycles due to delivery problems. Median delay was 4 weeks (range 3-9 weeks). Patients...

  16. Impact of cabazitaxel on 2-year survival and palliation of tumour-related pain in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated in the TROPIC trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, A; Oudard, S; Tombal, B

    2013-01-01

    Cabazitaxel significantly improves overall survival (OS) versus mitoxantrone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after docetaxel failure. We examined patient survival at 2 years and tumour-related pain with cabazitaxel versus mitoxantrone....

  17. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  18. Cabazitaxel: more than a new taxane for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer?

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    Mita, Alain C; Figlin, Robert; Mita, Monica M

    2012-12-15

    The taxanes are recognized as a major class of chemotherapeutic agents; however, mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance can limit their usefulness. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with microtubule-stabilizing potency similar to docetaxel, exhibits activity against tumor cell lines resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel. Cabazitaxel showed linear pharmacokinetics and a terminal elimination half-life comparable with that of docetaxel, findings which support dosing as a single infusion in three-week treatment cycles. Dose-ranging studies recommended doses of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) every three weeks. Antitumor activity was shown in patients with advanced cancer and chemotherapy failure (including taxane failure). Other early studies investigated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in pretreated metastatic breast cancer, either as a single agent or in combination with capecitabine. Objective antitumor response rates of up to 24% and sustained tumor stabilizations were also observed. The TROPIC phase III study, conducted in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel, established cabazitaxel as the first chemotherapeutic agent to offer a survival advantage in this patient population. Across these studies, the dose-limiting hematologic toxicity was neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia), usually controllable with colony-stimulating factor/granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support. ©2012 AACR.

  19. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR) and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an abiraterone withdrawal response are presented. Future directions in the use of abiraterone, including optimal dosing strategies, the role of

  20. Optimizing the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a Latin America perspective.

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    Sade, Juan Pablo; Báez, Carlos Alberto Vargas; Greco, Martin; Martínez, Carlos Humberto; Avitia, Miguel Ángel Álvarez; Palazzo, Carlos; Toriz, Narciso Hernández; Trujillo, Patricia Isabel Bernal; Bastos, Diogo Assed; Schutz, Fabio Augusto; Bella, Santiago; Nogueira, Lucas; Shore, Neal D

    2018-03-19

    Prostate cancer is a significant burden and cause of mortality in Latin America. This article reviews the treatment options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and provides consensus recommendations to assist Latin American prostate cancer specialists with clinical decision making. A multidisciplinary expert panel from Latin America reviewed the available data and their individual experience to develop clinical consensus opinions for the use of life-prolonging agents in mCRPC, with consideration given to factors influencing patient selection and treatment monitoring. There is a lack of level 1 evidence for the best treatment sequence or combinations in mCRPC. In this context, consensus recommendations were provided for the use of taxane-based chemotherapies, androgen receptor axis-targeted agents and targeted alpha therapy, for patients in Latin America. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) changes alone, during treatment, should be treated with caution; PSA may not be a suitable biomarker for radium-223. Bone scans and computed tomography are the standard imaging modalities in Latin America. Imaging should be prompted during treatment where symptomatic decline and/or significant worsening of laboratory evaluations are reported, or where a course of therapy has been completed and another antineoplastic agent is under consideration. Recommendations and guidance for treatment options in Latin America are provided in the context of country-level variable access to approved agents and technologies for treatment monitoring. Patients should be treated with the purpose of prolonging overall survival and preserving quality of life through increasing the opportunity to administer all available life-prolonging therapies when appropriate.

  1. Prostate-specific Antigen Decline After 4 Weeks of Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rescigno, P.; Lorente, D.; Bianchini, D.; Ferraldeschi, R.; Kolinsky, M.P.; Sideris, S.; Zafeiriou, Z.; Sumanasuriya, S.; Smith, A.D.; Mehra, N.; Jayaram, A.; Perez-Lopez, R.; Mateo, J.; Parker, C.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Tunariu, N.; Reid, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of multiple new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) mandates earlier treatment switches in the absence of a response. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used to monitor treatment response, but is not validated as an

  2. Challenges in the sequencing of therapies for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Phillip; Parnis, Francis; Gurney, Howard

    2014-09-01

    Prior to 2010, docetaxel was the standard option for chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Today, the picture is vastly different: several additional therapies have each demonstrated a survival benefit such that we now have chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen suppressive agents (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), a cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) and radium-233 (for symptomatic bone metastases). With several other agents in the pipeline for late-stage disease, the future looks promising for mCRPC. As the available data are not able to inform as to the optimum sequencing of therapy, this remains a challenge. This paper draws on insights from published and ongoing clinical studies to provide a practical patient-focused approach to maximize the benefits of the current therapeutic armamentarium. Preliminary sequencing suggestions are made based on clinical trial criteria. But until more data become available, clinical gestalt, experience, cost and individual patient preferences will continue to drive choices. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. The Role of Docetaxel in Non-Castrate Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer: An Evidence-based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Rahman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to learn the role of docetaxel in non-castrate resistant prostate cancer patient. Methods: literature search was conducted to find relevant study comparing the combination of docetaxel and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT to ADT alone in non-castrate resistant prostate cancer using PubMed, Cohrane Library, Proquest, EBSCO, and Scopus database. Quality assessment of studies was done using Bond University Rapid Critical Appraisal of a Systematic Review. Results: we found 494 studies from literature search, but only two studies were included in final selection. Based on validity assessment, we chose one study to be discussed further. This study showed that combination of docetaxel and ADT is better than ADT alone in regards of overall survival (HR 0.64; 95% CI 0.55, 0.75; p<0.0001; NNT=3, biochemical progression free survival (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.57, 0.69; p<0.0001; NNT=2 and clinical progression free survival (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.64, 0.84; p<0.0001; NNT=2. Benefit of docetaxel and ADT combination was especially seen in high volume disease (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.54, 0.83; p=0.0003; NNT=3. Conclusion: addition of docetaxel into ADT has beneficial effects in terms of overall survival and progression free survival in patients with non-castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer.

  4. [Experience with cabazitaxel therapy for patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maráz, Anikó; Boér, Katalin; Dankovics, Zsófia; Dank, Magdolna; Lahm, Erika; Petrányi, Ágota; Révész, János; Ruzsa, Ágnes; Szûcs, Miklós; Valikovics, Anikó; Vas, Mária; Küronya, Zsófia

    2017-12-18

    Our aim was to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of cabazitaxel (CBZ), a chemotherapeutic agent that can be administered to patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after docetaxel (DOC) therapy. We retrospectively analyzed data of CBZ received by mCRPC patients in 12 Hungarian oncological centers between 01/2016 and 06/2017. CBZ (25 or 20 mg/m2 q3w) was administered after DOC. Physical and laboratory examinations were performed in every cycle, tumor response was evaluated in every third cycle based on PCWG2 criteria. Adverse effects were evaluated based on CTCAE 4.0. Data of 60 patients were analyzed. CBZ was administered in 2nd and 3rd lines in 31.6% and 46.6%, while in 4th and 5th lines in 15% and 6.6% patients, respectively. Its starting dose was 25 mg/m2 and 20 mg/m2 in 65% and 35% of cases, respectively. The median number of cycles was 5. Progression-free survival and overall survival were 5.52 and 15.77 months, respectively. Survival results were similar in case of DOC-CBZ-ART/alfaradin and DOC-ART/alfaradin-CBZ sequences. Adverse effects were detected in 63,3% of patients. The most common adverse effects were neutropenia, anemia, and diarrhea. Our observations suggest that CBZ, with the appropriate support and chemotherapeutic experience, is well-tolerated and effective therapy of mCRPC after DOC.

  5. Budget Impact of Enzalutamide for Chemotherapy-Naïve Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Cat N; O'Day, Ken; Flanders, Scott; Oestreicher, Nina; Francis, Peter; Posta, Linda; Popelar, Breanna; Tang, Hong; Balk, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is expected to account for approximately one quarter of all new diagnoses of cancer in American men in 2015. The cost of prostate cancer care is expected to reach $15.1 billion by the year 2020, up from $11.9 billion in 2010. Given the high burden of prostate cancer, health care payers are interested in quantifying the potential budget impact of new therapies. To estimate the budget impact of enzalutamide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from a U.S. payer perspective. A model was developed to assess the budget impact of enzalutamide for treatment of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients in a hypothetical 1-million-member U.S. health plan over a 1-year time horizon. Comparators included abiraterone acetate, sipuleucel-T, radium Ra 223 dichloride, and docetaxel. Epidemiologic data, including National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) incidence rates, were used to estimate the number of chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. Dosing, administration, duration of therapy, and adverse event rates were based on package inserts and pivotal studies. Drug costs were obtained from RED BOOK and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) average sales price pricing files, costs of administration and monitoring from the CMS physician fee schedule, and adverse events from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and published literature. Market shares were estimated for each comparator before and after adoption of enzalutamide. The incremental aggregate budget impact, per patient per year (PPPY), per patient per month (PPPM), and per member per month (PMPM), was calculated. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed. In a population of 115 chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients, adopting enzalutamide had an annual incremental budget impact of $510,641 ($4,426 PPPY, $369 PPPM, and $0.04 PMPM). Results were most sensitive to

  6. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post-chemotherapy se......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post......-chemotherapy setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four mCRPC patients with progression after abiraterone treatment following primary docetaxel therapy received enzalutamide 160 mg/day. The percentage PSA response was recorded following first line docetaxel, abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment. Fischer's exact test......, Mann-Whitney U test and linear regression model were used to test for differences in PSA response. RESULTS: All patients had a follow-up of at least 3 months. The median PSA response following 1 month of enzalutamide was -12% (range -56% to 76%), while the median best PSA response was -22% (-76% to 76...

  7. Co-introduction of a steroid with docetaxel chemotherapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer affects PSA flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Takeuchi, Ario; Kiyoshima, Keijiro; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Shiga, Ken-Ichiro; Koga, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Akito; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the potential relationship of steroid usage with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) flare as well as the prognostic impact of PSA flare, which is known to occur in 10-20% of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer during docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 71 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by docetaxel chemotherapy with co-introduction of a steroid. PSA flare was defined as a transient PSA increase followed by a PSA decrease. PSA flare was recognized in 7.0-23.9% of patients according to the definition used. Intriguingly, men with steroid intake before the initiation of docetaxel chemotherapy experienced significantly fewer PSA flares. The progression-free survival rate in men with PSA flare was equivalent to that of PSA responders, but significantly better than men with PSA failure. Our results suggest that de novo steroid co-introduction with docetaxel chemotherapy induces the PSA flare phenomenon. This novel finding may account for the mechanism of PSA flare as well as being valuable for distinguishing PSA elevation attributable to PSA flare from that attributable to PSA failure. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...... with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.483). Events with grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity were equally distributed in the two groups (32 vs. 35%, P=0.80). PSA responses were observed in 46 and 17% of patients treated with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.002). PFS (5.5 vs. 3.3 months, P=0.087, log rank......-line or third-line therapy. Although PFS and the frequency of PSA responders favored patients treated with second-line CA, one treatment sequence could not be considered superior to the other in this study....

  9. Physicians' behavior influences the health and economic impact of applying circulating tumor cells as response marker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeling, K; Mehra, N.; Koffijberg, H; de Bono, J.S.; Ijzerman, M J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment decisions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) vary between physicians, even though expert opinion guidelines exist to guide the interpretation of information from multiple time-dependent imaging modalities and markers. We aimed to investigate whether

  10. Effect of abiraterone acetate treatment on the quality of life of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after failure of docetaxel chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harland, S.; Staffurth, J.; Molina, A.; Hao, Y.; Gagnon, D.D.; Sternberg, C.N.; Cella, D.; Fizazi, K.; Logothetis, C.J.; Kheoh, T.; Haqq, C.M.; Bono, J.S. de; Scher, H.I.; Mulders, P.F.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a recent randomised, double-blind, phase III clinical trial among 1195 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who had failed docetaxel chemotherapy, abiraterone acetate was shown to significantly prolong overall survival compared with prednisone alone.

  11. Phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) progressing after docetaxel and abiraterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massard, C.; Mateo, J.; Loriot, Y.; Pezaro, C.; Albiges, L.; Mehra, N.; Varga, A.; Bianchini, D.; Ryan, C.J.; Petrylak, D.P.; Attard, G.; Shen, L.; Fizazi, K.; Bono, J. De

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone and cabazitaxel improve survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted an open-label phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone to assess the antitumor activity and tolerability in patients with progressive mCRPC after

  12. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III Trial of Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Metastatic Chemotherapy-Naive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ipilimumab increases antitumor T-cell responses by binding to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. We evaluated treatment with ipilimumab in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer without visceral metastases. Pat...

  13. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progre...

  14. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison MR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Harrison, Terence Z Wong, Andrew J Armstrong, Daniel J GeorgeDuke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USABackground: Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153, 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration.Objective: This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile.Methods: Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database.Conclusion: Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab, which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153, which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel

  15. Practical recommendations for radium-223 treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); Carrio, Ignasi [Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); De Vincentis, Giuseppe [Policlinico Umberto I University Hospital Rome, Rome (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Mommsen, Caroline [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nitzsche, Egbert [Canton Hospital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Sundram, Francis [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Lewington, Val [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Radium Ra 223 dichloride (radium-223, Xofigo registered) is the first targeted alpha therapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 provides a new treatment option for this setting, but also necessitates a new treatment management approach. We provide straightforward and practical recommendations for European nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision. An independent research consultancy agency observed radium-223 procedures and conducted interviews with all key staff members involved in radium-223 treatment delivery in 11 nuclear medicine centres across six countries (Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK) experienced in administering radium-223. The findings were collated and discussed at a meeting of experts from these centres, during which key consensus recommendations were defined. The recommendations cover centre organization and preparation; patient referral; radium-223 ordering, preparation and disposal; radium-223 treatment delivery/administration; and patient experience. Guidance includes structured coordination and communication within centres and multidisciplinary teams, focusing on sharing best practice to provide high-quality, patient-centred care throughout the treatment pathway. These expert recommendations are intended to complement existing management guidelines. Sharing best practice and experience will help nuclear medicine centres to optimize radium-223 service provision and improve patient care. (orig.)

  16. Targeting heat shock proteins in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Arun A; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin E; Chi, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    The survival of malignant cells is constantly threatened by a myriad of cellular insults. In the context of such proteotoxic stress, cancer cells activate cytoprotective adaptive pathways. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but upregulated by cellular stress. As molecular chaperones, HSPs control the stability and function of client proteins, preventing aggregation of misfolded proteins, facilitating intracellular protein trafficking, maintaining protein conformation to enable ligand binding, phosphorylating proteins in signalling complexes and degrading severely damaged proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A key client protein of several HSPs is the androgen receptor (AR). HSPs facilitate binding of dihydrotestosterone to the AR, and enhance AR-mediated transcriptional activity. The integral role of HSPs in AR function speaks to their potential utility as therapeutic targets in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), a disease state characterized by persistent activation of the androgen-AR axis. Inhibition of HSPs has the additional benefit of potentially modulating signalling and transcriptional networks that are associated with HSP client proteins in CRPC cells. As a consequence, HSPs represent highly attractive targets in the development of treatments for CRPC.

  17. Do skeletal-related events predict overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, L E; De Hoedt, A M; Aronson, W J; Kane, C J; Amling, C L; Cooperberg, M R; Terris, M K; Divers, C H; Valderrama, A; Freedland, S J

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal-related events (SREs) including pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, radiation to bone and surgery to bone, are common in men with bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Men with mCRPC are at high risk of death. Whether SREs predict mortality is unclear. We tested the association between SREs and overall survival (OS) in a multiethnic cohort with bone mCRPC, controlling for key covariates unavailable in claims data such as bone pain, number of bone metastases and PSA doubling time (PSADT). We collected data on 233 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in 2000-2013 at two Veterans Affairs hospitals who later progressed to bone metastases. First occurrence of SRE and OS were collected from the medical records. Cox models were used to test the association between SRE and OS, treating SRE as a time-dependent variable. We adjusted for age, year, race, treatment center, biopsy Gleason, primary treatment to the prostate, PSA, PSADT, months from androgen deprivation therapy to CRPC, months from CRPC to metastasis and number of bone metastases at initial bone metastasis diagnosis. In a secondary analysis, we also adjusted for bone pain. During follow-up, 88 (38%) patients had an SRE and 198 (85%) died. After adjusting for risk factors, SRE was associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.30; P=0.001). When bone pain was added to the model, the association of SREs and OS was attenuated, but remained significant (HR=1.42; 95% CI 1.01-1.99; P=0.042). SREs are associated with increased mortality in men with bone mCRPC. Further studies on the impact of preventing SREs to increase survival are warranted.

  18. Docetaxel chemotherapy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: cost of care in Medicare and commercial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, A; Bui, C; Fitch, K; Sawhney, T Goss; Brown, B; Flanders, S; Balk, M; Deangelis, J; Chambers, J

    2017-06-01

    To estimate the healthcare costs and characteristics of docetaxel chemotherapy episodes of care for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study used the Medicare 5% sample and MarketScan Commercial (2010-2013) claims data sets to identify men with mCRPC and initial episodes of docetaxel treatment. Docetaxel episodes included docetaxel claim costs from the first claim until 30 days after the last claim, with earlier termination for death, insurance disenrollment, or the end of a 24-month look-forward period from initial docetaxel index date. Docetaxel drug claim costs were adjusted for 2011 generic docetaxel introduction, while other costs were adjusted to 2015 values using the national average annual unit cost increase. This study identified 281 Medicare-insured and 155 commercially insured men, with 325 and 172 docetaxel episodes, respectively. The average number of cycles (unique docetaxel infusion days) per episode was 6.9 for Medicare and 6.3 for commercial cohorts. The average cost per episode was $28,792 for Medicare and $67,958 for commercial cohorts, with docetaxel drug costs contributing $2,588 and $13,169 per episode, respectively. The average cost per episode on docetaxel infusion days was $8,577 (30%) for Medicare and $28,412 (42%) for commercial. Non-docetaxel infusion day costs included $7,074 (25%) for infused or injected drugs for Medicare, $10,838 (16%) for commercial cohorts, and $6,875 (24%) and $9,324 (14%) for inpatient admissions, respectively. The applicability is only to the metastatic castration-resistance clinical setting, rather than the metastatic hormone-sensitive setting, and the lack of data on the cost effectiveness of different sequencing strategies of a range of systemic therapies including enzalutamide, abiraterone, radium-223, and taxane chemotherapy. The majority of docetaxel episode costs in Medicare and commercial mCRPC populations were non-docetaxel drug costs. Future research should evaluate

  19. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of enzalutamide and abiraterone for treatment of chemotherapy naive patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Avxentyev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Enzalutamide and abiraterone are used for treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Both drugs were proved to be effective in randomized control trials.Objective. This pharmacoeconomic evaluation compared enzalutamide and abiraterone used prior to chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC from the Russian healthcare system perspective.Materials and methods. Based on clinical trials results we proposed an mCRPC Markov chain stochastic process model and calculated medical costs per 1 mCRPC patient. We also conducted cost – effectiveness, cost – utility and budget impact analysis.Results. Monthly medication costs for enzalutamide was 29 478 rubles (11.7 % less than for abiraterone + prednisolone. The 4 year total medical costs for enzalutamide was 318 thousand rubles (5.0 % less than for abiraterone + prednisolone. Enzalutamide was also found to be cost – effective compared to abiraterone.Conclusions. Enzalutamide is a rational option for mCRPC treatment.

  20. The Influence of Prednisone on the Efficacy of Cabazitaxel in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonerba, Carlo; Sonpavde, Guru; Vitrone, Francesca; Bosso, Davide; Puglia, Livio; Izzo, Michela; Iaccarino, Simona; Scafuri, Luca; Muratore, Margherita; Foschini, Francesca; Mucci, Brigitta; Tortora, Vincenzo; Pagliuca, Martina; Ribera, Dario; Riccio, Vittorio; Morra, Rocco; Mosca, Mirta; Cesarano, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Ileana; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cabazitaxel is a second-generation taxane that is approved for use with concomitant low dose daily prednisone in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after docetaxel failure. Since the role of daily corticosteroids in improving cabazitaxel efficacy or ameliorating its safety profile has not been adequately investigated so far, we compared outcomes of patients receiving cabazitaxel with or without daily corticosteroids in a retrospective single-Institution cohort of mCRPC patients. Patients and methods: Medical records of deceased patients with documented mCRPC treated with cabazitaxel following prior docetaxel between January, 2011 and January, 2017 were reviewed at the single participating center. Patients who were receiving daily doses of systemic corticosteroids other than low dose daily prednisone or prednisolone (30% PSA decline at 12 weeks. Prednisone use was not significantly prognostic for overall survival or PSA decline ≥30% rates on regression analyses. Importantly, a >30% PSA decline at 12, but not at 3, 6, 9 weeks, was prognostic for improved survival at multivariate analysis Conclusions: The data presented here support the hypothesis that omitting daily corticosteroids in cabazitaxel-treated patients has no negative impact on either survival or safety profile. In the large prospective trial CABACARE, cabazitaxel-treated patients will be randomized to receive or not receive daily prednisone. The CABACARE (EudraCT n. 2016-003646-81) study is currently ongoing at University Federico II of Naples and at other multiple participating centers in Italy. PMID:28928853

  1. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post hoc analysis of PREVAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A; Higano, C S; Iversen, P; Sternberg, C N; Rathkopf, D; Loriot, Y; de Bono, J; Tombal, B; Abhyankar, S; Lin, P; Krivoshik, A; Phung, D; Beer, T M

    2017-06-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide in the PREVAIL study were analyzed post hoc for rising versus nonrising PSA (empirically defined as >1.05 vs ⩽1.05 times the PSA level from 3 months earlier) at the time of radiographic progression. Clinical characteristics and disease outcomes were compared between the rising and nonrising PSA groups. Of 265 PREVAIL patients with radiographic progression and evaluable PSA levels on the enzalutamide arm, nearly one-quarter had a nonrising PSA. Median progression-free survival in this cohort was 8.3 months versus 11.1 months in the rising PSA cohort (hazard ratio 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.23); overall survival was similar between the two groups, although less than half of patients in either group were still at risk at 24 months. Baseline clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. Non-rising PSA at radiographic progression is a common phenomenon in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant on serial serum PSA measurement may more accurately identify disease progression.

  2. Consequences of an Early PSA Response to Enzalutamide Treatment for Japanese Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Haruo; Furuya, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Miyao, Takeshi; Syuto, Takahiro; Nomura, Masashi; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that an early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to androgen receptor (AR)-targeting agents in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is associated with a better prognosis. We analyzed early PSA response to enzalutamide and oncological outcomes to study their prognostic significance in the Japanese population. Fifty-one patients with mCRPC (26 of pre-docetaxel and 25 of post-docetaxel status) were treated with enzalutamide. The PSA progression-free survival (PFS), radiographic PFS (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed. The association of rPFS and OS in patients with an early PSA response at 4 weeks after commencement of enzalutamide was studied. Early PSA responses were significantly associated with a longer rPFS (median of 47.9 vs. 20.1 weeks, pPSA response; median of 40.9 vs. 20.1 weeks, p=0.016, in patients exhibiting a 30% PSA response). OS was also significantly associated with an early PSA response (p=0.002 for patients exhibiting a 50% PSA response, p=0.003 for patients exhibiting a 30% PSA response). Multivariate analysis showed that the predictors of a 50% PSA response were an interval to mCRPC and a docetaxel treatment history, while the predictor of a 30% PSA response was a docetaxel treatment history. Furthermore, a 50% PSA response was independently prognostic of rPFS. An early PSA response to enzalutamide was significantly associated with a longer rPFS and OS. This information will aid in the management of patients treated with enzalutamide. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Indicators of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with these drugs,7-9 both agents were ap- proved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate... testosterone (អ ng per deciliter [1.73 nmol per liter]) with continued androgen- deprivation therapy, and documented metastases, as confirmed on...clinical trials for patients with progressive prostate cancer and castrate levels of testosterone : recommendations of the Prostate Cancer Clinical

  4. Large Oncosomes: A Novel Liquid Biopsy for Genetic Profiling in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles...biopsy” changing the landscape of precision medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Extracellular Vesicles...the “liquid biopsy” and changing the landscape of precision medicine. Keywords Prostate Cancer, Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

  5. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J

    2015-01-01

    prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, patient characteristics, and progression-free survival, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were performed. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We identified 137 patients who prior to enzalutamide had progressed following a median...... on enzalutamide following disease progression on taxane-based chemotherapy and abiraterone was modest, but patients who experience a PSA decline >30% or 50%, respectively, with enzalutamide in this setting had longer survival. PATIENT SUMMARY: Enzalutamide produces modest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses...... of eight cycles of docetaxel and seven courses of abiraterone. The median time on enzalutamide was 3.2 mo; median OS from the time patients started enzalutamide was 8.3 mo (95% confidence interval, 6.8-9.8). Only 45 (38%) and 22 (18%) patients had PSA declines (unconfirmed) >30% and 50%, respectively...

  6. Circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: exploratory findings at a tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså SD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sophie D Fosså,1 Siri L Hess,1 Elisabeth Paus,2 Elin Borgen3 1National Resource Center for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, 3Department of Pathology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospital, Oslo, Norway Objectives: In patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, the finding of less than five circulating tumor cells (CTCs/7.5 mL blood before start of cytotoxic treatment or shortly thereafter indicates prolonged survival. In this descriptive pilot study, we investigated whether this association depends on the sequence of the therapeutic attempts. Patients and methods: CTCs were determined in 41 mCRPC patients before and 2–3 months after starting first-line treatment with docetaxel (group 1 or second-line treatment with either radium-223 (group 2 or placebo/best supportive care (group 3. A "favorable" CTC count was defined as <5 CTC/7.5 mL blood. The results were related to overall survival. Results: Pretreatment, six of ten men in group 1, three of 19 in group 2, and three of 12 patients in group 3 had a favorable CTC count, leading to a significant difference between first- and second-line therapy (P=0.04. Decrease of pretreatment elevated CTCs to a favorable CTC count was significantly more often observed in patients on first-line therapy (three of four patients than on second-line treatment (two of 26 men (P=0.03. A favorable CTC count before or shortly after treatment start was observed in nine of ten patients on first-line and in eight of 31 men on second-line therapy (P=0.01. A favorable CTC count pretreatment or 2–3 months after therapy start was associated with beneficial overall survival in the three groups combined and in each group analyzed separately. Conclusion: In mCRPC, a favorable CTC count before or 2–3 months after start of therapy is associated with length of overall survival, though such favorable CTC counts are observed

  7. 177Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic 68 Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. 177 Lu

  8. Influence of abiraterone acetate on neuroendocrine differentiation in chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baijun; Fan, Liancheng; Wang, Yanqing; Chi, Chenfei; Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Rui; Cai, Wen; Shao, Xiaoguang; Pan, Jiahua; Zhu, Yinjie; Shangguan, Xun; Xin, Zhixiang; Hu, Jianian; Xie, Shaowei; Kang, Xiaonan; Zhou, Lixin; Xue, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To determine the influence of abiraterone Acetate (AA) on neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) in patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted an analysis in 115 chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients who would be treated with chemotherapy. The serum levels of chromogranin A (CgA), neurone-specific enolase (NSE) were measured in 67 mCRPC patients without AA treatment and 48 patients after the failure of AA treatment, in which these markers were also measured in 34 patients before and after 6 months of AA treatment. Comparative t-test was used to evaluate the serial changes of serum NED markers during AA treatment and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the influence of AA treatment on NED. Serum CgA were NSE were evaluated to be above the upper limit of normal (ULN) in 56 (48.7%) and 29 (25.2%) patients before chemotherapy. In 34 patients with serial evaluation, serum CgA level of 14 patients and NSE of 14 patients increased after the failure of AA treatment. There was no significant difference of NED markers (CgA or NSE variation (P = 0.243) between at baseline and after the failure of AA treatment. Compared with the CgA elevation group in the first 6 months of AA treatment and baseline supranormal CgA group, the CgA decline group, and baseline normal CgA group has a much longer median PSA PFS (14.34 vs 10.00 months, P < 0.001, and 14.23 vs 10.30 months, P = 0.02) and rPFS, respectively (18.33 vs 11.37 months, P < 0.001, and 17.10 vs 12.07 months, P = 0.03). In logistic univariate analysis, AA treatment and its duration were not independent factors influencing NED. We hypothesized that AA might not significantly lead to progression of NED of mCRPC in general. Furthermore, we found there was heterogeneity in changes of NED markers in different mCRPC patients during AA treatment. Serial CgA and NSE evaluation might help clinicians guide clinical treatment of m

  9. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    CRPC with a good response to first-line docetaxel [serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) decrease ≥50%; no clinical/radiological progression]. We analysed the impact of management at relapse (docetaxel rechallenge or non-taxane-based therapy) on PSA response, symptomatic response (performance status....... At relapse, 223 patients were rechallenged with docetaxel (82.5%) and 47 received non-taxane-based therapy. There was no significant difference in median OS {18.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 16.1-22.00] and 16.8 [95%CI 13.4-21.5] months, respectively, P = 0.35}. However, good PSA response and symptom...... relief/stable disease were more frequent on docetaxel rechallenge (40.4% vs 10.6%, P PSA). A PFI of >6 months and added estramustine predicted a good PSA response and symptomatic response on docetaxel rechallenge but only a PFI of >6 months predicted longer OS. Haemoglobin (

  10. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA...... in the PREVAIL study were analyzed post hoc for rising versus nonrising PSA (empirically defined as >1.05 vs ⩽1.05 times the PSA level from 3 months earlier) at the time of radiographic progression. Clinical characteristics and disease outcomes were compared between the rising and nonrising PSA groups. RESULTS......: Of 265 PREVAIL patients with radiographic progression and evaluable PSA levels on the enzalutamide arm, nearly one-quarter had a nonrising PSA. Median progression-free survival in this cohort was 8.3 months versus 11.1 months in the rising PSA cohort (hazard ratio 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1...

  11. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Predictors of Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity and Treatment Outcomes in Elderly Versus Younger Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    used to evaluate treatment-related toxicity and efficacy. Logistic and Cox regression models were used to predict toxicity and survival. RESULTS: Age ≥ 75 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.33), baseline levels of hemoglobin (OR, 0.89), and previous metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC; OR, 1......BACKGROUND: In the present study, we examined possible predictors of chemotherapy-induced toxicity, treatment outcomes, and the consequences of dose reductions in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) receiving standard docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical.......70) were predictive of grade 3 and 4 nonhematologic toxicity. Previous MESCC was associated with a greater risk of febrile neutropenia (OR, 2.74). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 6.4 and 15.4 months, respectively. Survival was similar in the older (age ≥ 75 years...

  13. Time to prostate specific antigen (PSA) nadir may predict rapid relapse in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) receiving docetaxel chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Betsan M; Smith, Christian; Evans, Jessica; Button, Michael R; Kumar, Satish; Palaniappan, Nachi; Staffurth, John; Tanguay, Jacob S; Lester, Jason F

    2013-12-01

    Docetaxel has been shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There is no clear consensus regarding the optimum duration of chemotherapy. If patients at greater risk of rapid disease relapse could be identified when on chemotherapy, appropriate follow-up strategies could be put into place. The aim of our study was to find prostate specific antigen (PSA) characteristics that predict a shorter disease response to docetaxel chemotherapy. Data from 41 consecutive mCRPC patients treated with three-weekly docetaxel chemotherapy at a single centre between February 2010 and February 2012 were retrospectively analysed. All patients had ≥50% reduction in their PSA with chemotherapy. The relationship between time to PSA nadir (TTN) and PSA halving time with time to PSA progression and overall chemotherapy response duration was analysed. TTN was a strong predictor of the duration of chemotherapy response and time to PSA progression. When TTN was ≥16 weeks, the mean duration of response to chemotherapy was 37.5 weeks compared to 19.9 weeks when TTN PSA progression was 12.8 weeks if TTN was ≥16 weeks and 8.2 weeks TTN was <16 weeks (95% CI 0.63-8.60; p = 0.024). We observed that a TTN from the initiation of chemotherapy of <16 weeks for patients with mCRPC is an independent predictor of shorter duration of response and shorter progression-free survival.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Enzalutamide vs Bicalutamide in Younger and Older Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer in the TERRAIN Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, D Robert; Klotz, Laurence; Heidenreich, Axel; Chowdhury, Simon; Villers, Arnauld; Baron, Benoit; van Os, Steve; Hasabou, Nahla; Wang, Fong; Lin, Ping; Shore, Neal D

    2018-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly prolonged median progression-free survival vs bicalutamide in chemotherapy naïve men with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer in the TERRAIN (Enzalutamide versus Bicalutamide in Castrate Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer) trial. In this post hoc analysis we investigated the influence of age on the efficacy and safety of enzalutamide vs bicalutamide in this population. Patients were randomized 1:1 to enzalutamide 160 mg per day or bicalutamide 50 mg per day. Progression-free survival, time to prostate specific antigen progression and safety were analyzed post hoc in younger (age less than 75 years) and older (age 75 years or greater) subgroups. Enzalutamide significantly reduced the risk of disease progression or death vs bicalutamide in patients younger than 75 years (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.27-0.52, p <0.0001) and 75 years old or older (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37-0.92, p = 0.018). Time to prostate specific antigen progression was also significantly prolonged with enzalutamide vs bicalutamide in each subgroup. The adverse event distribution between treatments was similar in each subgroup except for more (5% or greater difference between subgroups) atrial fibrillation, urinary tract infections, falls and decreased appetite as well as less extremity pain and hot flushing in enzalutamide treated patients 75 years old or older, and less back pain and hot flushing in bicalutamide treated patients 75 years old or older. Grade 3 or greater cardiac events were more frequent in enzalutamide treated and bicalutamide treated patients who were 75 years old or older vs younger than 75 years. Fatigue was more frequent in enzalutamide treated patients with a similar distribution in each age subgroup. Enzalutamide improved clinical outcomes vs bicalutamide irrespective of age. Increased falls and cardiac events suggest caution when prescribing to older patients (age 75 years or greater) with significant comorbidity. Copyright © 2018 American

  15. Update on castrate-resistant prostate cancer: 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Kiran; Dawson, Nancy A

    2010-05-01

    Prostate cancer remains a medical dilemma and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in many western countries. It represents the most common cancer in US men, with an estimated 192 280 new cases diagnosed in 2009. The median survival for men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is 1-2 years, with improvements in survival seen primarily with docetaxel-based therapies. The purpose of this article is to discuss developments of novel agents in the field of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including new cytotoxic agents, immune-based therapies, circulating tumor markers and targeting agents. During this past year, several promising approaches yielded disappointing results in the phase III setting (GVAX); nonetheless, expectations for other agents (Abiraterone, MDV3100, Zibotentan, immunotherapy agents) still remain high. Systemic therapy options are limited in CRPC and survival benefit remains to be seen with the new therapies. Circulating tumor cells continue to provide important prognostic information and will likely become an important aspect of future clinical decision-making.

  16. Multicentre phase I/II study of PI-88, a heparanase inhibitor in combination with docetaxel in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasraw, M; Pavlakis, N; McCowatt, S; Underhill, C; Begbie, S; de Souza, P; Boyce, A; Parnis, F; Lim, V; Harvie, R; Marx, G

    2010-06-01

    Docetaxel (Taxotere) improve survival and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response rates in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We studied the combination of PI-88, an inhibitor of angiogenesis and heparanase activity, and docetaxel in chemotherapy-naive CRPC. We conducted a multicentre open-label phase I/II trial of PI-88 in combination with docetaxel. The primary end point was PSA response. Secondary end points included toxicity, radiologic response and overall survival. Doses of PI-88 were escalated to the maximum tolerated dose; whereas docetaxel was given at a fixed 75 mg/m(2) dose every three weeks Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the dose-escalation component. A further 35 patients were randomly allocated to the study to evaluate the two schedules in phase II trial. The trial was stopped early by the Safety Data Review Board due to a higher-than-expected febrile neutropenia of 27%. In the pooled population, the PSA response (50% reduction) was 70%, median survival was 61 weeks (6-99 weeks) and 1-year survival was 71%. The regimen of docetaxel and PI-88 is active in CRPC but associated with significant haematologic toxicity. Further evaluation of different scheduling and dosing of PI-88 and docetaxel may be warranted to optimise efficacy with a more manageable safety profile.

  17. Addressing the expected survival benefit for clinical trial design in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Sensitivity analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Pilotto, Sara; Maines, Francesca; Bracarda, Sergio; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Carlini, Paolo; Santini, Daniele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Porta, Camillo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    We performed a sensitivity analysis, cumulating all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) received systemic therapy, to evaluate if the comparison of RCTs may drive to biased survival estimations. An overall survival (OS) significant difference according to therapeutic strategy was more likely be determined in RCTs evaluating hormonal drugs versus those studies testing immunotherapy, chemotherapy or other strategies. With regard to control arm, an OS significant effect was found for placebo-controlled trials versus studies comparing experimental treatment with active therapies. Finally, regarding to docetaxel (DOC) timing, the OS benefit was more likely to be proved in Post-DOC setting in comparison with DOC and Pre-DOC. These data suggest that clinical trial design should take into account new benchmarks such as the type of treatment strategy, the choice of the comparator and the phase of the disease in relation to the administration of standard chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of cabazitaxel chemotherapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostatic carcinoma on Turkish patients (The Anatolian Society of Medical Oncology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süner, A; Aydın, D; Hacıoğlu, M B; Doğu, G G; İmamoğlu, G I; Menekşe, S; Pilancı, K N; Yazıcı, Ö K; Koca, D; Karaağaç, M; Akyol, M; Akman, T; Ergen, S; Avcı, N; Kaçan, T; Bozkurt, O; Kefeli, U; Urakçı, Z; Araz, M; Arpacı, E; Harputlu, H; Sevinç, A

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common cancers in males. Prostate cancer is androgen dependent in the beginning, but as time progresses, it becomes refractory to androgen deprivation treatment. At this stage, docetaxel has been used as standard treatment for years. Cabazitaxel has become the first chemotherapeutic agent which has been shown to increase survival for patients with metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) that progresses after docetaxel. Phase 3 TROPIC study demonstrated that cabazitaxel prolongs survival. In this study, we evaluated a total of 103 patients who took cabazitaxel chemotherapy for mCRPC diagnosis in 21 centers of Turkey, retrospectively. This study included patients who progressed despite docetaxel treatments, had ECOG performance score between 0-2, and used cabazitaxel treatment. Patients received cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 at every 3 weeks, and prednisolone 5 mg twice a day. Median number of cabazitaxel cures was 5.03 (range: 1-17). Cabazitaxel response evaluation detected that 34% of the patients had a partial response, 22.3% had stable disease and 32% had a progressive disease. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicities were neutropenia (28.2%), neutropenic fever (14.5%), anemia (6.7%), and thrombocytopenia (3.8%). In our study, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7.7 months and overall survival (OS) was 10.6 months. This study reflects toxicity profile of Turkish patients as a Caucasian race. We suggest that cabazitaxel is a safe and effective treatment option for mCRPC patients who progress after docetaxel. Moreover, ethnicity may play important roles both in treatment response and in toxicity profile.

  19. Clinical Impact of the Number of Treatment Cycles in First-Line Docetaxel for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the impact of the number of docetaxel cycles administered in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with first-line chemotherapy. Charts from 421 consecutive patients who initiated standard treatment with docetaxel-based chemotherapy (75 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks) between 2007 and 2013 were reviewed. Patients who received patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of whether or not ≥ 9 cycles of docetaxel were administered (n = 108 and 184, respectively). Reasons for treatment discontinuation and postdocetaxel treatments were registered. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses were defined as a confirmed ≥ 50% decrease in baseline PSA levels. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from start of therapy using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards were calculated to estimate the effect of clinical variables on OS. OS was longer in patients treated with ≥ 9 cycles of docetaxel (21.9 months vs. 17.2 months; P patients treated with ≥ 9 cycles of docetaxel when only patients ending docetaxel because of toxicity or treatment conclusion (22.3 vs. 19.4 months; P = .048, log rank) or patients who achieved a PSA response (22.3 vs. 18.7 months; P = .012, log rank) were evaluated. mCRPC-related prognostic factors and patients who received ≥ 1 subsequent line of therapy post-docetaxel were well balanced. On the basis of our retrospective findings, a superior OS was found in patients treated with ≥ 9 cycles of docetaxel when adjusting for known prognostic factors. Dose reductions might increase the number of docetaxel cycles administered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Timed Automata with Discrete Event Simulation for Modeling of Biomarker-Based Treatment Decisions: An Illustration for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Koen; Schivo, Stefano; Mehra, Niven; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Langerak, Rom; de Bono, Johann S; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2017-12-01

    With the advent of personalized medicine, the field of health economic modeling is being challenged and the use of patient-level dynamic modeling techniques might be required. To illustrate the usability of two such techniques, timed automata (TA) and discrete event simulation (DES), for modeling personalized treatment decisions. An early health technology assessment on the use of circulating tumor cells, compared with prostate-specific antigen and bone scintigraphy, to inform treatment decisions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was performed. Both modeling techniques were assessed quantitatively, in terms of intermediate outcomes (e.g., overtreatment) and health economic outcomes (e.g., net monetary benefit). Qualitatively, among others, model structure, agent interactions, data management (i.e., importing and exporting data), and model transparency were assessed. Both models yielded realistic and similar intermediate and health economic outcomes. Overtreatment was reduced by 6.99 and 7.02 weeks by applying circulating tumor cell as a response marker at a net monetary benefit of -€1033 and -€1104 for the TA model and the DES model, respectively. Software-specific differences were observed regarding data management features and the support for statistical distributions, which were considered better for the DES software. Regarding method-specific differences, interactions were modeled more straightforward using TA, benefiting from its compositional model structure. Both techniques prove suitable for modeling personalized treatment decisions, although DES would be preferred given the current software-specific limitations of TA. When these limitations are resolved, TA would be an interesting modeling alternative if interactions are key or its compositional structure is useful to manage multi-agent complex problems. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. PSA response to cabazitaxel is associated with improved progression-free survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: the non-interventional QoLiTime study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerer, Peter; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Keller, Martin; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and progression-free and overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with cabazitaxel. Men with mCRPC receiving cabazitaxel (25 mg/m 2 , every 3 weeks) plus oral prednis(ol)one (10 mg/day) were enrolled in the non-interventional, prospective QoLiTime study. Main outcome measures were progression-free survival and overall survival, in all patients and in those who showed a ≥ 50 or a ≥ 30% decrease in PSA relative to baseline after four cycles of cabazitaxel, as well as quality-of-life parameters. Of the 527 men (median age 72 years), 266 received ≥ 4 cycles of cabazitaxel and had PSA response data. After four cycles, 34.6% of men achieved a PSA decrease ≥ 50% and 49.6% a decrease ≥ 30%. Median progression-free survival was 7.7 (95% CI 6.2, 9.5) months, and overall survival was 19.5 (95% CI 16.0, 30.9) months, corresponding to 1-year event rates of 39.4 and 78.8%, respectively. Median progression-free survival was longer in PSA responders versus non-responders (15.7 vs 5.5 months at 50% cut-off; 15.7 vs 5.3 months for 30% cut-off; both P PSA response after four cycles of cabazitaxel is associated with improved progression-free survival in men with mCRPC treated with cabazitaxel plus prednis(ol)one.

  2. Systemic therapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer:American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C; Frame, James N; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Virgo, Katherine S

    2014-10-20

    To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 ((223)Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or (223)Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate optimal sequences or

  3. Preliminary study of the specific endothelin a receptor antagonist zibotentan in combination with docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Payne, Heather; Miller, Kurt; de Bono, Johann S; Stephenson, Joe; Burris, Howard A; Nathan, Faith; Taboada, Maria; Morris, Thomas; Hubner, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    This two-part study assessed the safety and tolerability of combined treatment with zibotentan (ZD4054), a specific endothelin A receptor antagonist, plus docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Part A was an open-label, dose-finding phase to determine the safety and toxicity profile of zibotentan in combination with docetaxel. Patients received once-daily oral zibotentan 10 mg (initial cohort) or 15 mg in combination with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) (administered on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) for up to 10 cycles. Part B was a double-blind phase which evaluated the safety and preliminary activity of zibotentan plus docetaxel. Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive zibotentan (at the highest tolerated dose identified in part A) plus docetaxel or placebo plus docetaxel. Six patients were enrolled in part A (n  = 3, zibotentan 10 mg; n = 3, zibotentan 15 mg). No dose-limiting toxicity was observed, thus zibotentan 15 mg in combination with docetaxel was evaluated in part B (n = 20, zibotentan plus docetaxel; n = 11, placebo plus docetaxel). CTCAE grade ≥3, most commonly neutropenia or leucopenia, were reported in 10 (50%) and nine (82%) patients in the zibotentan and placebo groups, respectively. One (17%) patient receiving placebo achieved complete response, two (22%) patients receiving zibotentan achieved partial response and stable disease occurred in six (67%) and three (50%) patients receiving zibotentan and placebo, respectively. The tolerability of zibotentan plus docetaxel was consistent with the known profiles of each drug. Sufficient preliminary activity was seen with this combination to merit continued development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Subsequent Chemotherapy and Treatment Patterns After Abiraterone Acetate in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Post Hoc Analysis of COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bono, Johann S; Smith, Matthew R; Saad, Fred; Rathkopf, Dana E; Mulders, Peter F A; Small, Eric J; Shore, Neal D; Fizazi, Karim; De Porre, Peter; Kheoh, Thian; Li, Jinhui; Todd, Mary B; Ryan, Charles J; Flaig, Thomas W

    2017-04-01

    Treatment patterns for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have changed substantially in the last few years. In trial COU-AA-302 (chemotherapy-naïve men with mCRPC), abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (AA) significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) when compared to placebo plus prednisone (P). This post hoc analysis investigated clinical responses to docetaxel as first subsequent therapy (FST) among patients who progressed following protocol-specified treatment with AA, and characterized subsequent treatment patterns among older (≥75 yr) and younger (AA arm received subsequent treatment with one or more agents approved for mCRPC. Efficacy analysis was performed for patients for whom baseline and at least one post-baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values were available. Baseline and at least one post-baseline PSA values were available for 100 AA patients who received docetaxel as FST. While acknowledging the limitations of post hoc analyses, 40% (40/100) of these patients had an unconfirmed ≥50% PSA decline with first subsequent docetaxel therapy, and 27% (27/100) had a confirmed ≥50% PSA decline. The median docetaxel treatment duration among these 100 patients was 4.2 mo. Docetaxel was the most common FST among older and younger patients from each treatment arm. However, 43% (79/185) of older patients who progressed on AA received no subsequent therapy for mCRPC, compared with 17% (60/361) of younger patients. Patients with mCRPC who progress with AA treatment may still derive benefit from subsequent docetaxel therapy. These data support further assessment of treatment patterns following AA treatment for mCRPC, particularly among older patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00887198. Treatment patterns for advanced prostate cancer have changed substantially in the last few years. This additional analysis provides evidence of clinical benefit for subsequent chemotherapy in men with advanced

  5. [Targeted radionuclide therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Baba, Shingo; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Although patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer frequently have metastases to the bone, they have a relatively favorable prognosis. Therefore, it is important to keep or improve the level of patient's quality of life. The use of strontium-89 for the management of the pain from bone metastasis was approved in 2007 in Japan. A new bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals using radium-223 is also promising, because a randomized trial showed an overall survival advantage of radium-223 in prostate patients with bone metastases. In this review, we summarize the role of targeted radionuclide therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer, focusing on strontium-89 and radium-223.

  6. Emerging therapies in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Kiran; Dawson, Nancy A

    2009-05-01

    Prostate cancer continues to represent a major health problem. It represents the most common cancer in US men, with an estimated 186 320 new cases diagnosed in 2008. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Despite several attempts, the median survival for men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is 1-2 years, with improvements in survival seen primarily with docetaxel-based therapies. Treatment options are limited, and there is a clear need for therapies that improve outcome. The purpose of this article is to discuss recent developments in the field of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer, including new cytotoxic agents, antiproliferative agents, immune-based therapies, circulating tumor markers and antiangiogenic agents. During this last year, several promising approaches yielded disappointing results in the phase III setting (GVAX, satraplatin, DN-101); nonetheless, expectations for other agents (abiraterone, zibotentan, Provenge) still remain high. These new agents will need to demonstrate survival benefit for approval. Circulating tumor cells have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making.

  7. Updated interim efficacy analysis and long-term safety of abiraterone acetate in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients without prior chemotherapy (COU-AA-302).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana E; Smith, Matthew R; de Bono, Johann S; Logothetis, Christopher J; Shore, Neal D; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mulders, Peter F A; Mainwaring, Paul; Hainsworth, John D; Beer, Tomasz M; North, Scott; Fradet, Yves; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Carles, Joan; Flaig, Thomas W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Yu, Evan Y; Higano, Celestia S; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Griffin, Thomas W; Todd, Mary B; Yu, Margaret K; Park, Youn C; Kheoh, Thian; Small, Eric J; Scher, Howard I; Molina, Arturo; Ryan, Charles J; Saad, Fred

    2014-11-01

    Abiraterone acetate (an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor) plus prednisone is approved for treating patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Study COU-AA-302 evaluated abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus prednisone alone in mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with progressive mCRPC without prior chemotherapy. Report the prespecified third interim analysis (IA) of efficacy and safety outcomes in study COU-AA-302. Study COU-AA-302, a double-blind placebo-controlled study, enrolled patients with mCRPC from April 2009 to June 2010. A total of 1088 patients were stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs 1). Patients were randomised 1:1 to abiraterone 1000mg plus prednisone 5mg twice daily by mouth versus prednisone. Co-primary end points were radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS). Median times to event outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived using the Cox model, and treatment comparison used the log-rank test. The O'Brien-Fleming Lan-DeMets α-spending function was used for OS. Adverse events were summarised descriptively. With a median follow-up duration of 27.1 mo, improvement in rPFS was statistically significant with abiraterone treatment versus prednisone (median: 16.5 vs 8.2 mo; HR: 0.52 [95% CI, 0.45-0.61]; ppatient-reported outcomes improved. While the post hoc nature of the long-term safety analysis is a limitation, the safety profile with longer treatment exposure was consistent with prior reports. The updated IA of study COU-AA-302 in patients with mCRPC without prior chemotherapy confirms that abiraterone delays disease progression, pain, and functional deterioration and has clinical benefit with a favourable safety profile, including in patients treated for ≥24 mo. Study COU-AA-302, ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00887198. The updated results of this ongoing study

  8. PSMA targeted radioligandtherapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy, abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. A retrospective analysis of overall survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar, K.; Schaefers, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Boegemann, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany); Yordanova, A.; Essler, M.; Ahmadzadehfar, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Eveslage, M. [University Hospital Muenster, Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Muenster (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    Our aim was to evaluate overall survival and parameters prognosticating longer survival in a large and homogeneous group of patients treated with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy with heavily pretreated advanced metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. A total of 104 patients were treated with 351 cycles of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) changes after the first cycle of therapy were documented prior to a second cycle. Patients were followed-up for overall survival (OS). Any PSA decline, PSA decline ≥50%, initial PSA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), visceral metastases and cumulative injected activity were analyzed and evaluated according to OS. Multivariable analysis with parameters with a p-value ≤0.05 in univariate analysis was performed, additionally adjusting for age and presence of visceral metastases. A total of 51 patients (49%) died during the observation period. The majority of patients (97%) presented with bone metastases, 77% with lymph node metastases and 32% with visceral metastases. All patients were treated with at least one line of chemotherapy. Either abiraterone or enzalutamide had been given in 100% of the patients. Any PSA decline occurred in 70 (67%) and a PSA decline ≥50% in 34 (33%) of patients after the first cycle. The median OS was 56.0 weeks (95%CI: 50.5-61.5). Initial PSA decline ≥50%, initial LDH, visceral metastases, second line chemotherapy or prior radium-223 did not have an effect on survival, whereas any initial PSA decline, initial ALP <220 U/L and cumulative injected activity ≥18.8 GBq were associated with a longer survival. A step-by-step analysis revealed a PSA decline ≥20.87% as the most noticeable cut-off prognosticating longer survival, which remained an independent prognosticator of improved OS in the multivariate analysis. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 RLT is a new effective therapeutic and seems to prolong survival in patients with advanced m

  9. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Rossi, Lorena; Amadori, Dino [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Caroli, Paola; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated the role of {sup 18}F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response

  10. Phase I clinical trial of sipuleucel-T combined with escalating doses of ipilimumab in progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Scholz,1 Sabrina Yep,1 Micah Chancey,1 Colleen Kelly,1 Ken Chau,1 Jeffrey Turner,1 Richard Lam,1 Charles G Drake,2,3 1Prostate Oncology Specialists, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA, 2The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, 3The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Sipuleucel-T (SIP-T, which functions by stimulating cancer-specific dendritic cells, prolongs survival in men with prostate cancer. Ipilimumab (IPI achieved a borderline survival advantage in a large randomized trial. SIP-T and IPI are potentially synergistic. Patients and Methods: Nine men with progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC were treated prospectively with SIP-T followed immediately by IPI with one of the following doses of IPI: 1 mg/kg at 1 week after SIP-T; 1 mg/kg at 1 and 4 weeks after SIP-T; or 1 mg/kg at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after SIP-T. Three patients were evaluated at each level. Cancer-specific immunoglobulins directed at granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor/prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fusion protein (PA2024 and PAP were measured prior to SIP-T, after SIP-T, 1 week after IPI, every other month for 5 months, then every 3 months for an additional 12 months. Results: Adverse events of SIP-T were consistent with previous reports. IPI only caused a transient grade 1 rash in one patient. Median age, Gleason score, and number of previous hormonal interventions were 77 years, 8, and 3, respectively. Eight men had bone metastases and one had lymph node metastasis. Statistically significant increases in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgG-IgM specific for PA2024 and PAP occurred after SIP-T. An additional statistically significant increase in the aforementioned immunoglobulins – above the levels achieved by SIP-T – occurred after IPI. Median clinical follow-up was 36 months (range: 26–40. Three patients died from progressive disease after 9, 18, and 20 months. Out of the

  11. Assessment of a prognostic model, PSA metrics and toxicities in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer using data from Project Data Sphere (PDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Robert J.; Abdallah, Kald; Pintilie, Melania; Joshua, Anthony M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prognostic models in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) may have clinical utility. Using data from PDS, we aimed to 1) validate a contemporary prognostic model (Templeton et al., 2014) 2) evaluate prognostic impact of concomitant medications and PSA decrease 3) evaluate factors associated with docetaxel toxicity. Methods We accessed data on 2,449 mCRPC patients in PDS. The existing model was validated with a continuous risk score, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and corresponding time-dependent Area under the Curve (tAUC). The prognostic effects of concomitant medications and PSA response were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models. One year tAUC was calculated for multivariable prognostic model optimized to our data. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess associations with grade 3/4 adverse events (G3/4 AE) at baseline and after cycle 1 of treatment. Results Despite limitations of the PDS data set, the existing model was validated; one year AUC, was 0.68 (95% CI 95% CI, .66 to .71) to 0.78 (95%CI, .74 to .81) depending on the subset of datasets used. A new model was constructed with an AUC of .74 (.72 to .77). Concomitant medications low molecular weight heparin and warfarin were associated with poorer survival, Metformin and Cox2 inhibitors were associated with better outcome. PSA response was associated with survival, the effect of which was greatest early in follow-up. Age was associated with baseline risk of G3/4 AE. The odds of experiencing G3/4 AE later on in treatment were significantly greater for subjects who experienced a G3/4 AE in their first cycle (OR 3.53, 95% CI 2.53–4.91, p < .0001). Conclusion Despite heterogeneous data collection protocols, PDS provides access to large datasets for novel outcomes analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate its utility for validating existing models and novel model generation including the utility of concomitant medications in

  12. {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, BR Ambedkar Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Seth, Amlesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic{sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity

  13. Development and Validation of A Bioanalytical Method to Quantitate Enzalutamide and its Active Metabolite N-Desmethylenzalutamide in Human Plasma: Application to Clinical Management of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Guillemette E; van der Meulen, Eric; van Oort, Inge M; Beumer, Jan Hendrik; Somford, Diederik M; Schalken, Jack A; Burger, David M; van Erp, Nielka P

    2018-02-05

    Enzalutamide is a potent androgen-signaling receptor inhibitor and is licensed for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. N-desmethylenzalutamide is the active metabolite of enzalutamide. A method to quantitate enzalutamide and its active metabolite was developed and validated according to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) guidelines. Enzalutamide and N-desmethylenzalutamide were extracted by protein precipitation, separated on a C18 column with gradient elution and analyzed with tandem quadruple mass spectrometry in positive ion mode. A stable deuterated isotope (D6-enzalutamide) was used as an internal standard. The method was tested and stability was studied in real life patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with enzalutamide. The calibration curve covered the range of 500-50000 ng/mL. Within- and between-day precisions were <8% and accuracies were within 108% for both enzalutamide and N-desmethylenzalutamide. Precisions for lower-limit-of-quantification level were <10% and accuracies within 116% for enzalutamide and N-desmethylenzalutamide. Enzalutamide and N-desmethylenzalutamide stability was proven for 24 hours for whole blood at ambient temperature, and 23 days for plasma at both ambient temperature and 2-8 °C. Long-term patient plasma stability was shown for 14 months at -40 °C. This bioanalytical method was successfully validated and applied to determine plasma concentrations of enzalutamide and N-desmethylenzalutamide in clinical studies and in routine patient care.

  14. Efficacy Against Human Prostate Cancer by Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen-specific, Transforming Growth Factor-β Insensitive Genetically Targeted CD8+T-cells Derived from Patients with Metastatic Castrate-resistant Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Helfand, Brian T; Carneiro, Benedito A; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Ximing J; Lee, Chung; Zhang, Weipeng; Giles, Francis J; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Kuzel, Timothy M

    2017-12-21

    Current immunotherapy has limited efficacy on metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We therefore sought to improve the antitumor ability of mCRPC patient-derived CD8 + T-cells by the endowment of specificity to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and insensitivity to immunosuppressant molecule transforming growth factor-β (TGF-ß) under the control of herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase. CD8 + T-cells were collected by leukapheresis and cultured in a Food and Drug Administration-approved Cell Processing Work Station. We developed a chimeric antigen receptor retroviral construct using an anti-PSMA chimeric immunoglobulin-T-cell receptor(ζ) gene (PZ1) and dominant negative TGF-ß type II receptor (TßRIIDN), that could induce CD8 + T-cells to be PSMA reactive and insensitive to TGF-ß. Cr 51 release assay was performed on PC-3 and PC-3-PSMA. The further antitumor functions of PSMA-specific, TGF-ß insensitive CD8 + T-cells was evaluated using an immunodeficient RAG-1 -/- mouse model. We found PSMA-specific, TGF-ß insensitive CD8 + T-cells from mCRPC were expanded with strong expression of PZ1 and thymidine kinase genes, and their growth was not suppressed by TGF-ß. The survival of these cells decreased sharply after treatment with ganciclovir. Treatment of PSMA-specific TGF-ß, insensitive CD8 + T-cells was associated with 61.58% specific lysis on PC-3-PSMA, and significantly suppressed PC3-PSMA tumor compared with the PC3 tumor. A large amount of tumor apoptosis and CD8 + T-cell infiltration were found only in the PC3-PSMA tumor. This study verified that PSMA-specific, TGF-ß insensitive CD8 + T-cells derived from mCRPC patients could be successfully expanded and used to overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment to control PSMA-expressing PC in vitro and in vivo. This may provide a promising approach for men with mCRPC who fail androgen deprivation therapy. We investigated the role of a novel chimeric antigen

  15. Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0529 TITLE: Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...survival mechanism and led cells to undergo apoptosis . Survival mechanisms elicited by CRPC C4-2B cells when treated with Enza may be blocked by...Targeting cancer cell metabolism: the combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose induces p53-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Cancer

  16. Abiraterone Acetate for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Naïve Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of an NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, Bram L T; Riemsma, Rob; Tomini, Florian; van Asselt, Thea; Deshpande, Sohan; Duffy, Steven; Armstrong, Nigel; Severens, Johan L; Kleijnen, Jos; Joore, Manuela A

    2017-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited Janssen, the company manufacturing abiraterone acetate (AA; tradename Zytiga ® ), to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of AA in combination with prednisone/prednisolone (AAP) compared with watchful waiting (i.e. best supportive care [BSC]) for chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Maastricht University Medical Center, was commissioned as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper presents a summary of the company submission (CS), the ERG report, subsequent addenda, and the development of the NICE guidance for the use of this drug in England and Wales by the Appraisal Committee (AC). The ERG produced a critical review of the clinical and cost effectiveness of AAP based on the CS. An important question in this appraisal was, according to the ERG, whether AAP followed by docetaxel is more effective than BSC followed by docetaxel. In the COU-AA-302 trial, 239 of 546 (43.8 %) AAP patients and 304 of 542 (56.1 %) BSC patients received docetaxel as subsequent therapy, following AA or placebo. The results for this specific group of patients were not presented in the CS; therefore, the ERG asked the company to provide these data in the clarification letter; however, these data were presented as commercial-in-confidence and cannot therefore be reported here. The ERG's critical assessment of the company's economic evaluation highlighted a number of concerns, including (a) not using the intention-to-treat (ITT) population; (b) inconsistencies in estimating prediction equations; (c) not fully incorporating the impact of adverse events; (d) incorrectly incorporating the new patient access scheme (PAS); and (e) the assumption that AA non-compliance leads to recoverable drug costs. Although some of these issues were adjusted in the ERG base case, the ERG could not estimate

  17. Aflibercept versus placebo in combination with docetaxel and prednisone for treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (VENICE): a phase 3, double-blind randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Ian F; Fizazi, Karim; Ivanov, Sergey; Karlsson, Camilla Thellenberg; Fléchon, Aude; Skoneczna, Iwona; Orlandi, Francisco; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Matveev, Vsevolod; Bavbek, Sevil; Gil, Thierry; Viana, Luciano; Arén, Osvaldo; Karyakin, Oleg; Elliott, Tony; Birtle, Alison; Magherini, Emmanuelle; Hatteville, Laurence; Petrylak, Daniel; Tombal, Bertrand; Rosenthal, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Docetaxel plus prednisone is standard first-line chemotherapy for men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Aflibercept is a recombinant human fusion protein that binds A and B isoforms of VEGF and placental growth factor, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. We assessed whether the addition of aflibercept to docetaxel and prednisone would improve overall survival in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer compared with the addition of placebo to docetaxel and prednisone. VENICE was a phase 3, multicentre, randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel group study done in 31 countries (187 sites). Men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, adequate organ function, and no prior chemotherapy were treated with docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) intravenously every 3 weeks) and oral prednisone (5 mg twice daily) and randomly allocated (1:1) to receive aflibercept (6 mg/kg) or placebo, intravenously, every 3 weeks. Treatment allocation was done centrally via an interactive voice response system, using a computer-generated sequence with a permuted-block size of four and stratified according Eastern Co-operative Group performance status (0-1 vs 2). Patients, investigators, and other individuals responsible for study conduct and data analysis were masked to treatment assignment. Aflibercept or placebo vials were supplied in identical boxes. The primary endpoint was overall survival using intention-to-treat analysis. This is the primary analysis of the completed trial. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00519285 FINDINGS: Between Aug 17, 2007, and Feb 11, 2010, 1224 men were randomly allocated to treatment: 612 to each group. At final analysis, median follow-up was 35 months (IQR 29-41) and 873 men had died. Median overall survival was 22·1 months (95·6% CI 20·3-24·1) in the aflibercept group and 21·2 months (19·6-23·8) in the placebo group (stratified hazard ratio 0·94, 95·6% CI 0·82-1·08; p=0·38). We

  18. Activity and safety of ODM-201 in patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (ARADES): an open-label phase 1 dose-escalation and randomised phase 2 dose expansion trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Massard, Christophe; Bono, Petri; Jones, Robert; Kataja, Vesa; James, Nicholas; Garcia, Jorge A; Protheroe, Andrew; Tammela, Teuvo L; Elliott, Tony; Mattila, Leena; Aspegren, John; Vuorela, Annamari; Langmuir, Peter; Mustonen, Mika

    2014-08-01

    ODM-201 is a novel androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor designed to block the growth of prostate cancer cells through high-affinity binding to the AR and inhibition of AR nuclear translocation. This trial assessed ODM-201's safety, pharmacokinetics, and activity in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The ARADES trial is an open-label phase 1-2 trial undertaken in 23 hospitals across Europe and USA with ongoing long-term follow-up. Men with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who had castrate concentrations of testosterone and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 0-1 were enrolled. In the phase 1 part of the trial, patients were given oral ODM-201 at a starting daily dose of 200 mg, which was increased to 400 mg, 600 mg, 1000 mg, 1400 mg, and 1800 mg. In phase 2, patients were randomly assigned centrally and stratified by previous chemotherapy and treatment with CPY17 inhibitors, to receive one of three daily doses of ODM-201 (200 mg, 400 mg, and 1400 mg). The primary endpoint in phase 1 was safety and tolerability, whereas in phase 2 it was the proportion of patients with a PSA response (50% or greater decrease in serum PSA) at week 12. All analyses included patients who had received at least one dose of ODM-201. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01317641, and NCT01429064 for the follow-up after 12 weeks. We enrolled patients between April 5, 2011, and March 12, 2013. In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled to six sequential cohorts of three to six patients and received a daily dose of ODM-201, 200-1800 mg. No dose-limiting toxic effects were reported and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. In phase 1, three patients reported eight adverse events of grade 3 (fracture, muscle injury, laceration, paralytic ileus, pain, presyncope, urinary retention, and vomiting) and one patient had a grade 4 adverse event (lymphoedema). None of the grade 3-4 adverse events were deemed to be related

  19. Overall survival and response pattern of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer to multiple cycles of radioligand therapy using [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Wegen, Simone; Yordanova, Anna; Kuerpig, Stefan; Eppard, Elisabeth; Wei, Xiao; Schlenkhoff, Carl; Essler, Markus [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Hauser, Stefan [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Up to 30% of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) do not show any response to the first cycle of radioligand therapy (RLT) with [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA). We evaluated patient response to the second and third cycles of RLT in patients that underwent at least three cycles. The second aim of this study was to calculate the median overall survival (OS) of responders and non-responders after the first cycle and after all three cycles of RLT. CRPC patients were treated with Lu-PSMA, with a median interval of 8 weeks between each cycle. The tumour marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was used as the marker for response evaluation. Fifty-two patients underwent a total of 190 cycles of RLT (3-6 cycles per patient). Of these, 80.8% showed a decline in PSA 2 months after the first cycle, with 44.2% showing a PSA decline of ≥50%. When compared to baseline PSA, 73.1% showed a PSA decline after the third cycle. 50% of patients that did not show any response to the first cycle also did not respond to the second and third cycles. The median OS was 60 weeks in all patients. The median OS was significantly longer for patients that showed any PSA decline after the first cycle compared to patients without PSA decline (68 vs. 33 weeks). There was a significant difference in median OS between responders and non-responders for a change in PSA after the third cycle compared to baseline PSA. Patients with a positive response to RLT, regardless of the rate of decline, had a significantly longer median OS. Of the patients that did not show any response to the first cycle, 50% responded to the second or third cycles. (orig.)

  20. Independent association between time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir and PSA progression-free survival in patients with docetaxel-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving abiraterone acetate, but not enzalutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hideaki; Hara, Takuto; Tamura, Keita; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Furuse, Hiroshi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prognostic effect of time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (TTPN) after treatment with abiraterone acetate (AA) and enzalutamide (Enz) in patients with docetaxel-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study included a total of 297 consecutive patients with mCRPC, of whom 125 and 172 received AA and Enz, respectively, without previous treatment with docetaxel and subsequently achieved any degree of PSA reduction after the administration of either agent. The mean values of TTPN in the AA and Enz groups were 19 and 14 weeks, respectively. Despite the lack of significant differences in several parameters according to the mean TTPN in the Enz group, patients with TTPN>19 weeks were characterized by longer duration of androgen deprivation therapy, better performance status, lower incidence of bone metastasis, lower value of nadir PSA, and higher incidence of PSA response than those with TTPN ≤19 weeks in the AA group. The PSA progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with TTPN >19 weeks was significantly superior when compared with TTPN ≤19 weeks in the AA group; however, there was no significant effect of the mean TTPN on the PSA-PFS in the Enz group. Furthermore, TTPN was identified as one of the independent predictors of PSA-PFS in the AA group but not in Enz group. A longer time to reach a PSA nadir after treatment with AA, but not Enz, appeared to be associated with favorable disease control in patients with docetaxel-naïve mCRPC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abiraterone Acetate: A Review in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostrate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley J

    2017-09-01

    Oral abiraterone acetate (Zytiga ® ) is a selective inhibitor of CYP17 and thereby inhibits androgen biosynthesis, with androgen signalling crucial in the progression from primary to metastatic prostate cancer (PC) and subsequently, in the development of metastatic castration-resistant PC (mCRPC). In large phase 3 trials and in the clinical practice setting, oral abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisone was an effective treatment and had an acceptable, manageable tolerability and safety profile in chemotherapy-naive and docetaxel-experienced men with mCRPC. In the pivotal global phase 3 trials, relative to placebo (+prednisone), abiraterone acetate (+prednisone) prolonged overall survival (OS) at data maturity (final analysis) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) at all assessed timepoints. Given its efficacy in prolonging OS and its convenient once-daily oral regimen, in combination with prednisone, abiraterone acetate is an important first-line option for the treatment of mCRPC.

  2. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Ingersoll

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  3. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Lyons, Anastesia S; Muniyan, Sakthivel; D'Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G; Bu, Xiu R; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  4. Weekly ascorbic acid infusion in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben K.; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon T.

    2017-01-01

    of this treatment.  Methods: This non-comparative, single-center, phase II trial included patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from an outpatient clinic to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IV AA therapy. Patients received weekly infusions of AA (week 1, 5 g...... μg/L was recorded at week 12. Among the secondary endpoints, no signs of disease remission were observed. In total, 53 adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Eleven were graded as "serious". Three AEs were directly related to AA, and all of which were related to fluid load.  Conclusions: Infusion...

  5. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has proven to be very challenging. Until recently, docetaxel was the only therapeutic demonstrated to extend overall patient survival. Yet recently, a considerable number of new therapeutics have been approved to treat CRPC patients. These remarkable advances now give new tools for the therapeutic management of late-stage prostate cancer. In this review, we will examine mechanistic and clinical data of several newly approved therapeutics including the chemotherapeutic cabazitaxel, antiandrogen enzalutamide, endocrine disruptor abiraterone acetate, immunotherapy sipuleucel-T, and bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical alpharadin. In addition, we will examine other promising therapeutics that are currently in Phase III trials.

  6. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  7. Health Economics and Radium-223 (Xofigo®) in the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC): A Case History and a Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Traasdahl, Erik R; Totth, Arpad; Nieder, Carsten; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2015-07-30

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in Western countries. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have caused significant pressure on health care budgets. We aimed to exemplify this dilemma presenting an example, radium-223 (Xofigo®), and review the literature. A 74-year-old man diagnosed with mCRPC was referred to our department in October 2014 for radium-223 therapy. We faced the following dilemma: is radium-223 standard therapy? Is it cost-effective? Medline was searched employing the following search criteria: "radium-223", "alpharadin", "Xofigo" and "prostate". Exclusion and inclusion criteria were applied. Guidelines and cost-effectiveness analyses were focused. We also searched the websites of ASCO, ESMO and ISPOR. The web was searched, using Yahoo and Google search engines, for Health Technology Assessments (HTAs). 181 publications were identified in the Medline database. Only four studies included the word "cost", three "economics" and none "budget" in heading or abstract. None of the publications were thorough of cost analysis (cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-minimizing or cost-of-illness analysis). Six HTAs and eight national guidelines were identified. The cost per quality adjusted life years was indicated €80.000-94,000. HTAs concluded reimbursement being not recommendable or no ultimate statement could be made. One pointed towards a limited use with caution. Guidelines were based on data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Health economics was not considered when guidelines were made. Most HTAs concluded this therapy not cost-effective or there was insufficient data for final conclusions. Licensing and reimbursement processes should be run simultaneously.

  8. A phase 2 study of OSI-906 (linsitinib, an insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 inhibitor) in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (non-opioid requiring) metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Pedro; Cooney, Matthew; Tyler, Allison; Wright, John; Dreicer, Robert; Garcia, Jorge A

    2018-02-23

    Background The inhibition of insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) induces cell cycle arrest and enhancing the effect of castration by delay of progression of human prostate cancer models. Linsitinib is a small molecule and potent dual inhibitor of IGF-1R and insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. We report results of a single-arm, phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of linsitinib in men with chemotherapy-naïve asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Methods Patients received at 150 mg orally twice daily on a 28-day cycle. The primary endpoint was prostate specific (PSA) response at 12 weeks and correlative studies included circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs). Results Seventeen patients, median age 68 (55-78) and pre-treatment PSA of 55.23 (2.46-277.60) were enrolled and completed 12 weeks of therapy. All but two patients discontinued therapy secondary to PSA progression, which met the predefined futility criteria and led to early termination of this study. Overall best response (RECIST v1.1) included a partial response in 1 patient and stable disease in 8 patients. Higher baseline CTCs were associated with higher pre-treatment PSA levels (Spearman r = 0.49, p = 0.04) but no correlation between PSA progression and CTCs/CECs were observed. Most common adverse events included fatigue, nausea/vomiting, AST/ALT changes and prolonged QT interval. Conclusions Single-agent linsitinib was safe and well tolerated but failed to show activity in men with mCRPC. These results highlight the complexity of using IGF-1R as a therapeutic target in this patient population. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01533246.

  9. A phase I study of combined docetaxel and repeated high activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone (the TAXIUM trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van; Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de; Haas, Marie J. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bezooijen, Bart P.J. van [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wilson, Richard H.; O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have palliative benefit in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone. Recent studies have shown improvement of survival and quality of life when radiopharmaceuticals were given repeatedly or in combination with chemotherapy. We designed a phase I study combining docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-labelled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in men with CRPC and bone metastases to evaluate toxicity. A dose escalation schedule was designed consisting of four dose levels with a standard dosage of docetaxel (75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly). {sup 186}Re-HEDP was given in increasing activities (1,250 MBq up to 2,500 MBq) after the third and sixth cycle of docetaxel. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade 4 toxicity lasting more than 7 days or any grade 3 toxicity that did not recover within 10 days. Three patients were planned for each dose level expanding to six if a DLT occurred. Fourteen patients were recruited with a median age of 64.6 years. One DLT, grade 3 thrombocytopenia lasting >10 days, occurred at dose level 3 leading to expansion of this group to six. One of these patients had an episode of acute renal failure which resolved. Because of production problems of {sup 186}Re-HEDP dose level 4 was not started. Combined therapy with docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-HEDP is generally well tolerated in patients with CRPC metastatic to bone. We will conduct a randomized phase II study using three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 40 MBq/kg body weight, followed by another three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 20 MBq/kg body weight. (orig.)

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Massoner, Petra; Eder, Iris E; Pircher, Andreas; Pichler, Renate; Aigner, Friedrich; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men in developed countries. Once the tumor has achieved a castration-refractory metastatic stage, treatment options are limited with the average survival of patients ranging from two to three years only. Recently, new drugs for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have been approved, and others are in an advanced stage of clinical testing. In this review we provide an overview of the new therapeutic agents that arrived in the clinical praxis or are tested in clinical studies and their mode of action including hormone synthesis inhibitors, new androgen receptor blockers, bone targeting and antiangiogenic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, growth factor inhibitors, novel radiotherapeutics and taxanes, and immunotherapeutic approaches. Results and limitations from clinical studies as well as future needs for improvement of CRPC treatments are critically discussed. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Androgen receptor variant-7: an important predictive biomarker in castrate resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent manuscript in New England Journal of Medicine by Antonarakis et al. [1] has important clinical implications. This study evaluates mRNA expression of a particular androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, in circulating tumor cells (CTCs from metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients receiving enzalutamide or abiraterone. The findings were striking, none of the 18 patients with detectable AR-V7 in CTCs had prostate-specific antigen (PSA responses. Further, the median time to PSA progression after enzalutamide or abiraterone treatment was only 1.3-1.4 months in AR-V7-positive patients as compared to 5.3-6.1 months in AR-V7 negative patients. AR-V7 in CTCs was also associated with shorter survival.

  12. Castration resistant prostate cancer - something new in the year 2014?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marencak, J.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most frequent solid neoplasm in Europe and therefore is regarded as one of the major medical problem of the male population. PC is extremely complicated and interindividual different tumor. The method of treatment depends on several factors, but mainly on the stage of prostate cancer. The term Hormone resistant (refractory) prostate cancer (HRPC) was used in older terminology. HRPC is cancer that progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone achieved androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), which is resistant to any hormonal therapy. Currently is increasingly used (instead of name HRPC) name CRPC – so called PC resistant for castration (CRPC – castration resistant prostate cancer), which is still able to respond to certain hormonal manipulation, although it meets the the criteria for HRPC. This state probably arises from either clonal selection of androgen – independent cell lines or increased ligand – independent activation of androgen receptors. Men with CRPC are quite a heterogeneous group; they include men with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) only and no demonstrable metastases, and men who have many bone and/ or visceral metastases, pain and poor functional status. Survival can range from only a few months to 4 years or more. Historically, therapy had little effect beyond modest palliation. More recently, significantly more options have become available and there are now several treatments that not only improve quality of life and pain palliation, but also increase overall survival. Some of the trials with important results for the treatment of CRPC are summarized in this paper. Objectives of article: provide information to the general medical community (and especially urologists and oncologists) about the possible pathogenesis of CRPC, complicated issues of treatment and evaluation of its effectiveness in patients with CRPC. The article presented basic data on the current and future possibilities of such therapy

  13. Synergistic antitumor activities of docetaxel and octreotide associated with apoptotic-upregulation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Zhu

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy has become the fist-line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; however, progression to castrate resistance disease occurs in the majority of patients. Thus, there is an urgent need for improvements in therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy somatostatin analogue octreotide (OCT combined with a low dose of docetaxel (DTX using castration resistant prostate cancer cells and to investigate the involved molecular mechanisms in vitro. The anti-proliferative and synergism potential effects were determined by MTT assay. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed employing annexing V and propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. VEGFA, CASP9, CASP3 and ABCB1 gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR analysis. OCT in combination with DTX treatments on DU145 cell migration was also evaluated. Investigation revealed that combined administration of DTX and OCT had significant, synergistically greater cytotoxicity than DTX or OCT treatment alone. The combination of the two drugs caused a more marked increase in apoptosis and resulted in greater suppression of invasive potential than either individual agent. There was obvious increase in caspase 3 expression in the OCT alone and two-drug combined treatment groups, however, VEGFA expression was markedly suppressed in them. These results support the conclusion that somatostatin analogues combined with docetaxel may enhance the chemotherapy efficacies through multiple mechanisms in castration-resistant PCa cell line. This work provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment in castrate resistance disease.

  14. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  15. Evaluation of Alpha-Therapy with Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer-the Role of Gamma Scintigraphy in Dosimetry and Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Joensuu, Timo; Rasulova, Nigora; Kiljunen, Timo; Kangasmäki, Aki

    2015-07-30

    Radium-223-dichloride ((223)RaCl₂) is a new bone-seeking calcium analogue alpha-emitter, which has obtained marketing authorization for the treatment skeletal metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The current treatment regimen is based on six consecutive doses of (223)RaCl₂ at 4 week intervals and the administered activity dose, 50 kBq/kg per cycle is based on patient weight. We analyzed two patients using quantitative serial gamma imaging to estimate dosimetry in tumors and see possible pharmacokinetic differences in the treatment cycles. The lesions were rather well visualized in gamma scintigraphy in spite of low gamma activity (2.0-fold (1.8 vs. 3.6). Of these patients, patient 1 demonstrated a serum PSA response, whereas there was no PSA response in patient 2. From our data, there were maximally up to 4.0-fold differences (62.1 vs. 246.6 ) between the relative absorbed radiation doses between patients as calculated from the quantitative standardized imaging to be delivered in only two lesions, and in the same lesion the maximum difference in the cycles was up to 2.3-fold (107.4 vs. 246.6). Our recommendation based on statistical simulation analysis, is serial measurement at days 0-8 at least 3 times, this improve the accuracy significantly to study the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the imaging. Both our patients had originally two metastatic sites in the imaging field; the former patient demonstrated a serum PSA response and the latter demonstrated no PSA response. In these two patients there was no significant difference in the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the quantitative imaging. Our results, although preliminary, suggest that dose monitoring can be included as a part of this treatment modality. On the other hand, from the absorbed radiation doses, the response cannot be predicted because with very similar

  16. Phase I/II clinical trial of dendritic-cell based immunotherapy (DCVAC/PCa) combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podrazil, Michal; Horvath, Rudolf; Becht, Etienne; Rozkova, Daniela; Bilkova, Pavla; Sochorova, Klara; Hromadkova, Hana; Kayserova, Jana; Vavrova, Katerina; Lastovicka, Jan; Vrabcova, Petra; Kubackova, Katerina; Gasova, Zdenka; Jarolim, Ladislav; Babjuk, Marek; Spisek, Radek; Bartunkova, Jirina; Fucikova, Jitka

    2015-07-20

    We conducted an open-label, single-arm Phase I/II clinical trial in metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients eligible for docetaxel combined with treatment with autologous mature dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells (DCVAC/PCa). The primary and secondary endpoints were safety and immune responses, respectively. Overall survival (OS), followed as a part of the safety evaluation, was compared to the predicted OS according to the Halabi and MSKCC nomograms. Twenty-five patients with progressive mCRPC were enrolled. Treatment comprised of initial 7 days administration of metronomic cyclophosphamide 50 mg p.o. DCVAC/PCa treatment consisted of a median twelve doses of 1 × 107 dendritic cells per dose injected s.c. (Aldara creme was applied at the site of injection) during a one-year period. The initial 2 doses of DCVAC/PCa were administered at a 2-week interval, followed by the administration of docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and prednisone (5 mg twice daily) given every 3 weeks until toxicity or intolerance was observed. The DCVAC/PCa was then injected every 6 weeks up to the maximum number of doses manufactured from one leukapheresis. No serious DCVAC/PCa-related adverse events have been reported. The median OS was 19 months, whereas the predicted median OS was 11.8 months with the Halabi nomogram and 13 months with the MSKCC nomogram. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients had a lower risk of death compared with both MSKCC (Hazard Ratio 0.26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.51) and Halabi (Hazard Ratio 0.33, 95% CI: 0.17-0.63) predictions. We observed a significant decrease in Tregs in the peripheral blood. The long-term administration of DCVAC/PCa led to the induction and maintenance of PSA specific T cells. We did not identify any immunological parameter that significantly correlated with better OS. In patients with mCRPC, the combined chemoimmunotherapy with DCVAC/PCa and docetaxel was safe and resulted in longer than expected survival. Concomitant chemotherapy

  17. Impact of bone-targeted therapies in chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone acetate: post hoc analysis of study COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Shore, Neal; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rathkopf, Dana E; Smith, Matthew R; de Bono, Johann S; Logothetis, Christopher J; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mulders, Peter F A; Mainwaring, Paul; Hainsworth, John D; Beer, Tomasz M; North, Scott; Fradet, Yves; Griffin, Thomas A; De Porre, Peter; Londhe, Anil; Kheoh, Thian; Small, Eric J; Scher, Howard I; Molina, Arturo; Ryan, Charles J

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) often involves bone, and bone-targeted therapy (BTT) has become part of the overall treatment strategy. Investigation of outcomes for concomitant BTT in a post hoc analysis of the COU-AA-302 trial, which demonstrated an overall clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone over placebo plus prednisone in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% overall survival [OS] events) for the COU-AA-302 trial. Patients were grouped by concomitant BTT use or no BTT use. Radiographic progression-free survival and OS were coprimary end points. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% OS events) and involves patients treated with or without concomitant BTT during the COU-AA-302 study. Median follow-up for OS was 27.1 mo. Median time-to-event variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), 95% CIs, and p values for concomitant BTT versus no BTT were obtained via Cox models. While the post hoc nature of the analysis is a limitation, superiority of AA and prednisone versus prednisone alone was demonstrated for clinical outcomes with or without BTT use. Compared with no BTT use, concomitant BTT significantly improved OS (HR 0.75; p=0.01) and increased the time to ECOG deterioration (HR 0.75; pAA was similar to that reported for AA in the overall intent-to-treat population. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (all grade 1/2) with concomitant BTT use was reported in AA with concomitant BTT was safe and well tolerated in men with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC. The benefits of AA on clinical outcomes were increased with concomitant BTT. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer often includes bone-targeted therapy. This post hoc analysis showed that in patients with advanced prostate cancer who were treated with abiraterone acetate and

  18. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  19. Evaluation of Alpha-Therapy with Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—the Role of Gamma Scintigraphy in Dosimetry and Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 is a new bone-seeking calcium analogue alpha-emitter, which has obtained marketing authorization for the treatment skeletal metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The current treatment regimen is based on six consecutive doses of 223RaCl2 at 4 week intervals and the administered activity dose, 50 kBq/kg per cycle is based on patient weight. We analyzed two patients using quantitative serial gamma imaging to estimate dosimetry in tumors and see possible pharmacokinetic differences in the treatment cycles. The lesions were rather well visualized in gamma scintigraphy in spite of low gamma activity (<1.1% gamma radiation at 0, 7 and 28 days using 30–60 min acquisition times. Both our patients analyzed in serial gamma imagings, had two lesions in the gamma imaging field, the mean counts of the relative intensity varied from 27.8 to 36.5 (patient 1, and from 37.4 to 82.2 (patient 2. The half-lives varied from 1.8 days to 4.5 days during the six cycles (patient 1, and from 1.5 days to 3.6 days (patient 2, respectively. In the lesion half-lives calculated from the imaging the maximum difference between the treatment cycles in the same lesion was 2.0-fold (1.8 vs. 3.6. Of these patients, patient 1 demonstrated a serum PSA response, whereas there was no PSA response in patient 2. From our data, there were maximally up to 4.0-fold differences (62.1 vs. 246.6 between the relative absorbed radiation doses between patients as calculated from the quantitative standardized imaging to be delivered in only two lesions, and in the same lesion the maximum difference in the cycles was up to 2.3-fold (107.4 vs. 246.6. Our recommendation based on statistical simulation analysis, is serial measurement at days 0–8 at least 3 times, this improve the accuracy significantly to study the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the imaging. Both our patients had

  20. Relationship between patient-reported outcomes and clinical outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post hoc analysis of COU-AA-301 and COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, D; Traina, S; Li, T; Johnson, K; Ho, K F; Molina, A; Shore, N D

    2018-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to assess benefit-risk in drug development. The relationship between PROs and clinical outcomes is not well understood. We aim to elucidate the relationships between changes in PRO measures and clinical outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We investigated relationships between changes in self-reported fatigue, pain, functional well-being (FWB), physical well-being (PWB) and prostate cancer-specific symptoms with overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) after 6 and 12 months of treatment in COU-AA-301 (N = 1195) or COU-AA-302 (N = 1088). Eligible COU-AA-301 patients had progressed after docetaxel and had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) ≤ 2. Eligible COU-AA-302 patients had no prior chemotherapy and ECOG PS 0 or 1. Patients were treated with abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/day) plus prednisone (10 mg/day) or prednisone alone daily. Association between self-reported fatigue, pain and functional status, and OS and/or rPFS, using pooled data regardless of treatment, was assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression modeled time to death or radiographic progression. In COU-AA-301 patients, PRO improvements were associated with longer OS and longer time to radiographic progression versus worsening or stable PROs (P AA-302 patients, worsening PROs were associated with higher likelihood of radiographic progression (P ≤ 0.025) compared with improved or stable PROs. In multivariate models, worsening PWB remained associated with worse rPFS. The 12-month analysis confirmed the 6-month results. PROs are significantly associated with clinically relevant time-to-event efficacy outcomes in clinical trials and may complement and help predict traditional clinical practice methods for monitoring patients for disease progression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for

  1. A Novel Role for Raloxifene Nanomicelles in Management of Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Taurin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, less than 25–33% survive more than five years. Recent studies have implicated estrogen, acting either alone or synergistically with androgens in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as a limited number of clinical trials, have highlighted the potential of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene (Ral for the treatment of castrate resistant prostate cancer. However, the poor oral bioavailability and metabolism of selective estrogen receptor modulators limit their efficiency in clinical application. To overcome these limitations, we have used styrene co-maleic acid (SMA micelle to encapsulate raloxifene. Compared to free drug, SMA-Ral micelles had 132 and 140% higher cytotoxicity against PC3 and DU 145 prostate cell lines, respectively. SMA-Ral effectively inhibits cell cycle progression, increases apoptosis, and alters the integrity of tumor spheroid models. In addition, the micellar system induced changes in expression and localization of estrogen receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and downstream effectors associated with cell proliferation and survival. Finally, SMA-Ral treatment decreased migration and invasion of castrate resistant prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, SMA-Ral micelles can potentially benefit new strategies for clinical management of castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  2. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  3. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years...... for an overall higher incidence of falls among elderly patients than younger patients [84/609 (13.8%) versus 62/1106 (5.6%)] and among elderly patients receiving enzalutamide than those receiving placebo [61/317 (19.2%) versus 23/292 (7.9%)]. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly men benefited from treatment with enzalutamide...... in terms of OS and rPFS. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in the elderly subgroup and those aged falls. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT01212991, ClinicalTrials.gov....

  4. The HGF/c-MET Axis as a Critical Driver of Resistance to Androgen Suppression in Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    aspirates, allowing us to perform these aspirates on the same day as their clinic visit rather than necessitating a separate return visit for patients to...expression was then expressed by qPCR to assess whether the expression pattern matched that of what was expected for PC3, LNCaP, and VCaP cells. Figure... Diagnostics World Conference - Faculty at 2016 Future Directions in Urology conference - Attended 2016 DOD IMPaCT meeting - Attended 2016 SPORE prostate

  5. Clinical Impact of the Number of Treatment Cycles in First-Line Docetaxel for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    , respectively). Reasons for treatment discontinuation and postdocetaxel treatments were registered. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses were defined as a confirmed ≥ 50% decrease in baseline PSA levels. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from start of therapy using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox...... docetaxel because of toxicity or treatment conclusion (22.3 vs. 19.4 months; P = .048, log rank) or patients who achieved a PSA response (22.3 vs. 18.7 months; P = .012, log rank) were evaluated. mCRPC-related prognostic factors and patients who received ≥ 1 subsequent line of therapy post-docetaxel were...

  6. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per

    2014-01-01

    in establishing an immune suppressive environment in patients with PC. Moreover, correlation of M-MDSC frequency with known prognostic markers and the observed impact on OS could reflect a possible role in tumor progression. Further insight into the generation and function of MDSC and their interplay with Tregs......Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are believed to play a role in immune suppression and subsequent failure of T cells to mount an efficient anti-tumor response, by employing both direct T-cell inhibition as well as induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Investigating the frequency...... with known negative prognostic markers in patients with PC including elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase and prostate-specific antigen. Accordingly, high levels of M-MDSC were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Our data strongly suggest that M-MDSC, possibly along with Tregs, play a role...

  7. A combination of sorafenib and nilotinib reduces the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archibald M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monica Archibald,1 Tara Pritchard,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Rhonda J Rosengren,1 Khaled Greish,1,2 Sebastien Taurin1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Aljawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Several tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and growth of CRPC, as such targeting these kinases may offer an alternative therapeutic strategy. We established the combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, sorafenib and nilotinib, as the most cytotoxic. In addtion, to improve their bioavailability and reduce their metabolism, we encapsulated sorafenib and nilotinib into styrene-co-maleic acid micelles. The micelles’ charge, size, and release rate were characterized. We assessed the effect of the combination on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis, protein expression, tumor spheroid integrity, migration, and invasion. The micelles exhibited a mean diameter of 100 nm, a neutral charge, and appeared highly stable. The micellar TKIs promoted greater cytotoxicity, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis relative to the free TKIs. In addition, the combination reduced the expression and activity of several tyrosine kinases and reduced tumor spheroid integrity and metastatic potential of CRPC cell lines more efficiently than the single treatments. The combination increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevance of a targeted combination therapy for the treatment of CRPC. In addition, the efficacy of the encapsulated drugs provides the basis for an in vivo preclinical testing. Keywords: sorafenib, nilotinib, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nanomedicine

  8. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Nan; Hjorth-Jensen, Kim; Hekmat, Omid

    2015-01-01

    timing. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes occur in the absence of obvious alterations in the activity of AKT, MAPK or mTORC1 pathways, suggesting that PAK2 and YAP1 may represent novel targets for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Pharmacologic inhibitors of PAK2 (PF-3758309......Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide owing to our inability to treat effectively castration-resistant tumors. To understand the signaling mechanisms sustaining castration-resistant growth, we implemented a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic...... approach and use it to compare protein phosphorylation in orthotopic xenograft tumors grown in either intact or castrated mice. This investigation identified changes in phosphorylation of signaling proteins such as MEK, LYN, PRAS40, YAP1 and PAK2, indicating the concomitant activation of several oncogenic...

  9. A case report of enzalutamide administration in a dialysis-dependent patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Erica S; de Haan, Marie; Eigl, Bernhard J

    2018-03-01

    Enzalutamide, an androgen receptor signaling inhibitor, is a standard of care treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We present the first reported case of enzalutamide in a patient with end-stage renal disease, on dialysis. While there were no significant toxicities, a sustained increase in systolic blood pressure was maintained after starting enzalutamide, suggestive of a degree of drug accumulation. Further evaluation of novel hormonal agents in end-stage renal disease patients should be encouraged as this population is typically excluded from clinical trials.

  10. Dihydrotestosterone synthesis bypasses testosterone to drive castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Li, Rui; Papari-Zareei, Mahboubeh; Watumull, Lori; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Auchus, Richard J; Sharifi, Nima

    2011-08-16

    In the majority of cases, advanced prostate cancer responds initially to androgen deprivation therapy by depletion of gonadal testosterone. The response is usually transient, and metastatic tumors almost invariably eventually progress as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The development of CRPC is dependent upon the intratumoral generation of the potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), from adrenal precursor steroids. Progression to CRPC is accompanied by increased expression of steroid-5α-reductase isoenzyme-1 (SRD5A1) over SRD5A2, which is otherwise the dominant isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. DHT synthesis in CRPC is widely assumed to require 5α-reduction of testosterone as the obligate precursor, and the increased expression of SRD5A1 is thought to reflect its role in converting testosterone to DHT. Here, we show that the dominant route of DHT synthesis in CRPC bypasses testosterone, and instead requires 5α-reduction of androstenedione by SRD5A1 to 5α-androstanedione, which is then converted to DHT. This alternative pathway is operational and dominant in both human CRPC cell lines and fresh tissue obtained from human tumor metastases. Moreover, CRPC growth in mouse xenograft models is dependent upon this pathway, as well as expression of SRD5A1. These findings reframe the fundamental metabolic pathway that drives CRPC progression, and shed light on the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  12. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris

    2012-01-01

    survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Because two...

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer: a focus on immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.R.; Sharma, P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Castration-resistant prostate cancer is a disease with limited treatment options. However, the ongoing elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this disease continues to support the development of not only novel agents, but also innovative approaches. Among these therapies, immunotherapy

  14. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  15. YAP1 regulates prostate cancer stem cell-like characteristics to promote castration resistant growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ning; Ke, Binghu; Hjort-Jensen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a stage of relapse that arises after various forms of androgen ablation therapy (ADT) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanism underlying progression to CRPC remains poorly understood. Here, we report that YAP1, which...

  16. ECF chemotherapy for liver metastases due to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shruti; Potvin, Kylea; Ernst, D Scott; Whiston, Frances; Winquist, Eric

    2014-09-01

    Most men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have biochemical response to docetaxel, but the objective response rate is low. Liver metastases are uncommon with CRPC and associated with shorter survival. More active treatment might benefit these patients. Epirubicin, cisplatin and flurouracil (ECF) is a standard regimen for gastric cancer and response in CRPC liver metastases has been reported. We reviewed our experience with ECF in CRPC with the primary objective of determining its anti-tumour activity in patients with liver metastatic CRPC. Men with CRPC treated with ECF were identified from electronic databases and data were extracted from medical records. Men with tumours showing neuroendocrine features were excluded. In total, we identified 14 CRPC patients treated with ECF were identified, of which 8 had liver metastases. The median age was 56 (range: 42-76) and all had multiple poor prognostic features. A median of 6 cycles of ECF were administered (range: 1-10) and toxicities were similar to previous reports. Of the 8 patients with liver metastases, 5 had partial remission. ECF was highly active in this small selected group of younger men with liver metastases from CRPC and multiple poor prognostic features. Despite important limitations, this is the third report of high objective response rates with ECF in CRPC. Objective response rates are low with current monotherapies. A higher probability of ORR is preferred for critical organ disease, therefore the anti-tumour activity should encourage testing of ECF in comparison to the most active current therapies.

  17. A profile of enzalutamide for the treatment of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greasley, Rosa; Khabazhaitajer, Mohammad; Rosario, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer from androgen-sensitive prostate cancer have provided new avenues exploring efficacious therapies in a disease which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the western world. In the evolution of second generation anti-androgens, enzalutamide, a novel androgen-receptor signaling inhibitor, has emerged targeting multiple steps within the androgenic stimulation pathway. This review discusses what is currently known of the mechanisms surrounding castration resistant prostate cancer development and the current human clinical trials to determine whether enzalutamide presents a new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer. The issues of therapy resistance, withdrawal effects and cross-resistance are briefly touched upon

  18. Radium-223 in treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 90 % of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC have radiologically confirmed skeletal metastases. Traditional treatment methods such as administration of painkillers, external beam therapy, bisphosphonates or denosumab, as well as injections of strontium-89 or samarium-153 radionuclides, have only palliative effect and in some cases can postpone development of skeletal complications. Alpha-emitter radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223; alpharadin previously is currently one of the known drugs with proven effectiveness in relation to increasing overall survival of patients with CRPC. Ra-223 was developed specifically for patients with CRPC and symptomatic skeletal metastases. The drug targets the areas of skeletal tissue remodeling. Ra-223 is the therapy of choice in patients with CRPC and skeletal metastases and without confirmed visceral metastases before and after docetaxel chemotherapy. Chemotherapy after treatment with Ra-223 is a possible and satisfactory tolerable treatment option. Combination of Ra-223 with abiraterone, enzalutamide, or denosumab is, apparently, effective and safe, but further studies are necessary.

  19. Clinical Relevance of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-12-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) currently benefits from a wealth of treatment options, yet still remains lethal in the vast majority of patients. It is becoming increasingly understood that this disease entity continues to evolve over time, acquiring additional and diverse resistance mechanisms with each subsequent therapy used. This dynamic relationship between treatment pressure and disease resistance can be challenging for the managing clinician. The recent discovery of alternate splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR) is one potential mechanism of escape in mCRPC, and recognizing this resistance mechanism might be important for optimal treatment selection for our patients. AR-V7 appears to be the most relevant AR splice variant, and early clinical data suggest that it is a negative prognostic marker in mCRPC. Emerging evidence also suggests that detection of AR-V7 may be associated with resistance to novel hormonal therapy (abiraterone and enzalutamide) but may be compatible with sensitivity to taxane chemotherapy (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). Adding to this complexity is the observation that AR-V7 is a dynamic marker whose status may change across time and depending on selective pressures induced by different therapies. Finally, it is possible that AR-V7 may represent a therapeutic target in mCRPC if drugs can be designed that degrade or inhibit AR splice variants or block their transcriptional activity. Several such agents (including galeterone, EPI-506, and bromodomain/BET inhibitors) are now in clinical development.

  20. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG inhibits progression of LuCaP35 xenograft prostate tumors to castration resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Katherine J; Langmann, Gabrielle; Ai, Junkui; Ramos-Garcia, Raquel; Vessella, Robert L; Wang, Zhou

    2012-07-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is currently treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT initially results in tumor regression; however, all patients eventually relapse with castration-resistant prostate cancer. New approaches to delay the progression of prostate cancer to castration resistance are in desperate need. This study addresses whether targeting Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) regulation of androgen receptor (AR) can inhibit prostate cancer progression to castration resistance. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG was injected intraperitoneally into nude mice bearing LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to determine the effect of HSP90 inhibition on prostate cancer progression to castration resistance and host survival. Administration of 17-AAG maintained androgen-sensitivity, delayed the progression of LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to castration resistance, and prolonged the survival of host. In addition, 17-AAG prevented nuclear localization of endogenous AR in LuCaP35 xenograft tumors in castrated nude mice. Targeting Hsp90 or the mechanism by which HSP90 regulates androgen-independent AR nuclear localization and activation may lead to new approaches to prevent and/or treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Andrographolide targets androgen receptor pathway in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2011-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The authors have previously identified andrographolide as an inhibitor of interleukin-6, which can suppress tumor growth of prostate cancer cells by screening compounds from the Prestwick Natural compound library. In this study, they identified that andrographolide can inhibit AR expression and prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis. Andrographolide is able to down-regulate AR expression at both mRNA and protein levels, prevents its nuclear translocation, and inhibits transactivation of its target genes. Andrographolide prevents the binding of Hsp90 to AR, resulting in proteasome-mediated AR degradation. Furthermore, andrographolide inhibits castration-resistant C4-2 cell growth by reducing AR expression and activity. Thus, andrographolide can be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer by inhibition of androgen receptor signaling.

  2. Phase II Study of Pomalidomide in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Robert J.; Glode, L. Michael; Podolnick, Jeremy; Knight, Robert; Crawford, David

    2011-01-01

    Pomalidomide is a distinct immunomodulatory agent that also displays anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pomalidomide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods: Pomalidomide was administered orally in doses of 1 or 2 mg/day without interruption. Follow ups were conducted every 4 weeks with evaluation of study outcomes at 12 weeks. The principal study outcomes were PSA response, time to progression (TTP) using RECIST, overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 32 patients were enrolled: 15 in the 1 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.30 ng/mL [0.8–236.0]), and 17 in the 2 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.50 ng/mL [0.6–191.8]). Results: In the 1 mg cohort disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in eight patients, and median TTP was 2.90 months. In the 2 mg cohort, PSA decreased ≥50% in three patients, disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in seven patients, and median TTP was 5.87 months. Toxicity in both cohorts was predominantly grade 1 or 2; 2 grade 3 toxicity (fatigue) occurred in the 1 mg cohort, and 5 grade 3 toxicities (chest pain, diarrhea, epigastric pain, impaction, pain) occurred in the 2 mg cohort. One grade 4 toxicity of cardiac ischemia occurred. Conclusions: Pomalidomide shows promising activity in patients with CRPC and has an acceptable safety profile

  3. Phase II Study of Pomalidomide in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Robert J., E-mail: robert.amato@uth.tmc.edu [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Glode, L. Michael [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Podolnick, Jeremy [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Knight, Robert [Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ 07901-3915 (United States); Crawford, David [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Pomalidomide is a distinct immunomodulatory agent that also displays anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pomalidomide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods: Pomalidomide was administered orally in doses of 1 or 2 mg/day without interruption. Follow ups were conducted every 4 weeks with evaluation of study outcomes at 12 weeks. The principal study outcomes were PSA response, time to progression (TTP) using RECIST, overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 32 patients were enrolled: 15 in the 1 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.30 ng/mL [0.8–236.0]), and 17 in the 2 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.50 ng/mL [0.6–191.8]). Results: In the 1 mg cohort disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in eight patients, and median TTP was 2.90 months. In the 2 mg cohort, PSA decreased ≥50% in three patients, disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in seven patients, and median TTP was 5.87 months. Toxicity in both cohorts was predominantly grade 1 or 2; 2 grade 3 toxicity (fatigue) occurred in the 1 mg cohort, and 5 grade 3 toxicities (chest pain, diarrhea, epigastric pain, impaction, pain) occurred in the 2 mg cohort. One grade 4 toxicity of cardiac ischemia occurred. Conclusions: Pomalidomide shows promising activity in patients with CRPC and has an acceptable safety profile.

  4. Phase I/II trials of {sup 186}Re-HEDP in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: post-hoc analysis of the impact of administered activity and dosimetry on survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis-Bacelar, Ana M.; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Divoli, Antigoni; Flux, Glenn D. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P.; Johnson, Bernadette [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, London (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); McCready, V.R. [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brighton (United Kingdom); Du, Yong [The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the role of patient-specific dosimetry as a predictive marker of survival and as a potential tool for individualised molecular radiotherapy treatment planning of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer, and to assess whether higher administered levels of activity are associated with a survival benefit. Clinical data from 57 patients who received 2.5-5.1 GBq of {sup 186}Re-HEDP as part of NIH-funded phase I/II clinical trials were analysed. Whole-body and SPECT-based absorbed doses to the whole body and bone lesions were calculated for 22 patients receiving 5 GBq. The patient mean absorbed dose was defined as the mean of all bone lesion-absorbed doses in any given patient. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, Cox's proportional hazards model and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for overall survival (OS) and correlation analyses. A statistically significantly longer OS was associated with administered activities above 3.5 GBq in the 57 patients (20.1 vs 7.1 months, hazard ratio: 0.39, 95 % CI: 0.10-0.58, P = 0.002). A total of 379 bone lesions were identified in 22 patients. The mean of the patient mean absorbed dose was 19 (±6) Gy and the mean of the whole-body absorbed dose was 0.33 (±0.11) Gy for the 22 patients. The patient mean absorbed dose (r = 0.65, P = 0.001) and the whole-body absorbed dose (r = 0.63, P = 0.002) showed a positive correlation with disease volume. Significant differences in OS were observed for the univariate group analyses according to disease volume as measured from SPECT imaging of {sup 186}Re-HEDP (P = 0.03) and patient mean absorbed dose (P = 0.01), whilst only the disease volume remained significant in a multivariable analysis (P = 0.004). This study demonstrated that higher administered activities led to prolonged survival and that for a fixed administered activity, the whole-body and patient mean absorbed doses correlated with the extent of disease, which, in turn, correlated

  5. TRAF4 and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    activation of AR. Ubiquitination is an important post-translational modification regulating protein degradation, trafficking, activity, and protein ... protein interaction. Deregulation of the ubiquitin pathways has been implicated in a number of diseases including cancers. Targeting the...specific PTEN deletion mouse line to examine the role of TRAF4 in prostate cancer development. 4. Impact (1) The impact on the development of the

  6. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...receptor (AR) targeted therapies, prostate cancer adapts. One way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor

  7. Combined immunotherapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Versluis, J.; van den Berg, H.P.; Santegoets, S.J.; van Moorselaar, R.J.; van der Sluis, T.M.; Gall, H.E.; Harding, T.C.; Jooss, K.; Lowy, I.; Pinedo, H.M.; Scheper, R.J.; Stam, A.G.; Blomberg, B.M. von; Gruijl, T.D. de; Hege, K.; Sacks, N.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells vaccine (GVAX) has antitumour activity against prostate cancer; preclinical studies have shown potent synergy when combined with ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte

  8. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our

  9. Correlating phosphoproteomic signaling with castration resistant prostate cancer survival through regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescarbeau, Reynald; Kaplan, David L

    2014-03-04

    Prostate cancer most commonly presents as initially castration dependent, however in a minority of patients the disease will progress to a state of castration resistance. Here, approaches for correlating alterations in the phosphoproteome with androgen independent cell survival in the LNCaP, PC3, and MDa-PCa-2b cell lines are discussed. The performance of the regression techniques multiple linear, ridge, principal component, and partial least squares regression is compared. The predictive performance of these algorithms over randomized data sets and using the Akaike Information Criterion is explored, and principal component and partial least squares regression are found to outperform other regression approaches. The effect of altering the number of features versus observations on the R(2) value and predictive performance is also examined using the partial least squares regression model. Utilizing these approaches "drivers" of castration resistant disease can be identified whose modulation alters phenotypic outcomes. These data provide an empirical comparison of the various considerations when statistically analyzing phosphorylation data with the aim of correlating with phenotypic outcomes.

  10. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  11. ROR-γ drives androgen receptor expression and represents a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Zou, June X; Xue, Xiaoqian; Cai, Demin; Zhang, Yan; Duan, Zhijian; Xiang, Qiuping; Yang, Joy C; Louie, Maggie C; Borowsky, Alexander D; Gao, Allen C; Evans, Christopher P; Lam, Kit S; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Ronald M; Xu, Yong; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is overexpressed and hyperactivated in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the determinants of AR overexpression in CRPC are poorly defined. Here we show that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ (ROR-γ) is overexpressed and amplified in metastatic CRPC tumors, and that ROR-γ drives AR expression in the tumors. ROR-γ recruits nuclear receptor coactivator 1 and 3 (NCOA1 and NCOA3, also known as SRC-1 and SRC-3) to an AR-ROR response element (RORE) to stimulate AR gene transcription. ROR-γ antagonists suppress the expression of both AR and its variant AR-V7 in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and tumors. ROR-γ antagonists also markedly diminish genome-wide AR binding, H3K27ac abundance and expression of the AR target gene network. Finally, ROR-γ antagonists suppressed tumor growth in multiple AR-expressing, but not AR-negative, xenograft PCa models, and they effectively sensitized CRPC tumors to enzalutamide, without overt toxicity, in mice. Taken together, these results establish ROR-γ as a key player in CRPC by acting upstream of AR and as a potential therapeutic target for advanced PCa.

  12. Development of a New Class of Drugs To Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    concentration of VPC-14449 suppressed the mitosis gene UBE2C, a known target of ARV7 (Hu et al., 2012, Cancer Res.). Fig. 6. PCa cell were cultured...Prostate Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul Rennie CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of British Columbia Vancouver V6T 1Z3 REPORT DATE...All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  13. Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC): state of the art, perspectives and new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Maines, Francesca; Modena, Alessandra; Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-07-01

    The rapid approval of several novel agents has given prostate cancer patients and their treating physicians many new and effective therapeutic options. Four new medical therapies were recently approved on the basis of prolonged overall survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients: sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate and MDV3100. Additionally, there are several other promising prostate cancer agents in late-stage development, including PROSTVAC-VF, orteronel and radium-223 chloride, each with a novel mechanism of action. The treatment paradigm for these patients is rapidly evolving, with future study needed to define the optimal sequencing and potential combinations of these new agents. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in understanding the biology of this disease and examining the development of a variety of new agents with promising activity and a favorable toxicity profile, that have been investigated in the setting of hormonal, cytotoxic, immune and targeted therapy. In this new therapeutic setting of CRPC, clinicians will have an opportunity to balance benefits and harms of these new agents in an individual context.

  14. PSA time to nadir as a prognostic factor of first-line docetaxel treatment in castration-resistant prostate cancer: evidence from patients in Northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jie Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Docetaxel-based chemotherapy remains the first-line treatment for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC in China; however, the prognostic factors associated with effects in these patients are still controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the data from 71 eligible Chinese patients who received docetaxel chemotherapy from 2009 to 2016 in our hospital and experienced a reduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA level ≥50% during the treatment and investigated the potential role of time to nadir (TTN of PSA. TTN was defined as the time from start of chemotherapy to the nadir of PSA level during the treatment. Multivariable Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to predict overall survival (OS. In these patients, the median of TTN was 17 weeks. Patients with TTN ≥17 weeks had a longer response time to chemotherapy compared to TTN 50% PSA remission.

  15. Platinum-based chemotherapy for variant castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Ana M; Harzstark, Andrea L; Corn, Paul G; Wen, Sijin; Araujo, John C; Tu, Shi-Ming; Pagliaro, Lance C; Kim, Jeri; Millikan, Randall E; Ryan, Charles; Tannir, Nizar M; Zurita, Amado J; Mathew, Paul; Arap, Wadih; Troncoso, Patricia; Thall, Peter F; Logothetis, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Clinical features characteristic of small-cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC), "anaplastic," often emerge during the progression of prostate cancer. We sought to determine the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients meeting at least one of seven prospectively defined "anaplastic" clinical criteria, including exclusive visceral or predominantly lytic bone metastases, bulky tumor masses, low prostate-specific antigen levels relative to tumor burden, or short response to androgen deprivation therapy. A 120-patient phase II trial of first-line carboplatin and docetaxel (CD) and second-line etoposide and cisplatin (EP) was designed to provide reliable clinical response estimates under a Bayesian probability model with early stopping rules in place for futility and toxicity. Seventy-four of 113 (65.4%) and 24 of 71 (33.8%) were progression free after four cycles of CD and EP, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 16 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.6-19.0 months]. Of the seven "anaplastic" criteria, bulky tumor mass was significantly associated with poor outcome. Lactic acid dehydrogenase strongly predicted for OS and rapid progression. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentration strongly predicted OS but not rapid progression. Neuroendocrine markers did not predict outcome or response to therapy. Our findings support the hypothesis that patients with "anaplastic" prostate cancer are a recognizable subset characterized by a high response rate of short duration to platinum-containing chemotherapies, similar to SCPC. Our results suggest that CEA is useful for selecting therapy in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and consolidative therapies to bulky high-grade tumor masses should be considered in this patient population. ©2013 AACR.

  16. Reactive oxygen species induction by cabazitaxel through inhibiting Sestrin-3 in castration resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Hongo, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Nishimoto, Koshiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by taxanes in cancer cells may influence the taxane-induced cell death or the drug resistance. We investigated the correlation between the cytotoxic effect of taxanes and ROS production in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing concentrations of docetaxel or cabazitaxel in vitro. Cabazitaxel showed significantly higher cytotoxic efficacy than docetaxel in human CRPC cells, accompanied by elevated ROS production detected by FACS analysis. To investigate whether cabazitaxel-mediated cell death was caused by the ROS generation induced by cabazitaxel, we treated CRPC cells in the presence of antioxidant NAC. NAC reduced the cytotoxic effect induced by cabazitaxel. We found that ROS elimination by Sestrin-3 (SESN3) was significantly inhibited by cabazitaxel, but not by docetaxel. These results indicate higher sensitivity of human CRPC to cabazitaxel compared to docetaxel involves ROS production through inhibiting the expression of antioxidant enzyme SESN3. PMID:29152111

  17. The Stromal Contribution to the Development of Resistance to New-Generation Drugs by Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Amy Lubik RECIPIENT: University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC Canada V6H 3Z6 REPORT...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC Canada V6H 3Z6 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...be beneficial for tumors that involved steroidogenesis evoked by paracrine Hh signaling, as compliment to traditional targeting of the AR and

  18. Complete biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) response to sipuleucel-T with enzalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a case report with implications for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Julie N; Drake, Charles G; Beer, Tomasz M

    2013-02-01

    To describe the case of a patient with castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer who achieved a complete and durable biochemical response after treatment with sipuleucel-T while continuing with enzalutamide and to explore the immunologic basis for such a response. We obtained serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements and bone scans to assess the patient's response to enzalutamide followed by the addition of sipuleucel-T. Using preclinical and clinical data, we describe his response through known immunobiologic mechanisms. This patient's PSA level became undetectable during treatment with enzalutamide and began to increase again after 14 months. He opted for treatment with sipuleucel-T, while continuing with the enzalutamide. This resulted in another complete PSA response 6 months after exposure to sipuleucel-T. Sipuleucel-T typically does not produce significant PSA reductions, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 1 previous report of a durable complete PSA response in a patient with metastatic disease has been published. The timing of this response supports an immune mechanism. The biologic rationale for the combination, coupled with the clinical result observed in our patient, provides a basis for studies of the combination of sipuleucel-T and enzalutamide. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsegian, Vahe; Moeckel, Daniel; Mueller, Stefan P.; Bockisch, Andreas; Horn, Peter A.; Lindemann, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ( 223 Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if 223 Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving 223 Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after 223 Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected. (orig.)

  20. Inhibiting autophagy overcomes docetaxel resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; He, Wei-Yang; Zeng, Yi-Zhou; Hossain, Arman; Gou, Xin

    2018-02-19

    This study investigates the docetaxel-resistant mechanism and explores the effect of tea polyphenols (TP) on autophagy and its related mechanism in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines PC3 and DU145. Immunofluorescence assay and annexin V-FITC/PI double staining flow cytometry were used to analyze the apoptosis and autophagy of PC3 and DU145 cells. The expression of autophagy-related proteins was detected by western bolt. Docetaxel could induce autophagy and apoptosis, together with the expression increase in p-JNK, p-Bcl-2 and Beclin1. The level of autophagy was remarkably decreased, but apoptosis was increased after combining with TP. In addition, the expression of p-mTOR was increased after combining with TP. Docetaxel induces protective autophagy in CRPC cells by JNK pathway activation and then Bcl-2 phosphorylation and Beclin1 dissociation. TP activates mTOR pathway, which ultimately inhibits docetaxel-induced autophagy and improves therapeutic efficacy of docetaxel in CRPC cells.

  1. Resistance to abiraterone in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, Silvana; Bassanelli, Maria; Aschelter, Anna Maria; Milano, Annalisa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Persistent androgen signaling is functionally significant in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and it is actually considered a validated therapeutic target. Residual intra-tumoral androgens compensate for the effects of androgen ablation, activating the androgen receptor (AR), AR-mediated gene expression and driving CRPC. The intra-tumoral biosynthesis of androgens takes place in different ways and cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) has a crucial role in this context. Abiraterone, a CYP17A1 inhibitor, has shown impressive results in pre- and post-chemotherapy settings, prolonging the survival of patients with CRPC. However, not all patients respond to the treatment and most responders develop resistance, with a widely variable duration of response. Although many hypotheses are emerging, the mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone treatment have not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present review is to describe the main data currently available on resistance to abiraterone. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Lymphocyte function following radium-223 therapy in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsegian, Vahe; Moeckel, Daniel [Helios Kliniken, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Schwerin (Germany); Mueller, Stefan P.; Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Horn, Peter A.; Lindemann, Monika [University Hospital Essen, Institute for Transfusion Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Therapy with the alpha-emitter radium-223 chloride ({sup 223}Ra) is an innovative therapeutic option in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, radiotherapy can lead to hematopoietic toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if {sup 223}Ra therapy induces an impairment of cellular antimicrobial immune responses. In 11 patients receiving {sup 223}Ra treatment, lymphocyte proliferation and the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-10) were determined, using lymphocyte transformation testing and ELISpot, respectively. Lymphocyte function after stimulation with mitogens and microbial antigens was assessed prior to therapy and at day 1, 7 and 28 after therapy. Lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 towards mitogens and antigens remained unchanged after therapy. Consistent with these in vitro data, we did not observe infectious complications after treatment. The results argue against an impairment of lymphocyte function after {sup 223}Ra therapy. Thus, immune responses against pathogens should remain unaffected. (orig.)

  3. Solution Formulation Development and Efficacy of MJC13 in a Preclinical Model of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Su; Bian, Xiaomei; Liang, Dong; Sivils, Jeffrey C.; Neckers, Leonard M.; Cox, Marc B.; Xie, Huan

    2015-01-01

    MJC13, a novel FKBP52 targeting agent, has potential use for the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. The purpose of this work was to develop a solution formulation of MJC13, and obtain its efficacy profile in a human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model. Preformulation studies were conducted to evaluate the physicochemical properties. Co-solvent systems were evaluated for aqueous solubility and tolerance. A human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model was established by growing 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells in C.B-17 SCID mice. The optimal formulation was used to study the efficacy of MJC13 in this preclinical model of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. We found that MJC13 was stable (at least for 1 month), very lipophilic (logP = 6.49), poorly soluble in water (0.28 μg/mL), and highly plasma protein bound (> 98%). The optimal formulation consisting of PEG 400 and Tween 80 (1:1, v/v) allowed us to achieve a MJC13 concentration of 7.5 mg/mL, and tolerated an aqueous environment. After twice weekly intratumoral injection with 10 mg/kg MJC13 in this formulation for 4 consecutive weeks, tumor volumes were significantly reduced compared to vehicle-treated controls. PMID:25380396

  4. Solution formulation development and efficacy of MJC13 in a preclinical model of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Su; Bian, Xiaomei; Liang, Dong; Sivils, Jeffrey C; Neckers, Leonard M; Cox, Marc B; Xie, Huan

    2016-01-01

    MJC13, a novel FKBP52 targeting agent, has potential use for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. The purpose of this work was to develop a solution formulation of MJC13, and obtain its efficacy profile in a human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model. Preformulation studies were conducted to evaluate the physicochemical properties. Co-solvent systems were evaluated for aqueous solubility and tolerance. A human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model was established by growing 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells in C.B-17 SCID mice. The optimal formulation was used to study the efficacy of MJC13 in this preclinical model of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. We found that MJC13 was stable (at least for 1 month), highly lipophilic (logP = 6.49), poorly soluble in water (0.28 µg/mL), and highly plasma protein bound (>98%). The optimal formulation consisting of PEG 400 and Tween 80 (1:1, v/v) allowed us to achieve a MJC13 concentration of 7.5 mg/mL, and tolerated an aqueous environment. After twice weekly intratumoral injection with 10 mg/kg MJC13 in this formulation for four consecutive weeks, tumor volumes were significantly reduced compared to vehicle-treated controls.

  5. A randomised, phase II study of repeated rhenium-188-HEDP combined with docetaxel and prednisone versus docetaxel and prednisone alone in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone; the Taxium II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meander Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Medical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oprea-Lager, Daniela E.; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, H.P. van den [Tergooi Medical Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Los, Maartje [St Antonius Hospital Utrecht, Department of Medical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beeker, Aart [Spaarne Gasthuis, Department of Medical Oncology, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Jonker, Marianne A. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Verheul, Henk M.W.; Eertwegh, Alfons J.M. van den [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    Rhenium-188-HEDP is a beta-emitting radiopharmaceutical used for palliation of metastatic bone pain. We investigated whether the addition of rhenium-188-HEDP to docetaxel/prednisone improved efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with CRPC. Patients with progressive CRPC and osteoblastic bone metastases were randomised for first-line docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly plus prednisone with or without 2 injections of rhenium-188-HEDP after the third (40 MBq/kg) and after the sixth (20 MBq/kg) cycle of docetaxel. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), defined as either PSA, radiographic or clinical progression. Patients were stratified by extent of bone metastases and hospital. Forty-two patients were randomised for standard treatment and 46 patients for combination therapy. Median number of cycles of docetaxel was 9 in the control group and 8 in the experimental group. Median follow-up was 18.4 months. Two patients from the experimental group did not start treatment after randomisation. In the intention to treat analysis no differences in PFS, survival and PSA became apparent between the two groups. In an exploratory per-protocol analysis median overall survival was significantly longer in the experimental group (33.8 months (95%CI 31.75-35.85)) than in the control group (21.0 months (95%CI 13.61-28.39); p 0.012). Also median PFS in patients with a baseline phosphatase >220U/L was significantly better with combination treatment (9.0 months (95%CI 3.92-14.08) versus 6.2 months (95%CI 3.08-9.32); log rank p 0.005). As expected, thrombocytopenia (grade I/II) was reported more frequently in the experimental group (25% versus 0%). Combined treatment with rhenium-188-HEDP and docetaxel did not prolong PFS in patients with CRPC. The observed survival benefit in the per-protocol analysis warrants further studies in the combined treatment of chemotherapy and radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  6. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P

  7. The treatment patterns of castration-resistant prostate cancer in Japan, including symptomatic skeletal events and associated treatment and healthcare resource use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Hiroji; DiBonaventura, Marco; Wang, Ed; Ledesma, Dianne Athene; Concialdi, Kristen; Aitoku, Yasuko

    2017-10-01

    Real-world treatment patterns of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in Japan were examined, focusing on treatment patterns and resource use differences attributed to symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs). Urologists (N = 176) provided retrospective chart data for patients with mCRPC (N = 445) via online surveys. Descriptive analyses and chi-square tests evaluated treatment patterns and their differences by SSE presence; generalized linear mixed models examined healthcare resource utilization differences as a function of SSEs. Patients were on average 73.6 years old (SD = 8.3), diagnosed with prostate cancer 5.1 years (SD = 6.2), castration-resistant 2.3 years (SD=2.0), and had 7.9 bone metastases sites (SD=12.4). Novel anti-hormones showed increased adoption as mCRPC treatment. Simultaneously, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist/antagonist use was common (43.6% of patients in 1 st line), even as CRPC treatment had started. SSEs were uncommon (2-3% per treatment line; 5% at any time), but were associated with increased opioids, strontium-89, bisphosphonates, and NSAIDs use, plus increased healthcare visits (all p < .05). LHRH agonist/antagonist treatment combinations remain the mCRPC treatment mainstay in Japan. However, novel anti-hormone therapies are becoming well-accepted in practice. SSEs were associated with increased healthcare resource and analgesic use, highlighting the need for efficient symptom management.

  8. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Brown

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecting PSA levels. As bone metastases develop, factors derived from bone metabolism are released into blood and urine, including N- and C-terminal peptide fragments of type 1 collagen and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which represent potentially useful biomarkers for monitoring metastatic bone disease. A number of clinical trials have investigated these bone biomarkers with respect to their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values. Results suggest that higher levels of bone biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events and/or death. As a result of these findings, bone biomarkers are now being increasingly used as study end points, particularly in studies investigating novel agents with putative bone effects. Data from prospective clinical trials are needed to validate the use of bone biomarkers and to confirm that marker levels provide additional information beyond traditional methods of response evaluation for patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  9. A Recombinant Platform for Prioritizing Aerolysin Molecular Grenades for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0377 TITLE: A Recombinant Platform for Prioritizing Aerolysin Molecular Grenades for Metastatic Prostate Cancer ...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Recombinant Platform for Prioritizing Aerolysin Molecular Grenades for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b...progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castrate resistant metastatic disease is an ominous diagnosis. To overcome tumor cell heterogeneity based

  10. Pain in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gater Adam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone metastases are a common painful and debilitating consequence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC. Bone pain may predict patients' prognosis and there is a need to further explore CRPC patients' experiences of bone pain in the overall context of disease pathology. Due to the subjective nature of pain, assessments of pain severity, onset and progression are reliant on patient assessment. Patient reported outcome (PRO measures, therefore, are commonly used as key endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of CRPC treatments. Evidence of the content validity of leading PRO measures of pain severity used in CRPC clinical trials is, however, limited. Methods To document patients' experience of CRPC symptoms including pain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL, semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 patients with CRPC and bone metastases. The content validity of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI scale from the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and the 'Average Pain' and 'Worst Pain' items of the Brief Pain Inventory Short-Form (BPI-SF was also assessed. Results Patients with CRPC and bone metastases present with a constellation of symptoms that can have a profound effect on HRQL. For patients in this study, bone pain was the most prominent and debilitating symptom associated with their condition. Bone pain was chronic and, despite being generally well-managed by analgesic medication, instances of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP were common. Cognitive debriefing of the selected PRO measures of pain severity highlighted difficulties among patients in understanding the verbal response scale (VRS of the MPQ PPI scale. There were also some inconsistencies in the way in which the BPI-SF 'Average Pain' item was interpreted by patients. In contrast, the BPI-SF 'Worst Pain' item was well understood and interpreted consistently among patients. Conclusions Study findings support the

  11. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and....../or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with first-line castration-based ADT were included. ERG protein expression was analysed in diagnostic specimens using immunohistochemistry (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Time to CRPC was compared between ERG subgroups using multiple cause-specific Cox regression stratified...... on ERG-status. Risk reclassification and time-dependent area under the ROC curves were used to assess the discriminative ability of ERG-status. Time to PSA-nadir, proportion achieving PSA-nadir ≤0.2 ng/ml, and risk of PCa-specific death were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 6.8 years...

  12. [Risk factors for predicting severe leukopenia induced by docetaxel plus prednisolone in patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Tamaki, Shinya; Nagamori, Satoshi; Endou, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extract the risk factors for GradeB3 leukopenia induced by docetaxel plus prednisolone (DP)therapy administered to patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Rates of 59% for GradeB3 leukopenia and 11% for FN were observed. On multivariate analysis, the pretreatment white blood cell count(OR=0.502, 95%CI: 0.292- 0.862, p=0.01)was significantly associated with severe leukopenia induced by DP therapy. In addition, on univariate analysis, the pretreatment platelet count, disease extent, and bilirubin level were significant factors. We consider it necessary to immediately treat patients with these risks with G-CSF.

  13. 5alphaDH-DOC (5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone) activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Motohide; Honma, Seijiro; Chung, Suyoun; Takata, Ryo; Furihata, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nonomura, Norio; Nasu, Yasutomo; Miki, Tsuneharu; Shuin, Taro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Okuyama, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer often relapses during androgen-depletion therapy, even under the castration condition in which circulating androgens are drastically reduced. High expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and genes involved in androgen metabolism indicate a continued role for AR in castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs). There is increasing evidence that some amounts of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and other androgens are present sufficiently to activate AR within CRPC tissues, and enzymes involved in the androgen and steroid metabolism, such as 5alpha-steroid reductases, are activated in CRPCs. In this report, we screened eight natural 5alphaDH-steroids to search for novel products of 5alpha-steroid reductases, and identified 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) as a novel substrate for 5alpha-steroid reductases in CRPCs. 11-Deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and 5alpha-dihydro-deoxycorticosterone (5alphaDH-DOC) could promote prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR activation, and type 1 5alpha-steroid reductase (SRD5A1) could convert from DOC to 5alphaDH-DOC. Sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis detected 5alphaDH-DOC in some clinical CRPC tissues. These findings implicated that under an extremely low level of DHT, 5alphaDH-DOC and other products of 5alpha-steroid reductases within CRPC tissues might activate the AR pathway for prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival under castration.

  14. Complete response to ethnylestradiol prolonged for almost two years in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-11-01

    An 80-year-old man with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 120 ng/mL) presented to the hospital in February 2011. A prostate needle biopsy was performed, and pathological examination revealed prostatic adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 4+5=9. Computed tomography revealed metastases of the pelvic lymph nodes. Combined androgen blockade was started. The PSA concentration decreased to 1.68 ng/mL, but started increasing again in August 2012 to 6.08 ng/mL. Although bicalutamide was discontinued due to antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome, the PSA concentration increased even more. The PSA concentration reached 21.62 ng/mL in September 2012, at which time ethnylestradiol was started. The PSA concentration decreased again and has remained below the limit of sensitivity for almost 2 years. To our knowledge, this is first case report describing a complete response to ethnylestradiol that lasted for almost 2 years in a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  15. SOD mimetics: A Novel Class of Androgen Receptor Inhibitors that Suppresses Castration-Resistant Growth of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rusha; Sharifi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer (PCa) is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men. The androgen receptor (AR) is vital for PCa progression, even in the face of castrate levels of serum testosterone following androgen ablation therapy, a mainstay therapy for advanced PCa. Downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), a major intracellular antioxidant enzyme, occurs progressively during PCa progression to advanced states, and is known to promote AR activity in PCa. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of SOD mimetics on AR expression and function in AR-dependent LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, and LAPC-4AD PCa cells. Treatment with Tempol, a SOD mimetic, not only lowered cellular superoxide levels, but also concomitantly attenuated AR transcriptional activity and AR target gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in the presence and absence of dihydrotestosterone, the major endogenous AR agonist. Tempol's inhibition of AR was mediated, in large part, by its ability to decrease AR protein via increased degradation, in the absence of any inhibitory effects on other nuclear receptors. Tempol's inhibitory effects on AR were also reproducible with other SOD mimetics, MnTBAP and MnTMPyP. Importantly, Tempol's effects on AR function were accompanied by significant in vitro and in vivo reduction in castration-resistant PCa survival and growth. Collectively, this study has demonstrated for the first time that SOD mimetics, by virtue of their ability to suppress AR function, may be beneficial in treating the currently incurable castration-resistant PCa in which SOD2 expression is highly suppressed. PMID:22172488

  16. Mitosis phase enrichment with identification of mitotic centromere-associated kinesin as a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Liu, Yuexin; Dhillon, Jasreman; Cogdell, David; Aprikian, Armen; Efstathiou, Eleni; Navone, Nora; Troncoso, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason-grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (Pcancer cases (n = 108). Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Should We Try Antiandrogen Withdrawal in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients? Insights From a Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Ezaki, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Shinojima, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-12-01

    It remains uncertain whether those with response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AAW) have a better prognosis. We investigated the predictors of a better response to AAW and overall survival after acquiring resistance to first-line androgen deprivation therapy inpatients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 87 CRPC patients treated at Keio University Hospital. Sixty-seven of 87 CRPC patients underwent AAW. We analyzed clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of survival in CRPC patients and investigated predictors of good response to AAW. Younger age, longer duration of androgen deprivation therapy before CRPC development, and better response to AAW were independent favorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Although better response to AAW was a favorable prognostic factor in this study, trying AAW was not significantly related to overall survival. Duration of hormone therapy was significantly longer in those whose disease responded to AAW (69.9 ± 11.0 months) than those with no response (45.3 ± 5.2 months). The prognostic benefit of AAW was not clearly determined in this study. However, AAW might be beneficial in patients who have favorable prognostic factors for a response to AAW-that is, those who have received hormone therapy for a long period. However, AAW should not be done in patients who do not have favorable factors and who had a high prostate-specific antigen level at the time of their prostate cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response (ARMOR) Phase I and II Studies: Galeterone for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Bruce; Eisenberger, Mario A; Rettig, Matthew B; Chu, Franklin; Pili, Roberto; Stephenson, Joseph J; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Koletsky, Alan J; Nordquist, Luke T; Edenfield, William J; Mamlouk, Khalid; Ferrante, Karen J; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2016-03-15

    Galeterone is a selective, multitargeted agent that inhibits CYP17, antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), and reduces AR expression in prostate cancer cells by causing an increase in AR protein degradation. These open-label phase I and II studies [Androgen Receptor Modulation Optimized for Response-1 (ARMOR1) and ARMOR2 part 1] evaluated the efficacy and safety of galeterone in patients with treatment-naive nonmetastatic or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and established a dose for further study. In ARMOR1, 49 patients received increasing doses (650-2,600 mg) of galeterone in capsule formulation; 28 patients in ARMOR2 part 1 received increasing doses (1,700-3,400 mg) of galeterone in tablet formulation for 12 weeks. Patients were evaluated biweekly for safety and efficacy, and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. In ARMOR1, across all doses, 49.0% (24/49) achieved a ≥30% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA; PSA30) and 22.4% (11/49) demonstrated a ≥50% PSA decline (PSA50). In ARMOR2 part 1, across all doses, PSA30 was 64.0% (16/25) and PSA50 was 48.0% (12/25). In the 2,550-mg dose cohort, PSA30 was 72.7% (8/11) and PSA50 was 54.5% (6/11). Galeterone was well tolerated; the most common adverse events were fatigue, increased liver enzymes, gastrointestinal events, and pruritus. Most were mild or moderate in severity and required no action and there were no apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) events. The efficacy and safety from ARMOR1 and ARMOR2 part 1 and the pharmacokinetic results support the galeterone tablet dose of 2,550 mg/d for further study. Galeterone was well tolerated and demonstrated pharmacodynamic changes consistent with its selective, multifunctional AR signaling inhibition. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men With Chemotherapy-Naïve, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Katherine S; Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Rumble, R Bryan; Carducci, Michael A; Nordquist, Luke; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Winquist, Eric; Singer, Eric A

    2017-06-10

    Purpose ASCO provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) offer direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potential practice-changing data. This PCO addresses second-line hormonal therapy for chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who range from being asymptomatic with only biochemical evidence of CRPC to having documented metastases but minimal symptoms. Clinical Context The treatment goal for CRPC is palliation. Despite resistance to initial androgen deprivation therapy, most men respond to second-line hormonal therapies. However, guidelines have neither addressed second-line hormonal therapy for nonmetastatic CRPC nor provided specific guidance with regard to the chemotherapy-naïve population. Recent Data Six phase III randomized controlled trials and expert consensus opinion inform this PCO. Provisional Clinical Opinion For men with CRPC, a castrate state should be maintained indefinitely. Second-line hormonal therapy (eg, antiandrogens, CYP17 inhibitors) may be considered in patients with nonmetastatic CRPC at high risk for metastatic disease (rapid prostate-specific antigen doubling time or velocity) but otherwise is not suggested. In patients with radiographic evidence of metastases and minimal symptoms, enzalutamide or abiraterone plus prednisone should be offered after discussion with patients about potential harms, benefits, costs, and patient preferences. Radium-223 and sipuleucel-T also are options. No evidence provides guidance about the optimal order of hormonal therapies for CRPC beyond second-line treatment. Prostate-specific antigen testing every 4 to 6 months is reasonable for men without metastases. Routine radiographic restaging generally is not suggested but can be considered for patients at risk for metastases or who exhibit symptoms or other evidence of progression. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/genitourinary-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  20. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2016-09-19

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells.

  1. Saikosaponin-d: A potential chemotherapeutics in castration resistant prostate cancer by suppressing cancer metastases and cancer stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Di; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Jiang, Yao-Dong; Wu, Peng; Qi, Huan; Cai, Chao; Zheng, Shao-Bin; Dang, Qiang

    2016-06-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the gold standard regimen for advanced Prostate cancer (PCa) patients, nevertheless, patients eventually develop into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently only a few chemotherapeutics are available for CRPC. Therefore, it is critical for identifying a new drug. In this study, we will explore a new agent, Saikosaponin-d (SSd), for CRPC therapy based on its mechanism of action. DU145 and CWR22Rv1 cells representing CRPC were employed in this study. A series of cell, biochemical, and molecular biologic assays such as Immunofluorescence, Zymography, Sphere formation, Colony formation, and MTT were used. Finally, we find SSd can significantly inhibit the growth of PCa cells in both dose- and time-dependent and suppress the colony formation during a long-term drug administration, it also can inhibit their migration and invasion abilities, which was accompanied by reverse the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and suppress MMP2/9 expression as well as activities. Furthermore, SSd can suppress cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes such as self-renewal ability. Mechanistically, SSd blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by decreasing GSK3β phosphorylation to affect EMT and CSC. These findings demonstrate the mechanism of anti-cancer activity of SSd in targeting EMT and CSC, suggesting SSd can be a potent agent for CRPC therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2, thereby preventing AR ubiquitination and protein degradation. Consequently, HOTAIR expression is sufficient to induce androgen-independent AR activation and drive the AR-mediated transcriptional program in the absence of androgen. Functionally, HOTAIR overexpression increases, whereas HOTAIR knockdown decreases, prostate cancer cell growth and invasion. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence of lncRNAs as drivers of androgen-independent AR activity and CRPC progression, and they support the potential of lncRNAs as therapeutic targets.

  3. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Castration-Resistant Prostate Tumor Growth by Pyrroloimidazole-based Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Xu, Yadong; Dar, Javid A; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E; Parrinello, Erica; Ai, Junkui; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that controls the expression of androgen-responsive genes. A key step in androgen action, which is amplified in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is AR nuclear translocation. Small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization could be developed as novel therapeutics for CRPC. We developed a high-throughput screen and identified two structurally-related pyrroloimidazoles that could block AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. We show that these two small molecules, 3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5 H -pyrrolo[1,2- a ]imidazole (EPPI) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5 H -pyrrolo[1,2- a ]imidazole (CPPI) can inhibit the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of AR and reduce the proliferation of AR-positive but not AR-negative prostate cancer cell lines. EPPI and CPPI did not inhibit nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor or the estrogen receptor, suggesting they selectively target AR. In LNCaP tumor xenografts, CPPI inhibited the proliferation of relapsed LNCaP tumors. These findings suggest that EPPI and CPPI could serve as lead structures for the development of therapeutic agents for CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2120-9. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future.

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Restore Cell Surface Expression of the Coxsackie Adenovirus Receptor and Enhance CMV Promoter Activity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kasman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviral gene therapy using the death receptor ligand TRAIL as the therapeutic transgene can be safely administered via intraprostatic injection but has not been evaluated for efficacy in patients. Here we investigated the efficacy of adenoviral TRAIL gene therapy in a model of castration resistant prostate cancer and found that intratumoral injections can significantly delay tumor growth but cannot eliminate established lesions. We hypothesized that an underlying cause is inefficient adenoviral delivery. Using the LNCaP progression model of prostate cancer we show that surface CAR expression decreases with increasing tumorigenicity and that castration resistant C4-2b cells were more difficult to transduce with adenovirus than castration sensitive LNCaP cells. Many genes, including CAR, are epigenetically silenced during transformation but a new class of chemotherapeutic agents, known as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, can reverse this process. We demonstrate that HDACi restore CAR expression and infectivity in C4-2b cells and enhance caspase activation in response to infection with a TRAIL adenovirus. We also show that in cells with high surface CAR expression, HDACi further enhance transgene expression from the CMV promoter. Thus HDACi have multiple beneficial effects, which may enhance not only viral but also non-viral gene therapy of castration resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Alterations of androgen receptor-regulated enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) contribute to enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingwen; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Liguo; Zhang, Jun; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Kohli, Manish; Wang, Guixia; Huang, Haojie

    2016-06-21

    Enzalutamide is a second-generation anti-androgen for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC). It prolongs survival of CRPC patients, but its overall survival benefit is relatively modest (4.8 months) and by 24 months most patients progress on enzalutamide. To date, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying enzalutamide resistance remain elusive. Herein, we report enzalutamide treatment-induced alterations of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated enhancer RNAs (AR-eRNAs) and their roles in enzalutamide-resistant growth and survival of CRPC cells. AR chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) and RNA-seq analyses revealed that 188 and 227 AR-eRNAs were differentially expressed in enzalutamide-resistant LNCaP and C4-2 cells, respectively. The AR-eRNAs upregulated in C4-2 cells and downregulated in LNCaP cells were selected through meta-analysis. Expression of AR-eRNAs and related mRNAs in the loci of FTO, LUZP2, MARC1 and NCAM2 were further verified by real-time RT-PCR. Silencing of LUZP2 inhibited, but silencing of MARC1 increased the growth of enzalutamide-resistant C4-2 cells. Intriguingly, meta-analysis showed that expression of LUZP2 mRNA increased in primary tumors compared to normal prostate tissues, but decreased again in metastatic CRPC. Our findings suggest that eRNA alteration profiling is a viable new approach to identify functional gene loci that may not only contribute to enzalutamide-resistant growth of CRPC, but also serve as new targets for CRPC therapy.

  7. PSA time to nadir as a prognostic factor of first-line docetaxel treatment in castration-resistant prostate cancer: evidence from patients in Northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai-Jie; Pei, Xin-Qi; Tian, Ge; Wu, Da-Peng; Fan, Jin-Hai; Jiang, Yu-Mei; He, Da-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy remains the first-line treatment for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in China; however, the prognostic factors associated with effects in these patients are still controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the data from 71 eligible Chinese patients who received docetaxel chemotherapy from 2009 to 2016 in our hospital and experienced a reduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≥50% during the treatment and investigated the potential role of time to nadir (TTN) of PSA. TTN was defined as the time from start of chemotherapy to the nadir of PSA level during the treatment. Multivariable Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to predict overall survival (OS). In these patients, the median of TTN was 17 weeks. Patients with TTN ≥17 weeks had a longer response time to chemotherapy compared to TTN PSA progression in patients with TTN ≥17 weeks was 11.44 weeks compared to 5.63 weeks when TTN was PSA level at the diagnosis of cancer (HR: 4.337, 95% CI: 1.616-11.645, P = 0.004), duration of initial androgen deprivation therapy (HR: 2.982, 95% CI: 1.104-8.045, P = 0.031), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (HR: 3.963, 95% CI: 1.380-11.384, P = 0.011), and total PSA response (Class 1 [PSA remains an important prognostic marker in predicting therapeutic outcome in Chinese population who receive chemotherapy for mCRPC and have >50% PSA remission.

  8. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  9. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization.

  10. Metastatic prostate cancer in transsexual diagnosed after three decades of estrogen therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turo, Rafal; Jallad, Samer; Prescott, Stephen; Cross, William Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in transsexual patients is very low with only few reported cases. Many years before presenting with prostate cancer, these patients receive hormone ablation as a part of their gender therapy. Their disease is already defined as castrate resistant, and the treatment and follow-up of such patients remains a challenge. We report a case of a male-to-female transgender woman who was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer, 31 years post-feminization. PMID:24032068

  11. Activation of P-TEFb by Androgen Receptor-Regulated Enhancer RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Liguo; Ren, Shancheng; Wang, Lan; Blackburn, Patrick R; McNulty, Melissa S; Gao, Xu; Qiao, Meng; Vessella, Robert L; Kohli, Manish; Zhang, Jun; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Tindall, Donald J; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, Robert; Ekker, Stephen C; Kang, Tiebang; Sun, Yinghao; Huang, Haojie

    2016-04-19

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) progression, but the function and disease relevance of AR-bound enhancers remain unclear. Here, we identify a group of AR-regulated enhancer RNAs (e.g., PSA eRNA) that are upregulated in CRPC cells, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs), and patient tissues. PSA eRNA binds to CYCLIN T1, activates P-TEFb, and promotes cis and trans target gene transcription by increasing serine-2 phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II-Ser2p). We define an HIV-1 TAR RNA-like (TAR-L) motif in PSA eRNA that is required for CYCLIN T1 binding. Using TALEN-mediated gene editing we further demonstrate that this motif is essential for increased Pol II-Ser2p occupancy levels and CRPC cell growth. We have uncovered a P-TEFb activation mechanism and reveal altered eRNA expression that is related to abnormal AR function and may potentially be a therapeutic target in CRPC. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of P-TEFb by Androgen Receptor-Regulated Enhancer RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is required for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC progression, but the function and disease relevance of AR-bound enhancers remain unclear. Here, we identify a group of AR-regulated enhancer RNAs (e.g., PSA eRNA that are upregulated in CRPC cells, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, and patient tissues. PSA eRNA binds to CYCLIN T1, activates P-TEFb, and promotes cis and trans target gene transcription by increasing serine-2 phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II-Ser2p. We define an HIV-1 TAR RNA-like (TAR-L motif in PSA eRNA that is required for CYCLIN T1 binding. Using TALEN-mediated gene editing we further demonstrate that this motif is essential for increased Pol II-Ser2p occupancy levels and CRPC cell growth. We have uncovered a P-TEFb activation mechanism and reveal altered eRNA expression that is related to abnormal AR function and may potentially be a therapeutic target in CRPC.

  13. Comparative efficacy, tolerability, and survival outcomes of various radiopharmaceuticals in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastasis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunio M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Abdulrehman Al Hadab,1 Yasser Bayoumi2 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC on pain control, symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs, toxicity profile, quality of life (QoL, and overall survival (OS.Materials and methods: The PubMed/MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database, and other search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing RPs with control (placebo or radiation therapy in metastatic CRPC. Data were extracted and assessed for the risk of bias (Cochrane’s risk of bias tool. Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; Mantel–Haenszel fixed-effects model.Results: Eight RCTs with a total patient population of 1,877 patients were identified. The use of RP was associated with significant reduction in pain intensity and SSE (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51–0.78, I2=27%, P<0.0001, improved QoL (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91, I2=65%, three trials, 1,178 patients, P=0.006, and a minimal improved OS (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.64–1.04, I2=47%, seven trials, 1,845 patients, P=0.11. A subgroup analysis suggested an improved OS with radium-223 (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.90, one trial, 921 patients and strontium-89 (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.91, one trial, 49 patients. Strontium-89 (five trials was associated with increased rates of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia (OR: 4.26, 95% CI: 2.22–8.18, P=0.01, leucopenia (OR: 7.98, 95% CI: 1.82–34.95, P=0.02, pain flare (OR: 6.82, 95% CI: 3.42–13.55, P=0.04, and emesis (OR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.76–7.40, P=0.02.Conclusion: The use of RPs was associated with significant reduction in SSEs and improved QoL, while the radium-223

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Status in Circulating Tumor Cells as a Predictive Biomarker of Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Docetaxel Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatsugu Okegawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We examined whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs can be used to predict survival in a population of bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients treated with docetaxel chemotherapy. Methods: All patients with mCRPC who had experienced treatment failure with androgen-deprivation therapy and had received docetaxel chemotherapy were eligible. CTCs and EGFR expression in CTCs were enumerated with the CellSearch System in whole blood. This system is a semi-automated system that detects and enriches epithelial cells from whole blood using an EpCAM antibody-based immunomagnetic capture. In addition, the EGFR-positive CTCs were assessed using CellSearch® Tumor Phenotyping Reagent EGFR. Results: The median CTC count at baseline before starting trial treatment was eight CTCs per 7.5 mL of blood (range 0–184. There were 37 patients (61.7% who had ≥5 CTCs, with median overall survival of 11.5 months compared with 20.0 months for 23 patients (38.3% with <5 CTCs (p < 0.001. A total of 15 patients (40.5%, 15/37 with five or more CTCs were subjected to automated immunofluorescence staining and cell sorting for EGFR protein. Patients with EGFR-positive CTCs had a shorter overall survival (OS (5.5 months than patients with EGFR-negative CTCs (20.0 months. CTCs, EGFR-positive CTCs, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were independent predictors of overall survival time (p = 0.002, p < 0.001, and p = 0.017, respectively. Conclusion: CTCs may be an independent predictor of OS in CRPC treated with docetaxel chemotherapy. The EGFR expression detected in CTCs was important for assessing the response to chemotherapy and predicting disease outcome.

  15. New therapies for relapsed castration-resistant prostate cancer based on peptide analogs of hypothalamic hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Schally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a pleasure to contribute our presentation at the International Prostate Forum of the Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA to this special issue of the Asian Journal of Andrology.

  16. Dual-Targeting of AR and Akt Pathways by Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    underlying the downregulation of full-length and splice variants of AR by the phytochemical berberine (BBR). We concluded that BBR inhibits the...and AKT expression in prostatic tissues. A-D, tissues from Pten wild-type mice. E-H, tissues from Pten knockout mice. Image analysis was...as immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining analysis showed BEZ235 effectively reduced AKT phosphorylation in prostatic tissues from the Pten-null mice

  17. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D; Williams, Noelle L; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life.

  18. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy and outcome in patients with metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuer, Axel; Grubert, Lena Sophie; Roll, Wolfgang; Schaefers, Michael; Rahbar, Kambiz [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Schrader, Andres Jan; Boegemann, Martin [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Radioligand therapies targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been established for the treatment of metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the last decade and show promising response rates and a favourable toxicity profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and to identify parameters predicting outcome in mCRPC patients treated with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617. Between December 2014 and January 2017, 59 consecutive patients (median age 72 years); interquartile range, (IQR, 66-76 years) with mCRPC, who had been treated with at least one next-generation antihormonal drug as well as chemotherapy, were included in this study. Biochemical response was evaluated using Prostate Cancer Working Group 3 (PCWG3) criteria. Survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox regression proportional hazards model. Toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The study was approved by the local ethics committee. The 59 patients were treated with a total of 159 cycles (median 3 cycles, range 1-7) of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 (median dose 6.11 GBq, IQR 5.9-6.3 GBq). The median follow-up was 24 weeks (IQR 15-36 weeks). Follow-up data for at least 12 weeks (PCWG3) were available in 76% (45) of the patients. For outcome results data from all patients treated with at least one cycle were analysed. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of ≥50% occurred in 53%, and a decline in PSA of any amount in 91% of patients. The estimated median OS was 32 weeks. An initial alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level <220 U/L and a PSA decline after the first cycle were associated with a longer OS (56 vs. 28 weeks, p < 0.01, and 56 vs. 29 weeks, p = 0.04, respectively). The median estimated PSA progression-free survival (PPFS) was 18 weeks. Only ALP level <220 U/L was significantly associated with a longer PPFS (41 vs. 18 weeks, p < 0.01). A PSA decline after the first cycle of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617

  19. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    mesenchymal tran- 585 sitions. J Clin Invest 2009;119:1429–37. 3.586 Acloque H, Adams MS, Fishwick K, Bronner- Fraser M, Nieto MA. 587 Epithelial-mesenchymal...resistance and metastatic progression, hallmarks of malig- nancy .2,3 Indeed, induction of EMT in breast cancer model systems generates properties of self...expression signature [0080] AT3-T cells sometimes formed tight clusters resembling protospheres. While sphere formation is not an exclusive

  20. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Enzalutamide- biotin conjugate bound streptavidin sepharose beads (beads linked to another inhibitor DZ1-067-PEG linker, as negative control) were...a PEG linker with a terminal amine attached to biotin so that the bound proteins can be captured on the streptavidin coated sepharose beads. 3...and (b) the identification of a novel AR acetylation site (K609) in the DNA binding domain of the AR in Enzalutamide resistant metastatic CRPC cells

  1. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    and suggestions for ther- apeutic interventions to address EP in PC. Cancer Metastasis Rev 2 Preclinical evidence of EP in PC EP in epithelial-origin...Szabadkai, I., Daub, H., Keri, G., & Ullrich, A. (2008). AXL is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in breast cancer progression. Cancer ... Testicular Cancer Lecture and 2011 Prostate Cancer Lecture 11.2010 Talk entitled: “CRPC: What Else is Out There?” for the UK Cancer Convention, Royal

  2. Phosphoproteomic Assessment of Therapeutic Kinases for Personalized Therapy in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Faltermeier CM, Carlin DE, Flemming DT, Wong CK, Newton Y, Sudha S, Vashisht AA, Huang J, Wohlschlegel JA, Graeber TG, Witte ON#, Stuart JM# (2016...Graham, ..., Thomas G. Graeber, Owen N. Witte, Joshua M. Stuart Correspondence justin.drake@cinj.rutgers.edu (J.M.D.), owenwitte@mednet.ucla.edu (O.N.W...relative phosphorylation of peptides (Figures S4C–S4H). We asked if the high differential kinase activities in CRPC compared to pri- mary prostate cancer

  3. Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    We started our study with saracatinib but had to switch to enzalutamide due to the halted effort by the pharmaceutical companies for the Src kinase...cells utilizes for aberrant AR activation, intracrine androgen synthesis and kinase pathway mediated AR activation in the absence of androgen, were...Interleukin-6 regulates androgen synthesis in prostate cancer cells. Clin Cancer Res, 2009. 15(15): p. 4815-22. 17. Nagabhushan, M., et al., CWR22: the

  4. Understanding the Role of MDSCs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    organs  such  as  the  liver,  skin,   intestine ,  and  pancreas   [22],  the  role  for  the  Hippo–YAP  pathway  in...important role in development and cancer in organs such as the liver, skin, intestine , and pan- creas (25–27), the role for the Hippo–YAP pathway in...Pharmacologic depletion of MDSCs using Gr1 antibody, Pep-H6 peptibody, or CXCR2 inhibitor arrested prostate progression at the high-grade PIN stage whereas

  5. Delineation of human prostate cancer evolution identifies chromothripsis as a polyclonal event and FKBP4 as a potential driver of castration resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer-Gsponer, Joël R; Quintavalle, Cristina; Müller, David C; Dietsche, Tanja; Perrina, Valeria; Lorber, Thomas; Juskevicius, Darius; Lenkiewicz, Elisabeth; Zellweger, Tobias; Gasser, Thomas; Barrett, Michael T; Rentsch, Cyrill A; Bubendorf, Lukas; Ruiz, Christian

    2018-02-27

    Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and genomic events leading to castration resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PC) is key to improve the outcome of this otherwise deadly disease. Here, we delineated the tumour history of seven patients progressing to castration resistance by analysing matched prostate cancer tissues before and after castration. We performed genomic profiling of DNA-content based flow-sorted populations in order to define the different evolutionary patterns. In one patient, we discovered that a catastrophic genomic event, known as chromothripsis, resulted in multiple CRPC tumour populations with distinct, potentially advantageous copy number aberrations, including an amplification of FK506 Binding Protein 4 (FKBP4, also known as FKBP52), a protein enhancing the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor signalling. Analysis of FKBP4 protein expression in more than 500 prostate cancer samples revealed increased expression in CRPC in comparison to hormone-naïve (HN) PC. Moreover, elevated FKBP4 expression was associated with poor survival of patients with HNPC. We propose FKBP4 amplification and overexpression as a selective advantage in the process of tumour evolution and as a potential mechanism associated with the development of CRPC. Furthermore, FKBP4 interaction with androgen receptor may provide a potential therapeutic target in PC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. AR-V7 in circulating tumor cells cluster as a predictive biomarker of abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide treatment in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okegawa, Takatsugu; Ninomiya, Naoki; Masuda, Kazuki; Nakamura, Yu; Tambo, Mitsuhiro; Nutahara, Kikuo

    2018-03-05

    We examined whether androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) in circulating tumor cell(CTC)clusters can be used to predict survival in patients with bone metastatic castration resistant-prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with abiraterone or enzalutamide. We retrospectively enrolled 98 patients with CRPC on abiraterone or enzalutamide, and investigated the prognostic value of CTC cluster detection (+ v -) and AR-V7 detection (+ v -) using a CTC cluster detection - based AR-V7 mRNA assay. We examined ≤50% prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS), clinical and radiological progression-free survival (radiologic PSF), and overall survival (OS). We then assessed whether AR-V7 expression in CTC clusters identified after On-chip multi-imaging flow cytometry was related to disease progression and survival after first-line systemic therapy. All abiraterone-treated or enzalutamide-treated patients received prior docetaxel. The median follow-up was 20.7 (range: 3.0-37.0) months in the abiraterone and enzalutamide cohorts, respectively. Forty-nine of the 98 men (50.0%) were CTC cluster (-), 23 of the 98 men (23.5%) were CTC cluster(+)/AR-V7(-), and 26 of the 98 men (26.5%) were CTC cluster(+)/AR-V7(+). CTC cluster(+)/AR-V7(+) patients were more likely to have EOD ≥3 at diagnosis (P = 0.003), pain (P = 0.023), higher alkaline phosphatase levels (P cluster(+), CTC cluster(+)/AR-V7(-), and ALP >UNL were independently associated with a poor PSA-PFS, radiographic PFS, and OS in abiraterone-treated patients and enzalutamide-treated patients. The CTC clusters and AR-V7-positive CTC clusters detected were important for assessing the response to abiraterone or enzalutamide therapy and for predicting disease outcome. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Long-term clinical impact of PSA surge in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Caffo, Orazio; Lolli, Cristian; Aieta, Michele; Scarpi, Emanuela; Bianchi, Emanuela; Maines, Francesca; Schepisi, Giuseppe; Salvi, Samanta; Massari, Francesco; Carrozza, Francesco; Veccia, Antonello; Chiuri, Vincenzo E; Campadelli, Enrico; Facchini, Gaetano; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2017-06-01

    Early changes in PSA have been evaluated in association to treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to assess PSA surge phenomenon in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with abiraterone and to correlate those variations with long-term treatment outcome. We retrospectively evaluated 330 CRPC patients in 11 Italian hospitals, monitoring PSA levels at baseline and every 4 weeks. Other clinical, biochemical and molecular parameters were determined at baseline. We considered PSA surge as PSA increase within the first 8 weeks from starting abiraterone more than 1% from baseline followed by a PSA decline. The log-rank test was applied to compare survival between groups of patients according to PSA surge. The impact of PSA surge on survival was evaluated by Cox regression analyses. A total of 330 patients with CRPC, median age 74 years (range, 45-90), received abiraterone (281 chemotherapy-treated and 49 chemotherapy-naïve). PSA surge was observed in 20 (7%) post-chemotherapy and 2 (4%) chemotherapy-naïve patients. For overall patients presenting PSA surge, timing of PSA peak from baseline was 5 ± 1.8 weeks and PSA rise from baseline was 21 ± 18.4%. The overall median follow-up was 23 months (range 1-62). No significant differences in progression-free survival and overall survival were observed between patients with and without PSA surge (P = 0.16 and =0.86, respectively). In addition, uni- and multivariate analyses showed no baseline factors related to PSA surge. PSA surge occurs in both chemotherapy-treated and chemotherapy-naïve patients treated with abiraterone resulting, however, in no long-term impact on outcome. Physicians and patients should be aware of PSA surge challenge to prevent a premature discontinuation of potentially effective therapy with abiraterone. Further larger and prospective studies are warranted to investigate this not infrequent phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  9. Novel prognostic markers in the serum of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer derived from quantitative analysis of the pten conditional knockout mouse proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälin, Martin; Cima, Igor; Schiess, Ralph; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Powles, Tom; Wild, Peter; Templeton, Arnoud; Cerny, Thomas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Krek, Wilhelm; Gillessen, Silke

    2011-12-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is associated with a poor outcome. Prognostic information is useful and aids treatment decisions. However, current nomograms based on clinical parameters alone have weak prognostic accuracy. Therefore, the identification of new prognostic serum biomarkers could be useful. To assess if quantitative analysis of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) conditional knockout mouse proteome reveals significant prognostic biomarkers in mCRPC and to compare the accuracy of these biomarkers with known prognostic factors. Fifty-seven patients with mCRPC were evaluated retrospectively. Prognostic factors used in clinical nomograms were assessed from the records. New candidate biomarkers in patients' sera were derived using a cancer genetics-guided model we recently described, screening the murine Pten-dependent glycoproteome. Quantification in patients' sera was performed by either mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Prognostic biomarkers for survival were identified based on Kaplan-Meier models. In a second step, random forest analysis was performed to identify a prognostic signature combined from the pooled data of known predictors and newly identified biomarkers. With univariate analysis, 13 new significant prognostic factors for survival in the sera of mCRPC patients were found with a Bonferroni-corrected level of significance <5%. Random forest analysis revealed a five-factor predictor (thrombospondin 1; C-reactive protein; poliovirus receptor-related 1; ephrin-A5; and membrane metallo-endopeptidase) with an accuracy of 96% and 94% for 12- and 24-mo survival, respectively. This means that, in our dataset, the error was reduced by 15% compared to using the Halabi et al. nomogram. The retrospective nature of the work and absence of a validating dataset is the major limitation of this work. Analysis of the serum proteome in mCRPC patients based on our Pten conditional

  10. Reproducibility and repeatability of semi-quantitative 18F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT) uptake metrics in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastases: a prospective multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Kramer, Gem M; Scott, Andrew M; Weickhardt, Andrew; Meier, Andreas A; Parada, Nicole; Beattie, Bradley J; Humm, John L; Staton, Kevin D; Zanzonico, Pat B; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S; Yaqub, Maqsood; Sosa, Ramon E; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J; Davis, Ian D; Ackermann, Uwe; Pathmaraj, Kunthi; Schuit, Robert C; Windhorst, Albert D; Chua, Sue; Weber, Wolfgang A; Larson, Steven M; Scher, Howard I; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Hoekstra, Otto; Morris, Michael J

    2018-04-06

    18 F-fluorodihydrotestosterone ( 18 F-FDHT) is a radiolabeled analogue of the androgen receptor's primary ligand that is currently being credentialed as a biomarker for prognosis, response, and pharmacodynamic effects of new therapeutics. As part of the biomarker qualification process, we prospectively assessed its reproducibility and repeatability in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Methods: We conducted a prospective multi-institutional study of mCRPC patients undergoing two (test/re-test) 18 F-FDHT PET/CT scans on two consecutive days. Two independent readers evaluated all examinations and recorded standardized uptake values (SUVs), androgen receptor-positive tumor volumes (ARTV), and total lesion uptake (TLU) for the most avid lesion detected in each of 32 pre-defined anatomical regions. The relative absolute difference and reproducibility coefficient (RC) of each metric were calculated between the test and re-test scans. Linear regression analyses, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate repeatability of 18 F-FDHT metrics. The coefficient of variation (COV) and ICC were used to assess inter-observer reproducibility. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 140 18 F-FDHT-avid regions were included. The best repeatability among 18 F-FDHT uptake metrics was found for SUV metrics (SUV max , SUVmean, and SUVpeak), with no significant differences in repeatability found among them. Correlations between the test and re-test scans were strong for all SUV metrics (R2 ≥ 0.92; ICC ≥ 0.97). The RCs of the SUV metrics ranged from 21.3% for SUVpeak to 24.6% for SUV max The test and re-test ARTV and TLU, respectively, were highly correlated (R2 and ICC ≥ 0.97), although variability was significantly higher than that for SUV (RCs > 46.4%). The PSA levels, Gleason score, weight, and age did not affect repeatability, nor did total injected activity, uptake measurement time, or differences in

  11. The Role of PCA 3 as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Treated with Docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdoumis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Stasinou, Theodora; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Kostakopoulos, Athanasios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2015-05-01

    To investigate potential fluctuations in prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA 3) scores in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with docetaxel and investigate the assay as a potential prognostic factor. This was a prospective observational cohort study. Inclusion criteria included patients on hormonal treatment who were recently diagnosed with CRPC. Exclusion criteria included patients previously having radical treatment (surgery or radiotherapy) and patients who have completed the first cycle of chemotherapy. All urine samples were collected and analyzed using the Progensa® assay. Samples were collected before starting chemotherapy and at 12 months. A prospective database was created including routine blood tests, prostate staging and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels throughout the study period. The effects of chemotherapy were also recorded. Between January 2010 and February 2013, 12 patients were included in the study out of an initial cohort of 23 patients with CRPC. Mean follow-up was 14.8 months. Mean age at CRPC diagnosis was 73.8 years (±3.6 SD). Mean Gleason score was 8, with PSA 84.23 ng/ml (±158 SD). Mean duration of androgen deprivation treatment (ADT) was 45.16 months (±34.9 SD). Mean time to castrate-resistant state was 46.58 months (±35.3 SD). All twelve (n=12, 100%) patients had non-assessable PCA 3 scores at baseline and at 12 months follow-up. As a direct consequence, statistical analysis was not performed as the anticipated change in PCA 3 scores was not identified and correlation between measurable differences was not possible. All patients tolerated chemotherapy and completed the scheduled cycles with no serious adverse effects. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study to demonstrate lack of expression of PCA3 in CRPC, with the result apparently not influenced by chemotherapy. There appears to be a strong association between hormonal treatment and lack of PCA 3 expression. It is still unknown whether

  12. Targeting Hsp27/eIF4E interaction with phenazine compound: a promising alternative for castration-resistant prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajer, Ziouziou; Claudia, Andrieu; Erik, Laurini; Sara, Karaki; Maurizio, Fermeglia; Ridha, Oueslati; David, Taieb; Michel, Camplo; Olivier, Siri; Sabrina, Pricl; Maria, Katsogiannou; Palma, Rocchi

    2017-09-29

    The actual strategy to improve current therapies in advanced prostate cancer involves targeting genes activated by androgen withdrawal, either to delay or prevent the emergence of the castration-refractory phenotype. However, these genes are often implicated in several physiological processes, and long-term inhibition of survival proteins might be accompanied with cytotoxic effects. To avoid this problem, an alternative therapeutic strategy relies on the identification and use of compounds that disrupt specific protein-protein interactions involved in androgen withdrawal. Specifically, the interaction of the chaperone protein Hsp27 with the initiation factor eIF4E leads to the protection of protein synthesis initiation process and enhances cell survival during cell stress induced by castration or chemotherapy. Thus, in this work we aimed at i) identifying the interaction site of the Hsp27/eIF4E complex and ii) interfere with the relevant protein/protein association mechanism involved in castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer. By a combination of experimental and modeling techniques, we proved that eIF4E interacts with the C-terminal part of Hsp27, preferentially when Hsp27 is phosphorylated. We also observed that the loss of this interaction increased cell chemo-and hormone-sensitivity. In order to find a potential inhibitor of Hsp27/eIF4E interaction, BRET assays in combination with molecular simulations identified the phenazine derivative 14 as the compound able to efficiently interfere with this protein/protein interaction, thereby inhibiting cell viability and increasing cell death in chemo- and castration-resistant prostate cancer models in vitro and in vivo .

  13. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans with Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    reduce or circumvent PC, especially among AA-men. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, health disparity, stem cells, hormone inactivating enzymes, CRPC...aggressive CaP in AA patients [8, 9]. Family history accounts for 5-10% of total CaP cases [8, 9], and it does not differ among AA, Asian Americans...metastatic CaP [23]. Although initially effective, hormonal therapy is marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) over a period of

  14. Silencing CAPN2 Expression Inhibited Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells Proliferation and Invasion via AKT/mTOR Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mRNA expression of CAPN2 was upregulated in CRPC cells (DU145 and PC3 than that in non-CRPC cells. Silencing CAPN2 expression could inhibit DU145 and PC3 cells proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Knockdown of CPAN2 level suppressed the migration and invasion capacity of CRPC cells by reducing matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, as well as repressing the phosphorylation protein expression of AKT and mTOR. In addition, we found that the expression of CAPN2 was elevated in Pca tissues than that in normal control tissues. Therefore, we showed the important roles of CAPN2 in the development and progression in CRPC cells, suggesting a new therapeutic intervention for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

  15. Exponential rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during anti-androgen withdrawal predicts PSA flare after docetaxel chemotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Seok; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between rising patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) before chemotherapy and PSA flare during the early phase of chemotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This study included 55 patients with CRPC who received chemotherapy and in whom pre-treatment or post-treatment PSA levels could be serially obtained. The baseline parameters included age, performance, Gleason score, PSA level, and disease extent. PSA doubling time was calculated using the different intervals: the conventional interval from the second hormone manipulation following the nadir until anti-androgen withdrawal (PSADT1), the interval from the initial rise after anti-androgen withdrawal to the start of chemotherapy (PSADT2), and the interval from the nadir until the start of chemotherapy (PSADT3). The PSA growth patterns were analyzed using the ratio of PSADT2 to PSADT1. There were two growth patterns of PSA doubling time: 22 patients (40.0%) had a steady pattern with a more prolonged PSADT2 than PSADT1, while 33 (60.0%) had an accelerating pattern with a shorter PSADT2 than PSADT1. During three cycles of chemotherapy, PSA flare occurred in 11 patients (20.0%); of these patients, 3 were among 33 (9.1%) patients with an accelerating PSA growth pattern and 8 were among 22 patients (36.4%) with a steady PSA growth pattern (p=0.019). Multivariate analysis showed that only PSA growth pattern was an independent predictor of PSA flare (p=0.034). An exponential rise in PSA during anti-androgen withdrawal is a significant predictor for PSA flare during chemotherapy in CRPC patients.

  16. Cdc20/p55 mediates the resistance to docetaxel in castration-resistant prostate cancer in a Bim-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Lin, Yun; Cui, Peng; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Lechao; Sun, Zeqiang; Huang, Shengliang; Li, Shun; Huang, Shiming; Zhao, Qingli; Liu, Qingyong

    2018-03-31

    At least to date, no effective treatment for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been established. Recent studies indicated that cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, the mechanism of Cdc20 in the development of docetaxel resistance in CRPC remains elusive. In this study, the transcription of Cdc20 was confirmed in three independent CRPC cell lines derived from different tissues, including LNCaP, PC3, and DU145. Docetaxel resistant (DR) cell lines were generated within the background of DU145 and PC3. The protein levels of Cdc20 and the biological phenotype were detected in both wild-type and DR cell lines. To further explore the mechanism of Cdc20 overexpression, stable cell lines with Cdc20 or Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) deprivation were generated and examined for biological parameters. In addition, a specific Cdc20 inhibitor was used in DR cell lines to explore the potential solution for docetaxel resistant CRPC. Here, we identified Cdc20 is overexpressed in docetaxel resistant CRPC cell lines, including LNCaP, PC3, and DU145. We also reported that DR cell lines, which mimic the recurrent prostate cancer cells after docetaxel treatment, have higher levels of Cdc20 protein compared with the CRPC cell lines. Interestingly, the protein levels of Bim, an E3 ligase substrate of Cdc20, were decreased in DR cell lines compared with the wild-type, while the mRNA levels were similar. More importantly, in DR cell lines, the biological phenotype induced by Cdc20 deletion could be significantly reversed by the additional knockdown of Bim. As a result, docetaxel resistant prostate cancer cells treated with the pharmacological Cdc20 inhibitor became sensitive to docetaxel treatment. In conclusion, our data collectively demonstrated that Cdc20 overexpression facilitates the docetaxel resistant of the CRPC cell lines in a Bim

  17. Tumour cell lysate-loaded dendritic cell vaccine induces biochemical and memory immune response in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D; Salazar, L; Espinoza, E; Pereda, C; Castellón, E; Valdevenito, R; Huidobro, C; Inés Becker, M; Lladser, A; López, M N; Salazar-Onfray, F

    2013-09-17

    Recently, we produced a tumour antigen-presenting cells (TAPCells) vaccine using a melanoma cell lysate, called TRIMEL, as an antigen source and an activation factor. Tumour antigen-presenting cells induced immunological responses and increased melanoma patient survival. Herein, we investigated the effect of TAPCells loaded with prostate cancer cell lysates (PCCL) as an antigen source, and TRIMEL as a dendritic cell (DC) activation factor; which were co-injected with the Concholepas concholepas haemocyanin (CCH) as an adjuvant on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. The lysate mix capacity, for inducing T-cell activation, was analysed by flow cytometry and Elispot. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction against PCCL, frequency of CD8(+) memory T cells (Tm) in blood and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in serum were measured in treated patients. The lysate mix induced functional mature DCs that were capable of activating PCCL-specific T cells. No relevant adverse reactions were observed. Six out of 14 patients showed a significant decrease in levels of PSA. DTH(+) patients showed a prolonged PSA doubling-time after treatment. Expansion of functional central and effector CD8(+) Tm were detected. Treatment of CRPC patients with lysate-loaded TAPCells and CCH as an adjuvant is safe: generating biochemical and memory immune responses. However, the limited number of cases requires confirmation in a phase II clinical trial.

  18. Lu-177-PSMA-617 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Inhibitor Therapy in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Stability, Bio-distribution and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kabasakal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses and to study the in vivo and in vitro stability as well as pharmacokinetic characteristics of lutetium-177 (Lu-177 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-617. Methods: For this purpose, 7 patients who underwent Lu-177-PSMA therapy were included into the study. The injected Lu-177-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 3.6 to 7.4 GBq with a mean of 5.2±1.8 GBq. The stability of radiotracer in saline was calculated up to 48 h. The stability was also calculated in blood and urine samples. Post-therapeutic dosimetry was performed based on whole body and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT scans on dual-headed SPECT/CT system. Results: The radiochemical yield of Lu-177-PSMA-617 was >99%. It remained stable in saline up to 48 h. Analyses of the blood and urine samples showed a single radioactivity peak even at 24 hours after injection. Half-life of the distribution and elimination phases were calculated to be 0.16±0.09 and 10.8±2.5 hours, respectively. The mean excretion rate was 56.5±8.8% ranging from 41.5% to 65.4% at 24 h. Highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys (1.90±1.19 and 0.82±0.25 Gy/GBq respectively. Radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p<0.05 (0.030±0.008 Gy/GBq. Conclusion: Lu-177-PSMA-617 is a highly stable compound both in vitro and in vivo. Lu-177-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The fractionation regime that enables the longest duration of tumor control and/or survival will have to be developed in further studies.

  19. Predicting time to castration resistance in hormone sensitive prostate cancer by a personalization algorithm based on a mechanistic model integrating patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elishmereni, Moran; Kheifetz, Yuri; Shukrun, Ilan; Bevan, Graham H; Nandy, Debashis; McKenzie, Kyle M; Kohli, Manish; Agur, Zvia

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of cancer death of men worldwide. In hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (HSPC), androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used, but an eventual failure on ADT heralds the passage to the castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) stage. Because predicting time to failure on ADT would allow improved planning of personal treatment strategy, we aimed to develop a predictive personalization algorithm for ADT efficacy in HSPC patients. A mathematical mechanistic model for HSPC progression and treatment was developed based on the underlying disease dynamics (represented by prostate-specific antigen; PSA) as affected by ADT. Following fine-tuning by a dataset of ADT-treated HSPC patients, the model was embedded in an algorithm, which predicts the patient's time to biochemical failure (BF) based on clinical metrics obtained before or early in-treatment. The mechanistic model, including a tumor growth law with a dynamic power and an elaborate ADT-resistance mechanism, successfully retrieved individual time-courses of PSA (R(2) = 0.783). Using the personal Gleason score (GS) and PSA at diagnosis, as well as PSA dynamics from 6 months after ADT onset, and given the full ADT regimen, the personalization algorithm accurately predicted the individual time to BF of ADT in 90% of patients in the retrospective cohort (R(2) = 0.98). The algorithm we have developed, predicting biochemical failure based on routine clinical tests, could be especially useful for patients destined for short-lived ADT responses and quick progression to CRPC. Prospective studies must validate the utility of the algorithm for clinical decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Stromal Contribution to the Development of Resistance to New Generation Drugs by Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    SUMMARY: 3a. Brief Overview of the Clinical Problem Addressed by the Project: In adult males , the normal functioning of the prostate is dependent on...significant role in acquired resistance of a prostate tumor to hormone therapies. Based upon our preliminary data showing that primary prostate stromal cells...pathway. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer, Hedgehog signaling, Hormone Therapy, Intratumoral, Steroidogenesis, Androgens, Smoothened Agonists

  1. Downregulation of androgen receptors by NaAsO2via inhibition of AKT-NF-κB and HSP90 in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunlim; Park, Sang Eun; Moon, Jeong-Weon; Kim, Bong-Min; Kim, Ha-Gyeong; Jeong, In Gab; Yoo, Sangjun; Ahn, Jae Beom; You, Dalsan; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Sujong; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-07-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play essential roles in the development and maintenance of prostate cancer. The recently identified AR splice variants (AR-Vs) have been considered as a plausible mechanism for the primary resistance against androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Sodium meta-arsenite (NaAsO 2 ; KML001; Kominox), a trivalent arsenical, is an orally bioavailable and water soluble, which is currently in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer. It has a potent anti-cancer effect on prostate cancer cells and xenografts. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of NaAsO 2 on AR signaling in LNCaP and 22Rv1 CRPC cells. We used hormone-sensitive LNCaP cells, hormone-insensitive 22Rv1 cells, and CRPC patient-derived primary cells. We analyzed anti-cancer effect of NaAsO 2 using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence staining and CellTiter Glo® luminescent assay. Statistical evaluation of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA. NaAsO 2 significantly reduced the translocation of AR and AR-Vs to the nucleus as well as their level in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells. Besides, the level of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), downstream target gene of AR, was also decreased. This compound was also an effective modulator of AKT-dependent NF-κB activation which regulates AR. NaAsO 2 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. We then investigated the effect of NaAsO 2 on AR stabilization. NaAsO 2 promoted HSP90 acetylation by down-regulating HDAC6, which reduces the stability of AR in prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that NaAsO 2 disrupts AR signaling at multiple levels by affecting AR expression, stability, and degradation in primary tumor cell cultures from prostate cancer patients as well as CRPC cell lines. These results suggest that NaAsO 2 could be a novel therapeutics for prostate

  2. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    amplification and chromosomal anomalies in metastatic prostatic carcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cancer Res 57, 524-31 (1997). 2. Qian, J...Jenkins, R.B. & Bostwick, D.G. Detection of chromosomal anomalies and c- myc gene amplification in the cribriform pattern of prostatic intraepithelial... chromosome 8 in high-grade, advanced, nonmetastatic prostate carcinoma. J Natl Cancer Inst 91, 1574-80 (1999). 4. Gurel, B. et al. Nuclear MYC protein

  3. Efficacy of Abiraterone and Enzalutamide in Pre- and Postdocetaxel Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Trial-Level Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the comparative efficacies of first-line abiraterone and enzalutamide in pre- and postdocetaxel settings in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC through a trial level meta-analysis. A mixed method approach was applied to 19 unique studies containing 17 median overall survival (OS estimates and 13 median radiographic progression-free survival (PFS estimates. We employed a random-effects meta-analysis to compare efficacies of abiraterone and enzalutamide with respect to OS and PFS. In the predocetaxel setting, enzalutamide use was associated with an increase in median OS of 5.9 months (p<0.001, hazard ratio (HR = 0.81, and an increase in median PFS of 8.3 months (p<0.001, HR = 0.47 compared to abiraterone. The advantage of enzalutamide improved after adjusting for baseline Gleason score to 19.5 months (p<0.001 and 14.6 months (p<0.001 in median OS and PFS, respectively. In the postdocetaxel setting, the advantage of enzalutamide use was nominally significant for median PFS (1.2 months p=0.02 without adjustment and 2.2 months and p=0.0007 after adjustment; there was no significant difference in median OS between the two agents. The results from this comprehensive meta-analysis suggest a survival advantage with the use of first-line enzalutamide over abiraterone in CRPC and highlight the need for prospective clinical trials.

  4. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  5. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Preexisting Lurker Cells That Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    prostate tumors. CD74 staining in a tissue microarray containing both local prostate tumors and lymph node metastases is shown. Examples of CD74...De Marzo et al., 1999, 2003). PIA cells are thought to exhibit an intermediate state of differentia- tion between basal and luminal cells and are...both basal and luminal cells are sufficient to initiate prostate cancer following Pten deletion, with differences in tumor outcome de- pending on the

  6. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachien Jake; Ying, James; Kapur, Payal; Wohlfeld, Bryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Kim, Dong W Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients.

  7. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  8. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  9. Multicenter phase II trial of the heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504), in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D; Stadler, Walter M; Srinivas, Sandy; Chu, Franklin; Bubley, Glenn; Goddard, J; Dunbar, Joi; Ross, Robert W

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate clinical activity and safety of retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504) in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). A single-arm trial was conducted in 2 cohorts: group 1, chemotherapy naive; group 2, docetaxel-treated. IPI-504 was administered intravenously at 400 mg/m2 on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of a 21-day cycle. Trial expansion was planned if ≥1 prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or radiographic response was noted per cohort. Pharmacokinetic samples were collected after the first dose; safety was assessed throughout. A total of 19 patients were enrolled (4 in group 1; 15 in group 2), with a median age of 66 years (range 49-78). Group 2 had received a median of 2 previous chemotherapy regimens. All group 2 patients had bone metastases; 66% had measurable soft tissue or visceral metastases. One group 1 patient remained on-trial for 9 cycles; his PSA level declined 48% from baseline. No PSA response was observed in the other patients. Adverse events reported in >25% of the study population included nausea (47%), diarrhea (42%), fatigue (32%), anorexia (26%), and arthralgia (26%). Two patients in group 2 died on-trial, involving study drug-related events of hepatic failure and ketoacidosis, respectively. Heat shock protein 90 inhibition with IPI-504 administered as a single agent had a minimal effect on the PSA level or tumor burden and was associated with unacceptable toxicity in several patients. Therefore, additional evaluation in CRPC patients is not warranted. IPI-504 is being investigated at less-intensive doses and schedules in other tumor types. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography of LAPC4-CR Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model in Soft Tissue Compartments1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Keisha C.; Cheng, Su-Chun; Huang, Ying; Kohl, Nancy E.; Tupper, Tanya; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Sweeney, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical xenograft models have contributed to advancing our understanding of the molecular basis of prostate cancer and to the development of targeted therapy. However, traditional preclinical in vivo techniques using caliper measurements and survival analysis evaluate the macroscopic tumor behavior, whereas tissue sampling disrupts the microenvironment and cannot be used for longitudinal studies in the same animal. Herein, we present an in vivo study of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) designed to evaluate the metabolism within the microenvironment of LAPC4-CR, a unique murine model of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Mice bearing LAPC4-CR subcutaneous tumors were administered [18F]-FDG via intravenous injection. After a 60-minute distribution phase, the mice were imaged on a PET/CT scanner with submillimeter resolution; and the fused PET/CT images were analyzed to evaluate tumor size, location, and metabolism across the cohort of mice. The xenograft tumors showed [18F]-FDG uptake that was independent of tumor size and was significantly greater than uptake in skeletal muscle and liver in mice (Wilcoxon signed-rank P values of .0002 and .0002, respectively). [18F]-FDG metabolism of the LAPC4-CR tumors was 2.1 ± 0.8 ID/cm3*wt, with tumor to muscle ratio of 7.4 ± 4.7 and tumor to liver background ratio of 6.7 ± 2.3. Noninvasive molecular imaging techniques such as PET/CT can be used to probe the microenvironment of tumors in vivo. This study showed that [18F]-FDG-PET/CT could be used to image and assess glucose metabolism of LAPC4-CR xenografts in vivo. Further work can investigate the use of PET/CT to quantify the metabolic response of LAPC4-CR to novel agents and combination therapies using soft tissue and possibly bone compartment xenograft models. PMID:26055171

  11. Phase I Clinical Trial of the CYP17 Inhibitor Abiraterone Acetate Demonstrating Clinical Activity in Patients With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Who Received Prior Ketoconazole Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Charles J.; Smith, Matthew R.; Fong, Lawrence; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Kantoff, Philip; Raynaud, Florence; Martins, Vanessa; Lee, Gloria; Kheoh, Thian; Kim, Jennifer; Molina, Arturo; Small, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Abiraterone acetate is a prodrug of abiraterone, a selective inhibitor of CYP17, the enzyme catalyst for two essential steps in androgen biosynthesis. In castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs), extragonadal androgen sources may sustain tumor growth despite a castrate environment. This phase I dose-escalation study of abiraterone acetate evaluated safety, pharmacokinetics, and effects on steroidogenesis and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men with CPRC with or without prior ketoconazole therapy. Patients and Methods Thirty-three men with chemotherapy-naïve progressive CRPC were enrolled. Nineteen patients (58%) had previously received ketoconazole for CRPC. Bone metastases were present in 70% of patients, and visceral involvement was present in 18%. Three patients (9%) had locally advanced disease without distant metastases. Fasted or fed cohorts received abiraterone acetate doses of 250, 500, 750, or 1,000 mg daily. Single-dose pharmacokinetic analyses were performed before continuous daily dosing. Results Adverse events were predominantly grade 1 or 2. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Hypertension (grade 3, 12%) and hypokalemia (grade 3, 6%; grade 4, 3%) were the most frequent serious toxicities and responded to medical management. Confirmed ≥ 50% PSA declines at week 12 were seen in 18 (55%) of 33 patients, including nine (47%) of 19 patients with prior ketoconazole therapy and nine (64%) of 14 patients without prior ketoconazole therapy. Substantial declines in circulating androgens and increases in mineralocorticoids were seen with all doses. Conclusion Abiraterone acetate was well tolerated and demonstrated activity in CRPC, including in patients previously treated with ketoconazole. Continued clinical study is warranted. PMID:20159824

  12. Radium-223 therapy of advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Marie Øbro; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    ) can serve as a prognostic biomarker of overall survival (OS) and hematological toxicity, as well as a tool for response assessment in patients with mCRPC treated with223RaCl2Methods:Retrospective study of the Danish cohort of mCRPC patients who received223RaCl2therapy between March 2014 and October...... ratio 2.65 [95% CI: 1.5-4.71];P= 0.001). Likewise, baseline BSI was prognostic for occurrence of hematological toxicity and patients with BSI > 5 had an odds ratio of 3.02 (95% CI: 1.2-7.8;P= 0.02) for toxicity. BSI declined during therapy in 44% of patients who completed three cycles of223RaCl2(n= 52......) and in 84% of patients after EOT (n= 32). There was no significant association between change in BSI during therapy and OS.Conclusion:BSI is a promising biomarker for late-stage mCRPC patients receiving223RaCl2for prognostication of OS and hematological toxicity. Further prospective studies are needed...

  13. Glyphosate Vedotin for Treatment of Bone Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    physical therapy , or surgical intervention. However, surgery is generally recommended for all symptomatic patients younger than 60 with a full...Park MK, Moon Y, Kim WU, et al. IL-17 induces production of IL-6 and IL-8 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts via NF-kappaB- and PI3-kinase...Hwang SY, Kim JY, Kim KW, Park MK, Moon Y, Kim WU, Kim HY. IL-17 induces production of IL-6 and IL-8 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts via

  14. Docetaxel in very elderly men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Li Wong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Very elderly patients (80 + years with mCRPC are infrequently included in clinical trials, yet the use of chemotherapy in this population is likely to increase. Our series demonstrates significant response rates to docetaxel chemotherapy, but that a substantial number of patients had treatment-related complications. This highlights the need for careful patient selection and optimization of chemotherapy dosing.

  15. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    -specific antigen (PSA) response, clinical and radiological progression, and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 73 consecutive patients with mCRPC undergoing treatment with AA between November 2012 and October 2014 were included. Median follow-up was 9.9 (0.9-23.4) months. PSA decline>50% was found in 39...... trial. Except for PSA response (>50% decline) in patients managed with AA, postchemotherapy results were inferior to phase III studies. This is most likely because of patient selection, which is a typical weakness when transferring results from phase III trials into clinical practice....

  16. Detection and quantification of223Ra uptake in bone metastases of patients with castration resistant prostate carcinoma, with the aim of determining the absorbed dose in the metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez, P; Gómez de Iturriaga, A; Fernández, I L; Rodeño, E

    To obtain the necessary acquisition and calibration parameters in order to evaluate the possibility of detecting and quantifying 223 Ra uptake in bone metastases of patients treated for castration resistant prostate carcinoma. Furthermore, in the cases in which the activity can be quantified, to determine the absorbed dose. Acquisitions from a Petri dish filled with 223 Ra were performed in the gamma camera. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to study the partial volume effect. Formulae to obtain the detection and quantification limits of 223 Ra uptake were applied to planar images of two patients 7 days post-administration of 55kBq/kg of 223 Ra. In order to locate the lesions in advance, whole-body scans and SPECT/CT images were acquired after injecting 99m Tc-HDP. The optimal energy window was found to be at 82keV with a medium-energy collimator MEGP. Of the lesions found in the patients, only those that had been detected in both the AP and PA projections could be quantified. These lesions were those which had shown a higher 99m Tc-HDP uptake. The estimated values of absorbed doses ranged between 0.7Gy and 7.8Gy. Of the lesions that can be detected, it is not possible to quantify the activity uptake in some of them, which means that the absorbed dose cannot be determined either. This does not mean that the absorbed dose in these lesions can be regarded as negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytotoxic effects of escin on human castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Songzhe; Kang, Minyong; Lee, Young Ju; Choi, Woo Suk; Chun, Yang-Sook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro and in vivo effects of escin on human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells, PC-3 and DU-145. The inhibition of cell proliferation and its mechanism were assessed through a cytotoxicity assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. The in vivo efficacy of escin in CRPC cells was assessed using a xenograft tumor model subcutaneously established in BALB/c nude mice. The treatment with escin significantly reduced cell viability of CRPC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Escin induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, which was accompanied by increases in pro-apoptotic (BCL-2 associated X protein, cleaved-caspase3, and cleaved-poly [adenosine diphosphate-ribose] polymerase) proteins and decreases in antiapoptotic (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2, and B-cell lymphoma-extra large) proteins. Escin induced G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and thus led to a significant decrease in the expression of cyclinB1 and its activating partner cyclin-dependent kinase 1, with the concomitant induction of p21. In addition, escin significantly inhibited the growth of CRPC cells in xenograft models. The results show that escin induced cytotoxic effects on CRPC cells through the induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, indicating it may be a novel therapeutic agent for CRPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel-Nitz, Nicole M; Alemayehu, Berhanu; Parry, David; Nathan, Faith

    2011-01-01

    Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined. Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin’s regression. The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001) and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001) or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004) compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001), chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001), and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001) over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001). At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists. CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher health care costs, than patients treated by urologists

  19. Small Molecule Antagonists of the Nuclear Androgen Receptor for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James K; Skoda, Erin M; Zhou, Jianhua; Parrinello, Erica; Wang, Dan; O'Malley, Katherine; Eyer, Benjamin R; Kazancioglu, Mustafa; Eisermann, Kurtis; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou; Wipf, Peter

    2016-08-11

    After a high-throughput screening campaign identified thioether 1 as an antagonist of the nuclear androgen receptor, a zone model was developed for structure-activity relationship (SAR) purposes and analogues were synthesized and evaluated in a cell-based luciferase assay. A novel thioether isostere, cyclopropane (1S,2R)-27, showed the desired increased potency and structural properties (stereospecific SAR response, absence of a readily oxidized sulfur atom, low molecular weight, reduced number of flexible bonds and polar surface area, and drug-likeness score) in the prostate-specific antigen luciferase assay in C4-2-PSA-rl cells to qualify as a new lead structure for prostate cancer drug development.

  20. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    models with impaired function of PSA enhancer RNA (eRNA). Hauptman Woodward Institute Site (Gewirth, PI ): Nothing to Report Vancouver Prostate Centre...Activities for University of Minnesota Site (Dehm, PI ) In the first reporting period, the major activities consisted of a) Testing the effects of...derivative VPC14449 on AR chromatin binding using chromatin fractionation techniques. Major Activities for Hauptman Woodward Institute Site (Gewirth, PI ) In

  1. [(18)F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography of LAPC4-CR Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model in Soft Tissue Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Keisha C; Cheng, Su-Chun; Huang, Ying; Kohl, Nancy E; Tupper, Tanya; Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Zukotynski, Katherine A; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical xenograft models have contributed to advancing our understanding of the molecular basis of prostate cancer and to the development of targeted therapy. However, traditional preclinical in vivo techniques using caliper measurements and survival analysis evaluate the macroscopic tumor behavior, whereas tissue sampling disrupts the microenvironment and cannot be used for longitudinal studies in the same animal. Herein, we present an in vivo study of [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) designed to evaluate the metabolism within the microenvironment of LAPC4-CR, a unique murine model of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Mice bearing LAPC4-CR subcutaneous tumors were administered [(18)F]-FDG via intravenous injection. After a 60-minute distribution phase, the mice were imaged on a PET/CT scanner with submillimeter resolution; and the fused PET/CT images were analyzed to evaluate tumor size, location, and metabolism across the cohort of mice. The xenograft tumors showed [(18)F]-FDG uptake that was independent of tumor size and was significantly greater than uptake in skeletal muscle and liver in mice (Wilcoxon signed-rank P values of .0002 and .0002, respectively). [(18)F]-FDG metabolism of the LAPC4-CR tumors was 2.1 ± 0.8 ID/cm(3)*wt, with tumor to muscle ratio of 7.4 ± 4.7 and tumor to liver background ratio of 6.7 ± 2.3. Noninvasive molecular imaging techniques such as PET/CT can be used to probe the microenvironment of tumors in vivo. This study showed that [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT could be used to image and assess glucose metabolism of LAPC4-CR xenografts in vivo. Further work can investigate the use of PET/CT to quantify the metabolic response of LAPC4-CR to novel agents and combination therapies using soft tissue and possibly bone compartment xenograft models. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lactate dehydrogenase predicts combined progression-free survival after sequential therapy with abiraterone and enzalutamide for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Keiichiro; Kimura, Takahiro; Onuma, Hajime; Kimura, Shoji; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Miki, Kenta; Egawa, Shin

    2017-07-01

    An array of clinical issues remains to be resolved for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including the sequence of drug use and drug cross-resistance. At present, no clear guidelines are available for the optimal sequence of use of novel agents like androgen-receptor axis-targeted (ARAT) agents, particularly enzalutamide, and abiraterone. This study retrospectively analyzed a total of 69 patients with CRPC treated with sequential therapy using enzalutamide followed by abiraterone or vice versa. The primary outcome measure was the comparative combined progression-free survival (PFS) comprising symptomatic and/or radiographic PFS. Patients were also compared for total prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-PFS, overall survival (OS), and PSA response. The predictors of combined PFS and OS were analyzed with a backward-stepwise multivariate Cox model. Of the 69 patients, 46 received enzalutamide first, followed by abiraterone (E-A group), and 23 received abiraterone, followed by enzalutamide (A-E group). The two groups were not significantly different with regard to basic data, except for hemoglobin values. In a comparison with the E-A group, the A-E group was shown to be associated with better combined PFS in Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.043). Similar results were obtained for total PSA-PFS (P = 0.049), while OS did not differ between groups (P = 0.62). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that pretreatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) values and age were significant predictors of longer combined PFS (P < 0.05). Likewise, multivariate analysis demonstrated that pretreatment hemoglobin values and performance status were significant predictors of longer OS (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggested the A-E sequence had longer combined PSA and total PSA-PFS compared to the E-A sequence in patients with CRPC. LDH values in sequential therapy may serve as a predictor of longer combined PFS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The {sup 68}Ga/{sup 177}Lu theragnostic concept in PSMA targeting of castration-resistant prostate cancer: correlation of SUV{sub max} values and absorbed dose estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpa, Lorenza; Buxbaum, Sabine; Kendler, Dorota; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fink, Katharina [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiotherapy / Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria); Gruber, Leonhard [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiotherapy / Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    A targeted theragnostic approach based on increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) on PC cells is an attractive treatment option for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Ten consecutive mCRPC patients were selected for {sup 177}Lu-PSMA617 therapy on the basis of PSMA-targeted {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT diagnosis showing extensive and progressive tumour load. Following dosimetry along with the first therapy cycle restaging ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC and {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT) was performed after 2 and 3 therapy cycles (each 6.1 ± 0.3 GBq, range 5.4-6.5 GBq) given intravenously over 30 minutes, 9 ± 1 weeks apart. PET/CT scans were compared to {sup 177}Lu-PSMA617 24-hour whole-body scans and contrast-enhanced dual-phase CT. Detailed comparison of SUVmax values and absorbed tumour doses was performed. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA617 dosimetry indicated high tumour doses for skeletal (3.4 ± 1.9 Gy/GBq; range 1.1-7.2 Gy/GBq), lymph node (2.6 ± 0.4 Gy/GBq; range 2.3-2.9 Gy/GBq) as well as liver (2.4 ± 0.8 Gy/GBq; range 1.7-3.3 Gy/GBq) metastases whereas the dose for tissues/organs was acceptable in all patients for an intention-to-treat activity of 18 ± 0.3 GBq. Three patients showed partial remission, three mixed response, one stable and three progressive disease. Decreased {sup 177}Lu-PSMA617 and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC uptake (mean SUVmax values 20.2 before and 15.0 after 2 cycles and 11.5 after 3 cycles, p < 0.05) was found in 41/54 skeletal lesions, 12/13 lymph node metastases, 3/5 visceral metastases and 4/4 primary PC lesions. Due to substantial individual variance, dosimetry is mandatory for a patient-specific approach following {sup 177}Lu-PSMA617 therapy. Higher activities and/or shorter treatment intervals should be applied in a larger prospective study. (orig.)

  4. ErbB-2 signaling plays a critical role in regulating androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Chen, Siu-Ju; Lin, Fen-Fen; Wang, Zhengzhong; Mehta, Parmender P; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-11-01

    While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduces tumor burden, autocrine growth factor loops such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/ErbB-2/neu) have been proposed to contribute to prostate cancer (PCa) survival and relapse. However, the role of ErbB-2 in regulating androgen-sensitive (AS) and castration-resistant (CR) cell proliferation remains unclear. Here, we determined the role of ErbB-2 in PCa progression and survival under steroid-reduced conditions using two independent PCa cell progression models. In AR-positive androgen-independent (AI) PCa cells that exhibit the CR phenotype, ErbB-2 was constitutively activated, compared to corresponding AS PCa cells. In AS LNCaP C-33 cells, androgen-induced ErbB-2 activation through ERK1/2 mediates PCa cell proliferation. Further, the ErbB-2-specific but not EGFR-specific inhibitor suppresses basal and androgen-stimulated cell proliferation and also blocks ERK1/2 activation. ErbB-2 ectopic expression and cPAcP siRNA transfection of LNCaP C-33 cells each increases ErbB-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, correlating with increased AI PSA secretion and cell proliferation. Conversely, trapping ErbB-2 by transfected endoplasmic reticulum-targeting ScFv5R expression vector abolished DHT-induced LNCaP C-33 cell growth. Moreover, inhibition of ErbB-2 but not EGFR in AI LNCaP C-81 and MDA PCa2b-AI PCa cells significantly abolished AI cell growth. In contrast to androgens via ErbB-2/ERK1/2 signaling in AS PCa cells, the inhibition of ErbB-2 abrogated AI cell proliferation by inhibiting the cell survival protein Akt in those AI cells. These results suggest that ErbB-2 is a prominent player in mediating the ligand-dependent and -independent activation of AR in AS and AI/CR PCa cells respectively for PCa progression and survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Uptake of Radium-223 Dichloride and Early [18F]NaF PET Response Are Driven by Baseline [18F]NaF Parameters: a Pilot Study in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Arthur; Johnson, Alison C; Kit, Nicolas How; Savigny, Jean-François; Batalla, Alain; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Aide, Nicolas

    2017-10-12

    The purpose of this study is to identify predictive factors on baseline [ 18 F]NaF positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of early response to radium-223 dichloride after 3 cycles of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Analysis of 152 metastases was performed in six consecutive patients who underwent [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT at baseline and for early monitoring after 3 cycles of radium-223 dichloride. All metastases depicted on whole-body [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT were contoured and CT (density in Hounsfield units, sclerotic, mixed, or lytic appearance) as well as [ 18 F]NaF [maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), SUV mean , and lesion volume (V 18F-NaF )] patterns were recorded. Tumor response was defined as percentage change in SUV max and SUV mean between baseline and post-treatment PET. Bone lesions were defined as stable, responsive, or progressive, according to thresholds derived from a recent multicentre test-retest study in [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT. Total [ 18 F]NaF uptake in metastases, defined as MATV × SUV mean , was correlated to uptake of radium-223 on biodistribution scintigraphy performed 7 days after the first cycle of treatment. Among metastases, 116 involved the axial skeleton and 36 the appendicular skeleton. Lesions were sclerotic in 126 cases and mixed in 26 cases. No lytic lesion was depicted. ROC analysis showed that SUV max and SUV mean were better predictors of lesion response than V 18F-NaF and density on CT (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). SUV max and SUV mean were predictors of individual tumor response in separate multivariate models (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). CT pattern (mixed versus sclerotic) and lesion density were independent predictors only when assessing response with delta SUV max (P = 0.002 and 0.007, respectively). A good correlation between total [ 18 F]NaF uptake within metastases and their relative radium-223 uptake assessed by two observers 7

  6. Treatment of Bone Metastases with Radium-223 in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC): Alternative or Complementary to Innovative Molecular Therapies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal metastatic disease is a real clinical problem. Approximately 70% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will develop skeletal metastases, which cause considerable morbidity. Several options are available for treatment, to be used either alone or in various combinations: hormones in case of hormone-sensitive tumours, chemotherapy, biphosphonates, external beam radiation therapy, surgery (in pathologic or impending fracture), bone-seeking radiopharmceuticals, and also molecular therapies. Focusing our attention to patients with prostate cancer, 50% of patients with bone metastases develop skeletal related events (SREs) such as: severe pain, pathologic fractures, spinal compression syndrome, malignant hypercalcemia, bone marrow suppression. All these SREs require adequate therapy since generally determine several functional impairments and worsen the prognosis. It is well known that skeletal complications reduce the quality of life affecting different aspects, physical, functional end emotional. SREs are associated also with lower survival

  7. Overcoming docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer: a perspective review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer has been historically challenging, with few therapeutic successes. Docetaxel was the first cytotoxic therapy associated with a survival benefit in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Toxicity is typical of other cytotoxic agents, with myelosuppression being the dose-limiting toxicity and neurotoxicity also a notable side effect for some patients. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer will not respond to docetaxel-based therapy and all patients will ultimately develop resistance. Because it is an effective therapy, docetaxel is likely to remain an important part of the treatment arsenal against metastatic prostate cancer for the foreseeable future, despite its toxicities and limitations. Overcoming docetaxel resistance has been a challenge since docetaxel was first established as front-line therapy for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Recent studies have shown that several new drugs, including cabazitaxel and abiraterone, are effective after docetaxel failure, dramatically changing the therapeutic landscape for these patients. In addition, a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance has led to several new treatment approaches which hold promise for the future. This review will discuss recent therapeutic advances in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer as well as ongoing clinical trials. PMID:23118808

  8. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Function and Level in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells by 2-[(isoxazol-4-ylmethyl)thio]-1-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)ethanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Eisermann, Kurtis; Yang, Zhenyu; Dar, Javid A; Pascal, Laura E; Nguyen, Minh; O'Malley, Katherine; Parrinello, Erica; Feturi, Firuz G; Kenefake, Alex N; Nelson, Joel B; Johnston, Paul A; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) as well as in the resistance to the second-generation AR antagonist enzalutamide and the selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) abiraterone. Novel agents targeting AR may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells resistant to enzalutamide and/or abiraterone. Through a high-throughput/high-content screening of a 220,000-member small molecule library, we have previously identified 2-[(isoxazol-4-ylmethyl)thio]-1-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)ethanone (IMTPPE) (SID 3712502) as a novel small molecule capable of inhibiting AR transcriptional activity and protein level in C4-2 prostate cancer cells. In this study, we show that IMTPPE inhibits AR-target gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase assays. IMTPPE inhibited proliferation of AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells in culture. IMTPPE inhibited the transcriptional activity of a mutant AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD), indicating that IMTPPE inhibition of AR is independent of the LBD. Furthermore, animal studies showed that IMTPPE inhibited the growth of 22Rv1 xenograft tumor, a model for enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer. These findings suggest that IMTPPE is a potential lead compound for developing clinical candidates for the treatment of CRPC, including those resistant to enzalutamide. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  9. Beyond the androgen receptor II: New approaches to understanding and treating metastatic prostate cancer; Report from the 2017 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Cheng, Heather H; Abida, Wassim; Ellis, Leigh; Harshman, Lauren C; Spratt, Daniel E; Simons, Jonathan W; Pienta, Kenneth J; Soule, Howard R

    2017-11-01

    The 2017 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy (CHPCA) Meeting, "Beyond the Androgen Receptor II: New Approaches to Understanding and Treating Metastatic Prostate Cancer," was held in Carlsbad, California from June 14-17, 2017. The CHPCA is an annual scientific conference hosted by the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) that is uniquely designed to produce extensive and constructive discussions on the most urgent and impactful topics concerning research into the biology and treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The 2017 CHPCA Meeting was the 5th meeting in this annual series and was attended by 71 investigators focused on prostate cancer and a variety of other fields including breast and ovarian cancer. The discussions at the meeting were concentrated on topics areas including: mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for molecular subclasses of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the epigenetic landscape of prostate cancer, the role of DNA repair gene mutations, advancing the use of germline genetics in clinical practice, radionuclides for imaging and therapy, advances in molecular imaging, and therapeutic strategies for successful use of immunotherapy in advanced prostate cancer. This article reviews the presentations and discussions from the 2017 CHPCA Meeting in order to disseminate this knowledge and accelerate new biological understandings and advances in the treatment of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Locoregional symptoms in patients with de novo metastatic prostate cancer: Morbidity, management, and disease outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikidou, Anna; Brureau, Laurent; Casenave, Julien; Albiges, Laurence; Di Palma, Mario; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Baumert, Hervé; Blanchard, Pierre; Bossi, Alberto; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Massard, Christophe; Fizazi, Karim; Blanchet, Pascal; Loriot, Yohann

    2015-05-01

    The paradigm change observed over the last few years in several solid tumors emphasizes the value of locoregional treatment in the presence of metastatic disease, currently ignored in de novo prostate cancer (CaP). We investigated the effect of the primary tumor that is left untreated on prostate cancer-specific morbidity and mortality, time to castration resistance, and overall survival (OS). We performed a bicentric cohort study. The overall population included de novo metastatic CaP managed at the Genito-Urinary Oncology Unit of the Gustave Roussy Institute and the Urology Clinic of the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre, France. Descriptive statistical and outcome analyses were performed in the overall cohort and also separately in the N+M0 and M+subgroups. The overall cohort included 263 patients. Approximately two-thirds of patients (64%) presented with locoregional symptoms at diagnosis, and 78% throughout the disease. Of the symptomatic patients, 59% required a locoregional procedure. Median OS of patients with locoregional symptoms at diagnosis was shorter than in those who were asymptomatic (47 vs. 86 mo, P = 0.0007); this difference was maintained in the N+M0 and M+subgroups. Median OS and time to castration resistance showed a nonsignificant trend in favor of patients undergoing a locoregional treatment at diagnosis. The presence of symptoms due to locoregional disease in de novo metastatic CaP entails significant morbidity and even mortality and requires active management. Randomized prospective trials are needed to evaluate the role of initial definite locoregional treatment in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Melatonin Inhibits Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-7 (AR-V7)-Induced Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB) Activation and NF-κB Activator-Induced AR-V7 Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells: Potential Implications for the Use of Melatonin in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent Wing Sun; Yau, Wing Lung; Tam, Chun Wai; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Shiu, Stephen Yuen Wing

    2017-05-31

    A major current challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, which can be initially controlled by medical or surgical castration, is the development of effective, safe, and affordable therapies against progression of the disease to the stage of castration resistance. Here, we showed that in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells transiently overexpressing androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was activated and could result in up-regulated interleukin ( IL ) -6 gene expression, indicating a positive interaction between AR-V7 expression and activated NF-κB/IL-6 signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) pathogenesis. Importantly, both AR-V7-induced NF-κB activation and IL-6 gene transcription in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells could be inhibited by melatonin. Furthermore, stimulation of AR-V7 mRNA expression in LNCaP cells by betulinic acid, a pharmacological NF-κB activator, was reduced by melatonin treatment. Our data support the presence of bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 expression and NF-κB activation in CRPC pathogenesis. Of note, melatonin, by inhibiting NF-κB activation via the previously-reported MT₁ receptor-mediated antiproliferative pathway, can disrupt these bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 and NF-κB and thereby delay the development of castration resistance in advanced prostate cancer. Apparently, this therapeutic potential of melatonin in advanced prostate cancer/CRPC management is worth translation in the clinic via combined androgen depletion and melatonin repletion.

  12. Annotating MYC Status in Treatment-Resistant Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer With Gallium-68 Citrate PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    washed and incubated with 10 µCi 125I-Tf for 30 min at 37o C. After washing twice with PBS, the cell associated 6 Author Manuscript Published...cells (4 x 105) were incubated with vehicle, (+)-JQ-1 (1 µM) and IBET- 151 (1 µM) at 37 degrees Celsius for 48 hours. Cells were lysed, and the mRNA...American Association for Cancer Research. Manufacturer-provided ordered subsets expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithm was used for

  13. Does the Androgen Receptor (AR)-Regulated Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) Enhance Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Survival under Therapeutic Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    in breast cancer models, and is inversely associated with apoptosis in preclinical prostate cancer models. Androgen and glucocorticoid signaling can... effects of both hormonal and chemotherapies. To date, significant progress has been made including optimization of MKP-1 protein detection...with apoptosis in preclinical prostate cancer models. Androgen and glucocorticoid signaling can induce MKP-1 expression; as mCRPC remains driven by

  14. A phase I study of personalized peptide vaccination using 14 kinds of vaccine in combination with low-dose estramustine in HLA-A24-positive patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and antitumor activity of a combination of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) and estramustine phosphate (EMP) in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In a phase I dose-escalation study, four peptides showing the highest levels of peptide-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) to 14 vaccine candidates (ITK-1) were subcutaneously injected every week in three different dose settings (1, 3, and 5 mg per peptide) for 6 weeks with a low dose of EMP, and the patients were followed by maximum 2 years extension study either weekly or bi-weekly six times PPV as one course with a low dose of EMP. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the phase I study. No serious treatment-related adverse events were observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 skin reactions at the injection sites. The maximum acceptable dose of ITK-1 was 8.643 mg. There were no treatment-related systemic adverse events of grade 3 or more, and maximum tolerated dose could not be determined. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses measured by interferon-γ release assay were boosted in 10 of 15 (67%) patients, and IgG responses were boosted in 7 of 15 (47%) patients. Twelve patients proceeded to the extension study, and the median survival time was 23.8 months during a median follow-up of 23.8 months. PPV treatment for HLA-A24 positive patients with CRPC could be recommended for further stages of clinical trials because of its safety and the higher frequency of boosting immune responses. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by Prostate Cancer Cells Cause Castrate-Resistant Cell Growth by Inducing B-cell Lymphotoxin Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    produced by NADPH oxidase , xanthine oxidase , and mitochondrial electron transport system mediate heat shock-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression. Free...FADH2-bound enzyme acetyl polyamine oxidase (APAO). APAO generates H2O2 during FADH2 ↔ FAD interconversion and releases bound FAD [9]. We have silenced...small molecule polyamine oxidase inhibitor blocks androgen-induced oxidative stress and delays prostate cancer progression in the transgenic

  16. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Pinilla, Mabel G. [Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C. [Department of Physiopathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); McNerney, Eileen M. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Onate, Sergio A., E-mail: sergio.onate@udec.cl [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Urology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  17. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A.; Pinilla, Mabel G.; Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Onate, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  18. A rare presentation of prostate adenocarcinoma metastatic to the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata S Prathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors of the orofacial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues and jaw bones. The occurrence of prostate as the primary site for jaw metastasis is extremely rare. Mandible and palate are the common prostate metastatic sites. Here, we present a rare case of prostate adenocarcinoma metastatic to maxilla.

  19. Perspectives on sipuleucel-T: Its role in the prostate cancer treatment paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulley, J.L.; Mulders, P.F.; Albers, P.; Banchereau, J.; Bolla, M.; Pantel, K.; Powles, T.

    2016-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved in the US for patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This significant advance for mCRPC treatment provides healthcare professionals with another effective therapy to

  20. Multiple urinary bladder masses from metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Choo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma that manifested with multiple exophytic intravesical masses, mimicking a multifocal primary bladder tumor. Biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated palliatively with external beam radiotherapy to prevent possible symptoms from local tumor progression. This case illustrates that when a patient with known prostate cancer presents with multifocal bladder tumors, the possibility of metastatic prostate cancer should be considered.

  1. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Slovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit.

  2. LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1  AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0518 TITLE: LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer...COVERED 1 Sep 2011 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...prostate, immunotherapy may be the only way to treat it [6, 7]. A majority of clinical trials for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer have yielded

  3. Whole-Genome Sequence of the Metastatic PC3 and LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Nelson, Colleen C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2017-06-07

    The bone metastasis-derived PC3 and the lymph node metastasis-derived LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines are widely studied, having been described in thousands of publications over the last four decades. Here, we report short-read whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and de novo assembly of PC3 (ATCC CRL-1435) and LNCaP (clone FGC; ATCC CRL-1740) at ∼70 × coverage. A known homozygous mutation in TP53 and homozygous loss of PTEN were robustly identified in the PC3 cell line, whereas the LNCaP cell line exhibited a larger number of putative inactivating somatic point and indel mutations (and in particular a loss of stop codon events). This study also provides preliminary evidence that loss of one or both copies of the tumor suppressor Capicua ( CIC ) contributes to primary tumor relapse and metastatic progression, potentially offering a treatment target for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our work provides a resource for genetic, genomic, and biological studies employing two commonly-used prostate cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Seim et al.

  4. MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR METASTATIC PROSTATE ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of molecular markers of metastasing and prognosis in prostate cancer remains an urgent task. In this study, we investigated the relationship of gene expression heparanase-1 (HPSE1 and D-glucuronil C5-epimerase (GLCE with early disease relapse and metastasis of a 2,5−3 years after diagnosis. It was shown that the ratio of the expression levels of genes HPSE1/GLCE > 1 may serve as a prognostic relapse marker and trends of the tumour to metastasis. The data obtained suggest to use this option as a molecular marker for the diagnostics of metastatic process and the disease prognosis.

  5. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  6. Enzalutamide Improves Survival in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared enzalutamide (Xtandi®) and placebo for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer that had progressed during treatment with androgen deprivation therapy.

  7. Cytoreductive surgery for men with metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Katelaris

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This data supports recent findings demonstrating that radical prostatectomy for metastatic prostate cancer is feasible. Further studies are needed to explore the role of cytoreductive surgery with regards to the potential oncological benefit.

  8. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Ayguen, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Toklu, Turkay [Yeditepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of {sup 177}Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are

  9. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of (177)Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Aygün, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami; Ocak, Meltem; Demirci, Emre; Toklu, Turkay

    2015-12-01

    (177)Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of (177)Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected (177)Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are within acceptable ranges; however, there is a substantial individual variance so patient dosimetry seems to be mandatory.

  10. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib Plus Prednisone Versus Prednisone Alone in Progressive, Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    /d continuously or placebo. Patients also received oral prednisone 5 mg twice daily. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS). Two interim analyses were planned. RESULTS: Overall, 873 patients were randomly assigned to receive sunitinib (n.......762 to 1.097; stratified log-rank test, P = .168). PFS was significantly improved in the sunitinib arm (median 5.6 v 4.1 months; HR, 0.725; 95% CI, 0.591 to 0.890; stratified log-rank test, P

  11. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    alone (C-index 0.73), p = 0.041. Conclusions: The upgraded and analytically validated automated BSI was found to be a strong predictor of OS in mCRPC patients. Additionally, the change in automated BSI demonstrated an additive clinical value to the change in PSA in mCRPC patients being treated...

  12. Abiraterone Acetate for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Naive Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer : An Evidence Review Group Perspective of an NICE Single Technology Appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, Bram L. T.; Riemsma, Rob; Tomini, Florian; van Asselt, Thea; Deshpande, Sohan; Duffy, Steven; Armstrong, Nigel; Severens, Johan L.; Kleijnen, Jos; Joore, Manuela A.

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited Janssen, the company manufacturing abiraterone acetate (AA; tradename Zytiga(A (R))), to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of AA in combination with prednisone/prednisolone (AAP) compared with watchful waiting

  13. Association of Gleason Risk Groups with Metastatic Sites in Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostate cancer is the second most common non cutaneous male malignancy worldwide. Gleason composite score is used for risk classification. The most common site of metastasis in prostate cancer is the bone among others. The site and number of metastasis affect overall survival. The ability to predict the metastatic site ...

  14. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    metastasis and responses to curcumin 19 Goals: This proposal tests the hypothesis that chemokine biomarkers that predict biochemical recurrence of...prostate cancer regulate metastatic progression of the cancer and curcumin can inhibit metastasis of prostate cancer by antagonizing inflammatory signaling

  15. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0553 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin Gleave...Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin Gleave 5d...goal of this project was to develop a novel means to inhibit prostate cancer development and progression. The development of Siah1/2 inhibitors to the

  16. Whole body MRI (WB-MRI) assessment of metastatic spread in prostate cancer: Therapeutic perspectives on targeted management of oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Ahmed; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Pasoglou, Vasiliki; Padhani, Anwar; Michoux, Nicolas; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Tombal, Bertrand; Lecouvet, Frédéric E

    2016-08-01

    To determine the proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients with oligometastatic disease (≤3 synchronous lesions) using whole body magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-MRI/DWI). To determine the proportion of patients with nodal disease confined within currently accepted target areas for extended lymph node dissection (eLND) and pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Two radiologists reviewed WB-MRI/DWI studies in 96 consecutive newly diagnosed metastatic PCa patients; 46 patients with newly diagnosed castration naive PCa (mHNPC) and 50 patients with first appearance of metastasis during monitoring for non-metastatic castration resistant PCa (M0 to mCRPC). The distribution of metastatic deposits was assessed and the proportions of patients with oligometastatic disease and with LN metastases located within eLND and EBRT targets were determined. Twenty-eight percent of mHNPC and 50% of mCPRC entered the metastatic disease with ≤3 sites. Bone metastases (BM) were identified in 68.8% patients; 71.7% of mHNPC and 66% mCRPC patients. Most commonly involved areas were iliac bones and lumbar spine. Enlarged lymph nodes (LN) were detected in 68.7% of patients; 69.6% of mHNPC and 68.0% of mCRPC. Most commonly involved areas were para-aortic, inter-aortico-cava, and external iliac areas. BM and LN were detected concomitantly in 41% of mHNPC and 34% of mCRPC. Visceral metastases were detected in 6.7%. Metastatic disease was confined to LN located within the accepted boundaries of eLND or pelvic EBRT target areas in only ≤25% and ≤30% of patients, respectively. Non-invasive mapping of metastatic landing sites in PCa using WB-MRI/DWI shows that 28% of the mHNPC patients, and 52% of the mCRPC can be classified as oligometastatic, thus challenging the concept of metastatic targeted therapy. More than two thirds of metastatic patients have LN located outside the usually recommended targets of eLND and pelvic EBRT. Prophylactic or salvage

  17. MO-AB-BRA-05: [18F]NaF PET/CT Imaging Biomarkers in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, S; Perk, T; Lin, C; Eickhoff, J; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Choyke, P; Dahut, W; Apolo, A [National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Humm, J; Larson, S; Morris, MJ [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical use of {sup 18}F-Sodium Fluoride (NaF) PET/CT in metastatic settings often lacks technology to quantitatively measure full disease dynamics due to high tumor burden. This study assesses radiomics-based extraction of NaF PET/CT measures, including global metrics of overall burden and local metrics of disease heterogeneity, in metastatic prostate cancer for correlation to clinical outcomes. Methods: Fifty-six metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) patients had NaF PET/CT scans performed at baseline and three cycles into chemotherapy (N=16) or androgen-receptor (AR) inhibitors (N=39). A novel technology, Quantitative Total Bone Imaging (QTBI), was used for analysis. Employing hybrid PET/CT segmentation and articulated skeletal-registration, QTBI allows for response assessment of individual lesions. Various SUV metrics were extracted from each lesion (iSUV). Global metrics were extracted from composite lesion-level statistics for each patient (pSUV). Proportion of detected lesions and those with significant response (%-increase or %-decrease) was calculated for each patient based on test-retest limits for iSUV metrics. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted between imaging metrics and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Functional burden (pSUV{sub total}) assessed mid-treatment was the strongest univariate predictor of PFS (HR=2.03; p<0.0001). Various global metrics outperformed baseline clinical markers, including fraction of skeletal burden, mean uptake (pSUV{sub mean}), and heterogeneity of average lesion uptake (pSUV{sub hetero}). Of 43 patients with paired baseline/mid-treatment imaging, 40 showed heterogeneity in lesion-level response, containing populations of lesions with both increasing/decreasing metrics. Proportion of lesions with significantly increasing iSUV{sub mean} was highly predictive of clinical PFS (HR=2.0; p=0.0002). Patients exhibiting higher proportion of lesions with decreasing i

  18. Immunotherapeutics for the treatment of prostate cancer: a patent landscape based on key therapeutic mechanisms of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elaine

    2018-01-01

    The area of immunotherapeutics for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer has made significant progress since the autologous cell-based vaccine sipuleucel T became the first and to date only immunotherapy for its treatment. This review focuses on a broad patent landscaping exercise of this therapeutic area and considers if basing this landscaping on key mechanisms of action is appropriate to elicit the main patenting trends.

  19. Repeated PSMA-targeting radioligand therapy of metastatic prostate cancer with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Zechmann, Christian; Mier, Walter; Spohn, Fabian; Debus, Nils; Kratochwil, Clemens [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Thomas [Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John [Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Citigroup Biomedical Imaging Center, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Meyer Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting radioligand therapy (RLT) was introduced in 2011. The first report described the antitumor and side effects of a single dose. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate toxicity and antitumor activity after single and repetitive therapies. Thirty-four men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received PSMA-RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Twenty-three patients received a second, and three patients a third dose, timed at PSA progression after an initial response to the preceding therapy. The applied doses were separated in three groups: <3.5, 3.5-5.0 and >5.0 GBq. Antitumor and side-effects were analyzed by blood samples and other clinical data. Follow-up was conducted for up to 5 years. The best therapeutic effect was achieved by the first therapy. A PSA decline of ≥50% was achieved in 70.6% of the patients. The second and third therapies were significantly less effective. There was neither an association between the applied activity and PSA response or the time-to-progression. Hematologic toxicities were less prevalent but presented in a higher percentage of patients with increasing number of therapies. After hematologic toxicities, xerostomia was the second most frequent side effect and presented more often and with higher intensity after the second or third therapy. The first dose of RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 presented with low side effects and could significantly reduce the tumor burden in a majority of patients. The second and third therapies were less effective and presented with more frequent and more intense side effects, especially hematologic toxicities and xerostomia. (orig.)

  20. Nonlinear joint models for individual dynamic prediction of risk of death using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo: application to metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Desmée

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint models of longitudinal and time-to-event data are increasingly used to perform individual dynamic prediction of a risk of event. However the difficulty to perform inference in nonlinear models and to calculate the distribution of individual parameters has long limited this approach to linear mixed-effect models for the longitudinal part. Here we use a Bayesian algorithm and a nonlinear joint model to calculate individual dynamic predictions. We apply this approach to predict the risk of death in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients with frequent Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA measurements. Methods A joint model is built using a large population of 400 mCRPC patients where PSA kinetics is described by a biexponential function and the hazard function is a PSA-dependent function. Using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm implemented in Stan software and the estimated population parameters in this population as priors, the a posteriori distribution of the hazard function is computed for a new patient knowing his PSA measurements until a given landmark time. Time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC and Brier score are derived to assess discrimination and calibration of the model predictions, first on 200 simulated patients and then on 196 real patients that are not included to build the model. Results Satisfying coverage probabilities of Monte Carlo prediction intervals are obtained for longitudinal and hazard functions. Individual dynamic predictions provide good predictive performances for landmark times larger than 12 months and horizon time of up to 18 months for both simulated and real data. Conclusions As nonlinear joint models can characterize the kinetics of biomarkers and their link with a time-to-event, this approach could be useful to improve patient’s follow-up and the early detection of most at risk patients.

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Micaela; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; D'Aniello, Carmine; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Vanacore, Daniela; Franco, Rossella Di; Mantia, Elvira La; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Muscariello, Raffaele; Berretta, Massimiliano; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Bianchi, Attilio Antonio Montano; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a main urological disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy are potentially curative for localized prostate cancer, while androgen deprivation therapy is the initial systemic therapy for metastatic prostate disease. However, despite temporary response, most patients relapse and evolve into castration resistant cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex gradual process that occurs during embryonic development and/or tumor progression. During this process, cells lose their epithelial characteristics and acquire mesenchymal features. Increasing evidences indicate that EMT promotes prostate cancer metastatic progression and it is closely correlated with increased stemness and drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the main molecular events that directly or indirectly govern the EMT program in prostate cancer, in order to better define the role and the mechanisms underlying this process in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. PMID:28430640

  2. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    mPCSCs)” PI : Dean Tang 1. INTRODUCTION: The main goal of this IDEA project is to help elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying...metastatic prostate cancer stem cells 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Dr. Tang, the PI of this grant, together with most lab members, moved from the M.D...repressing CD44. Nat Med 17, 211-215 (2011). 5. Qin, J. et al. The PSA -/lo prostate cancer cell population harbors self-renewing long-term tumor

  3. Continuous vs. intermittent androgen deprivation therapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhuijsen, J.F.; Badhauser, D.; Schaaf, B.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Mulders, P.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze the predictive value of PSA for progression and the role of testosterone for quality of life (QOL) in patients with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PSA and testosterone data were used from a phase III trial randomizing

  4. The potential of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 18}F-fluoride imaging to predict bone lesion response to treatment with {sup 223}Ra-dichloride in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Iain; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Denis-Bacelar, Ana M.; Flux, Glenn D. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Hindorf, Cecilia [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Parker, Christopher C. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Urology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Chua, Sue [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    The aims of this study were to calculate bone lesion absorbed doses resulting from a weight-based administration of {sup 223}Ra-dichloride, to assess the relationship between those doses and corresponding {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake and to assess the potential of quantitative {sup 18}F-fluoride imaging to predict response to treatment. Five patients received two intravenous injections of {sup 223}Ra-dichloride, 6 weeks apart, at 110 kBq/kg whole-body weight. The biodistribution of {sup 223}Ra in metastatic lesions as a function of time after administration as well as associated lesion dosimetry were determined from serial {sup 223}Ra scans. PET/CT imaging using {sup 18}F-fluoride was performed prior to the first treatment (baseline), and at week 6 immediately before the second treatment and at week 12 after baseline. Absorbed doses to metastatic bone lesions ranged from 0.6 Gy to 44.1 Gy. For individual patients, there was an average factor difference of 5.3 (range 2.5-11.0) between the maximum and minimum lesion dose. A relationship between lesion-absorbed doses and serial changes in {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake was demonstrated (r{sup 2} = 0.52). A log-linear relationship was demonstrated (r{sup 2} = 0.77) between baseline measurements of {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake prior to {sup 223}Ra-dichloride therapy and changes in uptake 12 weeks after the first cycle of therapy. Correlations were also observed between both {sup 223}Ra and {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake in lesions (r = 0.75) as well as between {sup 223}Ra absorbed dose and {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake (r = 0.96). There is both inter-patient and intra-patient heterogeneity of absorbed dose estimates to metastatic lesions. A relationship between {sup 223}Ra lesion absorbed dose and subsequent lesion response was observed. Analysis of this small group of patients suggests that baseline uptake of {sup 18}F-fluoride in bone metastases is significantly correlated with corresponding uptake of {sup 223}Ra, the associated {sup 223

  5. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  7. Impact of Phosphoproteomics in the Era of Precision Medicine for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny R. Ramroop

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States. While androgen deprivation therapy results in tumor responses initially, there is relapse and progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Currently, all prostate cancer patients receive essentially the same treatment, and there is a need for clinically applicable technologies to provide predictive biomarkers toward personalized therapies. Genomic analyses of tumors are used for clinical applications, but with a paucity of obvious driver mutations in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, other applications, such as phosphoproteomics, may complement this approach. Immunohistochemistry and reverse phase protein arrays are limited by the availability of reliable antibodies and evaluates a preselected number of targets. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has been used to profile tumors consisting of thousands of phosphopeptides from individual patients after surgical resection or at autopsy. However, this approach is time consuming, and while a large number of candidate phosphopeptides are obtained for evaluation, limitations are reduced reproducibility, sensitivity, and precision. Targeted mass spectrometry can help eliminate these limitations and is more cost effective and less time consuming making it a practical platform for future clinical testing. In this review, we discuss the use of phosphoproteomics in prostate cancer and other clinical cancer tissues for target identification, hypothesis testing, and possible patient stratification. We highlight the majority of studies that have used phosphoproteomics in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines and propose ways forward to apply this approach in basic and clinical research. Overall, the implementation of phosphoproteomics via targeted mass spectrometry has tremendous potential to aid in the development of more rational, personalized therapies that will result in increased survival

  8. Metastatic Breast Carcinoma to the Prostate Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E. Kapp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the male breast is an uncommon event with metastases to the breast occurring even less frequently. Prostate carcinoma has been reported as the most frequent primary to metastasize to the breast; however, the reverse has not been previously reported. Herein, we present, for the first time, a case of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the prostate gland. Prostate needle core biopsy revealed infiltrative nests of neoplastic epithelioid cells, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC to be positive for GATA3 and ER and negative for PSA and P501S. A prostate cocktail by IHC study demonstrated lack of basal cells (p63 and CK903 and no expression of P501S. The patient’s previous breast needle core biopsy showed strong ER positivity and negative staining for PR and HER2. Similar to the prostate, the breast was negative for CK5/6, p63, and p40. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis and comparing histology and IHC to prior known malignancies in the setting of atypical presentation or rare tumors.

  9. The impact of repeated cycles of radioligand therapy using [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 on renal function in patients with hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanova, Anna; Becker, Anja; Eppard, Elisabeth; Kuerpig, Stefan; Essler, Markus; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Fisang, Christian [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany); Feldmann, Georg [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Internal Medicine, MED3, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 is a well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. However, because of the mainly renal excretion of the tracer, the kidneys are one of the most limiting organs. The purpose of this study was to examine the post-therapeutic changes in renal function over time and to identify risk factors for developing renal toxicity. We also tested the reliability of markers for renal function monitoring. Fifty-five patients with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer treated with at least three cycles of [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 were investigated. Renal function was assessed through laboratory tests (creatinine, GFR, cystatin C) and Tc-99 m-MAG3 measurements. Adverse events were classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v4.0. To identify risk factors for renal toxicity, we used Pearson's correlation coefficient and the corresponding p values. None of the 55 patients experienced severe nephrotoxicity (grade 3/4). In 14 patients (25%), we observed increased creatinine levels of CTC 1 or 2 . There were 16 cases of increased GFR (grade 1/2). At the baseline, only 14 patients had elevated cystatin C. However, post-therapeutic cystatin C was elevated in 32 patients (58%). A significant effect on renal function was found for age (p = 0.049), hypertension (p = 0.001) and pre-existing kidney disease (p = 0.001). The most reliable predictive markers of nephrotoxicity were TER-MAG3 and cystatin C. Renal toxicity in patients treated with [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 was low. There was no (sub)acute grade 3 or 4 nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  10. Controversies and consensus in the innovation access for cancer therapy in the European countries: on the subject of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudard, S; Courbon, F

    2017-02-01

    Innovative cancer therapies and advances in drug development have created new hopes for patients and health providers. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the discrepancies in the assessment of the magnitude of benefit of four new drugs (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223 dichloride) for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The comparison was done among three European countries (UK, Germany and France) and Canada, according to the statement of each country and to the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale. Whereas those drugs are authorized by the European Medical Agency, one can observed that clear discrepancies in the magnitude of benefit assessment exist between selected countries, as well as between national pricing evaluation agencies and ESMO. However, price setting and reimbursement decisions remain national responsibility with differences in assessment of the medical value of new treatment across countries, leading to a heterogeneous accessibility to cancer treatments. In conclusion, several procedures have to be implemented to overcome the patchwork of administrative assessments. Among them, the assessment of medical value should be based on independent statements of learned societies, and the harmonization of access to cancer therapy in Europe has to be driven by a common European reimbursement and pricing policy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cytoreductive prostatectomy in metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Joachim Aidt; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy on oncological outcome in patients with prostate cancer and limited number of bone metastases is unclear. Data from cancer registries, multi-institutional databases and a single institutional case-control study indicate a possible benefit...

  12. Characterization of KRAS Rearrangements in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Shankar, Sunita; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Ateeq, Bushra; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Jing, Xiaojun; Robinson, Daniel; Cao, Qi; Prensner, John R.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Wang, Rui; Fries, Daniel F.; Han, Bo; Asangani, Irfan A.; Cao, Xuhong; Li, Yong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Pflueger, Dorothee; Gopalan, Anuradha; Reuter, Victor E.; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative genomics approach called Amplification Breakpoint Ranking and Assembly (ABRA) analysis, we nominated KRAS as a gene fusion with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2L3 in the DU145 cell line, originally derived from prostate cancer metastasis to the brain. Interestingly, analysis of tissues revealed that 2 of 62 metastatic prostate cancers harbored aberrations at the KRAS locus. In DU145 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS produces a fusion protein, specific knock-down of which, attenuates cell invasion and xenograft growth. Ectopic expression of the UBE2L3-KRAS fusion protein exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and RWPE prostate epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In NIH 3T3 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS attenuates MEK/ERK signaling, commonly engaged by oncogenic mutant KRAS, and instead signals via AKT and p38 MAPK pathways. This is the first report of a gene fusion involving Ras family suggesting that this aberration may drive metastatic progression in a rare subset of prostate cancers. PMID:22140652

  13. Prostate specific antigen: a prognostic marker of survival in good prognosis metastatic prostate cancer? (EORTC 30892)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collette, Laurence; de Reijke, Theo M.; Schröder, Fritz H.

    2003-01-01

    We study the value of PSA response and PSA progression as prognostic factors for survival in good prognosis metastatic prostate cancer. Data from 257 patients treated with Flutamide or Cyproterone acetate within the EORTC GU Group protocol 30892 have been used and analysis by Cox models. A PSA

  14. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  15. Enzalutamide monotherapy in hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide is approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that has progressed on docetaxel. Our aim was to assess the activity and safety of enzalutamide monotherapy in men with hormone-naive prostate cancer. METHODS......: This trial is an ongoing open-label, single-arm, phase 2 study, done across 12 European sites. Men aged over 18 years, with hormone-naive prostate cancer for whom hormone therapy was indicated, and who had non-castration levels of testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 2 ng/mL or greater......). Five patients reported serious adverse events, none of which were deemed to be treatment related. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that enzalutamide monotherapy in men with hormone-naive prostate cancer of varying severity provides a level of disease suppression, and was generally well tolerated...

  16. Stromal Gene Expression is Predictive for Metastatic Primary Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Fan; Lin, Dong; Takhar, Mandeep; Ramnarine, Varune Rohan; Dong, Xin; Bell, Robert H; Volik, Stanislav V; Wang, Kendric; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Haegert, Anne; Anderson, Shawn; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Erho, Nicholas; Wang, Xinya; Gout, Peter W; Morris, James; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Den, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley; Ren, Shancheng; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Gleave, Martin E; Davicioni, Elai; Sun, Yinghao; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C

    2018-04-01

    Clinical grading systems using clinical features alongside nomograms lack precision in guiding treatment decisions in prostate cancer (PCa). There is a critical need for identification of biomarkers that can more accurately stratify patients with primary PCa. To identify a robust prognostic signature to better distinguish indolent from aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). To develop the signature, whole-genome and whole-transcriptome sequencing was conducted on five PCa patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models collected from independent foci of a single primary tumor and exhibiting variable metastatic phenotypes. Multiple independent clinical cohorts including an intermediate-risk cohort were used to validate the biomarkers. The outcome measurement defining aggressive PCa was metastasis following radical prostatectomy. A generalized linear model with lasso regularization was used to build a 93-gene stroma-derived metastasis signature (SDMS). The SDMS association with metastasis was assessed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operating characteristic, and Kaplan-Meier curves. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to compare the SDMS alongside clinicopathological variables and reported signatures. AUC was assessed to determine if SDMS is additive or synergistic to previously reported signatures. A close association between stromal gene expression and metastatic phenotype was observed. Accordingly, the SDMS was modeled and validated in multiple independent clinical cohorts. Patients with higher SDMS scores were found to have worse prognosis. Furthermore, SDMS was an independent prognostic factor, can stratify risk in intermediate-risk PCa, and can improve the performance of other previously reported signatures. Profiling of stromal gene expression led to development of an SDMS that was validated as independently prognostic for the metastatic potential of prostate tumors. Our

  17. Radical prostatectomy for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeratterapillay, R; Goonewardene, S S; Barclay, J; Persad, R; Bach, C

    2017-04-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer remains challenging. Traditionally, radical prostatectomy was discouraged in patients with locally advanced or node positive disease owing to the increased complication rate and treatment related morbidity. However, technical advances and refinements in surgical techniques have enabled the outcomes for patients with high risk prostate cancer to be improved. More recently, the concept of cytoreductive prostatectomy has been described where surgery (often Combined with an extended lymph node dissection) is performed in the setting of metastatic disease. Indirect evidence suggests an advantage using the cytoreductive approach. Hypothetical explanations for this observed benefit include decreased tumour burden, immune modulation, improved response to secondary treatment and avoidance of secondary complications attributable to local tumour growth. Nevertheless, prospective trials are required to investigate this further.

  18. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  19. The oncologic role of local treatment in primary metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghadjar, P.; Briganti, A.; Visschere, P.J. De; Futterer, J.J.; Giannarini, G.; Isbarn, H.; Ost, P.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Surcel, C.I.; Bergh, R.C. van den; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Ploussard, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the oncologic benefit or otherwise of local treatment of the prostate in patients with primary metastatic prostate cancer. METHODS: A review of the literature was performed in April 2014 using the Medline/PubMed database. Studies were identified using the search terms "prostate

  20. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  2. Oncogenic LINE 1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0472 TITLE: Oncogenic LINE-1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression...30-Sep-2014 to 29-Sep-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oncogenic LINE-1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression 5a...in the National Center for Biotechnology database there were three differences, which could be predicted to result in three changes to the protein

  3. Biofluid-Based Detection of the Migration Switch in Prostate Cancer to Predict Metastatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0416 TITLE: Biofluid-Based Detection of the Migration Switch in Prostate Cancer to Predict Metastatic Disease PRINCIPAL...Aug 2016 Sep.20164. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Biofluid-Based Detection of the Migration Switch in Prostate Cancer to Predict Metastatic Disease 5a...accurately and non-invasively monitor localized disease longitudinally will allow patients to avoid the side effects and morbidity of definitive treatment

  4. Estramustine phosphate versus placebo as second line treatment after orchiectomy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Asmussen, C

    1997-01-01

    We compared the effect of 560 mg. estramustine phosphate daily to placebo as a supplement to standard palliative therapy in patients with progressive disease after bilateral orchiectomy as first line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer.......We compared the effect of 560 mg. estramustine phosphate daily to placebo as a supplement to standard palliative therapy in patients with progressive disease after bilateral orchiectomy as first line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer....

  5. FDA Approves Apalutamide for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apalutamide (Erleada) is a hormone therapy that counteracts resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Learn more about the FDA approval of apalutamide for men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer in this Cancer Currents blog post.

  6. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  7. Stable and high expression of Galectin-8 tightly controls metastatic progression of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Lucas Daniel; Pérez, Ignacio González; Kotler, Monica Lidia; Chauchereau, Anne; Laderach, Diego Jose; Compagno, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Two decades ago, Galectin-8 was described as a prostate carcinoma biomarker since it is only expressed in the neoplastic prostate, but not in the healthy tissue. To date, no biological function has been attributed to Galectin-8 that could explain this differential expression. In this study we silenced Galectin-8 in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and IGR-CaP1, and designed a pre-clinical experimental model that allows monitoring the pathology from its early steps to the long-term metastatic stages. We show for the first time that the natural and conserved expression of Gal-8 in tumour cells is responsible for the metastatic evolution of prostate cancer. In fact, Gal-8 controls the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and E-Cadherin expression, with a major impact on anoikis and homotypic aggregation of tumour cells, both being essential processes for the survival of circulating tumour cells during metastasis. While localized prostate cancer can be cured, metastatic and advanced disease remains a significant therapeutic challenge, urging for the identification of prognostic markers of the metastatic process. Collectively, our results highlight Galectin-8 as a potential target for anti-metastatic therapy against prostate cancer. PMID:28591719

  8. SOCS2 mediates the cross talk between androgen and growth hormone signaling in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Gato, Diego; Chuan, Yin Choy; Wikström, Pernilla

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic signals such as androgens and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis play an essential role in the normal development of the prostate but also in its malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2...... with benign tissue. In contrast, however, castration-resistant bone metastases exhibit reduced levels of SOCS2 in comparison with localized or hormone naive, untreated metastatic tumors. In PCa cells, SOCS2 expression is induced by androgens through a mechanism that requires signal transducer and activator......) as mediator of the cross talk between androgens and GH signals in the prostate and its potential role as tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). We observed that SOCS2 protein levels assayed by immunohistochemistry are elevated in hormone therapy-naive localized prostatic adenocarcinoma in comparison...

  9. Prospective Genomic Profiling of Prostate Cancer Across Disease States Reveals Germline and Somatic Alterations That May Affect Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Wassim; Armenia, Joshua; Gopalan, Anuradha; Brennan, Ryan; Walsh, Michael; Barron, David; Danila, Daniel; Rathkopf, Dana; Morris, Michael; Slovin, Susan; McLaughlin, Brigit; Curtis, Kristen; Hyman, David M; Durack, Jeremy C; Solomon, Stephen B; Arcila, Maria E; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, Jianjiong; Chakravarty, Debyani; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Robson, Mark E; Joseph, Vijai; Offit, Kenneth; Donoghue, Mark T A; Abeshouse, Adam A; Kundra, Ritika; Heins, Zachary J; Penson, Alexander V; Harris, Christopher; Taylor, Barry S; Ladanyi, Marc; Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Reuter, Victor E; Kantoff, Philip W; Solit, David B; Berger, Michael F; Sawyers, Charles L; Schultz, Nikolaus; Scher, Howard I

    2017-07-01

    A long natural history and a predominant osseous pattern of metastatic spread are impediments to the adoption of precision medicine in patients with prostate cancer. To establish the feasibility of clinical genomic profiling in the disease, we performed targeted deep sequencing of tumor and normal DNA from patients with locoregional, metastatic non-castrate, and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patients consented to genomic analysis of their tumor and germline DNA. A hybridization capture-based clinical assay was employed to identify single nucleotide variations, small insertions and deletions, copy number alterations and structural rearrangements in over 300 cancer-related genes in tumors and matched normal blood. We successfully sequenced 504 tumors from 451 patients with prostate cancer. Potentially actionable alterations were identified in DNA damage repair (DDR), PI3K, and MAP kinase pathways. 27% of patients harbored a germline or a somatic alteration in a DDR gene that may predict for response to PARP inhibition. Profiling of matched tumors from individual patients revealed that somatic TP53 and BRCA2 alterations arose early in tumors from patients who eventually developed metastatic disease. In contrast, comparative analysis across disease states revealed that APC alterations were enriched in metastatic tumors, while ATM alterations were specifically enriched in CRPC. Through genomic profiling of prostate tumors representing the disease clinical spectrum, we identified a high frequency of potentially actionable alterations and possible drivers of disease initiation, metastasis and castration-resistance. Our findings support the routine use of tumor and germline DNA profiling for patients with advanced prostate cancer, for the purpose of guiding enrollment in targeted clinical trials and counseling families at increased risk of malignancy.

  10. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Felice F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca De Felice,1 Vincenzo Tombolini,1 Francesco Marampon,2 Angela Musella,3 Claudia Marchetti3 1Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, 2Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, 3Department of Gynecological and Obstetrical Sciences and Urological Sciences, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1 and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2 mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. Keywords: prostate cancer, metastatic disease, castration resistant, BRCA, DNA-repair, PARP, olaparib

  11. Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G; Scher, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    fraction) followed by either ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Non-progressing patients could continue to receive ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg or placebo as maintenance therapy every 3 months until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effect, or death. Patients were randomly...... assigned to either treatment group via a minimisation algorithm, and stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, alkaline phosphatase concentration, haemoglobin concentration, and investigator site. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary......%) deaths occurred because of toxic effects of the study drug, all in the ipilimumab group. INTERPRETATION: Although there was no significant difference between the ipilimumab group and the placebo group in terms of overall survival in the primary analysis, there were signs of activity with the drug...

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study of maintenance therapy with tasquinimod in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer responsive to or stabilized during first-line docetaxel chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fizazi, K; Ulys, A; Sengeløv, L

    2017-01-01

    ) to receive tasquinimod (0.25-1.0 mg/day orally) or placebo. The primary end point was radiologic progression-free survival (rPFS); secondary efficacy end points included: overall survival (OS); PFS on next-line therapy (PFS 2) and symptomatic PFS, assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire...

  13. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J

    2001-01-01

    Castration is the most widely used form of androgen ablation employed in the treatment of metastatic (M1) prostate cancer. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy is a potential alternative treatment option for men for whom castration is unacceptable or not indicated. Of the three non-steroidal...... with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203....

  14. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  15. Obesity is associated with castration-resistant disease and metastasis in men treated with androgen deprivation therapy after radical prostatectomy: results from the SEARCH database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto, Christopher J; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Presti, Joseph C; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2012-08-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (cohort series). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The incidence and prevalence of obesity in the USA and Europe is increasing. Higher body mass index is associated with a lower risk of overall prostate cancer diagnosis but also with an increased risk of high grade prostate cancer. Obese men undergoing primary therapy with radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation are more likely to experience a biochemical recurrence after treatment compared with normal weight men. Finally, obesity is associated with increased prostate-cancer-specific mortality. We hypothesized that obese men on androgen deprivation therapy may be at increased risk for prostate cancer progression. Previous studies have shown that obese men have lower levels of testosterone compared with normal weight men. Additionally, one previous study found that obese men have higher levels of testosterone on androgen deprivation therapy. Men with higher levels of testosterone on androgen deprivation therapy are at increased risk of prostate cancer progression. We found that men with higher body mass index were at increased risk of progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer, development of metastases and prostate-cancer-specific mortality. When we adjusted for various clinicopathological characteristics, obese men were at increased risk of progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer and development of metastases. The results of our study help generate hypotheses for further study regarding the mechanisms between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer. • To investigate whether obesity predicts poor outcomes in men starting androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before metastasis, since previous studies found worse outcomes after surgery and radiation for obese men. • A retrospective review was carried out of 287 men in the SEARCH database treated with radical prostatectomy between 1988 and 2009. • Body mass index (BMI

  16. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    ...) to specifically target and lyse cells of an androgen independent prostate cancer osseous metastasis, which account for a majority of the morbidity and mortality experience by men with prostate cancer...

  17. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...) to specifically target and lyse cells of an androgen independent prostate cancer osseous metastasis, which account for a majority of the morbidity and mortality experience by men with prostate cancer...

  18. Development of a Gene Therapy Trial for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    .... The Phase I trial under development employs a prostate restricted replicative adenovirus (PRRA) with excellent preclinical performance in vitro and in vivo in relevant animal models of human prostate cancer...

  19. Development of Targeted Nanobubbles for Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    matrix, optically transparent fibrin-based gel phantom embedded with a layer of PC-3 and C4-2B of human prostate cancer , and MDA-MB-231 of breast ... Theranostics , 3(11): 802-815, 2013.  O. Aydin, E. Vlaisavljevich, Y. Y. Durmaz, M. ElSayed1, Z. Xu, “Nanodroplet-Mediated Histotripsy Cancer Cell...Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mohamed El-Sayed CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  20. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai-Xin; Firus, Jessica; Prieur, Brenda [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Jia, William [Department of Surgery and Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Rennie, Paul S., E-mail: prennie@interchange.ubc.ca [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2011-03-24

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge.

  1. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  2. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Halin Bergström

    Full Text Available Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1. To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  3. [Prostate cancer diagnosed through the biopsy of the bone metastatic lesion; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yasuo; Higuchii, Yoshihide; Hashimoto, Takahiko; Mitsui, Youzou; Maruyamai, Takuo; Kondou, Nobuyuki; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Shincho, Mayumi; Hirota, Seiichi; Shima, Hiroki

    2007-05-01

    An 80-year-old man visited our clinic with the chief complaint of asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria secondary to anticoagulant medicine. Although digital rectal examination was normal, a high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (85.9 ng/ml) led us to perform sextant prostate biopsy, resulting in negative for cancer. Three months later, since the serum PSA increased to 169 ng/ml with high serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels. Twelve-core prostate biopsy was performed again, but the result was negative. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a metastatic lesion on the right pubic bone, which was biopsied, and turned out to be poorly differentiated prostate cancer in histology. Maximum androgen blockade failed to control PSA. Finally he died of pneumonia 55 days after the bone biopsy. To our knowledge, there were only two case reports diagnosed as prostate cancer by biopsies of the metastatic lesions in Japanese literature, but none in the English literature. These findings suggest that high serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 in patients with prostate cancer are indications of hormone-refractory prostate cancer resulting in poor prognosis.

  4. A survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Veninga, T.; Bajrovic, A.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Hoskin, P. J.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a survival scoring system for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. Of 436 patients, 218 patients were assigned to the test group and 218 patients to the validation group. Eight potential prognostic factors (age,

  5. Phase I/II study on docetaxel, gemcitabine and prednisone in castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Trine Zeeberg; Bentzen, Lise Nørgaard; Hansen, Steinbjoern

    2010-01-01

    DGP, maximum of eight courses, until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously day 1, gemcitabine was given day 1 and 8 in doses increasing from 600 to 1,000 mg/m(2) every third week. Patients had castrate refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRMPC......), adequate function of liver, kidney and bone marrow; ECOG performance status...

  6. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Colleen N; Siddiqui, Khurram M; Al-Zahrani, Ali A; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I; Guo, Qiu Q; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E; Durfee, Paul N; MacMillan, Connor D; Townson, Jason L; Brinker, Jeffrey C; Fleshner, Neil E; Izawa, Jonathan I; Chambers, Ann F; Chin, Joseph L; Leong, Hon S

    2016-02-23

    Extracellular vesicles released by prostate cancer present in seminal fluid, urine, and blood may represent a non-invasive means to identify and prioritize patients with intermediate risk and high risk of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that enumeration of circulating prostate microparticles (PMPs), a type of extracellular vesicle (EV), can identify patients with Gleason Score≥4+4 prostate cancer (PCa) in a manner independent of PSA. Plasmas from healthy volunteers, benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, and PCa patients with various Gleason score patterns were analyzed for PMPs. We used nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate PMPs which were defined as submicron events (100-1000nm) immunoreactive to anti-PSMA mAb when compared to isotype control labeled samples. Levels of PMPs (counts/µL of plasma) were also compared to CellSearch CTC Subclasses in various PCa metastatic disease subtypes (treatment naïve, castration resistant prostate cancer) and in serially collected plasma sets from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. PMP levels in plasma as enumerated by nanoscale flow cytometry are effective in distinguishing PCa patients with Gleason Score≥8 disease, a high-risk prognostic factor, from patients with Gleason Score≤7 PCa, which carries an intermediate risk of PCa recurrence. PMP levels were independent of PSA and significantly decreased after surgical resection of the prostate, demonstrating its prognostic potential for clinical follow-up. CTC subclasses did not decrease after prostatectomy and were not effective in distinguishing localized PCa patients from metastatic PCa patients. PMP enumeration was able to identify patients with Gleason Score ≥8 PCa but not patients with Gleason Score 4+3 PCa, but offers greater confidence than CTC counts in identifying patients with metastatic prostate cancer. CTC Subclass analysis was also not effective for post-prostatectomy follow up and for distinguishing metastatic PCa and localized PCa patients

  7. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of pain from metastatic carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.C. Jr.; Hasan, S.M.; Jones, A.G.; Schlise, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy often is used for palliation of bone pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate but an objective evaluation of its efficacy in a large series of patients is unavailable. We report the results of external beam irradiation in 62 patients who had bone pain secondary to stage D carcinoma of the prostate. The variables used to judge pain before and after radiotherapy included subjective evaluation of pain, status of activity and quantitation of analgesic use. Complete relief of pain was achieved in 26 patients (42 per cent), partial relief in 22 (35 per cent) and no relief in 14 (23 per cent). On the basis of our experience external beam irradiation is useful palliative therapy for pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate

  8. Analysis of autophagic flux in response to sulforaphane in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope The phytochemical sulforaphane has been shown to decrease prostate cancer metastases in a genetic mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis, though the mechanism of action is not fully known. Sulforaphane has been reported to stimulate autophagy, and modulation of autophagy has been proposed to influence sulforaphane cytotoxicity; however, no conclusions about autophagy can be drawn without assessing autophagic flux, which has not been characterized in prostate cancer cells following sulforaphane treatment. Methods and Results We conducted an investigation to assess the impact of sulforaphane on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines at a concentration shown to decrease metastasis in vivo. Autophagic flux was assessed by multiple autophagy related proteins and substrates. We found that sulforaphane can stimulate autophagic flux and cell death only at high concentrations, above what has been observed in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that sulforaphane does not directly stimulate autophagy or cell death in metastatic prostate cancer cells under physiologically relevant conditions, but instead supports the involvement of in vivo factors as important effectors of sulforaphane- mediated prostate cancer suppression. PMID:26108801

  9. Immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in primary and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becich Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claudins are integral membrane proteins that are involved in forming cellular tight junctions. One member of the claudin family, claudin-3, has been shown to be overexpressed in breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer. Here we use immunohistochemistry to evaluate its expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (NAC, primary prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa, and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma (Mets. Methods Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for claudin-3, with the staining intensities subsequently quantified and statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA with subsequent Tukey tests for multiple comparisons or a nonparametric equivalent. Fifty-three cases of NAC, 17 cases of BPH, 35 cases of PIN, 107 cases of PCa, and 55 cases of Mets were analyzed in the microarrays. Results PCa and Mets had the highest absolute staining for claudin-3. Both had significantly higher staining than BPH (p Conclusions To our knowledge, this represents one of the first studies comparing the immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in PCa and NAC to specimens of PIN, BPH, and Mets. These findings provide further evidence that claudin-3 may serve as an important biomarker for prostate cancer, both primary and metastatic, but does not provide evidence that claudin-3 can be used to predict risk of metastasis.

  10. Cancer of the prostate presenting with diffuse osteolytic metastatic bone lesions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segamwenge Innocent Lule

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In the USA it is more common in African-American men than in Caucasian men. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone and the lesions appear osteoblastic on radiographs. Presentation with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions is rare. We describe an unusual presentation of metastatic prostate cancer with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions. Case presentation A 65-year-old Namibian man presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia and worsening back pains. In addition he had complaints of effort intolerance, palpitations, dysuria and mild symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. On examination he was found to be anemic, had a swollen tender right shoulder joint and spine tenderness to percussion. On digital rectal examination he had asymmetrical enlargement of the prostate which felt nodular and hard with diffuse firmness in some parts. His prostate-specific antigen was greater than 100ng/mL and he had diffuse osteolytic lesions involving the right humerus, and all vertebral, femur and pelvic bones. His screen for multiple myeloma was negative and the prostate biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. Conclusion Prostate cancer rarely presents with diffuse osteolytic bone lesions and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating male patients with osteolytic bone lesions.

  11. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    .... The scope of this project to perform the studies outlined in proposal to prove the hypothesis that conditional replication under the guidance of the osteocalcin promoter can exert a prostate cancer...

  12. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    .... The scope of this project to perform the studies outlined in proposal to prove the hypothesis that conditional replication under the guidance of the osteocalcin promoter can exert a prostate cancer...

  13. Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed in a bronchoalveolar lavage specimen: An unusual presentation of a common tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne E Moul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting as a primary lung disease is rare. We present a 52-year-old male with a 3-month history of cough, shortness of breath, and weight loss with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of a primary lung disease: Bilateral interstitial and alveolar opacities with blunting of the costophrenic angles, multiple diffuse foci of consolidations and nodules, predominantly subpleural and located in the lower lobes, and diffuse interlobular septal thickening and peribronchial thickening. The patient underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was obtained. Cytospin smears were diagnostic for a low-grade adenocarcinoma. Clinically, the patient had elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels greater than 5,000 ng/mL. Because of this, immunocytochemistry for PSA was performed which was positive, confirming the diagnosis of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. This unusual case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate first diagnosed by BAL highlights the significance of available clinical information and the use of immunocytochemistry for proper diagnosis.

  14. Multidisciplinary Intervention of Early, Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Report From the 2015 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K.; Lang, Joshua M.; Den, Robert B.; Garraway, Isla P.; Lotan, Tamara L.; Ross, Ashley E.; Stoyanova, Tanya; Cho, Steve Y.; Simons, Jonathan W.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Soule, Howard R.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND The 2015 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting, themed: “Multidisciplinary Intervention of Early, Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer,” was held in La Jolla, California from June 25 to 28, 2015. METHODS The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) sponsors an annual, invitation-only, action-tank-structured meeting on a critical topic concerning lethal prostate cancer. The 2015 meeting was attended by 71 basic, translational, and clinical investigators who discussed the current state of the field, major unmet needs, and ideas for addressing earlier diagnosis and treatment of men with lethal prostate cancer for the purpose of extending lives and making progress toward a cure. RESULTS The questions addressed at the meeting included: cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, evaluating, and targeting the microenvironment in the primary tumor, advancing biomarkers for clinical integration, new molecular imaging technologies, clinical trials, and clinical trial design in localized high-risk and oligometastatic settings, targeting the primary tumor in advanced disease, and instituting multi-modal care of high risk and oligometastatic patients. DISCUSSION This article highlights the current status, greatest unmet needs, and anticipated field changes that were discussed at the meeting toward the goal of optimizing earlier interventions to potentiate cures in high-risk and oligometastatic prostate cancer patients. PMID:26477609

  15. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per

    2013-01-01

    studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng......Background: Enzalutamide (ENZA) is an oral androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in the US and shown to increase overall survival by 4.8 months over a placebo (HR,0.63) in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) previously treated with docetaxel (Scher et....../dL). Methods: This was a 25-wk, open-label, single-arm study of patients with hormone-naïve, histologically confirmed prostate cancer (all stages) requiring hormonal treatment, an ECOG PS score of 0,and a life expectancy .1 y. All patients received ENZA 160 mg/d without concomitment castration. Primary endpoint...

  16. Successful Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer following Chemotherapy Based on Molecular Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E. Myers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available After Taxotere fails, treatment options for metastatic prostate cancer are limited. The three drugs with FDA approval in this setting, Jevtana, Provenge and Zytiga, are associated with median survivals of less than 2 years. In part, the impact on survival is the result of low response rates, indicating a significant proportion of patients exhibiting de novo resistance to these agents. An alternate approach is to let treatment selection be governed by gene expression profiling so that the treatment is tailored to the specific patient. Here, we report a case of metastatic prostate cancer with a dramatic response to treatment selected based on molecular profiling. This patient had failed LHRH agonist, bicalutamide, Taxotere, and doxorubicin. Molecular profiling showed overexpression of the androgen receptor and he had a dramatic response of measurable disease to second-line hormonal therapy with ketoconazole, estrogen and Leukine.

  17. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Chung, Ivy; Migliozzi, Matthew; Phan, Derek T; Wilson, Arianne M; Zetter, Bruce R; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful tool to interrogate the metastatic

  18. MYC RNAi-PT Combination Nanotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    combining platinum (Pt) chemotherapy and MYC- targeting RNA interference (RNAi) for more effective treatment of metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). In...project is to develop an innovative nanotherapy modality by combining platinum (Pt) chemotherapy and MYC-targeting RNA interference (RNAi) for more...used to align to the mm10 mouse reference genome mouse genome and generate gene and isoform level expression measures. Tables of estimated

  19. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Taxotere: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Docetaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that has proven its efficacy in the treatment of patients with both castration sensitive and resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel (Taxotere. ARDS is very rare but life threatening complication of docetaxel which requires aggressive supportive care and close monitoring. Better awareness and prompt diagnosis of this treatment related ARDS will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management.

  20. uPAR Targeted Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 Inhibits Dissemination of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Juhl, Karina; Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is implicated in cancer invasion and metastatic development in prostate cancer and provides therefore an attractive molecular target for both imaging and therapy. In this study, we provide the first in vivo data on an antimetastatic effect...... of uPAR radionuclide targeted therapy in such lesions and show the potential of uPAR positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying small foci of metastatic cells in a mouse model of disseminating human prostate cancer. Two radiolabeled ligands were generated in high purity and specific...... value of 100 nM in a competitive binding experiment. In vivo, uPAR targeted radionuclide therapy significantly reduced the number of metastatic lesions in the disseminated metastatic prostate cancer model, when compared to vehicle and nontargeted 177Lu groups (p

  1. Metastatic prostate cancer with elevated serum levels of CEA and CA19-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dar Juang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is well known as a specific tumor marker for prostate cancer, but carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA- and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9-elevating adenocarcinomas originating in the prostate gland are rare. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 in a 78-year-old man in whom prostate cancer (T3N1M1 had been diagnosed 2 years ago and who was treated with androgen deprivation therapy. He visited the emergency department because of a loss of appetite and abdominal pain. The serum CEA and CA19-9 levels were increased to 218.9 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL and 212 ng/mL (normal, <27 ng/mL, respectively. The serum PSA level was slightly elevated (4.41 ng/mL. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple liver metastases, para-aortic lymph node enlargement, and lung metastases. A liver biopsy was performed and the specimen showed high-grade adenocarcinoma with focal positive staining for PSA. Despite chemotherapy with docetaxel, the patient died 3 months after treatment. Based on this case and a review of the literature, an aggressive variant of prostatic carcinoma with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 and a low PSA level was shown to progress rapidly with a poor prognosis.

  2. How MMPs Impact Bone Responses to Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    Matrisian LM. Matrix metalloproteinase-7-dependent release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in a model of herniated disc resorption. J Clin Investig 2000;105...or disease. For example, in nonpathologic conditions such as herniated disc resorption, macrophage-derived MMP-7 is critical for the resorption of the... herniated disc and in mammary and prostate involution; MMP-7 processing of FasL is important for initiating apoptosis (22, 23, 35). More often

  3. Comparison of miRNA and gene expression profiles between metastatic and primary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaimin; Liang, Zuowen; Li, Fubiao; Wang, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify the regulatory mechanisms associated with the metastasis of prostate cancer (PC). The microRNA (miRNA/miR) microarray dataset GSE21036 and gene transcript dataset GSE21034 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following pre-processing, differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between samples from patients with primary prostate cancer (PPC) and metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) with |log 2 fold change (FC)| >1 and a false discovery rate terms (36 terms), followed by miR-494 (24 terms), miR-30d (18 terms), miR-181a (15 terms), hsa-miR-196a (8 terms), miR-708 (7 terms) and miR-486-5p (2 terms). Therefore, these miRNAs may serve roles in the metastasis of PC cells via downregulation of their corresponding target DEGs.

  4. An RNA-Based Digital Circulating Tumor Cell Signature Is Predictive of Drug Response and Early Dissemination in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, David T; Lee, Richard J; Kalinich, Mark; LiCausi, Joseph A; Zheng, Yu; Chen, Tianqi; Milner, John D; Emmons, Erin; Ho, Uyen; Broderick, Katherine; Silva, Erin; Javaid, Sarah; Kwan, Tanya Todorova; Hong, Xin; Dahl, Douglas M; McGovern, Francis J; Efstathiou, Jason A; Smith, Matthew R; Sequist, Lecia V; Kapur, Ravi; Wu, Chin-Lee; Stott, Shannon L; Ting, David T; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2018-03-01

    Blood-based biomarkers are critical in metastatic prostate cancer, where characteristic bone metastases are not readily sampled, and they may enable risk stratification in localized disease. We established a sensitive and high-throughput strategy for analyzing prostate circulating tumor cells (CTC) using microfluidic cell enrichment followed by digital quantitation of prostate-derived transcripts. In a prospective study of 27 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with first-line abiraterone, pretreatment elevation of the digital CTC M score identifies a high-risk population with poor overall survival (HR = 6.0; P = 0.01) and short radiographic progression-free survival (HR = 3.2; P = 0.046). Expression of HOXB13 in CTCs identifies 6 of 6 patients with ≤12-month survival, with a subset also expressing the ARV7 splice variant. In a second cohort of 34 men with localized prostate cancer, an elevated preoperative CTC L score predicts microscopic dissemination to seminal vesicles and/or lymph nodes ( P digital quantitation of CTC-specific transcripts enables noninvasive monitoring that may guide treatment selection in both metastatic and localized prostate cancer. Significance: There is an unmet need for biomarkers to guide prostate cancer therapies, for curative treatment of localized cancer and for application of molecularly targeted agents in metastatic disease. Digital quantitation of prostate CTC-derived transcripts in blood specimens is predictive of abiraterone response in metastatic cancer and of early dissemination in localized cancer. Cancer Discov; 8(3); 288-303. ©2018 AACR. See related commentary by Heitzer and Speicher, p. 269 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 253 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Management of elderly patients with prostate cancer without metastatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Akitake, Masakazu; Ikoma, Saya; Ri, Ken; Masuda, Katsuaki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the optimal management for elderly patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer (clinical stage: T1-T4N0M0), we reviewed the prognoses. From April 2000 to December 2008, we treated and followed up 175 patients aged 75 years, or older. In almost all of the patients above 79 years of age, endocrine therapy was selected. Among the 75 to 79-year-old patients, the proportion of radiation therapy, including external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-brachytherapy), as well as radical prostatectomy increased. The follow-up period for all the patients was 0 to 106 months (median, 32 months). In the low- and intermediate-risk group, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100% and 90%, respectively, and no patients with EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, and HDR-brachytherapy had biochemical failure at 34 and 46 months, respectively. In the high-risk group with 75 to 79-year-old patients, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 71.4%, 69.0% and 55.7%, respectively, while the actuarial biochemical control rate at 48 months for HDR-brachytherapy was 40.9%. In the high-risk group with patients above 79 years of age, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for endocrine therapy was 64.5%. Prostate cancer death was recognized only in 1 patient within the high-risk group, treated by endocrine therapy. In all the patients, the overall survival rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, HDR-brachytherapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100%, 100%, 76.4% and 89.5%, respectively. The actuarial biochemical control rate and overall survival rate were not significant among the management options in each risk group. However, the 75 to 79-year-old patients within the high-risk group, who were treated with

  6. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Yao; Bae, Kyungmi; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia (≥24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia (≤6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1α. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  7. Temporal and geographic variation in the systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caram, Megan E V; Estes, Jason P; Griggs, Jennifer J; Lin, Paul; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2018-03-06

    Several systemic treatments have been shown to increase survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. This study sought to characterize variation in use of the six "focus drugs" (docetaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, radium-223, and cabazitaxel) that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer during the years 2010-2015. We hypothesized that the use of these treatments would vary over time and by region of the country. We used Clinformatics DataMart™ Database (OptumInsight, Eden Prairie, MN), a de-identified claims database from a national insurance provider. Our sample included patients with prostate cancer who received any of the six drugs. We describe changes in usage patterns over time and geographic region of the United States via detailed descriptive statistics. We explore both patterns of first line therapy and sequence of treatments in our database. Our final analysis included 4275 patients with a mean age of 74 years. Docetaxel was the most commonly used first-line therapy in 2010 (97%), 2011 (66%), and 2012 (49%). Abiraterone was the most commonly used first-line therapy in 2013 (56%), 2014 (46%), and 2015 (34%). Approximately 14% of our study cohort received ≥3 of the 6 drugs throughout their disease course. There was marked geographic variation in use of each of the drugs. Variation in treatment patterns were found with respect to both time and geographic location. Prescription rates of abiraterone outpaced docetaxel as the most commonly prescribed drug after 2013 when it became widely available. However, some regions of the country still lagged behind and prescribed less than would be expected.

  8. uPAR targeted radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-DOTA-AE105 inhibits dissemination of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Morten; Juhl, Karina; Rasmussen, Palle; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Madsen, Jacob; Ploug, Michael; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-08-04

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is implicated in cancer invasion and metastatic development in prostate cancer and provides therefore an attractive molecular target for both imaging and therapy. In this study, we provide the first in vivo data on an antimetastatic effect of uPAR radionuclide targeted therapy in such lesions and show the potential of uPAR positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying small foci of metastatic cells in a mouse model of disseminating human prostate cancer. Two radiolabeled ligands were generated in high purity and specific activity: a uPAR-targeting probe ((177)Lu-DOTA-AE105) and a nonbinding control ((177)Lu-DOTA-AE105mut). Both uPAR flow cytometry and ELISA confirmed high expression levels of the target uPAR in PC-3M-LUC2.luc cells, and cell binding studies using (177)Lu-DOTA-AE105 resulted in a specific binding with an IC50 value of 100 nM in a competitive binding experiment. In vivo, uPAR targeted radionuclide therapy significantly reduced the number of metastatic lesions in the disseminated metastatic prostate cancer model, when compared to vehicle and nontargeted (177)Lu groups (p < 0.05) using bioluminescence imaging. Moreover, we found a significantly longer metastatic-free survival, with 65% of all mice without any disseminated metastatic lesions present at 65 days after first treatment dose (p = 0.047). In contrast, only 30% of all mice in the combined control groups treated with (177)Lu-DOTA-AE105mut or vehicle were without metastatic lesions. No treatment-induced toxicity was observed during the study as evaluated by observing animal weight and H&E staining of kidney tissue (dose-limiting organ). Finally, uPAR PET imaging using (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 detected all small, disseminated metastatic foci when compared with bioluminescence imaging in a cohort of animals during the treatment study. In conclusion, uPAR targeted radiotherapy resulted in a significant reduction in the number of

  9. A Paracrine Role for IL6 in Prostate Cancer Patients: Lack of Production by Primary or Metastatic Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Han; Zheng, Qizhi; Esopi, David; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Luo, Jun; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Drake, Charles G.; Vessella, Robert; Morrissey, Colm; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Sfanos, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Correlative human studies suggest that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) contributes to the development and/or progression of prostate cancer. However, the source of IL6 production in the prostate microenvironment in patients has yet to be determined. The cellular origin of IL6 in primary and metastatic prostate cancer was examined in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using a highly sensitive and specific chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay that underwent extensive analytical validation. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-RT-PCR) showed that benign prostate tissues often had higher expression of IL6 mRNA than matched tumor specimens. CISH analysis further indicated that both primary and metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma cells do not express IL6 mRNA. IL6 expression was highly heterogeneous across specimens and was nearly exclusively restricted to the prostate stromal compartment – including endothelial cells and macrophages among other cell types. The number of IL6-expressing cells correlated positively with the presence of acute inflammation. In metastatic disease, tumor cells were negative in all lesions examined and IL6 expression was restricted to endothelial cells within the vasculature of bone metastases. Finally, IL6 was not detected in any cells in soft tissue metastases. These data suggest that, in prostate cancer patients, paracrine rather than autocrine IL6 production is likely associated with any role for the cytokine in disease progression. PMID:26048576

  10. Review of Gallium-68 PSMA PET/CT Imaging in the Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzo, Nat P; Meyrick, Danielle; Turner, J Harvey

    2018-02-11

    Over 90% of prostate cancers over-express prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and these tumor cells may be accurately targeted for diagnosis by 68 Ga-PSMA-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 68 Ga-PSMA-PET/CT) imaging. This novel molecular imaging modality appears clinically to have superseded CT, and appears superior to MR imaging, for the detection of metastatic disease. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT has the ability to reliably stage prostate cancer at presentation and can help inform an optimal treatment approach. Novel diagnostic applications of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT include guiding biopsy to improve sampling accuracy, and guiding surgery and radiotherapy. In addition to facilitating the management of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), 68 Ga-PSMA can select patients who may benefit from targeted systemic radionuclide therapy. 68 Ga-PSMA is the diagnostic positron-emitting theranostic pair with the beta emitter Lutetium-177 PSMA ( 177 Lu-PSMA) and alpha-emitter Actinium-225 PSMA ( 225 Ac-PSMA) which can both be used to treat PSMA-avid metastases of prostate cancer in the molecular tumor-targeted approach of theranostic nuclear oncology.

  11. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Khan then phoned Dr. Lin regarding the conclusion of meeting with students’ evaluation and expressed students’ positive attitude toward research...nitrocellulose membrane, membranes were blocked with 5% non-fat milk Novel Imidazopyridines in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer PLOS ONE | DOI

  12. Impact of ethnicity on the outcome of men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Brandon; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Chen, Yu-Hui; Sridhar, Srikala S; Mitchell, Edith P; Pettaway, Curtis A; Carducci, Michael A; Nguyen, Paul L; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes are impacted by socioeconomic and biologic factors. Ethnicity plays a role in the former, but little is known about the responsiveness of metastatic PCa to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) among races. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was used to identify men who were diagnosed with distant, de novo, metastatic PCa from 2004 to 2012. Patterns of presentation, overall survival (OS), and PCa-specific mortality (PCSM) were determined for each race. E3805 clinical trial data also were retrospectively reviewed to assess outcomes of ADT and ADT plus docetaxel by race. Of all PCa diagnoses in SEER, distant, de novo, metastatic disease was diagnosed in 4.2% of non-Hispanic whites, 5.8% of Hispanic whites, 5.7% of blacks, 5.5% of Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 8.8% of American Indians/Alaska Natives (P blacks, respectively. Few Asians participated in the E3805 trial. Asian men have superior median OS and PCSM for distant, de novo, metastatic PCa than men of other race. Non-Hispanic whites and blacks who receive treatment with ADT or chemohormonal therapy have comparable outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:1536-1544. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer: Fatal outcome following strontium-89 therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, C.; McKenzie, R.; Coupland, D.B. [Univ. of British Columbia, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    A patient with metastatic prostate cancer was found to have low-grade disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He had significant bone pain despite external-beam radiotherapy and was given {sup 89}Sr with subsequent thrombocytopenia and epistaxis. The patient died from generalized hemorrhage 36 days postinjection. Although it is not possible to establish a causal relationship between {sup 89}Sr and DIC, practitioners should be alert to complications associated with the primary disorder which might occur at a time to raise concern about the intervention. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Complete Response to Bicalutamide Withdrawal Prolonged for Almost 2 Years in Patients With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Hongo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the first case report describing a complete response to bicalutamide withdrawal that lasted for almost 2 years in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer. An 80-year-old man who had prostate-specific antigen (PSA level elevation (168.1 ng/mL visited our hospital in February 2010. Bone scintigraphy showed pelvic metastases. We started hormonal therapy with leuprorelin and bicalutamide. The PSA concentration decreased to <0.1 ng/mL but started increasing again and reached 1.64 ng/mL in October 2012, at which time bicalutamide administration was discontinued. The PSA concentration decreased again and has remained below the limit of sensitivity for almost 2 years.

  16. Radiotherapy in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer: Current standards and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: The intent of this course is to review issues involved in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer and to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, the use of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with the radiation, the management of patients with regional metastases and recurrent disease following surgery and radiation. At the end of this course, participants should be able to fluently discuss management issues and strategies across the entire spectrum of non-metastatic prostate cancer. - Pre-treatment prognostic factors including clinical stage, grade, and pre-treatment PSA, will be presented and their relative value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. Strategies to be discussed include standard dose radiation, escalated dose radiation, particle radiation and the use of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy. - The process of simulation and field design will be presented, the value of CT-based treatment planning, beams-eye view design and the relative value of three-dimensional treatment planning will be discussed. - The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with this will also be presented so that what constitutes an adequate simulation and margin of treatment can be clarified. - The management of newly diagnosed patients, covering the range of low stage/low grade to locally advanced prostate cancer will be discussed. - The relative value of increasing dose, the relative value of using neo-adjuvant and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and the indications for escalated dose will be presented. - Strategies for managing post-prostatectomy patients will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant and therapeutic irradiation for biochemical failure will be presented and a strategy for management will be discussed. - How to deal with patients with residual disease post radiation will be discussed and the relative value of cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy or hormonal therapy will

  17. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaile Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  18. Treatment Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients With Ultra-High Prostate-Specific Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Patricia; Tonita, Jon; Woitas, Carla; Zhu Tong; Joseph, Kurian; Skarsgard, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: It is commonly believed that prostate cancer patients with very high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are unlikely to benefit from definitive local treatment, and patients with very high PSA are often underrepresented in, or excluded from, randomized clinical trials. Consequently, little is known about their optimal treatment or prognosis. We performed a registry-based analysis of management and outcome in this population of patients. Methods and Materials: Our provincial Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 to 2001. A retrospective chart review provided information on stage, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis, and treatment. In this study, ultra-high PSA was defined as PSA of ≥50 ng/ml. For a more complete perspective, treatment outcomes of patients with PSA of 20 to 49.9 ng/ml were also studied. Results: Of the 8378 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during this period, 6,449 had no known nodal or distant metastatic disease. The median follow-up of this group was 67.2 months (range, 0–192 months). A total of 1534 patients had PSA of ≥20 ng/ml. Among the 995 patients with PSA 20 to 49.9 ng/ml, 85 had radical prostatectomy (RP), and their 5- and 10-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) were 95% and 84%, respectively. The 497 patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) had 5- and 10-year CSS of 92% and 71%. For the 332 patients with PSA 50–99.9 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 81% and 55%. For the 207 patients with PSA of ≥100 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 80% and 54%. Conclusions: This is the largest series in the world on non metastatic cancer patients with ultra-high PSA at diagnosis. Even in the setting of a very high presenting PSA level, prostatectomy and radiotherapy are often associated with prolonged survival.

  19. Cell Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer Michael Lilly, MD Richard Weisbart, MD Medical...0534, entitled Cell- penetrating bispecific antibodies for targeting oncogenic transcription factors in advanced prostate cancer . The research is a... Prostate cancer , antibody, bispecific, androgen receptor, castration-resistant 3

  20. Contemporary Trends and Survival Outcomes After Aborted Radical Prostatectomy in Lymph Node Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Preisser, Felix; Nazzani, Sebastiano; Marchioni, Michele; Tian, Zhe; Fossati, Nicola; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Gallina, Andrea; Abdollah, Firas; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Montorsi, Francesco; Saad, Fred; Tilki, Derya; Briganti, Alberto; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2018-01-20

    Aborted radical prostatectomy (aRP) in lymph node (LN) metastatic (pN1) prostate cancer (PCa) patients showed worse survival in European patients. Contemporary rates of aRP are unknown in North America. To examine the rate of aRP and its effect on cancer-specific mortality (CSM) in contemporary North American patients. Within the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (2004-2014), we identified 3719 pN1 PCa patients. RP. Incidence proportion and median survival of LN metastatic PCa patients who underwent aRP versus completed RP (cRP). Cumulative incidence plots and competing-risks regression (CRR) models tested CSM and other-cause mortality rates according to aRP versus cRP. The effect of selected variables on CSM rate was graphically depicted using LOESS methodology. All analyses were repeated after propensity score matching. Between 2004 and 2014, the rate of aRP decreased from 20.4% to 5.6% (pcontemporary North American patients, 5% are affected by aRP. It confers a significant survival disadvantage that applies to patients with baseline PSA values up to 50ng/ml and in those with up to seven LN metastases. Radical prostatectomy should not be aborted in pN1 prostate cancer individuals. Copyright © 2018 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  2. Early growth inhibition is followed by increased metastatic disease with vitamin D (calcitriol treatment in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebusola Alagbala Ajibade

    Full Text Available The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW, were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg, or QW (50 µg/kg were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p. 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW. However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086, and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467. By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823. Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20-25 weeks-of-age(p = 0.0003. Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis.

  3. Early Growth Inhibition Is Followed by Increased Metastatic Disease with Vitamin D (Calcitriol) Treatment in the TRAMP Model of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Moser, Michael T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg), or QW (50 µg/kg) were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p.) 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW) and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW). However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086), and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467). By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823). Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20–25 weeks-of-age)(p = 0.0003). Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis. PMID:24586868

  4. PITX2 and non-canonical Wnt pathway interaction in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, I; Morrissey, C; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Corey, E; Strutton, G M; Nelson, C C; Nicol, D L; Clements, J A; Gardiner, E M

    2014-02-01

    The non-canonical Wnt pathway, a regulator of cellular motility and morphology, is increasingly implicated in cancer metastasis. In a quantitative PCR array analysis of 84 Wnt pathway associated genes, both non-canonical and canonical pathways were activated in primary and metastatic tumors relative to normal prostate. Expression of the Wnt target gene PITX2 in a prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis was strikingly elevated over normal prostate (over 2,000-fold) and primary prostate cancer (over 200-fold). The elevation of PITX2 protein was also evident on tissue microarrays, with strong PITX2 immunostaining in PCa skeletal and, to a lesser degree, soft tissue metastases. PITX2 is associated with cell migration during normal tissue morphogenesis. In our studies, overexpression of individual PITX2A/B/C isoforms stimulated PC-3 PCa cell motility, with the PITX2A isoform imparting a specific motility advantage in the presence of non-canonical Wnt5a stimulation. Furthermore, PITX2 specific shRNA inhibited PC-3 cell migration toward bone cell derived chemoattractant. These experimental results support a pivotal role of PITX2A and non-canonical Wnt signaling in enhancement of PCa cell motility, suggest PITX2 involvement in homing of PCa to the skeleton, and are consistent with a role for PITX2 in PCa metastasis to soft and bone tissues. Our findings, which significantly expand previous evidence that PITX2 is associated with risk of PCa biochemical recurrence, indicate that variation in PITX2 expression accompanies and may promote prostate tumor progression and metastasis.

  5. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  6. Influence of the location and number of metastases in the survival of metastatic prostatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, A; Hernández, V; de la Morena, J M; Jiménez-Valladolid, I; Pérez-Fernández, E; de la Peña, E; Llorente, C

    2017-05-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer seems to be modulated by factors such as the number and site of metastases. Our objective is to evaluate survival outcomes according to the number and site of metastases in our series of metastatic patients over the last 15 years. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2014. We analyzed overall survival and progression-free survival, depending on the number and location of metastases on patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer. Other potential prognostic factors were also evaluated: age, clinical stage, PSA at diagnosis, Gleason, PSA nadir, time till PSA nadir and first-line or second-line treatment after progression. We analyzed a series of 162 patients. The mean age was 72.7yr (SD: 8.5). The estimated median overall survival was 3.9 yr (95% CI 2.6-5.2). The overall survival in patients with only lymph node metastases was 7 yr (95% CI 4.1-9.7), 3.9 (95%CI 2.3-5.5) in patients with only bone metastases, 2.5 yr (95% CI 2-2.3) in lymph nodes and bone metastases, and 2.2 yr (95% CI 1.4-3) in patients with visceral metastases (Pnumber of metastases showed no association with survival. The site of metastases has a clear impact on both overall survival and progression-free survival. Patients with only lymph node involvement had a better prognosis. The number of metastases showed no significant impact on survival in our series. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) determinations before and during intermittent maximal androgen blockade in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kil, P. J. M.; Goldschmidt, H. M. J.; Wieggers, B. J. A.; Kariakine, O. B.; Studer, U. E.; Whelan, P.; Hetherington, J.; de Reijke, Th M.; Hoekstra, J. W.; Collette, L.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of serially measured tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) levels in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma treated with intermittent maximal androgen blockade (MAB). To determine its value with respect to predicting response to treatment and time to

  8. The inhibitory effects of AR/miR-190a/YB-1 negative feedback loop on prostate cancer and underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Tao; Song, Wen; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Wu, Kongming; Yu, Zuoren; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2015-08-28

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. MiR-190a belongs to the small noncoding RNA family and has an important role in breast cancer metastasis. However, it is still unknown whether miR-190a plays a role in prostate cancer development. Herein, we first observed AR/miR-190a/YB-1 forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in prostate cancer: miR-190a expression was down-regulated by AR activation; YB-1 functions are as an AR activator; miR-190a inhibited AR expression and transactivation through direct binding to 3'UTR of YB-1 gene. MiR-190a contributes the human prostate cancer cell growth through AR-dependent signaling. Moreover, we examined the expression of miR-190a and observed a significant decrease in human prostate cancers. Reduced expression of miR-190a was inversely correlated to AR levels of prostate cancer patients, and patients with higher miR-190a expression in their tumor have improved tumor-free survival. Taken together, our findings identified a biochemical and functional link between miR-190a with reduced expression in advanced prostate cancer, YB-1 and AR signaling in prostate cancer.

  9. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of prostate in a 28-year-old male: The outcome is poor in young patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Madan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is common in older patients. Rarity in younger population limits the study of natural history and prognosis in this population. Most of the published data has reported poor outcome in younger patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Here, we report a case of prostate cancer in 28-year-old male who presented with bone metastasis. After bilateral inguinal orchidectomy, he was started on anti-androgen therapy and received palliative radiotherapy for bone metastasis. There was only a slight decrease in prostate-specific antigen (PSA level and pelvic disease post treatment. Subsequently, he was started on opioid analgesics (by World Health Organization, WHO, step ladder in view of persistent pain. The index case is being presented for its rarity and probable poor outcome in young patients and to stress on the fact that the possibility of primary prostatic adenocarcinoma should be investigated in a male presenting with bone metastasis irrespective of the age.

  10. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  11. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Translational Medicine, 2012, 4(126). 4. Kirschmann, D.A., et al. Molecular Pathways: Vasculogenic Mimicry in Tumor Cells: Diagnostic and Therapeutic...cells with features of vasculogenic mimicry .4 • Fluorescence in situ hybridization for cell ploidy, TMPRSS2-ERG status, PTEN loss, and AR...molecular signatures. In adult animals , epithelial and mesenchymal cells usually remain in one phenotypic state; that is, epithelial cells do not change

  12. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    in vivo cytotoxicities of the conjugated JRM2 peptide and finishing up screening and validating the kinase inhibitor library screening. 15. SUBJECT...cells were purified out and then lysed to infect bacteria K91, from which 960 and 704 tet/kan- resistant bacterial colonies were generated from GFP+ and...Figure 2A; data not shown). To determine whether JRM2 can preferentially bind to the PSA-/lo LNCaP cells, we made several versions of JRM2 conjugates

  13. Dual-Targeting of AR and Akt Pathways by Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    knockout mice. A. The weight of the GU- bloc is normalized by body weight and presented as mean±standard deviation, n=6. B. Representative photos ...presented as mean ± standard deviation, n=6. B, Representative photos of the GU bloc in each group. 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 High...Brigham D, Moon M, Maneval EC, Chen I, Darimont B, Hager JH. A Clinically Relevant Androgen Receptor Mutation Confers Resistance to Second-Generation

  14. Investigating Genomic Mechanisms of Treatment Resistance in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should...PATENTS, AND LICENCES None REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Two clinical protocols and a laboratory protocol for the work have been developed for this...2011 University of California, San Francisco Fellowship Urologic Oncology LICENSES, CERTIFICATION 2004 Medical Licensure, California ( Licence

  15. Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin and Gprc6a Axis Produce Intratumoral Androgens in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and...growth. 6. PUBLICATIONS, ABSRACTS, AND PRESENTATIONS: None. 7. INVENTIONS, PATENTS AND LICENCES : None. 8. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES

  16. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Abstracts, and Presentations……….….……………. 16 7. Inventions, Patents and Licenses …………………………………… 17 8. Reportable Outcomes..……………………………………………… 17...continuous passaging LNCaP cells with stable knockdown of MAPK4 led to decreased knockdown efficiency, potentially due to the growth disadvantage of...LNCaP cells with stable knockdown of MAPK4 led to decreased knockdown efficiency, potentially due to the growth disadvantage of those cells with

  17. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    NUMBER (include area code ) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 3 Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic...Kim IY, Ahn HJ, Zelner DJ, Shaw JW, Lang S, Kato M, Oefelein MG, Miyazono K, Nemeth JA, Kozlowski JM, Lee C. Loss of expression of transforming

  18. CpG-STAT3siRNA for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    and thumb to draw back skin of above and below the eye then carefully insert the 30G needle at ~45° angle at the corner of the eye , lateral to the...retroorbital injections, mice should not receive more than single injection per day. Additional injections are possible only when using alternate eyes with 1...lately reported in MDSCs associated with several types of human cancers, such as melanoma , head and neck, renal, breast, and pancreatic cancers (15, 21

  19. Understanding and Targeting Tumor Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer to Inhibit Tumor Progression and Castration Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...overall survival. (G) Kaplan-Meier survival curve showing the significant delay of mortality caused by Pep-H6 peptibody treatment of Ptenpc-/-Smad4pc...purchased from US Biomax Tissue Microarray) for YAP1. Interestingly, YAP1 is expressed in basal cells, but not in the luminal cells of the normal

  20. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES...cell numbers compared to the time-matched control LNCaP-GFP cells (Figure 1F). We further characterized LNCaP-GFP and LNCaP-MDV cells at crisis point...cadherin, SLUG , and vimentin), and CSCs (i.e., CD44, integrin α2β1, and ABCG2) [2-4, 20, 25-33] (Figure 3B; Supplementary Figure S3). Flow

  1. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    extracted from laser -captured PCa cells from human CRPC tumors revealed that MAPK4 expression is strongly correlated with AR activation (expression...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and...signaling induced the expression of several AR targets as well as MAPK4 in PCa LNCaP cells, and that MAPK4 induced ligand-independent AR activation in

  2. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  3. Can we improve the definition of high-risk, hormone naïve, non-metastatic prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Alcaraz, Antonio; James, Nicholas; Valdagni, Riccardo; Irani, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    To identify criteria beyond Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TMN)-, prostate-specific antigen (PSA)- and Gleason score-based standard classifications to enhance the stratification of non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer. A detailed search of the literature was performed using PubMed. The authors reviewed the literature and used a modified Delphi approach to identify relevant approaches to enhance standard classifications. Specific criteria for high-risk prostate cancer vary across guidelines and clinical trials, reflecting the differing perspectives concerning the definition of 'risk' between different specialities within the urology/radiation oncology community. In addition to the present classifications, evidence exists that the measure of cancer volume can provide additional prognostic value. More accurate imaging, especially multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can also provide information concerning staging and cancer volume, and thus may assist in the identification of patients with high-risk prostate cancer. A refined definition of non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer is proposed. Within this high-risk cohort, patients with multiple high-risk criteria are especially at risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  4. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja, E-mail: barbara.jereczek@ieo.it [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Beltramo, Giancarlo [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, Laura [Radiotherapy Unit, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy); Fodor, Cristiana [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Luigi [Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Gherardi, Federica [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Ascione, Carmen [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, Ottavio [Department of Urology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  5. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting localized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support

  6. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. Results: The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p≤0.05). Conclusion: A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance. PMID:26219446

  7. [Effects of bioactive molecules of Beta vulgaris L. ssp. esculenta var. rubra on metastatic prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirády, Péter; Sárdi, Eva; Beko, Gabriella; Szucs, Miklós; Horváth, András; Székely, Edit; Szentmihályi, Klára; Romics, Imre; Blázovics, Anna

    2010-09-12

    Several reports are known about the effects of nutrition supplements in the improvement of quality of life of patients with tumor, however, the physiological background remains largely unknown. Table beet affects numerous biochemical reactions, enzymes and metabolic-synthesis. Natural table beet product come from commercial service was given twice 10 g daily for 1 month for 24 patients (mean age 68+/-8 years) with hormone-resistant and metastatic prostate cancer treated with taxan chemotherapy, who report themselves first, mean 3,6+/-2,8 years ago with their complains. 18 men's data were amenable after treatment for evaluation. In addition to routine laboratory examination values of HbA1c, 9 cytokines and levels of 3 growth factors, the global parameters of redox-homeostasis, few elements of their metal-ions, Zn- and level of free protoporfirin, trans-metilating processes before and 1 month after treatment were determined. In most of the patients, favorable impact of beet was enforced and significantly high levels of Zn- and free protoporfirin decreased; furthermore, trans-metilating processes fastened. According to results, it seems that moderate and permanent consumption of table beet product affects the life expectancy of patients favorably; however, due to the increasing values of EGF, medical control is necessary for patients with prostate cancer treated by chemotherapy.

  8. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer – role of denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paller CJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Channing J Paller,1 Michael A Carducci,1 George K Philips21Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-ΚB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically

  9. Reduced number of CD169+macrophages in pre-metastatic regional lymph nodes is associated with subsequent metastatic disease in an animal model and with poor outcome in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömvall, Kerstin; Sundkvist, Kristoffer; Ljungberg, Börje; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Tumor-derived antigens are captured by CD169 + (SIGLEC1 + ) sinus macrophages in regional lymph nodes (LNs), and are presented to effector cells inducing an anti-tumor immune response. Reduced CD169 expression in pre-metastatic regional LNs is associated with subsequent metastatic disease and a poor outcome in several tumor types, but if this is the case in prostate cancer has not been explored. CD169 expression was measured with immunohistochemistry in metastasis-free regional LNs from 109 prostate cancer patients treated with prostatectomy (January 1996 to April 2002). Possible associations of CD169 expression with PSA-relapse, prostate cancer death, Gleason score, and other clinical data were assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival- and Cox regression analysis. In addition, the Dunning rat prostate tumor model was used to examine CD169 expression in pre-metastatic LNs draining either highly metastatic MatLyLu- or poorly metastatic AT1-tumors. In patients with low CD169 immunostaining in metastasis-free regional LNs, 8 of the 27 patients died from prostate cancer compared with only three of the 82 patients with high immunostaining (P cancer aggressiveness. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Treatment of Hormone Resistance with Docetaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients: Results of a Clinical Experience at Omid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Tajvidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the most important cancers among men worldwide. Androgen ablation therapy can be used in treatment of these patients; however, most will progress to metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. In this regard, docetaxel has been approved to treat metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer in the United States. In this study, we aimed to investigate the results of this treatment modality in metastatic prostate cancer patients from Iran. Methods:We evaluated PSA response and bone pain relief in 18 metastatic prostate cancer patients who underwent treatment with docetaxel at a dose of 75 mg/m2 intravenously on the first day of treatment. The treatment was repeated every three weeks (6 cycles along with 10 mg of prednisolone. Results: Of 18 patients, 39% had >50% decline in PSA levels.There were 16% of the patients with a PSA decline of approximately 30% to 50% of the pre-treatment levels. In addition, 29% of the patients had progressive PSA levels during chemotherapy. Among them, 55% had significant pain relief. Conclusion: This research showed the effectiveness of docetaxel to decrease PSA levels in metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients from Iran. Docetaxel was also valuable in alleviation of pain in these patients. However, prospective studies should validate this approach.

  11. The preclinical development of novel treatment options for advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major societal problem with 11.000 new cases every year in the Netherlands. The advanced stage of the disease, castration-resistant prostate cancer, is especially deadly and is often accompanied with (bone) metastases. In this PhD-thesis, we have explored several strategies to

  12. Graphene oxide-wrapped PEGylated liquid crystalline nanoparticles for effective chemo-photothermal therapy of metastatic prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Youn, Yu Seok; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report the preparation of PEGylated liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCN) loaded with docetaxel (DTX) and wrapped with graphene oxide (GO), called PEG-GO/LCN/DTX, for effective chemo-photothermal therapy of metastatic prostate cancer cells. The prepared formulation exhibited a small particle size (<250 nm), high drug loading capacity (∼15%), and efficient near infrared (NIR) light-induced thermal heat. Importantly, PEG-GO/LCN/DTX successfully accumulated in prostate cancer cells and exhibited potent apoptotic and antimigration effects, mediated by the combination of the anticancer effects of DTX and the thermal heat induced by exposure of GO to NIR light. Taken together, our findings support that PEG-GO/LCN/DTX may be an effective system for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Moreover, the results establish a proof-of-concept for the potential chemo-photothermal functionality of PEG-GO/LCN/DTX. This hybrid system of LCN and GO could provide controlled and targeted drug delivery with enhanced NIR-induced thermal effects for effective treatment of metastatic cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracellular vesicles for personalized therapy decision support in advanced metastatic cancers and its potential impact for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Corcoran, Niall M; Oleinikova, Irina; Jovanovic, Lidija; Ramm, Grant A; Nelson, Colleen C; Jenster, Guido; Russell, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    The use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, as liquid biopsy-derived biomarkers for cancers have been investigated. CTC enumeration using the CellSearch based platform provides an accurate insight on overall survival where higher CTC counts indicate poor prognosis for patients with advanced metastatic cancer. EVs provide information based on their lipid, protein, and nucleic acid content and can be isolated from biofluids and analyzed from a relatively small volume, providing a routine and non-invasive modality to monitor disease progression. Our pilot experiment by assessing the level of two subpopulations of small EVs, the CD9 positive and CD63 positive EVs, showed that the CD9 positive EV level is higher in plasma from patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer with detectable CTCs. These data show the potential utility of a particular EV subpopulation to serve as biomarkers for advanced metastatic prostate cancer. EVs can potentially be utilized as biomarkers to provide accurate genotypic and phenotypic information for advanced prostate cancer, where new strategies to design a more personalized therapy is currently the focus of considerable investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical outcomes and nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) according to initial PSA levels in primary androgen deprivation therapy for metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Ueno, Satoru; Izumi, Kouji; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Mizokami, Atsushi; Hinotsu, Shiro; Akaza, Hideyuki; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the clinical outcomes of metastatic prostate cancer patients and the relationship between nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and different types of primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT). This study utilized data from the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer registry, which is a large, multicenter, population-based database. A total of 2982 patients treated with PADT were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated using combined androgen blockade (CAB) and non-CAB therapies. The relationships between nadir PSA levels and PADT type according to initial serum PSA levels were also investigated. Among the 2982 enrolled patients, 2101 (70.5 %) were treated with CAB. Although CAB-treated patients had worse clinical characteristics, their probability of PFS and OS was higher compared with those treated with a non-CAB therapy. These results were due to a survival benefit with CAB in patients with an initial PSA level of 500-1000 ng/mL. Nadir PSA levels were significantly lower in CAB patients than in non-CAB patients with comparable initial serum PSA levels. A small survival benefit for CAB in metastatic prostate cancer was demonstrated in a Japanese large-scale prospective cohort study. The clinical significance of nadir PSA levels following PADT was evident, but the predictive impact of PSA nadir on OS was different between CAB and non-CAB therapy.

  15. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca 2+ with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca 2+ signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca 2+ was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca 2+ -indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca 2+ oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca 2+ level could be induced by applying a high-K + solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca 2+ and voltage-gated Na + channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na + channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca 2+ oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na + channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca 2+ activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca 2+ oscillations are discussed.

  16. Development of Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancers by the Ser/Arg Repetitive Matrix 4-Mediated RNA Splicing Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn R. Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While the use of next-generation androgen receptor pathway inhibition (ARPI therapy has significantly increased the survival of patients with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma (AdPC, several groups have reported a treatment-resistant mechanism, whereby cancer cells can become androgen receptor (AR indifferent and gain a neuroendocrine (NE-like phenotype. This subtype of castration-resistant prostate cancer has been termed “treatment-induced castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer” (CRPC-NE. Recent reports indicate that the overall genomic landscapes of castration-resistant tumors with AdPC phenotypes and CRPC-NE are not significantly altered. However, CRPC-NE tumors have been found to contain a NE-specific pattern throughout their epigenome and splicing transcriptome, which are significantly modified. The molecular mechanisms by which CRPC-NE develops remain unclear, but several factors have been implicated in the progression of the disease. Recently, Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (SRRM4, a neuronal-specific RNA splicing factor that is upregulated in CRPC-NE tumors, has been shown to establish a CRPC-NE-unique splicing transcriptome, to induce a NE-like morphology in AdPC cells, and, most importantly, to transform AdPC cells into CRPC-NE xenografts under ARPI. Moreover, the SRRM4-targeted splicing genes are highly enriched in various neuronal processes, suggesting their roles in facilitating a CRPC-NE program. This article will address the importance of SRRM4-mediated alternative RNA splicing in reprogramming translated proteins to facilitate NE differentiation, survival, and proliferation of cells to establish CRPC-NE tumors. In addition, we will discuss the potential roles of SRRM4 in conjunction with other known pathways and factors important for CRPC-NE development, such as the AR pathway, TP53 and RB1 genes, the FOXA family of proteins, and environmental factors. This study aims to explore the multifaceted functions of SRRM4

  17. The Multifaceted Roles of STAT3 Signaling in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Thaper, Daksh; Zoubeidi, Amina, E-mail: azoubeidi@prostatecentre.com [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 governs essential functions of epithelial and hematopoietic cells that are often dysregulated in cancer. While the role for STAT3 in promoting the progression of many solid and hematopoietic malignancies is well established, this review will focus on the importance of STAT3 in prostate cancer progression to the incurable metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Indeed, STAT3 integrates different signaling pathways involved in the reactivation of androgen receptor pathway, stem like cells and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition that drive progression to mCRPC. As equally important, STAT3 regulates interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment as well as immune cell activation. This makes it a major factor in facilitating prostate cancer escape from detection of the immune response, promoting an immunosuppressive environment that allows growth and metastasis. Based on the multifaceted nature of STAT3 signaling in the progression to mCRPC, the promise of STAT3 as a therapeutic target to prevent prostate cancer progression and the variety of STAT3 inhibitors used in cancer therapies is discussed.

  18. AR Alternative Splicing and Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Cancer Res 2009;69:2912–8. 15. Culig Z, Bartsch G. Androgen axis in prostate cancer. J Cell Biochem...such as MLPA are useful for identifying deletions or duplications that involve probe-binding sites, this study has illustrated that unbiased...the AR locus is illustrated at the top. Paired-end sequence reads were mapped to the hg19 build of the human genome using Burrows --Wheeler Alignment

  19. Radiolabeled prostate-specific membrane antigen small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leon; Sonni, Ida; Kopka, Klaus; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in most PCs and represents an ideal target for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Numerous PSMA tracers have been recently developed. This review aims to provide an overview on the clinical influence of PSMA tracers in primary staging, biochemical recurrence (BCR) of PC and advanced, metastatic PC. Additionally, the use of PSMA tracers in systemic radioligand therapy (RLT) of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), as well as non-prostatic specific uptake of PSMA tracers and the use of PSMA imaging to manage therapy have been described. A computerized search of the literature (PubMed) was conducted in order to find evidence on the role of PSMA tracers in the diagnosis and therapy of PC. PSMA positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) outperforms conventional imaging in the settings of primary PC, BCR and advanced PC. Especially in BCR of PC, PSMA PET/CT shows clinical value with significantly higher detection rates than standard modalities. The use of PSMA PET/CT resulted in a change of the therapeutic management in up to half of the cases. Regarding RLT, smaller studies were able to show positive clinical effects of 177Lu-labeled PSMA tracers without the occurrence of severe side effects. The currently available data clearly shows that PSMA targeting has a clinical impact on the diagnosis of PC, and that RLT using radiolabeled PSMA tracers has high potentiality in the settings of resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches.

  20. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Osborne, Joseph R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); O' Donoghue, Joseph A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Beylergil, Volkan; Ruan, Shutian; Cheal, Sarah M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lyashchenko, Serge [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Lewis, Jason S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Holland, Jason P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Reuter, Victor E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Loda, Massimo F. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science of Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Weber, Wolfgang A.; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Bander, Neil H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Urology, New York, NY (United States); Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1-14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51-89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153-317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on {sup 89}Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on

  1. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  2. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  3. Dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion for palliative care and pain relief in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Le, Bao T; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Tran, Hung Q; Tran, Dao M; Pham, Cu Q; Pham, Tuan D; Ha, Trung V; Bui, Nga T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (adenocarcinoma of the prostate) is the most widespread cancer in men. It causes significant suffering and mortality due to metastatic disease. The main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) includes androgen manipulation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and/or radioisotopes. However, these therapeutic approaches are considered palliative at this stage, and their significant side effects can cause further decline in patients' quality of life and increase non-cancer-related morbidity/mortality. In this study, the authors have used the infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) to treat 18 patients with MPC. The 90-day follow-up of the patients having undergone the proposed therapeutic regimen showed significant improvement in clinical symptoms, blood and biochemistry tests, and quality of life. There were no major side effects from the treatment. In searching for new and better methods for palliative treatment and pain relief, this study strongly suggested therapy with DMSO-SB infusions could provide a rational alternative to conventional treatment for patients with MPC.

  4. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Hedgehog overexpression leads to the formation of prostate cancer stem cells with metastatic property irrespective of androgen receptor expression in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chin-Pao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog signalling has been implicated in prostate tumorigenesis in human subjects and mouse models, but its effects on transforming normal basal/stem cells toward malignant cancer stem cells remain poorly understood. Methods We produced pCX-shh-IG mice that overexpress Hedgehog protein persistently in adult prostates, allowing for elucidation of the mechanism during prostate cancer initiation and progression. Various markers were used to characterize and confirm the transformation of normal prostate basal/stem cells into malignant cancer stem cells under the influence of Hedgehog overexpression. Results The pCX-shh-IG mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN that led to invasive and metastatic prostate cancers within 90 days. The prostate cancer was initiated through activation of P63+ basal/stem cells along with simultaneous activation of Hedgehog signalling members, suggesting that P63+/Patch1+ and P63+/Smo+ cells may serve as cancer-initiating cells and progress into malignant prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs. In the hyperplastic lesions and tumors, the progeny of PCSCs differentiated into cells of basal-intermediate and intermediate-luminal characteristics, whereas rare ChgA+ neuroendocrine differentiation was seen. Furthermore, in the metastatic loci within lymph nodes, kidneys, and lungs, the P63+ PCSCs formed prostate-like glandular structures, characteristic of the primitive structures during early prostate development. Besides, androgen receptor (AR expression was detected heterogeneously during tumor progression. The existence of P63+/AR-, CK14+/AR- and CD44+/AR- progeny indicates direct procurement of AR- malignant cancer trait. Conclusions These data support a cancer stem cell scenario in which Hedgehog signalling plays important roles in transforming normal prostate basal/stem cells into PCSCs and in the progression of PCSCs into metastatic tumor cells.

  6. Characterization of a rat model of metastatic prostate cancer bone pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Donato De Ciantis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Donato De Ciantis1, Kiran Yashpal2, James Henry3, Gurmit Singh11Department of Pathology and Molecular Pathology, 2Pain Research Laboratories, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaPurpose: The objectives of this study were to establish and characterize a novel animal model of metastatic prostate cancer-induced bone pain.Methods: Copenhagen rats were injected with 106 MATLyLu (MLL prostate cancer cells or phosphate-buffered saline by per cutaneous intra femoral injections into the right hind leg distal epiphysis. Over 13 days, rats progressively developed a tumor within the distal femoral epiphysis. On days 3, 7, 10, and 13 post injection, rats were subjected to the incapacitance and Randall–Selitto behavioral tests as they are believed to be indirect reflections of tumor induced pain. Ipsilateral hind limbs were subjected to X-ray and computed tomography (CT scans and histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E.Results: Intra femoral injections of MLL cells resulted in the progressive development of a tumor leading to bone destruction and nociceptive behaviors. Tumor development resulted in the redistribution of weight to the contralateral hind leg and significantly reduced the paw withdrawal threshold of the ipsilateral hind paw as observed via the incapacitance and Randall–Selitto tests, respectively. X-ray and computed tomography scans along with H&E stains indicated tumor-associated structural damage to the distal femur. This model was challenged with administration of meloxicam. Compared with vehicle-injected controls, the meloxicam-treated rats displayed smaller nociceptive responses as observed with the incapacitance and Randall–Selitto tests, suggesting that meloxicam was effective in reducing the pain-related symptoms displayed by model animals and that the model behaved in a predictable way to cyclooxygenase-2 treatment.Conclusions: This

  7. Estrogens and Their Receptors in Prostate Cancer: Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Di Zazzo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in clinical management of prostate cancer (PC is to limit tumor growth and prevent metastatic spreading. Considerable efforts have been made to discover new compounds for PC therapy and recent years have seen promising progress in this field. Pharmacological approaches have been designed to achieve benefits in PC treatment and avoid the negative side effects resulting from administration of antagonists or agonists or new drugs. Nonetheless, the currently available therapies frequently induce resistance and PC progresses toward castration-resistant forms that can be caused by the androgen receptor reactivation and/or mutations, or derangement of signaling pathways. Preclinical and clinical findings have also shown that other nuclear receptors are frequently altered in PC. In this review, we focus on the role of estradiol/estradiol receptor (ER axis, which controls PC growth and progression. Selective targeting of ER subtypes (α or β may be an attractive way to limit the growth and spreading of prostatic cancer cells.

  8. Incidence of high chromogranin A serum levels in patients with non metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnabei Agnese

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChromograninA in prostate carcinoma (PC indicate NE differentiation. This tumour is more aggressive and resistant to hormone therapy. Patients and methods We analyzed the incidence of pre-operative ChromograninA serum levels in non metastatic PC patients. Serum PSA and ChromograninA were analyzed before treatment. Clinicopathological parameters were evaluated in relation to serum ChromograninA. 486 patients were enrolled. Results We found 352 pT2 and 134 pT3. 21 patients were N+. 278 patients had Gleason score levels 7. Median PSA pre-operative level was 7.61 ng/ml. PSA was significantly associated with pT stage (pT2 with PSA abnormal 23.6% vs pT3 48.5%, p 7 vs 29.5% in the Gleason score = 7 vs 27.3% in the Gleason score 7 (31.4% (p = 0.12. The serum ChromograninA levels in the two groups of patients were subdivided before and after 2005 on the basis of different used assays, showing no correlation with serum ChromograninA and other parameters. Conclusions This study showed that ChromograninA levels correlated to NE differentiation and possible aggressiveness of PC. Pre-operative circulating ChromograninA could complement PSA in selecting more aggressive PC cases, particularly in the presence of a higher Gleason score. Complementary information is provided by the absence of a correlation between serum ChromograninA and PSA levels.

  9. Nanodiamonds enhance therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in treating metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaam, Amanee D; Hwang, Patrick T J; Poonawalla, Aliza; Green, Hadiyah N; Jun, Ho-wook; Dean, Derrick

    2014-10-24

    Enhancing therapeutic efficacy is essential for successful treatment of chemoresistant cancers such as metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). To improve the efficacy of doxorubicin (DOX) for treating chemoresistant disease, the feasibility of using nanodiamond (ND) particles was investigated. Utilizing the pH responsive properties of ND, a novel protocol for complexing NDs and DOX was developed using a pH 8.5 coupling buffer. The DOX loading efficiency, loading on the NDs, and pH responsive release characteristics were determined utilizing UV-Visible spectroscopy. The effects of the ND-DOX on HRPC cell line PC3 were evaluated with MTS and live/dead cell viability assays. ND-DOX displayed exceptional loading efficiency (95.7%) and drug loading on NDs (23.9 wt%) with optimal release at pH 4 (80%). In comparison to treatment with DOX alone, cell death significantly increased when cells were treated with ND-DOX complexes demonstrating a 50% improvement in DOX efficacy. Of the tested treatments, ND-DOX with 2.4 μg mL(-1) DOX exhibited superior efficacy (60% cell death). ND-DOX with 1.2 μg mL(-1) DOX achieved 42% cell death, which was comparable to cell death in response to 2.4 μg mL(-1) of free DOX, suggesting that NDs aid in decreasing the DOX dose necessary to achieve a chemotherapeutic efficacy. Due to its enhanced efficacy, ND-DOX can be used to successfully treat HRPC and potentially decrease the clinical side effects of DOX.

  10. Combination of rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanxiong Ding

    Full Text Available Though prostate cancer (PCa has slow progression, the hormone refractory (HRCP and metastatic entities are substantially lethal and lack effective treatments. Transcription factor Slug is critical in regulating metastases of various tumors including PCa. Here we studied targeted therapy against Slug using combination of 3 drugs targeting 3 pathways respectively converging via Slug and further regulating PCa metastasis. Using in vitro assays we confirmed that Slug up-regulation incurred inhibition of E-cadherin that was anti-metastatic, and inhibited Bim-regulated cell apoptosis in PCa. Upstream PTEN/Akt, mTOR, Erk, and AR/Hsp90 pathways were responsible for Slug up-regulation and each of these could be targeted by rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG respectively. In 4 PCa cell lines with different traits in terms of PTEN loss and androgen sensitivity we tested the efficacy of mono- and combined therapy with the drugs. We found that metastatic capacity of the cells was maximally inhibited only when all 3 drugs were combined, due to the crosstalk between the pathways. 17-AAG decreases Slug expression via blockade of HSP90-dependent AR stability. Combination of rapamycin and CI-1040 diminishes invasiveness more potently in PCa cells that are androgen insensitive and with PTEN loss. Slug inhibited Bim-mediated apoptosis that could be rescued by mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors. Using mouse models for circulating PCa DNA quantification, we found that combination of mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors reduced circulating PCa cells in vivo significantly more potently than combination of 2 or monotherapy. Conclusively, combination of mTOR/Erk/Hsp90 inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

  11. RANKL/RANK/OPG cytokine receptor system: mRNA expression pattern in BPH, primary and metastatic prostate cancer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Frank; König, Frank; Lebentrau, Steffen; Jandrig, Burkhard; Krause, Hans; Strenziok, Romy; Schostak, Martin

    2018-02-01

    The cytokine system RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand), its receptor RANK and the antagonist OPG (osteoprotegerin) play a critical role in bone turnover. Our investigation was conducted to describe the gene expression at primary tumour site in prostate cancer patients and correlate the results with Gleason Score and PSA level. Seventy-one samples were obtained from prostate cancer patients at the time of radical prostatectomy and palliative prostate resection (n = 71). Patients with benign prostate hyperplasia served as controls (n = 60). We performed real-time RT-PCR after microdissection of the samples. The mRNA expression of RANK was highest in tumour tissue from patients with bone metastases (p < 0.001) as compared to BPH or locally confined tumours, also shown in clinical subgroups distinguished by Gleason Score (< 7 or ≥ 7, p = 0.028) or PSA level (< 10 or ≥ 10 µg/l, p = 0.004). RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was higher in tumour tissue from patients with metastatic compared to local disease. The RANKL/OPG ratio was low in normal prostate tissue and high tumours with bone metastases (p < 0.05). Expression of all three cytokines was high in BPH tissue but did not exceed as much as in the tumour tissue. We demonstrated that RANK, RANKL and OPG are directly expressed by prostate cancer cells at the primary tumour site and showed a clear correlation with Gleason Score, serum PSA level and advanced disease. In BPH, mRNA expression is also detectable, but RANK expression does not exceed as much as compared to tumour tissue.

  12. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J

    2001-01-01

    with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203....

  13. Endothelial Cells as Precursors for Osteoblasts in the Metastatic Prostate Cancer Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana E. Paiva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cells metastasize to the bones, causing ectopic bone formation, which results in fractures and pain. The cellular mechanisms underlying new bone production are unknown. In a recent study, Lin and colleagues, by using state-of-the-art techniques, including prostate cancer mouse models in combination with sophisticated in vivo lineage-tracing technologies, revealed that endothelial cells form osteoblasts induced by prostate cancer metastasis in the bone. Strikingly, genetic deletion of osteorix protein from endothelial cells affected prostate cancer–induced osteogenesis in vivo. Deciphering the osteoblasts origin in the bone microenvironment may result in the development of promising new molecular targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  14. Modeling prostate cancer in mice: something old, something new, something premalignant, something metastatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Shazia; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2013-06-01

    More than 15 years ago, the first generation of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of prostate cancer was introduced. These transgenic models utilized prostate-specific promoters to express SV40 oncogenes specifically in prostate epithelium. Since the description of these initial models, there have been a plethora of GEM models of prostate cancer representing various perturbations of oncogenes or tumor suppressors, either alone or in combination. This review describes these GEM models, focusing on their relevance for human prostate cancer and highlighting their strengths and limitations, as well as opportunities for the future.

  15. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  16. Differences in clinical outcome between docetaxel and abiraterone acetate as the first-line treatment in chemo-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with or without the ineligible clinical factors of the COU-AA-302 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M.C. Poon

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: Compared to T, AA treatment resulted in longer PFS and similar OS in chemo-naïve mCRPC patients, irrespective of the presence of ineligible factors, suggesting that the initial treatment by AA may still be beneficial to those with the aforementioned ineligible factors.

  17. Radium 223 dichloride for prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshayes E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Deshayes,1,2 Mathieu Roumiguie,3 Constance Thibault,4 Philippe Beuzeboc,5 Florent Cachin,6 Christophe Hennequin,7 Damien Huglo,8 François Rozet,9 Diana Kassab-Chahmi,10 Xavier Rebillard,11 Nadine Houédé1,12 1Radiobiology Unit, INSERM U1194, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier (ICM, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier (ICM, Montpellier, 3Urology Department, Andrology and Renal Transplantation, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse, 4Medical Oncology Department, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, 5Oncology Department, Institut Curie, 6Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU, Clermont-Ferrand, 7Radiotherapy Department, Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris, 8Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHRU, Lille, 9Urology Department, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, 10Intergroupe coopérateur francophone de recherche en onco-urologie, Paris, 11Urology Department, Clinique BeauSoleil, Montpellier, 12Medical Oncology Department, Institut de Cancérologie du Gard – CHU Caremeau, Nîmes, France Abstract: Prostate cancer is the most common malignant disease in men. Several therapeutic agents have been approved during the last 10 years. Among them, radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo® is a radioactive isotope that induces irreversible DNA double-strand breaks and consequently tumor cell death. Radium-223 dichloride is a calcium-mimetic agent that specifically targets bone lesions. Radium-223 dichloride has been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases, without known visceral metastases. In this review, first we summarize the interplay between prostate tumor cells and bone microenvironment; then, we discuss radium-223 dichloride mechanism of action and present the results of the available clinical trials and future developments for this new drug. Keywords: bone metastasis, mCRPC, mechanism, drug, agents, development 

  18. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Schalken, Jack A; Cabri, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Triptocare study was a prospective, open-label, multicentre, single-arm, Phase III study of triptorelin 22.5 mg in men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, who were naïve to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). The primary objective was to model the urinary PCA3...... change at 6 months, according to baseline variables. Other outcome measures included urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores and statuses, and serum testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of ADT. Safety was assessed by recording adverse...

  19. Identification of prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8(+ T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Matsueda

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among elderly men in the US, and immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising strategy to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Efforts to identify novel prostate specific tumor antigens will facilitate the development of effective cancer vaccines against prostate cancer. Prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR is a novel antigen that has been shown to be specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer tissues. In this study, we describe the identification of PSGR-derived peptide epitopes recognized by CD8(+ T cells in an HLA-A2 dependent manner.Twenty-one PSGR-derived peptides were predicted by an immuno-informatics approach based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptides were examined for their ability to induce peptide-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from either HLA-A2(+ healthy donors or HLA-A2(+ prostate cancer patients. The recognition of HLA-A2 positive and PSGR expressing LNCaP cells was also tested. Among the 21 PSGR-derived peptides, three peptides, PSGR3, PSGR4 and PSGR14 frequently induced peptide-specific T cell responses in PBMCs from both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Importantly, these peptide-specific T cells recognized and killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells in an HLA class I-restricted manner.We have identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted PSGR-derived peptides recognized by CD8(+ T cells, which, in turn, recognize HLA-A2(+ and PSGR(+ tumor cells. The PSGR-derived peptides identified may be used as diagnostic markers as well as immune targets for development of anticancer vaccines.

  20. PIAS1 is a crucial factor for prostate cancer cell survival and a valid target in docetaxel resistant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhr, Martin; Hoefer, Julia; Neuwirt, Hannes; Eder, Iris E.; Kern, Johann; Schäfer, Georg; Geley, Stephan; Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Culig, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Occurrence of an inherent or acquired resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug docetaxel is a major burden for patients suffering from different kinds of malignancies, including castration resistant prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we address the question whether PIAS1 targeting can be used to establish a basis for improved PCa treatment. The expression status and functional relevance of PIAS1 was evaluated in primary tumors, in metastatic lesions, in tissue of patients after docetaxel chemotherapy, and in docetaxel resistant cells. Patient data were complemented by functional studies on PIAS1 knockdown in vitro as well as in chicken chorioallantoic membrane and mouse xenograft in vivo models. PIAS1 was found to be overexpressed in local and metastatic PCa and its expression was further elevated in tumors after docetaxel treatment as well as in docetaxel resistant cells. Furthermore, PIAS1 knockdown experiments revealed an increased expression of tumor suppressor p21 and declined expression of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl1, which caused diminished cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. In summary, the presented data indicate that PIAS1 is crucial for parental and docetaxel resistant PCa cell survival and is therefore a promising new target for treatment of primary, metastatic, and chemotherapy resistant PCa. PMID:25474038

  1. Trends and outcome from radical therapy for primary non-metastatic prostate cancer in a UK population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Greenberg

    Full Text Available Increasing proportions of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK are presenting with non-metastatic disease. We investigated how treatment trends in this demographic have changed.Non-metastatic cancers diagnosed from 2000-2010 in the UK Anglian Cancer network stratified by age and risk group were analysed [n = 10,365]. Radiotherapy [RT] and prostatectomy [RP] cancer specific survival [CSS] were further compared [n = 4755].Over the decade we observed a fall in uptake of primary androgen deprivation therapy but a rise in conservative management [CM] and radical therapy [p<0.0001]. CM in particular has become the primary management for low-risk disease by the decade end [p<0.0001]. In high-risk disease however both RP and RT uptake increased significantly but in an age dependent manner [p<0.0001]. Principally, increased RP in younger men and increased RT in men ≥ 70y. In multivariate analysis of radically treated men both high-risk disease [HR 8.0 [2.9-22.2], p<0.0001] and use of RT [HR 1.9 [1.0-3.3], p = 0.024] were significant predictors of a poorer CSM. In age-stratified analysis however, the trend to benefit of RP over RT was seen only in younger men [≤ 60 years] with high-risk disease [p = 0.07]. The numbers needed to treat by RP instead of RT to save one cancer death was 19 for this group but 67 for the overall cohort.This study has identified significant shifts in non-metastatic prostate cancer management over the last decade. Low-risk disease is now primarily managed by CM while high-risk disease is increasingly treated radically. Treatment of high-risk younger men by RP is supported by evidence of better CSM but this benefit is not evident in older men.

  2. Synthetic lethality between androgen receptor signalling and the PARP pathway in prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asim, Mohammad; Tarish, Firas; Zecchini, Heather I; Sanjiv, Kumar; Gelali, Eleni; Massie, Charles Edward; Baridi, Ajoeb; Warren, Anne Y; Zhao, Wanfeng; Ogris, Christoph; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Mascalchi, Patrice; Shaw, Greg; Dev, Harveer; Wadhwa, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data demonstrate homologous recombination (HR) defects in castration resistant prostate cancers, rendering these tumours sensitive to PARP inhibition. Here, we demonstrate a direct requirement for the androgen receptor (AR) to maintain HR gene expression and HR activity in prostate cancer. We show that PARP-mediated repair pathways are upregulated in prostate cancer following androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Furthermore, upregulation of PARP activity is essential for the survival...

  3. Metastatic prostate cancer treated by flutamide versus cyproterone acetate. Final analysis of the "European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer" (EORTC) Protocol 30892

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, Fritz H.; Whelan, Peter; de Reijke, Theo M.; Kurth, Karl Heinz; Pavone-Macaluso, Michele; Mattelaer, Johan; van Velthoven, Roland F.; Debois, Muriel; Collette, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy of Flutamide (FLU) versus Cyproterone acetate (CPA) in men with metastatic prostate cancer and favourable prognostic factors. The primary endpoint of the trial was overall survival, disease specific survival, time to progression and side effects were

  4. Randomised study of Casodex 50 MG monotherapy vs orchidectomy in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The Scandinavian Casodex Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tveter, K; Varenhorst, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Casodex (ICI 176,334), a new, once-daily, selective antiandrogen, given as 50 mg monotherapy, was compared with orchidectomy in a randomised, multicentre, open study in 376 patients with metastatic prostate cancer. At 3 months, PSA was reduced by 86% in the Casodex group and by 96% ...

  5. The co-chaperone p23 promotes prostate cancer motility and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querol Cano, Laia; Lavery, Derek N.; Sin, Soraya; Spanjaard, Emma; Brooke, Greg N.; Tilman, Jessica D.; Abroaf, Ahmed; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N.; Heer, Rakesh; Mauri, Francesco; de Rooij, Johan; Driouch, Keltouma; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent malignancy at initiation and progression, therefore hormone therapy is the primary line of systemic treatment. Despite initial disease regression, tumours inevitably recur and progress to an advanced castration-resistant state a major feature of

  6. Urinary hydroxyproline excretion as a marker of bone metastasis in prostatic cancer. 2. Correlation between extent of metastatic lesions in whole body bone scintigraphy of patients with prostatic cancer and tumor markers in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Shin-ichi; Rinsho, Kenji (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1984-01-01

    In 25 patients with prostatic cancer confirmed histologically, 24 patients had bone metastasis on the whole body bone scintigraphy. The extent of bone metastasis was estimated quantitatively by the computerized digitizer. At the same time, the number of the metastatic lesions was counted. The correlations between the area of metastatic lesions on the sup(99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigrams and ESR, LDH, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase, ALP and urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were further investigated. The number of the metastatic lesions was also investigated with the same tumor markers. The results are as follows: 1) The extent of the metastatic lesions was showed more accurately by the area measured with the computerized digitalizer than by the number of metastatic lesions. 2) The correlation between the area of metastatic lesions and serum ALP levels was relatively high (..gamma.. = 0.75). But almost all were within normal limits. 3) As for the relation between the area of the metastatic lesions and the urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels, the correlation was high (..gamma.. = 0.78). And the hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were almost over the upper limit. Therefore, the urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine was considered as a good marker of the extent of bone metastasis.

  7. Therapy assessment of bone metastatic disease in the era of {sup 223}radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etchebehere, Elba; Brito, Ana Emilia [The University of Campinas, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Campinas (Brazil); Rezaee, Alireza; Langsteger, Werner [St. Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET - CT Center LINZ, Ordensklinikum, Linz (Austria); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET - CT Center LINZ, Ordensklinikum, Linz (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-08-15

    Defining an optimal imaging modality for assessment of therapy and the best time of evaluation are pivotal for ideal patient's management. {sup 223}Ra (Xofigo registered, formerly Alpharadin) has been approved by the FDA and European Medicines Agency for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with painful osseous involvement. PET/CT imaging using various radiotracers such as {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 18}F-FCH, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 18}F-NaF have been investigated to mitigate the limitations of conventional imaging modalities. Diagnostic radiotracers that have properties similar to a therapeutic radiotracer will precisely assess of the possibility and efficacy of a treatment; this is the theranostic concept. An example of a diagnostic test employed for selecting targeted therapy is the combined use of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for evaluation of possible therapy with {sup 223}Ra. This review examines the most recent publications related to this topic. (orig.)

  8. Radiation therapy for oligorecurrence in prostate cancer. Preliminary results of our centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ruiz de León, C; Ramírez Backhaus, M; Sobrón Bustamante, M; Casaña, J; Arribas, L; Rubio-Briones, J

    2017-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of more aggressive therapeutic modalities for treating metastatic prostate cancer. In this study, we examine the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with oligorecurrent prostate cancer. We analysed the biochemical response and toxicity of patients who underwent this therapy at our centre. We selected patients who experienced oligorecurrence between January 2015 to December 2016 and were administered SBRT. The association of androgen deprivation (AD) was left in each case to the decision of the tumour committee. We describe the clinical situation at diagnosis of oligorecurrence, the treatment administered and the biochemical response. We considered a biochemical response to be a 50% reduction in the absolute prostate-specific antigen (PSA) readings. SBRT was administered to 11 patients with bone (82%) and/or lymph node oligometastasis (18%). The treatment regimen for bone oligometastasis was 27Gy divided into 3 sessions, while the treatment for lymph node oligometastasis reached 70Gy. Seven patients had no treatment at the time of diagnosis, 2 were in the castration-resistant phase, 1 patient was in the off phase of intermittent AD, and 1 patient had adjuvant AD for pN1. Seven patients presented a biochemical response with a PSA reduction of 75-100%. The response was not assessable in 4 patients due to the continuing adjuvant AD. With a mean follow-up of 10.5 months, only 2 patients had progressed. Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity was detected in only 1 patient. Our data suggest that the use of SBRT in carefully selected patients with metastatic oligorecurrence of prostate cancer can achieve biochemical response and potentially delay progression and the use of systemic treatments. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen Deprivation Enhances PLZF-Repressed Cistrome that Promotes the Castration-Resistant Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    regulated network is activated when AR binds enhancer elements and modulates specific enhancer–promoter looping. Kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3... peptidase 3 (KLK3) enhancer, one of the strongest AR-bound enhancers in prostate cancer cells, produces KLK3 eRNA (KLK3e), which impacts androgen

  10. Imaging yield from 133 consecutive patients with prostate cancer and low trigger PSA from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinagare, A.B.; Keraliya, A.; Somarouthu, B.; Tirumani, S.H.; Ramaiya, N.H.; Kantoff, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the yield of imaging in patients with relapsed prostate cancer (PC) with a low trigger prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Materials and methods: This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study included all 133 patients (mean age 68 years; range 45–88; median 69 months since original diagnosis; interquartile range [IQR]: 32–139) with hormone-sensitive PC (HSPC, n=28) or castration-resistant PC (CRPC, n=105) and trigger PSA <4 ng/ml, who underwent same-day bone scintigraphy and computed tomography (CT; total 224 time points) at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from January to December 2013. Clinical and pathological data were obtained by manual review of the electronic medical records. All the included bone scintigraphs and CT images were reviewed by a fellowship-trained oncoradiologist to record the metastatic pattern and any clinically significant non-metastatic findings. Results: Ninety-four of the 133 (71%) patients had metastatic disease (18/28 [64%] with HSPC, 76/105 [72%] with CRPC). Forty-one of the 133 (31%) patients developed new metastatic disease and 23/133 (17%) developed new clinically significant non-metastatic findings. The incidence of osseous, nodal, and visceral metastases, and clinically significant non-metastatic findings was similar across the HSPC and CRPC groups (p>0.05 for all). Fifty-seven of the 133 (43%) patients had findings seen only at CT, of which 37 had new extra-osseous findings. Only 2/133 (2%) had findings at bone scintigraphy not seen at CT, both in areas not covered on CT. Conclusion: Imaging frequently demonstrated new metastatic and non-metastatic findings in patients with a low trigger PSA. CT is valuable in these patients because extra-osseous findings not visible at bone scintigraphy are frequently seen. - Highlights: • New and existing metastases common in prostate cancer with low trigger PSA. • Previous reports

  11. A review of tasquinimod in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson SC

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stuart Charles Williamson, Alice Elizabeth Hartley, Rakesh HeerNorthern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UKAbstract: Castration resistant prostate cancer remains a major clinical burden and novel therapeutic options are urgently required to improve survival. Tasquinimod is an orally administered quinoline-3-carboxamide with potent antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic action that has shown promise in the treatment of advanced prostate cancers. This review explores both preclinical and clinical findings to date. In summary, tasquinimod has been shown to demonstrate a potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer action and completed early phase clinical trials have demonstrated good drug tolerance and prolonged progression-free survival. Although Phase III clinical trials are on-going, the findings to date highlight the promise of this drug in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.Keywords: prostate cancer, castration resistant prostate cancer, antiangiogenesis, S100A9, HDAC4, ABR-215050, quinoline-3-carboximide

  12. Combined Whole Body and Multiparametric Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a 1-Step Approach to the Simultaneous Assessment of Local Recurrence and Metastatic Disease after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Nicola L; Sala, Evis; Benz, Matthias; Landa, Jonathan; Scardino, Peter; Scher, Howard I; Hricak, Hedvig; Vargas, Hebert A

    2017-07-01

    We report our initial experience with whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging as a single examination to assess local recurrence and metastatic disease in patients with suspected recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. In this institutional review board approved, retrospective, single center study 76 consecutive patients with clinically suspected recurrent prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy underwent combined whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging at a single session from October 2014 to January 2016. Scans were evaluated to detect disease in the prostate bed and regional nodes, and at distant sites. Comparison was made to other imaging tests, and prostate bed, node and bone biopsies performed within 90 days. Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging was completed successfully in all patients. Median prostate specific antigen was 0.36 ng/ml (range less than 0.05 to 56.12). Whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging identified suspected disease recurrence in 16 of 76 patients (21%), including local recurrence in the radical prostatectomy bed in 6, nodal metastases in 3, osseous metastases in 4 and multifocal metastatic disease in 3. In 43 patients at least 1 standard staging scan was done in addition to whole body and dedicated prostate magnetic resonance imaging. Concordance was demonstrated between the imaging modalities in 36 of 43 cases (84%). All metastatic lesions detected by other imaging tests were detected on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, the magnetic resonance imaging modality detected osseous metastases in 4 patients with false-negative findings on other imaging tests, including 2 bone scans and 3 computerized tomography scans. It also excluded osseous disease in 1 patient with positive 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography and subsequent negative bone biopsy. Combined whole body and dedicated

  13. Bone targeted therapies for the prevention of skeletal morbidity in men with prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Saylor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Men with prostate cancer suffer substantially from bone-related complications. Androgen deprivation therapy itself is a cause of loss of bone mineral density and is associated with an increased incidence of osteoporotic fractures. In advanced disease, bone is by far the most common site of metastasis. Complications of bone metastases prominently include pain and the potential for skeletal events such as spinal cord compression and pathologic fractures. Elevated osteoclast activity is an important aspect of the pathophysiology of both treatment-related osteoporosis and skeletal complications due to metastases. The osteoclast is therefore a therapeutic target. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody to receptor activator of nuclear factor-κ-B ligand that was designed to potently inhibit osteoclast activity and is the central focus of this review. Bisphosphonates, radiopharmaceuticals and systemically-active hormonal agents such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide have each been shown to improve skeletal morbidity in specific clinical situations. Denosumab is the only agent that has been shown to prevent osteoporotic fractures in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy and at elevated risk for fracture. It has also demonstrated superiority to the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid for the prevention of skeletal-related events in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Efficacy and toxicity data will be discussed.

  14. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  15. Calcium channel blockers and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Kevin R

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between calcium channel blockers and prostate cancer has been an area of increased interest to investigators. Calcium channel blockers have been shown to influence cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Clinically, the association between calcium channel blockers and the development of prostate cancer has been controversial. However, on a basic science level, there is evidence that calcium channel blockers induce cytotoxicity in androgen receptor positive cell lines and may offer an innovative strategy for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  17. RANKL/RANK/MMP-1 molecular triad contributes to the metastatic phenotype of breast and prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Casimiro

    Full Text Available The osteolytic nature of bone metastasis results from a tumor-driven increased bone resorption. Bone remodeling is orchestrated by the molecular triad RANK-RANKL-OPG. This process is dysregulated in bone metastases, mostly via induction of RANKL by tumor-derived factors. These factors increase expression of RANKL, which induce osteoclast formation, function, and survival, thereby increasing bone resorption. RANK is unexpectedly expressed by cancer cells, and the activation of RANKL-RANK pathway correlates with an increased invasive phenotype. To investigate the interaction between RANK expression in human breast and prostate cancer cells and their pro-metastatic phenotype we analyzed the activation of RANKL-RANK pathway and its effects on cell migration, invasion, gene expression in vitro, and osteolysis-inducing ability in vivo. RANKL activates kinase signaling pathways, stimulates cell migration, increases cell invasion, and up-regulates MMP-1 expression. In vivo, MMP-1 knockdown resulted in smaller x-ray osteolytic lesions and osteoclastogenesis, and decreased tumor burden. Therefore, RANKL inhibition in bone metastatic disease may decrease the levels of the osteoclastogenesis inducer MMP-1, contributing to a better clinical outcome.

  18. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  19. Survival in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer is associated with the number of extra-spinal organs involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Bartscht, Tobias; Karstens, Johann H; Schild, Steven E; Rades, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the predictive value of the number of extra-spinal organs involved by metastases for survival in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. In 95 patients irradiated with 10 × 3 Gy for MSCC from prostate cancer, seven factors were investigated: Age, performance score, number of involved vertebrae, interval from prostate cancer diagnosis to MSCC, pre-radiotherapy ambulatory status, time to motor deficits development, number of involved extra-spinal organs. Six-month survival rates for 0, 1 and ≥ 2 involved extra-spinal organs, were 81, 53 and 33%, respectively (pnumber of involved extra-spinal organs maintained significance (risk ratio 1.88, p=0.023). Better performance score (pcancer diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC (pnumber of extra-spinal organs involved by metastases predicts survival in patients with MSCC from prostate cancer.

  20. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p less than or equal to 0.05). A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance.

  1. AR Variant ARv567es Induces Carcinogenesis in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy remains the primary treatment modality for patients with metastatic prostate cancer but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC after a period of regression. Continued activation of androgen receptor (AR signaling is attributed as one of the most important mechanisms underlying failure of therapy. Recently, the discovery of constitutively active AR splice variants (AR-Vs adds more credence to this idea. Expression of AR-Vs in metastases portends a rapid progression of the tumor. However, the precise role of the AR-Vs in CRPC still remains unknown. ARv567es is one of the two AR variants frequently found in human CRPC xenografts and metastases. Herein, we developed a probasin (Pb promoter-driven ARv567es transgenic mouse, Pb-ARv567es, to evaluate the role of ARv567es in both autonomous prostate growth and progression to CRPC. We found that expression of ARv567es in the prostate results in epithelial hyperplasia by 16 weeks and invasive adenocarcinoma is evident by 1 year of age. The underlying genetic cellular events involved a cell cycle-related transcriptome and differential expression of a spectrum of genes that are critical for tumor initiation and progression. These findings indicate that ARv567es could induce tumorigenesis de novo and signifies the critical role of AR-Vs in CRPC. Thus, the Pb-ARv567es mouse could provide a novel model in which the role of AR variants in prostate cancer progression can be examined.

  2. Radiation therapy of a metastatic tumour of the orbit caused by prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, F.; Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poschauko, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of metastatic carcinoma to the apex of the orbit in a 66-year old patient. Orbital metastasis occurred while the patient suffered from another metastatic activity especially in his bony structures. The orbital tumour caused rapid visual impairment because of compression of the optic nerve. The metastasis was treated by radiation therapy. With CT-scan, electrophysiological examination, visual field examination, and visual function we demonstrate the regression of the tumour. One year after therapy the tumor was no longer detectable. Visual function had recovered and visual fields were normally. Radiation therapy prolonged high quality life for our patient due to preservation of visual function. (authors)

  3. [Economic evaluation of the treatments of non-metastatic prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlbarg, J; Rabetrano, H; Soulié, M; Salomon, L; Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men in France. The development of treatment for prostate cancer is fast and sometimes relies on costly innovations. Medico-economic studies are however rare in this area. This literature review aims to summarize available medico-economic data on the initial management of localized prostate cancer and discuss the quality and usability of existing economic studies on the subject. Literature review was done using PubMed and Cochrane databases. Studies and articles were selected based on several criteria: population with initial treatment for localized prostate cancer (without metastasis), comparative studies with surgery as control treatment, studies in countries members of the OECD, articles in English or French published between 2004 and 2014. The surgical robot, one of the newest innovations, is more expensive than conventional open surgery or no robotic laparoscopy, even if it is associated with a reduction of the original period of stay. Radiation therapy seems more expensive than surgery as initial therapy of localized prostate cancer. Conclusions remain limited because of the rarity of reliable health economic studies on the subject. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of microRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    manner in castration- resistant prostate cancer. Prostate 2012;72:1171-8. 71. Musumeci M, Coppola V, Addario A, et al. Control of tumor and...microenvironment cross-talk by miR-15a and miR-16 in prostate cancer. Oncogene 2011;30:4231-42. 72. Bonci D, Coppola V, Musumeci M, et al. The miR-15a- miR-16-1...Tumour Biol 2013. [Epub ahead of print]. 133. Coppola V, Musumeci M, Patrizii M, et al. BTG2 loss and miR-21 upregulation contribute to prostate

  5. MYC RNAi-Pt Combination Nanotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    thus providing a fascinating natural stimulus for triggered cytosolic drug/gene delivery. Moreover, elevated GSH levels have been correlated...enlarged pelvic lymph node was removed from one, and an ~5 mm metastatic lesion in liver was removed from the other. After tissue disruption a using a

  6. Role of Genetic Testing for Inherited Prostate Cancer Risk: Philadelphia Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Veda N; Knudsen, Karen E; Kelly, William K; Abida, Wassim; Andriole, Gerald L; Bangma, Chris H; Bekelman, Justin E; Benson, Mitchell C; Blanco, Amie; Burnett, Arthur; Catalona, William J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Cooperberg, Matthew; Crawford, David E; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Eggener, Scott; Fleshner, Neil; Freedman, Matthew L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Hurwitz, Mark D; Hyatt, Colette; Isaacs, William B; Kane, Christopher J; Kantoff, Philip; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Karsh, Lawrence I; Klein, Eric A; Lin, Daniel W; Loughlin, Kevin R; Lu-Yao, Grace; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Mann, Mark J; Mark, James R; McCue, Peter A; Miner, Martin M; Morgan, Todd; Moul, Judd W; Myers, Ronald E; Nielsen, Sarah M; Obeid, Elias; Pavlovich, Christian P; Peiper, Stephen C; Penson, David F; Petrylak, Daniel; Pettaway, Curtis A; Pilarski, Robert; Pinto, Peter A; Poage, Wendy; Raj, Ganesh V; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Robson, Mark E; Rosenberg, Matt T; Sandler, Howard; Sartor, Oliver; Schaeffer, Edward; Schwartz, Gordon F; Shahin, Mark S; Shore, Neal D; Shuch, Brian; Soule, Howard R; Tomlins, Scott A; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Uzzo, Robert; Vander Griend, Donald J; Walsh, Patrick C; Weil, Carol J; Wender, Richard; Gomella, Leonard G

    2018-02-01

    Purpose Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling, testing, and genetically informed management. Methods An expert consensus conference was convened including key stakeholders to address genetic counseling and testing, PCA screening, and management informed by evidence review. Results Consensus was strong that patients should engage in shared decision making for genetic testing. There was strong consensus to test HOXB13 for suspected hereditary PCA, BRCA1/2 for suspected hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, and DNA mismatch repair genes for suspected Lynch syndrome. There was strong consensus to factor BRCA2 mutations into PCA screening discussions. BRCA2 achieved moderate consensus for factoring into early-stage management discussion, with stronger consensus in high-risk/advanced and metastatic setting. Agreement was moderate to test all men with metastatic castration-resistant PCA, regardless of family history, with stronger agreement to test BRCA1/2 and moderate agreement to test ATM to inform prognosis and targeted therapy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive, multidisciplinary consensus statement to address a genetic evaluation framework for inherited PCA in the multigene testing era. Future research should focus on developing a working definition of familial PCA for clinical genetic testing, expanding understanding of genetic contribution to aggressive PCA, exploring clinical use of genetic testing for PCA management, genetic testing of African American males, and addressing the value framework of genetic evaluation and testing men at risk for PCA-a clinically heterogeneous disease.

  7. Interleukin-6 and prostate cancer: Current developments and unsolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Zoran; Puhr, Martin

    2018-02-15

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is expressed in prostate tumors and in the stromal tumor micro-enviroment. It is known to regulate proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and differentiation. The signaling pathway of Janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3, which is activated by IL-6, is in the focus of scientific investigations for improved treatment approaches. Different effects of IL-6 and/or STAT3 on tumor cell growth have been observed in human and murine prostate cancer (PCa) models. Experimental therapies have been proposed in order to block the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. In this context, the anti-IL-6 antibody siltuximab (CNTO 328) has been demonstrated to inhibit growth of prostate tumors in vitro and in vivo and delays progression towards castration resistance. However, clinically, the anti-IL-6 antibody was not successful as a monotherapy in phase II studies in patients with metastatic PCa. IL-6 is implicated in regulation of cellular stemness by increasing phosphorylation of STAT3. The cytokine has also a role in development of resistance to the non-steroidal anti-androgen enzalutamide. Endogenous inhibitors of IL-6 are suppressors of cytokine signaling and protein inhibitors of activated STAT. Although they inhibit signal transduction through STAT3, they may also exhibit anti-apoptotic effects. On the basis of complexity of IL-6 action in PCa, an individualized approach is needed to identify patients who will benefit from anti-IL-6 therapy in combination with standard treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological and Clinical Characterization of Novel lncRNAs Associated with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1598. 19. Olsen JV, Ong SE and Mann M. Trypsin cleaves exclusively C-terminal to arginine and lysine residues. Mol Cell Proteomics. 2004; 3(6):608...Pienta, F.Y. Feng, and A.M. Chinnaiyan. The long noncoding RNA SChLAP1 promotes aggressive prostate cancer and antagonizes the SWI/SNF complex. Nat Genet... antagonizes the SWI/SNF complex. Nat Genet, 2013. 45(11): p. 1392-8. 6. Prensner, J.R., et al., Transcriptome sequencing across a prostate cancer cohort

  9. MYC RNAi-PT Combination Nanotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    from the Bieberich lab to co-P.I. Dr. Angelo De Marzo’s laboratory for cloning. The cells were plated to single cell density in 100 mm culture dishes...mapped reads from 21 samples. Type Lobe tissue organ SampleName Reads rsem % rDNA (concordant) % fvb ant normal prostate MR01 123,449,603...35,551,704 28.80% 40,444,007 32.76% fvb ant normal prostate MR02 216,625,111 58,503,612 27.01% 65,889,904 30.42

  10. Docetaxel in hormone-sensitive advanced prostate cancer; GENESIS-SEFH evaluation reporta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Jesús Alegre del Rey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most common urogenital malignancy in older men and the second leading cause of death by cancer in men in Europe. Current therapeutic practice considers Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT as first line treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer at high-risk, either locally advanced or metastatic. ADT can be achieved through orchiectomy (surgical castration, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH agonists, or through complete androgen blockade (LHRH agonist combined with an anti-androgen. Docetaxel in combination with prednisone or prednisolone is indicated for the treatment of patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. The CHAARTED and STAMPEDE clinical trials studied the effect of bringing forward the use of docetaxel added on to ADT in the context of hormone-sensitive patients. The CHAARTED clinical trial showed a significant increase in a variable with maximum relevance such as Overall Survival (OS, with a difference of 13.6 months between medians. There was also clinical benefit in the secondary variables: median time until castration-resistant disease or until clinical progression. In the STAMPEDE clinical trial, which included 39% of non-metastatic patients, a 10-month difference between medians was demonstrated in OS, and 17 months in the primary co-variable of Progression Free Survival. The most frequent adverse events were: neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, leucopenia, and general disorders such as asthenia, lethargy or fever. According to data from the CHAARTED and STAMPEDE studies, and the incremental cost of € 3 196.98 for adding on docetaxel to standard treatment, the estimated additional cost for each year of life gained is compatible with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio between € 2 267.36 and € 3 851.78. In view of the efficacy and safety results, the proposed positioning is: to advance the use of docetaxel added to androgen deprivation therapy to first

  11. Development of Small Molecule Activators of Protein Phosphotase 2A (SMAPs) for the Treatment of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    recently developed a series of small molecules that activate PP2A and thereby exert anticancer effects in cell culture and xenograft models. This...molecules that activate PP2A and thereby exert anticancer effects in cell culture and xenograft models. This proposal focuses on a third generation...months. 9 Changes that had a significant impact on expenditures Significant changes in use or care of human subjects, vertebrate animals

  12. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...dose limiting toxicities. Based on safety and pharmacokinetics it is anticipated this will be the recommended phase II dose, and that the phase II

  13. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    PE, CD45-APCeFluor 780, HLA-A/B/C- biotin , Streptavidin - APC, and Streptavidin -APC-eFluor 780 (eBiosciences); CD49f- Alexa Fluor 647 and CD26-FITC...resulting in the integration of viral DNA into the genome of the target cell and all of its progeny. If both adenocarcinoma and squamous phenotypes within...microdissection was performed on neighboring adenocarcinoma and squamous phenotypes within an individual lesion (region X) and DNA was isolated

  14. Orofacial pain and numb chin syndrome as the presenting symptoms of a metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaver A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with orofacial pain as the presenting symptom caused by a mandibular metastasis from a previously undiagnosed cancer of the prostate. This possibility should be considered in the differential diagnosis of male patients presenting with orofacial pain.

  15. Bisphosphonates in the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Breast, Lung, and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Huang, Wenhui; Zhou, Ruoyu; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether bisphosphonates are a key therapy for bone metastases in lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer by comparing all randomized controlled trials that appraised the effects of bisphosphonates on risk of skeletal-related events (SREs). PubMed, Embase, and Medline databases (up to December 2014) were used to search all related articles. Using the data from 19 available publications, the authors examined the efficacy in treating or reducing the risk of SREs in lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer by meta-analysis. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated efficacy in treating or reducing the risk of SREs in lung cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69–0.95, P = 0.008], breast cancer (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.54–0.71, P = 0.000), and prostate cancer (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.45–0.86, P = 0.004). This meta-analysis suggests that bisphosphonates have demonstrated efficacy in treating or reducing the risk of SREs in lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. PMID:26579808

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate and metastatic medullary compression. A retrospective study of 22 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Kvist, E; Hjortberg, P

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of 709 patients with prostatic cancer was carried out. Twenty-two developed medullary cord compression (an incidence of 3%). All but two of the 22 patients were treated by radiation and 10 had additional hormonal treatment. Ten had some benefit from the treatment, but only 2...

  17. Epidermal growth factor potentiates in vitro metastatic behaviour of human prostate cancer PC-3M cells: involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uysal-Onganer Pinar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a high level of functional voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC expression has been found in strongly metastatic human and rat prostate cancer (PCa cells, the mechanism(s responsible for the upregulation is unknown. The concentration of epidermal growth factor (EGF, a modulator of ion channels, in the body is highest in prostatic fluid. Thus, EGF could be involved in the VGSC upregulation in PCa. The effects of EGF on VGSC expression in the highly metastatic human PCa PC-3M cell line, which was shown previously to express both functional VGSCs and EGF receptors, were investigated. A quantitative approach, from gene level to cell behaviour, was used. mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Protein expression was studied by Western blots and immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Functional assays involved measurements of transverse migration, endocytic membrane activity and Matrigel invasion. Results Exogenous EGF enhanced the cells' in vitro metastatic behaviours (migration, endocytosis and invasion. Endogenous EGF had a similar involvement. EGF increased VGSC Nav1.7 (predominant isoform in PCa mRNA and protein expressions. Co-application of the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX suppressed the effect of EGF on all three metastatic cell behaviours studied. Conclusion 1 EGF has a major involvement in the upregulation of functional VGSC expression in human PCa PC-3M cells. (2 VGSC activity has a significant intermediary role in potentiating effect of EGF in human PCa.

  18. AR Variant ARv567es Induces Carcinogenesis in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Sprenger, Cynthia; Sun, Shihua; Epilepsia, Kathryn Soriano; Haugk, Kathleen; Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Plymate, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy remains the primary treatment modality for patients with metastatic prostate cancer but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after a period of regression. Continued activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is attributed as one of the most important mechanisms underlying failure of therapy. Recently, the discovery of constitutively active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) adds more credence to this idea. Expression of AR-Vs in metastases portends a rapid progression of the tumor. However, the precise role of the AR-Vs in CRPC still remains unknown. ARv567es is one of the two AR variants frequently found in human CRPC xenografts and metastases. Herein, we developed a probasin (Pb) promoter-driven ARv567es transgenic mouse, Pb-ARv567es, to evaluate the role of ARv567es in both autonomous prostate growth and progression to CRPC. We found that expression of ARv567es in the prostate results in epithelial hyperplasia by 16 weeks and invasive adenocarcinoma is evident by 1 year of age. The underlying genetic cellular events involved a cell cycle-related transcriptome and differential expression of a spectrum of genes that are critical for tumor initiation and progression. These findings indicate that ARv567es could induce tumorigenesis de novo and signifies the critical role of AR-Vs in CRPC. Thus, the Pb-ARv567es mouse could provide a novel model in which the role of AR variants in prostate cancer progression can be examined. PMID:24027426

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate and metastatic medullary compression. A retrospective study of 22 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Kvist, E; Hjortberg, P

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of 709 patients with prostatic cancer was carried out. Twenty-two developed medullary cord compression (an incidence of 3%). All but two of the 22 patients were treated by radiation and 10 had additional hormonal treatment. Ten had some benefit from the treatment, but only 2...... of 19 regained their ability to walk. The need for immediate diagnosis and treatment is stressed....

  20. Characterization of prostate neuroendocrine cancers and therapeutic management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargos, P; Ferretti, L; Gross-Goupil, M; Orre, M; Cornelis, F; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Houédé, N; Merino, C; Roubaud, G; Dallaudiére, B; Richaud, P; Fléchon, A

    2014-09-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancers (NEPCs) are rare. The current lack of consensus for clinical, biological and pathological characterization as well as therapeutic approach makes the management of those tumors a clinical challenge. This literature review aims to summarize available data on the characterization and management of patients with prostate cancer with a neuroendocrine element. We try to identify major controversies and uncertainties in order to understand all aspects of this particular entity. We searched for all articles published and registered in the MEDLINE database before 31 November 2013 with the following search terms: (('prostatic neoplasms' (MeSH Terms)) AND ('carcinoma, neuroendocrine' (MeSH Terms)) OR ('carcinoma, small cell' (MeSH Terms))) AND (English (Language)). Case reports, letters or comments were excluded. We then selected relevant articles from titles and abstracts. Overall, 278 articles published between 1976 and November 2013 were identified. No definition of NEPC seems to be clearly established. Natural history of the disease reveals poor prognosis with median survival of up to 10 to 13 months. Histological characterization appears difficult. Serum markers could be helpful with some controversies in terms of prognostic significance. Concerning management, the majority of patients received local treatment combined with chemotherapy in case of early and localized disease. Few clinical trials described strategy for metastatic disease. The exploration of the different pathways implicated in the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancers is essential for the comprehension of castration-resistance mechanisms. It will enable the identification of optimal therapeutic strategies for which no recommendation is currently established. Inclusion in prospective clinical trials appears necessary to identify the adequate strategy.

  1. Induction of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells by Dovitinib (TKI-258 and its Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini S. Yadav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men with an estimated mortality of more than 26,000 in 2016 alone. Aggressive and metastatic tumors are treated with androgen deprivation therapies (ADT; however, the tumors acquire resistance and develop into lethal castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. With the advent of better therapeutics, the incidences of a more aggressive neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC variant continue to emerge. Although de novo occurrences of NEPC are rare, more than 25% of the therapy-resistant patients on highly potent new-generation anti-androgen therapies end up with NEPC. This, along with previous observations of an increase in the number of such NE cells in aggressive tumors, has been suggested as a mechanism of resistance development during prostate cancer progression. Dovitinib (TKI-258/CHIR-258 is a pan receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor that targets VEGFR, FGFR, PDGFR, and KIT. It has shown efficacy in mouse-model of PCa bone metastasis, and is presently in clinical trials for several cancers. We observed that both androgen receptor (AR positive and AR-negative PCa cells differentiate into a NE phenotype upon treatment with Dovitinib. The NE differentiation was also observed when mice harboring PC3-xenografted tumors were systemically treated with Dovitinib. The mechanistic underpinnings of this differentiation are unclear, but seem to be supported through MAPK-, PI3K-, and Wnt-signaling pathways. Further elucidation of the differentiation process will enable the identification of alternative salvage or combination therapies to overcome the potential resistance development.

  2. {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP for palliation of pain from bone metastases in patients with prostate and breast cancer: a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Singla, Suhas; Arora, Geetanjali; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP for pain palliation in patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate and breast cancer. The secondary objective was to compare low-dose and high-dose {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP in bone pain palliation. Included in the study were 44 patients with documented breast carcinoma (12 patients; age 47 ± 13 years) or castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (32 patients; age 66 ± 9 years) and skeletal metastases. Patients were randomized into two equal groups treated with {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP intravenously at a dose of 1,295 MBq (group A) or 2,590 MBq (group B). Pain palliation was evaluated using a visual analogue score (VAS), analgesic score (AS) and Karnofsky performance score (KPS) up to 16 weeks. Toxicity was assessed in terms of haematological and renal parameters. The overall response rate (in all 44 patients) was 86 %. Complete, partial and minimal responses were seen in 6 patients (13 %), 21 patients (48 %) and 11 patients (25 %), respectively. A favourable response was seen in 27 patients (84 %) with prostate cancer and in 11 patients (92 %) with breast cancer. There was a progressive decrease in the VAS from baseline up to 4 weeks (p < 0.05). Also, AS decreased significantly from 1.8 ± 0.7 to 1.2 ± 0.9 (p < 0.0001). There was an improvement in quality of life of the patients as reflected by an increase in mean KPS from 56 ± 5 to 75 ± 7 (p < 0.0001). The overall response rate in group A was 77 % compared to 95 % in group B (p = 0.188). There was a significant decrease in VAS and AS accompanied by an increase in KPS in both groups. Nonserious haematological toxicity (grade I/II) was observed in 15 patients (34 %) and serious toxicity (grade III/IV) occurred in 10 patients (23 %). There was no statistically significant difference in haematological toxicity between the groups. {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP was found to be a safe and effective radiopharmaceutical for bone pain

  3. Doxorubicin Conjugated to Immunomodulatory Anticancer Lactoferrin Displays Improved Cytotoxicity Overcoming Prostate Cancer Chemo resistance and Inhibits Tumour Development in TRAMP Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaranarayanan, Jayanth Suryanarayanan; Kanwar, Jagat R; Al-Juhaishi, Afrah Jalil Abd; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2016-08-31

    Advanced, metastatic, castration resistant and chemo-resistant prostate cancer has triggered change in the drug development landscape against prostate cancer. Bovine lactoferrin (bLf) is currently attracting attention in clinics for its anti-cancer properties and proven safety profile. bLf internalises into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis, boosts immunity and complements chemotherapy. We employed bLf as an excellent functional carrier protein for delivering doxorubicin (Dox) into DU145 cells, CD44+/EpCAM+ double positive enriched DU145 3D prostaspheres and drug resistant ADR1000-DU145 cells, thus circumventing Dox efflux, to overcome chemo-resistance. Successful bLf-Dox conjugation with iron free or iron saturated bLf forms did not affect the integrity and functionality of bLf and Dox. bLf-Dox internalised into DU145 cells within 6 h, enhanced nuclear Dox retention up to 24 h, and proved significantly effective (p resistance.

  4. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Prostate Cancer Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Mateo, Joaquin; Collins, David J.; Koh, Dow-Mu; de Bono, Johann S.; Tunariu, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to correlate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) bone metastases with histological and molecular features of bone metastases. Materials and Methods Forty-three bone marrow biopsies from 33 metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients with multiparametric MRI and documented bone metastases were evaluated. A second cohort included 10 CRPC patients with no bone metastases. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), normalized b900 diffusion-weighted imaging (nDWI) signal, and signal-weighted fat fraction (swFF) with bone marrow biopsy histological parameters were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman correlations. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were analyzed. Results Median ADC and nDWI signal was significantly higher, and median swFF was significantly lower, in bone metastases than nonmetastatic bone (P < 0.001). In the metastatic cohort, 31 (72.1%) of 43 biopsies had detectable cancer cells. Median ADC and swFF were significantly lower and median nDWI signal was significantly higher in biopsies with tumor cells versus nondetectable tumor cells (898 × 10−6 mm2/s vs 1617 × 10−6 mm2/s; 11.5% vs 62%; 5.3 vs 2.3, respectively; P < 0.001). Tumor cellularity inversely correlated with ADC and swFF, and positively correlated with nDWI signal (P < 0.001). In serial biopsies, taken before and after treatment, changes in multiparametric MRI parameters paralleled histological changes. Conclusions Multiparametric MRI provides valuable information about mCRPC bone metastases. These data further clinically qualify DWI as a response biomarker in mCRPC. PMID:28906339

  5. Critical role of androgen receptor level in prostate cancer cell resistance to new generation antiandrogen enzalutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Julia; Akbor, Mohammady; Handle, Florian; Ofer, Philipp; Puhr, Martin; Parson, Walther; Culig, Zoran; Klocker, Helmut; Heidegger, Isabel

    2016-09-13

    Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor approved for therapy of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. However, clinical application revealed that 30 to 40% of patients acquire resistance after a short period of treatment. Currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying such resistances are not completely understood, partly due to a lack of model systems. In the present study we established three different cellular models of enzalutamide resistance including a cell line with wild type AR (LAPC4), DuCaP cells which overexpress wild-type AR, as well as a cell which has been adapted to long term androgen ablation (LNCaP Abl) and harbors the AR T878A mutation. After 10 months of cultivation, sustained growth in the presence of enzalutamide was achieved. When compared to controls, resistant cells exhibit significantly decreased sensitivity to enzalutamide as measured with 3[H]thymidine incorporation and WST assay. Moreover, these cell models exhibit partly re-activated AR signaling despite presence of enzalutamide. In addition, we show that enzalutamide resistant cells are insensitive to bicalutamide but retain considerable sensitivity to abiraterone. Mechanistically, enzalutamide resistance was accompanied by increased AR and AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression as well as AR gene amplification, while no additional AR mutations have been identified.

  6. The Cardiovascular Toxicity of Abiraterone and Enzalutamide in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Roberto; Ciccarese, Chiara; Bria, Emilio; Romano, Mario; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Muraglia, Alessandro; Porcaro, Antonio Benito; Siracusano, Salvatore; Brunelli, Matteo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Artibani, Walter; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-12-27

    The cardiovascular toxicity related to abiraterone and enzalutamide has been previously studied by our group. In this analysis, we aim to update our previous findings related to abiraterone and enzalutamide, including the new available evidence, both in castration-resistant and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prospective studies were identified by searching the MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Library, and ASCO Meeting abstracts. Combined relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fixed- or random-effects methods. We included 7 articles in this meta-analysis, covering a total of 8660 patients who were used to evaluate cardiovascular toxicity. The use of new hormonal agents was associated with an increased risk of all-grade (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.64; P = .001) and high-grade (RR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.21-2.80; P = .004) cardiac toxicity. The use of new hormonal agents was also associated with an increased risk of all-grade (RR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.62-2.43; P = .001) and high-grade (RR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.84-2.77; P = .004) hypertension compared with the controls. Abiraterone was found to significantly increase the risk of both cardiac toxicity and hypertension, whereas enzalutamide significantly increases only the risk of hypertension. No differences were found based on the dose of prednisone used with abiraterone. The major limitation of this study is that data are available only as aggregate, and no single-patient information could be analyzed. Abiraterone and enzalutamide significantly increase the incidence and RR of cardiovascular toxicity in patients affected by metastatic prostate cancer. Follow-up for the onset of treatment-related cardiovascular events should therefore be considered in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Current vaccination strategies for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniau, Steven; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Figdor, Carl; Hamdy, Freddie; Verhagen, Paul; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Wirth, Manfred; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Osanto, Susanne

    2012-02-01

    The first therapeutic cancer vaccine demonstrating effectiveness in a phase 3 study was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on 29 April 2010. The pivotal trial demonstrated overall survival (OS) benefit in patients treated with antigen-loaded leukapheresis cells compared with a control infusion. Results of other prostate cancer (PCa) vaccination strategies are awaited, as this approach may herald a new era in the care for patients with advanced PCa. Consider effectiveness and safety of vaccination strategies in the treatment of PCa. We searched three bibliographic databases (January 1995 through October 2010) for randomised phase 2 and 3 studies of vaccination strategies for PCa based on predetermined relevant Medical Subject Heading terms and free text terms. Data from 3 randomised phase 3 and 10 randomised phase 2 vaccination trials are discussed with respect to clinical outcome in terms of progression-free survival and OS, toxicity, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, and immunologic response. Three phase 3 trials (D9901, D9902A, and D9902B) that enrolled a total of 737 patients, all controlled and double-blinded, tested the efficacy of sipuleucel-T. The largest of these three trials, called Immunotherapy for Prostate Adenocarcinoma Treatment (IMPACT), has demonstrated safety and effectiveness of sipuleucel-T (now marketed as Provenge) as measured by prolonged survival of 512 asymptomatic patients with metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC). The study showed a 4.1-mo median survival benefit in the sipuleucel-T vaccine-treated group compared with the control group (25.8 vs 21.7 mo; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.98; p=0.032) and extended 3-yr survival (31.7% vs 23.0%). In contrast, two phase 3 vaccination trials with a whole-tumour-cell mixture of two PCa cell lines (GVAX) and testing GVAX either alone or in combination with chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone (VITAL1 and 2) were terminated prematurely

  8. Disease volume and distribution as drivers of treatment decisions in metastatic prostate cancer: From chemohormonal therapy to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Ronak; Cheung, Patrick; Zukotynski, Katherine; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis of men with metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer (CSPC) depends on both the distribution and extent of metastases, among other things. Patients with low-volume or oligometastatic disease have improved survival compared with those with high-volume metastases. While chemohormonal therapy is the new standard of care for men with high-volume metastatic CSPC, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is emerging as a promising treatment option with low toxicity for the management of oligometastatic CSPC. Our review summarizes the current evidence on the role of SABR in oligometastatic prostate cancer. SABR shows control rates of metastases ranging from 88% to 100% at 6 months to 3 years, and progression-free survival commonly reported as >50% for the first 12 months. In addition, SABR may allow androgen-deprivation therapy to be delayed by more than 2 years in selected patients, minimizing the chronic side effects associated with such therapy. However, much still needs to be learned before SABR can be implemented as standard treatment for oligometastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation therapy for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, S A; Ramakrishna, N R; DeWeese, T L

    2001-06-01

    Radiation therapy for locally advanced PCa continues to evolve. A current treatment recommendation for nonmetastatic, high-risk disease includes AS combined with RT. The precise duration and sequencing of AS has not been established but most frequently includes treatment in the neoadjuvant, concomitant and, occasionally, adjuvant periods. As technology allows higher doses without significant increases in morbidity and as clinical data provide proof of a radiation dose response, RT doses continue to escalate. The goal of therapy for metastatic disease continues to focus on the relief of pain and the improvement in quality of life. Multiple studies document the significant role RT plays in achieving these goals. Focal RT and systemic radioisotopes have become the mainstay of management in this patient group and the development of newer isotopes that cause less marrow toxicity will improve the therapeutic ratio and provide an opportunity for their use with systemic chemotherapy. As molecular and genomic technologies advance, directed targeting of critical cellular radiation-response pathways hold the promise of improved radiation response and individualized, tailored therapy.

  10. Mesothelial Inclusions in Pelvic Lymph Nodes Initially Diagnosed as Metastatic Prostate Cancer; the Utility of Second Opinions and Genomic Testing in the Setting of Unexpected Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Joudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign mesothelial inclusions in pelvic lymph nodes may be mistaken for metastatic disease in the setting of pelvic malignancy. In this case-report a patient with Low-Risk prostate cancer (confirmed by biopsy and genomic testing underwent radical prostatectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection. The initial pathological diagnosis was organ-confined Gleason 3 + 3 = 6 cancer with metastasis to a pelvic lymph node. Upon review of the pathological specimen and immunohistochemical staining the lymph node tissue concerning for metastatic disease was recharacterized as mesothelial in origin. This case illustrates the importance of second opinions and immunohistochemistry for unexpected or unusual pathological findings.

  11. Strontium-89 (Metastron) and the bisphosphonate olpadronate reduce the incidence of spinal cord compression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer metastatic to the skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, Vidya; Pelger, Rob C.M.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.A.B.; Arndt, Jan-Willem; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Papapoulos, Socrates E.; Hamdy, Neveen A.T.

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord compression (SCC) is a devastating complication of metastatic cancer. We investigated the potential beneficial effect of two palliative therapies - strontium-89 (Metastron) and the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate olpadronate - on the incidence of SCC in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) metastatic to the skeleton. We retrospectively studied 415 patients with histologically proven prostate cancer who underwent bone scintigraphy at the time of diagnosis and were followed up at the Leiden University Medical Center between 1990 and 1999. Medical or surgical castration was undertaken in 172 patients with evidence for skeletal metastases. Within 2 years, 147 of these patients (85%) developed HRPC associated with severe progressive bone pain. Palliative treatment was given to 131 patients in the form of local radiotherapy (n=10), 89 Sr (n=46) or intravenous olpadronate (n=66), with (n=57) or without (n=9) maintenance oral olpadronate. Nine patients received both 89 Sr and olpadronate at various intervals. Sixteen patients who did not receive any of these treatments were used as historical controls. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between treatment modalities. The incidence of SCC was 17% in the whole group, and highest in controls receiving no palliation (50%). None of the patients treated with local radiotherapy, only 4% of patients receiving 89 Sr and 21% of patients given olpadronate developed this complication. Our findings suggest a significant reduction in SCC in patients with symptomatic HRPC metastatic to the skeleton who receive palliative therapies. Local radiotherapy completely prevents the incidence of SCC, 89 Sr leads to an important decrease in this complication and olpadronate induces a significant, albeit smaller decrease in the incidence of SCC. The use of these agents opens new avenues in the difficult management of patients with advanced prostate cancer who are most at risk of developing SCC. (orig.)

  12. Randomised study of Casodex 50 MG monotherapy vs orchidectomy in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The Scandinavian Casodex Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tveter, K; Varenhorst, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Casodex (ICI 176,334), a new, once-daily, selective antiandrogen, given as 50 mg monotherapy, was compared with orchidectomy in a randomised, multicentre, open study in 376 patients with metastatic prostate cancer. At 3 months, PSA was reduced by 86% in the Casodex group and by 96...... in the orchidectomy group. Median survival was significantly longer in the orchidectomy group. Casodex was well-tolerated. The most likely reason for the differences between the groups regarding time to treatment failure and survival is that the dose of Casodex was too small. Further studies with higher doses...

  13. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M

    2018-01-01

    some of these topics. OBJECTIVE: To present the report of APCCC 2017. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Ten important areas of controversy in APC management were identified: high-risk localised and locally advanced prostate cancer; "oligometastatic" prostate cancer; castration-naïve and castration......-resistant prostate cancer; the role of imaging in APC; osteoclast-targeted therapy; molecular characterisation of blood and tissue; genetic counselling/testing; side effects of systemic treatment(s); global access to prostate cancer drugs. A panel of 60 international prostate cancer experts developed the program...... literature review or meta-analysis. The outcomes of the voting had varying degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of this article, as well as in the detailed voting results recorded in Supplementary data. CONCLUSIONS: The presented expert voting results can be used for support in areas of management...

  14. Associations between aerobic exercise levels and physical and mental health outcomes in men with bone metastatic prostate cancer: a cross-sectional investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, E M; Newton, R U; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Cormie, P; Joseph, D; Chambers, S K; Baumann, F T; Bloch, W; Galvão, D A

    2017-11-01

    Cancer patients with bone metastases have previously been excluded from participation in physical activity programmes due to concerns of skeletal fractures. Our aim was to provide initial information on the association between physical activity levels and physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Between 2012 and 2015, 55 prostate cancer patients (mean age 69.7 ± 8.3; BMI 28.6 ± 4.0) with bone metastases (58.2% >2 regions affected) undertook assessments for self-reported physical activity, physical and mental health outcomes (SF-36), objective physical performance measures and body composition by DXA. Sixteen men (29%) met the current aerobic exercise guidelines for cancer survivors, while 39 (71%) reported lower aerobic exercise levels. Men not meeting aerobic exercise guidelines had lower physical functioning (p = .004), role functioning (physical and emotional) (p health scores (p = .014) as well all lower measures of physical performance (p exercise are associated with reduced physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. While previous research has focused primarily in those with non-metastatic disease, our initial results suggest that higher levels of aerobic exercise may preserve physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Clinical Trial Registry: Trial Registration: ACTRN12611001158954. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts PSA Response and Prognosis in Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    Full Text Available An unprecedented advance has been seen in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC treatments in the past few years. With a number of novel agents were approved, there is a pressing need to develop improved prognostic biomarkers to facilitate the personalised selection and sequencing of these novel agents. Emerging evidence indicates that the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR is associated with poorer survival in patients with prostate cancer (PCa. However, the importance of the NLR for the prediction of the PSA response (PSARS and biochemical recurrence (BCR has been largely neglected. Here, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic value of the NLR for the PSARS, BCR, and survival in PCa. A systematic database search was performed using Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI. A meta-analysis was performed by pooling hazard ratios (HRs, odds ratios (ORs and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs. A total of 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Our results suggest that an elevated NLR predicts a lower PSARS rate (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.40-1.98 and a higher possibility of BCR (HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.21. Additionally, we confirmed that an elevated NLR was a prognostic predictor of shorter overall survival (OS in both metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC (HR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.32-1.59 and localized PCa (LPC (HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.01-1.23 and that it predicted worse progression-free survival (PFS in CRPC (HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.23-1.61 and poorer recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.01-1.75 in LPC. Our results suggest that an elevated NLR might be employed as a prognostic marker of biochemical changes and prognosis to facilitate risk stratification and decision making for individual treatment of PCa patients. The potential mechanisms underlying these associations and future research directions are also discussed.

  16. Prospected epigenetic moderators from natural sources and drug of class NSAIDS as effective treatment options to prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Dubey1

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common and leading cancer amongst the males all around the world. Depending upon it long latency and cost involved in its management and treatment, there is extensive need for more personalized and economical therapeutic approach for its effective therapy. The current review here discusses agents from natural dietary sources and drug class Non-Steroidal Antinflammatory (NSAIDS that bears chemopreventive potential to regulate PC progression & tumour development and therefore could be devised into effective future treatment strategy against PC along with its metastatic castration-resistant form. Based on the literature search the therapeutic scope of selected agents are delineated, sighting their previous activity and prospects as epigenetic moderators in specific to particular PC causing biomarkers like over expression of AKR1C3, lost intracellular glutathione/glutathione-stranferases( GSH/GST expression, DNA hypermethylation, aberrant cell proliferation and other related factors that are thought to potentiate and aggravate the onset of PC like smoking and use of other narcotics products.

  17. Vinculin and filamin-C are two potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Jin, Tao; Yang, Lu; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Yang; Li, Hong; Zhu, Ye

    2017-10-10

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common diseases for male population, and the effective treatment for metastatic castration-resistant PCa is still lacking. To unravel the underlying mechanism of PCa cell migration, we plan to analyze the related crucial proteins and their roles. In our study, we firstly identify the differentially expressed proteins using quantitative proteomics, and confirm their mRNA expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The alterations of these proteins at DNA and mRNA levels are obtained from cBioPortal database. Furthermore, the functions of these proteins are evaluated using wound-healing assay. The quantitative proteomics identified vinculin (VCL) and filamin-C (FLNC) as two highly expressed proteins in PC3 cells, and the DNA and mRNA of these two proteins were amplified and upregulated in a part of PCa patients. Knockdown of VCL and FLNC gene expression significantly inhibit PCa cell migration. These findings suggest that VCL and FLNC identified by quantitative proteomics are highly expressed in PCa cells with high migration potential, and they could be effective targets for repressing PCa cell migration, paving a new avenue for the prognosis and treatment of advanced PCa.

  18. Metronomic Treatment with Low-Dose Trofosfamide Leads to a Long-Term Remission in a Patient with Docetaxel-Refractory Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Greiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients refractory to androgen withdrawal and docetaxel therapy is currently discouraging and new therapeutic approaches are vastly needed. Here, we report a long-term remission over one year in a 68-year-old patient with metastatic docetaxel-refractory prostate cancer employing low-dose trofosfamide. The patient suffered from distant failure with several bone lesions and lymph node metastases depicted by a (11 C-Choline positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT. After initiation of trofosfamide 100 mg taken orally once a day we observed a steadily decreasing PSA value from initial 46.6 down to 2.1 g/l. The Choline-PET/CT was repeated after 10 months of continuous therapy and demonstrated a partial remission of the bone lesions and a regression of all involved lymph nodes but one. Taken together we found an astonishing and durable activity of the alkylating agent trofosfamide given in a metronomic fashion. We rate the side effects as low and state an excellent therapeutic ratio of this drug in our patient.

  19. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  20. Hedgehog Protein Cholesterolysis: A New Therapeutic Target for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among men in the US. Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) represents the most dangerous and...feasibility with SMDC robotics and plate readers. The calculated Z’ value, a statistical measure of assay quality, was consistently > 0.5, consistent with a...out cholesterolysis assays in the absence (green trace) and presence (grey to black traces) of increasing concentrations of a small molecule

  1. Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 Undergoes Transportin 1-Dependent Nuclear Localization and Remains Functional at the Nucleus of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don-Salu-Hewage, Ayesha S.; Chan, Siu Yuen; McAndrews, Kathleen M.; Chetram, Mahandranauth A.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Bethea, Danaya A.; Hinton, Cimona V.

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 (CXCR4), plays an important role in prostate cancer metastasis. CXCR4 is generally regarded as a plasma membrane receptor where it transmits signals that support transformation, progression and eventual metastasis. Due to the central role of CXCR4 in tumorigenesis, therapeutics approaches such as antagonist and monoclonal antibodies have focused on receptors that exist on the plasma membrane. An emerging concept for G-protein coupled receptors is that they may localize to and associate with the nucleus where they retain function and mediate nuclear signaling. Herein, we demonstrate that CXCR4 associated with the nucleus of malignant prostate cancer tissues. Likewise, expression of CXCR4 was detected in nuclear fractions among several prostate cancer cell lines, compared to normal prostate epithelial cells. Our studies identified a nuclear pool of CXCR4 and we defined a nuclear transport pathway for CXCR4. We reveal a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS), ‘RPRK’, within CXCR4 that contributed to nuclear localization. Additionally, nuclear CXCR4 interacted with Transportinβ1 and Transportinβ1-binding to CXCR4 promoted its nuclear translocation. Importantly, Gαi immunoprecipitation and calcium mobilization studies indicated that nuclear CXCR4 was functional and participated in G-protein signaling, revealing that the nuclear pool of CXCR4 retained function. Given the suggestion that functional, nuclear CXCR4 may be a mechanism underlying prostate cancer recurrence, increased metastatic ability and poorer prognosis after tumors have been treated with therapy that targets plasma membrane CXCR4, these studies addresses a novel mechanism of nuclear signaling for CXCR4, a novel mechanism of clinical targeting, and demonstrate an active nuclear pool that provides important new information to illuminate what has been primarily clinical reports of nuclear CXCR4. PMID:23468933

  2. Dosimetry for {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617: a new radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delker, Andreas; Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Brunegraf, Anika; Gosewisch, Astrid; Gildehaus, Franz Josef; Bartenstein, Peter; Boening, Guido [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Kratochwil, Clemens; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Tritschler, Stefan; Stief, Christian Georg [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Dosimetry is critical to achieve the optimal therapeutic effect of radioligand therapy (RLT) with limited side effects. Our aim was to perform image-based absorbed dose calculation for the new PSMA ligand {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 in support of its use for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Whole-body planar images and SPECT/CT images of the abdomen were acquired in five patients (mean age 68 years) for during two treatment cycles at approximately 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after administration of 3.6 GBq (range 3.4 to 3.9 GBq) {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617. Quantitative 3D SPECT OSEM reconstruction was performed with corrections for photon scatter, photon attenuation and detector blurring. A camera-specific calibration factor derived from phantom measurements was used for quantitation. Absorbed doses were calculated for various organs from the images using a combination of linear approximation, exponential fit, and target-specific S values, in accordance with the MIRD scheme. Absorbed doses to bone marrow were estimated from planar and SPECT images and with consideration of the blood sampling method according to the EANM guidelines. The average (± SD) absorbed doses per cycle were 2.2 ± 0.6 Gy for the kidneys (0.6 Gy/GBq), 5.1 ± 1.8 Gy for the salivary glands (1.4 Gy/GBq), 0.4 ± 0.2 Gy for the liver (0.1 Gy/GBq), 0.4 ± 0.1 Gy for the spleen (0.1 Gy/GBq), and 44 ± 19 mGy for the bone marrow (0.012 Gy/GBq). The organ absorbed doses did not differ significantly between cycles. The critical absorbed dose reported for the kidneys (23 Gy) was not reached in any patient. At 24 h there was increased uptake in the colon with 50 - 70 % overlap to the kidneys on planar images. Absorbed doses for tumour lesions ranged between 1.2 and 47.5 Gy (13.1 Gy/GBq) per cycle. The salivary glands and kidneys showed high, but not critical, absorbed doses after RLT with {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617. We suggest that {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 is suitable for radiotherapy, offering tumour

  3. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  4. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Clinical Management and Burden of Prostate Cancer: A Markov Monte Carlo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Chiranjeev; Aprikian, Armen; Cury, Fabio; Chevalier, Simone; Dragomir, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-skin cancer among men in developed countries. Several novel treatments have been adopted by healthcare systems to manage PCa. Most of the observational studies and randomized trials on PCa have concurrently evaluated fewer treatments over short follow-up. Further, preceding decision analytic models on PCa management have not evaluated various contemporary management options. Therefore, a contemporary decision analytic model was necessary to address limitations to the literature by synthesizing the evidence on novel treatments thereby forecasting short and long-term clinical outcomes. Objectives To develop and validate a Markov Monte Carlo model for the contemporary clinical management of PCa, and to assess the clinical burden of the disease from diagnosis to end-of-life. Methods A Markov Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the management of PCa in men 65 years and older from diagnosis to end-of-life. Health states modeled were: risk at diagnosis, active surveillance, active treatment, PCa recurrence, PCa recurrence free, metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer, overall and PCa death. Treatment trajectories were based on state transition probabilities derived from the literature. Validation and sensitivity analyses assessed the accuracy and robustness of model predicted outcomes. Results Validation indicated model predicted rates were comparable to observed rates in the published literature. The simulated distribution of clinical outcomes for the base case was consistent with sensitivity analyses. Predicted rate of clinical outcomes and mortality varied across risk groups. Life expectancy and health adjusted life expectancy predicted for the simulated cohort was 20.9 years (95%CI 20.5–21.3) and 18.2 years (95% CI 17.9–18.5), respectively. Conclusion Study findings indicated contemporary management strategies improved survival and quality of life in patients with PCa. This model could be used

  6. Commentary on "Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer". Robinson D, Van Allen EM, Wu YM, Schultz N, Lonigro RJ, Mosquera JM, Montgomery B, Taplin ME, Pritchard CC, Attard G, Beltran H, Abida W, Bradley RK, Vinson J, Cao X, Vats P, Kunju LP, Hussain M, Feng FY, Tomlins SA, Cooney KA, Smith DC, Brennan C, Siddiqui J, Mehra R, Chen Y, Rathkopf DE, Morris MJ, Solomon SB, Durack JC, Reuter VE, Gopalan A, Gao J, Loda M, Lis RT, Bowden M, Balk SP, Gaviola G, Sougnez C, Gupta M, Yu EY, Mostaghel EA, Cheng HH, Mulcahy H, True LD, Plymate SR, Dvinge H, Ferraldeschi R, Flohr P, Miranda S, Zafeiriou Z, Tunariu N, Mateo J, Perez-Lopez R, Demichelis F, Robinson BD, Schiffman M, Nanus DM, Tagawa ST, Sigaras A, Eng KW, Elemento O, Sboner A, Heath EI, Scher HI, Pienta KJ, Kantoff P, de Bono JS, Rubin MA, Nelson PS, Garraway LA, Sawyers CL, Chinnaiyan AM.Cell. 21 May 2015;161(5):1215-1228.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Aronson, William J

    2017-08-01

    Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53, and PTEN were frequent (40%-60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified new genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin, and ZBTB16/PLZF. Moreover, aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1, and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) compared to those in primary prostate cancers. A total of 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration, including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides clinically actionable information that could affect treatment decisions for these affected individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen response rate of sequential chemotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: the results of real life practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geehyun Song

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: Docetacel was the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in second- and third-line trials of chemotherapy in Korean CRPC patients. Although docetaxel is not used as first-line chemotherapy, and new agents are not available for therapy in CRPC patients, we can consider docetaxel a second- or third-line chemotherapy in CRPC.

  8. A Continuation Study Using Sunitinib Malate For Patients Leaving Treatment On A Previous Sunitinib Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Metastatic Breast Cancer [F]; Advanced Breast Cancer; Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Advanced/Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Advanced Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Pancreatic Islet Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

  9. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1

  10. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väänänen H Kalervo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. Methods We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. Results VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p p p p Conclusion The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites.

  11. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Prostate Cancer Bone Disease: Correlation With Bone Biopsy Histological and Molecular Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Mateo, Joaquin; Collins, David J; Koh, Dow-Mu; de Bono, Johann S; Tunariu, Nina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) bone metastases with histological and molecular features of bone metastases. Forty-three bone marrow biopsies from 33 metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients with multiparametric MRI and documented bone metastases were evaluated. A second cohort included 10 CRPC patients with no bone metastases. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), normalized b900 diffusion-weighted imaging (nDWI) signal, and signal-weighted fat fraction (swFF) with bone marrow biopsy histological parameters were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman correlations. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were analyzed. Median ADC and nDWI signal was significantly higher, and median swFF was significantly lower, in bone metastases than nonmetastatic bone (P < 0.001). In the metastatic cohort, 31 (72.1%) of 43 biopsies had detectable cancer cells. Median ADC and swFF were significantly lower and median nDWI signal was significantly higher in biopsies with tumor cells versus nondetectable tumor cells (898 × 10 mm/s vs 1617 × 10 mm/s; 11.5% vs 62%; 5.3 vs 2.3, respectively; P < 0.001). Tumor cellularity inversely correlated with ADC and swFF, and positively correlated with nDWI signal (P < 0.001). In serial biopsies, taken before and after treatment, changes in multiparametric MRI parameters paralleled histological changes. Multiparametric MRI provides valuable information about mCRPC bone metastases. These data further clinically qualify DWI as a response biomarker in mCRPC.

  12. Optimal duration of androgen deprivation therapy following radiation therapy in intermediate- or high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Frederico; Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto Novis de; Sasse, Andre Deeke, E-mail: sasse@cevon.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Objectives: to investigate current evidence on the optimal duration of adjuvant hormone deprivation for prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was performed in electronic databases. Data from randomized trials comparing different durations of hormone blockade was collected for pooled analysis. Overall survival, disease-free survival, disease-specific survival and toxicity were the outcomes of interest. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects model. Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria. For overall survival, the pooled data from the studies demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for longer hormone deprivation (Hazard Ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.96). A statistically significant benefit was also found for disease-free survival (Hazard Ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.89), and disease-specific survival (Hazard Ratio 0.73; 95% CI 0.62 - 0.85). Studies with longer blockade duration arm demonstrated greater benefit. Toxicity was low, with no increase in cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Longer duration of androgen deprivation combined to radiotherapy prolongs OS, DFS and DSS in patients with intermediate and high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer. However, this evidence is based on trials using older radiation techniques, and further research of combination of androgen deprivation and new RT technologies may be warranted. (author)

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L. [F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Romak, Lindsay B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kwon, Eugene D. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R., E-mail: olivier.kenneth@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  14. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, P.O.; Damber, J.E.; Hagerman, I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events...

  15. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer -- Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Per Olov; Ala-Opas, Martti; Brekkan, Einar

    2002-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, interest in parenteral estrogen therapy for prostate cancer was renewed when it was found that it influenced liver metabolism only marginally and had very few cardiovascular side-effects. In this study high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) was compared to combined...

  16. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer -- Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Per Olov; Ala-Opas, Martti; Brekkan, Einar

    2002-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, interest in parenteral estrogen therapy for prostate cancer was renewed when it was found that it influenced liver metabolism only marginally and had very few cardiovascular side-effects. In this study high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) was compared to combined ...

  17. Two Domains of Vimentin Are Expressed on the Surface of Lymph Node, Bone and Brain Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lines along with the Putative Stem Cell Marker Proteins CD44 and CD133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Nicole F. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maurer, Jochen [Sanford-Burnham, Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Sheng, Huiming [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Bensussan, Armand [INSERM U976, Hôpital Saint Louis, F-75475 Paris (France); Department of Immunology, Dermatology and Oncology, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMRS976 F-75475 Paris (France); Maricic, Igor; Kumar, Vipin [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Laboratory of Autoimmunity, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Braciak, Todd A., E-mail: tbraciak@tpims.org [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2011-07-13

    Vimentin was originally identified as an intermediate filament protein present only as an intracellular component in many cell types. However, this protein has now been detected on the surface of a number of different cancer cell types in a punctate distribution pattern. Increased vimentin expression has been indicated as an important step in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required for the metastasis of prostate cancer. Here, using two vimentin-specific monoclonal antibodies (SC5 and V9 directed against the coil one rod domain and the C-terminus of the vimentin protein, respectively), we examined whether either of these domains would be displayed on the surface of three commonly studied prostate cancer cell lines isolated from different sites of metastases. Confocal analysis of LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines (derived from lymph node, bone or brain prostate metastases, respectively) demonstrated that both domains of vimentin are present on the surface of these metastatic cancer cell types. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that vimentin expression was readily detected along with CD44 expression but only a small subpopulation of prostate cancer cells expressed vimentin and the putative stem cell marker CD133 along with CD44. Finally, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) nanoparticles that target vimentin could bind and internalize into tested prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that at least two domains of vimentin are present on the surface of metastatic prostate cancer cells and suggest that vimentin could provide a useful target for nanoparticle- or antibody- cancer therapeutic agents directed against highly invasive cancer a