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Sample records for metaphase chromosomes induced

  1. Stage-specific damage to synaptonemal complexes and metaphase chromosomes induced by X rays in male mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, L.C.; Sontag, M.R.; Allen, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) reveal mutagen-induced effects in germ cell meiotic chromosomes. The study was aimed at characterizing relationships between SC and metaphase I chromosome damage following radiation exposure at various stages of spermatogenesis. Male mice were irradiated with doses of 0, 2, or 4 Gy, and spermatocytes were harvested at times consistent with earlier exposures as spermatogonial stem cells, preleptotene cells (premeiotic DNA synthesis), or meiotic prophase cells. After stem-cell exposure, twice as many rearrangements were observed in SCs as in metaphase I chromosomes. Irradiation during premeiotic DNA synthesis resulted in dose-related increases in SC breakage and rearrangements (including novel forms) and in metaphase chromosomal aberrations. Following prophase exposure, various types and levels of SC and metaphase damage were observed. Irradiation of zygotene cells led to high frequencies of chromosome multivalents in metaphase I without a correspondingly high level of damage in preceding prophase SCs. Thus, irradiation of premeiotic and meiotic cells results in variable relationships between SC and metaphase chromosome damage

  2. Automatic Metaphase Finding by Inter-Chromosome Extrema Profile Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vega-Alvarado, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    ...-level inter-chromosome coarseness features in microscopic images of metaphase spreads, and allows to quantity the texture of the cytological objects analysing the intensity profile between chromosome...

  3. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 1. Numerical and structural chromosome anomalies in metaphase II oocytes, pre- and post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, Charles; Fisher, Graham

    1996-01-01

    The incidences of X-ray induced numerical and structural chromosome anomalies were screened in a range of developmental stages from metaphase II oocytes through to post-implantation embryos. Following 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, the rate of hyperploidy (chromosome gain) was found to be elevated over levels in unirradiated controls, at metaphase II, in 1-cell and 3.5 day pre-implantation embryos but not in 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. In the latter, however, the frequency of mosaicism was significantly increased. A similar response of an increase in mosaicism but not in hyperploidy in 8.5 day post-implantation embryos was also found after irradiation of dictyate stage oocytes with 4 Gy of acute X-rays. Significantly elevated frequencies of structural chromosome anomalies were present in metaphase II oocytes and pre-implantation embryonic stages, but could not be detected in block-stained chromosome preparations from 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. However, analysis of chromosome preparations after G-banding showed that almost 14% of 14.5 day foetuses carried a chromosome rearrangement after 1 Gy of X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of radiation-induced chromosome gains are incompatible with embryonic survival but that a proportion of embryos with structural chromosome damage develop past mid-gestation. These latter embryos are therefore potentially capable of contributing to the genetic burden of the next generation

  4. Mapping EBNA-1 Domains Involved in Binding to Metaphase Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Vincent; Dehee, Axelle; Chikhi-Brachet, Roxane; Piolot, Tristan; Coppey-Moisan, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome can persist in dividing human B cells as multicopy circular episomes. Viral episomes replicate in synchrony with host cell DNA and are maintained at a relatively constant copy number for a long time. Only two viral elements, the replication origin OriP and the EBNA-1 protein, are required for the persistence of viral genomes during latency. EBNA-1 activates OriP during the S phase and may also contribute to the partition and/or retention of viral genomes during mitosis. Indeed, EBNA-1 has been shown to interact with mitotic chromatin. Moreover, viral genomes are noncovalently associated with metaphase chromosomes. This suggests that EBNA-1 may facilitate the anchorage of viral genomes on cellular chromosomes, thus ensuring proper partition and retention. In the present paper, we have investigated the chromosome-binding activity of EBV EBNA-1, herpesvirus papio (HVP) EBNA-1, and various derivatives of EBV EBNA-1, fused to a variant of the green fluorescent protein. The results show that binding to metaphase chromosomes is a common property of EBV and HVP EBNA-1. Further studies indicated that at least three independent domains (CBS-1, -2, and -3) mediate EBNA-1 binding to metaphase chromosomes. In agreement with the anchorage model, two of these domains mapped to a region that has been previously demonstrated to be required for the long-term persistence of OriP-containing plasmids. PMID:10196336

  5. Distribution of sex chromosomes (XY) in lymphocyte metaphase spreads of dairy bulls

    OpenAIRE

    Kotikalapudi Rosaiah; Patel Rajesh Kumar; Medidi Hemanth; Sugali Nagaraju Naik

    2013-01-01

    Position of autosome and sex chromosomes in metaphase spreads is grate concerned of Cytogeneticians worldwide to understand cell biology. A few isolated studies have been conducted for the distribution of chromosomes in metaphase spread. Our studies reveal that most sex chromosomes (XY) remain on periphery and semi-periphery, 84.16% for X and 86.97% for Y respectively, in round metaphase spreads. The application of sex chromosome position in metaphase sprea...

  6. Manipulating chromosome structure and metaphase status with ultraviolet light and repair synthesis inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullinger, A.M.; Johnson, R.T. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Dept. of Zoology)

    1985-02-01

    DNA repair occurs in metaphase-arrested cells in response to ultraviolet irradiation. In the presence of the repair synthesis inhibitors, hydroxyurea and 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, the chromosomes of such cells are decondensed. The dose response of chromosome decondensation varies between different cell types. In human cells defective in excision repair there is much less chromosome decondensation in response to the same ultraviolet dose and time of repair inhibition. However, a simian virus 40-transformed muntjac cell displays pronounced chromosome decondensation but has limited incision ability. Both chromosome decondensation and single-strand break accumulation in the presence of inhibitors are reversed when DNA precursors are provided, but reversal after higher ultraviolet doses and longer period of incubation leads to recondensed chromosomes that are fragmented. Although the chromosomes of repair-inhibited metaphase cells are decondensed in fixed preparations, their morphology appears normal in intact cells. The cells also retain a capacity to induce prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) when fused with interphase cells: compared with control mitotic cells, the speed of induction is sometimes reduced but the final amount of PCC produced is similar.

  7. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  8. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L., E-mail: rafat@um.ac.ir; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  9. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  10. Applying deep learning technology to automatically identify metaphase chromosomes using scanning microscopic images: an initial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Automated high throughput scanning microscopy is a fast developing screening technology used in cytogenetic laboratories for the diagnosis of leukemia or other genetic diseases. However, one of the major challenges of using this new technology is how to efficiently detect the analyzable metaphase chromosomes during the scanning process. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technology, which can identify the metaphase chromosomes with high accuracy. The CAD scheme includes an eight layer neural network. The first six layers compose of an automatic feature extraction module, which has an architecture of three convolution-max-pooling layer pairs. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd pair contains 30, 20, 20 feature maps, respectively. The seventh and eighth layers compose of a multiple layer perception (MLP) based classifier, which is used to identify the analyzable metaphase chromosomes. The performance of new CAD scheme was assessed by receiver operation characteristic (ROC) method. A number of 150 regions of interest (ROIs) were selected to test the performance of our new CAD scheme. Each ROI contains either interphase cell or metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that new scheme is able to achieve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.886+/-0.043. This investigation demonstrates that applying a deep learning technique may enable to significantly improve the accuracy of the metaphase chromosome detection using a scanning microscopic imaging technology in the future.

  11. Computer graphics of SEM images facilitate recognition of chromosome position in isolated human metaphase plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, L D; Barrett, J M; Welter, D A

    1995-04-01

    There is general agreement that at the time of mitosis chromosomes occupy precise positions and that these positions likely affect subsequent nuclear function in interphase. However, before such ideas can be investigated in human cells, it is necessary to determine first the precise position of each chromosome with regard to its neighbors. It has occurred to us that stereo images, produced by scanning electron microscopy, of isolated metaphase plates could form the basis whereby these positions could be ascertained. In this paper we describe a computer graphic technique that permits us to keep track of individual chromosomes in a metaphase plate and to compare chromosome positions in different metaphase plates. Moreover, the computer graphics provide permanent, easily manipulated, rapid recall of stored chromosome profiles. These advantages are demonstrated by a comparison of the relative position of group A-specific and groups D- and G-specific chromosomes to the full complement of chromosomes in metaphase plates isolated from a nearly triploid human-derived cell (HeLa S3) to a hypo-diploid human fetal lung cell.

  12. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip microfl...

  13. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000).

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  15. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  16. In situ hybridization of iodinated 5S and 18/25S RNA to Vicia faba metaphase chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, I.; Baeumlein, H.; Wobus, U.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro labelled 125 I ribosomal RNA fractions (18/25S and 5S) were in situ hybridized to metaphase chromosomes of a reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba (characterized by two translocations and one pericentric inversion, each being present homozygously). The sites of 18S and 25S RNA were found to be confined to the nucleolus organizing secondary constriction. Two loci of 5S RNA were recognized on the satellite of nucleolus bearing chromosome. Possible correlations between the location of ribosomal genes, heterochromatic G-bands and clusters of mutagen induced chromatid aberrations are discussed. (author)

  17. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Hoshi, Osamu [Division of Microscopic Anatomy and Bio-imaging, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Shigeno, Masatsugu [SII NanoTechnology Incorporated, RBM Tsukiji Building, Shintomi 2-15-5, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0041 (Japan)], E-mail: t-ushiki@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

    2008-09-24

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes-obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique-were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m{sup -1}), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  18. Immunostimulatory oligonucleotide-induced metaphase cytogenetics detect chromosomal aberrations in 80% of CLL patients: A study of 132 CLL cases with correlation to FISH, IgVH status, and CD38 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Frank; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Kern, Wolfgang; Schoch, Claudia

    2006-11-01

    Compared with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), conventional metaphase cytogenetics play only a minor prognostic role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) so far, due to technical problems resulting from limited proliferation of CLL cells in vitro. Here, we present a simple method for in vitro stimulation of CLL cells that overcomes this limitation. In our unselected patient population, 125 of 132 cases could be successfully stimulated for metaphase generation by culture with the immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 plus interleukin 2. Of 125 cases, 101 showed chromosomal aberrations. The aberration rate is comparable to the rate detected by parallel interphase FISH. In 47 patients, conventional cytogenetics detected additional aberrations not detected by FISH analysis. A complex aberrant karyotype, defined as one having at least 3 aberrations, was detected in 30 of 125 patients, compared with only one such case as defined by FISH. Conventional cytogenetics frequently detected balanced and unbalanced translocations. A significant correlation of the poor-prognosis unmutated IgV(H) status with unbalanced translocations and of the likewise poor-prognosis CD38 expression to balanced translocations and complex aberrant karyotype was found. We demonstrate that FISH analysis underestimates the complexity of chromosomal aberrations in CLL. Therefore, conventional cytogenetics may define subgroups of patients with high risk of progression.

  19. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Stephens, J.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1992-05-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiation sensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared to the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes from xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part, the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells

  20. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Stephens, J.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiosensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes form xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells. (Author)

  1. Automated detection of analyzable metaphase chromosome cells depicted on scanned digital microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Wang, Xingwei; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zheng, Bin

    2010-02-01

    Visually searching for analyzable metaphase chromosome cells under microscopes is quite time-consuming and difficult. To improve detection efficiency, consistency, and diagnostic accuracy, an automated microscopic image scanning system was developed and tested to directly acquire digital images with sufficient spatial resolution for clinical diagnosis. A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was also developed and integrated into the image scanning system to search for and detect the regions of interest (ROI) that contain analyzable metaphase chromosome cells in the large volume of scanned images acquired from one specimen. Thus, the cytogeneticists only need to observe and interpret the limited number of ROIs. In this study, the high-resolution microscopic image scanning and CAD performance was investigated and evaluated using nine sets of images scanned from either bone marrow (three) or blood (six) specimens for diagnosis of leukemia. The automated CAD-selection results were compared with the visual selection. In the experiment, the cytogeneticists first visually searched for the analyzable metaphase chromosome cells from specimens under microscopes. The specimens were also automated scanned and followed by applying the CAD scheme to detect and save ROIs containing analyzable cells while deleting the others. The automated selected ROIs were then examined by a panel of three cytogeneticists. From the scanned images, CAD selected more analyzable cells than initially visual examinations of the cytogeneticists in both blood and bone marrow specimens. In general, CAD had higher performance in analyzing blood specimens. Even in three bone marrow specimens, CAD selected 50, 22, 9 ROIs, respectively. Except matching with the initially visual selection of 9, 7, and 5 analyzable cells in these three specimens, the cytogeneticists also selected 41, 15 and 4 new analyzable cells, which were missed in initially visual searching. This experiment showed the feasibility of

  2. Separate Location of Parental Chromosomes in Squashed Metaphases of Hybrid between Hordeum vulgare L. and Four Polyploid, Alien Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    In 38 squashed, somatic metaphases of four hybrids between diploid Hordeum vulgare and two tetra-and two hexaploid alien species, each of the H. vulgare chromosomes was identifed, and differentiated from the chromosomes of the other parental species, by its Giemsa C-banding pattern. The H. vulgare...

  3. Accurate cytogenetic biodosimetry through automated dicentric chromosome curation and metaphase cell selection [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate digital image analysis of abnormal microscopic structures relies on high quality images and on minimizing the rates of false positive (FP and negative objects in images. Cytogenetic biodosimetry detects dicentric chromosomes (DCs that arise from exposure to ionizing radiation, and determines radiation dose received based on DC frequency. Improvements in automated DC recognition increase the accuracy of dose estimates by reclassifying FP DCs as monocentric chromosomes or chromosome fragments. We also present image segmentation methods to rank high quality digital metaphase images and eliminate suboptimal metaphase cells. A set of chromosome morphology segmentation methods selectively filtered out FP DCs arising primarily from sister chromatid separation, chromosome fragmentation, and cellular debris. This reduced FPs by an average of 55% and was highly specific to these abnormal structures (≥97.7% in three samples. Additional filters selectively removed images with incomplete, highly overlapped, or missing metaphase cells, or with poor overall chromosome morphologies that increased FP rates. Image selection is optimized and FP DCs are minimized by combining multiple feature based segmentation filters and a novel image sorting procedure based on the known distribution of chromosome lengths. Applying the same image segmentation filtering procedures to both calibration and test samples reduced the average dose estimation error from 0.4 Gy to <0.2 Gy, obviating the need to first manually review these images. This reliable and scalable solution enables batch processing for multiple samples of unknown dose, and meets current requirements for triage radiation biodosimetry of high quality metaphase cell preparations.

  4. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  5. Preimplantation diagnosis of repeated miscarriage due to chromosomal translocations using metaphase chromosomes of a blastomere biopsied from 4- to 6-cell-stage embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Awata, Shoichiro; Mawatari, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Izumi; Kusunoki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and accuracy of karyotyping the blastomere chromosomes at metaphase in the natural cell cycle for preimplantation diagnosis. A pilot study. A private infertility clinic and a university laboratory. Eleven patients undergoing IVF and preimplantation diagnosis. Intact human embryos at the 4- to 6-cell stage and human-mouse heterokaryons were cultured and checked hourly for disappearance of the nuclear envelope. After it disappeared, the metaphase chromosomes were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Percentage of analyzable metaphase plates and safety and accuracy of the method. The success rate of electrofusion to form human-mouse heterokaryons was 87.1% (27/31), and analyzable chromosomes were obtained from 77.4% (24/31) of the heterokaryons. On the other hand, disappearance of the nuclear envelope occurred in 89.5% (17/19) of the human embryos and it began earlier than that in the heterokaryons. Analyzable chromosomes were obtained and their translocation sites were identified in all blastomeres biopsied from the 17 embryos. After the biopsy, 67.0% of the embryos could develop to the blastocyst stage. The natural cell cycle method reported herein requires frequent observation, but it is safe, with no artificial effects on the chromosomes and without loss of or damage to blastomeres, which occurred with the electrofusion method. Using the natural cell cycle method, we could perform preimplantation diagnosis with nearly 100% accuracy.

  6. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  7. [THE INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PRETREATMENT ON IN SITU DETECTION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES AND IN INTERPHASE NUCLEI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudinina, N A; Sasina, L K; Noniashvili, E M; Neronova, E G; Pavlinova, L I; Suchkova, I O; Sofronov, G A; Patkin, E L

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitate analysis of DNA methylation in situ at the level of cells, chromosomes and chromosomal domains is extremely important for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, the study of ageing and the consequences of environmental impacts. An important question arises, whether the revealed in situ methylation pattern reflects DNA methylation per se and (or) availability of the DNA for antibodies, which in turn depends on the peculiarities of chromatin structure and chromosome condensation. These events can lead to an incorrect evaluation of the actual pattern of DNA methylation. To avoid this shortcoming as far as possible, we have modified the most widely used method of revealing 5-methylcytosine in situ with monoclonal antibodies. Here we have shown that the detection of DNA methylation staining of chromosomes including C-heterochromatin, chromosomal arms and sister chromatids is drastically dependent on pretreatment of chromosomal preparations for immunocytochemical study using fluorescent antibodies. Using undifferentiated stem cells of mouse embryonal carcinoma line F9, it has been found that change in preparations storage results in a sharp fluorescence decrease up to complete disappearance of the signal in centromeric heterochromatin. With the help of the method described in the work, we have first revealed the asymmetry of sister chromatids methylation in metaphase chromosomes of F9 cell and lymphocytes of human periphery blood. This may lead to asymmetry of transcriptional signature of daughter cells after division. The proposed here modification of 5-methylcytosine detection in situ provides a more complete characterization of methylation of chromosomes and chromosomal domains, compared to previously published methods.

  8. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein......The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  9. Methods of scoring induced chromosome structural changes in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoleff, H.; Gecheff, K.

    1976-01-01

    In barley, a material widely used in mutation and chromosomal aberration studies, the method most frequently used for scoring induced chromosomal changes is still anaphase analysis. In this paper, data obtained after treatment of barley with gamma-rays and ethyleneimine (EI) and comparative scoring of aberrations in metaphase and anaphase are reported and discussed. It is evident that the metaphase aberrations induced by gamma-rays and ethyleneimine, due probably to their specific location, showed a differential manifestation during anaphase. Thus, after treatment with ethyleneimine a great portion of the induced aberrations, being located preferentially at the centromere regions, gave no scorable bridges, and an apparent excess of fragments was observed at anaphase. After gamma-irradiation the differences between metaphase and anaphase scoring were mainly due to a large portion of fragments escaping detection

  10. Cobalt chloride induces metaphase when topically applied to larvae and pupae of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueira-Vieira, C; Tavares, R R; Morelli, S; Pereira, B B; Silva, R P; Torres-Mariano, A R; Kerr, W E; Bonetti, A M

    2013-06-20

    In order to optimize preparations of bee metaphases, we tested cobalt chloride, which has been used as a metaphase inducer in other organisms, such as hamsters and fish. Four microliters of 65 mM cobalt chloride aqueous solution was topically applied to larval and pupal stages of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. The cerebral ganglion was removed after treatment and prepared for cytogenetic analysis. Identically manipulated untreated individuals were used as controls. The number of metaphases was increased 3-fold in treated individuals compared to controls. The micronucleus test showed no mutagenic effects of cobalt chloride on M. scutellaris cells. We concluded that cobalt chloride is a metaphase-inducing agent in M. scutellaris, thus being useful for cytogenetic analyses.

  11. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells leading to acute myeloid leukemia in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuhiko Ban; Tomoko Kusama

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (RI-AML) in mice is charaterized by deletion and/or rearrangement of chromosome 2. While chromosome 2 has been suspected to be a target of RI-AML, radiation-sensitive site of the chromosome might be implicated in the leukemogenesis. There were few cytogenetical studies, however, focusing on chromosomal rearrangements shortly after irradiation, and little was known about the frequency and pattern of chromosome 2 aberrations during the early period. In this study, metaphase samples were prepared from whole-body irradiated mice 24 hours after irradiation, most of the cells considered to be in the first mitotic stage. Distribution of chromosomal breakpoints on the metaphase samples were analyzed to study the relationship between chromosome aberrations and RI-AML. (author)

  13. Cyclophosphamide and acrolein induced oxidative stress leading to deterioration of metaphase II mouse oocyte quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, Roohi; Khan, Sana N; Shaeib, Faten; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Aldhaheri, Sarah R; Najafi, Tohid; Thakur, Mili; Morris, Robert; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2017-09-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat ovarian, breast, and hematological cancers as well as autoimmune disorders. Such chemotherapy is associated with reproductive failure and premature ovarian insufficiency. The mechanism by which CTX and/or its main metabolite, acrolein, affect female fertility remains unclear, but it is thought to be caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effect of CTX on metaphase II mouse oocytes obtained from treated animals (120mg/kg, 24h of single treatment), and oocytes directly exposed to increasing concentrations of CTX and acrolein (n=480; 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100μM) with and without cumulus cells (CCs) for 45min which correlates to the time of maximum peak plasma concentrations after administration. Oocytes were fixed and subjected to indirect immunofluorescence and were scored based on microtubule spindle structure (MT) and chromosomal alignment (CH). Generation of ROS was evaluated using the Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species Detection Assay Kit. Deterioration of oocyte quality was noted when oocytes were obtained from CTX treated mice along with CTX and acrolein treated oocytes in a dose-dependent manner as shown by an increase in poor scores. Acrolein had an impact at a significantly lower level as compared to CTX, plateau at 10μM versus 50μM, respectively. These variation is are associated with the higher amount of ROS generated with acrolein exposure as compared to CTX (pacrolein scavengers may mitigate the damaging effects of these compounds and help women undergoing such treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Correspondence: chromosomal localization of uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berliner, J.; Mello, R.S.; Norman, A.

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the grain density - the number of grains per unit length - over the centromere and noncentromere regions of metaphase chromosomes in autoradiographs of human lymphocytes. When the chromosomes were labeled in G 0 by uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis, the grain density was two to four times larger over the centromere than over the noncentromere regions. When the labeling was done by scheduled DNA synthesis in S or unscheduled synthesis in M, the grain densities were approximately equal over both regions

  15. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis.

  16. Chromosomal instability induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents. For instance, some cells surviving exposure to ionizing radiations show delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation and / or delayed chromosomal instability. Such instability, especially chromosome destabilization has been implicated in mutation, gene amplification, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosomal instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells. The relationship between delayed chromosomal destabilization and other endpoints of genomic instability, namely; delayed mutation and gene amplification will be discussed, as will the potential cytogenetic and molecular mechanisms contributing to delayed chromosomal instability

  17. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  18. Possible mechanisms of chromosomal aberrations: VII. Comparative dynamics of sister chromatid disjunction and realization of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.; Akhmamet'eva, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during c-metaphase sister chromatid disjunction was demonstrated in murine bone marrow cells exposed to a total γ-irradiation at 0.5 Gy. Caffeine (Cf) treatment during mitosis partially suppressed the chromatid disjunction rate and increased the number of radiation-induced aberrations in this mitosis. Nalidixic acid (NA) treatment of c-metaphase cells completely suppressed chromatid disjunction and the realization of induced aberrations. Topoisomerase 2 was assumed to be involved during mitosis in both processes

  19. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  20. Structural Chromosomal Alterations Induced by Dietary Bioflavonoids in Fanconi Anemia Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Guevara

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive diseasecharacterized by a variety of congenital abnormalities,progressive bone marrow failure,increased chromosomal instability and higherrisk to acute myeloid leukemia, solid tumors. Thisentity can be considered an appropriate biologicalmodel to analyze natural substances with possiblegenotoxic effect. The aims of this study wereto describe and quantify structural chromosomalaberrations induced by 5 flavones, 2 isoflavonesand a topoisomerase II chemotherapeutic inhibitorin Fanconi anemia lymphocytes in order todetermine chromosomal numbers changes and/or type of chromosomal damage.Materials and methodsChromosomes stimulated by phytohaemagglutininM, from Fanconi anemia lymphocytes,were analysed by conventional cytogenetic culture.For each chemical substance and controls,one hundred metaphases were evaluated. Chromosomalalterations were documented by photographyand imaging analyzer. To statisticalanalysis was used chi square test to identify significantdifferences between frequencies of chromosomaldamage of basal and exposed cellcultured a P value less than 0.05.ResultsThere were 431 chromosomal alterations in1000 metaphases analysed; genistein was themore genotoxic bioflavonoid, followed in descendentorder by genistin, fisetin, kaempferol,quercetin, baicalein and miricetin. Chromosomalaberrations observed were: chromatidbreaks, chromosomal breaks, cromatid andchromosomal gaps, quadriratials exchanges,dicentrics chromosome and complex rearrangements.ConclusionBioflavonoids as genistein, genistin and fisetin,which are commonly present in the human diet,showed statistical significance in the number ofchromosomal aberrations in Fanconi anemialymphocytes, regarding the basal damage.

  1. Chromosome painting analysis of X-ray-induced aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Hayashi, M.; Yamazaki, N.; Sofuni, T.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in human lymphocytes induced by X-rays (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gray) were analyzed using chromosome painting. DNA probes for human chromosomes 1, 3 or 4 alone, and a combination of 1 and 4, were used for analysis. The frequency of cells with rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations, dicentrics, insertions, tricentrics and fragments, involving chromosome 4 increased with dose in both 48 and 72 h cultures. The number of translocations per cell also increased with dose at 48 and 72 h. Dicentrics increased with dose in 48 h but not in 72 h cultures. The estimated genomic frequency of aberrations per cell was comparable with results in banded cells. No difference was shown on the detection efficiency of chromosome rearrangements among the various DNA probes used. Since this technique does not necessarily require well-spread metaphases for analysis, it is possible to increase the number of analyzable metaphases compared with the banding technique. Chromosome painting is a simpler, more objective and practical method for detecting chromosome rearrangements than conventional banding analyses. (Author)

  2. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Liou, Louis [Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 670 Albany St., Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Adam, Rosalyn M. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wise, John Pierce Sr., E-mail: john.wise@louisville.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  3. Radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes of various species of mammals and the influence of coffeine during the G-2 phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, M.

    1983-01-01

    The cellular kinetics and the G0-radiation sensitivity of human, chimpanzee, swine and rabbit lymphocytes were investigated using the lymphocytes test system (Ham's F-10 Medium, PHA). Due to the integration of BrdU in the DNA (S-phase), the author was able to distinguish between first, second and third mitoses (M1, M2, M3) in accordance with the differential colouring of the metaphase chromosomes which took place according to the labelling pattern. When checking the G0-radiation sensitivity of the lymphocytes, the rates of chromosomal aberrations in the metaphases of the first and second mitoses were evaluated separately. The different radiation sensitivities are thought to be due to interspecies differences in the repair capacity of the lymphocytes. In the metaphases of second mitoses, the rate of dicentric chromosomes is approximately half of that in M1-metaphases. Ring chromosomes were nearly as frequent in M2-metaphases as in M1-metaphases. In the second experimental phase, the effects of coffein on the aberration rates after radiation exposure of the lymphocytes in the G2 phase was investigated. Achromatic lesions, open chromatide breaks, and translocations were evaluated. Aberration rates were found to increase with the radiation dose and to decrease with the cultivation time after radiation exposure. There was no marked effect of coffein on the aberration rates. The progress of the G2 phase was measured in terms of the rate of radioactively labelled metaphases, which increased with the cultivation time. This labelling index was lower in the exposed cultures than in the control cultures, suggesting a radiation-induced delay of the G2 phase. The labelling indexes of all cultures were enhanced after coffein treatment, suggesting a coffein-induced acceleration of the G2 phase. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  5. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  6. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  7. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  8. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  9. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  10. Distinction of metaphases in the first cell cycle for automated system in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayata, I.; Kajima, J.; Okabe, N.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the biological improvements for developing an automated scoring system of radiation induced chromosome aberrations for radiation dosimetry, we introduce a new method for identifying the metaphases in the first cell cycle. Differing from the conventional method with BrdUrd, it focuses on the difference of chromosome number to be induced by inhibiting the cytokinesis with Cytochalasin B. Majority of the cells with 46 chromosomes were in the first cell cycle, and the ratio of those with 46 chromosomes in the second division was less than one per cent both when Cytochalasin B of 1.5 μg/ml was added to the culture of irradiated lymphocytes and when that of 1.8 μg/ml was added to that of non-irradiated cells for one day, respectively. The ratio of metaphases with over-condensed chromosomes is reduced, the clear-cut image of chromosomes is obtained, culture and staining processes are simpler, and the device of UV irradiation is not necessary. Thus the present Cytochalasin B method offers more qualified input, data based on the numerical difference, than conventional image based recognition, and upgrades the quality of the scoring in the automated analysis system. (Author)

  11. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Cella, L.; Greco, O.; George, K.; Yang, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  12. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; [INFN, Naples (Italy); Cella, L; Greco, O [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Furusawa, Y [NIRS, Chiba (Japan); George, K; Yang, T C [NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  13. Hypermutability of mouse chromosome 2 during the development of x-ray-induced murine myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rithidech, K.; Bond, V.P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Thompson, M.H.; Bullis, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to identify the precise role of a deletion at regions D-E of mouse chromosome 2 [del2(D-E)] during the development of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, we conducted a serial sacrifice study in which metaphase chromosomes were examined by the G-banding technique. Such metaphase cells were collected from x-irradiated mice during the period of transformation of some of the normal hematopoietic cells to the fully developed leukemic phenotype. A group of 250 CBA/Ca male mice (10-12 weeks old) were exposed to a single dose of 2 Gy of 250-kilovolt-peak x-rays; 42 age-matched male mice served as controls. Groups of randomly selected mice were sacrificed at 20 hr, 1 week, and then at intervals of 3 months up to 24 months after x-irradiation. Slides for cytogenetic, hematological, and histological examination were prepared for each animal at each sacrifice time. The majority of such lesions were translocations at 2F or 2H, strongly suggesting hyper mutability of these sites on mouse chromosome 2. No lesions were found in control mice. The finding leads to the possibility that genomic lesions close to 2D and 2E are aberrants associated with radiation leukemogenesis, whereas a single clone of cells with a del2(D-E) may lead directly to overt leukemia. The data also indicate that leukemic transformation arises from the cumulative effects of multiple genetic events on chromosome 2, reinforcing the thesis that multiple steps of mutation occur in the pathogenesis of cancer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  14. Inter-chromosomal heterogeneity in the formation of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Vermeulen, S.; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally assumed that radiation induced chromosomal lesions are distributed randomly and repaired randomly among the genome. Recent studies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome specific DNA libraries indicate that some chromosomes are more sensitive for radiation induced aberration formation than others. Chromosome No. 4 in human and chromosome No. 8 in Chinese hamster have been found to involve more in exchange aberrations than others, when calculated on the basis of their DNA content. Painting with arm specific chromosome libraries indicate that the frequencies of radiation induced intra-chromosome exchanges (i.e., between the arms of a chromosome, such as centric rings and inversions) are far in excess than one would expect on the basis of the frequencies of observed inter-chromosomal exchanges. The possible factors leading to the observed heterogeneity will be discussed

  15. Telomere-mediated chromosomal instability triggers TLR4 induced inflammation and death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres are essential to maintain chromosomal stability. Cells derived from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC-/- mice display elevated telomere-mediated chromosome instability. Age-dependent telomere shortening and associated chromosome instability reduce the capacity to respond to cellular stress occurring during inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is one of the important risk factors in cancer progression. Controlled innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR are required for host defense against infection. Our aim was to understand the role of chromosome/genome instability in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of TLR4 in telomerase deficient mTERC-/- mice harbouring chromosome instability which did not develop any overt immunological disorder in pathogen-free condition or any form of cancers at this stage. Chromosome instability was measured in metaphase spreads prepared from wildtype (mTERC+/+, mTERC+/- and mTERC-/- mouse splenocytes. Peritoneal and/or bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to examine the responses of TLR4 by their ability to produce inflammatory mediators TNFalpha and IL6. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is highly up-regulated in the immune cells derived from telomerase-null (mTERC-/- mice and lipopolysaccharide, a natural ligand for TLR4 stabilises NF-kappaB binding to its promoter by down-regulating ATF-3 in mTERC-/- macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implied that background chromosome instability in the cellular level stabilises the action of TLR4-induced NF-kappaB action and sensitises cells to produce excess pro-inflammatory mediators. Chromosome/genomic instability data raises optimism for controlling inflammation by non-toxic TLR antagonists among high-risk groups.

  16. Study of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfring, E.

    2004-06-01

    A method for determining chromosomal aberrations was established for the purpose of examining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of photon radiation with respect to mammary epithelium cells. Cells were exposed to 25 kV X-radiation and to 200 kV X-radiation for comparison and the resulting concentrations of chromosomal aberrations were compared. The RBE M value for radiation-induced fragmentation was found to be 4.2 ± 2.4, while the RBE M value for radiation-induced generation of dicentric chromosomes was found to be 0.5 ± 0.5. In addition to the evaluation of chromosomal aberrations the number of cell cycles undergone by the cells was monitored by means of BrDU staining. As expected, the proportion of cells which underwent more than one cell cycle following exposure to 5 Gy was very low in both cases, amounting to 1.9% (25 kV) and 3.2 (200 kV). Non-radiated cells yielded control values of 26.0% and 12.6%, suggesting variations in external conditions from day to day

  17. Cell survival and radiation induced chromosome aberrations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Braselmann, H.

    1986-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated in whole blood with 0.5-4.0 Gy of 220 kVp X-rays and the frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in 1st or 2nd division metaphases discriminated by fluorescence plus giemsa staining. Using the empirical distributions of aberrations among cells, cell survival and transmission of aberrations were investigated. Considering both daughter cells, we found that 20% of fragments and 55% of dicentrics or ring chromosomes are lost during the 1st cell division; i.e. cell survival rate from 1st to 2nd generation is mainly influenced by anaphase bridging of these two-hit aberrations. Cell survival to 2nd mitosis was calculated considering this situation and compared with the survival derived from the fraction of M1 cells without unstable aberrations. The resulting shouldered survival curves showed significantly different slopes, indicating that cell reproductive death is overestimated in the latter approach. (orig.)

  18. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  19. Radioprotective effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on gamma ray induced chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonist such as Cimetidine, Famotidine and Ranitidine are used in the clinical treatment of peptic ulcer. In vitro metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay were used to test the effects of famotidine and ranitidine on Cobalt 60 γ-ray induced clastogenic effects. Heparinised whole blood was obtained from healthy non-smoker volunteers. Blood samples were irradiated at a dose of 3Gy and incubated at 37 deg C for 1h. Lymphocyte cultures were initiated for metaphase chromosomes and cytochalasin B blocked micronucleus analysis. Aqueous solution of Famotidine (150 g/ml) and Ranitidine (500 g/ml) was added to the whole blood cultures at 0h and 24h. Cultures were harvested and processed at 48h and 72h for chromosome aberrations and micronucleus analysis respectively. Cultures treated with Famotidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 60.90% and 56.52% inhibition in dicentrics, 48.70% and 43.61% inhibition in total aberrations. Ranitidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 52.17% and 43.47% inhibition in dicentrics, 33.60% and 46.15% inhibition in total aberrations, when compared with 3Gy γ-ray irradiation alone. 43-54% inhibition in Binucleated cells with micronuclei and 47.72% inhibition in micronuclei at 0h treatment respectively. In conclusion radioprotective effects of Histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on γ-ray induced chromosome damage is observed and the drugs effectively reduced the frequency of radiation induced chromosome aberrations and micronucleus. Famotidine was found to be more effective. The mechanism in which these drugs reduce clastogenic effect of γ-radiation is not fully understood. It might be due to their antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties. (author)

  20. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  1. FISHprep: A Novel Integrated Device for Metaphase FISH Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel integrated device for preparing metaphase chromosomes spread slides (FISHprep). The quality of cytogenetic analysis from patient samples greatly relies on the efficiency of sample pre-treatment and/or slide preparation. In cytogenetic slide preparation, cell cultures...... are routinely used to process samples (for culture, arrest and fixation of cells) and/or to expand limited amount of samples (in case of prenatal diagnostics). Arguably, this expansion and other sample pretreatments form the longest part of the entire diagnostic protocols spanning over 3–4 days. We present here...... with minimal handling for metaphase FISH slide preparation....

  2. Modulation of gamma ray induced chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by Hippophae rhammnoides leaf extract, SBL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Madhu Bala

    2014-01-01

    Hippophae rhammnoides L. commonly known as seabuckthorn is a temperate shrub and native of Asia and Europe. It has high antioxidant potential and is known to the traditional Indian, Chinese and Tibetan medicinal system for treatment of multiple disorders viz., circulatory and digestive disorders, hepatic injuries, neoplasia etc. One time treatment with the standardized leaf extract from H. rhammnoides (SBL-1) before whole body irradiation with 60 Co (10 Gy), rendered more than 90% survival in non SBL-1 treated irradiated animals (J herbs, spices medi plants, 2009). Present study investigated the effects of SBL-1 treatment on chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), with or without 60 Co-gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood drawn from different donors. The isolated lymphocytes were divided into several groups: Group 1-untreated control, Group 2-irradiated (2 Gy), Group 3, 4 and 5 were treated with different concentration of SBL-1, 30 min. after irradiation with 60 Co-gamma-rays (2 Gy). Group 6 was treated with the maximum concentration of SBL-1 used in the study. The metaphase spreading technique was used as per standard procedure to record chromosome breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The results were also recorded in terms of total aberrant metaphase and frequency of aberrant metaphase per 100 cells. In comparison to the untreated control, in the irradiated PBL culture, there was 8-fold increase in breaks, 211-folds in dicentrics, 75-folds in acentrics and 3-folds in rings (average data). SBL-1 alone at the highest concentration did not cause any significant change in number of breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The radiation induced aberrations decreased significantly by treatment with SBL-1 and the maximum decrease was observed when the cells were treated with 22μg/ml of SBL-1. These results demonstrated the anti-clastogenic activity of SBL-1 against gamma radiation induced damage. (author)

  3. A high resolution chromosome image processor for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, and algorithm developing to classify radiation induced aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M; Hayata, I; Furuta, S

    1992-03-01

    Since 1989 we have promoted a project to develop an automated scoring system of radiation induced chromosome aberrations. As a first step, a high resolution image processing system for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, has been developed. It is composed of: (1) CHROMO MARKER whose main purpose is to mark on images to make image data base, (2) CHROMO ALGO whose purpose is algorithm development, and (3) METAPHASE RANKER whose purposes are metaphase finding and ranking with a high power objective lens. However, METAPHASE RANKER is presently under development. The system utilizes a high definition video system so as to realize the best spatial resolution that is achievable with an optical microscope using an objective lens (x 100, numerical aperture 1.4). The video camera has 1024 effective scan lines to realize 0.1 microns sampling on a specimen. The system resolution achieved on the hard copy is less than 0.3 microns on a specimen. A preliminary algorithm has been developed to classify the aberrations on the system using projection information of gray level. The preliminary test results on excellent 10 metaphases show that the correct classification ratio is 92.7%, that the detection rate of the aberrations is 83.3% and that the false positive rate is 6.1%.

  4. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M; Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Tarone, R E; Price, F M; Mock, B; Huppi, K

    1988-04-01

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and the other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.

  5. The Project Of Another Low-Cost Metaphase Finder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The most popular and 'gold standard' phenomenon in Biological dosimetry is the appearance of dicentric chromosomes in metaphase in white blood cells. The metaphase finder is a tool for biological dosimetry that finds metaphase cells on slide glasses. The author and a software company were using new special software that was faster than conventional systems. A Nikon Eclipse Ni-E microscope with motorised X-Y stage, 4x objective lens and 1920 x 1024 pixels colour camera for hardware were used. The software uses mathematical morphology filters. The new system was compact and low-priced. And the remarkable point is, this system can be applicable not only to human blood, but also to non-human samples. The speed was 208-236 s per 5 x 20 mm area, while capturing 378 images, which achieved the aim of the project. The false-positive ratio achieved below 5% in some slides. (author)

  6. Studies on chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by very low-dose exposure to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Moriya, Junko; Nakai, Sayaka

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of potential hazard from environmental tritium to man becomes very important with increasing the development of nuclear-power industry. However, little data are available as to the determination on the genetic effect of tritium especially at the low levels. The object of the present study is to obtain quantitative data for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes, as an indicator for genetic risk estimation, induced by tritium at very low dose levels. Leukocyte cultures of human peripheral blood were chronically exposed for 48h to tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine using a wide range of tritium doses, and aberrations in lymphocyte chromosomes at the first metaphases were examined. In the experimental conditions, the types of aberrations induced by radiation emitted from both tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine were mostly chromatid types, such as chromatid gaps and deletions. The dose-response relations for chromatid breaks per cell exhibited unusual dose-dependency in both cases. It was demonstrated that at higher dose range the yields of chromatid breaks increased linearly with dose, while those at lower dose range were significantly higher than would be expected by a downward extraporation from the linear relation. Partial-hit or partial-target kinetics events appeared at very low dose exposure. (author)

  7. Application and potentiality of laser micro-irradiation of chromosomes in animal and plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H Liang; Wang, L L [Laboratory of Laser and Genetics, Institute of Genetics, Academia Sinica, Beijing (China)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The classical methods of inducing genetic variation use chemical or physical mutagens applied to populations of cells. Since the development of laser techniques allows focussing a beam to a submicron spot, laser microsurgery of chromosomes was attempted. In mammalian cells, the nucleolus formation could be prevented. Also several chromosome damages were produced by focussing on specific chromosomes in prophase, metaphase and anaphase. Chromosomes of broad bean, maize, wheat, barley were dissected into small fragments. (author)

  8. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and dominant lethal mutations induced by x irradiation in germ cells of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianli; Wang Mingdong; Wang Bin; Sun Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    After male mice irradiated by 2 Gy X rays mated to normal virginal females superovulated with PMSG and HCG, pronuclei chromosome spreading of first-cleavage embryos were prepared and chromosomal aberrations of paternal pronuclei were observed. The results showed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was highest irradiated at spermatic stage among different stages of spermatogenesis. The sequence of radiosensitivity in spermatogenesis was as follows: spermatids > mature sperm > spermatocyte > spermatogonia and stem spermatogonia. The frequencies of paternal chromosomal aberrations resulted from irradiation at spermatids and mature sperms were significantly higher than that in control. The reciprocal translocations of stem spermatogonia induced by 2 Gy X rays in those male mice were also examined in the preparations of diakinesis-metaphase I. The frequency of reciprocal translocations were 0.0429 per cell and significantly higher than that in control. The proportion of unbalanced gametes, resulting in lethal embryos after fertilization, was 0.02145 to be predicted. At the same time, the dominant lethality induced by X rays in stem spermatogonia was measured, being 0.0371. The frequency of dead fetuses in irradiation group was about twice as in control. The regression analysis was found that the reciprocal translocations was markedly related to the dominant lethality

  9. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10 5 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G 0 , the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  10. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenzes Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II. Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II. The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M; 16 h nicotine (16N; 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N. Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M, or for 16 h (16N, resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%. Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%. A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%. Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  11. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Otero, D.; Di Giorgio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  12. Stage specificity and dose-response relationships for chromosome aberrations induced in mouse primary spermatocytes following X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.; Utsugi, T.

    1986-05-01

    In this study, dose-response relationships were examined for chromosome aberrations observed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes with X-irradiation at various stages of meiosis (diplotene, mid-pachytene, zygotene and leptotene). The frequencies of cells with X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations increased with dose at all stages in the applied range of 0.5-3.0 Gy and tended to increase as the irradiated stages descended after leptotene stage. In three stages, the frequencies increased exponentially with dose, but the rates of induction of chromosome breaks were markedly different depending on the stages at which spermatocytes were irradiated with X-rays. The rate of induction was the highest at diplotene and the lowest at leptotene, suggesting that diplotene spermatocytes had the highest radiosensitivity to the induction of chromosome breaks, followed by pachytene, zygotene and leptotene spermatocytes in that order. The dose-response relationships fitted well to linear equations for deletion-type aberrations at each stage, and to linear-quadratic equations for exchange-type aberrations at all stages except for leptotene. At leptotene, the chromatid exchanges were hardly observed, the aberrations being mainly consisted of iso-chromatid fragments. On the contrary, chromatid exchanges and iso-chromatide deletions were mainly observed at later stages (zygotene-diplotene).

  13. Radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in relation to changes in interphase chromosome conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to study several factors that determine the yield of chromosome fragments as observed in interphase cells after irradiation. In addition to absorbed dose and the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation, changes in chromosome conformation as cells progressed through the cell cycle after irradiation affected dramatically the yield of chromosome fragments observed. As a test of the effect of chromosome decondensation, irradiated metaphase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were allowed to divide, and the prematurely condensed chromosomes in the daughter cells were analyzed in their G1 phase. The yield of chromosome fragments increased as the daughter cells progressed toward S phase and chromosome decondensation occurred. When early G1 CHO cells were irradiated and analyzed at later times in G1 phase, an increase in chromosome fragmentation again followed the gradual increase in chromosome decondensation. As a test of the effect of chromosome condensation, G0 human lymphocytes were irradiated and analyzed at various times after fusion with mitotic CHO cells, i.e., as condensation proceeded. The yield of fragments observed was directly related to the amount of chromosome condensation allowed to take place after irradiation and inversely related to the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation. It can be concluded that changes in chromosome conformation interfered with rejoining processes. In contrast, resting chromosomes (as in G0 lymphocytes irradiated before fusion) showed efficient rejoining. These results support the hypothesis that cytogenetic lesions become observable chromosome breaks when chromosome condensation or decondensation occurs during the cell cycle

  14. Chromosome orientation and sterility in gamma-ray induced interchanges in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, O.A.; Panda, R.C.; Rao, K.G.R.

    1986-01-01

    After gamma irradiation (30 Kr) of seeds of Capsicum annuum cultivar cerasiformis (2 n = 24) two plants were recorded each carrying two interchanges. The nucleolus organiser chromosome appeared not to be involved. The interchange heterozygotes were weak and meiosis was irregular. At least one multivalent association per PMC was recorded. At metaphase I the predominant orientation was adjacent. The probable reasons for anaphase I and other meiotic irregularities and the incidence of high pollen sterility are discussed. (author)

  15. Comparison of the induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks and gamma-H2AX foci after irradiation of chromosomes in G1-phase or in condensed metaphase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takamitsu A; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Bedford, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) after irradiation of G1 and mitotic cells were compared with the gamma-H2AX foci assay and a gel electrophoresis assay. This is to determine whether cell cycle related changes in chromatin structure might influence the gamma-H2AX assay which depends on extensive phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the H2AX histone variant surrounding DSBs. The disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci after irradiation was much slower for mitotic than for G1 cells. On the other hand, no difference was seen for the gel electrophoresis assay. Our data may suggest the limited accessibility of dephosphorylation enzyme in irradiated metaphase cells or trapped gamma-H2AX in condensed chromatin.

  16. Comparison of the induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks and γ-H2AX foci after irradiation of chromosomes in G1-phase or in condensed metaphase cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takamitsu A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Bedford, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) after irradiation of G1 and mitotic cells were compared with the γ-H2AX foci assay and a gel electrophoresis assay. This is to determine whether cell cycle related changes in chromatin structure might influence the γ-H2AX assay which depends on extensive phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the H2AX histone variant surrounding DSBs. The disappearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation was much slower for mitotic than for G1 cells. On the other hand, no difference was seen for the gel electrophoresis assay. Our data may suggest the limited accessibility of dephosphorylation enzyme in irradiated metaphase cells or trapped γ-H2AX in condensed chromatin

  17. Chromosomal aberrations induced by alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2005-01-01

    The chromosomal aberrations produced by the ionizing radiation are commonly used when it is necessary to establish the exposure dose of an individual, it is a study that is used like complement of the traditional physical systems and its application is only in cases in that there is doubt about what indicates the conventional dosimetry. The biological dosimetry is based on the frequency of aberrations in the chromosomes of the lymphocytes of the individual in study and the dose is calculated taking like reference to the dose-response curves previously generated In vitro. A case of apparent over-exposure to alpha particles to which is practiced analysis of chromosomal aberrations to settle down if in fact there was exposure and as much as possible, to determine the presumed dose is presented. (Author)

  18. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by 60 Co γ rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 69. Taber's Medical Dictionary Online. Chromosome. www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/753321/all/chromosome?q=Chromosome&ti=0 . Accessed June 11, 2017.

  20. Radiation induced chromosome aberrations and interphase DNA geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Di Giorgio, M.; Otero, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosome aberrations. Stable chromosome aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). Assuming DSBs induction and interaction is completely random and neglecting proximity effects, the expected ratio of translocations to inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm lengths. We analyzed the number of translocations and inversions using G-banding, in 16 lymphocyte cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0.5Gy-3Gy). Our results give F=13.5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have an extra probability of interaction. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. We assume a DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length = 1 μ. We propose that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosome confinement. (author). 14 refs

  1. A note on chromosomes of Pontellopsis herdmani and Pontella princeps (Copepoda) from the Laccadive sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.; Goswami, S.C.

    Pontellopsis herdmani and Pontella princeps (Pontellidae, Calanoida, Copepoda) showed a diploid number of 20 and a haploid number of 10 chromosomes during the spermatogonial metaphase and metaphase II stages. The chromosomes were in the size range...

  2. Laser uv microirradiation of interphase nuclei and post-treatment with caffeine. A new approach to establish the arrangement of interphase chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, C; Cremer, T; Cremer, C; Zimmer, J

    1977-12-29

    Laser uv microirradiation of Chinese hamster interphase cells combined with caffeine post-treatment produced different patterns of chromosome damage in mitosis following irradiation of a small area of the nucleus that may be classified in three categories: (I) intact metaphase figures, (II) chromosome damage confined to a small area of the metaphase spread, (III) mitotic figures with damage on all chromosomes. Category III might be the consequence of a non-localized distortion of nuclear metabolism. By contrast, category II may reflect localized DNA damage induced by microirradiation, which could not be efficiently repaired due to the effect of caffeine. If this interpretation is right, in metaphase figures of category II chromosome damage should occur only at the irradiation site. The effect might then be used to investigate neighbourhood relationships of individual chromosomes in the interphase nucleus.

  3. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2011-01-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at 137 Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after 137 Cs and 241 AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  4. Chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of mice induced by accelerated {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xiaofei [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Hong, E-mail: zhangh@impac.ac.cn [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Zhenhua; Min Xianhua; Liu Yang; Wu Zhenhua [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun Chao [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu Bitao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} 220 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions is 1.5 times more effective than X-rays in inducing chromosomal aberration in bone marrow cell. {yields} The ratio of dose averaged liner energy transfer is approach the RBE. {yields} {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions could induce severe mitosis delay. {yields} The cell cycle is not recovered 72 h following irradiation. - Abstract: The whole bodies of 6-week-old male Kun-Ming mice were exposed to different doses of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions or X-rays. Chromosomal aberrations of the bone marrow (gaps, terminal deletions and breaks, fragments, inter-chromosomal fusions and sister-chromatid union) were scored in metaphase 9 h after exposure, corresponding to cells exposed in the G{sub 2}-phase of the first mitosis cycle. Dose-response relationships for the frequency of chromosomal aberrations were plotted both by linear and linear-quadratic equations. The data showed that there was a dose-related increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in all treated groups compared to controls. Linear-quadratic equations were a good fit for both radiation types. The compound theory of dual radiation action was applied to decipher the bigger curvature (D{sup 2}) of the dose-response curves of X-rays compared to those of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions. Different distributions of the five types of aberrations and different degrees of homogeneity were found between {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion and X-ray irradiation and the possible underlying mechanism for these phenomena were analyzed according to the differences in the spatial energy deposition of both types of radiation.

  5. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  6. In-situ fluorescence hybridization applied to biological dosimetry: contribution of automation to the counting of radio-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain Thomas Roy, Laurence

    1999-01-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations on peripheral blood lymphocytes is a dose indicator in the case of ionizing radiations over-exposure. Stable chromosome aberrations (translocations, insertions) are visualized after labelling of some chromosomes using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). The study of the use of the FISH technique in biological dosimetry is done with dose-effect curves. It seems that a bias is introduced during the observation of chromosome aberrations involving only 3 pairs of chromosomes. In order to avoid this bias, it would be useful to test the feasibility of using the multi-FISH technique in biological dosimetry. Moreover, this type of chromosome aberration changes with the type of irradiation. It is thus important to define the aberrations to be considered when the FISH technique is used. In order to reduce the time of image analysis, the CYTOGEN system, developed by IMSTAR company (Paris, France) has been adapted to the needs of biological dosimetry. This system allows to localize automatically the metaphases on the slide, which reduces the observation time by 2 or 4. An automatic detection protocol for chromosome aberrations has been implemented. It comprises the image capture, the contours detection and the classification of some chromosome aberrations. The different steps of this protocol have been tested in order to check that no bias is introduced by the automation. However, because radio-induced aberrations are rare events, it seems that a totally automatic system is not foreseeable. A semi-automatic analysis is more suitable. The use of the Slit-Scan technology (Laboratory of applied physics, Heidelberg, Germany) in biological dosimetry has been studied too. This technique allows to analyze rapidly a huge number of chromosomes. A good correlation has been observed between the dicentric frequency measured automatically and by manual counting. The system is under development and should be adapted to the detection of

  7. Folic acid deficiency increases chromosomal instability, chromosome 21 aneuploidy and sensitivity to radiation-induced micronuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetstra, Sasja; Thomas, Philip; Salisbury, Carolyn; Turner, Julie; Fenech, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Folic acid deficiency can lead to uracil incorporation into DNA, hypomethylation of DNA, inefficient DNA repair and increase chromosome malsegregation and breakage. Because ionising radiation increases demand for efficient DNA repair and also causes chromosome breaks we hypothesised that folic acid deficiency may increase sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome breakage. We tested this hypothesis by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in 10 day WIL2-NS cell cultures at four different folic acid concentrations (0.2, 2, 20, and 200 nM) that span the 'normal' physiological range in humans. The study showed a significant dose-dependent increase in frequency of binucleated cells with micronuclei and/or nucleoplasmic bridges with decreasing folic acid concentration (P < 0.0001, P = 0.028, respectively). These biomarkers of chromosomal instability were also increased in cells irradiated (1.5 Gy γ-rays) on day 9 relative to un-irradiated controls (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency and γ-irradiation were shown to have a significant interactive effect on frequency of cells containing micronuclei (two-way ANOVA, interaction P 0.0039) such that the frequency of radiation-induced micronucleated cells (i.e. after subtracting base-line frequency of un-irradiated controls) increased with decreasing folic acid concentration (P-trend < 0.0001). Aneuploidy of chromosome 21, apoptosis and necrosis were increased by folic acid deficiency but not by ionising radiation. The results of this study show that folate status has an important impact on chromosomal stability and is an important modifying factor of cellular sensitivity to radiation-induced genome damage

  8. Distribution of X-ray induced chromosome rearrangement breaks along the polytene chromosomes of Anopheles messeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshkova, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution of chromosomal aberrations localization along polytene chromosomes (aoutosomes) of salivary glands of malarial mosquito. Anopheles messeae is presented. Induced aberrations in F 1 posterity from X-ray irradiated fecundated females are studied. Poipts of breaks of inversions and trapslocations are localized separately. There are no considerable dif-- ferences in the distribution character of two types of aberrations. Over the length of autosomes the breaks are more frequent in distal halves, their frequency in proximal parts anally in near centromeric regions of chromosomes is reduced. Concentration of breaks in certain ''hot points'' of the chromosomes is pointed out. Comparison of distribution of actual and expected frequencies of break points according to chi 2 criterion revealed highly fiducial discrepancies, testifying to uneven participation of different regions of chromosomes in aberration formation. Similarities and differences of the data obtained from analogous ones, demonstrated in Drosophila, as well as possible reasons for the distribution unevennes are discussed. On the basis of analysis of intrinsic and literature data a supposition is made that the ''hot points'' (break concentrations) can be considered as localizaion markers of intercalary heterochromatin

  9. Municipal landfill leachates induced chromosome aberrations in rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical and heavy metal analysis of the test samples showed that they contained high concentrations of toxic anions and cations that are capable of inducing mutation in living cells. The interaction of these constituents with the genetic material in the bone marrow cells of rat caused the observed chromosome ...

  10. Is 24-color FISH detection of in-vitro radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations suited to determine individual intrinsic radiosensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuechler, A.; Wendt, T.G.; Neubauer, S.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Claussen, U.; Liehr, T.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Reliable determination of intrinsic radiosensitivity in individual patients is a serious need in radiation oncology. Chromosomal aberrations are sensitive indicators of a previous exposure to ionizing irradiation. Former molecular cytogenetic studies showed that such aberrations as an equivalent of intrinsic radiosensitivity can be detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) techniques using whole chromosome painting (wcp) probes. However, only one up to three randomly chosen wcp probes have been applied for such approaches until now. As a random distribution of chromosomal rearrangements along the chromosomes is up to now still controversial, the power of the 24-color FISH approach should be elucidated in the present study. Methods and Material: Lymphocytes derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines of one patient with Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS homozygote) and of two NBS heterozygotes and peripheral blood lymphocytes of two controls were analyzed. Samples of each patient/control were irradiated in vitro with 0.0 Gy, 0.7 Gy or 2.0 Gy prior to cultivation. Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in detail and quantified by means of 24-color FISH as an expression of the individual intrinsic radiosensitivity. Results: 24-color FISH analyses were done in a total of 1,674 metaphases. After in-vitro irradiation, 21% (0.7 Gy) or 57% (2.0 Gy) of the controls' cells, 15% (0.7 Gy) or 53% (2.0 Gy) of the heterozygotes' cells and 54% (0.7 Gy) or 79% (2.0 Gy) of the homozygote's cells contained aberrations. The highest average rates of breaks per mitosis [B/M] (0.7 Gy: 1.80 B/M, 2.0 Gy: 4.03 B/M) and complex chromosomal rearrangements [CCR] (0.7 Gy: 0.20 CCR/M, 2.0 Gy: 0.47 CCR/M) were observed in the NBS patient. Moreover, the proportion of different aberration types after irradiation showed a distinct increase in the rate of CCR combined with a decrease in dicentrics in the NBS homozygote. Conclusion: To come to a more complete picture of radiation-induced

  11. Chromosome painting analysis of radiation-induced aberrant cell clones in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruill, M.D.; Nath, J.; Tucker, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    In a study of the persistence of radiation-induced translocations over the life span of the mouse, we observed a number of clonal cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of clones caused the mean frequency of aberrations at various time points to be elevated which interfered with biodosimetry. For this reason, we have corrected our data for the presence of clones. Mice were given an acute dose of 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 Gy 137 Cs at 8 weeks of age. Aberrations were measured by painting chromosomes 2 and 8 and cells were examined for clones at 3 months and every 3 months thereafter until 21 months. Clones were identified by comparing the color photographic slides of all abnormal cells from each animal. Determination of clonality was made on the basis of similar breakpoint locations or the presence of other identifying characteristics such as unusual aberrations. To correct the frequency of translocations for the presence of clones, each clone, regardless of how many cells it contained, was counted only once. This reflects the original aberration frequency since each clone originated as only one cell. Among mice exposed to 4 Gy, the mean frequencies of aberrant cell clones ranged from 3-29% of the total number of metaphase cells scored with the highest frequency being 1 year post exposure. 32-70% of reciprocal and 19-92% of non-reciprocal translocations were clonal. A dose response relationship for clones was evident until 21 months when the unexposed animals exhibited a mean frequency of aberrant cell clones >10% of the total number of cells scored. Almost 75% of reciprocal and 95% of non-reciprocal translocations in these unexposed control animals were of clonal origin. Correction for clonal expansion greatly reduced the means and their standard errors at most time points where clonal expansion was prevalent. The biodosimetry was much improved suggesting that correction is beneficial in long-term studies

  12. Chromosomal instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts null for the transcriptional co-repressor Ski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelain, Katherine; Armisen, Ricardo; Aguirre, Adam; Ueki, Nobuhide; Toro, Jessica; Colmenares, Clemencia; Hayman, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ski is a transcriptional regulator that has been considered an oncoprotein given its ability to induce oncogenic transformation in avian model systems. However, studies in mouse and in some human tumor cells have also indicated a tumor suppressor activity for this protein. We found that Ski-/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit high levels of genome instability, namely aneuploidy, consistent with a tumor suppressor function for Ski. Time-lapse microscopy revealed lagging chromosomes and chromatin/chromosome bridges as the major cause of micronuclei (MN) formation and the subsequent aneuploidy. Although these cells arrested in mitosis after treatment with spindle disrupting drugs and exhibited a delayed metaphase/anaphase transition, spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) was not sufficient to prevent chromosome missegregation, consistent with a weakened SAC. Our in vivo analysis also showed dynamic metaphase plate rearrangements with switches in polarity in cells arrested in metaphase. Importantly, after ectopic expression of Ski the cells that displayed this metaphase arrest died directly during metaphase or after aberrant cell division, relating SAC activation and mitotic cell death. This increased susceptibility to undergo mitosis-associated cell death reduced the number of MN-containing cells. The presented data support a new role for Ski in the mitotic process and in maintenance of genetic stability, providing insights into the mechanism of tumor suppression mediated by this protein. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chromosomal Aberrations in Humans Induced by Urban Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, Hannu; Gamborg, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes as a biomar......We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes...... that long-term exposure to urban air pollution (with traffic as the main contributor) induces chromosome damage in human somatic cells. Low DNA repair capacity and GSTM1 and NAT2 variants associated with reduced detoxification ability increase susceptibility to such damage. The effect of the GSTM1 genotype......, which was observed only in the bus drivers, appears to be associated with air pollution, whereas the NAT2 genotype effect, which affected all subjects, may influence the individual response to some other common exposure or the baseline level of chromosomal aberrations....

  14. X-ray- and mitomycin C (MMC)-induced chromosome aberrations in spermiogenic germ cells and the repair capacity of mouse eggs for the X-ray and MMC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Utsugi-Takeuchi, Toyoko; Tobari, Izuo; Seki, Naohiko; Chiba Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced at the first-cleavage metaphase of eggs fertilized with sperm recovered from spermiogenic cells which had been X-irradiated and treated with mitomycin C (MMC) at various stages were observed using in vitro fertilization and embryo culture technique. Furthermore, the repair capacity of the fertilized eggs for X-ray- and MMC-induced DNA damage which was induced in the spermiogenic cells and retained in the sperm until fertilization was investigated by analysis of the potentiation effects of 2 repair inhibitors, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and caffeine on the yield of chromosome aberrations. The frequency of chromosome aberrations observed in the eggs fertilized with sperm recovered from speratozoa to late spermatid stage (0-8 days after X-irradiation). The induced chromosome aberrations followed by chromosome exchange through all the spermiogenic stages. The results suggest that the large amount of DNA lesions induced in spermiogenic cells by X-rays and MMC persist as reparable damage until sperm maturation and are effectively repaired in the cytoplasm of the fertilized eggs. (author). 29 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Survivin and chromosome instability induced by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bo; Ju Guizhi; Liu Yang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the biological effect of survivin on chromosome instability induced by X-ray irradiation. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to detect the expression of sutvivin in HeLa cells. Carrier pSUPER-SVV was transfected into HeLa cells to interfere the expression of survivin. Flow cytometry assay was applied to detect the occurrence of polyploid at 0 h, 4 h, 12 h, and 48 h after the HeLa cells transfected with pSUPER-SVV and irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays irradiation, and compared with the group irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays but no transfection. Results: The expression of survivin was down-regulated by transfecting with small hair RNA, its depression rate was estimated to be about 32.16% at 48 h after transfection. The occurrence of polyploid giant cells was higher in the 4 Gy X-ray irradiated group at 48 h after the irradiation than the control groups (P<0.001). Being expression of survivin interfered, the occurrence at 12 h or 48 h after irradiation, however, was about two times higher than that in the control group. Conclusion: X-ray irradiation can induce chromosome instability in HeLa cells and the effect could be enhanced by interfering the expression of surviving. It was suggested that survivin plays an important role in maintaining the stability of chromosome. (authors)

  16. FahamecV1:A Low Cost Automated Metaphase Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yilmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, FahamecV1 is introduced and investigated as a low cost and high accuracy solution for metaphase detection. Chromosome analysis is performed at the metaphase stage and high accuracy and automated detection of the metaphase stage plays an active role in decreasing analysis time. FahamecV1 includes an optic microscope, a motorized microscope stage, an electronic control unit, a camera, a computer and a software application. Printing components of the motorized microscope stage (using a 3D printer is of the main reasons for cost reduction. Operations such as stepper motor calibration, are detection, focusing, scanning, metaphase detection and saving of coordinates into a database are automatically performed. To detect metaphases, a filter named Metafilter is developed and applied. Average scanning time per preparate is 77 sec/cm2. True positive rate is calculated as 95.1%, true negative rate is calculated as 99.0% and accuracy is calculated as 98.8%.

  17. Structural analysis of γ radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shuang; Chen Ying; Ge Shili; Liu Xiulin; Zhou Pingkun; Zhang Sa; Zhang Detian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find a new method for the measurement of radiation-induced damage, the structures of normal chromosomes and 60 Co γ-ray-induced chromosomal aberration were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Methods: Normal and irradiated chromosomes of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared, then three-dimensional structure and height of chromosomes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Results: Three-dimensional structures of normal chromosomes and dicentric aberration in irradiated chromosomes were observed clearly. The data of chromosome height were helpful to recognizing the dicentric aberrations. Conclusion: Atomic force microscopy providing three-dimension image and linear measurement is a new and valuable tool for structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

  18. An algorithm for automatic detection of chromosome aberrations induced by radiation using features of gray level profile across the main axis of chromosome image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hironao; Imai, Katsuhiro; Fukuoka, Hideya; Yamamoto, Mikio; Hayata, Isamu.

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm for detecting chromosome aberrations induced by radiation is developed. Microscopic images of conventional Giemsa stained chromosomes of rearranged chromosomes (abnormal chromosomes) including dicentric chromosomes, ordinary acentric fragments, small acentric fragments, and acentric rings are used as samples. Variation of width along the main axis and gray level profile across the main axis of the chromosome image are used as features for classification. In 7 microscopic images which include 257 single chromosomes, 90.0% (231 chromosomes) are correctly classified into 6 categories and 23 of 26 abnormal chromosomes are correctly identified. As a result of discrimination between a normal and an abnormal chromosome, 95.3% of abnormal chromosomes are detected. (author)

  19. A quantitative study of the second meiotic metaphase in male mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R A; Lim, M C; Coulter, V J

    1975-01-01

    Over 11,000 second meiotic metaphase spreads stained for the pericentromeric region have been studied quantitatively in male mice of 14 strains. The sex-chromosome constitution of a cell could be judged objectively if X and Y chromosomes and ploidy were all scored. A bias arose if only Y chromosomes and ploidy were scored but could be corrected statistically. There was no sign of other forms of bias. The original contiguity of X and Y second metaphases in vivo was very occasionally evident in the preparations. Most of the subhaploid aneuploid counts were assumed to be artifactual. The incidence of truly aneuploid second metaphases in 13 strains was estimated as 0.38+/-0.12%. The estimated average rate per chromosome was 0.019+/-0.006%, with a comparable order of magnitude for the sex chromosomes alone. Simultaneous aneuploidy of two or more chromosomes of the haploid set was estimated to be very rare. Of the spreads from 13 strains, 9.6% were polyploid (2N, 3N, 4N) and showed most of the possible combinations of sex chromosomes. Nearly all the polyploid spreads were considered to arise by artifactual cell fusion at the time of second metaphase during the preparative technique, especially of the X and Y daughter-cell products of the first meiotic division. Other modes of origin (true polyploidy, accidental superposition of cells during preparation) were unlikely. The data could be accommodated by a statistical model with only four parameters. It allowed for artifactual fusion mainly between daughter cells but also between non-daughter cells, bias in one scoring method, and bias in the numbers of cells with given ploidy successfully mounted. Current techniques of chromosome preparation were thought to be wholly unsuitable for the recognition of true polyploidy. The artifactual origin of polyploid spreads was borne out by an absence of polyploid spermatozoa in 14 strains. There appeared to be a virtually constant transmission rate of paternal X and Y chromosomes from

  20. Radiation-induced chromosome breakages in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larik, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    Meiosis and pollen fertility were studied in the M 2 generation in four varieties of hexaploid wheat. Meiosis was characterized by the formation of interchange configurations, such as rings and chains of four chromosomes in several cells. Chromosomal aberrations showed linear relationship with gamma irradiation; 45 kR dose induced the highest chromosomal abnormalities. Most multivalents were interchange rings of four chromosomes. Translocations involving two pairs of homologous or nonhomologous chromosomes seemed to be higher in frequency than those involving more than two pairs of chromosomes. Anaphase abnormalities, such as laggards, bridges and fragments and unequal segregation of chromosomes, were frequently observed. Pollen fertility was considerably reduced in the M 2 plants arising form the treatments of higher doses of gamma rays because of the induced chromosome interchanges. (author)

  1. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F.I.S.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, J.; Bayley, R.; Boyle, S.; Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Hill, W.; Ji, L.; Malloy, P.; Perry, P.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Whale, D.

    1993-01-01

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented

  3. Impact of various parameters in detecting chromosomal aberrations by FISH to describe radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, U.; Mueller, E.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.; Kuechler, A.; Liehr, T.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations is regarded as the ''gold standard'' for classifying individual radiosensitivity. A variety of different parameters can be used. The crucial question, however, is to explore which parameter is suited best to describe the differences between patients with increased radiosensitivity and healthy individuals. Patients and methods: in this study, five patients with severe radiation-induced late effects of at least grade 3, classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), and eleven healthy individuals were examined retrospectively. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with 0.7 Gy and 2.0 Gy prior to cultivation and stained by means of three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The detailed analysis was focused on the number of breaks per metaphase, on breaks from complex chromosomal rearrangements per metaphase, as well as on the percentage of translocations, dicentric chromosomes, breaks, and excess acentric fragments - each in comparison with the total number of mitoses analyzed. Results: using the number of breaks from complex chromosomal rearrangements after 2.0 Gy, radiosensitive patients as endpoint were clearly to be distinguished (p = 0.001) from healthy individuals. Translocations (p = 0.001) as well as breaks per metaphase (p = 0.002) were also suitable indicators for detecting differences between patients and healthy individuals. The parameters ''percentage of dicentric chromosomes'', ''breaks'', and ''excess acentric fragments'' in comparison to the total number of mitoses analyzed could neither serve as meaningful nor as significant criteria, since they showed a strong interindividual variability. Conclusion: to detect a difference in chromosomal aberrations between healthy and radiosensitive individuals, the parameters ''frequency of breaks per metaphase'', ''complex chromosomal rearrangements'', and ''translocations'' are most

  4. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Chromosomal aberrations of blood lymphocytes induced in vitro by radon-222 daughter α-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.; Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Atzmueller, C; Eckl, P.; Haas, O.A.; Obe, G.; Grell-Buechtmann, I.; Van Buul, P.P.W.; Natarajan, A.T.; Schroeder-Kurth, T.; Sasaki, M.S.; Fischer, P.; Kubiak, R.

    2000-01-01

    Blood samples were irradiated in vitro with α-rays emitted from short-lived radon decay products dissolved in the culture medium at doses between 0.03 and 41.4 mGy. The data were collected from experiments conducted during the period 1984-1992 and comprise a total of about 64000 scored metaphases. For statistical reasons, only 60,022 metaphases were used for the subsequent analysis. The results for total chromosome aberrations and dicentrics indicate a linear dose dependence in the dose range above about 10 mGy, consistent with other experimental observations. At doses below about 10 mGy, aberration frequencies cannot be linearly extrapolated from higher doses, suggesting that there is no dependence on dose within a certain low-dose range. In addition, a statistically significant minimum has been observed at a dose of about 0.03 mGy, which is consistently lower than the related control values. The behavior of the aberration frequencies in the low-dose region seems to be influenced by the control values, which also depend on the environmental radiation burdens to the donors before blood sampling and thus were significantly affected by the Chernobyl fallout

  6. Analysis of B chromosome nondisjunction induced by the r-X1 deficiency in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Hsuan; Peng, Shu-Fen; Cheng, Ya-Ming

    2017-11-20

    The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21.2%) contained zero or two B chromosomes. However, a much higher percentage of the r-X1-containing progeny (43.4%) exhibited zero or two B chromosomes, but none displayed more than two B chromosomes. Thus, the results indicated that the r-X1 deficiency could also induce nondisjunction of the B chromosome during the second megaspore division; moreover, the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division. In addition, pollen grains from plants with two B chromosomes lacking or exhibiting the r-X1 deficiency were compared via pollen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a B chromosome-specific probe. The results revealed that the r-X1 deficiency could induce the occurrence of B chromosome nondisjunction during the first microspore division and that the B chromosome in itself could undergo nondisjunction during the same division at a lower frequency. Our data shed more light on the behavior of the maize B chromosome during cell division.

  7. DNA content of cells with generalized chromosome shattering induced by ultraviolet light plus caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Asynchronously growing Chinese hamster cells (M3-1) were UV-irradiated (lambda = 254 nm) and then incubated with/without caffeine (2 mM) for 20 h. Microscopic evaluation of metaphase spreads revealed that after UV-irradiation alone (5.0 J/m 2 ) and caffeine treatment alone, the percentage of cells with condensed chromatin appearing fragmented and/or pulverized ('GCS-like' cells; GCS, Generalized Chromosome Shattering) was very low while it was high following the combined treatment. Cytogenetic and flow cytometric analysis of cells obtained by mechanical shaking cultures treated with UV and caffeine indicated that 'GCS-like' cells have the same DNA content as untreated cells in G2 phase and mitosis. (orig.)

  8. Anti-topoisomerase drugs as potent inducers of chromosomal aberrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bassi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases catalyze topological changes in DNA that are essential for normal cell cycle progression and therefore they are a preferential target for the development of anticancer drugs. Anti-topoisomerase drugs can be divided into two main classes: "cleavable complex" poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The "cleavable complex" poisons are very effective as anticancer drugs but are also potent inducers of chromosome aberrations so they can cause secondary malignancies. Catalytic inhibitors are cytotoxic but they do not induce chromosome aberrations. Knowledge about the mechanism of action of topoisomerase inhibitors is important to determine the best anti-topoisomerase combinations, with a reduced risk of induction of secondary malignancies.As topoisomerases de DNA catalisam alterações topológicas no DNA que são essenciais para a progressão do ciclo celular normal e, portanto, são um alvo preferencial para o desenvolvimento de drogas anticâncer. Drogas anti-topoisomerases podem ser divididas em duas classes principais: drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" e inibidores catalíticos. As drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" são muito eficazes como drogas anticancerígenas, mas são também potentes indutores de aberrações cromossômicas, podendo causar neoplasias malignas secundárias. Inibidores catalíticos são citotóxicos mas não induzem aberrações cromossômicas. Conhecimento a respeito do mecanismo de ação de inibidores de topoisomerases é importante para determinar as melhores combinações anti-topoisomerases, com um reduzido risco de indução de neoplasias malignas secundárias.

  9. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ... dardized even after more than 20 years of research, making it difficult to draw .... (c) Part of a metaphase with a chromosome break in the centromeric region (arrows).

  10. Origin of specific chromosome aberration in radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki; Masuno, Yoko

    2005-01-01

    The theme in the title is discussed from the four aspects of specific chromosome aberration (sAb) patterns in radiation-induced leukemia (RIL), possibility for radiation to induce the sAb in RIL, any evidence for participation of delayed aberration to form sAb and the proportion of such healthy humans as having the specifically rearranged genome. Data of sAb observed in leukemia of 25 A-bomb survivors and of 38 patients post radiotherapy of cancers give a rather common pattern. However, many inconsistent results are obtained for sAb in patients post radiotherapy, A-bomb survivors, residents living in radio-contaminated houses in Taipei, in vitro exposure, and Chernobyl residents. At present, any clear evidence is available neither for sAb derived from the delayed aberration nor for estimating the proportion with the specifically rearranged gene. As above, it is unlikely that radiation induces such a translocation abnormality as BCR-ABL specifically seen in leukemia, and this aspect will be important for studies on the genesis of RIL and its risk assessment. (S.I.)

  11. Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Tommerup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a major cytogenetic technique for clinical genetic diagnosis of both inherited and acquired chromosomal abnormalities. Although FISH techniques have evolved and are often used together with other cytogenetic methods like CGH, PRINS and PNA-FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3–5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies.

  12. The Physics of the Metaphase Spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriola, David; Needleman, Daniel J; Brugués, Jan

    2018-05-20

    The assembly of the mitotic spindle and the subsequent segregation of sister chromatids are based on the self-organized action of microtubule filaments, motor proteins, and other microtubule-associated proteins, which constitute the fundamental force-generating elements in the system. Many of the components in the spindle have been identified, but until recently it remained unclear how their collective behaviors resulted in such a robust bipolar structure. Here, we review the current understanding of the physics of the metaphase spindle that is only now starting to emerge.

  13. Chromosome aberrations induced by radiation. With special reference to possible relation between chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, N [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1980-02-01

    Chromosome aberration seems to be one of the most conspicuous residual abnormalities recognizable in radiation-exposed persons for many years after exposure. Knowledge of the biological significance of these abnormalities seems to be necessary for understanding of the effect of radiation on humans, especially in relation to possible leukemic development. Cytogenetic studies were performed on the bone marrow cells, T and B lymphocytes, and fibroblasts in atomic bomb-survivors who were in apparent good health (105 cases), atomic bomb exposed patients who had prolonged periods of blood disorders which terminated in acute leukemia (8 cases), and who had no such abnormalities (6 cases). All patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and a history of atomic bomb exposure showed Philadelphia chromosome, a characteristic chromosome abnormality for CML. The persistent chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells, T and B lymphocytes found among the atomic bomb survivors with or without blood disorders may give some clue to solve the problems of carcinogenesis.

  14. Cell inactivation and chromosomal aberrations induced by X-rays and fast neutrons in cells of the Chinese hamster. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolkendorf, E.

    1979-01-01

    Asynchronously grown cultures of Chinese hamster cells V79-4 were irradiated in suspension with 180 kV X-rays and fast neutrons (average energy of 6.2 MeV). The damage was assessed by measuring cell survival and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first post-irradiation metaphases. The experimental data for survival and chromosome aberrations were fitted by computer programmes. From the fitted curves the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons was calculated. The RBE shows a similar dose dependence for killed and aberrant cells. The RBE decreases with increasing dose and amounts to approximately 5 for both effects for small neutron doses. The highest RBE is found for asymmetrical chromosomal exchanges and is dependent on the neutron dose, too. However, for isochromatid deletions the RBE is dose independent with a value of 3.6. (author)

  15. Flow cytometric determination of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its correlation with cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welleweerd, J.; Wilder, M.E.; Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster M3-1 cells were irradiated with several doses of x rays or α particles from 238 Pu. Propidium iodide-stained chromosome suspensions were prepared at different times after irradiation; cells were also assayed for survival. The DNA histograms of these chromosomes showed increased background counts with increased doses of radiation. This increase in background was cell-cycle dependent and was correlated with cell survival. The correlation between radiation-induced chromosome damage and cell survival was the same for X rays and α particles. Data are presented which indicate that flow cytometric analysis of chromosomes of irradiated cell populations can be a useful adjunct to classical cytogenic analysis of irradiation-induced chromosomal damage by virtue of its ability to express and measure chromosomal damage not seen by classical cytogenic methods

  16. Use of M-FISH analysis of α-particle-induced chromosome aberrations for the assessment of chromosomal breakpoint distribution and complex aberration formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.M.; Sumption, N.D.; Papworth, D.G.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Double strand breaks (dsb) of varying complexity are an important class of damage induced after exposure to ionising radiation and are considered to be the critical lesion for the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Assuming the basic principles of the 'Breakage and Reunion' theory, dsb represent 'breakage' and aberrations are produced from the illegitimate repair (reunion) of the resulting dsb free-'ends'. Numerous questions relate to this process, in particular, (1) do chromosomal breakpoint 'hot-spots' that represent sensitive sites for breakage and/or regions of preferential repair/mis-repair, exist? (2) Considering that individual chromosomes and chromosome regions occupy discrete territories in the interphase nucleus, could rearrangements between specific chromosomes reflect domain organisation at the time of damage? (3) Assuming the topological constraints imposed on chromatin are not dramatically influenced by the presence of dsb, then how do multiple 'ends' from different chromosomes proximally associate for mis-repair as complex chromosome aberrations? To address these questions, we have analysed the chromosome aberrations induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 0.5 Gy α -particles (mean of 1 α -particle/cell) using the technique of M-FISH. This technique 'paints' all the human chromosomes (excluding homologues) uniquely, allowing chromosomal mis-repair to be visualised as differential colour-junctions and in addition, enhanced DAPI banding enables gross breakpoint assignation of these colour junctions. To test for non-randomness, we are comparing the frequency of occurrence of breakpoints obtained up to now with the F98 glioma model our knowledbased on chromosome length. Similarly, the involvement of each chromosome relative to other chromosomes within individual rearrangements can be determined by assuming the volume of chromosome domains is also proportional to their length. The current data to be presented will

  17. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the rat peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemba-Zoltowska, B.; Bocian, E.; Radwan, I.; Rosiek, O.; Sablinski, J.

    1978-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations in rat lymphocytes of peripheral blood after X (in vitro and in vivo) and 3 H tritiated water (in vivo) irradiations were studied. The yield of chromosome aberrations after in vivo and in vitro exposure to X-rays was similar. The frequency of chromosome aberrations three weeks after exposure to X-rays and soon after irradiation was practically on the same level. The yield of chromosome aberrations determined three weeks after injection with tritiated water or X-rays exposure was similar. (author)

  18. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  19. Radiation exposure and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome damage is discussed as a means of biologically measuring radiation exposure to the body. Human lymphocytes are commonly used for this test since the extent of chromosome damage induced is related to the exposure dose. Several hundred lymphocytes are analysed in metaphase for chromosome damage, particularly dicentrics. The dose estimate is made by comparing the observed dicentric yield against calibration curves, previously produced by in vitro irradiation of blood samples to known doses of different types of radiation. This test is useful when there is doubt that the film badge has recorded a reasonable whole body dose and also when there is an absence of any physical data. A case of deliberate exposure is described where the chromosome damage test estimated an exposure of 152 rads. The life span of cell aberrations is also considered. Regular checks on radiotherapy patients and some accidental overdose cases have shown little reduction in the aberration levels over the first six weeks after which the damage disappears slowly with a half-life of about three years. In conclusion, chromosome studies have been shown to be of value in resolving practical problems in radiological protection. (U.K.)

  20. Evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities and common trombophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Infections, genetic, endocrine, anatomic and immunologic problems have been suggested as causes for RM. ... Metaphase chromosome preparations from the .... The rate of karyotypically abnormal abortion specimens.

  1. Chromosome condensation and radiation-induced G2 arrest studied by the induction of premature chromosome condensation following cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Bedford, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    When mitotic and interphase cells are fused together, the chromosomes of the interphase cell sometimes condense prematurely. The phenomenon of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) was utilized in investigating the problem of whether the chromosomes of cells suffering a radiation-induced G 2 delay are capable of condensation. Colcemide-arrested mitotic cells were fused with synchronized G 2 cells, and with irradiated cells suffering a G 2 delay. The frequency of PCC in mitotic X G 2 binucleate cells was determined. This was compared to the PCC frequency in an unirradiated synchronized population rich in G 2 cells after fusion with mitotic cells. Flash-labelling with 3 HTdR and autoradiography allowed S-phase cells to be eliminated. The frequency of G 2 PCCs was not significantly different for the irradiated G 2 -delayed or unirradiated cells. From these results it was concluded that the chromosomes of cells suffering a G 2 arrest are capable of condensation, although the involvement of the condensation process in radiation-induced G 2 delay could not be ruled out. (author)

  2. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase

  3. Studies on protective effects of superoxide dismutase on radiation induced-chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Siying; Jiang Jiagui; Lin Xingcheng

    1987-09-01

    This study demonstrates that radiation induced-chromosomal aberrations are not only due to the direct effect of radiation h it , but the indirect effect of free radical as well. Therefore, chromosome damage induced by radiation may be reduced by adding exogenous SOD into the radiation exposed lymphocyte culture to eliminate the superoxide free radical which damages DNA. On the other hand, however, the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes can be raised by adding SOD inhibitor (DDC) into the lymphocyte culture, which makes radiation induced-chromosomal damages more severely

  4. Cellular irradiation during phase S: a study of induced chromosomic damage and its transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The author examines the effects of ionizing radiation on the chromosomes during phase S (synthesis) in which DNA progressively duplicates itself. He analyses disturbances in the cellular cycle of human lymphocytes caused by the type and number of radiologically induced lesions on the chromosomes [fr

  5. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  6. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  7. Influence of caffeine on chromosome lesions induced by chemical mutagens and radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, B.

    1977-01-01

    The modifying influence of caffeine on γ-ray induced chromosome lesions was studied by chromosome aberration anaysis. Caffeine was applied as a pre- and post-treatment agent following seed (G 1 ) and root meristem (G 2 and S) irradiation of C.capillaris. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in G 1 was changed neither by post- nor by pre-treatment with caffeine. This fact proves the lack of caffeine modifying effect. Applied as a post-treatment agent caffeine enhances considerably the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in root meristem cells. This is especially valid for G 2 irradiated cells, while in S cells no synergistic effect was established between induced chromosome lesions and caffeine. The enhancement of chromosome aberration frequency produced in G 2 shows a clearly manifested dependence on the time (moment) of caffeine application post irradiation. Most considerable enhancement was obtained following post-treatment with caffeine immediately after irradiation. In the following intervals - 15 and 30 min - it decreases progressively, while after 60, 180 and 300 min no enhancing effect is observed. The probable causes for the manifestation and the lack of synergistic effect between chromosome lesions induced in the various mitotic cycle phases and caffeine are discussed. (author)

  8. Computational model of dose response for low-LET-induced complex chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidelman, Y.A.; Andreev, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with full-colour mFISH chromosome painting have revealed high yield of radiation-induced complex chromosomal aberrations (CAs). The ratio of complex to simple aberrations is dependent on cell type and linear energy transfer. Theoretical analysis has demonstrated that the mechanism of CA formation as a result of interaction between lesions at a surface of chromosome territories does not explain high complexes-to-simples ratio in human lymphocytes. The possible origin of high yields of γ-induced complex CAs was investigated in the present work by computer simulation. CAs were studied on the basis of chromosome structure and dynamics modelling and the hypothesis of CA formation on nuclear centres. The spatial organisation of all chromosomes in a human interphase nucleus was predicted by simulation of mitosis-to-interphase chromosome structure transition. Two scenarios of CA formation were analysed, 'static' (existing in a nucleus prior to irradiation) centres and 'dynamic' (formed in response to irradiation) centres. The modelling results reveal that under certain conditions, both scenarios explain quantitatively the dose-response relationships for both simple and complex γ-induced inter-chromosomal exchanges observed by mFISH chromosome painting in the first post-irradiation mitosis in human lymphocytes. (authors)

  9. Chromosomal aberrations induced by low-dose γ-irradiation: Study of R-banded chromosomes of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.; Lefrancois, D.; Aurias, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of low-dose (0-0.5 Gy) γ-radiations was studied on R-banded chromosomes from lymphocytes of healthy donors of various ages. In cells from newborns, an increase of chromosome damage roughly proportional to the dose was found. In lymphocytes from young adults chromosomal aberrations were not detected at doses of 0.05 and 0.1 Gy, and in lymphocytes from old adults not even at 0.2 Gy. The difficulty in detecting aberrations in lymphocytes from adults is largely due to a considerable background of chromosomal anomalies which should be borne in mind in dosimetry studies. The rate of induction largely depends on the types of rearrangements. One-break terminal deletions are efficiently induced at 0.1 and 0.2 Gy and are the best indicators of exposure at these doses. At 0.5 Gy, the frequencies of 2-break lesions, i.e., dicentrics and reciprocal translocations, increase, whereas the of deletions decreases. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Particle-induced chromosome aberrations and mutations: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    This overview will focus on progress in chromosome and mutation studies achieved by the application of new techniques. Furthermore, recent relevant data on longterm genetic effects of densely ionizing radiation will be summarized. (orig./MG)

  11. Structural and numerical chromosome aberration inducers in liver micronucleus test in rats with partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru; Hattori, Chiharu; Nagata, Mayumi; Sanbuissho, Atsushi

    2012-08-30

    The liver micronucleus test is an important method to detect pro-mutagens such as active metabolites not reaching bone marrow due to their short lifespan. We have already reported that dosing of the test compound after partial hepatectomy (PH) is essential to detect genotoxicity of numerical chromosome aberration inducers in mice [Mutat. Res. 632 (2007) 89-98]. In naive animals, the proportion of binucleated cells in rats is less than half of that in mice, which suggests a species difference in the response to chromosome aberration inducers. In the present study, we investigated the responses to structural and numerical chromosome aberration inducers in the rat liver micronucleus test. Two structural chromosome aberretion inducers (diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and two numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were used in the present study. PH was performed a day before or after the dosing of the test compound in 8-week old male F344 rats and hepatocytes were isolated 4 days after the PH. As a result, diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, structural chromosome aberration inducers, exhibited significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocyte (MNH) when given either before and after PH. Colchicine and carbendazim, numerical chromosome aberration inducers, did not result in any toxicologically significant increase in MNH frequency when given before PH, while they exhibited MNH induction when given after PH. It is confirmed that dosing after PH is essential in order to detect genotoxicity of numerical chromosome aberration inducers in rats as well as in mice. Regarding the species difference, a different temporal response to colchicine was identified. Colchicine increased the incidence of MNH 4 days after PH in rats, although such induction in mice was observed 8-10 days after PH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia

  13. Distribution of the various radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements in relation to the dose and sampling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Prod'homme, M.; Sportes, M.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of the chromosome rearrangements detected in 2128 R-banded metaphases, obtained from γ-irradiated human lymphocytes after 48 to 96 h in culture is reported. Depending on the culture time, and possibly on the dose of radiation (from 1 to 3 Gy), the most frequent type of rearrangement was either dicentrics or reciprocal translocations. In first generation mitoses, the frequency of cells without rearrangement ranged from 0.66 to 0.18, and the mean number of rearranged chromosomes per cell from 0.79 to 3.28. The dose-response curve follows a quadratic function for dicentric aberration yields, but not for other rearrangements. (Auth.)

  14. Protective Effect of Curcumin on γ - radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSuhaibani, E.S

    2008-01-01

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the radioprotective effect of curcumin on γ radiation induced genetic toxicity. The DNA damage was analyzed by the frequencies of chromosome aberrations assay. Human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with 5.0 γg/ml of curcumin for 30 min at 37 degree C then exposed to 1, 2 and 4 Gy gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes which were pre-treated with curcumin exhibited a significant decrease in the frequency of chromosome aberration at 1 and 2 Gy radiation-induced chromosome damage as compared with the irradiated cells which did not receive the curcumin pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin gives protection to lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced chromosome aberration at certain doses. (author)

  15. Frequency and distribution analysis of chromosomal translocations induced by x-ray in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Hidalgo, Juana Ines

    2000-01-01

    The characteristic of ionizing radiation suggests that induced chromosomal damage in the form of translocations would appear to be randomly distributed. However, the outcome of tests performed in vitro and in vivo (irradiated individuals) are contradictories. The most translocation-related chromosomes, as far as some studies reveal on one hand, appear to be less involved in accordance with others. These data, together with those related to molecular mechanisms involved in translocations production suggest that in G 0 -irradiated cells, the frequency and distribution of this kind of chromosomal rearrangement, does not take place at random. They seem to be affected by in-nucleus chromosome distribution, by each chromosome's DNA length and functional features, by the efficiency of DNA repair mechanisms, and by inter individual differences. The objective of this study was to establish the frequency pattern of each human chromosome involved in radio-induced translocations, as well as to analyze the importance the chromosome length, the activity of DNA polymerase- dependant repair mechanisms, and inter individual differences within the scope of such distribution. To achieve the goals, peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors were irradiated in presence and absence of 2'-3' dideoxithimidine (ddThd), a Β - DNA polymerase inhibitor, which takes part in the base repair mechanism (B E R). The results showed that: The presence of ddThd during the irradiation increase the basal frequency of radioinduced translocations in 60 %. This result suggests that ddThd repair synthesis inhibition can be in itself a valid methodology for radiation-induced bases damage assessment, damage which if not BER-repaired may result in translocation-leading double strand breaks. A statistically significant correlation between translocation frequency and chromosome length, in terms of percentage of genome, has been noticed both in (basal) irradiation and in irradiation with ddThd inhibitor

  16. Comparative study of dose-response curve for chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by {sup 60}Co and X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Andrade, Aida M.G.; Silva, Laís M.; Hwang, Suy; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: mendes_sb@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Biodosimetry represents a biological marker to the estimation of health risks after accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation. Chromosomal dicentric in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been the most reliable biomarker of exposure to IR during the last several decades. This technique could be used to support physical dosimetry or when it is impossible to achieve it. A reliable measurement of the absorbed dose is critical for medical decision, including the assessment of long-term health consequences. The aim of this research is to compare dose-response curves for dicentric aberration induced in human lymphocytes by {sup 60}Co and X-Rays. For both quality of radiation, the samples were exposed to at least eight different absorbed doses. The X-rays with dose rate of 0,275 Gy/min at Laboratory of Metrology (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to cobalt source with dose rate of 0.055 Gy/min ({sup 60}Co Gammacell 220) located at Department of Nuclear Energy (UFPE-DEN-BRASIL). Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. The frequencies of dicentrics were counted in more than 18.000 metaphases for this comparison. After that, all frequencies and distributions of dicentrics were tested to analyze their conformity with Poisson distribution and then each quality of radiation were used for build the calibration curves using Dose Estimate program. These results showed that both curves followed the Poisson distribution and coefficients of each one are: YX-rays = 0,0013 (± 0,0006) + 0,0271 (± 0,0086)⁎D + 0,0556(±0,0050))⁎D{sup 2} and Y{sub Co-60} = 0,0014 (± 0,0010) + 0,0081 (± 0,0073))⁎D + 0,0451 (± 0,0046))⁎D{sup 2} (Y = frequency of dicentrics and D = absorbed dose). It was expected that there was no significant difference between this two types of radiation because both were low LET. We believed that dose rate have been a principal factor to produce this

  17. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  18. Structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations by atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after Giemsa staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Kanda, R.; Minamihisamatsu, M.; Hayata, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied structures of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation by an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM could visualize the fine structure of chromosomes on Giemsa stained or unstained samples, although it was difficult to visualize unstained chromosomes by light microscope. The height data of chromosomes obtained by AFM provided useful information to describe detailed structure of chromatid gaps induced by heavy ion irradiation. A fibrous structure was observed on the unstained chromosome and these structures were considered to be the 30nm fibers on the chromosome. These types of structures were observed in the gaps as well as on surface of the chromosome. Further more, other types of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation visualized by AFM will be presented

  19. Flow cytogenetics: progress toward chromosomal aberration detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrano, A.V.; Gray, J.W.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Using clonal derivatives of the Chinese hamster M3-1 cell line, we demonstrate the potential of flow systems to karyotype homogeneous aberrations (aberrations which are identical and present in every cell) and to detect heterogeneous aberrations (aberrations which occur randomly in a population and are not identical in every cell). Flow cytometry (FCM) of ethidium bromide stained isolated chromosomes from clone 650A of the M3-1 cells distinguishes nine chromosome types from the fourteen present in the actual karyotype. X-irradiation of this parent 650A clone produced two sub-clones with an altered flow karyotype, that is, their FCM distributions were characterized by the addition of new peaks and alterations in area under existing peaks. From the relative DNA content and area for each peak, as determined by computer analysis, we predicted that each clone had undergone a reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes from two peaks. This prediction was confirmed by Giemsa-banding the metaphase cells. Heterogeneous aberrations are reflected in the flow karyotype as an increase in background, that is, an increase in area underlying the chromosome peaks. This increase is dose dependent but, as yet, the sample variability has been too large for quantitative analysis. Flow sorting of the valleys between chromosome peaks produces enriched fractions of aberrant chromosomes for visual analysis. These approaches are potentially applicable to the analysis of chromsomal aberrations induced by environmental contaminants

  20. Turnover of sex chromosomes induced by sexual conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G. S.; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Sex-determination genes are among the most fluid features of the genome in many groups of animals(1,2). In some taxa the master sex-determining gene moves frequently between chromosomes, whereas in other taxa different genes have been recruited to determine the sex of the zygotes. There is a well

  1. Polyploidy and chromosomal aberrations induced by mutagens in open flowering sterile mutants of spring barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzyuk, V T; Kozachenko, M R; Kirichenko, V V

    1975-01-01

    Two types of aberration in meiosis were observed which induced sterility in chemical and radiational mutations of spring wheat: asynapsis and absence of cytokinesis, and chromosomal aberrations in the form of bridges and fragments. Gamma-mutants have many more chromosomal aberrations in the form of fragments, bridges and cells with micronuclei than do chemical mutants. The percent of tetrads with micronuclei is 1.5-2 times greater than the number of dyads with such nuclei. We obtained an original gamma-mutant exhibiting depolyploidization and polyploidization in the mother cells; we also observed cells possessing chromosomal associations of n, 2n, 4n, 68, 8n and greater.

  2. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and on the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of whole-body or local irradiation with X-rays at a dose of 600 R on the induction of chromosomal translocations in the diakinesis metaphase I of the meiosis in treated and F 1 males has been examined along with their fertility. Our results show the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of the fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93.7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in diakinesis, metaphase I, of the meiosis was higher after whole-body irradiation than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  3. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of whole-body and local irradiation with a dose of 600 X-rays on the induction of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis in treated and F 1 males and their fertility have been examined. Our results showed the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93,7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis was greater after whole-body than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  4. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  5. ADP-ribosylation of nonhistone proteins from metaphase and interphase HeLa cells: factors responsible for differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolph, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A striking reduction was previously detected for HeLa metaphase chromosomes, compared to interphase nuclei, in the number of modified nonhistone species. Several factors which could contribute to this cell cycle change in ADP-ribosylation have therefore been examined. In these experiments, mitotic or interphase cells were incubated with [ 32 P]NAD, chromosomes and nuclei were prepared, and the proteins were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The level of incorporation of 32 P label was found to be substantially influenced by chromosome expansion, DNA nicking, disruption of chromosomes or nuclei, and the growth activity of cells. The level of ADP-ribosylation was not greatly affected by the presence of inhibitors of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. NAD concentration influenced the extent of labelling but not the pattern of labeled species. A similar change in the pattern from interphase to mitosis was observed for whole cells as well as for isolated chromosomes and nuclei. The procedure used to arrest cells in mitosis was not artifactually responsible for the results. The difference in metaphase and interphase ADP-ribosylation is not confined to HeLa cells, since comparable patterns were found for chromosomes and nuclei from Novikoff rat hepatoma cells

  6. Chromosomal changes in maize induced by hydrogen fluoride gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, A H

    1970-01-01

    Maize seedlings were fumigated in growth chambers with hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of about 3 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The experiment was run for 10 days, with the first group of treated plants removed from the chambers after 4 days and then at intervals of 2 days. Microsporocyte smears from the treated plants revealed chromosomal aberrations that included asynaptic regions, translocations, inversions, and bridges plus fragments or fragments by themselves. It is believed that these abnormalities were due to the physiological effect of HF causing the chromosomes to become sticky and/or to the occurrence of chromatid breakage followed by reunion to sticky and/or to the occurrence of chromatid breakage followed by reunion to form structural changes. These findings indicate that HF is a mutagenic agent.

  7. Low level dose induced chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Unstable structural aberrations in chromosomes of human blood lymphocytes cannot be used as biological dosemeters in the low dose range, when extrapolating from high doses using a linear dose response, as required by the original formula of the dual radiation action theory. A survey is given of experimental dose-response curves of chromosome aberrations, obtained in investigations not only by this institute, in cooperation with many other laboratories, but also by various authors in different areas of the world. The results are not compatible with the predicted linear dose relationships at in vivo dose ranges up to 30 mGy.y -1 . The aberration frequencies rise sharply with dose within the normal environmental exposure up to about twice that level. At higher doses, aberration frequencies increase less rapidly and reach a plateau. Some in vitro experiments of various authors with higher doses of low LET radiations, up to about 400 mGy have found dose responses with steps. (author)

  8. Alterations and abnormal mitosis of wheat chromosomes induced by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulan Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. 'Mianyang11'×rye S. cereale L. 'Kustro' and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with 'Mianyang11' followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in 'Mianyang11'. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat.

  9. Alterations and Abnormal Mitosis of Wheat Chromosomes Induced by Wheat-Rye Monosomic Addition Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Fei, Yunyan; Tan, Feiquan; Ren, Zhenglong; Yan, Benju; Zhang, Huaiyu; Tang, Zongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. ‘Mianyang11’×rye S. cereale L. ‘Kustro’ and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with ‘Mianyang11’ followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in ‘Mianyang11’. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat. PMID:23936213

  10. TDP2 suppresses chromosomal translocations induced by DNA topoisomerase II during gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Zagnoli-Vieira, Guido; Ntai, Ioanna; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Anderson, Rhona M; Herrero-Ruíz, Andrés; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-08-10

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by abortive topoisomerase II (TOP2) activity are a potential source of genome instability and chromosome translocation. TOP2-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in part by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2)-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), but whether this process suppresses or promotes TOP2-induced translocations is unclear. Here, we show that TDP2 rejoins DSBs induced during transcription-dependent TOP2 activity in breast cancer cells and at the translocation 'hotspot', MLL. Moreover, we find that TDP2 suppresses chromosome rearrangements induced by TOP2 and reduces TOP2-induced chromosome translocations that arise during gene transcription. Interestingly, however, we implicate TDP2-dependent NHEJ in the formation of a rare subclass of translocations associated previously with therapy-related leukemia and characterized by junction sequences with 4-bp of perfect homology. Collectively, these data highlight the threat posed by TOP2-induced DSBs during transcription and demonstrate the importance of TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining in protecting both gene transcription and genome stability.DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by topoisomerase II (TOP2) are rejoined by TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) but whether this promotes or suppresses translocations is not clear. Here the authors show that TDP2 suppresses chromosome translocations from DSBs introduced during gene transcription.

  11. Meiotic consequences of induced chromosomal anomalies in Triticum aestivum L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larik, A.S.; Hafiz, H.M.I.; Ansari, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations on the mechanism of chromosome breakages, types of aberrations and their genetic consequences form an integral part of the most of the studies on radiation genetics (BROCK 1977; KONZAK et al. 1977; LARIK 1975; SEARS 1977; SHARMA & FORSBEGR 1977), covering a wide range of plants belonging to both wild and cultivated species. Mutations due to deficiency of genes with a dominant or epistatic effect occur in very high frequency (MAC KEY 1968) because the well buffered genomes of polyploids can tolerate losses of large chromosome segments and even of entire chromosomes (LARIK 1978a; LARIK & THOMAS 1979; LARIK et al. 1980a). Extensive investigations on the effect of physical and chemical mutagens on the cytological behaviour of wheat and other plants have already been reported (GAUL 1977). However, cytological studies on the M 2 and M 3 populations are very limited (LARIK et al. 1980a). An attempt has been made in the present work to extend these studies. This paper presents an analysis of meiotic anomalies in M 3 populations of bread wheat and discusses their significance with reference to genetics and plant breeding

  12. Chromosomal aberrations induced by 12C6+ ions and 6Co γ-rays in mouse immature oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Duan Xin; Yuan Zhigang; Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Zhou Qingming; Bing Liu; Min Fengling; Li Xiaoda; Xie Yi

    2006-01-01

    The ovaries of Kun-Ming strain mice (3 weeks) were irradiated with different doses of 12 C 6+ ion or 6 Co γ-ray. Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in metaphase II oocytes at 7 weeks after irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 12 C 6+ ion was calculated with respect to 6 Co γ-ray for the induction of chromosomal aberrations. The 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray dose-response relationships for chromosomal aberrations were plotted by linear quadratic models. The data showed that there was a dose-related increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations in all the treated groups compared to controls. The RBE values for 12 C 6+ ions relative to 6 Co γ-rays were 2.49, 2.29, 1.57, 1.42 or 1.32 for the doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 or 6.0 Gy, respectively. Moreover, a different distribution of the various types of aberrations has been found for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray irradiations. The dose-response relationships for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray exhibited positive correlations. The results from the present study may be helpful for assessing genetic damage following exposure of immature oocytes to ionizing radiation

  13. Effect of vitamin E on preovulatory stage irradiated female mouse expressed as chromosomal abnormalities in generated embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, M.; Mozdarani, H.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the effects of preovulatory stage gamma-irradiation of female mice in the absence or presence of vitamin E on numerical chromosome abnormalities in 8-cell embryos after mating with non- irradiated males. Materials and Methods: The 8-11 weeks adult female NMRl mice were whole body irradiated at preovulatory stage (post PMSG injection and about 12-18 hours before Injecting HCG) with 4 Gy gamma-rays generated from a cobalt-60 source alone or in combination with 200 IU/kg vitamin E, intraperitoneally administered one hour prior to irradiation. Soon after HCG injection super ovulated irradiated females were mated with non-irradiated males. About 68-h post coitus (p.c), 8-cell embryos were flushed from the oviducts of pregnant mice and were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for metaphase spreads and numerical chromosome abnormalities. Results: In control embryos, 8% of metaphase plates were aneuploidy whereas in preovulatory stage irradiated female mice, about 50% of metaphase plates of embryos showed numerical chromosome aberrations (P nd meiotic division. Reduction of the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the presence of vitamin E is probably due to antioxidant effects of this vitamin, and scavenging free radicals induced by gamma-rays in mice oocytes' environment

  14. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-01

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  15. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  16. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  17. Radiation-induced cellular reproductive death and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J.S.; Mitchell, J.B.; Griggs, H.G.; Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    If a major mode of cell killing by ionizing radiation is the death of cells containing visible chromosomal aberrations, as for example from anaphase-bridge formation at mitosis, then cells bearing such aberrations should be selectively eliminated from the population, resulting in an increased survival potential for the population remaining at each succeeding cell generation. Using synchronized V79B Chinese hamster cells, we measured the aberration frequency and the colony-forming ability of mitotic cells at each of the first three generations following irradiation in G1. Cells were resynchronized by mechanial harvest at each succeeding mitosis after irradiation in order to avoid mixing of generations in the cell population at later sampling times. As anticipated, the chromosome aberration frequencies decreased markedly from the first to the second and from the second to the third mitosis. The surviving fraction, however, was virtually the same for plating assays carried out immediately after irradiation, at the first, or at the second mitosis. The surviving fraction was significantly higher for cells reaching the third postirradiation mitosis. Survival and aberration frequencies were assayed again at approximately the fourteenth postirradiation division, by which time the irradiated and control populations were not significantly different

  18. Nature of chromosome gaps induced by alkylating agents and γ-rays as revealed by caffeine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, B.

    1981-01-01

    In the cells of primary roots of Crepis capillaris, post-treatment with caffeine increased the frequency of gaps and chromosomal aberrations induced by the alkylating agents ethyleneimine and N-nitroso-N-methylurethane and γ-rays. The increase in the frequency of gaps was considerably lower than that observed in chromosomal aberrations, this being more strongly expressed in the case fo the alkylating agents. The potentiating effect of caffeine on the γ-ray-induced chromosomal gaps was a little higher in S as compared in G 2 . These results lead to the conclusion that the alkylating agents and the γ-rays might induce 2 types of chromosomal gap. (orig.)

  19. Lack of specificity of chromosome breaks resulting from radiation-induced genomic instability in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.-R.; Teibe, A.

    1998-01-01

    In V79 Chinese hamster cells, radiation-induced genomic instability results in a persistently increased frequency of micronuclei, dicentric chromosomes and apoptosis and in decreased colony-forming ability. These manifestations of radiation-induced genomic instability may be attributed to an increased rate of chromosome breakage events many generations after irradiation. This chromosomal instability does not seem to be a property which has been inflicted on individual chromosomes at the time of irradiation. Rather, it appears to be secondary to an increased level of non-specific clastogenic factors in the progeny of most if not all irradiated cells. This conclusion is drawn from the observations presented here, that all the chromosomes in surviving V79 cells are involved in the formation of dicentric chromosome aberrations 1 or 2 weeks after irradiation with about equal probability if corrections are made for chromosome length. (orig.)

  20. Studies on radiation-induced chromosome damage in humans: Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes recent research to determine and report the frequency of somatic cell chromosome aberrations in approximately 200 lymphocyte metaphases from each of 200 control patients or persons who received radiation for enlarged thymus, and from an additional 475 irradiated and control subjects selected by NCI from populations exposed to therapeutic ionizing radiation during the period 1930 to 1970. The priority of populations to be studied will be determined by NCI in consultation with the contractor and with advice from NCI consultants. Additional research will determine and report dose response curves among the several populations, to determine how differences with respect to radiation dose, quality of radiation, fractionation, sex and age within and among groups affect the ''dose-response relationship.'' 7 tabs

  1. Effect of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) on the radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, D.P.; Gupta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of MPG, a SH compound used clinically as detoxicating agent, was investigated in vivo on adult whole-body exposed mice to 3 Gy of 60 Co radiation 15 to 20 min after a single i.p. injection of MPG. Animals pretreated with colchicine were autopsied at various intervals from 2 to 28 days and bone marrow metaphases were scored. Significantly less number of cells were found to carry aberrations in the MPG-treated animals at 24 hr as compared to the non-drug treated irradiated ones. However, at all the other earlier and later intervals, both groups of animals showed approximately the same frequency of aberrant cells. It appears that MPG protection to the chromosome is at the reparation stage rather than at the initial stage of breakage. (author)

  2. Frequencies of X-ray and fast neutron induced chromosome translocations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes as detected by in situ hybridization using chromosome specific DNA libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Darroudi, F.; Vermeulen, S.; Wiegant, J.

    1992-01-01

    DNA libraries of six human chromosomes were used to detect translocations in human lymphocytes induced by different doses of X-rays and fast neutrons. Results show that with X-rays, one can detect about 1.5 to 2.0 fold more translocations in comparison to dicentrics, whereas following fast neutron irradiation, the difference between these two classes of aberrations are significantly different at high doses. In addition, triple fluorescent in situ hybridization technique was used to study the frequencies of radiation-induced translocations involving a specific chromosome. Chromosome number 1 was found to be involved in translocations more frequently than chromosomes number 2, 3, 4, 8 and X. (author). 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Radiation induced chromosomal instability in lymphocytes of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, H.; Sagara, M.; Ban, S.; Noda, S.; Iwakawa, M.; Harada, Y.; Imai, T.; Cologne, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay has been extensively used to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human individuals. Using the CBMN assay, Scott et al (1998, 1999) demonstrated that a fraction of radiosensitive individuals in breast cancer case population was larger than in normal individual population. However, Vral et al were very skeptical about the Scott et al's findings (2002). Under the approval from the ethical committee of NIRS, peripheral blood was obtained from 46 normal healthy females, 131 breast cancer patients, 32 cervical cancer patients and 7 female head and neck cancer patients. Radiosensitivity of T-lymphocytes was assessed by using a CBMN assay. The frequencies of MN per binucleated cell in healthy donors were 0.031(±0.010) and 0.151(±0.066) for cells treated before and after X-ray-irradiation (2Gy), respectively. Spontaneous MN frequencies in cancer patients were significantly higher than healthy donors (p < 0.001). Radiation sensitivities of breast- and head and neck-cancer patients were significantly higher than normal individuals (p < 0.001). Cervical cancer patients were more resistant to irradiation than healthy donors, though the number of cases for statistical analysis was small. (p < 0.001). We are considering that the HPV infection affected the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cases. Because it is widely believed that one key mechanism which leads to spontaneous micronucleus formation involves an imbalance of chromosomal segregation and a chromosomal instability in patients' lymphocytes might be greater than that in normal individuals' lymphocytes. Recently, Kuschel et al (2002) demonstrated that ratios in two SNPs on XRCC3 were significantly different between cancer patients and healthy females. Then, we can suppose that the radiation-related genes with low penetrance may be involved in tumorigenesis of mammary- and head and neck-cells, and also, in patients' radiation susceptibility

  4. Failure of antimony trioxide to induce micronuclei or chromosomal aberrations in rat bone-marrow after sub-chronic oral dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, David; Whitwell, James; Deyo, James; Serex, Tessa

    2007-03-05

    Antimony trioxide (Sb2O3, CAS 1309-64-4) is widely used as a flame retardant synergist in a number of household products, as a fining agent in glass manufacture, and as a catalyst in the manufacture of various types of polyester plastics. It does not induce point mutations in bacteria or mammalian cells, but is able to induce chromosomal aberrations (CA) in cultured cells in vitro. Although no CA or micronuclei (MN) have been induced after acute oral dosing of mice, repeated oral dosing for 14 or 21 days resulted in increased CA in one report, but did not result in increased MN in another. In order to further investigate its in vivo genotoxicity, Sb2O3 was dosed orally to groups of rats for 21 days at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg day. There were no clinical signs of toxicity in the Sb2O3-exposed animals except for some reductions in body-weight gain in the top dose group. Toxicokinetic measurements in a separate study confirmed bone-marrow exposure, and at higher levels than would have been achieved by single oral dosing. Large numbers of cells were scored for CA (600 metaphases/sex group) and MN (12,000 PCE/sex group) but frequencies of CA or MN in Sb2O3-treated rats were very similar to controls, and not biologically or statistically different, at all doses. These results provide further indication that Sb2O3 is not genotoxic to the bone marrow of rodents after 21 days of oral administration at high doses close to the maximum tolerated dose.

  5. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and cell killing in normal human fibroblasts and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, T.; Saito, M.; Uno, T.; Ito, H.; Shigematsu, N.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: When cells are held in a non-dividing state (G0) after irradiation, an enhanced survival can be observed compared to that of immediate plating. A change of survival depending on post irradiation condition is known to be repair of potentially lethal damage (RPLD). The effects of confluent holding recovery (24-h incubation following irradiation) on chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts (AG1522) and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts (GM02052C) were examined. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to study chromosome aberrations in G2 and M-phase. Results from cell survival showed that the capacity for potentially lethal damage repair was normal in AG1522 cells but very little in GM02052C cells. The frequency of chromosome aberrations in AG1522 cells decreased when cells were allowed to repair for 24-h. Especially complex type exchanges were found to decrease markedly at high doses (4Gy and 6Gy). However, the frequency of chromosome aberrations including complex type exchanges showed little decrease in GM02052C cells. Confluent holding can effectively reduce chromosome aberrations, especially complex type exchanges in normal cells

  6. Biological dosimetry of heavy ion induced chromosome lesions in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of different healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesser, T.; Rydberg, B.; Ritter, S.; Hessel, P.; Kraft, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the presented work the effect of sparsely ionizing X-rays or densely ionizing carbon ions on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors regarding the fluctuations in radiosensitivity within the same donor and between different donors was examined. This is not only of special interest for physicians and radiation biologists but also plays an important role in space flights because such fluctuations in the radiation response would reduce the accuracy of the biological dosimetry. In this context, biological changes in the aberration rate of metaphase cells as well as in cell proliferation and the mitotic index were measured. Since chromosome analyses are presently the most powerful biological method to quantify radiation exposure, the study focused on the measurements of chromosome aberrations in first-metaphase cells. The investigations showed that the aberration yield after 400 MeV/u carbon ion exposure (LET = 11 keV/micrometer) was higher than after X-irradiation. The aberration yield in first mitotic cells as well as the proportion of damaged cells was stable over the examined period up to 72h after exposure to X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, the results of the presented work revealed pronounced fluctuations in the measured parameters in the same donor as well as between different donors. If the dose effect curves of such parameters were used as calibration curves for radiation dose assessment these fluctuations will decrease their potential of use for dose estimation. This demonstrates that a general calibration curve for dose assessment might not be sufficiently precise and individual calibration curves might improve the accuracy of the biological dosimetry

  7. Distamycin A/DAPI bands and the effects of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Haaf, T

    1984-01-01

    The chromosomes of the chimpanzee were stained with distamycin A/DAPI, which labels specific C-bands. Bright distamycin A/DAPI fluorescence was found in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 6, 11, 14 to 16, 18 to 20, and 23 and the Y. Lymphocyte cultures from chimpanzees were treated with low doses of 5-azacytidine during the last hours of culture. This cytosine analog induces highly distinct undercondensations in 28 heterochromatic regions of 19 chromosomes. These 5-azacytidine-sensitive regions are predominantly located in the terminal C-bands of the chromosomes. In vitro treatment with 5-azacytidine also preserves into the metaphase stage somatic pairings between the 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatic regions in interphase nuclei. The homologies and differences regarding the chromosomal localization of distamycin A/DAPI-bright C-bands, 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatin, 5-methylcytosine-rich DNA sequences, and satellite DNAs in the chimpanzee and man are discussed.

  8. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by 123I-estrogen in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope I-123, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the 123 I-estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.2. The corresponding ratio with 60 Co gamma rays was 15.6. The dose-response was biphasic suggesting that either receptor sites are saturated at high does, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the 123 I-estrogen. The 123 I-estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1,000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of 123 I-estrogen for these cells suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that 123 I-estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F-ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 ± 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high LET radiations. Their results suggest that I-123 bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, that the cytotoxic damage produced by I-123 bound to estrogen is very like high LET-induced damage, and the I-123 in the estrogen-receptor-DNA complex is probably in close proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA

  9. Calibration curves for biological dosimetry by drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C.; Cho, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    To develop the cytogenetic tool to detect chromosome damages after high dose exposure with 60 Coγ- rays, dose-response curves were measured for induction of prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) in peripheral lymphocytes. Blood was obtained from 10 different healthy donors, and given okadaic acid (OA) 500nM in cultured lymphocytes 1h after radiation exposure. Cells were analyzed by the frequencies of OA-induced PCC rings because it is difficult to obtain mitotic chromosomes using a conventional chromosome aberration (CA). PCC-rings were scored in cells exposed in the dose range of 0.2-16Gy. The frequency of the cells with PCC and the dose-response relationship for the yield of PCC rings were examined in the irradiated lymphocytes. The yield of PCC-rings increased with dose dependent-manner up to 16Gy. The observed dose-effect relationship for the percentage of cells with PCC-rings was calculated by linear-quadratic model. This technique can be applied to biological dosimetry of radiation exposures involving whole body irradiation to allow damaged chromosomes to be detected with great sensitivity. Detection of okadaic acid-induced PCC rings is a useful method up to 16Gy or more doses in estimating the absorbed doses of victims after high dose exposure. Calibration curves described in this paper will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry by PCC-ring after a high dose exposure

  10. Chromosome aberrations induced by 135 MeV of carbon and neon beams by PRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Minamihisamatu, Masako; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Itsukaichi, Hiromi; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Yatagai, Fumio; Sato, Kohki.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberration can be an indicator of the radiation lesions in irradiated cells. Many studies on chromosome aberration induced by X-ray and γ - ray have indicated that the dose response of the aberration can be fitted to a quadratic equation, Y = αD + βD 2 , and it becomes linear as the LET of beams increases. The main subject of this study was some quantification of chromosomal aberration induced by 135 MeV/n carbon and neon beams produced by the RRC, the operation of which increasingly became useful for the studies on heavy ion biology. The results will meet with some of the radiobiological features connected to the specific action of charged particles. The materials used, the experimental method and the results are reported. Four curves of the dose response for the production of dicentric and ring types of aberration induced by carbon and neon beams and four different dose average LETs are given. Aberration production rate became higher as LET increased. Chromosome aberration can be quantified as an indicator of radiation lesions in the case of high LET particle radiation. (K.I.)

  11. The Detection and Analysis of Chromosome Fragile Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Özer, Özgün; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    A fragile site is a chromosomal locus that is prone to form a gap or constriction visible within a condensed metaphase chromosome, particularly following exposure of cells to DNA replication stress. Based on their frequency, fragile sites are classified as either common (CFSs; present in all...... for detection and analysis of chromosome fragile sites....

  12. Cell killing and chromosomal aberration induced by heavy-ion beams in cultured human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, K.; Funada, A.; Mohri, M.; Lee, R.; Aoki, M.; Furusawa, Y.; Gotoh, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human tumor cells irradaited with heavy-ion beams. The analyses were carried out on the basis of the linear energy transfer (LET) values of heavy ion beams as radiation source. Exponentially growing human tumor cells, Human Salivary Gland Tumor cells (HSG cells), were irradiated with various high energy heavy ions, such as 13 keV/micrometer carbon (C) ions as low LET charged particle radiation source, 120 keV/ micrometer carbon (C) ions and 440 keV/micrometer iron (Fe) ions as high LET charged particle radiation sources.The cell death was analysed by the colony formation method, and the chromosomal aberration and its repairing kinetics was analysed by prematurely chromosome condensation method (PCC method) using calyculin A. Chromatid-type breaks, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were scored for the samples from the cells keeping with various incubation time after irradiation. The LET dependence of the cell death was similar to that of the chromosome exchange formation after 12 hours incubation. A maximum peak was around 120 keV/micrometer. However it was not similar to the LET dependence of isochromatid breaks or chromatid breaks after 12 hours incubation. These results suggest that the exchanges formed in chromosome after irradiation should be one of essential causes to lead the cell death. The different quality of induced chromosome damage between high-LET and low-LET radiation was also shown. About 89 % and 88 % chromatid breaks induced by X rays and 13 keV/micrometer C ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation, though only 71% and 58 % of chromatid breaks induced by 120 keV/micrometer C ions and 440 keV/micrometer Fe ions were rejoined within 12 hours of post-irradiation

  13. Induction of chromosome aberrations and mitotic arrest by cytomegalovirus in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuBakar, S.; Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Albrecht, T.

    1988-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is potentially an effective but often overlooked genotoxic agent in humans. We report here evidence that indicates that infection by CMV can induce chromosome alterations and mitotic inhibition. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced was dependent on the input multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for human lung fibroblasts (LU), but not for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) when both cell types were infected at the GO phase of the cell cycle. The aberrations induced by CMV were mostly chromatid breaks and chromosome pulverizations that resembled prematurely condensed S-phase chromatin. Pulverized chromosomes were not observed in LU cells infected with virus stocks that had been rendered nonlytic by UV-irradiation at 24,000 ergs/mm2 or from infection of human lymphocytes. In LU cells infected with UV-irradiated CMV, the frequency of aberrations induced was inversely dependent on the extent of the exposure of the CMV stock to the UV-light. In permissive CMV infection of proliferating LU cells at 24 hr after subculture, a high percentage (greater than 40%) of the metaphase cells were arrested at their first metaphase and displayed severely condensed chromosomes when harvested 48 hr later. A significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the chromosome aberration frequency was also observed. Our study shows that CMV infection is genotoxic to host cells. The types and extent of damage are dependent on the viral genome expression and on the cell cycle stage of the cells at the time of infection. The possible mechanisms for induction of chromosome damage by CMV are discussed

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-induced transgene insertion and telomere-associated truncation of a single human chromosome for chromosome engineering in CHO and A9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Narumi; Hiramatsu, Kei; Uno, Katsuhiro; Komoto, Shinya; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2017-10-06

    Chromosome engineering techniques including gene insertion, telomere-associated truncation and microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) are powerful tools for generation of humanised model animal, containing megabase-sized genomic fragments. However, these techniques require two cell lines: homologous recombination (HR)-proficient DT40 cells for chromosome modification, and CHO cells for transfer to recipient cells. Here we show an improved technique using a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-induced HR in CHO and mouse A9 cells without DT40 cells following MMCT to recipient cells. Transgene insertion was performed in CHO cells with the insertion of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) using CRISPR/Cas9 and a circular targeting vector containing two 3 kb HR arms. Telomere-associated truncation was performed in CHO cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and a linearised truncation vector containing a single 7 kb HR arm at the 5' end, a 1 kb artificial telomere at the 3' end. At least 11% and 6% of the targeting efficiency were achieved for transgene insertion and telomere-associated truncation, respectively. The transgene insertion was also confirmed in A9 cells (29%). The modified chromosomes were transferrable to other cells. Thus, this CHO and A9 cell-mediated chromosome engineering using the CRISPR/Cas9 for direct transfer of the modified chromosome is a rapid technique that will facilitate chromosome manipulation.

  15. Radioprotective effect of penicillin on the x-ray induced chromosome aberrations in the Syrian hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, S.K.; Manna, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow cells of Syrian hamsters treated with penicillin and X-rays separately and conjointly was found to be 27% in X-irradiated series, 6.3% in penicillin treated series while it was 7.6%, 8% and 6.3% respectively for the treatment of penicillin prior to, almost simultaneously with and after X-irradiation. The results indicated the protective action of penicillin on the frequency of radiation-induced chromosome damages. (author)

  16. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray--induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosomes aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells

  17. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray-induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosome aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells

  18. Colchicine promotes a change in chromosome structure without loss of sister chromatid cohesion in prometaphase I-arrested bivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E M; Parra, M T; Rufas, J S; Suja, J A

    2001-12-01

    In somatic cells colchicine promotes the arrest of cell division at prometaphase, and chromosomes show a sequential loss of sister chromatid arm and centromere cohesion. In this study we used colchicine to analyse possible changes in chromosome structure and sister chromatid cohesion in prometaphase I-arrested bivalents of the katydid Pycnogaster cucullata. After silver staining we observed that in colchicine-arrested prometaphase I bivalents, and in contrast to what was found in control bivalents, sister kinetochores appeared individualised and sister chromatid axes were completely separated all along their length. However, this change in chromosome structure occurred without loss of sister chromatid arm cohesion. We also employed the MPM-2 monoclonal antibody against mitotic phosphoproteins on control and colchicine-treated spermatocytes. In control metaphase I bivalents this antibody labelled the tightly associated sister kinetochores and the interchromatid domain. By contrast, in colchicine-treated prometaphase I bivalents individualised sister kinetochores appeared labelled, but the interchromatid domain did not show labelling. These results support the notion that MPM-2 phosphoproteins, probably DNA topoisomerase IIalpha, located in the interchromatid domain act as "chromosomal staples" associating sister chromatid axes in metaphase I bivalents. The disappearance of these chromosomal staples would induce a change in chromosome structure, as reflected by the separation of sister kinetochores and sister axes, but without a concomitant loss of sister chromatid cohesion.

  19. Cosmic radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

    2003-01-01

    Since decades, elevated frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (DIC) in human lymphocytes have successfully been used as a biological dosimeter in cases of acute, often accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. As long as duration and time lags after exposure are small compared to the lifetime of DIC, their frequencies can also be used to assess doses from protracted, chronic irradiation. E.g., within the substantial range of uncertainties, the frequencies of DIC observed in cosmonauts are compatible with the frequencies expected from doses of low and high LET radiation to which they were exposed in low earth orbit (LEO). On the other hand, frequencies of DIC detected in lymphocytes of civilian aviation crewmembers rarely correlate with the doses accumulated all along their professional career. For such long duration exposures with relatively low induction rates, the concomitant decay of DIC frequencies due to the removal during exposure of lymphocytes carrying DIC has to be taken into account. We present temporal profiles of frequencies of DIC during the exposure calculated with a model of exponential decay of DIC for some scenarios of chronic exposure to cosmic radiation. E.g., even after a 'heavily' shielded Mars mission, the expected frequencies of DIC in lymphocytes of astronauts will be 10 to 40 times higher than the terrestrial control levels. For air flight personnel we calculated the time profiles of frequencies of DIC in lymphocytes of a 'typical' pilot, a male cabin attendant and a female cabin attendant whose professional radiation exposures were recalculated for the actual flight routes flown during their entire flight career as recorded in detailed duty logs. These results demonstrate that experimental (epidemiological) studies concerning DIC in air or space flight personnel must explicitly take into consideration the temporal exposure profiles in the prospective study population and that the point in time at which blood samples are to be drawn must

  20. Proliferation, differentiation, and possible radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in circulating hemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Honda, Takeo; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Otake, Masanori; Hazama, Ryuji; Tomonaga, Yu; Tomonaga, Masao; Ichimaru, Michito.

    1986-07-01

    The effects of atomic bomb radiation on hemopoietic stem cells were studied cytogenetically and from the aspect of differentiation and proliferation, using single colonies derived from human hemopoietic stem cells. The subjects studied were A-bomb survivors in the high dose exposure group (T65D 100 + rad) with a high incidence (10 % or more) of radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in their peripheral lymphocytes, and their controls. Examinations were performed on 21 A-bomb survivors (10 males and 11 females) and 11 controls (5 males and 6 females). Colony formation of hemopoietic stem cells (granulocyte/monocyte-colony-forming cells, GM-CFC and burst-forming unit-erythrocytes, BFU-E) was made by the methylcellulose method patterned after the methods of Iscove et al and Ogawa et al using 5 - 10 ml of peripheral blood. Chromosome specimens were prepared from single colonies by the micromethod which we have reported elsewhere. The total number of colonies analyzed in the exposed group was 131 GM-CFC and 75 BFU-E. Chromosome abnormalities were observed in 15 (11.5 %) and 9 (12.0 %) colonies, respectively. In the control group, the total number of colonies analyzed was 61 GM-CFC and 41 BFU-E, but none of the colonies showed chromosome abnormalities. A highly significant difference in chromosome abnormalities was demonstrated by an exact test with a probability of 0.3 % for GM-CFC and 1.7 % for BFU-E. The karyotypes of chromosome abnormalities obtained from the colonies of hemopoietic stem cells in the exposed group were mostly translocations, but deletion and marker chromosomes were also observed. In two individuals, such karyotypic abnormalities as observed in the peripheral lymphocytes were seen also in the hemopoietic precursor cells. This finding suggests that radiation may produce an effect even on relatively undifferentiated hemopoietic stem cells. (author)

  1. Chromosomal damages and mutagenesis in mammalian and human cells induced by ionizing radiations with different LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorun, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of literature and proper data the inference was made about essential role of structural chromosomal (and gene) damages in spontaneous and radiation-induced mutagenesis of mammalian and human cells on HPRT-loci. The evidences of increasing role of these damages in the mutagenesis after the influence of ionizing radiations with high LET are adduced. The consequences of HPRT-gene damages have been examined hypothetically. The geterogeneity of mutant subclones on their cytogenetical properties were revealed experimentally. The data reflect a phenomenon of the reproductive chromosomal instability in many generations of mutant cell. The mutagenesis of mammalian cells is also accompanied by the impairment of chromosome integrity with high probability as a stage of appropriate genome reorganization because of changed vital conditions

  2. Meiotic chromosomal translocations in male mice induced by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski; Vuksanovic, L.; Radivojevic, D.; Alavantic, D.

    1983-01-01

    The dose-response curve for reciprocal translocations induced by acute exposure of spermatogonial stem cells to X-rays in treated mice and their F-1 sons was examined. Male mice were totally irradiated with doses of 1Gy;5x1Gy and 5Gy. The obtained results show that frequency of the chromosomal translocations in directly treated animals is dose dependent. The percentage of animals irradiated with 1Gy which had the chromosomal translocations was 60, while this percentage in animals irradiated with single and fractionated dose of 5Gy was 100. The frequency of chromosomal translocations varies from 1.5% to 8.0%. Multivalent configurations in F-1 males were observed after exposure to 5Gy only. The incidence of F-1 translocated males was 17.5%.

  3. Structural variations of chromosome 1 R from rye cultivar Jingzhouheimai induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Conglei; Zhuang Lifang; Qi Zengjun

    2012-01-01

    Irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays (12 Gy), the pollen of wheat landrace Huixianhong-Secale cereal cv. Jingzhouheimai DA1R was pollinated to the emasculated spikes of Huixianhong. Analyzed with genomic in situ hybridization GISH using gDNA of rye cv. Jingzhouheimai as a probe, four plants with reciprocal translocation, four plants with large segmental translocation and one plant with distal segmental translocation, one plant with one telocentric chromosome were identified from 33 M 1 seeds. The results showed that the translocation frequency was 30.30% and of the total 11 breakage-fusion events, 1 involved centric regions and 10 involved interstitial regions. The experiment showed that pollen irradiation was an effective method to induce wheat alien chromosomal structural variations which could effectively by used in deletion mapping, chromosomal location of important agronomic genes and development of small segmental translocations with target genes. (authors)

  4. DNA damage and chromosome aberration induced by heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kahoru; Funada, Aya; Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the relation between cell death and chromosomal aberration in cultured human cells (human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells and GM05389 human normal fibroblasts) irradiated with heavy ion beams on the basis of linear energy transfer (LET) values. The LET dependences of cell death were observed for the both cells by the method of colony assay. The LET dependences of the chromosomal aberrations, breaks and gaps, isochromatid breaks and exchanges were also observed for the both cells using the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. From these results it is suggested that exchange formation is essential for the cell death caused by heavy ion beam irradiation. It is suspected that the densely ionizing track structure of hight LET heavy ions inhibits the effective repair in the chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks and finally induce much exchange in the cells, which should be essential cause of cell death. (author)

  5. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or γ-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes. PMID:14563680

  6. Persistence of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in a long-term cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Assumpta; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Caballín, María Rosa; Ribas, Montserrat; Barrios, Leonardo

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the persistence of chromosome aberrations induced by X rays. FISH painting and mFISH techniques were applied to long-term cultures of irradiated cells. With painting, at 2 Gy the frequency of apparently simple translocations remained almost invariable during all the culture, whereas at 4 Gy a rapid decline was observed between the first and the second samples, followed by a slight decrease until the end of the culture. Apparently simple dicentrics and complex aberrations disappeared after the first sample at 2 and 4 Gy. By mFISH, at 2 Gy the frequency of complete plus one-way translocations remained invariable between the first and last sample, but at 4 Gy a 60% decline was observed. True incomplete simple translocations disappeared at 2 and 4 Gy, indicating that incompleteness could be a factor to consider when the persistence of translocations is analyzed. The analysis by mFISH showed that the frequency of complex aberrations and their complexity increased with dose and tended to disappear in the last sample. Our results indicate that the influence of dose on the decrease in the frequency of simple translocations with time postirradiation cannot be fully explained by the disappearance of true incomplete translocations and complex aberrations. The chromosome involvement was random for radiation-induced exchange aberrations and non-random for total aberrations. Chromosome 7 showed the highest deviations from expected, being less and more involved than expected in the first and last samples, respectively. Some preferential chromosome-chromosome associations were observed, including a coincidence with a cluster from radiogenic chromosome aberrations described in other studies.

  7. The use of premature chromosome condensation to study in interphase cells the influence of environmental factors on human genetic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki I. Hatzi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a constantly increasing concern regarding the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a variety of harmful environmental factors to which humans are exposed in their natural and anthropogenic environment. These factors exert their hazardous potential in humans' personal (diet, smoking, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and occupational environment that constitute part of the anthropogenic environment. It is well known that genetic damage due to these factors has dramatic implications for human health. Since most of the environmental genotoxic factors induce arrest or delay in cell cycle progression, the conventional analysis of chromosomes at metaphase may underestimate their genotoxic potential. Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC induced either by means of cell fusion or specific chemicals, enables the microscopic visualization of interphase chromosomes whose morphology depends on the cell cycle stage, as well as the analysis of structural and numerical aberrations at the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The PCC has been successfully used in problems involving cell cycle analysis, diagnosis and prognosis of human leukaemia, assessment of interphase chromosome malformations resulting from exposure to radiation or chemicals, as well as elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the conversion of DNA damage into chromosomal damage. In this report, particular emphasis is given to the advantages of the PCC methodology used as an alternative to conventional metaphase analysis in answering questions in the fields of radiobiology, biological dosimetry, toxicogenetics, clinical cytogenetics and experimental therapeutics.

  8. Chromosomal analysis in mouse eggs fertilized in vitro with sperm exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) and methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate (MMS and EMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were analyzed at the first-cleavage metaphase of mouse eggs fertilized in vitro with sperm exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) as well as to methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate (MMS and EMS). The frequencies of chromosome aberrations markedly increased with dose of UV as well as with concentration of MMS and EMS. In the UV-irradiation group, the frequency of chromosome-type aberrations was much higher than that of chromatid-type aberrations. About 90% of chromosome aberrations observed in the eggs following MMS and EMS treatment to sperm were chromosome type in which the frequency of chromosome fragments was the highest. The effects of UV on the induction of chromosome aberrations were clearly potentiated by post-treatment incubation of fertilized eggs in the presence of Ara-C or caffeine, but the effects of MMS and EMS were not pronounced by post-treatment of Ara-C or caffeine. The results indicate a possibility that UV damage induced in mouse sperm DNA is reparable in the eggs during the period between the entry of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and the first-cleavage metaphase. 35 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  9. Effects of a chromosome-3 mutator gene on radiation-induced mutability in Drosophila melanogaster females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaranarayanan, K. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis; Cohen (J.A.) Inst. voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1982-01-01

    A series of X-irradiation experiments was carried out using Drosophila melanogaster females homozygous for a third chromosome mutator gene and females which had a similar genetic background except that the mutator-bearing third chromosomes were substituted by normal wild-type chromosomes. In the present work, the sensitivity of the pre-meiotic germ cells of mutator and normal females to the X-ray induction (2000 R) of sex-linked recessive lethals was studied. In addition, experiments were conducted to examine the sensitivity of the immature (stage 7; prophase I of meiosis) oocytes of both kinds of females to the induction of dominant lethals, X-linked recessive lethals and X-chromosome losses. The results show that in pre-meiotic germ cells, the frequencies of radiation-induced recessive lethals are similar in both kinds of females. However, the proportion of these mutations that occur in clusters of size 3 and higher, is higher in mutator than in normal females. In stage-7 oocytes, the frequencies of radiation-induced dominant lethals and sex-linked recessive lethals were similar in both kinds of females. The X-loss frequencies however, were consistently higher in mutator females although statistical significance was obtained only at higher exposures (3000 and 3750 R) and not at lower ones (750-2250 R). Possible reasons for the discrepancy between the present results and those of Gold and Green with respect to pre-meiotic germ cells are discussed.

  10. The Aurora Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei plays distinctive roles in metaphase-anaphase transition and cytokinetic initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B kinase is an essential regulator of chromosome segregation with the action well characterized in eukaryotes. It is also implicated in cytokinesis, but the detailed mechanism remains less clear, partly due to the difficulty in separating the latter from the former function in a growing cell. A chemical genetic approach with an inhibitor of the enzyme added to a synchronized cell population at different stages of the cell cycle would probably solve this problem. In the deeply branched parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, an Aurora B homolog, TbAUK1, was found to control both chromosome segregation and cytokinetic initiation by evidence from RNAi and dominant negative mutation. To clearly separate these two functions, VX-680, an inhibitor of TbAUK1, was added to a synchronized T. brucei procyclic cell population at different cell cycle stages. The unique trans-localization pattern of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, consisting of TbAUK1 and two novel proteins TbCPC1 and TbCPC2, was monitored during mitosis and cytokinesis by following the migration of the proteins tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in live cells with time-lapse video microscopy. Inhibition of TbAUK1 function in S-phase, prophase or metaphase invariably arrests the cells in the metaphase, suggesting an action of TbAUK1 in promoting metaphase-anaphase transition. TbAUK1 inhibition in anaphase does not affect mitotic exit, but prevents trans-localization of the CPC from the spindle midzone to the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone for cytokinetic initiation. The CPC in the midzone is dispersed back to the two segregated nuclei, while cytokinesis is inhibited. In and beyond telophase, TbAUK1 inhibition has no effect on the progression of cytokinesis or the subsequent G1, S and G2 phases until a new metaphase is attained. There are thus two clearly distinct points of TbAUK1 action in T. brucei: the metaphase-anaphase transition and

  11. The structure of chromosom 5 in interphase-nucleii of HeLa-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Claussen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the structure of chromosoms during the interphase HeLa-cells were synchronised and preperated. In further steps visulaised we the chromosom5 with help of multicour-banding. It could be showed that the chromosom 5 has a similar structure during the interphase as a metaphase-chromosom.

  12. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T., E-mail: natarajan@live.nl [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Hill, Mark A. [CRUK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Stevens, David L. [MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Ahnstroem, Gunnar [Department of Microbiology and Genetic Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-10

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  13. No interaction between X-ray induced lesions in maternal and paternal chromosomes in inseminated eggs of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuergler, F.E.; Graf, U.; Jeanneret, P.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray induced premutational lesions persist in mature gametes of drosophila until fertilization. Repairable lesions in sperm and oocyte chromosomes are repaired exclusively by maternal repair systems in the inseminated egg. Interactions between irradiated genomes in inseminated eggs might result in additional lethality if breaks induced in separate nuclei, which would normally be repaired, could interact to form dicentric chromosomes. Adult drosophila flies were X-irradiated (up to 5 kR), individual females crossed to three or four males, and the dose-response curves for dominant lethals (embryonic lethality) compared. The results indicate thet the potentially lethal damage present in irradiated sperm chromosomes was expressed independently of whether or not the oocyte was also irradiated. There were no (or only very few) interactions between maternal and paternal chromosome complements, and the maternal repair systems acting on radiation-induced chromosome breaks in sperm were resistant to X-rays. (U.K.)

  14. 125IdUrd-induced chromosome fragments, assayed by premature chromosome condensation, and DNA double-strand breaks have similar repair kinetics in G1-phase CHO-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, George; Pantelias, G.E.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Seaner, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 125 I-decay on cell lethality, and induction of chromosome and DNA damage, was studied in synchronous non-cycling, G 1 -phase CHO-cells. Neutral filter elution was used to assay repair of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs), and premature chromosome condensation was used to assay repair of chromosome fragments and induction of ring chromosomes. The results indicate very little repair at the cell survival level (repair of PLD). At the DNA level an efficient repair of DNA dsbs was observed, with kinetics similar to those observed after exposure to X-rays. At the chromosome level a fast repair of prematurely condensed chromosome fragments was observed, with a concomitant increase in the number of ring chromosomes induced. The repair kinetics of chromosome fragments and DNA dsbs were very similar, suggesting that DNA dsbs may underlie chromosome fragmentation. (author)

  15. Epstein–Barr virus particles induce centrosome amplification and chromosomal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Anatoliy; Tsai, Ming-Han; Schlosser, Yvonne T.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Bernhardt, Katharina; Fink, Susanne; Mizani, Tuba; Lin, Xiaochen; Jauch, Anna; Mautner, Josef; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Feederle, Regina; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Infections with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) are associated with cancer development, and EBV lytic replication (the process that generates virus progeny) is a strong risk factor for some cancer types. Here we report that EBV infection of B-lymphocytes (in vitro and in a mouse model) leads to an increased rate of centrosome amplification, associated with chromosomal instability. This effect can be reproduced with virus-like particles devoid of EBV DNA, but not with defective virus-like particles that cannot infect host cells. Viral protein BNRF1 induces centrosome amplification, and BNRF1-deficient viruses largely lose this property. These findings identify a new mechanism by which EBV particles can induce chromosomal instability without establishing a chronic infection, thereby conferring a risk for development of tumours that do not necessarily carry the viral genome. PMID:28186092

  16. Cytogenetic analysis of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in spontaneous leukaemic AKR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szollar, J.

    1975-01-01

    The increased frequency of numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations in spontaneously leukaemic AKR mice, compared with the values of healthy control CBA/H-T 6 T 6 mice, induced by X-irradiation, might be connected with the predisposition to malignant growth, probably indirectly helping the virus activation, or acting together with the immune deficiency, by creating a weaker system that is more sensitive to carcinogenic agents

  17. Lack of spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage at interstitial telomeric sites in murine scid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H-P; Mozdarani, H; Finnegan, C; McIlrath, J; Bryant, P E; Slijepcevic, P

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial telomeric sites (ITSs) in chromosomes from DNA repair-proficient mammalian cells are sensitive to both spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage. Exact mechanisms of this chromosome breakage sensitivity are not known. To investigate factors that predispose ITSs to chromosome breakage we used murine scid cells. These cells lack functional DNA-PKcs, an enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Interestingly, our results revealed lack of both spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breakage at ITSs found in scid chromosomes. Therefore, it is possible that increased sensitivity of ITSs to chromosome breakage is associated with the functional DNA double-strand break repair machinery. To investigate if this is the case we used scid cells in which DNA-PKcs deficiency was corrected. Our results revealed complete disappearance of ITSs in scid cells with functional DNA-PKcs, presumably through chromosome breakage at ITSs, but their unchanged frequency in positive and negative control cells. Therefore, our results indicate that the functional DNA double-strand break machinery is required for elevated sensitivity of ITSs to chromosome breakage. Interestingly, we observed significant differences in mitotic chromosome condensation between scid cells and their counterparts with restored DNA-PKcs activity suggesting that lack of functional DNA-PKcs may cause a defect in chromatin organization. Increased condensation of mitotic chromosomes in the scid background was also confirmed in vivo. Therefore, our results indicate a previously unanticipated role of DNA-PKcs in chromatin organisation, which could contribute to the lack of ITS sensitivity to chromosome breakage in murine scid cells. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Development of a biological dosimeter for translocation scoring based on two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosome subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, S; Cremer, T [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics and Anthropology

    1992-03-01

    Recently fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols have been developed which allow the paining of individual chromosomes using DNA-libraries from sorted human chromosomes. This approach has the particular advantage that radiation induced chromosome translocations can be easily detected, if chromosomes of distinctly different colors take part in the translocation event. To enhance the sensitivity of this approach two metaphase chromosome subsets A and B (A: chromosome 1, 2, 4, 8, 16; B: 3, 5, 9, 10, 13) were simultaneously painted in green and red color. Counterstaining of the chromosomes with DAPI resulted in a third subset which exhibited blue fluorescence only. Green-red, green-blue and red-blue translocation chromosomes could be easily detected after irradiation of lymphocyte cultures with {sup 137}Cs-{gamma}-rays. Analyses of painted chromosomes can be combined with conventional GTG-banding analyses. This new biological dosimeter should become useful to monitor both long term effects of single irradiation events and the cumulative effects of multiple or chronic irradiation exposure. In contrast to translocation scoring based on the analysis of banded chromosomes, this new approach has the particular advantage that a rapid, automated scoring of translocations can now be envisaged. (author).

  19. Amifostine Protection Against Mitomycin-induced Chromosomal Breakage in Fanconi Anaemia Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam T. P. Lopes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anaemia (FA is a rare genetic chromosomal instability syndrome caused by impairment of DNA repair and reactive oxygen species (ROS imbalance. This disease is also related to bone marrow failure and cancer. Treatment of these complications with radiation and alkylating agents may enhance chromosomal breakage. We have evaluated the effect of amifostine (AMF on basal and mitomycin C (MMC-induced chromosomal breakage in FA blood cells using the micronucleus assay. The basal micronuclei count was higher among FA patients than healthy subjects. Pre-treatment with AMF significantly inhibited micronucleation induced by MMC in healthy subjects (23.4 ± 4.0 – MMC vs 12.3 ± 2.9 – AMF →MMC MN/1000CB, p < 0.01, one way ANOVA as well as in FA patients (80.0 ± 5.8 – MMC vs 40.1 ± 5.8 – AMF →MMC MN/1000CB, p < 0.01, ANOVA. Release of ROS by peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with AMF →MMC and measured by chemoluminometry showed that AMF-protection was statistically higher among FA patients than in healthy individuals. Based on these results we suggest that AMF prevents chromosomal breakage induced by MMC, probably by its antioxidant effect.

  20. Entropic effects in formation of chromosome territories: towards understanding of radiation-induced gene translocation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Ciesla, Michal

    2012-07-01

    A detailed understanding of structural organization of biological target, such as geometry of an inter-phase chromosome, is an essential prerequisite for gaining deeper insight into relationship between radiation track structure and radiation-induced biological damage [1]. In particular, coupling of biophysical models aimed to describe architecture of chromosomes and their positioning in a cell nucleus [2-4] with models of local distribution of ionizations caused by passing projectiles, are expected to result in more accurate estimates of aberration induction caused by radiation. There is abundant experimental evidence indicating that arrangements of chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nucleus is non-random and has been evolutionary conserved in specific cell types. Moreover, the radial position of a given chromosome territory (CT) within the cell nucleus has been shown to correlate with its size and gene density. Usually it is assumed that chromosomal geometry and positioning result from the action of specific forces acting locally, such as hydrogen bonds, electrostatic, Van der Waals or hydrophobic interactions operating between nucleosomes and within their interiors. However, it is both desirable and instructive to learn to what extend organization of inter-phase chromosomes is affected by nonspecific entropic forces. In this study we report results of a coarse-grained analysis of a chromatin structure modeled by two distinct approaches. In the first method, we adhere to purely statistical analysis of chromatin packing within a chromosome territory. On the basis of the polymer theory, the chromatin fiber of diameter 30nm is approximated by a chain of spheres, each corresponding to about 30 kbp. Random positioning of the center of the domain is repeated for 1000 spherical nuclei. Configuration of the domain is determined by a random packing of a polymer (a string of identical beads) in estimated fraction of space occupied by a chromosome of a given length and mass

  1. Caffeine potentiates or protects against radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes depending on temperature and concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoilov, L.M. (Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Genetics, Sofia (Bulgaria)); Mullenders, L.H.F.; Natarajan, A.T. (J.A. Cohen Institute, Interuniversity Research Institute for Radiopathology and Radiation Protection, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-12-01

    The effect of caffeine on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and DNA strand breaks in unstimulated human lymphocytes was investigated. When present prior to and during the radiation exposure, caffeine treatment was found to cause either potentiation or protection against induction of chromosomal aberrations depending on the concentration and temperature. When the nucleoid sedimentation technique was applied, enhancement or reduction of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by caffeine was also found to be dependent on temperature and caffeine concentration. It is proposed that caffeine, in addition to its suspected ability to influence DNA repair, can also influence the induction of DNA damage, leading to alterations in the yield of chromosomal aberrations.

  2. Caffeine potentiates or protects against radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes depending on temperature and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoilov, L.M.; Mullenders, L.H.F.; Natarajan, A.T.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and DNA strand breaks in unstimulated human lymphocytes was investigated. When present prior to and during the radiation exposure, caffeine treatment was found to cause either potentiation or protection against induction of chromosomal aberrations depending on the concentration and temperature. When the nucleoid sedimentation technique was applied, enhancement or reduction of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by caffeine was also found to be dependent on temperature and caffeine concentration. It is proposed that caffeine, in addition to its suspected ability to influence DNA repair, can also influence the induction of DNA damage, leading to alterations in the yield of chromosomal aberrations

  3. Telomere healing following DNA polymerase arrest-induced breakages is likely the main mechanism generating chromosome 4p terminal deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannes, Femke; Van Houdt, Jeroen; Quarrell, Oliver W; Poot, Martin; Hochstenbach, Ron; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2010-12-01

    Constitutional developmental disorders are frequently caused by terminal chromosomal deletions. The mechanisms and/or architectural features that might underlie those chromosome breakages remain largely unexplored. Because telomeres are the vital DNA protein complexes stabilizing linear chromosomes against chromosome degradation, fusion, and incomplete replication, those terminal-deleted chromosomes acquired new telomeres either by telomere healing or by telomere capture. To unravel the mechanisms leading to chromosomal breakage and healing, we sequenced nine chromosome 4p terminal deletion boundaries. A computational analysis of the breakpoint flanking region, including 12 previously published pure terminal breakage sites, was performed in order to identify architectural features that might be involved in this process. All terminal 4p truncations were likely stabilized by telomerase-mediated telomere healing. In the majority of breakpoints multiple genetic elements have a potential to induce secondary structures and an enrichment in replication stalling site motifs were identified. These findings suggest DNA replication stalling-induced chromosome breakage during early development is the first mechanistic step leading toward terminal deletion syndromes. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  5. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.B.; Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co 60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  6. Induced chromosomal aberrations in somatic cells of Nigella sativa L. by mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Nizam, J

    1978-01-01

    A cytological study was carried out on root tips of Nigella sativa L. by treatment with Mitomycin C at 0.001% for six time intervals (10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 50 min). The chromosomal abnormalities were increasingly proportionate to the increase in time of treatment. The seedlings treated with a 0.001% concentration of Mitomycin C for 10 min. did not show any significant effect. At other time intervals, the effect was observed to be quite significant. Beyond 40 min. treatment almost all the cells would become sticky. Thirty minutes' treatment showed significant effect, inducing various types of chromosomal aberrations in the anaphase, such as bridges and fragments of 34.13% and 48.07%, respectively.

  7. Cytogenetic methods for the detection of radiation-induced chromosome damage in aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    One means of evaluating the genetic effects of radiation on the genomes of aquatic organisms is to screen radiation-exposed cells for chromosome aberrations. A brief literature review of studies dealing with radiation-induced chromosome damage in aquatic organisms is presented, and reasons are given detailing why most previous studies are of little quantitative value. Suggestions are made for obtaining adequate qualitative and quantitative data through the use of modern cytogenetic methods and a model systems approach to the study of cytogenetic radiation damage in aquatic organisms. Detailed procedures for both in vivo and in vitro cytogenetic methods are described, and experimental considerations are discussed. Finally, suggestions for studies that could be of value in establishing protective guidelines for aquatic ecosystems are presented. (author)

  8. Nonrandom distribuion of chromosome breaks in cultured lymphocytes of normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayme, S.; Mattei, J.F.; Mattei, M.G.; Aurran, Y.; Giraud, F.

    1976-02-29

    Breakpoint distribution was studied from cultured lymphocytes on 7653 metaphases from 524 subjects whose karyotypes were normal. The mean break rate was 5% in both sexes. The frequency increased significantly after 40 years and varied during the year. The location of the breaks was very different from the expected random distribution. The break frequency for each chromosome was different according to the type of break (chromatid, simple chromosomal and chromosomal involving rearrangements). The location of the breaks was also studied according to the type of band and with respect to the centromere. A comparison between spontaneous breaks, x-ray induced breaks, breaks in Fanconi's anemia and in congenital rearrangements, show very significant differences.

  9. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, J.G.; Coco, R.

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the 'in vitro' X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.)

  10. Chromosome investigations on persons whose mothers have been treated with ionizing radiations during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanebuth, P.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis reports on chromosome investigations on seven persons between 2 and 26 years of age who, during their prenatal life, have been exposed to ionizing radiation. The metaphase chromosomes from peripheral lymphocytes, obtained by standard cytogenic methods, have been scanned for numerical and structural aberrations after a culture period of two or three days. Comparison with non-irradiated specimens revealed a summarily slight increase in the occurrence of some structural aberrations in the irradiated material. The differences are smaller in number than the rate of deviation to be accounted to culturing techniques so that one cannot deduce a radiation-induced impairment from these results. As one of the persons investigated has been undergoing longterm therapy with anticonvulsive drugs, this case is discussed separately. In another case, new staining methods (G, C, or Q-bands) together with an investigation of material from the father, revealed a particularly small Y-chromosome. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Drinking beer reduces radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Manami

    2002-01-01

    We here investigated and reported the effects of beer drinking on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Human blood that was collected either before or after drinking a 700 ml beer was in vitro irradiated with 200 kVp X rays or 50 keV/μm carbon ions. The relation between the radiation dose and the aberration frequencies (fragments and dicentrics) was significantly (P<0.05) lower for lymphocytes collected 3 h after beer drinking than those before drinking. Fitting the dose response to a linear quadratic model showed that the alpha term of carbon ions was significantly (P<0.05) decreased by beer drinking. A decrease of dicentric formation was detected as early as 0.5 h after beer drinking, and lasted not shorter than 4.5 h. The mitotic index of lymphocytes was higher after beer drinking than before, indicating that a division delay would not be responsible for the low aberrations induced by beer drinking. An in vitro treatment of normal lymphocytes with 0.1 M ethanol, which corresponded to a concentration of 6-times higher than the maximum ethanol concentration in the blood after beer drinking, reduced the dicentric formation caused by X-ray irradiation, but not by carbon-ion irradiation. The beer-induced reduction of dicentric formation was not affected by serum. It is concluded that beer could contain non-ethanol elements that reduce the chromosome damage of lymphocytes induced by high-LET radiation. (author)

  12. Studies on chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyung; Oh, Hyeon Joo; Shim, Sun Bo; Roh, Hye Won; Lee, Hai Yong [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Ja [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Cytogenetic assays for unstable chromosomes were performed on 54 medical radiation workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation and 42 controls. A total of 15,577 metaphase cells were scored. The frequencies of dicentrics and acentric chromosomes on controls were 0.52*10{sup -3} and 0.82*10{sup -2}, respectively. On radiation workers those were 2.28*10{sup -3} and 1.34*10{sup -2}, respectively. Though the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the workers were higher than those in the controls, the only significant difference was found in the case of dicentrics (P < 0.01). When we considered exposure dose of recent one year, duration of employment and smoking habit in radiation worker, a slight increase was shown in frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations on these workers, but no statistical differences were observed (P > 0.05) except exposure dose of recent one year (P < 0.05). These results could indicate that low level exposure to ionizing radiation can induce unstable chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes.

  13. New trends and techniques in chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: automation of chromosome analysis; storage of fixed cells from cultures of lymphocytes obtained routinely during periodic employee medical examinations; analysis of banded chromosomes; identification of first division metaphases; sister chromatid exchange; and patterns of aberration induction

  14. Supernumerary ring chromosome 20 characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Langen, Irene M.; Otter, Mariëlle A.; Aronson, Daniël C.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Leschot, Nico J.; Hoovers, Jan M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a boy with mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay, in whom karyotyping showed an additional minute ring chromosome in 60% of metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromere specific probe demonstrated that the ring chromosome contained the centromeric

  15. Chromosomal studies on radiation-induced gynogenesis and diploid gynogenesis in the fish Oryzias latipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Kenichi

    1983-01-01

    When sperm of the fish Oryzias latipes exposed to radiation fertilize normal eggs, the 'Hertwig effect' occurs, namely a high mortality of embryos at low doses but a better survival at high doses. This phenomenon induced by ultraviolet light (UV) or gamma-rays was previously studied quantitatively using the survival frequencies of embryos at various stages during their development. From the genetic analysis of both UV and gamma-ray effects, using the wild-type sperm of this species and then checking the appearance of melanophores on the yolk sacs of embryos, it was suggested that sperm chromosomes do not participate in embryonic development at high doses. The number of chromosomes in cells of the embryos which survive till stage 26 were counted, finding haploid embryos in the dose region of the Hertwig phenomenon. The analysis of chromosome number was mostly in agreement with the genetic studies, but there existed a few cases in which these two methods of analysis did show the opposite results. From these data, the validity of the genetic studies based on the appearance of melanophores on the yolk sac is discussed. Attempts to produce diploid gynogenesis through the cold temperature treatment are also reported. (author)

  16. Effect of estradiol on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Reiko; Hayata, Isamu

    1999-01-01

    As a part of studies on physiological factors that affect radiosensitivity, we examined the in vitro effect of estradiol (E2) on the yield of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were cultured for 3 days in the medium containing E2 at 0-100000 ng/ml. On the second day, they were irradiated by X-rays at 3 Gy, and then 2% phytohemagglutinin and 0.05 μg/ml colcemid were added to the medium. After further 48 h, mitotic indices and the yields of chromosome aberrations were examined at various E2 concentrations. E2 treatment at concentrations above 1000 ng/ml resulted in dose-related inhibition of mitosis. Repeated experiments showed that the yield of dicentrics plus centric rings in the culture containing E2 at 100 ng/ml was significantly higher than the yields at 0 ng/ml. Similarly, the yield of total chromosome breaks in the culture containing E2 at 100 ng/ml was significantly higher than that at 1 ng/ml. This study provides the direct evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to hormonal conditions. (author)

  17. Spontaneous and X-ray induced chromosomal aberrations in selected connective tissue diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.C.; Jackson, J.F.; Songcharoen, S.; Meydrech, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome studies were performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes of 28 patients with connective tissue disease (6 with progressive systemic sclerosis, 6 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 with anti-nuclear antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, 6 with anti-nuclear antibody negative rheumatoid arthritis, and 4 with mixed connective tissue disease) and on 17 controls to determine the frequency of spontaneous as well as X-ray (75 rads) induced aberrations. The mean spontaneous chromosomal aberration frequency for the 28 patients (9.1%) was significantly (P=0.038) greater than that of controls (6.4%). When patients were categorized into specific clinically designated connective tissue disease subdivisions for comparison with the controls, only X-irradiated cells from the progressive systemic sclerosis group displayed significantly elevated levels of total chromosomal aberrations over those of the control group. The X-irradiated lymphocytes from these patients had an average of 23.6% aberrations per patient, while those of the control group showed an average of 14.9% per patient (P<0.05). (author)

  18. Spontaneous and X-ray induced chromosomal aberrations in selected connective tissue diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, W C; Jackson, J F; Songcharoen, S; Meydrech, E F [Mississippi Univ., Jackson (USA). Medical Center

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome studies were performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes of 28 patients with connective tissue disease (6 with progressive systemic sclerosis, 6 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 with anti-nuclear antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, 6 with anti-nuclear antibody negative rheumatoid arthritis, and 4 with mixed connective tissue disease) and on 17 controls to determine the frequency of spontaneous as well as X-ray (75 rads) induced aberrations. The mean spontaneous chromosomal aberration frequency for the 28 patients (9.1%) was significantly (P=0.038) greater than that of controls (6.4%). When patients were categorized into specific clinically designated connective tissue disease subdivisions for comparison with the controls, only X-irradiated cells from the progressive systemic sclerosis group displayed significantly elevated levels of total chromosomal aberrations over those of the control group. The X-irradiated lymphocytes from these patients had an average of 23.6% aberrations per patient, while those of the control group showed an average of 14.9% per patient (P<0.05).

  19. Investigation of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in 'preleukaemic' mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szollar, J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was done on the frequency of numerical and structural aberrations induced by different doses of X-ray irradiation in spontaneously leukaemic AKR mice, compared with the values of healthy control CBA/H-T 6 T 6 mice. Both were irradiated under the same conditions, but their chromosomes were affected in a different way. The number of cells containing aneuploid sets, rings, fragments, or metacentric chromosomes was significantly higher in the 2-month-old AKR mice than in the control CBA group. The increased chromosomal fragility found in AKR bone marrow cells 5-7 months before the manifestation of lymphoid leukaemia might be an important factor in the development of malignant condition. This genetic imbalance could provide a possible reason for an increase of spontaneous malfunction of the cellular system, as well as for an increased sensitivity to external factors. Thus it might be connected directly with the predisposition to malignant growth, or it has an indirect role helping virus activation, or acting together with the immune deficiency, by creating a weaker system that is more sensitive to carcinogenic agents

  20. Induced and natural break sites in the chromosomes of Hawaiian Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonzetich, J.; Lyttle, T.W.; Carson, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation of a laboratory strain of the Hawaiian species of Drosophila heteroneura yielded 310 breaks in the five major acrocentric polytene chromosomes. Their map positions conform to the Poisson distribution, unlike most of the 436 natural breaks mapped in 105 closely related species endemic to Hawaii. Genome element E is longer and has more induced breaks than the others. Both in Hawaiian and related species groups, this element shows increased polymorphism and fixation of naturally occurring inversions. The X chromosome (element A) also accumulates many natural breaks; the majority of the resulting aberrations become fixed rather than remain as polymorphisms. Although size may play a small role in initial break distribution, the major effects relative to the establishment of a rearrangement in natural populations are ascribed to the interaction of selection and drift. Nonconformance of the natural breaks to the Poisson distribution appears to be due to the tendency for breaks to accumulate both in the proximal euchromatic portion of each arm and in heterochromatic regions that are not replicated in the polytene chromosomes

  1. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruprasad Kanive

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05. On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight were significantly higher (p Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life.

  2. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m 2 . This rate resembles that for 1500 R γ-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals [mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV] or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. Nucleoplasmic bridges are a sensitive measure of chromosome rearrangement in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, M.; Umegaki, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have performed experiments using the WIL2-NS human B-lymphoblastoid cell line and primary human lymphocytes to (a) determine the importance of including measurements of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and (b) provide evidence that NPB originate from dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes. In addition we describe theoretical models that explain how dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes may result in the formation of NPB at anaphase. The results with WIL2-NS showed that it was possible to distinguish genotoxic effects induced by different oxidizing agents in terms of the NPB/micronucleus frequency ratio. The results with lymphocytes indicated a strong correlation (a) between NPB, centric ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes in metaphases (R>0.93, P 0.93, P<0.0001). The dose-response curves with gamma rays were very similar for NPB, ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes, as were the dose-responses for MNi, acentric rings and fragments. However, not all acentric chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes/centric rings were converted to MNi and NPB respectively, depending on the dose of radiation. Preliminary data, using FISH, suggests that NPB often represent DNA from a structural rearrangement involving only one or two homologous chromosomes. The results from this study validate the inclusion of NPB in the CBMN assay which provides a valuable measure of chromosome breakage/ rearrangement that was otherwise not available in the micronucleus assay. The CBMN assay allows NPB measurement to be achieved reliably because inhibition of cytokinesis prevents the loss of NPB that would otherwise occur if cells were allowed to divide

  4. [Correlation of single-cell gel electrophoresis and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage for chromosomal instabiligy in children with Fanconi anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Qiang; Zou, Yao; Liu, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Shu-chun; Chen, Xiao-juan; Guo, Ye; Yang, Wen-yu; Ruan, Min; Liu, Tian-feng; Liu, Fang; Cai, Xiao-jin; Chen, Yu-mei; Zhu, Xiao-fan

    2013-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital abnormalities and predisposition to neoplasia. Hypersensitivity of FA cells to the clastogenic effect of mitomycin C (MMC) provides a unique marker for the diagnosis before the beginning of hematological manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Single-Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage in children with FA. Between January 2007 and June 2011, 248 children (results of the two methods and compared with each other. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the parameters in SCGE. Seventeen patients were diagnosed as FA and 231 as non-FA. Chromosomal breakage was found to be significantly higher in FA patients [(32.2 ± 4.8)%] than non-FA [(19.9 ± 3.0)%] and controls[(21.6 ± 4.8)%] when induced by MMC 80 ng/ml. The parameters of SCGE were significantly different between FA patients and non-FA or controls. All the parameters were rectilinearly correlated with MMC (P = 0.000). The most closely correlated parameter was the rate of comet cell (r = 0.848, P = 0.000). The results of ROC curves suggested the comet cell rate (0.999) was more important. SCGE might be used to discriminate between FA and non-FA individuals. The relationship between SCGE and MMC-induced chromosomal breakage was significant. The rate of comet cell was the important parameter.

  5. A correlative study on the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buul, P.P.W. van

    1976-01-01

    A series of investigations on the correlation between the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of mouse and rhesus monkey is described. In the mouse the induction of reciprocal translocations in bone-marrow cells was compared with that in spermatogonia (as scored in the descending spermatocytes). In the rhesus monkey frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in spermatogonia and peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied. Furthermore the effect of multigeneration irradiation (69 generations with 200 rads X-rays) on the sensitivity for translocation induction in spermatogonia of male mice was studied. Frequencies of dicentric chromosomes and chromosomal deletions in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes of 5 different types of mice were determined following in vitro irradiation with doses of 100 and/or 200 rad X-rays. To obtain more insight into the processes underlying translocation induction in spermatogonia of the mouse, fractionation experiments were conducted

  6. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in radiologists and medical radiographers chronically exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Rozgaj, R.; Jazbec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are fairly reliable indicators of damage induced by ionising radiation. This study included 180 radiologists and medical radiographers (technicians) and 90 controls who were not occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. All exposed subjects were routinely monitored with film badge, and none was exposed to a radiation dose exceeding the limit for occupational exposure recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Two hundred metaphases for each person were scored. The frequencies of acentric fragments, dicentrics, ring chromosomes and chromosomal exchanges were determined and compared to those obtained in the control group. Chromosome aberrations were analysed using Poisson regression for profession, age, sex, smoking and years of exposure. Age, smoking, diagnostic exposure to X-rays and occupation were found to correlate with the occurrence of acentric fragments. The influence of exposure duration on the frequency of acentric fragments was greater in medical radiographers than in radiologists. Smoking and sex were found to correlate with the occurrence of dicentric chromosomes, which were more common in men than in women. As chromosome aberrations exceeded the expected level with respect to the absorbed dose, our findings confirm the importance of chromosome analysis as a part of regular medical check-up of subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation.(author)

  7. Induction of premature chromosome condensation by calyculin A for bio dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, S.; Mozdarani, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Premature chromosome condensation is a method for interphase chromosome analysis in bio dosimetry. This study was performed to verify the usefulness of premature chromosome condensation induced by calyculin A in human peripheral blood lymphocytes for biological dosimetry and possible construction of dose-response curve. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to various doses(0.25- 4 Gy) of γ-rays. The frequency of simple breaks and dicentrics were scored in G 2/M chromosomes of Giemsa stained cells. Results:Results show that the frequency of simple chromosome breaks appears to increase linearly with dose; while the frequency of dicentrics apparently increases linear-quadratically with the dose. Conclusion: Induction of chromosome condensation by calyculin A is a powerful biodisimetric method, which provides a high number of spreads for analysis. With the use of this method, it is possible to overcome problems related to low mitotic index or cell-cycle alterations in routine metaphase analysis and low fusion rate in conventional Premature chromosome condensation technique

  8. Damage of chromosomes in mouse bone marrow cells after combined treatment with gamma radiation and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, Ivanka

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current approaches to successful management of malignancy include combined modalities of treatment with ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs. Together with tumor cells normal tissues and cells are also submitted to the damaging effect of these agents, creating thus a probability for development of secondary neoplastic processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of chromosome damage at different modalities of combined exposures to gamma irradiation and cyclophosphamide(CY) of mice. Chromosomal aberration frequency in metaphase bone marrow cells was used as a measure to evaluate the effect. Combination treatments with 3 Gy gamma irradiation and 20 mg/kg cyclophosphamide were given at different intervals - simultaneously or at 12 hr interval, in order to establish the conditions and factors influencing the rate of chromosome damage. The distribution of different types of chromosome aberrations, such as chromatid fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments and chromosome exchanges was analyzed. The results showed a high synergistic effect at simultaneous treatment with both agents if assessed by the index of aberrations per cell (%). An attempt has been made to suggest a possible explanation of the effects at different combined treatments related to the type of induced chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  9. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  10. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Ramos

    Full Text Available Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb. Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14(q10;q10. Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  11. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  12. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  13. Identification of the facultative heterochromatic X chromosome in females of 25 rodent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, N; Yosida, T H

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of the chromosomes of 25 rodent species with a 50 degrees C hypotonic solution and Giemsa staining permitted identification of the heterochromatic X chromosome in 24 species. With this technique, the facultative of the heterochromatic X chromosome or the facultative portion of large, composite-type X chromosoms is stained darker than the other chromosomes, allowing it to be distinguished from the homologous euchromatic X chromosome in female metaphase cells. Intense staining of the single X chromosome was not observed in male metaphase cells. It is suggested that this differential staining of one of the two X chromosomes might be due to qualitative differences in chromosomal proteins rather than to differences in the degree of chromosomal condensation or in DNA base sequence.

  14. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  15. Breeding few-seed/seedless watermelon via chromosome reciprocal translocation induced by gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, W.; Xingping, Z.; Xian, Z.; Kechi, N.; Shuai, Z.; Juenlian, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The development of autotriploid watermelon was a great advance in the field of watermelon breeding. However, some disadvantages still existed with this type of seedless watermelon. Partial sterility may be induced in diploid watermelon via chromosome reciprocal translocation. We used gamma-rays to irradiate the seeds of homozygous translocation strains with one translocation ring composed of 4 chromosomes (symbol (4) ). Watermelon strains were 'Asahi Yamato', 'Mioyaka', and 'Fumin' saent to us by H. Kihara in 1977. In order to further induce multiple reciprocal translocations for developing new few-seed/seedless watermelon strains, the seeds of the above 3 strains were sown for further selfing in 1978. The seeds of each selfed fruit were grown as a single plant line in 1979 for evaluation of their characters. In addition, some crosses between common diploid watermelon cultivars and translocations were carried out to test the seed setting rate of the heterozygous translocation strains. Some of the crosses were 'Sugar Baby' x 'Asahi Yamato AT-1' and 'Akakotama' x Asahi Yamato AT-2'. The plump seed setting rate of the F1 of these crosses were ca. 50%

  16. Okadaic acid for radiation dose estimation using drug-induced premature chromosome condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunyan; Zhang Wei; Su Xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish simple biological method for high irradiation dose estimation using drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) aberrations. Methods: Peripheral blood was taken from healthy adults and irradiated by 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. Then the blood samples were cultured for 48 hrs. One hr before the end of culture , okadaic acid was added into culture medium to induce PCC rings, which were counted for each dose point. Results: The yield of PCC rings was increased with the dose of radiation until 20 Gy. Within the range of 1 to 20 Gy, there was a good dose-response relationship between the yield of PCC rings and radiation dose. Conclusion: Compared with the analysis of frequency of dicentrics, the yield of PCC rings could be a good biodosimetry indicator for estimation of high dose irradiation. (authors)

  17. Kinetics of gene and chromosome mutations induced by UV-C in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltovaya, N.; Kokoreva, A.; Senchenko, D.; Shvaneva, N.; Zhuchkina, N.

    2017-01-01

    The systematic study of the kinetics of UV-induced gene and structural mutations in eukaryotic cells was carried out on the basis of model yeast S. cerevisiae. A variety of genetic assays (all types of base pair substitutions, frameshifts, forward mutations canl, chromosomal and plasmid rearrangements) in haploid strains were used. Yeast cells were treated by UV-C light of fluence of energy up to 200 J/m"2. The kinetics of the induced gene and structural mutations is represented by a linear-quadratic and exponential functions. The slope of curves in log-log plots was not constant, had the value 2-4 and depended on the interval of doses. It was suggested that it is the superposition and dynamics of different pathways form the mutagenic responses of eukaryotic cells to UV-C light that cause the high-order curves. [ru

  18. An automatic system to search, acquire, and analyse chromosomal aberrations obtained using FISH technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Chromosomal aberrations (CA) analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes is useful both in prenatal diagnoses and cancer cytogenetics, as well as in toxicology to determine the biologically significant dose of specific, both physical and chemical, genotoxic agents to which an individual is exposed. A useful cytogenetic technique for CAs analysis is Fluorescence-in-situ-Hybridization (FISH) which simplifies the automatic Identification and characterisation of aberrations, allowing the visualisation of chromosomes as bright signals on a dark background, and a fast analysis of stable aberrations, which are particularly interesting for late effects. The main limitation of CA analysis is the rarity with which these events occur, and therefore the time necessary to single out a statistically significant number of aberrant cells. In order to address this problem, a prototype system, capable of automatically searching, acquiring, and recognising chromosomal images of samples prepared using FISH, has been developed. The system is able to score large number of samples in a reasonable time using predefined search criteria. The system is based on the appropriately implemented and characterised automatic metaphase finder Metafer4 (MetaSystems), coupled with a specific module for the acquisition of high magnification metaphase images with any combination of fluorescence filters. These images are then analysed and classified using our software. The prototype is currently capable of separating normal metaphase images from presumed aberrant ones. This system is currently in use in our laboratories both by ourselves and by other researchers not involved in its development, in order to carry out analyses of CAs induced by ionising radiation. The prototype allows simple acquisition and management of large quantities of images and makes it possible to carry out methodological studies -such as the comparison of results obtained by different operators- as well as increasing the

  19. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  20. Increased frequency of spontaneous and X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes from neonates and the influence of caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsdon, J.; Rijn, J. van; Berger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have examined lymphocytes from human preterm (PT) and fullterm (FT) babies for an effect of gestational age (GA) on chromosomal aberrations either occurring spontaneously or indiced by treatment with X-rays alone; or with caffeine supplementation in comparison to the lymphocytes of healthy adults. (AD). Per cent of abnormal cells (% Abn) was used as an indicator of chromosome sensitivy to the different treatments. PT babies had significantly higher spontaneous and X-ray-induced % Abn values than AD, but were comparable to FT. After X-iradiation + caffeine the yield of aberrations in any 2 groups was not significantly different. Chromosomal sensitivity may resuult from factors other than GA. This in vitro model may permit study of the mechanisms of chromosomal damage repair and prevention of free radical damage of DNA during the perinatal period. (author). 33 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  1. Effects of aphidicolin on repair replication and induced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeland, A.A. van; Filon, A.R.; Natarajan, A.T.; Bussmann, C.J.M.; Degrassi, F.; Kesteren-van Leeuwen, A.C. van; Palitti, F.; Rome Univ.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of polymerase α, on UV-induced repair replication in human skin fibroblasts, as well as in HeLa cells, was determined. In growing fibroblasts and in HeLa cells, aphidicolin had a potentiating effect on UV-induced repair replication, whereas in fibroblasts grown to confluency, aphidicolin had an inhibitory effect. This inhibitory effect was stronger when measured in the presence of hydroxyurea. In HeLa cells the presence of both aphidicolin and hydroxyurea also had an inhibitory effect, but in the presence of hydroxyurea alone, UV-induced repair replication was enhanced. The results of these studies can be explained on the basis of differences in deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pool sizes in growing and confluent cells. Post-treatment of X-irradiated human lymphocytes in the G 0 and G 1 stages with aphidicolin increased the frequencies of X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations. Such an increase was not observed in G 1 cells of CHO after similar treatment with X-rays and aphidicolin. However, treatment with aphidicolin, in the G 2 stage, increased the frequencies of induced chromatid breaks. The significance of these results is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentini, Laura; Amato, Angela; Schillaci, Tiziana; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN). CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy), and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116). We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Our results show that centrosome amplification alone is not sufficient

  3. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    High-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is moreefficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after longduration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cellscollected at one time point after irradiation, andanalysis of chemically-induced premature chromosomecondensation (PCC) may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided.However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarkerof radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronicexposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties. (author)

  4. Induction and persistence of multicentric chromosomes in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes following high-dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Akiyama, Miho; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tominaga, Takako; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yuki, Masanori; Nakayama, Fumiaki

    2012-01-01

    Among radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, multicentric chromosomes, as represented by dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics), are regarded as sensitive and specific biomarkers for assessing radiation dose in the 0 to 5 Gy range. The objective of this study was to characterize chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by a higher dose of radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 15 Gy gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min and harvested at 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 and 72 h. The first mitotic peak appeared at 52-54 h, showing about a 6 h mitotic delay as compared with nonirradiated control cultures. Cell-cycle analysis of parallel and simultaneous cultures by sister-chromatid differentiation staining suggests that metaphase cells examined in 48-56 h cultures were in the first mitosis after culture initiation. The mean dicentric equivalent counts ranged from 9.0 to 9.3 in consecutively harvested cultures with no significant differences among them. At 72 h, about 20% of dividing cells were tetraploid, persisting with faithfully replicated unstable chromosome aberrations. The non-random distribution of replicated chromosome pairs, deduced from multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, led us to surmise that the predominant mechanism underlying the induction of tetraploid cells is endoreduplication. These findings suggest that a high-dose in vitro irradiation applied to peripheral blood lymphocytes may affect on the replication process, in addition to structural chromosome damage. (author)

  5. Comparative studies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in several mammalian species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, S.; Matsuoka, O.

    1976-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for inducing chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of five mammalian species - man, cynomolgus monkey, rabbit, domestic cat and beagle dog - were studied comparatively by whole-blood microculture technique following in-vitro exposures at various doses with 200-kVp X rays. The yields of induced chromosome aberrations were dependent on exposure doses between 48 and 480 rads in all the species examined. The relationship between exposure dose (D in rads) and frequency of induced dicentrics per cell (Y) was expressed by: Ysub((man)) = 14.38x10 -6 Dsup(1.94); Ysub((monkey)) = 18.12x10 -6 Dsup(1.86); Ysub((rabbit)) = 1.88x10 -6 Dsup(2.06); Ysub((cat)) = 78.66x10 -6 Dsup(1.35); Ysub((dog)) = 46.13x10 -6 Dsup(1.37). Taking the frequency of dicentrics in man as 1.00, the relative frequency in each species was estimated as 0.79, 0.24, 0.22 and 0.16 in monkey, rabbit, cat and dog, respectively. From these results the consistent relationship could not be discovered between X-ray doses and the dicentric yield based on the arm number effect proposed by Brewen et al., whereas the nuclear DNA contents and the arm number in all the species used are roughly similar to those in man. The authors considered that such interspecies differences may be derived from the cellular and/or physiological features of PHA-responsible lymphocytes (T-cells) in each species, and that may be due to the level of development of each species on the phylogenetic or evolutionary scale. (author)

  6. Procedure Improvement in Blood Processing for Chromosome Aberration Analyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad; Rahimah Abd Rahim; Yahaya Talib; Mohd Rodzi Ali

    2015-01-01

    Detection of chromosome at metaphase of the cell cycle is performed either manually or automatically. Procedure for slide preparation published by the IAEA does not guarantee that the quality of slide is suitable for automatic detection. The detection efficiency reduces if there is cells debris on slides. This paper describes the modifications made to the standard procedure. The period of hypotonic treatment to the cell was lengthened; the slides were pre-treated with RNase and the frequency of rinsing during the chromosomal coloring process was increased. Results show the metaphase images were better and clearer, and numbers of metaphase that can be detected automatically were also increased. In conclusion, modification to the current standard protocol helps to easy the process of chromosome aberration analysis at Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  7. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by neutron capture reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1993-01-01

    Boron neutron capture reaction (B-NCR) has been practiced in the treatment of malignancies of the central nervous system and melanoma using a thermal neutron beam from the KUR. Because of the very large neutron absorption cross-section and high kinetic energy released, gadolinium (Gd-157) has been expected to be an another promising element for neutron capture therapy. The dose-response relationship was determined for the induction of chromosomal aberrations by neutron capture reactions by B-10 and Gd-157 in cultured mammalian cells. The cells were exposed to thermal neutron beam with and without B-10 enriched (97 atom %) boric acid or Gd-DTPA, and chromosome-type aberrations were analysed in the first metaphases following irradiation. The frequency of dicentrics and rings increased linearly with neutron fluence either in the presence or absence of B-10 boric acid, while the yield of chromosomal aberrations induced by Gd-NCR increased in a linear quadratic fashion as a function of dose as in γ-rayed cells. Survival curves for the cells exposed to thermal neutrons showed no shoulder irrespective of the loading of B-10, but Gd-NCR produced the survival curve with a small shoulder. The differential chromosomal response to B-NCR and Gd-NCR might reflect the difference in radiation quality generated from the two types of thermal neutron capture reaction. (J.P.N.)

  8. Phage-inducible chromosomal islands are ubiquitous within the bacterial universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillol-Salom, Alfred; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Abdulrahman, Rezheen F; Chen, John; Davies, Robert; Penadés, José R

    2018-06-06

    Phage-inducible chromosomal islands (PICIs) are a recently discovered family of pathogenicity islands that contribute substantively to horizontal gene transfer, host adaptation and virulence in Gram-positive cocci. Here we report that similar elements also occur widely in Gram-negative bacteria. As with the PICIs from Gram-positive cocci, their uniqueness is defined by a constellation of features: unique and specific attachment sites, exclusive PICI genes, a phage-dependent mechanism of induction, conserved replication origin organization, convergent mechanisms of phage interference, and specific packaging of PICI DNA into phage-like infectious particles, resulting in very high transfer frequencies. We suggest that the PICIs represent two or more distinct lineages, have spread widely throughout the bacterial world, and have diverged much more slowly than their host organisms or their prophage cousins. Overall, these findings represent the discovery of a universal class of mobile genetic elements.

  9. Comparative studies on radiation induced chromosome aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes in primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobari, Izuo; Hirai, Momoki; Takahashi, Eiichi; Nakai, Sayaka; Utugi, Toyoko

    1978-01-01

    In order to obtain the information regarding interspesific extrapolation of the production of chromosome aberrations, we have examined species difference in the yields of dicentrics induced by the acute or chronic irradiations of gamma-rays. After acute irradiation, there were no significant differences in the yields among four primate species, man, crab-eating monkey, squirrel monkey and slow loris, in spite of the difference in chromosome arm number. On the other hand, after chronic irradiation, a significant difference in the yields was observed between man and crab-eating monkey. Comparing the α and β values estimated by fitting the observed yields with linear-quadratic equation, the value of β was clearly different between acute and chronic irradiations for both man and monkey. Furthermore, at low dose rate the value of β for monkey was almost negligible, while it was somewhat measurable one for man. To clarify the mechanism(s) involved in the species difference in the yields of dicentrics induced by chronic irradiation, post-irradiation incubation experiment was carried out. The considerable reductions of both the yields of dicentrics and mitotic indices during post-irradiation incubation periods under unstimulated conditions may probably indicate that cells with dicentrics are partly eliminated in the course of chronic irradiation for both man and monkey. However, the elimination mechanism is not sufficient to explain the reduction of dicentric yields after chronic irradiation. Consequently, Go repair mechanism(s) may presumably be responsible for the dose-rate effects, and the different amount of reduction of dicentric yields between man and monkey may reflect the different ability of Go repair between them. (author)

  10. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisiops, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentries in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same

  11. Spontaneous and induced loss of chromosomes in slow-growing somatic hybrid calli of Solanum tuberosum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelaar, MJ; Drenth - Diephuis, L.J.; SAAT, TAWM; Jacobsen, E.

    Rate and extent of spontaneous and induced chromosome loss have been determined at the callus level of somatic hybrids of mutants of Solanum tuberosum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. AEC (amino ethyl cystein) resistance in potato and Nitrate-Reductase deficiency in N. plumbaginifolia have been used

  12. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-01-01

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [fr

  13. Chromosomal aberration induced by gamma rays in winter rape (Brassica napus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczkiewicz, T.; Rogalska, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Winter rape seeds (Brassica napus L. cv. Jet Neuf) were irradiated twice with gamma rays. In γ 1-2 generation (dose 50.0 kR) plants with reduced fertility were selected. Offspring of these plants, in the following generations, were segregated into fertile plants, partly fertile and sterile plants. Analysis of meiosis in PCM revealed presence of a great number of cells (in prophase 1. and metaphase 1.) with crosses, rings and chains of multivalents. It is a proof of vast heterozygous translocation. (author)

  14. Effect of caffeine posttreatment on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, A T [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis; Cohen (J.A.) Inst. voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands)); Obe, G [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis; Cohen (J.A.) Inst. voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands); Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik); Dulout, F N [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis; Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular, La Plata (Argentinia))

    1980-01-01

    The potentiating effect of caffeine on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes has been investigated, with special reference to cell cycle stages (G0 and G2). Both quantitative and qualitative differences in the yield of chromosomal aberrations were detected in caffeine-posttreated cells, depending on the cell stage irradiated. The studies on caffeine potentiating effects on X-irradiated G0 lymphocytes from normal adults, newborns, Down syndrome patients, and an ataxia telangiectasia patient pointed to interindividual variations in the response to caffeine potentiation among normal probands and a very profound effect in ataxia cells.

  15. The effect of caffeine posttreatment on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Obe, G.

    1980-01-01

    The potentiating effect of caffeine on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes has been investigated, with special reference to cell cycle stages (G0 and G2). Both quantitative and qualitative differences in the yield of chromosomal aberrations were detected in caffeine-posttreated cells, depending on the cell stage irradiated. The studies on caffeine potentiating effects on X-irradiated G0 lymphocytes from normal adults, newborns, Down syndrome patients, and an ataxia telangiectasia patient pointed to interindividual variations in the response to caffeine potentiation among normal probands and a very profound effect in ataxia cells. (orig.) [de

  16. Protective effect of Yin Shen Yin on chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood in dogs induced by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bingchai; Chen Tiehe; Lu Jiaben; Wang Zongwu; Huang Yinmei

    1992-01-01

    'Yin Shen Yin' preparation used in this studies is made up of Tremella Fcuiformis, Radix Acanthopanacis Senticosi and others. The drug was taken orally to dogs before irradiation, and the same time, its anti-radiation effect was compared with those of Tremella Fuciformis and cystamine. The results showed that 'Yin Shen Yin', Tremella and cystamine all have not obvious harmful effects on chromosome, however, they have good protective effects on chromosome damage induced by γ-ray irradiation. Among them, high dose 'Yin Shen Yin' has the best radio-protective effect

  17. On the mutagenicity of methadone hydrochloride. Induced dominant lethal mutation and spermatocyte chromosomal aberrations in treated males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, F M; Rabouh, S A; Badr, R S

    1979-11-01

    The mutagenicity of methadone hydrochloride was tested in male mice using the dominant lethal mutation technique and the spermatocyte test of treated mice. Male mice of C3H inbred strain received one of the following doses, 1, 2, 4 or 6 mg/kg body weight once a day for 3 consecutive days. Another group of mice served as control and received saline instead. Treated males were then mated to virgin females at 3-day intervals for a period of 45 days. Pregnant females were dissected at mid-term and the corpora lutea and intrauterine contents were recorded. The spermatocytes of treated males were examined 45-50 d after treatments with methadone and abnormal pairing configurations were scored. The methadone treatment was found to increase the rate of preimplantation deaths consistently in all post-meiotic stages with all doses used. In addition, the higher doses, 4 and 6 mg, affected spermatogonia stages. Quantitatively, the dose-response relationship cannot be demonstrated though the spectrum of effect increased with higher doses as more spermatogenesis stages became more sensitive to the treatment. In many cases the frequency of live implants showed a positive correlation with preimplantation deaths in contrast with the frequency of early deaths which showed only sporadic variation. The mutation indices based on total embryonic death indicate that methadone hydrochloride affected several stages of germ-cell maturation namely, spermatozoa (M.I. 14-35), late spermatids (M.I. 15-48), early spermatids (M.I. 14-50), late spermatocytes (M.I. 15-43) and spermatogonial stages (M.I. 12-63). Chromosome analysis at diakinesis-metaphase 1 revealed significant increase in the frequency of sex chromosome and autosome univalents with different doses of methadone. The smallest dose applied was quite effective and the data represent direct dose-response relationship. Of the multivalent configuration, the most frequent type was chain quadrivalents. The frequencies of total translocations

  18. Time course of photoreactivation of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations and lethal damage in interphase Xenopus cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, H.G.; Payne, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Sets of G1, S, and G2 phase Xenopus cells were exposed to 15.0 Jm -2 UV and their ability to photoreactivate the induced cell killing and chromosomal aberrations was determined. Most of the lesions induced in G1 cells leading to cell death were converted to a non-photoreactivable state before the cells entered the S phase, while lesions leading to chromosomal aberrations were converted to a non-photoreactivable state as the cells entered the S phase. In S phase cells the UV-induced lesions leading to aberrations appeared to be converted to a non-photoreactivable state at a much faster rate than those leading to cell death. A significant fraction of the lesions induced in G2 cells, leading to cell death, were converted to a non-photoreactivable state before the progeny of the exposed cells reach the next S phase. Few, if any, lesions were induced in G2 cells that were expressed as aberrations at the first mitosis following exposure. The results suggest that the intracellular mechanism which expresses photoreactivable UV-induced lesions as cell death is not identical to the mechanism which expresses such lesions as chromosomal aberrations, and the two mechanisms operate with different efficiencies in different phases of the cell cycle. (author)

  19. Chromosome breakage in Vicia faba by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetner, R H

    1958-02-15

    Meristem cells of Vicia faba roots were exposed to an atmosphere of ozone and the fraction of cells showing chromosome aberrations were recorded. Chromosome aberrations were observed on a dose-response basis after exposing the seeds to 0.4 wt. percent ozone for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results of ozone, x-rays, and ozone and x-ray treatments are presented. A small number of root tips from each group was treated with colchicine and an analysis made of metaphase aberrations. These observations confirmed that the aberrations were all of the chromosome-type.

  20. Delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome instability induced by X-irradiation in human embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.; Kodama, Seiji; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1999-01-01

    We studied X-ray-induced delayed cell death, delayed giant cell formation and delayed chromosome aberrations in normal human embryo cells to explore the relationship between initial radiation damage and delayed effect appeared at 14 to 55 population doubling numbers (PDNs) after X-irradiation. The delayed effect was induced in the progeny of X-ray survivors in a dose-dependent manner and recovered with increasing PDNs after X-irradiation. Delayed plating for 24 h post-irradiation reduced both acute and delayed lethal damage, suggesting that potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) can be effective for relieving the delayed cell death. The chromosome analysis revealed that most of the dicentrics (more than 90%) observed in the progeny of X-ray survivors were not accompanied with fragments, in contrast with those observed in the first mitosis after X-irradiation. The present results indicate that the potentiality of genetic instability is determined during the repair process of initial radiation damage and suggest that the mechanism for formation of delayed chromosome aberrations by radiation might be different from that of direct radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. (author)

  1. Modifying effect of 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine and thymidine at G1 phase on radiation and chemically induced chromosome rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azatyan, R.A.; Voskanyan, A.Z.; Avakyan, V.A.; Akif'ev, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    The yield of structural chromosome mutations induced in Crepis capillaris seeds by X-rays and nitrogen mustard was studied as a function of treatment (at G 1 phase) with an inhibitor of unscheduled DNA synthesis, 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine (FdU), and its antagonist, thymidine. Air-dry seeds were irradiated at 10 krad and immediately placed in aqueous solutions of FdU, thymidine, or FdU + thymidine. Ionizing radiation induced only chromosome exchanges in the seeds. When EdU was used, the number of chromosome exchanges was the same although the fraction of simple and isolocus deletions was significantly greater than additive. The effect of FdU was manifested only after 10-hour incubation of the cells. Thymidine alone did not appreciably alter the frequency of radiation-induced aberrations. At the same time, the FdU + thymidine combination decreased the mutation yield i.e. was protective. Frequencies of the chromosome aberration in this experiment were the same as in the control

  2. Persistence of X-ray-induced chromosomal rearrangements in long-term cultures of human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Y.; Little, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a long-term study of mechanisms of human cell neoplastic transformation, the authors have examined the change in the frequencies of X-ray-induced chromosome rearrangements in density-inhibited human foreskin fibroblasts as a function of subculture time. In nonproliferating cells, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations declined within 24 to 48 hr but still remained at a relatively high level up to 43 days after irradiation. Aberrations disappeared rapidly, however, when the cells were allowed to proliferate, indicating that these lesions are lethal to dividing cells. The frequency of induced translocations, as determined by analysis of G-banded karyotypes, was dose dependent and remained stable up to 20 mean population doublings after irradiation. When subculture of density-inhibited cultures was delayed for 4 hr after irradiation (confluent holding), the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the first mitosis declined, whereas the translocation frequencies at later passage were elevated as compared with cells subcultured immediately. This correlates with the reported increase in the frequency of transformation under similar conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements induced by DNA damage may be involved in the initiation of cancer

  3. G-banding analysis of radiation-induced chromosome damage in lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Nakashima, Eiji.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the G-banding analysis of somatic chromosomes in lymphocytes from 63 atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Summary findings are as follows: (1) The cells with stable-type chromosome aberrations (Cs cells) predominated among the aberrant cells and showed a dose-dependent increase. All stable chromosome aberrations were classified into 9 types: reciprocal translocations (t), translocations of complex type (t-cx), insertions (ins), complex exchanges (e-cx), peri- and paracentric inversions (inv-peri, inv-para), terminal and interstitial deletions (del-ter, del-int), and unidentified rearrangements. Aberration frequencies increased with increasing dose for all aberration categories. Among the chromosome aberrations classified, reciprocal translocations predominated in all dose ranges. The frequencies of complex aberrations were low at the low-dose level but increased sharply as dose increased. (2) The linear model was fitted to test the dose-response relationship for Cs-cell frequencies. With a constant neutron relative biological effectiveness of 10, an estimated linear slope of 15.2%/Sv was obtained for Dosimetry System 1986 bone-marrow dose with an intercept of 2.9% at dose 0. The present observation confirmed a wide variability of Cs-cell frequencies among individual survivors in every dose category.(3) Statistical analysis of data on 3370 break sites showed good correlations between relative DNA content and the distribution of chromosome breaks involved in translocations, although the involvement of chromosome 1 is significantly higher, for as-yet-unknown reasons. (J.P.N.)

  4. Distributions of Low- and High-LET Radiation-Induced Breaks in Chromosomes are Associated with Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    To study the breakpoint along the length of the chromosome induced by low- and high-LET radiations, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to Cs-137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons at a low dose rate, and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The location of the breaks was identified using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) that paints Chromosome 3 in 23 different colored bands. The breakpoint distributions were found to be similar between rays of low and high dose rates and between the two high-LET radiation types. Detailed analysis of the chromosome break ends involved in inter- and intrachromosome exchanges revealed that only the break ends participating in interchromosome exchanges contributed to the hot spots found for low-LET. For break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges, the distributions for all four radiation scenarios were similar with clusters of breaks found in three regions. Analysis of the locations of the two break ends in Chromosome 3 that joined to form an intrachromosome exchange demonstrated that two breaks with a greater genomic separation may be more likely to rejoin than two closer breaks, indicating that chromatin folding can play an important role in the rejoining of chromosome breaks. Our study demonstrated that the gene-rich regions do not necessarily contain more breaks. The breakpoint distribution depends more on the likelihood that a break will join with another break in the same chromosome or in a different chromosome.

  5. Effects of Spirulina platensis on DNA damage and chromosomal aberration against cadmium chloride-induced genotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Fayza M; Kotb, Ahmed M; Hammad, Seddik

    2018-04-01

    Todays, bioactive compounds extracted from Spirulina platensis have been intensively studied for their therapeutical values. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of S. platensis extract on DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations induced by cadmium in rats. Four groups of male albino rats (n = 7 rats) were used. The first group served as a control group and received distilled water. The second group was exposed intraperitoneally to cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) (3.5 mg/kg body weight dissolved in 2 ml distilled water). The third group included the rats that were orally treated with S. platensis extract (1 g/kg dissolved in 5 ml distilled water, every other day for 30 days). The fourth group included the rats that were intraperitoneally and orally exposed to cadmium chloride and S. platensis, respectively. The experiment in all groups was extended for 60 days. The results of cadmium-mediated toxicity revealed significant genetic effects (DNA fragmentation, deletion or disappearance of some base pairs of DNA, and appearance of few base pairs according to ISSR-PCR analysis). Moreover, chromosomes showed structural aberrations such as reduction of chromosomal number, chromosomal ring, chromatid deletions, chromosomal fragmentations, and dicentric chromosomes. Surprisingly, S. platensis extract plus CdCl 2 -treated group showed less genetic effects compared with CdCl 2 alone. Further, S. platensis extract upon CdCl 2 toxicity was associated with less chromosomal aberration number and nearly normal appearance of DNA fragments as indicated by the bone marrow and ISSR-PCR analysis, respectively. In conclusion, the present novel study showed that co-treatment with S. platensis extract could reduce the genotoxic effects of CdCl 2 in rats.

  6. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  7. Transfer of Hessian fly resistance from rye to wheat via radiation-induced terminal and intercalary chromosomal translocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebe, B.; Hatchett, J.H.; Gill, B.S.; Mukai, Y.; Sebesta, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    A new Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) resistance gene derived from 'Balbo' rye and its transfer to hexaploid wheat via radiation-induced terminal and intercalary chromosomal translocations are described. Crosses between resistant 'Balbo' rye and susceptible 'Suwon 92' wheat and between the F1 amphidiploids and susceptible 'TAM 106' and 'Amigo' wheats produced resistant BC2F3 lines that were identified by C-banding analysis as being 6RL telocentric addition lines. Comparative chromosomal analyses and resistance tests revealed that the resistance gene is located on the 6RL telocentric chromosome. X-irradiated pollen of 6RL addition plants was used to fertilize plants of susceptible wheats 'TAM 106,' 'TAM 101,' and 'Vona.' After several generations of selection for resistance, new sublines were obtained that were homogeneous for resistance. Thirteen of these lines were analyzed by C-banding, and three different wheat-6RL chromosomal translocations (T) were identified. Wheat chromosomes involved in the translocations were 6B, 4B, and 4A. Almost the complete 6RL arm is present in T6BS · 6BL-6RL. Only the distal half of 6RL is present in T4BS · 4BL-6RL, which locates the resistance gene in the distal half of 6RL. Only a very small segment (ca 1.0 μm) of the distal region of 6RL is present in an intercalary translocation (Ti) Ti4AS · 4AL-6RL-4AL. The 6RL segment is inserted in the intercalary region between the centromere of chromosome 4A and the large proximal C-band of 4AL. The break-points of the translocations are outside the region of the centromere, indicating that they were induced by the X-ray treatment. All three translocations are cytologically stable and can be used directly in wheat breeding programs

  8. Gamma induced chromosomal aberrations in meristem cells of cotton hybrids and their parental forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraevoj, S.Ya.; Akhmedova, M.M.; Amirkulov, D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of gamma quanta on the first mitoses in the small roots of cotton hybrids and their parents results in different frequency of chromosome rearrangements in them. It has been proved that the frequency of chromosome aberrations is different in hybrids and different varieties of cotton. With increase in irradiation doses (from 10 to 30 kR) the frequency of chromosome aberrations goes up in all varieties and hybrids studies. The type of chromosome rearrangements in hybrids and their parents depends on the irradiation dose

  9. ''Protective'' effect of cells gamma-irradiation at the metaphase of mitosis after UV-irradiation at the S-period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, L I; Chubykin, V L [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Tsitologii i Genetiki

    1975-10-01

    As a result of the ultraviolet irradiation in vitro of the embryo fibroblasts of BALB mice in the S-stage with an incident dose of 40 erg/mm/sup 2/, 20.1% cells showed chromosome aberrations. Additional gamma irradiation of cells in the metaphase of the first mitosis with a dose of 5 krad leads with a high degree of certainty to a decrease to 11.7% in the frequency of aberrant cells observed in the same mitotic stage. The frequency of spontaneous aberrations does not change during the first few minutes after the gamma irradiation of intact cells. The ''protective'' effect of gamma rays cannot be attributed to non-uniform changes in the duration of the mitotic stages for aberrant and normal cells, to the adhesion of chromosome fragments or to the breaking of bridges in the anaphase. The destruction of cells during irradiation is also an unlikely explanation of the observed effect. It is assumed that the decrease in the frequency of aberrations is a result of the previously predicted modification of the processes involved, when potential chromosome damage becomes visible abberations during metaphase.

  10. Delayed formation of chromosome aberrations in mouse pachytebne spermatocytes treated with triethylenemelamine (TEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generoso, W.M.; Krishna, M.; Sotomayor, R.E.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Induction of chromosome aberrations in pachytene spermatocytes of mice by 2 mg/kg TEM was compared with induction by 400 R x rays. These doses induced comparably high dominant lethal effects in pachytene spermatocytes of mice. Cytological analysis at diakinesis-metaphase I stage showed that whereas 76.4% of the cells treated with x rays at pachytene stage had aberrations, the frequencies observed in two TEM experiments were only 0.8 and 2.2%. On the other hand, 5% of the progeny from TEM-treated pachytene spermatocytes were found to be translocation heterozygotes. This is the first report on the recovery of heritable translocations from treated spermatocytes of mice. The aberration frequencies observed for TEM in diakinesis-metaphase I were much too low to account for all the lethal mutations and heritable translocations. Thus, the formation of the bulk of aberrations induced by TEM in pachytene spermatocytes was delayed--a marked contrast to the more immediate formation of x-ray-induced aberrations. It is postulated that the formation of the bulk of TEM-induced aberrations in pachytene spermatocytes and in certain postmeiotic stages occurs sometime during spermiogenesis, and not through the operation of postfertilization pronuclear DNA synthesis

  11. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillaci Tiziana

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN. CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy, and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Methods Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. Results We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116. We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Conclusion Our

  12. Simulation of Radiation-Induced Damage Distribution to evaluate Models for Higher-Order Chromosome Organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P. Quicken (Peter); G. Kreth (Gregor); W. Friedland (Werner); A.A. Friedl (Anna)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe structure of chromatin at the level of the 30 nm fibre has been studied in considerable detail, but little is known about how this fibre is arranged within the interphase chromosome territory. Over the years, various polymer models were developed to simulate chromosome structure,

  13. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  14. Analysis of spontaneous and bleomycin-induced chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes of long-haul aircrew members from Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzan, Alejandro D.; Bianchi, Martha S.; Gimenez, Esteban M.; Flaque, Maria C. Diaz; Ciancio, Vicente R.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous and bleomycin (BLM)-induced chromosomal aberrations in G0 and G2 stages of the cell cycle have been analyzed in peripheral lymphocytes of 21 long-haul aircrew members from Argentina in order to assess BLM-induced clastogenesis as a first approach to determine the DNA repair capacity and thereby the susceptibility to environmental cancers in aircrew. The possibility that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation can induce an adaptive response in their peripheral lymphocytes that can be detected by a subsequent in vitro treatment with BLM was also investigated. For comparison, aberrations were also scored in the lymphocytes of 15 healthy volunteers matched by age, health, sex, drinking and smoking habits to the flight personnel group. Aircrew exhibited a higher frequency of spontaneous dicentrics and ring chromosomes than the control population (p 0.05). However, the aircrew sampled population was almost two times more sensitive to BLM G0 clastogenic effects than controls (p < 0.05). Therefore, our data suggest that chronic exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation increases the in vitro chromosomal sensitivity of their peripheral lymphocytes to BLM (at least in the G0 stage of the cell cycle), and that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation does not induce an adaptive response to this radiomimetic compound. Our results justify further studies aimed at determine if those aircrew members hypersensitive to BLM are more prone to develop environmental cancer than BLM-insensitive individuals

  15. Heritable alteration of DNA methylation induced by whole-chromosome aneuploidy in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihong; Diarso, Moussa; Zhang, Ai; Zhang, Huakun; Dong, Yuzhu; Liu, Lixia; Lv, Zhenling; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes changes in gene expression and phenotypes in all organisms studied. A previous study in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana showed that aneuploidy-generated phenotypic changes can be inherited to euploid progenies and implicated an epigenetic underpinning of the heritable variations. Based on an analysis by amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, we found that although genetic changes at the nucleotide sequence level were negligible, extensive changes in cytosine DNA methylation patterns occurred in all studied homeologous group 1 whole-chromosome aneuploid lines of common wheat (Triticum aestivum), with monosomic 1A showing the greatest amount of methylation changes. The changed methylation patterns were inherited by euploid progenies derived from the aneuploid parents. The aneuploidy-induced DNA methylation alterations and their heritability were verified at selected loci by bisulfite sequencing. Our data have provided empirical evidence supporting earlier suggestions that heritability of aneuploidy-generated, but aneuploidy-independent, phenotypic variations may have an epigenetic basis. That at least one type of aneuploidy - monosomic 1A - was able to cause significant epigenetic divergence of the aneuploid plants and their euploid progenies also lends support to recent suggestions that aneuploidy may have played an important and protracted role in polyploid genome evolution. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Chromosomal Instability and Molecular Defects in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs. Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction. Furthermore, NBS-iPSCs display slower growth, mitotic inhibition, a reduced apoptotic response to stress, and abnormal cell-cycle-related gene expression. Importantly, NBS neural progenitor cells (NBS-NPCs show downregulation of neural developmental genes, which seems to be mediated by P53. Our results demonstrate the importance of NBS1 in early human development, shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this severe syndrome, and further expand our knowledge of the genomic stress cells experience during the reprogramming process.

  17. Chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa after 137Cs γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Hirokazu; Kamiguchi, Yujiroh

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrated that freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa possess strong resistance to 137 Cs γ-ray irradiation at doses of up to 8 Gy. Freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa were rehydrated and injected into mouse oocytes with an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technique. Most oocytes can be activated after ICSI by using spermatozoa irradiated with γ-rays before and after freeze-drying. Sperm chromosome complements were analyzed at the first cleavage metaphase. Chromosome aberrations increased in a dose-dependent manner in the spermatozoa irradiated before freeze-drying. However, no increase in oocytes with chromosome aberrations was observed when fertilized by spermatozoa that had been irradiated after freeze-drying, as compared with freeze-dried spermatozoa that had not been irradiated. These results suggest that both the chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried spermatozoa, as well as their ability to activate oocytes, were protected from γ-ray irradiation at doses at which chromosomal damage is found to be strongly induced in spermatozoa suspended in solution

  18. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  19. Non-random intrachromosomal distribution of radiation-induced chromatid aberrations in Vicia faba. [Aberration clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, I; Rieger, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinst. fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1976-04-01

    A reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba, with all chromosomes individually distinguishable, was treated with X-rays, fast neutrons, (/sup 3/H) uridine (/sup 3/HU). The distribution within metaphase chromosomes of induced chromatid aberrations was non-random for all agents used. Aberration clustering, in part agent specific, occurred in chromosome segments containing heterochromatin as defined by the presence of G bands. The pattern of aberration clustering found after treatment with /sup 3/HU did not allow the recognition of chromosome regions active in transcription during treatment. Furthermore, it was impossible to obtain unambiguous indications of the presence of AT- and GC-base clusters from the patterns of /sup 3/HT- and /sup 3/HC-induced chromatid aberrations, respectively. Possible reasons underlying these observations are discussed.

  20. High resolution FISH on super-stretched flow-sorted plant chromosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valárik, M.; Bartos, J.; Kovarova, P.; Kubalakova, M.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Dolezel, J.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) strategy, using super-stretched flow-sorted plant chromosomes as targets, is described. The technique that allows longitudinal extension of chromosomes of more than 100 times their original metaphase size is especially attractive for

  1. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...

  2. Amphitelic orientation of centromeres at metaphase I is an important ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-31

    Jul 31, 2014 ... sion of sister chromatids at AI without the second meiotic division (Matsuoka and .... level of chromosome pairing with 0.28 bivalents/PMC was seen in 20% of the ... The union of two such unreduced games could result in the ...

  3. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  4. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, G. (Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Szeged (Hungary). Orvosbiologiai Intezet)

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners.

  5. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szemere, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners. (author)

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability driven by de novo chromosomal rearrangement hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Allen, R.N.; Moore, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability has become generally recognized as a critical contributor to tumor progression by generating the necessary number of genetic alterations required for expression of a clinically significant malignancy. Our study of chromosomal instability investigates the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in instability acting predominantly in cis. Here we present an analysis of the karyotypic distribution of instability associated chromosomal rearrangements in TK6 and derivative human lymphoblasts. Karyotypic analysis performed on a total of 455 independent clones included 183 rearrangements distributed among 100 separate unstable clones. The results demonstrate that the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements in unstable clones are non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. This pattern is statistically significant, and incompatible with expectations for random breakage associated with loss or alteration of a trans-acting factor. Furthermore, specific chromosomal breakage hot spots associated with instability have been identified; these occur in several independent unstable clones and are often repeatedly broken and rejoined during the outgrowth of an individual clone. In complimentary studies, genomic instability was generated without any exposure to a DNA-damaging agent, but rather by transfection with alpha heterochromatin DNA. In a prospective analysis, human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11 were transfected with heterochromatic alpha DNA repeats and clones were analyzed by chromosome 11 painting. Transfection with alpha DNA was associated with karyotypic heterogeneity in 40% of clones examined; control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic heterogeneity

  7. Effects of turmeric and its active principle, curcumin, on bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Maria Cristina P.; Dias, Francisca da Luz; Kronka, Sergio N. [UNESP; Takahashi, Catarina S.

    1999-01-01

    Naturally occurring antioxidants have been extensively studied for their capacity to protect organisms and cells from oxidative damage. Many plant constituents including turmeric and curcumin appear to be potent antimutagens and antioxidants. The effects of turmeric and curcumin on chromosomal aberration frequencies induced by the radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM) were investigated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Three concentrations of each drug, turmeric (100, 250 and 500 mg/ml) and ...

  8. A rapid, non-sacrificial chromosome preparation technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... centrifuges or sacrificing the specimen. In situations such as the induction of triploidy or tetraploidy, it is necessary to have a quick, reliable method of assessing the results of experimental design. The technique presented in this report provides numerous, well-spread metaphase chromosomes with a tissue handling time ...

  9. A rapid, non-sacrificial chromosome preparation technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-09-16

    Sep 16, 1987 ... Contribution to the knowledge of eggs and early larval stages of mullets ... Giemsa staining makes it possible to achieve good quality metaphase chromosome spreads using small fish without the use of sterile conditions, ... Genetic mechanisms of sex determination have been described for a number of ...

  10. Persistent genetic instability induced by synergistic interaction between x-irradiation and 6-thioguanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Nelson, S.L.; Smith, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    Clonal karyotypic analysis was performed using G-banding on four groups of clones derived from TK6 human lymphoblasts: 25 HPRT - total gene deletion mutants induced by exposure to 2 Gy of x-rays; 8 spontaneous HPRT - total gene deletion mutants; 25 clones irradiated with 2 Gy, not selected with 6-thioguanine. Ten to twenty metaphases were examined for each clone. Extensive karyotypic heterogeneity was observed among x-ray induced HPRT - mutants involving translocations, deletions, duplications and aneuploidy; recovery of chromosomal aberrations and karyotypic heterogeneity was greater than the additive effects of clones treated with x-irradiation or 6-thioguanine alone. This synergistic interaction between x-irradiation and 6-thioguanine was observed despite a 7 day phenotypic expression interval between exposure to the two agents. Thus, x-irradiated TK6 cells appear to be persistently hypersensitive to the induction of genetic instability. Several mutants appeared to exhibit evidence of clonal evolution since aberrant chromosomes observed in one metaphase, were found to be further modified in other metaphases. In order to determine if genetic instability, identified by clonal karyotypic heterogeneity, affected specific locus mutation rates, we utilized the heterozygous thymidine kinase (tk) locus as a genetic marker. Four x-ray induced HPRT - mutants with extensive karyotypic heterogeneity, exhibited mutation rates at tk ranging from 5 to 8 fold higher than the parental TK6 cells. Further analysis, using fractionated low dose radiation exposure, is currently in progress

  11. Prevention of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow of mice by Indian medicinal plant, Alstonia scholaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, Swafiya; Ranuchaudhary; Goyal, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It is well established that ionizing radiation can damage biologically important macromolecules such as DNA via both direct and indirect mechanisms. Chromosomal aberrations are a measure of direct effects on the genetic material and serve as useful biological dosimeter. With the realization of deleterious effects of ionizing radiation, a need was felt to protect human beings against these harmful effects by using physical and/or chemical means. Numerous chemical compounds have been tested for their ability to protect against ionizing radiation. Despite extensive screening of several synthetic compounds for radio protective activity, no single compound has emerged as a good radio protector so far. The plants have been the companion of man since time immemorial, providing several useful drugs for the treatment of various ailments. Therefore, it is natural that the choices of alternative radio protectors would include plants and plants products. However, some plants have been tested for radio protective action but a detailed study, with all possible end points, is still lacking. Hence, screening of natural products presents a major avenue for the discovery of new radioprotective drugs. Alstonia scholaris, a non toxic herbal preparation, has been reported to be clinically effective in treating syphilis insanity and epilepsy. A. scholaris has also been reported to inhibit liver injuries. These results encourage us to conduct further experiments to prove its radioprotective potential. The present study was performed to verify the radioprotective capacity of Alstonia scholaris on radiation-induced clastogenic change in term of chromosomal aberrations. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the control while the other group received Alstonia scholaris bark extract (100 mg/kg b. wt.) orally for 5 consecutive days before irradiation to serve as experimental. Such animals were pretreated with colchicine

  12. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    Full Text Available Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1 extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  13. Molecular and genetic characterization of a radiation-induced structural rearrangement in mouse chromosome 2 causing mutations at the limb deformity and agouti loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woychik, R.P.; Generoso, W.M.; Russell, L.B.; Cain, K.T.; Cacheiro, N.L.; Bultman, S.J.; Selby, P.B.; Dickinson, M.E.; Hogan, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular characterization of mutations in the mouse, particularly those involving agent-induced major structural alterations, is proving to be useful for correlating the structure and expression of individual genes with their function in the whole organism. Here we present the characterization of a radiation-induced mutation that simultaneously generated distinct alleles of both the limb deformity (ld) and agouti (a) loci, two developmentally important regions of chromosome 2 normally separated by 20 centimorgans. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that an interstitial segment of chromosome 17 (17B- 17C; or, possibly, 17A2-17B) had been translocated into the distal end of chromosome 2, resulting in a smaller-than-normal chromosome 17 (designated 17del) and a larger form of chromosome 2 designated 2(17). Additionally, a large interstitial segment of the 2(17) chromosome, immediately adjacent and proximal to the insertion site, did not match bands 2E4-2H1 at corresponding positions on a normal chromosome 2. Molecular analysis detected a DNA rearrangement in which a portion of the ld locus was joined to sequences normally tightly linked to the a locus. This result, along with the genetic and cytogenetic data, suggests that the alleles of ld and a in this radiation-induced mutation, designated ldIn2 and ajIn2, were associated with DNA breaks caused by an inversion of an interstitial segment in the 2(17) chromosome

  14. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  15. Radiation induced wheat-rye chromosomal translocations in triticale. Optimizing the dose using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, F. [Brandon Univ., Manitoba (Canada); Comeau, A.; Chen, Q.; Collin, J.; St-Pierre, C.A.

    2000-03-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was utilized to monitor the level of ionizing radiation ({sup 60}Co source) in their ability to cause intra- and intergeneric chromosomal aberrations in triticale seeds. Seeds were irradiated with 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy doses. The root growth of irradiated seeds was greatly inhibited at 200 Gy and above. Various types of aberrations including wheat-rye, wheat-wheat, rye-rye, wheat-rye-wheat, rye-wheat-rye translocations and acentric fragments with or without translocations were observed. There was a consistent increase in proportion of aberrations per cell with an increase in radiation dose. It was concluded that for an optimal level of chromosomal translocation and least number of acentric fragments, a 20 Gy dose was quite sufficient for inducing a desirable level of wheat-rye chromosomal translocations. The excellent efficiency and importance of utilizing FISH in such studies of alien-introgression via chromosomal translocations are discussed. (author)

  16. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  17. Aberrations of holokinetic chromosomes and associated lethality after X-irradiation of meiotic stages in Tetranychus urticae Koch (acari, tetranychidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempelaar, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosomes of the holokinetic organization type were irradiated with X-rays in various stages of meiosis in unfertillized eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch. Visible cytological aberrations, lethality and sterility were investigated in subsequent generations. Chromosome fragments are the most frequently occuring light-microscopically visible chromosome aberrations; bridges are not formed. Contrary to expectations, the presence of fragments appears to be positively correlated with the occurrence of lethality; loss of fragments, missegregation and the measure of damage of the broken chromosome parts are involved. In contrast with monokinetic chromosomes the earliest lethality occurs only after about 10 divisions. The ratios between different embryonic lethality types (early vs. late) differ depending on the stage irradiated: in more compact chromatin, more serious damage (i.e. more early lethality syndromes) is induced than in less compact chromatin. In the progeny of the surviving males, neither translocations nor independent fragments are found; indirect evidence indicated the occasional presence of inversions. The presumtive inversions are induced more frequently in a chromatin-compact stage (metaphase I) than in a less compact one (telophase I). (Auth.)

  18. Chromosomes of older humans are more prone to aminopterine-induced breakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, D.; Fassina, G.; Szabo, P.; Weksler, M.; De Angelis, P.; Siniscalco, M.; Rodgers, L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have adopted a simplified version of the cell hybrid cotransfer method to test the hypothesis that human lymphocytes derived from elderly individuals have a higher chromosome instability. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from old male individuals and young controls were fused with a Chinese hamster cell line (CHO-YH21), yielding 10 HAT-resistant rodent-human clones from the old propositi and 22 from the young controls. Both series of hybrid clones were analyzed with respect to the retention of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the surface antigen MIC2 identified by monoclonal antibody 12E7, two human X chromosome-linked markers located at opposite ends of the X chromosome. Cell hybrid clones with an X chromosome from a young control retained both markers in about 70% of the cells. In contrast, cell hybrid clones with an X chromosome from an old donor retained the MIC2 marker in only 30% of their cells. Slot-blot hybridization studies have established that the observed loss of the MIC2 marker is due to loss of the coding gene, not to suppression of its expression. T lymphocytes from old donors were also found to have an LD 50 for aminopterine significantly lower than the concentration of this drug in the HAT medium used to grow the hybrids. They speculate that the higher rate of chromosomal breakage and of marker loss observed along the old-age X chromosomes could be the result of molecular scars accumulated with aging at sites of constitutive chromosomal fragility

  19. Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    -FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3-5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work...... also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over...... a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies....

  20. On-line sorting of human chromosomes by centromeric index, and identification of sorted populations by GTG-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Rens, W.; Manders, E.; van Oven, C.; Barendsen, G. W.; Aten, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Using slit-scan flow cytometry, the shape of human metaphase chromosomes, as expressed in their centromeric index (CI), and the DNA content of the chromosomes have been used as parameters in bivariate flow karyotyping. The resolution of the DNA vs CI flow karyogram of the larger chromosomes up to

  1. Rejoining of x-ray induced chromosome breaks in human cells and its relationship to cellular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornforth, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed to improve the resolution for measuring breaks produced in interphase chromosomes by X-rays following the induction of premature chromosome condensation (PCC). It is based on the principle of 5-BrdU incorporation into the DNA of HeLa mitotic cells, which act as inducers of PCC when they are fused to diploid human fibroblasts. After a modified Fluorescence Plus Giemsa (FPG) protocol, the PCC stain intensely, while the mitotic inducer chromosomes stain faintly. The dose response for density inhibited (G 0 ) human cells was linear from 10.9 to 600 rad, with a slope of 0.06 breaks per cell per rad. Upon incubation at 37 0 C, half of the breaks disappeared in 2 hours. Following a dose of 600 rad the initial rate of break rejoining mirrored the rate of increase in survival from post-irradiation incubation, due to the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD). The X-ray induced PCC rejoining characteristics from two ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cell lines were compared to profiles obtained with normal cells. Both normal and A-T cells apparently sustained the same initial level of radiation damage, and both cell types rejoined breaks at the same rate. However, while normal cells eventually rejoined all but about 5% of the breaks produced by 600 rad, the A-T lines were left with 5-6 times the level of residual damage. These experiments demonstrate that progression of cells into S phase is not a necessary condition for the measured frequency of chromosome fragments observed in X-irradiated A-T cells

  2. Chromosome behaviour in Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata is unusual in that its twelve chromosomes are arranged in a ring at meiosis. The order of the chromosomes has been established, and each chromosome arm has been designated a letter in accordance with the segmental interchange theory. Chromosomes are often irregularly orientated at metaphase I. Chromosomes at anaphase I are generally distributed equally (6-6, 58.75%) although not necessarily balanced. Due to adjacent distribution, 7-5 distribution at anaphase I was frequently observed (24.17%), and due to lagging, 6-1-5 and 5-2-5 distributions were also observed (10.83% and 3.33% respectively). Three types of abnormal distribution, 8-4, 7-1-4 and 6-2-4 were observed very infrequently (2.92% total), and their possible origins are discussed. Irregularities, such as adjacent distribution and lagging, undoubtedly reduce the fertility of the plant because of the resulting unbalanced gametes.

  3. WE-D-BRE-05: Prediction of Late Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Prostate Cancer Patients Using Chromosome Aberration and Cell Proliferation Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Chromosome damage and cell proliferation rate have been investigated as potential biomarkers for the early prediction of late radiationinduced toxicity. Incorporating these endpoints, we explored the predictive power for late radiation proctitis using a machine learning method. Methods: Recently, Beaton et al. showed that chromosome aberration and cell proliferation rate could be used as biomarkers to predict late radiation proctitis (Beaton et al. (2013) Int J Rad Onc Biol Phys, 85:1346–1352). For the identification of radiosensitive biomarkers, blood samples were collected from 10 patients with grade 3 late proctitis along with 20 control patients with grade 0 proctitis. After irradiation at 6 Gy, statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups, using the number of dicentrics and excess fragments, and the number of cells in metaphase 2 (M2). However, Beaton et al. did not show the usefulness of combining these endpoints. We reanalyzed the dataset to investigate whether incorporating these endpoints can increase the predictive power of radiation proctitis, using a support vector machine (SVM). Results: Using the SVM method with the number of fragments and M2 endpoints, perfect classification was achieved. In addition, to avoid biased estimate of the classification method, leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) was performed. The best performance was achieved when all three endpoints were used with 87% accuracy, 90% sensitivity, 85% specificity, and 0.85 AUC (the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). The most significant endpoint was the number of fragments that obtained 83% accuracy, 70% sensitivity, 90% specificity, and 0.82 AUC. Conclusion: We demonstrated that chromosome damage and cell proliferation rate could be significant biomarkers to predict late radiation proctitis. When these endpoints were used together in conjunction with a machine learning method, the better performance was obtained

  4. [Chromosome banding analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with IL2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěpanovská, K; Vaňková, G; Némethová, V; Tomášiková, L; Smuhařová, P; Divíšková, E; Vallová, V; Kuglík, P; Plevová, K; Oltová, A; Doubek, M; Pospíšilová, S; Mayer, J

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations play an important role as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These aberrations are mostly detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as chromosomal banding analysis has been scarce due to low proliferative activity of malignant B-lymphocytes in vitro. In 2006, a new method using stimulation with IL-2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 for metaphase generation in CLL was published [1]. The objective of our study was to verify the efficacy of stimulation and to evaluate if the method is suitable for routine diagnostics. In total, peripheral blood samples of 369 CLL patients were analyzed in parallel by chromosomal banding analysis and by FISH probes for 13q14, 11q22-23, CEP12 and 17p13. Out of 369 patients, 307 (83%) were successfully stimulated for metaphase generation. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 243 (79%) out of 307 patients evaluated by chromosomal banding analysis. Other aberrations that are not included into standard FISH panel were detected in patients karyotypes, e.g. del(6q), del(14q), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(18;22)(q21;q11). One hundred and three (42%) patients showed complex aberrant karyotype not detected by FISH analysis. Stimulation with IL-2 and oligonucleotide DSP30 is an efficient method how to induce proliferation of malignant B-lymphocytes and allows detection of a substantial number of chromosomal aberrations in addition to those detected by standard FISH panel. Using this method in routine diagnostics is helpful particularly in identification of patients with complex aberrant karyotype.

  5. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  6. Repair of x-ray induced chromosomal damage in trisomy 2- and normal diploid lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countryman, P.I.; Heddle, J.A.; Crawford, E.

    1977-01-01

    The frequency of chromosomal aberrations produced by x-rays is greater in lymphocytes cultured from trisomy 21 patients (Down's syndrome) than from normal diploid donors. This increase, which can be detected by a micronucleus assay for chromosomal damage, was postulated by us to result from a defect in the rejoining system which repairs chromosomal breaks. The postulated defect would result in a longer rejoining time, therapy permitting more movement of broken ends and thus enhancing the frequency of exchanges. To test this possibility, the time required for the rejoining (repair) of chromosome breaks was measured in lymphocytes from five Down's syndrome (four trisomy 21 and one D/G translocation partial trisomy 21) donors, from a monosomy 21 donor, and from five diploid donors. The rejoining time was reduced in the Down's syndrome lymphocytes in comparison to the normal diploid and monosomy 21 lymphocytes. Thus the repair of chromosome breaks, far from being defective as evidenced by a longer rejoining time in Down's syndrome cells, occurred more rapidly than in normal cells

  7. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  8. Chromosomes and their meiotic behaviour in two species of Dieuches Dohrn, 1860 (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae: Rhyparochromini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbhajan Kaur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Lygaeidae (Heteroptera are a large and diverse family in which the male diploid chromosomal complement ranges from 10 to 30. Diploid numbers of 14 and 16 are taken as two modal numbers of the family. The Rhyparochrominae, one of the largest subfamilies of the Lygaeidae, are known to be heterogeneous both cytologically and morphologically. Available data on the tribe Rhyparochromini reveal that all species are characterized by the presence of a pair of microchromosomes (m-chromosomes and have an XY/XX (♂/♀ sex chromosome determining system. Dieuches coloratus (Distant, 1909 and D. insignis (Distant, 1918 belonging to Rhyparochromini, have 2n=14=10A+2m+XY and 2n=12=8A+2m+XY respectively. Both the species are similar inone pair of distinctly large autosomes in their chromosome complements. The metaphase plate arrangement of autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes in D. coloratus is similar to the common condition observed in the tribe Rhyparochromini. In D. insignis, however, the arrangement is different. Here, metaphase I is usual in showing peripheral position of autosomes and central position of sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes. At metaphase II, however, autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes are peripherally placed, an arrangement, which is not reported earlier in the tribe Rhyparochromini.

  9. Analysis of spontaneous and bleomycin-induced chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes of long-haul aircrew members from Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzan, Alejandro D. [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Miembro de la Carrera del Investigador Cientifico del CONICET (Argentina)], E-mail: abolzan@imbice.org.ar; Bianchi, Martha S. [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Miembro de la Carrera del Investigador Cientifico del CONICET (Argentina); Gimenez, Esteban M.; Flaque, Maria C. Diaz [Laboratorio de Citogenetica y Mutagenesis, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Celular (IMBICE), C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ciancio, Vicente R. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, 120 y 60, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-03-01

    Spontaneous and bleomycin (BLM)-induced chromosomal aberrations in G0 and G2 stages of the cell cycle have been analyzed in peripheral lymphocytes of 21 long-haul aircrew members from Argentina in order to assess BLM-induced clastogenesis as a first approach to determine the DNA repair capacity and thereby the susceptibility to environmental cancers in aircrew. The possibility that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation can induce an adaptive response in their peripheral lymphocytes that can be detected by a subsequent in vitro treatment with BLM was also investigated. For comparison, aberrations were also scored in the lymphocytes of 15 healthy volunteers matched by age, health, sex, drinking and smoking habits to the flight personnel group. Aircrew exhibited a higher frequency of spontaneous dicentrics and ring chromosomes than the control population (p < 0.05). BLM sensitivity test showed that aircrew and controls are equally sensitive to BLM G2 clastogenic effects, since both groups exhibited a similar frequency of chromatid breaks per cell (p > 0.05). However, the aircrew sampled population was almost two times more sensitive to BLM G0 clastogenic effects than controls (p < 0.05). Therefore, our data suggest that chronic exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation increases the in vitro chromosomal sensitivity of their peripheral lymphocytes to BLM (at least in the G0 stage of the cell cycle), and that occupational exposure of flight personnel to cosmic radiation does not induce an adaptive response to this radiomimetic compound. Our results justify further studies aimed at determine if those aircrew members hypersensitive to BLM are more prone to develop environmental cancer than BLM-insensitive individuals.

  10. Chromosomal aberrations induced by alpha particles; Aberraciones cromosomicas inducidas por particulas {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: cgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The chromosomal aberrations produced by the ionizing radiation are commonly used when it is necessary to establish the exposure dose of an individual, it is a study that is used like complement of the traditional physical systems and its application is only in cases in that there is doubt about what indicates the conventional dosimetry. The biological dosimetry is based on the frequency of aberrations in the chromosomes of the lymphocytes of the individual in study and the dose is calculated taking like reference to the dose-response curves previously generated In vitro. A case of apparent over-exposure to alpha particles to which is practiced analysis of chromosomal aberrations to settle down if in fact there was exposure and as much as possible, to determine the presumed dose is presented. (Author)

  11. Two new types of chromosomal rearrangements in the swine species induced by semen irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschini, P.H.; Mikich, A.B.; Garcia, J.M.; Almeida Junior, I.L.; Pinheiro, L.E.L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present experiment were used one boar and 5 descendent of Landrace and Large White cross-breeding were used, all the animals were healthy concerning to the reproductive aspect and chromosome constitution. Initially semen was collected from the boar through the glove hand method, diluted and submitted to gamma irradiation. The total applied dose was of 800 R, with an exposition period of 3,76 min. The artificial insemination of the females with the treated semen was performed from the time of observation of positive tolerance reflex, with each animal receiving 2 inseminations with a 12 hour interval in between. after birth, the piglets had their blood aseptically collected for karyotype preparation and analysis. From 17 piglets born and cytogenetically analysed, 2 chromosomal rearrangements were detected, namely, a reciprocal translocation or insertion, 8q-; 14p+ in a female a pericentric inversion in chromosome 1 in a male. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs

  12. Radiation-induced mutation frequency in marked chromosome of Macaca mulatta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhemilev, Z.A.; Machavariani, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies of marked (nucleolus forming) chromosomes were studied in the lymphocytes and epithelial kidney cells irradiated by X-rays at G 0 , both in vivo and in vitro. Symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies were found to be equal. In both the types of Macaca mulatta cells, the exchange frequency in the long arm appeared to be higher than theoretically expected. The increased exchange in the long arm is thought to be due to a greater quantity of late replicating heterochromatin in it. The short arm of marked chromosome of epithelial kidney cells enters the exchange in accordance to its length in mitosis, but exchange number in the short arm chromosome in lymphocytes is lower than in epithelial cells. This difference is caused likely by different functioning of the nucleolus forming heterochromatin. (author)

  13. Gamma radiation induced cytological abnormalities in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. pusa ruby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayabalan, N.; Rao, G.R.

    1987-03-01

    Healthy dry seeds of pusa ruby variety of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. were irradiated with gamma rays at 10 KR, 20 KR, 30 KR, 40 KR and 50 KR dose levels. Meiotic studies were made in treated plants as well as in control plants. At metaphase I, meiotic abnormalities like clumping and stickiness of chromosomes, univalents, multivalents, fragments and irregular grouping of chromosomes were observed. At anaphase I, there were laggards and unequal grouping of chromosomes at poles. Germination percentage and pollen fertility were also studied. Pollen sterility seems to be the cumulative result of various abnormal meiotic stages as well as of physiological and genetic damages induced probably by breakage of chromosomes. The frequency of meiotic abnormalities with reference to the effect of radiation doses is discussed.

  14. Gamma radiation induced cytological abnormalities in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. pusa ruby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabalan, N.; Rao, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Healthy dry seeds of pusa ruby variety of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. were irradiated with gamma rays at 10 KR, 20 KR, 30 KR, 40 KR and 50 KR dose levels. Meiotic studies were made in treated plants as well as in control plants. At metaphase I, meiotic abnormalities like clumping and stickiness of chromosomes, univalents, multivalents, fragments and irregular grouping of chromosomes were observed. At anaphase I, there were laggards and unequal grouping of chromosomes at poles. Germination percentage and pollen fertility were also studied. Pollen sterility seems to be the cumulative result of various abnormal meiotic stages as well as of physiological and genetic damages induced probably by breakage of chromosomes. The frequency of meiotic abnormalities with reference to the effect of radiation doses is discussed. (author)

  15. Dependence of Early and Late Chromosomal Aberrations on Radiation Quality and Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to radiation induces different types of DNA damage, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo. The susceptibility of cells to radiation depends on genetic background and growth condition of cells, as well as types of radiation. Mammalian cells of different tissue types and with different genetic background are known to have different survival rate and different mutation rate after cytogenetic insults. Genomic instability, induced by various genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors including radiation, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Accurate measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is important for estimating radiation-related risks. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles and their RBE, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast AG1522, human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10), and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH(CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice to high energy protons and Fe ions. Normal human fibroblasts AG1522 have apparently normal DNA damage response and repair mechanisms, while mammary epithelial cells (M10) are deficient in the repair of DNA DSBs. Mouse strain CBA is radio-sensitive while C57 is radio-resistant. Metaphase chromosomes at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and chromosome aberrations were analyzed as RBE for different cell lines exposed to different radiations at various time points up to one month post irradiation.

  16. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Melissa; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; McHenry, Peter; Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis

  17. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  18. Roles of Cohesin and Condensin in Chromosome Dynamics During Mammalian Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Jibak

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis is a key step for sexual reproduction in which chromosome number is halved by two successive meiotic divisions after a single round of DNA replication. In the first meiotic division (meiosis I), homologous chromosomes pair, synapse, and recombine with their partners in prophase I. As a result, homologous chromosomes are physically connected until metaphase I and then segregated from each other at the onset of anaphase I. In the subsequent second meiotic division (meiosis II), sister c...

  19. Possible mechanisms of chromosome aberrations. 2. Formation of aberrations after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    One of mechanisms of chromosome aberrations after UV-radiation of animal cells initiated by thymine dimerization from different dna threads (by cross joints) and finished in mitosis metaphase is discussed. The model of aberration formation, taking a count of peculiarities of chromosome ansate structure and predicting the important role of chromosome isolation during mitosis in realization of structural aberrations, is suggested. An attempt to present aberration formation under conditions of exact repair is the distinguishing feature of the model

  20. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Santos, Neide

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a 60 Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to 60 Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN

  1. Transfection of normal human and Chinese hamster DNA corrects diepoxybutane-induced chromosomal hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaham, M.; Adler, B.; Ganguly, S.; Chaganti, R.S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured cells from individuals affected with Fanconi anemia (FA) exhibit spontaneous chromosome breakage and hypersensitivity to the cell killing and clastogenic effects of the difunctional alkylating agent diepoxybutane (DEB). The authors report here the correction of both of these DEB-hypersensitivity phenotypes of FA cells achieved by cotransfection of normal placental of Chinese hamster lung cell DNA and the plasmid pSV2-neo-SVgpt. Transfectants were selected for clonogenic survival after treatment with DEB at a dose of 5 μgml. At this dose of DEB, the clonogenicity of normal fibroblasts was reduced to 50% and that of FA fibroblasts was reduced to zero. DEB-resistant (DEB/sup r/) colonies selected in this system exhibited a normal response to DEB-induced chromosome breakage and resistance to repeated DEB treatment. The neo and gpt sequences were detected by Southern blot analysis of DNA from one of four DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of human DNA and one of three DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of Chinese hamster DNA. The results demonstrate that DNA sequences that complement the two hallmark cellular phenotypes (cellular and chromosomal hypersensitivity to alkylating agents) of FA are present in human as well as Chinese hamster DNA. The cloning of these genes using transfection strategies can be expected to enable molecular characterization of FA

  2. mBAND analysis for high- and low-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Megumi, E-mail: megumi.hada-1@nasa.gov [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Wu Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    During long-term space travel or cancer therapy, humans are exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) energetic heavy ions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, and cytogenetic damage can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Epidemiological data, mainly from survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan, have enabled risk estimation from low-LET radiation exposures. The identification of a cytogenetic signature that distinguishes high- from low-LET exposure remains a long-term goal in radiobiology. Recently developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-painting methodologies have revealed unique endpoints related to radiation quality. Heavy-ions induce a high fraction of complex-type exchanges, and possibly unique chromosome rearrangements. This review will concentrate on recent data obtained with multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) methods in mammalian cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. Chromosome analysis with mBAND technique allows detection of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges, and also distribution of the breakpoints of aberrations.

  3. Premature chromosome condensation and cell separation studies in biopsies from head and neck tumors for radiosensitivity prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begg, Adrian C.; Sprong, Debbie; Balm, Alfons; Coco Martin, Jose M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor cells from biopsies, assayed by colony formation after in vitro irradiation, has shown significant correlations with outcome after radiotherapy. Alternatives to the colony assay have been sought due to its long and cumbersome nature. We have previously shown good correlations between colony formation and radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumor cell lines. In addition, we and others have shown on cell lines that premature chromosome condensation (PCC) induced with phosphatase inhibitors can be used to aid rapid assessment of aberrations in interphase cells, reducing the selection problem with metaphases. The purpose of this study was to translate the in vitro results to human cancer, with the aim of developing a rapid assay for intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and results: The problem of admixtures of normal and malignant cells in biopsies was addressed using magnetic bead separation (MACS) employing antibodies to human fibroblasts. This proved to be a reliable and efficient method, enriching mean tumor cell fractions from 20 to almost 80%. PCC could be induced in human normal and tumor cell lines, and in sorted or unsorted suspensions from biopsies, with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A. Maximum PCCs were achieved after 1-week culture of biopsy-derived cells. Mean fractions of aneuploid tumor cell PCCs were, however, less than 1%. PCCs were predominantly from S and G2 phase, of which only G2 were scorable for aberrations. Almost no G1 PCCs were found. More scorable PCCs were found after 1 h of calyculin A than metaphases after 5 h of colcemid, but these were calculated to be too few to yield reliable estimates of chromosome damage after radiation. Conlcusions: Tumor cells can be satisfactorily separated from fibroblasts in fresh suspensions from cancer biopsies, but poor growth of tumor cells in short term culture and low yields of PCCs combine to prevent the routine use of such

  4. Changes in Sperm Motility and Capacitation Induce Chromosomal Aberration of the Bovine Embryo following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoku Kato

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI has become the method of choice to treat human male infertility. One of the outstanding problems associated with this technique is our current lack of knowledge concerning the effect of sperm capacitation and motility upon the subsequent development of oocytes following ICSI. In the present study, we first examined the capacitation state of sperm exhibiting normal motility, along with sperm that had been activated, and examined the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by these sperm types upon embryogenesis following bovine in vitro fertilization (IVF and ICSI. Data showed that activated sperm reduced the chromosomal integrity of IVF/ICSI embryos at the blastocyst stage, while capacitated sperm produced ROS in capacitation media. Secondly, we treated sperm with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP, a chemical known to uncouple cell respiration within the mitochondria, and investigated the effect of this treatment upon blastocyst formation and chromosomal integrity at the blastocyst stage. Activated sperm in which the mitochondria had been treated with CCCP reduced levels of chromosomal aberration at the blastocyst stage following ICSI, by reducing mitochondrial activity in activated sperm. In conclusion, these findings suggest that capacitated sperm exhibiting activated motility induced chromosomal aberration during development to the blastocyst stage following ICSI. The injection of sperm exhibiting normal motility, or activated sperm in which mitochondrial activity had been reduced, improved the quality of ICSI-derived embryos. Therefore, the selection of sperm exhibiting progressive motility may not always be better for early embryo development and fetal growth following human ICSI, and that the use of a bovine model may contribute to a deeper understanding of sperm selection for human ICSI embryo development.

  5. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  6. Visualization of chromatin events associated with repair of ultraviolet light-induced damage by premature chromosome condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittelman, W.N.; Pollard, M.

    1984-01-01

    Quiescent normal human fibroblasts were irradiated with u.v. and the ensuing chromatin events were visualised by inducing premature chromosome condensation in the treated cells. Treatment with u.v. induced 1) a generalised elongation of the Gl premature condensed chromosomes (PCC) and 2) regions of localized elongation or gaps. The degree of chromatin change was dose dependent and could be seen immediately after irradiation. The generalised elongation process continued to increase for 24 h after irradiation, suggesting it represented a cellular reaction to the u.v.-induced damage, rather than a direct physical distortion. The localized decondensation reaction was associated with the site of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Post-treatment incubation of cells in the presence of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea resulted in an accumulation of gaps. The inhibitor novobiocin predominantly inhibited the formation of gap regions, suggesting that a topoisomerase-like reaction might be important in their formation. The presence of cycloheximide after u.v. irradiation had no effect on the chromatin changes, suggesting that no new protein synthesis is required for these chromatin processes associated with repair. These results suggest that the PCC technique is useful in elucidating chromatin changes associated with DNA repair after u.v. treatment. (author)

  7. Body-weight and chromosome aberrations induced by X-rays in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, A. de; Belloni, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    Body-weight has been shown to influence the final expression of genetic damage by X-rays in Drosophila melanogaster. If larvae of Drosophila were raised up to the third instar in media containing different amounts of the same nutrient and in different conditions of crowding a positive correlation was observed between body-weight and frequency of chromosome aberrations induced by a given dose of X-rays in the somatic cells of their nerve ganglia. This effect, present in both sexes, is most plausibly attributed to a different capacity of big and small larvae for repairing radiation damage. (orig.) [de

  8. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  9. Time course of enhancement of chromosomal aberration production in human lyphocytes by post-treatment with aphidicolin following X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have shown earlier that the DNA polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin, enhances the production of chromosomal aberration by X-rays when administered as a post-treatment. The effect is marked in metaphases collected for the first hour or two following irradiation. Because the yield of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations falls rapidly with increasing irradiation-fixation interval in G 2 cells it is possible that a difference in yield between cells post-treated with a drug like aphidicolin and those not-treated could arise simply through alteration of the time required for post-treated cells to reach metaphase. The results of the present experiments agree with those of the earlier one in that the X-ray and X-ray plus 1.5 h 5 x 10 -5 M aphidicolin post-treatment-induced chromatid aberration yield fall very rapidly with increasing X-ray-fixation interval, with the marked excess caused by the post-treatment rapidly disappearing and the yield for post-treated samples fixed between 3 and 6 h post-irradiation becoming no greater than those for samples treated with X-rays alone. The answer to the question of whether the yields increase again at later irradiation-fixation intervals, though complicated by the greater delay in aphidicolin post-treated samples and by admixture at later fixation times of metaphases that were in G 1 when irradiated, appears clearly to be yes. (author). 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Effect of pretreatment with venom of Apis mellifera bees on the yield of gamma-ray induced chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.; Takahashi, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    Venom of the honey bee Apis mellifera induced a protective effect against the induction of dicentric chromosomes by gamma radiation (2.0 Gy) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes when the cultures were treated with 0.00015 μl venom/1 ml medium 6 h before irradiation. In cultures to which the venom was added immediately before irradiation with 0.25, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, no significant differences in number of dicentric chromosomes induced was observed when compared to cultures submitted to irradiation only. The venom did not induce clastogenic effects nor did it increase the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. (author)

  11. Protective effects of vitamins C and E against γ-ray-induced chromosomal damage in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, L.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of vitamins C and E on bone marrow chromosomes of the mouse exposed to 1 Gy of whole-body γ-irradiation were studied. These vitamins, dissolved in water/peanut oil, were administered orally as acute doses, either 2 h before, immediately after, or 2 h after irradiation. Both vitamins significantly reduced the frequencies of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells; radioprotection by vitamin E was, however, appreciably greater than that afforded by vitamin C. Administration of the vitamins to mice immediately after irradiation was as effective as that 2 h before irradiation. A sequential treatment consisting of both the vitamins did not result in additional radioprotection over that afforded by vitamin E alone. The probable mechanisms of radioprotection are discussed. (author)

  12. Differential response of biochemical parameters to EMS and MMS treatments and their dose effect relationship on chromosomes in induced diabetic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B.D. Khalandar

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: (1 Even though alkylating agents induce chromosomal aberrations in diabetic mice, MMS, a methylating agent is a more potent inducer of chromatid type of aberrations than EMS, an ethylating agent. (2 Diabetic mouse is more resistant than the non diabetic to alkylating agents and (3 the tested agents altered the analyzed biochemical parameters.

  13. Chromosome dosimetry: the influence of culture media on the proliferation of irradiated and unirradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purrott, R.J.; Lloyd, D.C.; Vulpis, N.

    1981-01-01

    The proliferation of phytohaemagglutinin stimulated human lymphocytes in four types of synthetic culture medium has been studied using the fluorescence plus Giemsa staining technique to determine cell cycle status. 48 hour cultures of unirradiated cells containing Ham's F10 or RPMI 1640 media yielded significant numbers of second cycle metaphases. Cultures containing Eagle's MEM or TC 199 media, however, required longer incubation times to produce appreciable numbers of second division cells. Intrinsic differences between donors in the rate of proliferation had little effect on the relative ranking of the media. Radiation induced mitotic delay of about 1 hour per Gray was observed for each medium. The relevance of these results to the accuracy of radiation dose estimation by chromosome aberration analysis is discussed. (author)

  14. A note on Poisson goodness-of-fit tests for ionizing radiation induced chromosomal aberration samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueras, Manuel; González, J E; Di Giorgio, Marina; Barquinero, J F

    2018-05-18

    To present Poisson exact goodness-of-fit tests as alternatives and complements to the asymptotic u-test, which is the most widely used in cytogenetic biodosimetry, to decide whether a sample of chromosomal aberrations in blood cells comes from an homogeneous or inhomogeneous exposure. Three Poisson exact goodness-of-fit test from the literature are introduced and implemented in the R environment. A Shiny R Studio application, named GOF Poisson, has been updated for the purpose of giving support to this work. The three exact tests and the u-test are applied in chromosomal aberration data from clinical and accidental radiation exposure patients. It is observed how the u-test is not an appropriate approximation in small samples with small yield of chromosomal aberrations. Tools are provided to compute the three exact tests, which is not as trivial as the implementation of the u-test. Poisson exact goodness-of-fit tests should be considered jointly to the u-test for detecting inhomogeneous exposures in the cytogenetic biodosimetry practice.

  15. Chromosome alterations in the X-ray-induced transformants of cultured mouse cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Komatsu, Kenshi; Okumura, Yutaka; Sasaki, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mouse m5S cells were subjected to soft X-ray irradiation. Twenty-four transformants were separated as indicators of focus formation. Two clones, cl.4103 and cl.6310, were chosen for the analysis of chromosome alterations in transformants. A parent strain, m5S/1M, served as the control. Anchorage independence (AG) was not detected in the control strain, irrespective of culture conditions and population doubling number (PDN). In the case of transformants, the frequency of AG was increased with increasing PDN for cl.4103, and was constant for cl.6310, irrespective of PDN. Karyotype of m5S/1M was 42, X, -Y, +der (6) t(6;13), t(8;8), +8, +15. In addition, -13, der(10) and -der(6)t(6;13), der(5), +mar occurred as karyotype alterations for cl.4103 and cl. 6310, respectively. The present experiment indicated that chromosome alterations secondary to primary alterations occur in a high frequency in the transforming process of X-ray irradiated cells, and that the secondary chromosome alterations result in selective proliferation of transformed clones. (Namekawa, K)

  16. Lethality of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumour cell lines with different radiosensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco-Martin, J M; Ottenheim, C P; Bartelink, H; Begg, A C

    1996-03-01

    In order to find an explanation for the eventual disappearance of all chromosome aberrations in two radiosensitive human tumour cell lines, the type and stability of different aberration types was investigated in more detail. To classify the aberrations into unstable and stable types, three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed, including a whole-chromosome probe, a pancentromere probe, and a stain for total DNA. This technique enables the appropriate classification of the aberrations principally by the presence (stable) or not (unstable) of a single centromere per chromosome. Unstable-type aberrations were found to disappear within 7 days (several divisions) in the two radiosensitive and the two radioresistant tumour lines investigated. Stable-type aberrations were found to remain at an approximately constant level over the duration of the experiment (14 days; 8-10 divisions) in the two radioresistant lines. In contrast, the majority of these stable-type aberrations had disappeared by 14 days in the two radiosensitive lines. The previous findings of disappearance of total aberrations in radiosensitive cells was therefore not due to a reduced induction of stable-type aberrations, but the complete disappearance of cells with this aberration type. These results could not be explained by differences in apoptosis or G1 blocks. Two possible explanations for these unexpected findings involve non-random induction of unstable-type aberrations, or lethality of stable-type aberrations. The results suggest caution in the use of stable-type aberration numbers as a predictor for radiosensitivity.

  17. Dose-response relationship for chromosomal aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by 18 MeV electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashin, E.A.; Elaasar, E.M.; Moustafa, H.F.; Bakir, Y.Y.; Al Zenki, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    Dose response curves for lymphocyte chromosome aberration frequencies using X- and gamma radiation became an important and reliable indicator as biological dosimeter especially in radiation accidents and occupational over exposures. Nowadays electron beam therapy is frequently used for their advantages in cases of tumours under or near to the body surface. Dose-response curves for these electron beams are rarely published. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were in vitro irradiated with various low and high doses (0.1 Gy to 4.9 Gy) of 18 MeV electron beams to utilize such a dose-response curve using chromosomal aberration frequencies as a biological indicator. Then we compared the biological curve with physically obtained curves normally used in planning for radiotherapy treatment. It is interesting to find a significant difference between both of them. The biological curve is generally higher in value and the aberrations induced by 93% of a dose is significantly higher and deeper in site than those aberrations induced by the 100% dose calculated physically. If the above observation is confirmed by detailed studies, it would be of importance to the radiotherapist to plan for isodose curves according to biological determinations. (author)

  18. Therapeutic efficacy of inosine against radiation-induced damage at cellular, biochemical and chromosomal levels in swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shamy, E.; Sallam, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Inosine has been used for treatment of various diseases and disorders in medicine. Modulator effect of inosine against γ radiation-induced histological alterations in testis, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), acid and alkaline phosphatases activities (AP and ALP) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in mice was studied at various experimental intervals between 1 and 30 days. Mice exposed to 8 Gy γ-rays showed acute radiation sickness including marked testis histological changes and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in bone marrow cells with 100 % mortality within 22 days. When inosine was given orally at a dose of 80 mg/ kg body wt for 15 consecutive days after exposure to γ-rays, death in radiation + inosine group was reduced to 70 % at 30 days. The radiation - dose reduction factor (DRF) was 1.43. There was significantly lesser degree of damage to testis tissue architecture and various cell populations including spermatogonia, spermatids and leydig cells. Correspondingly, a significant decrease in the LPO and increase in the GSH levels were observed in testis of radiation + inosine group. Similarly, a significant decrease in level of AP and increase in level of ALP were observed. Inosine treatment significantly prevented γ-rays-induced CA frequency in bone marrow cells.

  19. Effects of turmeric and its active principle, curcumin, on bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Maria Cristina P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antioxidants have been extensively studied for their capacity to protect organisms and cells from oxidative damage. Many plant constituents including turmeric and curcumin appear to be potent antimutagens and antioxidants. The effects of turmeric and curcumin on chromosomal aberration frequencies induced by the radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM were investigated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Three concentrations of each drug, turmeric (100, 250 and 500 mg/ml and curcumin (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/ml, were combined with BLM (10 mg/ml in CHO cells treated during the G1/S, S or G2/S phases of the cell cycle. Neither turmeric nor curcumin prevented BLM-induced chromosomal damage in any phases of the cell cycle. Conversely, a potentiation of the clastogenicity of BLM by curcumin was clearly observed in cells treated during the S and G2/S phases. Curcumin was also clastogenic by itself at 10 µg/ml in two protocols used. However, the exact mechanism by which curcumin produced clastogenic and potentiating effects remains unknown.

  20. Concentration-Dependent Protection by Ethanol Extract of Propolis against γ-Ray-Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Montoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioprotection with natural products may be relevant to the mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems; in this sense, propolis extracts have shown effects such as antioxidant, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant. We report for the first time a cytogenetic study to evaluate the radioprotective effect, in vitro, of propolis against radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Lymphocytes were cultured with increasing concentrations of ethanol extract of propolis (EEP, including 20, 40, 120, 250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 μg mL−1 and then exposed to 2 Gy γ-rays. A significant and concentration-dependent decrease is observed in the frequency of chromosome aberrations in samples treated with EEP. The protection against the formation of dicentrics was concentration-dependent, with a maximum protection at 120 μg mL−1 of EEP. The observed frequency of dicentrics is described as negative exponential function, indicating that the maximum protectible fraction of dicentrics is approximately 44%. Free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities are the mechanisms that these substances use to protect cells from ionizing radiation.

  1. Investigation of relationship between karyotype pattern, effective chromosome-arm number and chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of three species: man, rabbit, swine. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation induced chromosomal aberrations for genetic risk evaluation in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liniecki, J.

    1980-08-01

    Blood from 3 donors of each species: man, rabbit and pig was irradiated with a dose of 2.5Gy 60 Co gamma-rays. Microcultures of lymphocytes, established in presence of BrdUrd, were harvested at 6 different times after PHA-stimulation. The preparations containing metaphase figures were stained acc. to Perry and Wolff to permit differentiation of the cells in first and later mitoses. In all individuals and species studied there was a highly significant negative correlation between dicentric yield and time from stimulation to the harvest. The decline of the yield with time of harvest varied in the three species between 1.0 and 3.6 per cent per hour. Implications for biological dosimetry are discussed

  2. A global, myosin light chain kinase-dependent increase in myosin II contractility accompanies the metaphase-anaphase transition in sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R; Shuster, Charles B

    2006-09-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase-anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase-anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus.

  3. Effects of hyperthermia on radiation-induced chromosome breakage and loss in excision repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittler, S.

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity with respect to γ-ray induced chromosome loss and breakage in all stages of spermatogenesis in the wild type Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster, whereas hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity to a lesser extent in cn mus(2) 201sup(D1), an excision repair mutant with 0 per cent excision capacity and in mus(3) 308sup(D1), a strain with 24 per cent excision capacity. The differences in hyperthermia-induced radiation sensitivity between the excision repair mutants and the wild strain may be due to the hyperthermia affecting the excision repair mechanism, suggesting that one of the possible mechanisms involved in hyperthermia-increased radiosensitivity is an effect on excision repair. (author)

  4. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO Z. PASSAMANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS, micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR. Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus BGLF4 kinase retards cellular S-phase progression and induces chromosomal abnormality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsin Chang

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV induces an uncoordinated S-phase-like cellular environment coupled with multiple prophase-like events in cells replicating the virus. The EBV encoded Ser/Thr kinase BGLF4 has been shown to induce premature chromosome condensation through activation of condensin and topoisomerase II and reorganization of the nuclear lamina to facilitate the nuclear egress of nucleocapsids in a pathway mimicking Cdk1. However, the observation that RB is hyperphosphorylated in the presence of BGLF4 raised the possibility that BGLF4 may have a Cdk2-like activity to promote S-phase progression. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of BGLF4 on cell cycle progression and found that S-phase progression and DNA synthesis were interrupted by BGLF4 in mammalian cells. Expression of BGLF4 did not compensate Cdk1 defects for DNA replication in S. cerevisiae. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found the fate of individual HeLa cells was determined by the expression level of BGLF4. In addition to slight cell growth retardation, BGLF4 elicits abnormal chromosomal structure and micronucleus formation in 293 and NCP-TW01 cells. In Saos-2 cells, BGLF4 induced the hyperphosphorylation of co-transfected RB, while E2F1 was not released from RB-E2F1 complexes. The E2F1 regulated activities of the cyclin D1 and ZBRK1 promoters were suppressed by BGLF4 in a dose dependent manner. Detection with phosphoamino acid specific antibodies revealed that, in addition to Ser780, phosphorylation of the DNA damage-responsive Ser612 on RB was enhanced by BGLF4. Taken together, our study indicates that BGLF4 may directly or indirectly induce a DNA damage signal that eventually interferes with host DNA synthesis and delays S-phase progression.

  6. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  7. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  8. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  9. Analysis of α-particle induced incomplete chromosome aberrations, using pan-centro metric and pan-telomeric DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestres, M.; Schmid, E.; Stephan, G.; Barrios, L.; Caballin, M. R.; Barquinero, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study has been the evaluation of the incompleteness of α-particle induced chromosome aberrations by the simultaneous detection of all centromeres and telomeres present in human lymphocytes. For this purpose attached lymphocytes were irradiated at doses of 0.2, 0.5,0.7 and 1 Gy in a ''241Am source. FISH techniques were applied using pan-centromeric and pan-telomeric probes. All abnormal cells were digitalised and analysed using a Cytovision FISH workstation. A total of 378 incomplete chromosomes plus incomplete acentrics was found. Cases with more than 92 telomeres were not detected. The ratio between total incomplete elements and multicentrics was 1.00. The total number of acentric fragments was 822; 57% of then were complete fragments ace (+.+), 26% incomplete fragments ace (+,-), and 17% interstitial fragment ace (-.-). The percentage of incomplete aberrations is higher after high-LET than described for low-LET exposure. The results seem to indicate that compared to low-LET. after α-particle exposure it is more likely to repair the centromere-containing elements. (Author) 30 refs

  10. DNA base sequence changes induced by ultraviolet light mutagenesis of a gene on a chromosome in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romac, S; Leong, P; Sockett, H; Hutchinson, F [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    1989-09-20

    The DNA base sequence changes induced by mutagenesis with ultraviolet light have been determined in a gene on a chromosome of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The gene was the Excherichia coli gpt gene, of which a single copy was stably incorporated and expressed in the CHO cell genome. The cells were irradiated with ultraviolet light and gpt{sup -} colonies were selected by resistance to 6-thioguanine. The gpt gene was amplified from chromosomal DNA by use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the amplified DNA sequenced directly by the dideoxy method. Of the 58 sequenced mutants of independent origin 53 were base change mutations. Forty-one base substitutions were single base changes, ten had two adjacent (or tandem) base changes, and one had two base changes separated by a single base-pair. Only one mutant had a multiple base change mutation with two or more well separated base changes. In contrast much higher levels of such mutations were reported in ultraviolet mutagenesis of genes on a shuttle vector in primate cells. Two deletions of a single base-pair were observed and three deletions ranging from 6 to 37 base-pairs. The mutation spectrum in the gpt gene had similarities to the ultraviolet mutation spectra for several genes in prokaryotes, which suggests similarities in mutational mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (author).

  11. 3-GROUP METAPHASE AS A MORPHOLOGIC CRITERION OF PROGRESSIVE CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOURITS, MJE; PIETERS, WJLM; HOLLEMA, H; BURGER, MPM

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to investigate the presence of three-group metaphase in progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective histologic study on the conization specimens of 41 women with microinvasive cervical carcinoma, 28 of whom were

  12. Three-group metaphase as a morphologic criterion of progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; Pieters, W. J.; Hollema, H.; Burger, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to investigate the presence of three-group metaphase in progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective histologic study on the conization specimens of 41 women with microinvasive cervical carcinoma, 28 of whom were

  13. Suppressing effect of antimutagenic flavorings on chromosome aberrations induced by UV-light or X-rays in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yu.F.; Imanishi, Hisako; Watanabe, Mie; Ohta, Toshihiro; Shirasu

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induces by UV-light or X-rays were suppressed by the post-treatment with antimutagenic flavorings, such as anisaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, coumarin, and vanillin. UV- or X-ray-irradiated surviving cells increased in the presence of each flavouring. X-ray-induced breakage-type and exchange-type chromosome aberrations were suppressed by the vanillin treatment in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle and a greater decrease in the number of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations during G 1 holding was observed in the presence of vanillin. Furthermore, a greater decrease in the number of X-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks was observed in the presence of vanillin. Treatment with vanillin in the G 2 phase suppressed UV-and X-ray-induced breakage-type but not exchange-type chromosome aberrations. The suppression of breakage-type aberrations was assumed to be due to a modification of the capability of the post-replicational repair of DNA double-strand breaks. (author). 28 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs

  14. The Induction of Chromosome Aberrations and Micronuclei in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes at Low Doses of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Krasavin, E A; Melnikova, L A; Fadeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The chromosome damage induced by the low doses of gamma-irradiation with ^{60}Co and X-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied using different cytogenetic assays. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.01-1.0 Gy, simulated by PHA, and analysed for chromosome aberrations by the metaphase and the anaphase methods, by the micronucleus assay. Despite the quantitative differences in the amount of chromosome damage revealed by different methods, all of them demonstrated complex nonlinear dose dependence of the frequency of aberrant cells and aberrations. At the dose range of 0.01-0.05 Gy the cells showed the highest radiosensitivity; at 0.05-0.5 Gy the dose-independent induction of chromosome damage was revealed. At the doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy the dose-effect curves became linear with the decreased slope compared with the initial one (by a factor of 5 to 10 for different criteria) reflecting a higher radioresistance of the cells. These data confirm the idea that the direct linear extrapolation of high-dos...

  15. Poisson goodness-of-fit tests for radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, W.

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic and exact Poisson goodness-to-fit tests have been reviewed with regard to their applicability in analysing distributional properties of data on chromosome aberrations. It has been demonstrated that for typical cytogenetic samples, i.e. when the average number of aberrations per cell is smaller than one, results of asymptotic tests, especially of the most commonly used u-test, differ greatly from results of corresponding exact tests. While the u-statistic can serve as a qualitative index to indicate a tendency towards under- or over-dispersion, exact tests should be used if the assumption of a Poisson distribution is crucial, e.g. in investigating induction mechanisms. If the main interest is to detect a difference between the mean and the variance of a sample it is furthermore important to realize that a much larger sample size is required to detect underdispersion than it is to detect overdispersion. (author)

  16. Chromosome aberrations induced by low doses of X-rays in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemba-Zoltowska, B.; Bocian, E.; Rosiek, O.; Sablinski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Curves derived from the dose-response data for the yield of aberrations in human lymphocytes can be represented by a quadratic equation at all but low dose ranges. A calibration curve has therefore been determined at a low dose range of X-radiation (11.5 to 57.5 rad). The frequencies of dicentrics plus centric rings, and of acentrics were better fitted by linear dose-response models than quadratic. The linearity of the relationship indicated that asymmetrical chromosome exchanges at low doses of radiation are produced predominantly by a single track mechanism. A dose-response curve for dicentrics plus centric rings (5 to 60 rad) has also been derived by pooling published data with the results of this study. This calibration curve is relevant to cytogenetic dosimetry in radiological protection. (UK)

  17. Biotin-deficient diet induces chromosome misalignment and spindle defects in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ai; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Increased abnormal oocytes due to meiotic chromosome misalignment and spindle defects lead to elevated rates of infertility, miscarriage, and trisomic conceptions. Here, we investigated the effect of biotin deficiency on oocyte quality. Three-week-old female ICR mice were fed a biotin-deficient or control diet (0, 0.004 g biotin/kg diet) for 21 days. On day 22, these mouse oocytes were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Due to biotin, undernutrition increased the frequency of abnormal oocytes (the biotin deficient vs. control: 40 vs. 16%). Next, the remaining mice in the biotin-deficient group were fed a control or biotin-deficient diet from day 22 to 42. Although biotin nutritional status in the recovery group was restored, the frequency of abnormal oocytes in the recovery group was still higher than that in the control group (48 vs. 18%). Our results indicate that steady, sufficient biotin intake is required for the production of high-quality oocytes in mice.

  18. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, J G; Coco, R

    1986-03-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the in vitro X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.). 29 references, 4 tables.

  19. Chromosomal and plasmid-encoded factors of Shigella flexneri induce secretogenic activity ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Faherty

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The ShigellaEnterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2 have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3, which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates.

  20. Radiation hybrid mapping of human chromosome 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, U.; Moon, A.J.; Chang, E.; Foellmer, B.; Strauss, B.; Haschke, A.; Chihlin Hsieh; Geigl, E.M.; Welch, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have generated a Chinese hamster V79/380-6 HPRT minus x human leukocyte hybrid cell line (18/V79) with chromosome 18 as the only human chromosome that is retained at high frequency without specific selection. Hybrid cells were selected in HAT medium, and 164 individual colonies were isolated. Of 110 colonies screened for human DNA by PCR amplification using a primer specific for human Alu repeats 67 (61%) were positive. These were expanded in culture for large-scale DNA preparations. Retesting expanded clones by PCR with Alu and LINE primers has revealed unique patterns of amplification products. In situ hybridization of biotin labelled total human DNA to metaphase spreads from various hybrids revealed the presence of one or more human DNA fragments integrated in hamster chromosomes. The authors have generated a resource that should allow the construction of a radiation map, to be compared with the YAC contig map also under construction in their laboratory

  1. Comparison of type and frequency of chromosome aberrations by conventional and G-staining methods in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Shimba, Hachiro; Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Somatic chromosomes derived from cultured lymphocytes of 23 atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima were analyzed to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced structural aberrations, using in sequence the ordinary staining method (O-method) and the trypsin G-banding method (G-method). Of 896 cells examined, 342 were found to contain induced aberrations, including 31 cells in which the precise identification of the type of aberrations was not possible even by the G-method. The number of chromosome aberrations observed was 376 in the 311 cells where aberrant precise identification was possible. The majority (288 or 76.6%) were intra- or inter-chromosomal symmetric exchanges due to a two-break event, while only 24 were found to be asymmetric exchanges (dicentrics, rings, and interstitial deletions). Further, there were 28 aberrations showing acentric fragments and terminal deletions, and the remaining 36 were complex intra- and inter-chromosomal exchanges involving three or more breaks which result in insertions and double translocations. A comparative karyotype analysis of the same metaphases examined by the sequential 0- And G-methods was carried out independently on 361 aberrations, mostly of the symmetric type. It was found that 78 (21.6%) of the 361 were detected only by the G-method; among these were 14 paracentric inversions, 48 reciprocal interchanges of chromosome segments with either equal length (11) or unequal length (37), 14 minor deletions and 2 complex rearrangements, all of which were nevertheless judged to fall within the normal range of variation by theO-method. In contrast, 25 aberrations detected in O-method chromosomes which were overcontracted or twisted, were shown to have normal banding patterns by the G-method. (author)

  2. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  3. Development of a chromosomally integrated metabolite-inducible Leu3p-alpha-IPM "off-on" gene switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Poulou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present technology uses mostly chimeric proteins as regulators and hormones or antibiotics as signals to induce spatial and temporal gene expression.Here, we show that a chromosomally integrated yeast 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' system constitutes a ligand-inducible regulatory "off-on" genetic switch with an extensively dynamic action area. We find that Leu3p acts as an active transcriptional repressor in the absence and as an activator in the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate (alpha-IotaRhoMu in primary fibroblasts isolated from double transgenic mouse embryos bearing ubiquitously expressing Leu3p and a Leu3p regulated GFP reporter. In the absence of the branched amino acid biosynthetic pathway in animals, metabolically stable alpha-IPM presents an EC(50 equal to 0.8837 mM and fast "OFF-ON" kinetics (t(50ON = 43 min, t(50OFF = 2.18 h, it enters the cells via passive diffusion, while it is non-toxic to mammalian cells and to fertilized mouse eggs cultured ex vivo.Our results demonstrate that the 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' constitutes a simpler and safer system for inducible gene expression in biomedical applications.

  4. Hidden chromosomal abnormalities in pleuropulmonary blastomas identified by multiplex FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quilichini, Benoit; Andre, Nicolas; Bouvier, Corinne; Chrestian, Marie-Anne; Rome, Angelique; Intagliata, Dominique; Coze, Carole; Lena, Gabriel; Zattara, Helene

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare childhood dysontogenetic intrathoracic neoplasm associated with an unfavourable clinical behaviour. We report pathological and cytogenetic findings in two cases of PPB at initial diagnosis and recurrence. Both tumors were classified as type III pneumoblastoma and histological findings were similar at diagnosis and relapse. In both cases, conventional cytogenetic techniques revealed complex numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities. Molecular cytogenetic analysis (interphase/metaphase FISH and multicolor FISH) identified accurately chromosomal aberrations. In one case, TP53 gene deletion was detected on metaphase FISH. To date, only few cytogenetic data have been published about PPB. The PPB genetic profile remains to be established and compared to others embryonal neoplasia. Our cytogenetic data are discussed reviewing cytogenetics PPBs published cases, illustrating the contribution of multicolor FISH in order to identify pathogenetically important recurrent aberrations in PPB

  5. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Acien, Maribel; Paya, Pilar; Giulotto, Elena; Egozcue, Josep; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs

  6. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Acien, Maribel [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Paya, Pilar [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Giulotto, Elena [Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati Traverso, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Egozcue, Josep [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Montserrat [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain) and Departament de Biologia Cellular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2006-03-20

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs.

  7. Karyotype and chromosome banding of endangered crucian carp, carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knytl, M.; Kalous, L.; Ráb, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2013), s. 205-215 ISSN 1993-0771 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP506/11/P596 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : fish cytogenetics * paleotetraploid * heterochromatin * metaphase chromosomes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2013

  8. 40 CFR 799.9537 - TSCA in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effects are clear but do not immediately reveal the identity of the coded slides to the reader. Examples... if applicable. (H) Modal number of chromosomes. (iv) Test conditions. (A) Identity of metaphase... Mutation Assay. Environmental Mutagenesis 5, 795-801 (1983). (17) Locke-Huhle, C. Endoreduplication in...

  9. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic biodosimetry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Peter K; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah; Knoll, Joan H

    2014-06-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was recoded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelisation with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic bio-dosimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogan, Peter K.; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Knoll, Joan H.; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was re-coded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelization with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. (authors)

  11. Nanoneedle insertion into the cell nucleus does not induce double-strand breaks in chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Naka, Ryohei; Silberberg, Yaron R; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2013-09-01

    An atomic force microscope probe can be formed into an ultra-sharp cylindrical shape (a nanoneedle) using micro-fabrication techniques such as focused ion beam etching. This nanoneedle can be effectively inserted through the plasma membrane of a living cell to not only access the cytosol, but also to penetrate through the nuclear membrane. This technique shows great potential as a tool for performing intranuclear measurements and manipulations. Repeated insertions of a nanoneedle into a live cell were previously shown not to affect cell viability. However, the effect of nanoneedle insertion on the nucleus and nuclear components is still unknown. DNA is the most crucial component of the nucleus for proper cell function and may be physically damaged by a nanoneedle. To investigate the integrity of DNA following nanoneedle insertion, the occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was assessed. The results showed that there was no chromosomal DNA damage due to nanoneedle insertion into the nucleus, as indicated by the expression level of γ-H2AX, a molecular marker of DSBs. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from man and crab-eating monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, E.; Hirai, M.; Tobari, I.; Utsugi, T.; Nakai, S.

    1982-01-01

    To obtain information on the relation between yield of chromosome aberrations and dose at low-dose levels, experiments were conducted with 5, 10, 20, 30 and 50 rad of 137 Cs γ-rays, on lymphocytes from man and crab-eating monkey (Macaca fascicularis). The dose-response relationship for dicentrics was obtained from the combined data of these low-dose experiments with those of our previous ones at high doses (100-400 rad). When the difference between observed yields and those expected from the linear-quadratic model were computed, the dose-response curve had a good fit for man, but not for the monkey. The linear regression lines between 0 and 30 rad were calculated, because the expected values of α/β for man and monkey would be about 100 and 60 rad. The human data gave a satisfactory fit to a linear model, i.e., a linear increase in aberration frequency with dose, whereas this was not so for those of the monkey. Furthermore, there was some suggestive evidence for the existence of a plateau in dicentric yields between 10 and 30 rad for the monkey and between 20 and 30 rad for human lymphocytes, but more data would be needed to verify this suggestion, particularly for human lymphocytes. (orig.)

  13. X-ray-induced breakage and rejoining of human interphase chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornforth, M.N.; Bedford, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    A method was developed for the high-resolution measurement of breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes at the G 1 phase of the cell cycle. The dose response for fragments (breaks) produced immediately after x-irradiation of confluent cultures of normal human cells was linear down to 10.9 rad (0.109 Gy) and extrapolated to zero effect at zero dose. The curve had a slope of 0.063 breaks per cell per rad, which is at least an order of magnitude greater than that for breaks scored in the same cells after they have progressed to mitosis following subculture. When incubated at 37 0 C half of the breaks disappeared in 2 hours. A slower, perhaps nonrejoining component was apparent at later incubation times. The initial rate of break rejoining was similar to the rate of increase in survival after incubation because of the repair of potentially lethal damage and is also in close agreement with recently reported values for the rejoining of double-strand breakage in DNA

  14. Potent radio-protective effects of vitamins E and C on radiation induced DNA damage in gametes leading to lower frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in subsequent embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To compare the effects of parental and maternal exposure of NMRI mice with γ-rays on gametes in the absence or presence of vitamins E and C and subsequent cytogenetic damage in pre-implantation embryos generated from irradiated gametes. Materials and Methods: Male and female NMRI mice were whole body irradiated in the presence of 200 IU/Kg vitamin E and 100 μg/ml vitamin C. Various mating schemes were designed for mating of irradiated mice, e.g. mating irradiated male with non-irradiated female, irradiated female with non irradiated male or both male and female irradiated. About 68 h post coitus, 4-8-cell embryos were flushed out from oviducts and fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for chromosome abnormalities and micronuclei. Results: In control embryos, frequencies of abnormal metaphase and embryos with micronuclei was low and there was no significant difference between vitamins treated samples and controls. However there was an increase in both abnormal metaphases and micronuclei frequency in embryos generated after parental or maternal irradiation or both. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of aneuploidy in all irradiated groups and vitamin C was very effective in reducing the frequencies of micronuclei. DRF calculated for both vitamins indicate that vitamin C is more potent than vitamin E in reducing clastogenic effects of gamma-rays in pre-implantation embryos. Conclusion: Data indicate that γ-irradiation affects spermatogenesis and preovulatory stage oocytes in male and female mice respectively. These effects might be due to DNA alterations in sperms and oocytes affecting meiotic segregations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos expressed as numerical chromosome abnormalities or micronuclei. Administration of vitamins E and C before irradiation effectively reduced the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. The way these vitamins reduces genotoxic

  15. An improved method for chromosome counting in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A

    1997-09-01

    An improved method for counting chromosomes in maize (Zea mays L.) is presented. Application of cold treatment (5C, 24 hr), heat treatment (42 C, 5 min) and a second cold treatment (5C, 24 hr) to root tips before fixation increased the number of condensed and dispersed countable metaphase chromosome figures. Fixed root tips were prepared by the enzymatic maceration-air drying method and preparations were stained with acetic orcein. Under favorable conditions, one preparation with 50-100 countable chromosome figures could be obtained in diploid maize using this method. Conditions affecting the dispersion of the chromosomes are described. This technique is especially useful for determining the somatic chromosome number in triploid and tetraploid maize lines.

  16. Energy Landscapes of Folding Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  17. The analysis of distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic x-ray workers. Methods: The breakpoints of lymphocyte chromosomes are analyzed using G-banding. Results: There are 146 breakpoints among 3545 metaphase in 37 cases of X-ray workers. There are statistically significant differences between observed values and expected values (χ 2 =42.82, df=23, P 0.05). Conclusion: The chromosome aberration breakpoints of medical diagnostic X-ray workers are non-random. The observed values of breakpoint numbers are higher than those of the expected values in 7 and 14 chromosomes (P<0.05)

  18. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Cragg, Mark S. [Tenovus Laboratory, Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University School of Medicine, General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Salmina, Kristine [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Hausmann, Michael [Kirchhoff Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Scherthan, Harry, E-mail: scherth@web.de [Inst. fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr in Verbindung mit der Univ. Ulm, D-80937 Munich (Germany); MPI for Molec. Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  19. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in γ irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  20. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in gamma irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  1. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  2. A comparative study on the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the somatic and germ cells in mouse and monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobels, F.H.

    1976-06-01

    Two systems were mainly used for studying the relationship between radiation induced chromosome aberration frequencies in somatic and germ cells. The first consists of reciprocal translocation induced in bone-marrow cells of mice compared to reciprocal translocation induced spermatogonia (scored in descending spermatocytes) of the same mice. Dose-response curves for induced aberrations in both cell types (0-100-200-300-400-500 and 600 R X-rays) and dose rate effects indicated that (130-1.92-0.0287 R/min) of a 400 R γ-ray exposure of the two cell types mitotically dividing germ cells respond to radiation similarly to mitotic dividing germ cells. Clonal proliferation or selective elimination of aberration-carrying cells, and other post-irradiation factors can, however, cause great differences in absolute aberration frequencies. A similar study was attempted, using the rhesus monkey as a second system. Its bone-marrow cells were proved unsuitable for induced reciprocal translocations. Stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied instead. Following 100, 200 and 300 R of X-rays, the frequencies of induced dicentric chromosomes were compared to those of induced reciprocal translocations in spermatogonia. Human peripheral blood was studied similarly. It was concluded that: (a) The absolute frequencies of chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of the rhesus monkey are low compared to most other mammalian species. (b) The ratio between dicentric frequencies and reciprocal translocation frequencies at 100 R and 200 R differed significantly from 4:1 reported for mouse and Chinese hamster and 2:1 for marmoset and man. (c) Although the numbers of 'effective chromosome arms' in man and rhesus monkey are similar (81 vs 83), the rhesus monkey showed at all doses a lower rate of induction of dicentrics in blood lymphocytes than man, reaching statistical significance at the 300 R level

  3. γ-ray induced chromosome aberration in rabbit peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in partial and whole body and decline of aberration rate with time post-exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lianzhen; Deng Zhicheng; Wang Haiyan

    1997-01-01

    Te author presents the results of study on 60 Co γ-ray induced chromosome aberration in rabbits peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in partial and whole body and the aberration rate decrease with the time of post-exposure. The experiments included 5 groups, it was whole-body exposure group, partial-body exposure (abdomen and pelvic cavity) group, blood irradiation group in vitro and control group respectively. Radiation dose was 3.0 Gy delivered at rate of 0.5 Gy/min. The results show that it was no significant differences between whole body and in blood irradiation group. The chromosome aberration yield in whole body exposure group was higher than that in partial-body group and in the abdomen exposure group was higher than in that in the pelvic cavity irradiation; The chromosome aberration rate decreased with the time of post-exposure in partial and whole body by γ-ray irradiation

  4. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Effect of tumour promoter iodoacetate on γ-radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjaria, K.B.; Shirsath, K.B.; Bhat, N.N.; Sreedevi, B.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that tumour-promoting agents potentiate a number of genetic events induced by initiating agents in vitro Iodoacetate (IA) is reported to be a tumour promoter of moderate potency and although to the best of our knowledge, tumour promoting ability of IA in animals has not been reported, a large number of studies have reported various types of effects of IA, which may result in tumour promotion. In this paper, the modifying effects of tumour promoter IA on radiation induced dicentrics in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been reported

  6. Mitotic spindle defects and chromosome mis-segregation induced by LDL/cholesterol-implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoneta Granic

    Full Text Available Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer's disease (AD and Atherosclerosis (CVD, suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy-in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1 high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis' first prediction, 2 Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3 oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL, induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4 LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5 cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6 ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol's aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  7. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in rennet-induced skim milk gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M

    2015-01-01

    genomic regions affecting traits related to rennet-induced gelation, the aim of this study was to identify potential candidate genes affecting these traits. Hence, rennet-induced gelation, including rennet coagulation time, gel strength, and yield stress, was measured in skim milk samples collected from...... 379 animals of the Swedish Red breed using low-amplitude oscillation measurements. All animals had genotypes for almost 621,000 segregating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), identified using the Bovine HD SNPChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). The genome was scanned for associations, haplotypes...... based on SNP sets comprising highly associated SNP were inferred, and the effects of the 2 most common haplotypes within each region were analyzed using mixed models. Even though the number of animals was relatively small, a total of 21 regions were identified, with 4 regions showing association...

  8. X-ray-induced dicentric yields in lymphocytes of the teleost, Umbra limi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, I. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Environmental Health); Etoh, H. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Biology)

    1983-01-01

    A microculture technique was applied to the study of lymphocytes of Umbra limi, which have a low number of large meta- and submetacentric chromosomes (2n=22). On the 5th day (90 h) and later after initiation of culture at 20/sup 0/C, some cultures provided well spread metaphase chromosomes for analyses. After initiation, cultures were irradiated with 50, 100, 150 and 200 R of 200 kVp X-rays. The cultures were harvested on the 5th day, at which time all arrested metaphase chromosomes were in their first division. The dicentric yields induced in X-irradiated Umbra lymphocytes were observed to be significantly (P=0.05) lower than those in human lymphocytes. The resulting dose-response relationship for dicentric yield was described by the quadratic equation Y=aD+bD/sup 2/. The advantage of this method lies in the fact that small amounts (0.1 ml) of blood can be repeatedly withdrawn from the fish after a minimal interval of 2 weeks.

  9. X-ray-induced dicentric yields in lymphocytes of the teleost, Umbra limi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, I.; Etoh, H.

    1983-01-01

    A microculture technique was applied to the study of lymphocytes of Umbra limi, which have a low number of large meta- and submetacentric chromosomes (2n=22). On the 5th day (90 h) and later after initiation of culture at 20 0 C, some cultures provided well spread metaphase chromosomes for analyses. After initiation, cultures were irradiated with 50, 100, 150 and 200 R of 200 kVp X-rays. The cultures were harvested on the 5th day, at which time all arrested metaphase chromosomes were in their first division. The dicentric yields induced in X-irradiated Umbra lymphocytes were observed to be significantly (P=0.05) lower than those in human lymphocytes. The resulting dose-response relationship for dicentric yield was described by the quadratic equation Y=aD+bD 2 . The advantage of this method lies in the fact that small amounts (0.1 ml) of blood can be repeatedly withdrawn from the fish after a minimal interval of 2 weeks. (orig./AJ)

  10. Variation in sensitivity to #betta#-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejima, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

    1982-01-01

    Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with 137 Cs #betta# rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities

  11. Use of induced chlorophyll deficient mutants to identify 'heterotic blocks' in pearl millet chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Chlorophyll deficient mutant stocks induced in 'Tift 23' of pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke) were crossed with 'Tift 23' and 5 other normal inbreds to study the effect of these deleterious recessive genes on yield. The difference between near-isogenic S 1 (F 2 ) populations homozygous or heterozygous for the chlorophyll deficiency was not significant. However among 69 S 1 progenies from crosses with other inbreds the heterozygotes were higher yielding than the homozygotes in 53 cases, 15 of which were significant. A mutant like 'M5' identified a high yield 'heterotic block' in 'Inbred 104' and a very low yield 'heterotic block' in 'Inbred 186'. (author)

  12. Hydrocortisone Increases the Vinblastine-Induced Chromosomal Damages in L929 Cells Investigated by the Micronucleus Assay on Cytokinesis-Blocked Binucleated Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahere Ebrahimipour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress may cause damages to DNA or/and change the ability of the cells to overcome these damages. It may also cause irregularities in the cell cycle and induce abnormal cell divisions through glucocorticoid-dependent functions. The abnormal cell divisions, in turn, lead to chromosomal mal-segregation and aneuploidy. In this study, the effects of the stress hormone, hydrocortisone (HYD, were investigated on the induced chromosomal abnormalities by vinblastine (VIN during cell cycle in L929 cells. Methods: This work was performed in winter 2013 at Department of Biology, University of Ferdowsi, Mashhad, Iran. Cultured cells were divided into different groups including control, VIN-treated, HYD treated and VIN+HYD co-treated cells. The induced chromosomal damages were investigated by micronucleus assay in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Although HYD by itself did not increase the micronuclei (Mn frequency, co-treatment of cells with VIN and HYD led to significant increase (P<0.05 in the frequency of Mn in comparison to control and VIN treated groups. Conclusion: Cells treated with stress hormone are more sensitive to damages induced by VIN. Therefore, stress may not directly result in genetic instability, it can increase the harmful effects associated with other genotoxic agents.

  13. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in the leucocytes of mouse and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, R.J.; Brewen, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    In earlier studies it was shown that the frequency of dicentrics induced by X-rays in human leucocytes was about twice that induced in mouse leucocytes. The frequencies of deletions were similar in both species. However, the mouse cultures were fixed at 60 h and the human cultures at 54 h. In both cases it was likely that some of the cells analysed were in their second post-treatment mitosis. Further studies were carried out using fixation times of 48 h for both mouse and human cultures (three different human donors were used). The same relationships held here, namely twice as many dicentrics in humans, and similar deletion frequencies in both. The aberration frequencies observed were corrected to take account of second-diversion cells by assuming that cells containing a dicentric without an accompanying fragment were in their second division. There were more such cells in mouse than in human cultures. Further to increase reliance on the conclusions, cultures were fixed at the earliest times that 300 cells per dose could be obtained - 36 h for the mouse, 42 h for the human. The frequencies of dicentrics were increased in both, and a relationship of about 2:1 for human to mouse was obtained. Deletion frequencies were similar in both. Since no dicentrics without fragments were obtained, it appeared that aberration frequencies in first-division cells only were being compared. (author)

  14. Microdissection and molecular manipulation of single chromosomes in woody fruit trees with small chromosomes using pomelo (Citrus grandis) as a model. I. Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D; Wu, W; Zhou, Y; Hu, Z; Lu, L

    2004-05-01

    Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries by means of chromosome microdissection and microcloning will be useful for genomic research, especially for those species that have not been extensively studied genetically. Application of the technology of microdissection and microcloning to woody fruit plants has not been reported hitherto, largely due to the generally small sizes of metaphase chromosomes and the difficulty of chromosome preparation. The present study was performed to establish a method for single chromosome microdissection and microcloning in woody fruit species using pomelo as a model. The standard karyotype of a pomelo cultivar ( Citrus grandis cv. Guanxi) was established based on 20 prometaphase photomicrographs. According to the standard karyotype, chromosome 1 was identified and isolated with fine glass microneedles controlled by a micromanipulator. DNA fragments ranging from 0.3 kb to 2 kb were acquired from the isolated single chromosome 1 via two rounds of PCR mediated by Sau3A linker adaptors and then cloned into T-easy vectors to generate a DNA library of chromosome 1. Approximately 30,000 recombinant clones were obtained. Evaluation based on 108 randomly selected clones showed that the sizes of the cloned inserts varied from 0.5 kb to 1.5 kb with an average of 860 bp. Our research suggests that microdissection and microcloning of single small chromosomes in woody plants is feasible.

  15. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  16. Preparation of single rice chromosome for construction of a DNA library using a laser microbeam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Haowei; Li, Yinmei; Tang, Yesheng; Liu, Yilei; Hu, Xin; Jia, Peixin; Ying, Kai; Feng, Qi; Guan, Jianping; Jin, Chaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Lou, Liren; Zhou, Zhuan; Han, Bin

    2004-04-29

    We report the development of a laser micromanipulation system and its application in the isolation of individual rice chromosomes directly from a metaphase cell. Microdissection and flow sorting are two major methods for the isolation of single chromosome. These methods are dependent on the techniques of chromosome spread and chromosome suspension, respectively. In the development of this system, we avoided using chromosome spread and cell suspension was used instead. The cell wall of metaphase rice cell was cut by optical scissors. The released single chromosome was captured by an optical trap and transported to an area without cell debris. The isolated single chromosome was then collected and specific library was constructed by linker adaptor PCR. The average insert size of the library was about 300 bp. Two hundred inserts of chromosome 4 library were sequenced, and 96.5% were aligned to the corresponding sequences of rice chromosome 4. These results suggest the possible application of this method for the preparation of other subcellular structures and for the cloning of single macromolecule through a laser microbeam trap.

  17. A comparative study of the potentiating effect of caffeine and poly-D-lysine on chromosome damage induced by X-rays in plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, S.; Panneerselvam, N.; Cortes, F. (Sevilla University, Faculty of Biology (Spain). Department of Cell Biology); Mateos, J.C. (Centro Regional de Oncologia ' Duque del Infantado' , Sevilla (Spain))

    1992-04-01

    X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations (CA) were potentiated by post-treatments in G{sub 2} with either caffeine (caff) or poly-D-lysine (PDL) in root-tip cells of Allium cepa. The enhancement of the yield of CA was concomittant with an increase in the frequency of mitosis. The results seem to support the idea of a direct relationship between radiation-induced G{sub 2} delay and repair of chromosome damage. Similarities between caff and PDL are reported in both decreasing G{sub 2} delay and enhancing chromatid aberration yield. The possible molecular mechanism(s) of action responsible for the cytogenetic effects observed are discussed. (author). 20 refs.; 2 tabs.

  18. Relationship between cell cycle stage in the fertilized egg of mice and repair capacity for X-ray-induced damage in the sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Y.; Maemori, M.; Tobari, I. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-09-01

    The potentiation effects of 3-aminobenzamide, caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine on the yield of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations of mouse sperm were examined at the first-cleavage metaphase, to clarify a correlation between chromosome aberrations and cell cycle dependency of repair capacity of the fertilized egg. The result provided evidence that there are two major types of DNA damage in X-irradiated sperm: (1) short-lived DNA lesions; the lesions are subject to repair inhibitions by agents added in G{sub 1} and are converted into chromosome-type aberrations during G{sub 1}, and (2) long-lived DNA lesions; the lesions persist until S phase and repair of the lesions is inhibited by caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine in G {sub 2}. (author).

  19. Relationship between cell cycle stage in the fertilized egg of mice and repair capacity for X-ray-induced damage in the sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Maemori, M.; Tobari, I.

    1989-01-01

    The potentiation effects of 3-aminobenzamide, caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine on the yield of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations of mouse sperm were examined at the first-cleavage metaphase, to clarify a correlation between chromosome aberrations and cell cycle dependency of repair capacity of the fertilized egg. The result provided evidence that there are two major types of DNA damage in X-irradiated sperm: (1) short-lived DNA lesions; the lesions are subject to repair inhibitions by agents added in G 1 and are converted into chromosome-type aberrations during G 1 , and (2) long-lived DNA lesions; the lesions persist until S phase and repair of the lesions is inhibited by caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine in G 2 . (author)

  20. Biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation by C-banding of interphase chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    In the present report a C-banding procedure, refined to avoid swelling and chromosome distortion of freshly prepared prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs) spreads, is used to identify aberrations in non-stimulated human lymphocytes. The method allows immediate banding of the centromeric regions and enables scoring of aberrations within a time interval (3-4h after blood sample withdrawal) that is only a fraction of that normally required when cells stimulated to proliferate are analysed at metaphase. The dose-response for dicentrics and centric rings measured in interphase lymphocytes was found to be similar to that obtained at metaphase. Measurement of dicentrics and centric rings in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human lymphocytes would provide valuable information on radiation dose estimates, especially in cases of extreme urgency. (Author)

  1. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  2. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  3. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  4. Frequencies of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of xeroderma pigmentosum and Fanconi anemia patients estimated by Giemsa and fluorescence in situ hybridization staining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathy Radha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood lymphocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP and Fanconi anemia (FA patients were assessed for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation by estimating the frequency of X-ray (1 and 2 Gy-induced chromosome aberrations (CA. The frequencies of aberrations in the whole genome were estimated in Giemsa-stained preparations of lymphocytes irradiated at G0 or G2 stages. The frequencies of translocations and dicentrics involving chromosomes 1 and 3 as well as the X-chromosome were determined in slides stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique. An increase in all types of CA was observed in XP and FA lymphocytes irradiated at G0 when compared to controls. The frequency of dicentrics and rings was 6 to 27% higher (at 1 and 2 Gy in XP lymphocytes and 37% higher (at 2 Gy in FA lymphocytes than in controls, while chromosome deletions were higher in irradiated (30% in 1 Gy and 72% in 2 Gy than in control XP lymphocytes and 28 to 102% higher in FA lymphocytes. In G2-irradiated lymphocytes the frequency of CA was 24 to 55% higher in XP lymphocytes than in controls. In most cases the translocation frequencies were higher than the frequencies of dicentrics (21/19.

  5. Effects of caffeine upon material repair systems involved in the rejoining of x-ray-induced chromosome breaks in the paternal genome of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osgood, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in which ring-X/B/sup s/Yy + males were x-irradiated and mated with females which had been fed on either 1.0% caffeine in 10% sucrose, 0.2% caffeine in 10% sucrose, or on 10% sucrose alone. F1 progeny were scored for dominant lethals and sex chromosome losses, while in the F2 generation the frequency of translocations was monitored. In line with previous reports it was found that at a concentration of 0.2% caffeine the frequencies of dominant lethals and sex chromosome losses were increased while the frequency of translocations was depressed. At the higher concentration of 1.0% caffeine the frequencies of dominant lethals and sex chromosome losses were depressed. With respect to translocations, while the formation of translocations between autosomes was enhanced in the presence of 1.0% caffeine, the frequency of translocations between the Y and the autosomes was depressed relative to sucrose controls. The proposal is made that at high effective concentrations, caffeine promotes the rejoining of breaks induced in sperm, supported by evidence of an enhancement in the frequency of autosomal translocations in the 1.0% caffeine series and consistent with the depression in the frequencies of dominant lethals and sex chromosome losses in the 1.0% series as compared to sucrose controls

  6. Chromosomal aberrations in humans induced by urban air pollution: influence of DNA repair and polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and N-acetyltransferase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, H; Gamborg, M O

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes as a biomar......We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes...... that long-term exposure to urban air pollution (with traffic as the main contributor) induces chromosome damage in human somatic cells. Low DNA repair capacity and GSTM1 and NAT2 variants associated with reduced detoxification ability increase susceptibility to such damage. The effect of the GSTM1 genotype......, which was observed only in the bus drivers, appears to be associated with air pollution, whereas the NAT2 genotype effect, which affected all subjects, may influence the individual response to some other common exposure or the baseline level of chromosomal aberrations....

  7. The chromosomal distributions of Ty1-copia group retrotransposable elements in higher plants and their implications for genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. (Pat) Heslop-Harrison; Andrea Brandes; Shin Taketa; Thomas Schmidt; Alexander V. Vershinin; Elena G. Alkhimova; Anette Kamm; Robert L. Doudrick; . [and others

    1997-01-01

    Retrotransposons make up a major fraction - sometimes more than 40% - of all plant genomes investigated so far. We have isolated the reverse transcriptase domains of theTyl-copia group elements from several species, ranging in genome size from some 100 Mbp to 23,000 Mbp, and determined the distribution patterns of these retrotransposons on metaphase chromosomes and...

  8. Effects of x-rays on growth of plants and mitotic chromosomal aberrations of Lathyrus sativus Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, D.; Das, A.

    1985-01-01

    It has been found that the abnormalities of chromosome at different stages of mitosis show a linear dose relationship. From the detailed study of normal, abnormal phases of prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase, it is observed that the abnormality (per cent) in all stages of mitosis has increased with increase in dose. Under different doses, the observed characters of abnormality in chromosomes of Lathyrus sativus may exhibit the occurence of direct hit process. (M.N.)

  9. Chromosomal instability and double minute chromosomes in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalic, H.; Radosevic-Stasic, B.

    2004-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a woman with ductal breast carcinoma, who as a hospital employee was exposed professionally for 15 years to low doses of ionizing radiation. The most important finding after the chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy was the presence of double minutes (DM) chromosomes, in combination with other chromosomal abnormalities (on 200 scored metaphases were found 2 chromatid breaks, 10 dicentrics, 11 acentric fragments, 2 gaps, and 3 double min chromosomes). In a repeated analysis (after 6 months), DM chromosomes were still present. To rule out the possibility that the patient was overexposed to ionizing radiation at work, her blood test was compared with a group of coworkers as well as with a group of professionally unexposed people. The data rejected this possibility, but the retroactive analysis showed that the patient even at the time of employment had a moderately increased number of chromosomal aberrations (3.5%) consisting of 3 isochromatids and 4 gaps, suggesting that her initial genomic instability enhanced the later development. The finding of a continuous presence of rare DM chromosomes in her PBL (4 and 10 months after radio-chemotherapy) was considered as an indicator of additional risk, which might have some prognostic significance. (author)

  10. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions

  11. The meiotic consequences of chromosomal aberrations induced by separate and simultaneous applications of gamma rays and NMU in lentil (Lens culinaris Med.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Pratibha; Dubey, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    Certain meiotic abnormalities were induced by the application of 5, 10 or 15 Kr of gamma rays and/or 0.02 percent of NMU on seeds of lentil (Lens culinaris Med.) var. T36. Univalents, quadrivalents or higher multivalent associations were induced by gamma rays individually or in combination with NMU, while no such associations were recorded in plants treated with NMU alone. But nucleolar fragmentation, chromatin bridges and non-orientation of chromosome fragments were induced by both the mutagens. The percentage of cells showing meiotic abnormalities in the gamma ray treatments increased with an increase in the irradiation dose, however, the combined treatments of the two mutagens did not show a synergestic influence of the two mutagens in inducing such abnormalities. (author)

  12. Chromosome Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions wit...

  13. Caffeine-mediated release of alpha-radiation-induced G2 arrest increases the yield of chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke-Huhle, C.; Hieber, L.; Wegner, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Severe and partly irreversible G2 arrest caused by americium-241 alpha-particles in Chinese hamster V79 cells acted as a competing process to the yield of detectable aberrant mitoses at metaphase. With increasing dose of alpha-radiation an increasing fraction of cells was irreversibly arrested in G2 with the consequence of interphase death before the first post-irradiation mitosis. This irreversible G2 arrest (demonstrated by flow cytofluorometry and mitotic indices) could be overcome by adding caffeine 8 hours after irradiation, the time point of maximum G2 arrest (80-90 per cent of all cells). Within 3.5 hours the number of aberrant mitoses increased by this treatment from 54 to 96 per cent and from 65 to 99.9 per cent for doses of 1.75 and 4.38 Gy of alpha-particles, respectively. The aberration frequency per mitotic cell, scored as chromatid and isochromatid breaks, rings, interchanges and dicentrics increased by a factor of about 3 after releasing G2 arrested cells. The frequency distribution of aberrations per cell revealed that, after 4.38 Gy, 58 per cent of the formerly G2-arrested cells had more than five aberrations per cell compared to only 8 per cent without the interaction of caffeine. (author)

  14. Jarid2 Is Implicated in the Initial Xist-Induced Targeting of PRC2 to the Inactive X Chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Boeva, Valentina; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martin

    2014-01-01

    complex, unlike at other parts of the genome, such as CG-rich regions, where Jarid2 and PRC2 binding are interdependent. Conversely, we show that Jarid2 loss prevents efficient PRC2 and H3K27me3 enrichment to Xist-coated chromatin. Jarid2 thus represents an important intermediate between PRC2 and Xist RNA......During X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is thought to participate in the early maintenance of the inactive state. Although Xist RNA is essential for the recruitment of PRC2 to the X chromosome, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate...... for the initial targeting of the PRC2 complex to the X chromosome during onset of XCI....

  15. Expedited Radiation Biodosimetry by Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identification (ADCI) and Dose Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Ben; Li, Yanxin; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2017-09-04

    Biological radiation dose can be estimated from dicentric chromosome frequencies in metaphase cells. Performing these cytogenetic dicentric chromosome assays is traditionally a manual, labor-intensive process not well suited to handle the volume of samples which may require examination in the wake of a mass casualty event. Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identifier and Dose Estimator (ADCI) software automates this process by examining sets of metaphase images using machine learning-based image processing techniques. The software selects appropriate images for analysis by removing unsuitable images, classifies each object as either a centromere-containing chromosome or non-chromosome, further distinguishes chromosomes as monocentric chromosomes (MCs) or dicentric chromosomes (DCs), determines DC frequency within a sample, and estimates biological radiation dose by comparing sample DC frequency with calibration curves computed using calibration samples. This protocol describes the usage of ADCI software. Typically, both calibration (known dose) and test (unknown dose) sets of metaphase images are imported to perform accurate dose estimation. Optimal images for analysis can be found automatically using preset image filters or can also be filtered through manual inspection. The software processes images within each sample and DC frequencies are computed at different levels of stringency for calling DCs, using a machine learning approach. Linear-quadratic calibration curves are generated based on DC frequencies in calibration samples exposed to known physical doses. Doses of test samples exposed to uncertain radiation levels are estimated from their DC frequencies using these calibration curves. Reports can be generated upon request and provide summary of results of one or more samples, of one or more calibration curves, or of dose estimation.

  16. Reduction of transgenerational radiation induced genetic damages observed as numerical chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, M.; Mozdarani, H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of parental gamma irradiation (4 Gy) of NMRI (Naval Medical Research Institute) mice on the numerical chromosome abnormalities in subsequent preimplantation embryos in the presence of vitamin E (200 IU/kg), super-ovulated irradiated females were mated with irradiated males at weekly intervals in successive 6 weekly periods. About 68 h post coitus, 8-cell embryos were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for abnormalities in chromosome number. In embryos generated by irradiated mice, the frequency of aneuploids dramatically increased compared to control unirradiated groups (p < 0.001), while no significant difference were observed within irradiated groups mated at weekly interval. Administration of vitamin E significantly decreased chromosomal aberrations in all groups (p < 0.05). Data indicate that gamma irradiation affects spermatogenesis and oogenesis and causes DNA alterations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of abnormalities. The way vitamin E reduces genotoxic effects of radiation might be via radical scavenging or antioxidative mechanism. (authors)

  17. Some characteristics and its influence factors of chromosome aberrations of germ cells induced by ionizing radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Cai Lu; Wang Xianli

    1995-01-01

    The chromosome aberrations of germ cells in mice by low LET ionizing radiation were systematically studied. The study demonstrated that the chromosome aberrations were linear or linearly square correlated with X-ray doses in large doses; that was linear correlated with X-ray doses in low doses. In addition, there were many factors directly influencing chromosome aberrations. The aberrations of the germ cells in males were 4.4 times of that in females. The aberrations in the germ cells were significantly higher after meiosis than before. The aberrations in secondary spermatocytes were 3.6 times of that in spermatogonia and 10 times of that in primary spermatocytes, respectively. In different phases of meiosis, the amount of chromosome aberrations in leptotene was the least, that in diaknesis was the most. The spermatogonic translocation rate receiving a whole body X-irradiation was 1.74 times of that receiving a local testis X-irradiation. The spermatogonic translocation rate of acute X-irradiation was 4.6∼6.3 times of that of chronic γ-irradiation

  18. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  19. Metaphase II oocytes from human unilaminar follicles grown in a multi-step culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, M; Albertini, D F; Wallace, W H B; Anderson, R A; Telfer, E E

    2018-03-01

    Can complete oocyte development be achieved from human ovarian tissue containing primordial/unilaminar follicles and grown in vitro in a multi-step culture to meiotic maturation demonstrated by the formation of polar bodies and a Metaphase II spindle? Development of human oocytes from primordial/unilaminar stages to resumption of meiosis (Metaphase II) and emission of a polar body was achieved within a serum free multi-step culture system. Complete development of oocytes in vitro has been achieved in mouse, where in vitro grown (IVG) oocytes from primordial follicles have resulted in the production of live offspring. Human oocytes have been grown in vitro from the secondary/multi-laminar stage to obtain fully grown oocytes capable of meiotic maturation. However, there are no reports of a culture system supporting complete growth from the earliest stages of human follicle development through to Metaphase II. Ovarian cortical biopsies were obtained with informed consent from women undergoing elective caesarean section (mean age: 30.7 ± 1.7; range: 25-39 years, n = 10). Laboratory setting. Ovarian biopsies were dissected into thin strips, and after removal of growing follicles were cultured in serum free medium for 8 days (Step 1). At the end of this period secondary/multi-laminar follicles were dissected from the strips and intact follicles 100-150 μm in diameter were selected for further culture. Isolated follicles were cultured individually in serum free medium in the presence of 100 ng/ml of human recombinant Activin A (Step 2). Individual follicles were monitored and after 8 days, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were retrieved by gentle pressure on the cultured follicles. Complexes with complete cumulus and adherent mural granulosa cells were selected and cultured in the presence of Activin A and FSH on membranes for a further 4 days (Step 3). At the end of Step 3, complexes containing oocytes >100 μm diameter were selected for IVM in SAGE medium (Step 4) then

  20. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sup 60}Co; Analise da frequencia de alteracoes cromossomicas instaveis em linfocitos humanos irradiados com {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: july_cgm@hotmail.com, E-mail: mendes_sb@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a {sup 60}Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to {sup 60}Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN.

  1. Protective effects of several plant polyphenols against chromosomal damage induced in vivo by X-rays. Comparative study versus diosmin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, M; Rosa, B [Radiology and Physical Medicine Department of Furfural Espanol S.A., Murcia (Spain); Castillo, J; Benavente-Garcia, O; Lorente, J [Research and Development Department of Furfural Espanol S.A., Murcia (Spain); Vicente, V [Pathology Department of Furfural Espanol S.A., Murcia (Spain); Canteras, M [Biostatistical Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Protective effects of grape (Vitis vinifera) seed (GSE), Citrus spp. fruits (CE) and olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf (OL) extracts, the flavonoids diosmin and rutin, widely used as pharmaceuticals, and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) against chromosomal damage induced by X-rays were determined by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity. The reduction of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs) in bone marrow of mouse exposed to X-rays was examined. The most effective compounds were, in order: GSE {approx} CE > rutin {approx} DMSO {approx} OL > diosmin. These results suggest a correlation between the antioxidant and anticlastogenic activity of these polyphenolic extracts. (author)

  2. Protective effects of several plant polyphenols against chromosomal damage induced in vivo by X-rays. Comparative study versus diosmin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Rosa, B.; Castillo, J.; Benavente-Garcia, O.; Lorente, J.; Vicente, V.; Canteras, M.

    2001-01-01

    Protective effects of grape (Vitis vinifera) seed (GSE), Citrus spp. fruits (CE) and olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf (OL) extracts, the flavonoids diosmin and rutin, widely used as pharmaceuticals, and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) against chromosomal damage induced by X-rays were determined by using the micronucleus test for anticlastogenic activity. The reduction of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs) in bone marrow of mouse exposed to X-rays was examined. The most effective compounds were, in order: GSE ∼ CE > rutin ∼ DMSO ∼ OL > diosmin. These results suggest a correlation between the antioxidant and anticlastogenic activity of these polyphenolic extracts. (author)

  3. Higher incidence of spontaneous sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, T.; Das, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes from human and muntjac (barking deer) females who were at an advanced stage of pregnancy (32-37 weeks pregnant women and 20-24 weeks pregnant muntjacs) showed an enhanced frequency of SCEs and X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations when compared with those of nonpregnant females. Lymphocyte cultures of nonpregnant females to which sex hormones progesterone, oestrogen and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) were added together exogenously also showed higher frequency of SCEs. The plausible reason(s) for such high incidence of SCEs during pregnancy is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Drifter technique: a new method to obtain metaphases in Hep-2 cell line cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hep-2 cell line is derived from laryngeal carcinoma cells and is often utilized as a model in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis tests. To evaluate the proliferative potential of this line, we developed a cytogenetic methodology (drifter technique to obtain metaphases from cells that loose cellular adhesion when they underwent mitosis in culture. By this procedure, 2000 cells were counted, resulting in a mitotic index (MI of 22.2%. Although this MI was not statistically different from the one obtained using either a classical cytogenetic method or a cell synchronization technique, the drifter technique has the advantage of not requiring the use of some reagents for the obtention of metaphases and also of diminishing the consumption of maintenance reagents for this cell line.A linhagem celular Hep-2 é formada por células de carcinoma da laringe e é muito utilizada em modelos de carcinogênese e mutagenêse. Para avaliar o potencial proliferativo desta linhagem, desenvolvemos uma metodologia citogenética (técnica do sobrenadante para obtenção de metáfases a partir de células que, ao entrarem em mitose, perdem adesão celular, ficando em suspensão no meio de cultura. Através deste procedimento, foram contadas 2000 células, correspondendo a um índice mitótico (IM de 22.2% . Apesar de o IM obtido por esta técnica não ter sido estatisticamente diferente do IM obtido por outras metodologias citogenéticas clássicas, a técnica do sobrenadante é vantajosa porque elimina o uso de alguns reagentes utilizados na obtenção de metáfases e também diminui o consumo de reagentes de manutenção desta linhagem.

  5. Using 3-color chromosome painting to decide between chromosome aberration models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.N.; Sachs, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces chromosome aberrations when DNA double strand breaks (DSB) interact pairwise. For more than 30 years there have been two main, competing theories of such binary DSB interactions. The classical theory asserts that an unrepaired DSB makes two ends which separate, with each end subsequently able to join any similar (non-telomeric) end. The exchange theory asserts that the two DSB ends remain associated until repair or a reciprocal chromosome exchange involving a second DSB occurs. The authors conducted an experiment to test these models, using 3-color chromosome painting. After in vitro irradiation of resting human lymphocytes, they observed cells with three-color triplets at first metaphase: three derivative chromosomes having permuted colors, as if three broken chromosomes had played musical chairs. On the exchange model in its standard form such 3-color triplets cannot occur. On the classical model the expected frequency can be calculated. They report data and computer calculations which exclude the exchange model and favor the classical model

  6. Chronic exposure to a low concentration of bisphenol A during follicle culture affects the epigenetic status of germinal vesicles and metaphase II oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapphoff, Tom; Heiligentag, Martyna; El Hajj, Nady; Haaf, Thomas; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether exposure to low concentrations of the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during follicle culture and oocyte growth alters the methylation status of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes and histone posttranslational modification patterns in mammalian oocytes. Comparative and control study. Experimental laboratory. C57/Bl6JxCBA/Ca mice. Exposure of oocytes to 3 nM or 300 nM BPA during follicle culture from preantral to antral stage. Methylation status of DMRs of maternally imprinted (Snrpn, Igf2r, and Mest) and paternally imprinted gene(s) (H19) in mouse germinal vesicle oocytes; trimethylation of histone H3K9, acetylation of histone H4K12, and distance between centromeres of sister chromatids in metaphase II oocytes. Exposure to 3 nM BPA was associated with slightly accelerated follicle development, statistically significant increases in allele methylation errors in DMRs of maternally imprinted genes, and statistically significant decreases in histone H3K9 trimethylation and interkinetochore distance. The disturbances in oocyte genomic imprinting and modification of posttranslational histone and centromere architecture provide the first link between low BPA exposures and induction of epigenetic changes that may contribute to chromosome congression failures and meiotic errors, and to altered gene expression that might affect health of the offspring. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Frequency of chromosome aberrations in residents of the Semipalatinsk Oblast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubitskaia, E G; Akhmatullina, N B; Vsevolodov, E B; Bishnevskaia, S S; Sharipov, I K; Cherednichenko, O G

    1999-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the population of the Beskaragai district of the Semipalatinsk oblast adjacent to the territory of the nuclear test site was conducted by means of an ecological genetic questionnaire and cytogenetic examination of metaphase chromosomes. An increase in the total mutation level in the region was observed. The frequency of chromosome aberrations among the population of the Beskaragai district (3.2%) was statistically significantly (about 1.5 times) higher than the background levels in the clear regions (from 1 to 2%). Furthermore, the frequency of aberrations in adolescents was comparable with that in the adults. The spectrum of chromosome aberrations pointed to a significant contribution of radiation component to the mutagenesis.

  8. Chromosomal damage after Iodine-131 treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer: in vivo dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.K.; Nguyen, X.P.; Truong, Q.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although it is well known that radiation induces chromosomal aberrations, there is a lack of information on the in- vivo dose-effect relationship in patients receiving Iodine-131 treatment and the results of previous studies are controversial. In this study, the dicentric chromosomal aberrations (DCA) analysis method was employed to investigate acute and late chromosomal damage (CD) in the peripheral lymphocytes of 58 differentiated thyroid cancer patients who received dose 1,1 GBq of Iodine-131 (group A), and 34 patients who received dose 3,7 GBq of Iodine- 131 (group B). The mean 100 metaphase spreads were scored for each subject. The DCA frequencies in cultured peripheral lymphocytes were determined before treatment to assess basal DCA frequencies, on the 3rd day to assess acute DCA frequencies and 6 months later to assess late DCA frequencies. The basal, acute and late DCA frequencies were divided into two groups: 0,18%, 2,14% and 0,53% (group A) and 0,18%, 2,12 % and 0,89% (group B), respectively, and these values differed significantly at various time after treatment (p 2 = 0,987), and group B as Y= 32,71 + 0,189 X. (r = 0,9381, R 2 = 0,880). However, there was an interesting difference in comparison with in- vitro studies, in that we found the coefficient β to have a negative value, suggesting the disappearance of damaged lymphocytes from peripheral circulation in a dose- dependent manner following Iodine-131 treatment. Further studies are therefore needed to clarify the effect of the negative β value on biological dosimetry approach in continuous internal low LET radiation, as in the case of Iodine-131 treatment. (author)

  9. Comment of the paper 'Chromosome aberrations induced by low doses of X-rays in human lymphocytes in vitro'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, W.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    This comment points out some problems in the statistical evaluation of the data of Ziemba-Zoltowska, E. Bocian, O. Rosiek and J. Sablinski (1980) on chromosome aberrations in irradiated human lymphocytes; comments are made on results derived from a an iteratively reweighted least squares procedure instead of the ordinary unweighted least squares method to establish first and second order dose-response curves for dicentric and centric rings. (U.K.)

  10. Effects of inhibitors of DNA repair on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by x-rays or alkylating agents in cultured human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.; Andersson, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the first part of this presentation the authors give examples of the synergistic enhancements that are obtained with various inhibitor combinations in G/sub 2/. The second part of the presentation deals with the effects of two agents, also well known for their capacity to potentiate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by physical and chemical agents, but with a different mechanism of action. These agents are caffeine and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB). Caffeine has for decades been used as an inhibitor of DNA repair although its mechanism of action has not been fully understood. 3AB has more recently come into focus as an efficient inhibitor of the synthesis of poly-(ADP-ribose), a substance believed to be of importance in connection with the repair of certain types of DNA damage. The results presented do not quite fit in with the general idea about the mode of action of these agents. All experiments were carried out with whole-blood cultures of human lymphocytes. When inhibitors were used as post-treatments, chromosomal aberrations were induced by X-rays or by the alkylating agents thiotepa (TT) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). X-rays were generated by a Siemens Stabilipan 200 apparatus, at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min. The tube (TR 200f) was operated at 180 kV, 10 mA and the radiation filtered through 4 mm Al

  11. [Acute transformation of chronic myeloid leukemia: disappearance of the Philadelphia chromosome after autograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffers, J; David, B; Bernard, P; Vezon, G; Marit, G; Moulinier, J; Broustet, A

    1984-04-12

    Two patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia (C.G.L.) undergoing transformation were treated by high dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by autografting of hematopoietic stem cells collected and cryo-preserved at the time of diagnosis. Recovery of hematopoiesis was characterized by disappearance of the Philadelphia chromosome in most metaphases. A new approach of the management of C.G.L. is discussed.

  12. Meiotic non-disjunction induced by fission neutrons relative to X-rays observed in mouse secondary spermatocytes. Pt. 1. The response of different cell stages to a single radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, A.; Pacchierotti, F.; Metalli, P. (Nuclear Energy Agency, Rome (Italy). Div. of Physics and Biomedical Sciences)

    1983-03-01

    (C57BL/CnexC3H/Cne)F/sub 1/ male mice were irradiated with 2 Gy of 250-kV X-rays or 0.56 Gy of attenuated fission spectrum neutrons, and killed at various times after treatment. Second meiotic metaphases of spermatogenetic cells irradiated in various meiotic and premeiotic stages were observed. These stages were first meiotic metaphase, diplotene, late pachytene, mid-pachytene, zygotene, pre-leptotene and spermatogonia. Cells were classified by chromosome counting, and those with 18 <=n<=22 were recorded. An index of induction of non-disjunction events was obtained by the frequency of hyper-haploid spermatocytes relative to the sum of hyper-haploid and normal haploid spreads. The frequency of hyper-haploid spermatocytes was 0.7+-0.4 in control mice. It was higher after treatment with both types of radiation at all meiotic stages tested, with a peak of induction at and shortly before metaphase I-diakinesis (16-19%). Irradiated gonial cells also yielded values higher than did controls. The difference was statistically significant after irradiation with neutrons, showing that radiation can induce non-disjunction events in stem cells.

  13. Induction of chromosome damage by ultraviolet light and caffeine: correlation of cytogenetic evaluation and flow karyotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Cremer, T.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Asynchronously growing cells of a M3-1 Chinese hamster line were ultraviolet (UV) irradiated (lambda . 254 nm) with UV fluences up to 7.5 J/m(2). After irradiation cells were incubated with or without 2 mM caffeine for 20 hr, then mitotic cells were selected by mechanical shaking. Their chromosomes were isolated, stained with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin A3, and measured flow cytometrically. While the fluorescence distributions of chromosomes (flow karyo-types) from cells treated with UV alone or with caffeine alone were very similar to those of untreated controls, the flow karyo-types of UV + caffeine-treated cells showed a debris continuum that increased with increasing UV fluence suggesting an increased number of chromosome fragments. Visual evaluation of metaphase plates revealed that the percentage of cells with chromosome damage also increased steadily with increasing UV fluence. A high degree of correlation was observed between the relative magnitude of the debris level from flow karyotypes and the percentage of cells with chromosome damage and with generalized chromosomes shattering, respectively, as determined from metaphase spreads

  14. The alpha-spectrin gene is on chromosome 1 in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K; Palumbo, A P; Isobe, M; Kozak, C A; Monaco, S; Rovera, G; Croce, C M; Curtis, P J

    1985-06-01

    By using alpha-spectrin cDNA clones of murine and human origin and somatic cell hybrids segregating either mouse or human chromosomes, the gene for alpha-spectrin has been mapped to chromosome 1 in both species. This assignment of the mouse alpha-spectrin gene to mouse chromosome 1 by DNA hybridization strengthens the previous identification of the alpha-spectrin locus in mouse with the sph locus, which previously was mapped by linkage analysis to mouse chromosome 1, distal to the Pep-3 locus. By in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the human alpha-spectrin gene has been localized to 1q22-1q25; interestingly, the locus for a non-Rh-linked form of elliptocytosis has been provisionally mapped to band 1q2 by family linkage studies.

  15. Effect of x-rays on the somatic chromosomes of the exotic fish, Tilapia mossambica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, G.K.; Som, R.C. (Kalyani Univ. (India). Dept. of Zoology)

    1982-03-01

    Male and female T. mossambica were x-rayed with 100 r and the metaphase chromosome aberrations in their gill epithelia were studied at 13 different intervals against suitable control. The chromosomes of males appeared more radio-sensitive than those of females. Among the diploid complement of 44 chromosomes, the individual type aberrations were non-random in both sexes. The longest pair of chromosomes, taken as the marker pair, was found very highly radio-sensitive, while the remaining 21 pairs as non-markers were somewhat resistant to x-radiation when the observed and the expected numbers were subjected to statistical analysis. The break in the marker chromosome was also non-randomly distributed as the distal half had a significantly large number of breaks.

  16. Chromosomal aberration in peripheral lymphocytes and doses to the active bone marrow in radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershkevitsh, E.; Trott, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of prostate cancer. Epidemiological data indicate a small but significant risk of radiation-induced leukemia after radiotherapy which might be related to the high mean bone marrow dose associated with radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relation between the mean bone marrow dose and unstable chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer as a possible indicator of risk. Endometrial cancer patients were also included for comparison. Patients and Methods: Nine patients, six with prostate cancer (60-73 years old) and three with endometrial cancer (61-81 years old) treated with radiotherapy were included in the study. The non-bony spaces inside the pelvic bones were outlined on every CT slice using the treatment planning system and mean doses to the bone marrow calculated. Blood samples of the patients were obtained at different times before, during and at the end of treatment. Lymphocytes were cultured in the usual way and metaphases scored for dicentric aberrations. Results: 46 samples from nine patients were obtained. The mean number of metaphases analyzed per sample was 180 with a range from 52 to 435. The mean bone marrow doses for prostate cancer patients ranged from 2.8 to 4.2 Gy and for endometrial cancer patients from 12.8 to 14.8 Gy. The aberration yield increased with the planning target volume and the mean bone marrow dose. Conclusion: The yield of dicentric aberrations for prostate cancer patients correlated closely with the mean bone marrow dose albeit the induction of dicentrics occurred in mature T lymphocytes most of which were probably in transit through the irradiated volumes. Therefore, the observed relationship between dicentrics and mean bone marrow doses are indirect. (orig.) [de

  17. Molecular nature of X-ray-induced mutations compared with that of spontaneous ones in human c-hprt gene integrated into mammalian chromosomal DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Kato, Takesi.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray-induced mutations were analysed at molecular levels in comparison with spontaneous mutations. Altered sequences were determined tentatively of 30 independent X-ray-induced mutations in a cDNA of the human hprt gene which was integrated into mammalian chromosome as a part of a shuttle vector. Mutations consisted of base substitutions (37 %), frameshifts (27 %), deletions (27 %) and others (10 %). All these mutational events were distributed randomly over the gene without there being hot spots. The spectrum and distribution of X-ray-induced mutations resembled those of spontaneous mutations. Among base substitutions, transversions were predominant and base substitution mutations occurred more at A:T sites than at G:C sites, which is also the case in spontaneous mutations. Most of the frameshift and deletion mutations induced by X-rays, as well as those spontaneously arising, were characterized by the existence of short direct repeats of several identical bases in a row at the sites of the mutations. A slippage misalignment mechanism in replication well accounts for the generation of these classes of mutations. Judging from the data accumulated so far, it can be concluded that X-ray-induced mutations at molecular levels are similar to those spontaneously occurring. (author)

  18. Generalized concept of the LET-RBE relationship of radiation-induced chromosome aberration and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Yoshikawa, Isao; Sasaki, Masao S.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations per traversal of a nucleus by a charged particle at the low dose limit increases proportionally to the square of the linear energy transfer (LET), peaks at about 100 keV/μm and then decreases with further increase of LET. This has long been interpreted as an excessive energy deposition over the necessary energy required to produce a biologically effective event. Here, we present an alternative interpretation. Cell traversed by a charged particle has certain probability to receive lethal damage leading to direct death. Such events may increase with an increase of LET and the number of charged particles traversing the cell. Assuming that the lethal damage is distributed according to a Poisson distribution, the probability that a cell has no such damage is expressed by e -cLx , where c is a constant, L is LET, and x is the number of charged particles traversing the cell. From these assumptions, the frequency of chromosome aberration in surviving cells can be described by Y=αSD+βS 2 D 2 with the empirical relation Y=αD+βD 2 in the low LET region, where S=e -cL , α is a value proportional to LET, β is a constant, and D is the absorbed dose. This model readily explains the empirically established relationship between LET and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The model can also be applied to clonogenic survival. If cells can survive and they have neither unstable chromosome aberrations nor other lethal damage, the LET-RBE relationship for clonogenic survival forms a humped curve. The relationship between LET and inactivation cross-section becomes proportional to the square of LET in the low LET region when the frequency of a directly lethal events is sufficiently smaller than unity, and the inactivation cross-section saturates to the cell nucleus cross-sectional area with an increase in LET in the high LET region. (author)

  19. Niacin deficiency delays DNA excision repair and increases spontaneous and nitrosourea-induced chromosomal instability in rat bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Lisa M; Thomas, Megan; Linford, Geordie; Lizotte, Matthew; Toxopeus, Lori; Bartleman, Anne-Pascale; Kirkland, James B

    2007-12-01

    We have shown that niacin deficiency impairs poly(ADP-ribose) formation and enhances sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei formation in rat bone marrow. We designed the current study to investigate the effects of niacin deficiency on the kinetics of DNA repair following ethylation, and the accumulation of double strand breaks, micronuclei (MN) and chromosomal aberrations (CA). Weanling male Long-Evans rats were fed niacin deficient (ND), or pair fed (PF) control diets for 3 weeks. We examined repair kinetics by comet assay in the 36h following a single dose of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) (30mg/kg bw). There was no effect of ND on mean tail moment (MTM) before ENU treatment, or on the development of strand breaks between 0 and 8h after ENU. Repair kinetics between 12 and 30h were significantly delayed by ND, with a doubling of area under the MTM curve during this period. O(6)-ethylation of guanine peaked by 1.5h, was largely repaired by 15h, and was also delayed in bone marrow cells from ND rats. ND significantly enhanced double strand break accumulation at 24h after ENU. ND alone increased chromosome and chromatid breaks (four- and two-fold). ND alone caused a large increase in MN, and this was amplified by ENU treatment. While repair kinetics suggest that ND may be acting by creating catalytically inactive PARP molecules with a dominant-negative effect on repair processes, the effect of ND alone on O(6)-ethylation, MN and CA, in the absence of altered comet results, suggests additional mechanisms are also leading to chromosomal instability. These data support the idea that the bone marrow cells of niacin deficient cancer patients may be more sensitive to the side effects of genotoxic chemotherapy, resulting in acute bone marrow suppression and chronic development of secondary leukemias.

  20. Chromosomal aberrations induced by caffeine, 3H-thymidine and by X-rays in two L5178Y sublines of different radiosensitivity. Part 1. Chromosomal aberrations in cells treated with 2mM caffeine and tritiated thymidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocian, E.; Bouzyk, E.; Rosiek, O.; Ziemba-Zoltowska, B.

    1982-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were studied in two sublines of L5178Y cells with different sensitivity to X-rays. Cells were treated with 2 mM caffeine for 12 h. Then they were examined at various time intervals from 5 to 24 h. Caffeine caused over three times more aberrations, mainly chromatid breaks and gaps, in radiation-sensitive L5178Y-S than in radiation-resistant L5178Y-R cells. The maximum frequency of chromatid breaks in both sublines was found at 8 h and that of chromatid exchanges and isochromatid breaks at 12 h after treatment. A dramatic decrease of the frequency of all types of aberrations at 24 h was observed. In the pulse labelled experiments caffeine enhanced the frequency of aberrations that were induced by 3 H-thymidine at a concentration of 1 μCi/ml. This effect of caffeine was greater in L5178Y-R than in L5178Y-S cells. (author)

  1. Division-induced DNA double strand breaks in the chromosome terminus region of Escherichia coli lacking RecBCD DNA repair enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kumar Sinha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marker frequency analysis of the Escherichia coli recB mutant chromosome has revealed a deficit of DNA in a specific zone of the terminus, centred on the dif/TerC region. Using fluorescence microscopy of a marked chromosomal site, we show that the dif region is lost after replication completion, at the time of cell division, in one daughter cell only, and that the phenomenon is transmitted to progeny. Analysis by marker frequency and microscopy shows that the position of DNA loss is not defined by the replication fork merging point since it still occurs in the dif/TerC region when the replication fork trap is displaced in strains harbouring ectopic Ter sites. Terminus DNA loss in the recB mutant is also independent of dimer resolution by XerCD at dif and of Topo IV action close to dif. It occurs in the terminus region, at the point of inversion of the GC skew, which is also the point of convergence of specific sequence motifs like KOPS and Chi sites, regardless of whether the convergence of GC skew is at dif (wild-type or a newly created sequence. In the absence of FtsK-driven DNA translocation, terminus DNA loss is less precisely targeted to the KOPS convergence sequence, but occurs at a similar frequency and follows the same pattern as in FtsK+ cells. Importantly, using ftsIts, ftsAts division mutants and cephalexin treated cells, we show that DNA loss of the dif region in the recB mutant is decreased by the inactivation of cell division. We propose that it results from septum-induced chromosome breakage, and largely contributes to the low viability of the recB mutant.

  2. Induction and persistence of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to neutrons in vitro or in vivo: Implications of findings in 'retrospective' biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, L.G.; McFee, A.F.; Sayer, A.M.; O'Neill, J.P.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Maor, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The induction and persistence were evaluated of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes exposed in vitro to highly efficient 1 MeV monoenergetic neutrons and in patients who received fast neutrons as therapy for tumours. For the in vitro studies, lymphocytes were exposed to various doses of neutrons and cultured for one or 20 cell cycles. Aberrations were quantified in painted chromosome pairs 1, 2 or 4. These 1 MeV neutrons were highly efficient in inducing aberrations, and dicentrics as well as one-way and two-way translocations increased as a linear function of dose. About 30% of the aberrant metaphases displayed complex aberrations. After multiple in vitro cell divisions, virtually all asymmetrical aberrations had been eliminated from the cell population, and the frequency of one-way translocations was reduced dramatically. In contrast, most two-way translocations apparently survived through multiple cell divisions and still displayed excellent correlation with dose after 20 cell cycles. Classical methods were used to evaluate persistence of aberrations in patients who received fractionated neutron therapy to tumours located in many different sites. Neutron induced dicentrics and rings disappeared from the peripheral circulation within the first three years after exposure, while translocations persisted for more than 17 y. However, considerable variability in numbers of aberrations were observed between patients who had received similar 'average bone marrow doses'. Results of these studies are discussed in relation to the possible use of translocations as retrospective dosemeters in persons exposed to radiation many years ago. (author)

  3. ATM promotes the obligate XY crossover and both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity on autosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Barchi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis in most sexually reproducing organisms, recombination forms crossovers between homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes and thereby promotes proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. The number and distribution of crossovers are tightly controlled, but the factors that contribute to this control are poorly understood in most organisms, including mammals. Here we provide evidence that the ATM kinase or protein is essential for proper crossover formation in mouse spermatocytes. ATM deficiency causes multiple phenotypes in humans and mice, including gonadal atrophy. Mouse Atm-/- spermatocytes undergo apoptosis at mid-prophase of meiosis I, but Atm(-/- meiotic phenotypes are partially rescued by Spo11 heterozygosity, such that ATM-deficient spermatocytes progress to meiotic metaphase I. Strikingly, Spo11+/-Atm-/- spermatocytes are defective in forming the obligate crossover on the sex chromosomes, even though the XY pair is usually incorporated in a sex body and is transcriptionally inactivated as in normal spermatocytes. The XY crossover defect correlates with the appearance of lagging chromosomes at metaphase I, which may trigger the extensive metaphase apoptosis that is observed in these cells. In addition, control of the number and distribution of crossovers on autosomes appears to be defective in the absence of ATM because there is an increase in the total number of MLH1 foci, which mark the sites of eventual crossover formation, and because interference between MLH1 foci is perturbed. The axes of autosomes exhibit structural defects that correlate with the positions of ongoing recombination. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a role in both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity and further suggests that ATM is important for coordinating these features of meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  4. Focal accumulation of preribosomes outside the nucleolus during metaphase-anaphase in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriggi, Giulia; Gaspar, Sonia G; Nieto, Blanca; Bustelo, Xosé R; Dosil, Mercedes

    2017-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains one nucleolus that remains intact in the mother-cell side of the nucleus throughout most of mitosis. Based on this, it is assumed that the bulk of ribosome production during cell division occurs in the mother cell. Here, we show that the ribosome synthesis machinery localizes not only in the nucleolus but also at a center that is present in the bud side of the nucleus after the initiation of mitosis. This center can be visualized by live microscopy as a punctate body located in close proximity to the nuclear envelope and opposite to the nucleolus. It contains ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and precursors of both 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. Proteins that actively participate in ribosome synthesis, but not functionally defective variants, accumulate in that site. The formation of this body occurs in the metaphase-to-anaphase transition when discrete regions of rDNA occasionally exit the nucleolus and move into the bud. Collectively, our data unveil the existence of a previously unknown mechanism for preribosome accumulation at the nuclear periphery in budding yeast. We propose that this might be a strategy to expedite the delivery of ribosomes to the growing bud. © 2017 Moriggi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Comparative analysis of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced 'in vitro' by various types of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, S.

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative analysis on various types of chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro whole blood irradiation with 180 kV X-rays, gamma rays from cobalt 60, 50 MeV protons and scission neutrons is carried out. The following aberrations are scored: breaks, total number of aberrations, aberrant cells, chromosome fragments, dicentrics and interstitial deletions. The experimental data obtained are statistically processed applying the method of the least squares and employing four mathematical models: Y = cD 2 , Y = cD, Y = a + bD and Y = a + bD + cD 2 . Statistical analysis showed that after treatment with low LET (linear energy transfer) radiations the most suitable for the description of the kinetic of the two break aberrations, total number of aberrations and breaks in relation to dose is the polynomial second degree model, whereas for one break aberrations and aberrant cells - the linear model. The linear model is equally appropriate for one or two breaks aberrations when it is a matter of high LET radiations. Using the linear component of the polynominal second degree equation a comparative characteristic of the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) for the various radiations types is made. The following mean values for RBE are obtained: 0,86 +- 0,44 for gamma radiation from cobalt 60, 0,98 +- 0,06 for 50 MeV protons and 2,38 +- 0,11 for scission neutrons. (A.B.)

  6. Chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and nuclear buds induced in human lymphocytes by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid pesticide formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeljezic, Davor; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2004-01-01

    Pesticides of worldwide application are used in agriculture in vast amounts each year, of which herbicides are the most prominent class. Phenoxyacetic herbicides constitute one of the largest groups of herbicides sold in the world. Among them, for many years 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) has been the one most used. In this study we used Deherban A[reg], a commercial formulation of 2,4-D to determine its possible genotoxic effect on human lymphocytes in vitro by chromosomal aberration analysis and micronucleus assay including the scoring of nuclear buds. Two different concentrations of pesticide formulation were used so that final concentrations of 2,4-D were 0.4 and 4 μg/ml, both in the presence and in the absence of the liver microsomal fraction as metabolic activator. Both concentrations of pesticide caused an increase in chromatid and chromosome breaks, number of micronuclei and number of nuclear buds. Presence of the S9 mix additionally elevated the number of chromatid breaks and micronuclei in treated lymphocytes

  7. Mutagenic effects induced by accumulating rare earths nuclides with different ionic radius in fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Liuyi; Cao Genfa; Sun Baofu

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to ascertain the correlation between the different ionic radius of rare earths nuclides such as 170 Tm, 152 Eu, 147 Pm and its accumulation peculiarity as well as induction of mutagenic effect on bone marrow cells. The study showed that the accumulation peculiarity of rare earths nuclides will vary with the ionic radius. The results indicated that large ionic radius of 147 Pm was selectively localized in liver in early stage, while small ionic radius of 170 Tm and 152 Eu were deposited in bone predominantly. There was a positive relationship between the incidence of chromosome aberration rates and the absorption dose in skeleton by 170 Tm, 152 Eu, or 147 Pm. Studies indicated that the chromosome aberration rates were elevated when the absorption dose in skeleton was increased. Among the type of chromosome aberrations induced by rare earths nuclides with different ionic radius, chromatid breakage was predominant, accompanied with a few chromosome breakage and translocation. At the same time mitosis index of metaphase cells was depressed. Internal contamination of 170 Tm, 152 Eu, or 147 Pm can be induced by some aberrations in one cell. This phenomenon might be due in part to nonuniform irradiation of bone marrow cell with local deposition of these rare earths nuclides with different ionic radius

  8. DNA sequence changes in mutation induced by ultraviolet light in the gpt gene on the chromosome of Escherichia coli uvr+ und uvrA cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sockett, H.; Romac, S.; Hutchinson, F.

    1991-01-01

    Sequence changes in mutations induced by ultraviolet light are reported for the chromosomal Escherichia coli gpt gene in almost isogenic E. coli uvr + and excision-deficient uvrA cells. Differences between the mutagenic spectra are ascribed to preferential removal of photoproducts in the transcribed strand by excision repair in uvr + cells. This conclusion is confirmed by analysis of published results for genes in both uvr + and uvr − cells, showing a similar selective removal of mutagenic products from the transcribed strand of the E. coli lacI gene and of the lambda phage cl repressor gene. Comparison of these data with published results for ultraviolet mutagenesis of gpt on a chromosome in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that a mutagenic hot spot in mammalian cells is not present in E. coli; the possibility is suggested that the hot spot might arise from localized lack of excision repair. Otherwise, mutagenesis in hamster cells appeared similar to that in E. coli uvr + cells, except there appears to be a smaller fraction of single-base additions and deletions (frameshifts) in mammalian than in bacterial cells. Phenotypes of 6-thioguanine-resistant E. coli showed there is a gene (or genes) other than gpt involved in the utilization of thioguanine by bacteria

  9. Caffeine-Induced Premature Chromosome Condensation Results in the Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death in Root Meristems of Vicia faba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rybaczek

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that the activation of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD was a secondary result of caffeine (CF induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC in hydroxyurea-synchronized Vicia faba root meristem cells. Initiation of the apoptotic-like cell degradation pathway seemed to be the result of DNA damage generated by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU [double-stranded breaks (DSBs mostly] and co-treatment with HU/CF [single-stranded breaks (SSBs mainly]. A single chromosome comet assay was successfully used to study different types of DNA damage (neutral variant-DSBs versus alkaline-DSBs or SSBs. The immunocytochemical detection of H2AXS139Ph and PARP-2 were used as markers for DSBs and SSBs, respectively. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB were applied for quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of dead, dying and living cells. Apoptotic-type DNA fragmentation and positive TUNEL reaction finally proved that CF triggers AL-PCD in stressed V. faba root meristem cells. In addition, the results obtained under transmission electron microscopy (TEM further revealed apoptotic-like features at the ultrastructural level of PCC-type cells: (i extensive vacuolization; (ii abnormal chromatin condensation, its marginalization and concomitant degradation; (iii formation of autophagy-like vesicles (iv protoplast shrinkage (v fragmentation of cell nuclei and (vi extensive degeneration of the cells. The results obtained have been discussed with respect to the vacuolar/autolytic type of plant-specific AL-PCD.

  10. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  11. GTPase Ran strongly accumulates at the kinetochores of somatic chromosomes in the spermatogonial mitoses of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Unequal chromosome segregation and spindle formation occurs in the last gonial mitosis in the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus. During this differential mitosis, all germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) migrate undivided to only one pole of the cell, while the somatic chromosomes (=Ss) first remain in the metaphase plane, and with the arrival of the Ks at the pole, they then separate equally. The evolutionarily conserved GTPase Ran plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. This includes the regulation of microtubule nucleation and stabilisation at kinetochores and of spindle assembly during mitosis, which is promoted by a RanGTP concentration gradient that forms around the mitotic chromosomes (Kalab et al. in Science 295:2452-2456, 2002, Nature 440:697-701, 2006). In the present study, a strong accumulation of Ran was detected by immunofluorescence at the kinetochores of the Ss in normal gonial and differential gonial mitoses of males of A. lucidus. In contrast, no Ran accumulation was observed at the kinetochores of the Ss in the metaphases of brain ganglia mitoses or of aberrant spermatocytes or in metaphases I and II of spermatocyte meiotic divisions. Likewise, there was no accumulation at the kinetochores of Drosophila melanogaster mitotic chromosomes from larval brains. The specific accumulation of Ran at the kinetochores of the Ss in differential gonial mitoses of A. lucidus strongly suggests that Ran is involved in a mechanism acting in this exceptional mitosis, which retains the Ss at the metaphase plane and prevents a premature separation and unequal segregation of the Ss during monopolar migration of the Ks.

  12. Silica nanoparticles induce multinucleation through activation of PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and downregulation of chromosomal passenger proteins in L-02 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weijia; Li, Yang; Yu, Yongbo; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Jiang, Lizhen; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-04-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are applicable in various fields due to their unique physicochemical characteristics. However, concerns over their potential adverse effects have been raised. In our previous studies, we reported that SNPs could induce abnormal high incidence of multinucleation. The aim of this study is to further investigate the mechanisms of multinucleation induced by SNPs (68 nm) in human normal liver L-02 cells (L-02 cells). In order to determine the cytotoxicity of SNPs, MTT assay was performed, and the cell viability was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by flow cytometry and multinucleation observed by Giemsa stain showed that ROS generation and rate of multinucleated cells increased after SNPs exposure. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor against SNP-induced toxicity, was used as a ROS inhibitor to elucidate the relationship between ROS and multinucleation. The presence of NAC resulted in inhibition of both ROS generation and rate of multinucleation. Moreover, Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of Cdc20, Aurora B, and Survivin were down-regulated, and the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway was activated by SNPs. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggested that multinucleation induced by SNPs was related to PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signal pathway activation and downregulation of G2/M phase-related protein and chromosomal passenger proteins.

  13. Silica nanoparticles induce multinucleation through activation of PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and downregulation of chromosomal passenger proteins in L-02 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Weijia; Li, Yang; Yu, Yongbo; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Jiang, Lizhen; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei, E-mail: zwsun@ccmu.edu.cn, E-mail: zwsun@hotmail.com [Capital Medical University, School of Public Health (China)

    2016-04-15

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are applicable in various fields due to their unique physicochemical characteristics. However, concerns over their potential adverse effects have been raised. In our previous studies, we reported that SNPs could induce abnormal high incidence of multinucleation. The aim of this study is to further investigate the mechanisms of multinucleation induced by SNPs (68 nm) in human normal liver L-02 cells (L-02 cells). In order to determine the cytotoxicity of SNPs, MTT assay was performed, and the cell viability was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by flow cytometry and multinucleation observed by Giemsa stain showed that ROS generation and rate of multinucleated cells increased after SNPs exposure. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor against SNP-induced toxicity, was used as a ROS inhibitor to elucidate the relationship between ROS and multinucleation. The presence of NAC resulted in inhibition of both ROS generation and rate of multinucleation. Moreover, Western blot analysis showed that the protein levels of Cdc20, Aurora B, and Survivin were down-regulated, and the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway was activated by SNPs. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggested that multinucleation induced by SNPs was related to PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signal pathway activation and downregulation of G2/M phase-related protein and chromosomal passenger proteins.

  14. Radiation-induced nondisjunction of oocytes of aged mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, I.A.; Freeman, C.P.V.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that some human epidemiological studies suggest that there may be an association between chromosomal nondisjunction and pre-conception abdominal exposure to X-rays in women, and that this appears to increase with age. In order to test this, some experimental evidence was sought by studying second metaphase chromosomes of cultured oocytes of mice. It had previously been found that abnormal segregation was induced in young mice by exposing them to a low dose of whole body 137 Cs γ-radiation. The new studies confirmed that this radiosensitivity increases with age. The radiation dose was kept low to minimise chromosome breakage. The results indicated that abnormal segregation may be induced during first meiotic division by in vivo exposure of mouse ovaries to low radiation doses, and that this radiosensitivity appears to increase markedly with age. This supports a suggestion that the risk of producing trisomic off-spring in humans is increased with exposure of the abdomen to diagnostic X-rays, and that this increases with age. (U.K.)

  15. Application of pulsed field gel electrophoresis to determine γ-ray-induced double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomal molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, A.A.; Hahn, K.; Eckardt-Schupp, F.; Kellerer, A.M.; Beisker, W.

    1993-01-01

    The frequency of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) was determined in yeast cells exposed to γ-rays under anoxic conditions. Genomic DNA of treated cells was separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and two different approaches for the evaluation of the gels were employed: (1) The DNA mass distribution profile obtained by electrophoresis was compared to computed profiles, and the number of DSB per unit length was then derived in terms of a fitting procedure; (2) hybridization of selected chromosomes was performed, and a comparison of the hybridization signals in treated and untreated samples was then used to derive the frequency of dsb. The two assays gave similar results for the frequency of dsb ((1.07 ± 0.06) x 10 -9 Gy -1 bp -1 and (0.93 ± 0.09) x 10 -9 Gy -1 bp -1 , respectively). The dsb frequency was found to be linearly dependent on dose. (author)

  16. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  17. Diagnostic yield by supplementing prenatal metaphase karyotyping with MLPA for microdeletion syndromes and subtelomere imbalances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, S; Sundberg, K; Jørgensen, F S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the relevance of using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for detection of selected microdeletion syndromes (22q11, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Miller-Dieker, Smith-Magenis, 1p-, Williams), the reciprocal microduplication syndrome...... and imbalance at the subtelomere regions of chromosomes in a routine prenatal setting....

  18. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  19. Centralspindlin and Chromosomal Passenger Complex Behavior During Normal and Rappaport Furrow Specification in Echinoderm Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiros, Haroula; Henson, Lauren; Holguin, Christiana; Foe, Victoria; Shuster, Charles Bradley

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger (CPC) and Centralspindlin complexes are essential for organizing the anaphase central spindle and providing cues that position the cytokinetic furrow between daughter nuclei. However, echinoderm zygotes are also capable of forming “Rappaport furrows” between asters positioned back-to-back without intervening chromosomes. To understand how these complexes contribute to normal and Rappaport furrow formation, we studied the localization patterns of Survivin and mitotic-kinesin-like-protein1 (MKLP1), members respectively of the CPC and the Centralspindlin complex, and the effect of CPC inhibition on cleavage in mono- and binucleate echinoderm zygotes. In zygotes, Survivin initially localized to metaphase chromosomes, upon anaphase onset relocalized to the central spindle and then, together with MKLP1 spread towards the equatorial cortex in an Aurora-dependent manner. Inhibition of Aurora kinase activity resulted in disruption of central spindle organization and furrow regression, although astral microtubule elongation and furrow initiation were normal. In binucleate cells containing two parallel spindles MKLP1 and Survivin localized to the plane of the former metaphase plate, but were not observed in the secondary cleavage plane formed between unrelated spindle poles, except when chromosomes were abnormally present there. However, the secondary furrow was sensitive to Aurora inhibition, indicating that Aurora kinase may still contribute to furrow ingression without chromosomes nearby. Our results provide insights that reconcile classic micromanipulation studies with current molecular understanding of furrow specification in animal cells. PMID:22887753

  20. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  1. Somatic association of telocentric chromosomes carrying homologous centromeres in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Sampayo, T

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of distances between telocentric chromosomes, either homologous or representing the opposite arms of a metacentric chromosome (complementary telocentrics), were made at metaphase in root tip cells of common wheat carrying two homologous pairs of complementary telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B (double ditelosomic 1 B or 6 B). The aim was to elucidate the relative locations of the telocentric chromosomes within the cell. The data obtained strongly suggest that all four telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B are spacially and simultaneously co-associated. In plants carrying two complementary (6 B (S) and 6 B (L)) and a non-related (5 B (L)) telocentric, only the complementary chromosomes were found to be somatically associated. It is thought, therefore, that the somatic association of chromosomes may involve more than two chromosomes in the same association and, since complementary telocentrics are as much associated as homologous, that the homology between centromeres (probably the only homologous region that exists between complementary telocentrics) is a very important condition for somatic association of chromosomes. The spacial arrangement of chromosomes was studied at anaphase and prophase and the polar orientation of chromosomes at prophase was found to resemble anaphase orientation. This was taken as good evidence for the maintenance of the chromosome arrangement - the Rabl orientation - and of the peripheral location of the centromere and its association with the nuclear membrane. Within this general arrangement homologous telocentric chromosomes were frequently seen to have their centromeres associated or directed towards each other. The role of the centromere in somatic association as a spindle fibre attachment and chromosome binder is discussed. It is suggested that for non-homologous chromosomes to become associated in root tips, the only requirement needed should be the homology of centromeres such as exists between complementary

  2. Effect of Initiation Time of Hydrostatic Pressure Shock on Chromosome Set Doubling of Tetraploidization in Turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangping; Lin, Zhengmei; Wu, Zhihao; Li, Jiandong; You, Feng

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the study was to clarify the effects of initiation time on chromosome set doubling induced by hydrostatic pressure shock through nuclear phase fluorescent microscopy in turbot Scophthalmus maximus. The ratio of developmentally delayed embryo and chromosome counting was used to assess induction efficiency. For the embryos subjected to a pressure of 67.5 MPa for 6 min at prometaphase (A group), chromosomes recovered to the pre-treatment condition after 11-min recovering. The first nuclear division and cytokinesis proceeded normally. During the second cell cycle, chromosomes did not enter into metaphase after prometaphase, but spread around for about 13 min, then assembled together and formed a large nucleus without anaphase separation; the second nuclear division and cytokinesis was inhibited. The ratio of developmentally delayed embryo showed that the second mitosis of 78% A group embryo was inhibited. The result of chromosome counting showed that the tetraploidization rate of A group was 72%. For the embryos subjected to a pressure of 67.5 MPa for 6 min at anaphase (B group), chromosomes recovered to the pre-treatment condition after about 31-min recovering. Afterwards, one telophase nucleus formed without anaphase separation; the first nuclear division was inhibited. The time of the first cleavage furrow occurrence of B group embryos delayed 27 min compared with that of A group embryos. With the first cytokinesis proceeding normally, 81.3% B group embryos were at two-cell stage around the middle of the second cell cycle after treatment. Those embryos were one of the two blastomeres containing DNA and the other without DNA. The first nuclear division of those embryos was inhibited. During the third cell cycle after treatment, 65.2% of those abovementioned embryos were at four-cell stage, cytokinesis occurred in both blastomeres, and nuclear division only occurred in the blastomere containing DNA. Of those abovementioned embryos, 14.0% were at

  3. Low-level chromosome 12 amplification in a primary lipoma of the lung: evidence for a pathogenetic relationship with common adipose tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, J A; Roberts, C A; Degenhardt, J; Walker, C; Lackner, R; Linder, J

    1998-02-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of a primary lipoma of the lung removed from a 56-year-old woman revealed the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome in all metaphase cells analyzed; namely, 47,XX,+mar. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cytogenetic description of a primary lipoma of lung. Genetic analysis of intramuscular lipoma, atypical lipoma, and well-differentiated liposarcoma have revealed the presence of one to three supernumerary ring or giant marker chromosomes composed of chromosome 12 segments as the characteristic anomaly. The marker chromosome in the present case was shown to be composed entirely of chromosome 12 material by subsequent analysis with a chromosome 12-specific paint probe and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Thus, analogous to intramuscular lipoma, atypical lipoma, and well-differentiated liposarcoma, extra chromosome 12 material is present. These findings support a pathogenetic relationship between this lipoma of unusual anatomic location and common adipose tissue tumors.

  4. Abnormally banded chromosomal regions in doxorubicin-resistant B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, M L; Hoeltge, G A; Ganapathi, R

    1986-08-01

    B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells were selected for cytogenetic evaluation during the stepwise development of increasing resistance in vitro to the antitumor antibiotic, doxorubicin (DOX). Karyotypic studies demonstrated extensive heteroploidy with both numerical and structural abnormalities which were not present in the parental DOX-sensitive B16-BL6 cells. Trypsin-Giemsa banding revealed the presence of several marker chromosomes containing abnormally banding regions (ABRs) in the 44-fold B16-BL6 DOX-resistant subline. These ABRs appeared to be more homogeneously staining at the higher DOX concentrations. Length measurements (ABR index) in seven banded metaphases indicated a direct correlation with increasing DOX concentration. When the DOX-resistant cells were grown in drug-free medium for 1 yr, the drug-resistant phenotype gradually declined in parallel with the level of resistance and the ABR index. DOX-induced cytogenetic damage examined by sister chromatid exchange methodology in parental B16-BL6 cells indicated a linear sister chromatid exchange:DOX dose-response relationship. However, after continuous treatment of parental B16-BL6 cells with DOX (0.01 microgram/ml) for 30 days, sister chromatid exchange scores were found to return to base-line values. The B16-BL6 resistant cells demonstrated a cross-resistant phenotype with N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-valerate, actinomycin D, and the Vinca alkaloids but not with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine. The results suggest that ABR-containing chromosomes in DOX-resistant sublines may represent cytogenetic alterations of specific amplified genes involved in the expression of DOX resistance. Further studies are required to identify and define the possible gene products and to correlate their relationship to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin.

  5. Chromosome characterization of two varieties of Mangifera indica L.¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Izabel Pierozzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome studies were performed in two varieties of Mangifera indica L. (mango, 'IAC-140 Espadona' and in its progenitor 'Espada Stahl'. Both varieties showed 2n=40 chromosomes though the karyotype formulae were 8m + 10sm + 2sm s for 'Stahl' and 7m + 11sm + 2sm s for 'IAC-140'. The varieties showed moderate karyotype asymmetry which was estimated according to four different indices. Both varieties exhibited three chromosome pairs with silver impregnation after NOR-banding. The number of nucleoli within interphase cells varied from one, the commonest, to eight. The nucleolus persistent phenomenon was observed in more than 22% of metaphase cells of both varieties, seeing that in 'Stahl', up to two nucleoli were evidenced. This variety also showed one nucleolus in several anaphase cells. The studies were suitable for evidencing diversity at chromosomal level between these two varieties.

  6. induced chromosome aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Eight years follow up of the Goiania radiation accident victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Santos, S.J.; Darroudi, F.; Hadjidikova, V.; Vermeulen, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Van de Berg, M.; Grigorova, M.; Sakamoto-Hojo, E.T.; Granath, F.; Ramalho, A.T.; Curado, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation accident in focus here occurred in a section of Goiania (Brazil) where more than a hundred individuals were contaminated with on September 1987. In order to estimate the absorbed radiation doses, initial frequencies of dicentrics and rings were determined in 129 victims [A.T. Ramalho, PhD Thesis, Subsidios a tecnica de dosimetria citogenetica gerados a partir da analise de resultados obtidos com o acidente radiologico de Goiania, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1992]. We have followed some of these victims cytogenetically over the years seeking for parameters that could be used as basis for retrospective radiation dosimetry. Our data on translocation frequencies obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could be directly compared to the baseline frequencies of dicentrics available for those same victims. Our results provided valuable information on how precise these estimates are. The frequencies of translocations observed years after the radiation exposure were two to three times lower than the initial dicentrics frequencies, the differences being larger at higher doses (>1 Gy). The accuracy of such dose estimates might be increased by scoring sufficient amount of cells. However, factors such as the persistence of translocation carrying lymphocytes, translocation levels not proportional to chromosome size, and inter-individual variation reduce the precision of these estimates

  7. Induced chromosome aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Eight years follow up of the Goiania radiation accident victims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Santos, S.J.; Darroudi, F.; Hadjidikova, V.; Vermeulen, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Van de Berg, M.; Grigorova, M. [Leiden University Medical Centrum LUMC, Department of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis, Wassenaarseweg 72, 2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Sakamoto-Hojo, E.T. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Granath, F. [Department of Mathematical Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramalho, A.T. [Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry, National Commission of Nuclear Energy, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Curado, M.P. [Foundation Leide das Neves Ferreira, Goiania (Brazil)

    1998-05-25

    The radiation accident in focus here occurred in a section of Goiania (Brazil) where more than a hundred individuals were contaminated with on September 1987. In order to estimate the absorbed radiation doses, initial frequencies of dicentrics and rings were determined in 129 victims [A.T. Ramalho, PhD Thesis, Subsidios a tecnica de dosimetria citogenetica gerados a partir da analise de resultados obtidos com o acidente radiologico de Goiania, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1992]. We have followed some of these victims cytogenetically over the years seeking for parameters that could be used as basis for retrospective radiation dosimetry. Our data on translocation frequencies obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could be directly compared to the baseline frequencies of dicentrics available for those same victims. Our results provided valuable information on how precise these estimates are. The frequencies of translocations observed years after the radiation exposure were two to three times lower than the initial dicentrics frequencies, the differences being larger at higher doses (>1 Gy). The accuracy of such dose estimates might be increased by scoring sufficient amount of cells. However, factors such as the persistence of translocation carrying lymphocytes, translocation levels not proportional to chromosome size, and inter-individual variation reduce the precision of these estimates

  8. In vitro studies on chemoprotective effect of Purnark against benzo(a)pyrene-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaisas, S D; Bhide, S V

    1994-01-01

    Human lymphocytes were used as an assay system to test chemopreventive activity of natural products. Purnark, a mixture of extracts of turmeric, betel leaf and catechu, was tested for its chemoprotective activity against BP induced DNA damage. Sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei were used as markers to assess the protective activity of Purnark. Purnark gave 50-60% protection against BP induced SCEs and micronuclei. Purnark at 100 micrograms dose did not show any genotoxicity.

  9. Identification of Y-Chromosome Sequences in Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane Lopes da; Trovó-Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete; Sousa, Tiago Alves de; Croce, Lilian Da; Balarin, Marly Aparecida Spadotto

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the presence of Y-chromosome sequences and determine their frequency in patients with Turner syndrome. The study included 23 patients with Turner syndrome from Brazil, who gave written informed consent for participating in the study. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes, with 100 metaphases per patient. Genomic DNA was also extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes, and gene sequences DYZ1, DYZ3, ZFY and SRY were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction. The cytogenetic analysis showed a 45,X karyotype in 9 patients (39.2 %) and a mosaic pattern in 14 (60.8 %). In 8.7 % (2 out of 23) of the patients, Y-chromosome sequences were found. This prevalence is very similar to those reported previously. The initial karyotype analysis of these patients did not reveal Y-chromosome material, but they were found positive for Y-specific sequences in the lymphocyte DNA analysis. The PCR technique showed that 2 (8.7 %) of the patients with Turner syndrome had Y-chromosome sequences, both presenting marker chromosomes on cytogenetic analysis.

  10. Chromosome Characteristic of Peranakan Etawa (PE) Goat (Capra hircus Linn.) as Indonesian Local Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. R. I.; Ciptadi, G.; Warih, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome characteristics of Peranakan Etawa (PE) goat needs to be analyzed because information about Indonesian goat races is very limited. The purpose of this research was to determine the characteristics of PE goat chromosome as basic data as one of the genetic local resources. Blood was collected from pair of PE goat at Sumber Sekar Field Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Brawijaya University, Malang. Blood cultured using standard cytogenetic technique and stained with G-Banding. Observations being done in metaphase cells and analyzed using Genus Cytovision Image. Chromosomes arranged and numbered by standard goat karyotype. The result of this research showed that PE goat had number of chromosomes 2n=60, consisting of 29 pairs of autosome and a pair of sex chromosomes. Female goat had average of total length (TL) of autosome ranged from 47.91 µm±6.46 to 22.12 µm±3.33. TL of chromosome X are 45.96 µm±4,59 and 44.45 µm±3,96. Centromeric index (Ci) of chromosome X, 31,74 and 32,80. PE goat had average of TL of autosome ranged from 58.20µm±6.72 to 18.97µm±2.82. TL of chromosome X is 56,42µm±7,38 and Y chromosome is 15,80 µm±3,24. Ci in chromosome X and Y are 19.34 and 46.84. These results concluded that the total of goat chromosome was 60 with types of autosomal chromosomes were acrocentric as many as 58 chromosomes and pair of sex chromosomes XX and XY, X classified as subtelocentric and Y submetacentric.

  11. Lack of effect of inhibitors of DNA synthesis/repair on the ionizing radiation-induced chromosomal damage in G[sub 2] stage of ataxia telangiectasia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoccia, A. (Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Genetica e Biologia Molecolare); Palitti, F.; Raggi, T. (Univ. del Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy). Dipt. di Agrobiologia ed Agrochimica); Catena, C. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia); Tanzarella, C. (Rome Univ. 3 (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia)

    1994-09-01

    The relationship between the repair processes occurring at the G[sub 2] phase of the cell cycle and cytogenetic damage in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells was studied. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from normal, heterozygote AT (HzAT) and three AT patients were exposed to X-rays or fission neutrons and post-treated with inhibitors of DNA synthesis/repair, such as inhibitors of DNA polymerases [alpha], [sigma] and [epsilon] (cytosine arabinoside, ara-C; aphidicolin, APC; buthylphenyl-guanine, BuPdG) or ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea HU). A strong increase of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations was observed in normal and HzAT cells post-treated with ara-C, APC and HU, but not in the presence of BuPdG. No enhancing effect was observed in cells derived from AT patients, except for HU post-irradiation treatment. These results suggest that the enzymes that can be inhibited by these agents are not directly involved in the repair of radiation damage induced in G[sub 2] cells from AT patients, indicating that probably the AT cells that we used lack the capability to transform the primary DNA lesions into reparable products, or that AT cells might contain a mutated form of DNA polymerase resistant to the inhibitors. (author).

  12. 40 CFR 799.9538 - TSCA mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effects are clear but do not immediately reveal the identity of the coded slides to the reader. It is... schedules. (K) Methods for measurement of toxicity. (L) Identity of metaphase arresting substance, its...) Locke-Huhle, C. Endoreduplication in Chinese Hamster Cells During Alpha-Radiation Induced G2 Arrest...

  13. Expression of a possible constitutional hot spot in sperm chromosomes of a patient treated for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genesca, A.; Miro, R.; Caballin, M.R.; Benet, J.; Navarro, J.; Templado, C.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J.

    1987-01-01

    Sperm chromosomes were studied in a man who was treated for Wilms' tumor with radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) 18 years ago. Human pronuclear sperm chromosomes were obtained after penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Eighty-nine sperm chromosome complements were analyzed; 12.4% of them showed structural anomalies. This percentage was statistically different from the one found in our laboratory for controls (p less than 0.05). Five of eleven structurally abnormal metaphases had the same aberration: fission of chromosome number1 with the breakpoint at or near the centromere. Breaks and rearrangements of chromosome number1, often involving the centromere region, are among the most frequent anomalies found in Wilms' tumor cells

  14. Comparative analysis of chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes in vitro by various types of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    Certain problems of comparative analyses of radiation-induced dicentrics in human lymphocytes following various types of ionizing radiations are considered as follows: 1. Equations best fitting for dose-response kinetics; 2. Use of dicentrics for analysing the RBE of various types of radiations; 3. The relationship between RBE and LET as seen by the analysis of dicentrics. (author)

  15. Symmetrical exchanges between chromosomes induced by irradiation of human lymphocytes with fast neutrons and detected by repeated fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukasova, E.; Kozubek, S.; Ryznar, L.; Mareckova, A.; Bartova, E.; Kozubek, M.; Skalnikova, M.; Kroha, V.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency was studied of exchange aberrations between chromosomes no. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 18, and 22 in the first postirradiation mitosis of human lymphocytes irradiated with various doses of neutrons of a mean energy of 7 MeV. Seven repeated hybridizations were carried out. Seven different images were obtained for each mitosis, in which two specific chromosomes were distinguished from the others by red and green fluorescence. The successive images were compared, whereby the frequencies of exchange aberrations between the visualized chromosomes were found. The results show a higher frequency of exchanges between chromosomes 14/8, 14/18, 14/3, 8/3, 8/1, and 8/18. No exchan