WorldWideScience

Sample records for metamorphosis

  1. Metamorphosis in Craniiformea revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Wanninger, Andreas; Holmer, Lars E.

    2013-01-01

    We revisited the brachiopod fold hypothesis and investigated metamorphosis in the craniiform brachiopod Novocrania anomala. Larval development is lecithotrophic and the dorsal (brachial) valve is secreted by dorsal epithelia. We found that the juvenile ventral valve, which consists only of a thin....... We show that the “brachiopod fold hypothesis,” which argues that brachiopods are transversely “folded” across the ontogenetic anterior–posterior axis, should be rejected at least with respect to the craniiforms. The data now suggest that the Craniiformea may be a derived group within......), such as a through-gut and missing hinge articulation, may thus be secondarily derived characters of the Craniiformea within the Rhynchonelliformea....

  2. The phylogeny of amphibian metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, John O

    2002-01-01

    Frogs have one of the most extreme metamorphoses among vertebrates. How did this metamorphosis evolve? By combining the methods previously proposed by Mabee and Humphries (1993) and Velhagen (1997), I develop a phylogenetic method suited for rigorous analysis of this question. In a preliminary analysis using 12 transformation sequence characters and 36 associated event sequence characters, all drawn from the osteology of the skull, the evolution of metamorphosis is traced on an assumed phylogeny. This phylogeny has lissamphibians (frogs, salamanders, and caecilians) monophyletic, with frogs the sister group of salamanders. Successive outgroups used are temnospondyls and discosauriscids, both of which are fossil groups for which ontogenetic data are available. In the reconstruction of character evolution, an unambiguous change (synapomorphy) along the branch leading to lissamphibians is a delay in the lengthening of the maxilla until metamorphosis, in accordance with my previous suggestion (Reiss, 1996). However, widening of the interpterygoid vacuity does not appear as a synapomophy of lissamphibians, due to variation in the character states in the outgroups. From a more theoretical perspective, the reconstructed evolution of amphibian metamorphosis involves examples of heterochrony, through the shift of ancestral premetamorphic events to the metamorphic period, caenogenesis, through the origin of new larval features, and terminal addition, through the origin of new adult features. Other changes don't readily fit these categories. This preliminary study provides evidence that metamorphic changes in frogs arose as further modifications of changes unique to lissamphibians, as well as a new method by which such questions can be examined.

  3. Amphibian haematology: Metamorphosis-related changes in blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Per; Sørensen, Inger; Ussing, Anne Phaff

    1995-01-01

    Zoofysiologi, Amphibian metamorphosis, Haematology, Immunosuppression, Immunological Tolerance, Protozoan Infection, metamorfose, springpadder, ontogenese, halepadder.......Zoofysiologi, Amphibian metamorphosis, Haematology, Immunosuppression, Immunological Tolerance, Protozoan Infection, metamorfose, springpadder, ontogenese, halepadder....

  4. Mechanisms of tail resorption during anuran metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yuya; Nakajima, Keisuke; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2017-09-26

    Amphibian metamorphosis has historically attracted a good deal of scientific attention owing to its dramatic nature and easy observability. However, the genetic mechanisms of amphibian metamorphosis have not been thoroughly examined using modern techniques such as gene cloning, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction or genomic editing. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms underlying tadpole tail resorption.

  5. Metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2015-01-01

    the constructional logic of reciprocal structures within the Grasshopper parametric design environment, and the KRS algorithm, a software for the design of free form kinetic reciprocal structure, both developed by the author, and coupled with structural form finding processes. The pavilion incorporates novel digital...

  6. Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    One thing history's torrent appears to be sweeping away is, ironically, the study of its most productive wellspring, Western civilization. "The Vanishing West", a report the National Association of Scholars released in May 2011, documents the extent of this vanishing. The traditional Western civilization survey requirement, commonplace only…

  7. Posthuman Metamorphosis: Narrative and Systems, New

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke D'hoker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of Bruce Clarke, Posthuman Metamorphosis: Narrative and Systems, New
    York: Fordham University Press, 2008. 242 pages.
    978-0-8232-2580-8 (hardback
    978-0-8232-2581-5 (paperback

  8. Structural Elements in Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" is not only a masterpiece of modern literature but also a work that exemplifies many ideas of structural family therapy. Examines how Kafka's novella embodies concepts such as parentified children, enmeshment, intergenerational boundaries, coalitions and triangles, structural dysfunction, and…

  9. The genetic covariance between life cycle stages separated by metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J David; Blows, Mark W; Marshall, Dustin J

    2014-08-07

    Metamorphosis is common in animals, yet the genetic associations between life cycle stages are poorly understood. Given the radical changes that occur at metamorphosis, selection may differ before and after metamorphosis, and the extent that genetic associations between pre- and post-metamorphic traits constrain evolutionary change is a subject of considerable interest. In some instances, metamorphosis may allow the genetic decoupling of life cycle stages, whereas in others, metamorphosis could allow complementary responses to selection across the life cycle. Using a diallel breeding design, we measured viability at four ontogenetic stages (embryo, larval, juvenile and adult viability), in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis and examined the orientation of additive genetic variation with respect to the metamorphic boundary. We found support for one eigenvector of G: (gobsmax ), which contrasted larval viability against embryo viability and juvenile viability. Target matrix rotation confirmed that while gobsmax shows genetic associations can extend beyond metamorphosis, there is still considerable scope for decoupled phenotypic evolution. Therefore, although genetic associations across metamorphosis could limit that range of phenotypes that are attainable, traits on either side of the metamorphic boundary are capable of some independent evolutionary change in response to the divergent conditions encountered during each life cycle stage. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D Object Metamorphosis with Pseudo Metameshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOCANU, B.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object metamorphosis, represented by closed triangular meshes. The systems returns a high quality transition sequence, smooth and gradual, that is visual pleasant and consistent to both source and target topologies. The method starts by parameterizing both the source and the target model to a common domain (the unit sphere. Then, the features selected from the two models are aligned by applying the CTPS C2a radial basis functions. We demonstrate how the selected approach can create valid warping by deforming the models embedded into the parametric domain. In the final stage, we propose and validate a novel algorithm to construct a pseudo-supermesh able to approximate both, the source and target 3D objects. By using the pseudo-supermesh we developed a morphing transition consistent with respect to both geometry and topology of the 3D models.

  11. A role for Taiman in insect metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Lozano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in vitro have reported that the Methoprene-tolerant (Met and Taiman (Tai complex is the functional receptor of juvenile hormone (JH. Experiments in vivo of Met depletion have confirmed this factor's role in JH signal transduction, however, there is no equivalent data regarding Tai because its depletion in larval or nymphal stages of the beetle Tribolium castaneum and the bug Pyrrhocoris apterus results in 100% mortality. We have discovered that the cockroach Blattella germanica possesses four Tai isoforms resulting from the combination of two indels in the C-terminal region of the sequence. The presence of one equivalent indel-1 in Tai sequences in T. castaneum and other species suggests that Tai isoforms may be common in insects. Concomitant depletion of all four Tai isoforms in B. germanica resulted in 100% mortality, but when only the insertion 1 (IN-1 isoforms were depleted, mortality was significantly reduced and about half of the specimens experienced precocious adult development. This shows that Tai isoforms containing IN-1 are involved in transducing the JH signal that represses metamorphosis. Reporter assays indicated that both T. castaneum Tai isoforms, one that contains the IN-1 and another that does not (DEL-1 activated a JH response element (kJHRE in Krüppel homolog 1 in conjunction with Met and JH. The results indicate that Tai is involved in the molecular mechanisms that repress metamorphosis, at least in B. germanica, and highlight the importance of distinguishing Tai isoforms when studying the functions of this transcription factor in development and other processes.

  12. Metamorphosis of the landlocked sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Patrick J.; Stauffer, Thomas M.

    1970-01-01

    The external metamorphosis of the sea lamprey was divided into four stages, based primarily on the condition of the mouth: mouth reduced, mouth fused, mouth enclosed, and mouth elongated. During metamorphosis, the eye enlarged greatly, the snout and mouth region changed from a fleshy hood enclosing a sieve apparatus to a large sucking disc, the nasopore membrane and the branchial area shrank, the branchiopores changed in shape, the general color changed from dark brown and yellow to an intense blue-black dorsally and white ventrally, and the total length increased. Metamorphosis began in early to mid-July and did not take place after August. The duration of external metamorphosis was about 3 months for lampreys transforming under natural conditions. The mean lengths of metamorphosing lampreys from tributaries of lakes Superior and Michigan were 145 and 136 mm, respectively.

  13. The Concept of Metamorphosis and its Metaphors - Possible and Impossible Transformations of Life; Metamorphosis in Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruguière, Catherine; Perru, Olivier; Charles, Frédéric

    2018-03-01

    The article examines a number of links between the metaphorical uses of the concept of metamorphosis in literature and the various changes of the meaning of the concept that took place at the beginning of the modern scientific age between the 17th and 19th centuries, a period during which the notion of metamorphosis resurfaced in conflict with evolutionist thinking. We present the extent to which the concept of animal metamorphosis, the object of multiple redefinitions over the course of this historical period, became the vector of a very strong metaphorical meaning, which emerged in the literature of the period and survives to this day in certain children's storybooks belonging to what we term the genre of "realistic fiction". We intend, from a pedagogical standpoint, to identify which specific attributes of these metaphors exist in those storybooks, and to gauge the extent to which those attributes contradict the scientific characteristics and fictional representations of the concept of metamorphosis.

  14. The Insect Neuropeptide PTTH Activates Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Torso to Initiate Metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim; Yamanaka, Naoki; Gilbert, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Holometabolous insects undergo complete metamorphosis to become sexually mature adults. Metamorphosis is initiated by brain-derived prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH), which stimulates the production of the molting hormone ecdysone via an incompletely defined signaling pathway. Here we demonstrate...

  15. Career Pathways And Youth Metamorphosis Into Area Boys In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Youth metamorphosis into area boys was found within structural forces including family disorganization, academic failure and poor career orientation. Unexpectedly, obedience to patron-client agencies ... Keywords: Deprivation, Social Mobility, Gangs, Deviance, Lagos African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social ...

  16. The Metamorphosis of Bourgeoisie Politics in a Modern Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian military class turned into Bourgeoisie class has credibility problems in the Nigerian state and politics. The paper interrogates their metamorphosis and masquerading character as ploy to delay the people-oriented revolution. The just-concluded PDP party primaries and secondary elections are evidence that ...

  17. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana temporalis is influenced by genetic relatedness of the cohort. S Girish S K Saidapur. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 489-496 ...

  18. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Girish S and Saidapur S K 2002 Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana temporalis is influenced by genetic relatedness of the ... kin interaction during larval development in anurans seems to vary with the ... leaves were cut into small pieces of uniform size before boiling. Ten grams of ...

  19. Elemental concentration in mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor L.) during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Edina; Baranyai, Edina; Braun, Mihály; Fábián, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2013-07-01

    Mealworm beetles have been used in numerous experiments as bioindicators. The aim of our experiment was to study the elemental composition in three larvae, pupae and first and second generation adult stages during their life cycle. We selected 180 larvae from a genetically similar population and put them in three groups, in two boxes (60 larvae in each box). Larvae were fed with mashed potato made of the same quality and quantity of potato powder. Then, we selected 10 individuals from each stage to the elemental analysis, using the ICP-OES method. The following elements were analysed in the studied stages: Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Sr and Zn. The results of principal component analysis demonstrated that based on elemental composition, different stages were separated with each other, but in the cases of the three larvae stages, high overlap was found. The results of the GLM ANOVA showed significant differences between the different stages of metamorphosis-based elemental composition. Our results show that the calcium and magnesium were found in a relatively high concentration, while the iron and zinc may be essential elements during the metamorphosis. Our results also show that in insect, the concentration of sodium was higher than in the pupa which may cause by hemolymph. We also demonstrated that the metamorphosis has an effect on the concentration of elements. Our study shows that in the different stages of insects, there are significant changes in the elemental composition of different stages of insects during their metamorphosis.

  20. The Mechanisms of the Ecdysone Pulses that Cause Metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Erik

    of ecdysone biosynthesis, necessary for the generation of the temporally defined pulse prior to the metamorphosis. We found that ecdysone works back on the PG itself through its receptor, EcR, to regulate the expression of the transcription factor broad isoform Z4 (br-Z4), which in turn regulates...

  1. Troponin T isoform expression is modulated during Atlantic Halibut metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn Lynda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flatfish metamorphosis is a thyroid hormone (TH driven process which leads to a dramatic change from a symmetrical larva to an asymmetrical juvenile. The effect of THs on muscle and in particular muscle sarcomer protein genes is largely unexplored in fish. The change in Troponin T (TnT, a pivotal protein in the assembly of skeletal muscles sarcomeres and a modulator of calcium driven muscle contraction, during flatfish metamophosis is studied. Results In the present study five cDNAs for halibut TnT genes were cloned; three were splice variants arising from a single fast TnT (fTnT gene; a fourth encoded a novel teleost specific fTnT-like cDNA (AfTnT expressed exclusively in slow muscle and the fifth encoded the teleost specific sTnT2. THs modified the expression of halibut fTnT isoforms which changed from predominantly basic to acidic isoforms during natural and T4 induced metamorphosis. In contrast, expression of red muscle specific genes, AfTnT and sTnT2, did not change during natural metamorphosis or after T4 treatment. Prior to and after metamorphosis no change in the dorso-ventral symmetry or temporal-spatial expression pattern of TnT genes and muscle fibre organization occurred in halibut musculature. Conclusion Muscle organisation in halibut remains symmetrical even after metamorphosis suggesting TH driven changes are associated with molecular adaptations. We hypothesize that species specific differences in TnT gene expression in teleosts underlies different larval muscle developmental programs which better adapts them to the specific ecological constraints.

  2. Macromolecular metamorphosis via stimulus-induced transformations of polymer architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Kabb, Christopher P; Dai, Yuqiong; Hill, Megan R; Ghiviriga, Ion; Bapat, Abhijeet P; Sumerlin, Brent S

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular architecture plays a pivotal role in determining the properties of polymers. When designing polymers for specific applications, it is not only the size of a macromolecule that must be considered, but also its shape. In most cases, the topology of a polymer is a static feature that is inalterable once synthesized. Using reversible-covalent chemistry to prompt the disconnection of chemical bonds and the formation of new linkages in situ, we report polymers that undergo dramatic topological transformations via a process we term macromolecular metamorphosis. Utilizing this technique, a linear amphiphilic block copolymer or hyperbranched polymer undergoes 'metamorphosis' into comb, star and hydrophobic block copolymer architectures. This approach was extended to include a macroscopic gel which transitioned from a densely and covalently crosslinked network to one with larger distances between the covalent crosslinks when heated. These architectural transformations present an entirely new approach to 'smart' materials.

  3. Macromolecular metamorphosis via stimulus-induced transformations of polymer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Kabb, Christopher P.; Dai, Yuqiong; Hill, Megan R.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Bapat, Abhijeet P.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular architecture plays a pivotal role in determining the properties of polymers. When designing polymers for specific applications, it is not only the size of a macromolecule that must be considered, but also its shape. In most cases, the topology of a polymer is a static feature that is inalterable once synthesized. Using reversible-covalent chemistry to prompt the disconnection of chemical bonds and the formation of new linkages in situ, we report polymers that undergo dramatic topological transformations via a process we term macromolecular metamorphosis. Utilizing this technique, a linear amphiphilic block copolymer or hyperbranched polymer undergoes 'metamorphosis' into comb, star and hydrophobic block copolymer architectures. This approach was extended to include a macroscopic gel which transitioned from a densely and covalently crosslinked network to one with larger distances between the covalent crosslinks when heated. These architectural transformations present an entirely new approach to 'smart' materials.

  4. Midgut morphological changes and autophagy during metamorphosis in sand flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Juliana; Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju Lin; Fernandes, Kenner M; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    During metamorphosis, holometabolous insects undergo significant remodeling of their midgut and become able to cope with changes in dietary requirements between larval and adult stages. At this stage, insects must be able to manage and recycle available food resources in order to develop fully into adults, especially when no nutrients are acquired from the environment. Autophagy has been previously suggested to play a crucial role during metamorphosis of the mosquito. Here, we investigate the overall morphological changes of the midgut of the sand fly during metamorphosis and assess the expression profiles of the autophagy-related genes ATG1, ATG6, and ATG8, which are associated with various steps of the autophagic process. Morphological changes in the midgut start during the fourth larval instar, with epithelial degeneration followed by remodeling via the differentiation of regenerative cells in pre-pupal and pupal stages. The changes in the midgut epithelium are paired with the up-regulation of ATG1, ATG6 and ATG8 during the larva-adult transition. Vein, a putative epidermal growth factor involved in regulating epithelial midgut regeneration, is also up-regulated. Autophagy has further been confirmed in sand flies via the presence of autophagosomes residing within the cytoplasmic compartment of the pupal stages. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of this process should aid the future management of this neglected tropical vector.

  5. Making REF is Making Politics: Memories of an Editorial Metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzinete Simões Minella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the new editorial model launched in Revista Estudos Feministas in 2002, that is, three years after its installation in Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC. While firstly detailing the memories of such metamorphosis, the text refers to the transitions of REF’s editorship format, to the purposes and criteria of the new structure, as well as the meanings of the team expansion in relation to some national and international feminist publications. Eventually the article briefly discusses the advantages and challenges implicated in this new editorial policy.

  6. Induction of Metamorphosis of Larvae of the Green Sea Urchin, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, by Coralline Red Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C M; Scheibling, R E

    1990-12-01

    The coralline red algae, Lithothamnion glaciale, Phymatolithon laevigatum, P. rugulosum, and Corallina officinalis, induced >85% of laboratory-reared larvae of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis to metamorphose. Larvae must contact live L. glaciale or its spores for metamorphosis to occur; the inducer is not sensed in the water column. However, aqueous extracts of L. glaciale can induce metamorphosis, suggesting that the inducing factor is chemical. Neither ashed nor boiled L. glaciale induces metamorphosis, indicating that the factor is heat-labile and that thigmotaxis, per se, is not important in the response. The amino-acid, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which induces settlement of other marine invertebrate larvae, also induces significant rates of metamorphosis of S. droebachiensis at concentrations ≥ 10-4 M. A reduction (with antibiotics) in the number of live bacteria on the surface of L. glaciale does not affect the rate of metamorphosis of larvae.

  7. The reasons of metamorphosis and abundance of Kabylian vernacular houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Hamma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Kabylia suffers from the abundance of its ancient villages and the metamorphosis of its traditional houses, which has led to a very advanced degradation and a loss of the authenticity of its old constructions. To understand the phenomenon of exodus, the reasons for its abundant villages and the remodeling of historical buildings, we adopted two approaches, the first is sociological through the use of questionnaire and the second is architectural through use of the method of morphological analysis. After survey, we first highlighted the reasons for the abundant which are economic at 74.89%, educational at 17.00%, social at 4.05%, political at 3.23% and religious at 0.83%. Then, the reasons for the metamorphosis of Kabyle houses, which are structural at 25.20%, functional at 31.70%, spatial at 34.95%, aesthetics at 4.06%, thermal insulation at 2.43% and sound insulation at 1.62%. Finally, the architectural parts changed are the structure at 69.10%, the materials at 13.01%, the roof at 98.37%, the facade at 39.02%, the decoration at 45.52%, the operation at 82.92%, the spaces at 85.63%, the area at 85.63% Thermal insulation at 13.82%, noise insulation at 7.31% and carpentry at 96.74%.

  8. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-08

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteomic analysis during larval development and metamorphosis of the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa

    KAUST Repository

    Mok, Flora SY

    2009-12-14

    Background: While the larval-juvenile transition (metamorphosis) in the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa involves gradual morphological changes and does not require substantial development of juvenile organs, the opposite occurs in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. We hypothesized that the proteome changes during metamorphosis in the spionids are less drastic than that in the barnacles. To test this, proteomes of pre-competent larvae, competent larvae (ready to metamorphose), and juveniles of P. vexillosa were compared using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and they were then compared to those of the barnacle.Results: Unlike the significant changes found during barnacle metamorphosis, proteomes of competent P. vexillosa larvae were more similar to those of their juveniles. Pre-competent larvae had significantly fewer protein spots (384 spots), while both competent larvae and juveniles expressed about 660 protein spots each. Proteins up-regulated during competence identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis included a molecular chaperon (calreticulin), a signal transduction regulator (tyrosin activation protein), and a tissue-remodeling enzyme (metallopeptidase).Conclusions: This was the first time to study the protein expression patterns during the metamorphosis of a marine polychaete and to compare the proteomes of marine invertebrates that have different levels of morphological changes during metamorphosis. The findings provide promising initial steps towards the development of a proteome database for marine invertebrate metamorphosis, thus deciphering the possible mechanisms underlying larval metamorphosis in non-model marine organisms. © 2009 Mok et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  10. Kafka's Writing Machine: Metamorphosis in the Penal Colony

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    Arnold Weinstein

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available Kafka's "In the Penal Colony" is a problematic story, largely because of the conflicting interpretations it has received: does its famous machine dispense grace or torture? Is Kafka giving us a parable of Old vs. New Law? How does the "liberal" explorer or the "liberal" reader assess the Officer's impassioned pleading for the Machine and the kind of justice it serves? A strange kind of coherence emerges, however, when one focusses on the central unifying motif of the story: understanding. The tale itself is little more than the Officer's desperate effort to make the explorer-reader understand; the machine itself makes its victim understand the nature of justice. Language is, of course, a primary vehicle for understanding, and Kafka's story dramatizes two radically opposed languages: verbal and physical. All efforts to bridge the distance between people, between matter and spirit, seem to fail, at least insofar as spoken language is concerned; the machine's mission is to create physical language, an unmediated script which is the reality of which it speaks. By writing the crime onto and into the flesh of the criminal, the machine offers a sublime and frightening figure of "visceral knowledge," of the open self as the opened self. By entering into the machine himself, the Officer undergoes the classic Kafka metamorphosis: he becomes the prisoner, and he thereby suffers knowledge. The entire parable may be seen as an illustration of the writer's yearning for a language so potent that the reader would experience, "in the flesh," the writer's words. Kafka's own narrative techniques aim at precisely such a metamorphosis in the reader.

  11. Transformations of Aortic Arches During Metamorphosis of the Spade-Foot Toad, Pelobates fuscus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majorová, H.; Roček, Zbyněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 260, č. 3 (2004), s. 309 ISSN 0362-2525. [International Congress of Vertebrate Morphology /7./. 27.07.2004-01.08.2004, Boca Raton] Keywords : Anura * Circulatory System * Metamorphosis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  12. Thyroid Histopathology Assessments for the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay to Detect Thyroid-active Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    In support of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) Test Guideline for the detection of substances that interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, a document was developed that provides a standardized appro...

  13. Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber / Jonathan Swain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Swain, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber, Mathis der Maler - Symphony, Nobilissima visione - suite. Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Yoel Levi" Telarc/ Conifer CD 80 195

  14. Signatures of natural selection between life cycle stages separated by metamorphosis in European eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pujolar, J.M.; Jacobsen, M.W.; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Species showing complex life cycles provide excellent opportunities to study the genetic associations between life cycle stages, as selective pressures may differ before and after metamorphosis. The European eel presents a complex life cycle with two metamorphoses, a first metamorphosis from larvae...... into glass eels (juvenile stage) and a second metamorphosis into silver eels (adult stage). We tested the hypothesis that different genes and gene pathways will be under selection at different life stages when comparing the genetic associations between glass eels and silver eels. Results: We used two sets...... supports the adaptive decoupling hypothesis for the benefits of metamorphosis. Partitioning the life cycle into discrete morphological phases may be overall beneficial since it allows the different life stages to respond independently to their unique selection pressures. This might translate into a more...

  15. Relevance of biofilm bacteria in modulating the larval metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    that the water borne and the surface associated cues from the bacteria function differentially in mediating larval metamorphosis. Understanding the complexities involved in such interactions and identification of the factors governing them would be a step ahead....

  16. Increased Larval Density Induces Accelerated Metamorphosis Independently of Growth Rate in the FrogRana sphenocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Janel; Martin, Lincoln; Beachy, Christopher K

    2009-01-01

    We grew larval Rana sphenocephala at different densities but maintained equal mean growth rates among density treatments (via equal per capita food levels) to test the hypothesis that larval density can influence metamorphic timing independently of larval growth rate. Tadpoles at high density metamorphosed earlier than tadpoles at low density despite growing at similar rates. Food reductions did not accelerate metamorphosis. These results support the hypothesis that density can be a sufficient cue to initiate metamorphosis independently of growth rate.

  17. The heterochronic gene Lin28 regulates amphibian metamorphosis through disturbance of thyroid hormone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Fernando; Gundermann, Daniel G; Muñoz, Rosana; Bruno, Renzo; Larraín, Juan

    2017-05-15

    Metamorphosis is a classic example of developmental transition, which involves important morphological and physiological changes that prepare the organism for the adult life. It has been very well established that amphibian metamorphosis is mainly controlled by Thyroid Hormone (TH). Here, we show that the heterochronic gene Lin28 is downregulated during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. Lin28 overexpression before activation of TH signaling delays metamorphosis and inhibits the expression of TH target genes. The delay in metamorphosis is rescued by incubation with exogenous TH, indicating that Lin28 works upstream or parallel to TH. High-throughput analyses performed before any delay on metamorphosis or change in TH signaling showed that overexpression of Lin28 reduces transcript levels of several hormones secreted by the pituitary, including the Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH), and regulates the expression of proteins involved in TH transport, metabolism and signaling, showing that Lin28 disrupts TH function at different levels. Our data demonstrates that the role of Lin28 in controlling developmental transitions is evolutionary conserved and establishes a functional interaction between Lin28 and thyroid hormone function introducing a new regulatory step in perinatal development with implications for our understanding of endocrine disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Metamorphosis of a butterfly-associated bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobin J Hammer

    Full Text Available Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies.

  19. Metamorphosis of a butterfly-associated bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tobin J; McMillan, W Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies.

  20. The Paradigm of Decline-Metamorphosis-Rebirth in Fine Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Germ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The triad of decline-metamorphosis-rebirth constantly reappears in the history of civilisation, it is current in all historical periods and cultural environments, in different areas and the most diverse contexts. Its manifestations are countless and the same is true of its interpretations. They are especially frequent in the area of art, because the evolutionary model, grounded in the idea of cyclic development comes very handy for explanations and illustrations which seek to present complicated things in a simple and clear way. The history of art, mainly in the 19th century, advocated a tripartite development of art which seeks greater perfection and maturity and reaches its peak just to be then inevitably followed by a decline in artistic originality and power. Already for some time now the evolutionary model has been shown too ineffective in addressing scholarly questions, especially due to oversimplification and a priori classification of subject matter which cannot possibly be classified. The perception that the art of the Early Renaissance was a preliminary period for more mature and accomplished achievements of High Renaissance which at some point began to lose its drive and went into decline either by repeating outmoded forms or their decomposition, is not only naive, but simply wrong and represents a misunderstanding of the essence of art. In much the same way it would be equally wrong to label in advance the early works of a certain artist as not-mature-yet or possessing less artistic authenticity.

  1. Glitches: The Exact Quantum Signatures of Pulsars Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujeirat, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    The observed recurrence of glitches in pulsars and neutron stars carries rich information about the evolution of their internal structures. In this article, I show that the glitch-events observed in pulsars are exact quantum signatures for their metamorphosis into dark super-baryons (SBs), whose interiors are made of purely incompressible superconducting gluon-quark superfluids. Here the quantum nuclear shell model is adopted to describe the permitted energy levels of the SB, which are assumed to be identical to the discrete spinning rates Ω_{SB} that SBs are allowed to rotate with. Accordingly, a glitch-event corresponds to a prompt spin-down of the superconducting SB from one energy level to the next, thereby expelling a certain number of vortices, which in turn spins up the ambient medium. The process is provoked mainly by the negative torque of the ambient dissipative nuclear fluid and by a universal scalar field φ at the background of a supranuclear dense matter. As dictated by the Onsager-Feynman equation, the prompt spin-down must be associated with increase of the dimensions of the embryonic SB to finally convert the entire pulsar into SB-Objects on the scale of Gyrs. Based on our calculations, a Vela-like pulsar should display billions of glitches during its lifetime, before it metamorphoses entirely into a maximally compact SB-object and disappears from our observational windows. The present model predicts the mass of SBs and ΔΩ/Ω in young pulsars to be relatively lower than their older counterparts

  2. Metamorphosis and neoteny: alternative pathways in an extinct amphibian clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rainer R; Fröbisch, Nadia B

    2006-07-01

    The Branchiosauridae was a clade of small amphibians from the Permo-Carboniferous with an overall salamander-like appearance. The clade is distinguished by an extraordinary fossil record that comprises hundreds of well-preserved specimens, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages. Branchiosaurids had external gills and weakly ossified skeletons, and due to this larval appearance their status as neotenic (perennibranchiate) forms has long been accepted. Despite their extensive fossil record large specimens with an adult morphology appeared to be lacking altogether, but recently two adult specimens were identified in a rich sample of Apateon gracilis collected in the 19th century from a locality near Dresden, Saxony. These specimens are unique among branchiosaurids in showing a high level of ossification, including bones that have never been reported in a branchiosaur. These highlight the successive formation of features believed to indicate terrestrial locomotion, as well as feeding on larger prey items. Moreover, these transformations occurred in a small time window (whereas the degree of size increase is used as a proxy of time) and the degree of concentration of developmental events in branchiosaurids is unique among tetrapods outside the lissamphibians. These specimens are compared with large adults of the neotenic branchiosaurid Apateon caducus from the Saar-Nahe Basin, which despite their larger body size lack the features found in the adult A. gracilis specimens. These specimens give new insight into patterns of metamorphosis (morphological transformation) in branchiosaurids that are believed to be correlated to a change of habitat, and clearly show that different life-history pathways comparable to those of modern salamanders were already established in this Paleozoic clade.

  3. Do effects of mercury in larval amphibians persist after metamorphosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian D; Willson, John D; Bergeron, Christine M; Hopkins, William A

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread concern about the role of environmental contaminants in global amphibian declines, and evidence that post-metamorphic life stages contribute disproportionately to amphibian population dynamics, most studies in amphibian ecotoxicology focus on larval life stages. Studies that focus solely on early life stages may miss important effects of contaminant exposure, such as latent effects that manifest some time after previous exposure. Moreover, it is often assumed that effects observed in amphibian larvae will persist to affect survival or reproduction later in life. We used terrestrial enclosures to determine whether exposure to mercury (Hg) through maternal transfer and/or larval diet had any adverse effects in post-metamorphic American toads (Bufo americanus). We found a 5% difference in size at metamorphosis that was attributed to maternal Hg exposure persisted for 1 year in the terrestrial environment, resulting in a 7% difference at the conclusion of the study. Although patterns of survival differed among treatments through time, we found no overall difference in survival after 1 year. We also found no evidence of emergent latent effects in the terrestrial toads that could be attributed to earlier exposure. Our results indicate that adverse effects of maternal Hg exposure that were observed in larval amphibians may persist to affect later terrestrial life stages but that no novel adverse effects developed when animals were raised in a semi-natural environment. Moreover, we found no evidence of persistent effects of dietary Hg exposure in larvae, highlighting a need for greater focus on maternal effects in amphibian ecotoxicology. Finally, we suggest an increase in the use of longitudinal studies to better understand contaminant impacts to amphibian populations via effects in both aquatic and terrestrial life stages.

  4. The insect neuropeptide PTTH activates receptor tyrosine kinase torso to initiate metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Yamanaka, Naoki; Gilbert, Lawrence I; O'Connor, Michael B

    2009-12-04

    Holometabolous insects undergo complete metamorphosis to become sexually mature adults. Metamorphosis is initiated by brain-derived prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH), which stimulates the production of the molting hormone ecdysone via an incompletely defined signaling pathway. Here we demonstrate that Torso, a receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates embryonic terminal cell fate in Drosophila, is the PTTH receptor. Trunk, the embryonic Torso ligand, is related to PTTH, and ectopic expression of PTTH in the embryo partially rescues trunk mutants. In larvae, torso is expressed specifically in the prothoracic gland (PG), and its loss phenocopies the removal of PTTH. The activation of Torso by PTTH stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, and the loss of ERK in the PG phenocopies the loss of PTTH and Torso. We conclude that PTTH initiates metamorphosis by activation of the Torso/ERK pathway.

  5. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage.

  6. Cloning and stage-specific expression of CK-M1 gene during metamorphosis of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanjie; Zhang, Quanqi; Qi, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Sun, Yeying; Zhong, Qiwang; Li, Shuo; Li, Chunmei

    2010-05-01

    The symmetrical body of flatfish larvae changes dramatically into an asymmetrical form after metamorphosis. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this change are poorly understood. As an initial step to clarify these mechanisms, we used representational difference analysis of cDNA for the identification of genes active during metamorphosis in the Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olicaceus. One of the up-regulated genes was identified as creatine kinase muscle type 1 (CK-M1). Sequence analysis of CK-M1 revealed that it spanned 1 708 bp and encoded a protein of 382 amino acids. The overall amino acid sequence of the CK-M1 was highly conserved with those of other organisms. CK-M1 was expressed in adult fish tissues, including skeletal muscle, intestine and gill. Whole mount in-situ hybridization showed that the enhanced expression of CK-M1 expanded from the head to the whole body of larvae as metamorphosis progressed. Quantitative analysis revealed stage-specific high expression of CK-M1 during metamorphosis. The expression level of CK-M1 increased initially and peaked at metamorphosis, decreased afterward, and finally returned to the pre-metamorphosis level. This stage-specific expression pattern suggested strongly that CK-M1 was related to metamorphosis in the Japanese flounder. Its specific role in metamorphosis requires further study.

  7. Structural and functional maturation of skin during metamorphosis in the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus)

    KAUST Repository

    Alves, Ricardo N.

    2018-02-20

    To establish if the developmental changes in the primary barrier and osmoregulatory capacity of Atlantic halibut skin are modified during metamorphosis, histological, histochemical, gene expression and electrophysiological measurements were made. The morphology of the ocular and abocular skin started to diverge during the metamorphic climax and ocular skin appeared thicker and more stratified. Neutral mucins were the main glycoproteins produced by the goblet cells in skin during metamorphosis. Moreover, the number of goblet cells producing neutral mucins increased during metamorphosis and asymmetry in their abundance was observed between ocular and abocular skin. The increase in goblet cell number and their asymmetric abundance in skin was concomitant with the period that thyroid hormones (THs) increase and suggests that they may be under the control of these hormones. Several mucin transcripts were identified in metamorphosing halibut transcriptomes and Muc18 and Muc5AC were characteristic of the body skin. Na+, K+-ATPase positive (NKA) cells were observed in skin of all metamorphic stages but their number significantly decreased with the onset of metamorphosis. No asymmetry was observed between ocular and abocular skin in NKA cells. The morphological changes observed were linked to modified skin barrier function as revealed by modifications in its electrophysiological properties. However, the maturation of the skin functional characteristics preceded structural maturation and occurred at stage 8 prior to the metamorphic climax. Treatment of Atlantic halibut with the THs disrupter methimazole (MMI) affected the number of goblet cells producing neutral mucins and the NKA cells. The present study reveals that the asymmetric development of the skin in Atlantic halibut is TH sensitive and is associated with metamorphosis and that this barrier’s functional properties mature earlier and are independent of metamorphosis.

  8. Precocious metamorphosis in the juvenile hormone-deficient mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Daimon

    Full Text Available Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs. JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several "moltinism" mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval-larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval-pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH-deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis.

  9. Juvenile hormone resistance gene Methoprene-tolerant controls entry into metamorphosis in the beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopová, Barbora; Jindra, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, - (2007), s. 10488-10493 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007305; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insect metamorphosis * postembryonic development * endocryne regulation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.598, year: 2007

  10. Delayed metamorphosis and recurrence of bacterial infection in irradiated Rana clamitans tadpoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.R.

    1982-03-01

    X-ray doses of 5 and 10 Gy (1 Gy/min) given to premetamorphic Green Frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles delayed their metamorphosis relative to unirradiated controls. Previous pathogenic bacterial infections recurred in irradiated animals prior to metamorphic climax. Limited mortality occurred during metamorphic climax, 80-105 days after irradiation

  11. Quantitative proteomics identify molecular targets that are crucial in larval settlement and metamorphosis of bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2011-01-07

    The marine invertebrate Bugula neritina has a biphasic life cycle that consists of a swimming larval stage and a sessile juvenile and adult stage. The attachment of larvae to the substratum and their subsequent metamorphosis have crucial ecological consequences. Despite many studies on this species, little is known about the molecular mechanism of these processes. Here, we report a comparative study of swimming larvae and metamorphosing individuals at 4 and 24 h postattachment using label-free quantitative proteomics. We identified more than 1100 proteins at each stage, 61 of which were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in energy metabolism and structural molecules were generally down-regulated, whereas proteins involved in transcription and translation, the extracellular matrix, and calcification were strongly up-regulated during metamorphosis. Many tightly regulated novel proteins were also identified. Subsequent analysis of the temporal and spatial expressions of some of the proteins and an assay of their functions indicated that they may have key roles in metamorphosis of B. neritina. These findings not only provide molecular evidence with which to elucidate the substantial changes in morphology and physiology that occur during larval attachment and metamorphosis but also identify potential targets for antifouling treatment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Characterization and expression of calmodulin gene during larval settlement and metamorphosis of the polychaete Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhangfan

    2012-08-01

    The polychaete . Hydroides elegans (Serpulidae, Lophotrochozoa) is a problematic marine fouling organism in most tropical and subtropical coastal environment. Competent larvae of . H. elegans undergo the transition from the swimming larval stage to the sessile juvenile stage with substantial morphological, physiological, and behavior changes. This transition is often referred to as larval settlement and metamorphosis. In this study, we examined the possible involvement of calmodulin (CaM) - a multifunctional calcium metabolism regulator, in the larval settlement and metamorphosis of . H. elegans. A full-length . CaM cDNA was successfully cloned from . H. elegans (. He-CaM) and it contained an open reading frame of 450. bp, encoding 149 amino acid residues. It was highly expressed in 12. h post-metamorphic juveniles, and remained high in adults. . In situ hybridization conducted in competent larvae and juveniles revealed that . He-CaM gene was continuously expressed in the putative growth zones, branchial rudiments, and collar region, suggesting that . He-CaM might be involved in tissue differentiation and development. Our subsequent bioassay revealed that the CaM inhibitor W7 could effectively inhibit larval settlement and metamorphosis, and cause some morphological defects of unsettled larvae. In conclusion, our results revealed that CaM has important functions in the larval settlement and metamorphosis of . H. elegans. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..

  13. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  14. A phosphoproteomics approach to elucidate neuropeptide signal transduction controlling insect metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Larsen, Martin R; Lobner-Olesen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    In insects, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) stimulates production of ecdysone (E) in the prothoracic glands (PGs). E is the precursor of the principal steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), that is responsible for eliciting molting and metamorphosis. In this study, we used ...

  15. Stable isotope enrichment in laboratory ant colonies: effects of colony age, metamorphosis, diet, and fat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecologists use stable isotopes to infer diets and trophic levels of animals in food webs, yet some assumptions underlying these inferences have not been thoroughly tested. We used laboratory-reared colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Formicidae: Solenopsidini) to test the effects of metamorphosis,...

  16. Exploration and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia ; Thoracica) cyprids: significance of sugars and adult extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A; Raghukumar, S.

    metamorphosis than the non-treated cyprids at 10-8M, whereas cyprids treated with the other LCA specific sugar (D-glucose) showed an inhibitory effect in the absence of AE. This result implies the involvement of D-mannose moieties of AE in the settlement...

  17. Phosphoproteome analysis during larval development and metamorphosis in the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2011-05-25

    Background: The metamorphosis of the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa includes spontaneous settlement onto soft-bottom habitats and morphogenesis that can be completed in a very short time. A previous study on the total changes to the proteome during the various developmental stages of P. vexillosa suggested that little or no de novo protein synthesis occurs during metamorphosis. In this study, we used multicolor fluorescence detection of proteins in 2-D gels for differential analysis of proteins and phosphoproteins to reveal the dynamics of post-translational modification proteins in this species. A combination of affinity chromatography, 2D-PAGE, and mass spectrometry was used to identify the phosphoproteins in pre-competent larvae, competent larvae, and newly metamorphosed juveniles. Results: We reproducibly detected 210, 492, and 172 phosphoproteins in pre-competent larvae, competent larvae, and newly metamorphosed juveniles, respectively. The highest percentage of phosphorylation was observed during the competent larval stage. About 64 stage-specific phosphoprotein spots were detected in the competent stage, and 32 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly differentially expressed in the three stages. We identified 38 phosphoproteins, 10 of which were differentially expressed during metamorphosis. These phosphoproteins belonged to six categories of biological processes: (1) development, (2) cell differentiation and integrity, (3) transcription and translation, (4) metabolism, (5) protein-protein interaction and proteolysis, and (6) receptors and enzymes. Conclusion: This is the first study to report changes in phosphoprotein expression patterns during the metamorphosis of the marine polychaete P. vexillosa. The higher degree of phosphorylation during the process of attaining competence to settle and metamorphose may be due to fast morphological transitions regulated by various mechanisms. Our data are consistent with previous studies showing a

  18. Influence of bacterial exopolymers, conspecific adult extract and salinity on the cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, R.

    The influence of bacterial exopolymers and conspecific adult extract of Balanus amphitrite on metamorphosis of cyprid larvae at different salinities has been evaluated through laboratory assay. The bacterial exopolymers (epm) extracted from...

  19. Using bacterial extract along with differential gene expression in Acropora millepora larvae to decouple the processes of attachment and metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachshon Siboni

    Full Text Available Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP, isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100% with little or no attachment (0-2%. To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI, selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05 in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05 following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that

  20. Dependency on de novo protein synthesis and proteomic changes during metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2010-05-24

    Background: Metamorphosis in the bryozoan Bugula neritina (Linne) includes an initial phase of rapid morphological rearrangement followed by a gradual phase of morphogenesis. We hypothesized that the first phase may be independent of de novo synthesis of proteins and, instead, involves post-translational modifications of existing proteins, providing a simple mechanism to quickly initiate metamorphosis. To test our hypothesis, we challenged B. neritina larvae with transcription and translation inhibitors. Furthermore, we employed 2D gel electrophoresis to characterize changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome during early metamorphosis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and their gene expression patterns were profiled using semi-quantitative real time PCR.Results: When larvae were incubated with transcription and translation inhibitors, metamorphosis initiated through the first phase but did not complete. We found a significant down-regulation of 60 protein spots and the percentage of phosphoprotein spots decreased from 15% in the larval stage to12% during early metamorphosis. Two proteins--the mitochondrial processing peptidase beta subunit and severin--were abundantly expressed and phosphorylated in the larval stage, but down-regulated during metamorphosis. MPPbeta and severin were also down-regulated on the gene expression level.Conclusions: The initial morphogenetic changes that led to attachment of B. neritina did not depend on de novo protein synthesis, but the subsequent gradual morphogenesis did. This is the first time that the mitochondrial processing peptidase beta subunit or severin have been shown to be down-regulated on both gene and protein expression levels during the metamorphosis of B. neritina. Future studies employing immunohistochemistry to reveal the expression locality of these two proteins during metamorphosis should provide further evidence of the involvement of these two

  1. Are the anticipatory pathways in lecithotrophic larvae that delay metamorphosis adaptations? (A review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    During anticipatory development in lecithotrophic larvae that delay metamorphosis, the growth and differentiation of features of the adult action system continue to develop at a slow pace even though they do not become functional. After metamorphosis occurs, the larger size and advanced development of these components may allow juveniles to initially grow at a faster rate than they normally would. Anticipatory development has been demonstrated in archeogastropods, some solitary ascidians and a hydrozoan. In the gastropod Haliotis and the hydrozoan Phialidium anticipatory development increases the initial growth rate of juveniles. In Haliotis and ascidians all of the larvae of a given female that live long enough exhibit anticipatory development. In Phialidium, the ability of a given female to produce larvae that can exhibit anticipatory development is a maternal polymorphic character. In Haliotis and solitary ascidians that exhibit anticipatory development, it appears to be a slower version of the rapid developmental changes that occur in parts of the adult action system at metamorphosis. In Phialidium, developmental changes in relative sizes of the different presumptive regions of the polyp are slowly altered prior to and independently of metamorphosis. Anticipatory development is not linked to the decrease in the size or nutrient reserves of older larvae but to the length of their larval period. From an evolutionary perspective, the mechanisms that operate during anticipatory development are probably of adaptive significance for lecithotrophic larvae of species that spend variable amounts of time in the water column because of a patchy distribution of appropriate settlement cues. The developmental mechanisms that underlie anticipatory development may have been used during the transition from lecithotrophy to planktotrophy. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93

    OpenAIRE

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M.; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Duncan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the...

  3. Ouro proteins are not essential to tail regression during Xenopus tropicalis metamorphosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yuya; Nakajima, Keisuke; Robert, Jacques; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Tail regression is one of the most prominent transformations observed during anuran metamorphosis. A tadpole tail that is twice as long as the tadpole trunk nearly disappears within three days in Xenopus tropicalis. Several years ago, it was proposed that this phenomenon is driven by an immunological rejection of larval-skin-specific antigens, Ouro proteins. We generated ouro-knockout tadpoles using the TALEN method to reexamine this immunological rejection model. Both the ouro1- and ouro2-kn...

  4. Broad-Complex acts downstream of Met in juvenile hormone signaling to coordinate primitive holometabolan metamorphosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopová, Barbora; Jindra, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 3 (2008), s. 559-568 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1032; GA AV ČR IAA5007305; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : metamorphosis * juvenile hormone * broad-complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.812, year: 2008

  5. Organocatalytic Stereoconvergent Synthesis of α-CF3Amides: Triketopiperazines and Their Heterocyclic Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Robert W; Lenz, Eva N; Simpkins, Nigel S; Stead, Darren

    2017-07-03

    The highly enantioselective alkylation of α-CF 3 enolates, generated from triketopiperazines, has been accomplished through use of a bifunctional thiourea organocatalyst to facilitate 1,4-addition to varied enone acceptors. On treatment with appropriate nitrogen nucleophiles, the chiral triketopiperazine products undergo a metamorphosis, to provide novel fused heterocyclic lactams such as extended pyrazolopyrimidines. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Signatures of natural selection between life cycle stages separated by metamorphosis in European eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujolar, J M; Jacobsen, M W; Bekkevold, D; Lobón-Cervià, J; Jónsson, B; Bernatchez, L; Hansen, M M

    2015-08-13

    Species showing complex life cycles provide excellent opportunities to study the genetic associations between life cycle stages, as selective pressures may differ before and after metamorphosis. The European eel presents a complex life cycle with two metamorphoses, a first metamorphosis from larvae into glass eels (juvenile stage) and a second metamorphosis into silver eels (adult stage). We tested the hypothesis that different genes and gene pathways will be under selection at different life stages when comparing the genetic associations between glass eels and silver eels. We used two sets of markers to test for selection: first, we genotyped individuals using a panel of 80 coding-gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) developed in American eel; second, we investigated selection at the genome level using a total of 153,423 RAD-sequencing generated SNPs widely distributed across the genome. Using the RAD approach, outlier tests identified a total of 2413 (1.57%) potentially selected SNPs. Functional annotation analysis identified signal transduction pathways as the most over-represented group of genes, including MAPK/Erk signalling, calcium signalling and GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) signalling. Many of the over-represented pathways were related to growth, while others could result from the different conditions that eels inhabit during their life cycle. The observation of different genes and gene pathways under selection when comparing glass eels vs. silver eels supports the adaptive decoupling hypothesis for the benefits of metamorphosis. Partitioning the life cycle into discrete morphological phases may be overall beneficial since it allows the different life stages to respond independently to their unique selection pressures. This might translate into a more effective use of food and niche resources and/or performance of phase-specific tasks (e.g. feeding in the case of glass eels, migrating and reproducing in the case of silver eels).

  7. Larval development and metamorphosis of the deep-sea cidaroid urchin Cidaris blakei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kathleen C; Young, Craig M; Emlet, Richard B

    2012-04-01

    Cidaroids, one of the two major sister clades of sea urchins, first appeared during the lower Permian (ca. 270 mya) and are considered to represent the primitive form of all living echinoids. This study of Cidaris blakei, a deep-sea cidaroid urchin with planktotrophic larvae, provides a description of development from fertilization through early juvenile stages and is the first report of a deep-sea urchin reared through metamorphosis. C. blakei resembles other cidaroids in its lack of a cohesive hyaline layer, the absence of an amniotic invagination for juvenile rudiment formation, and the presence of spines with a single morphotype at metamorphosis. C. blakei differed from other cidaroids in the presence of an apical tuft, the extent of fenestration of postoral skeletal rods, the shape of juvenile spines, and an extended (14-day) lecithotrophic stage prior to development of a complete gut. The development of C. blakei, 120 days from fertilization to metamorphosis, was protracted relative to that of shallow-water cidaroids. Preliminary work on temperature tolerances suggests that C. blakei larvae would be unable to survive the warmer temperatures higher in the water column and are therefore unable to vertically migrate.

  8. Biological factors controlling developmental duration, growth and metamorphosis of the larval green toad, Bufo viridis viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Bekhet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study in a controlled laboratory setting provided important insights into both the degree of plasticity and the proximal environmental cues operating in the response of green toad tadpoles to pond drying, food level. It was concluded that timing of metamorphosis and size at metamorphosis were highly affected by pond duration. The effects of pond desiccation are reflected by shorter developmental duration and smaller size at metamorphosis as a result of increased crowding in the shallow tanks than tadpoles in the deep tanks. Bufo viridis raised on high food supplements grew faster than those raised on low food in low or high population density. In the tanks with decreased water and food levels, the tadpoles accelerate development and metamorphose earlier than tadpoles in higher food and water levels. The obtained data revealed that tadpoles grew faster under conditions of high population density than low one in either high or low food levels. Actual density had limited but significant effects on tadpole size and development. It also suggested that density regulation, acting on the tadpole stage, may be present in the population but was of less short-term importance than abiotic factors. Environmentally induced variation in developmental rates translated to changes in relative hind leg length. Hind leg length plasticity was positively correlated with growth rate plasticity. Finally, documenting the recent results of this study, B. viridis breed in temporary ponds and exhibited plasticity in developmental duration and growth rate in response to a change in water level.

  9. Differential expression of proteins and phosphoproteins during larval metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I

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    Qian Pei-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spontaneous metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I larvae into juveniles requires minor morphological changes, including segment formation, body elongation, and loss of cilia. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression patterns of both proteins and phosphoproteins during the transition from larvae to juveniles in this species. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE followed by multiplex fluorescent staining and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis to identify the differentially expressed proteins as well as the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of both competent larvae and juveniles. Results Twenty-three differentially expressed proteins were identified in the two developmental stages. Expression patterns of two of those proteins were examined at the protein level by Western blot analysis while seven were further studied at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Results showed that proteins related to cell division, cell migration, energy storage and oxidative stress were plentifully expressed in the competent larvae; in contrast, proteins involved in oxidative metabolism and transcriptional regulation were abundantly expressed in the juveniles. Conclusion It is likely that these differentially expressed proteins are involved in regulating the larval metamorphosis process and can be used as protein markers for studying molecular mechanisms associated with larval metamorphosis in polychaetes.

  10. The uptake of 14C-glycine to Bufo vulgaris formosus (Boulenger) larva at metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Haruo; Ishiguro, Shigeru; Nonoyama, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Harumi.

    1981-01-01

    With the eggs of Bufo vulgaris formosus (Boulenger) immediately after fertilization, the larvae in the 50 ml solution containing 1 ml of 14 C-glycine were developed to the end of metamorphosis. Measurements were made on the length of body, tail, fore limb and hind leg through the stages of tail degeneration and vestige. The radioactivity of the cut off fore limbs, hind legs, tails and head trunks was measured with a scintillation counter, and the 10 μ sections of the samples were used for autoradiography. The larvae uptook orally 14 C-glycine to the organs of cell tissues. On the basis of the reports of the autolysis of tails and the activation of lysosome enzyme in metamorphosis and on the uptake of 14 C-leucine and 14 C-proline to four legs by other workers, and on the present results, the free amino acids formed from the autolysis of tails were utilized for the recomposition of organ protein synthesis in the metamorphosis of the amphibians. (J.P.N.)

  11. The Metamorphosis of the Victim of Crime: From Crime to Culture and the Implications for Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Walklate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beck (2015: 81 observes, metamorphosis ‘is proceeding latently, behind the mind walls of unintended side effects, which are being constructed as ‘natural’ and ‘self-evident’. Thus Beck’s concept of metamorphosis conceives of social change as unnoticed and unacknowledged. Such change is evident in the contemporary ever present invocation of the ‘victim’ in a wide range of different, crime-soaked circumstances. This paper is concerned to explore this metamorphosis of the ‘victim’ in reflecting on two narratives: the victim narrative and the trauma narrative. The contemporary conflation of these two narratives has led Agamben (1999: 13 to suggest that policy has proceeded as if ‘“testis” (the testimony of a person as a third party in a trial or a law suit can be conflated with “superstes” (a person who has lived through something and can thereby bear witness to it’. The paper makes the case that this conflation has consequences for understandings of justice.

  12. Effects of depleted uranium on survival, growth, and metamorphosis in the african clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S.E.; Caldwell, C.A.; Gonzales, G.; Gould, W.R.; Arimoto, R.

    2005-01-01

    Embryos (stage 8-47, Nieuwkoop and Faber) of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) were subjected to water-borne depleted uranium (DU) concentrations that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/Lusing an acute 96-h frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). In a chronic 64-d assay, X. laevis (from embryo through metamorphosis; stages 8-66) were subjected to concentrations of DU that ranged from 6.2 to 54.3 mg/L Our results indicate DU is a non teratogenic metal. No effects on mortality, malformations, or growth were observed in the 96-h FETAX with concentrations of DU that ranged from 4.8 to 77.7 mg/L From stage 8 to stage 47, X. laevis tadpoles do not actively feed and the gills are not well developed. Thus, uptake of DU was reduced despite exposure to elevated concentrations. The 64-d assay resulted in no concentration response for either mortality or malformations; however, a delay in metamorphosis was observed in tadpoles subjected to elevated DU concentrations (from 13.1 to 54.3 mg/L) compared to tadpoles in both the well-water control and reference. The delay in metamorphosis was likely due to increasing body burden of DU that ranged from 0.98 to 2.82 mg/kg. Copyright?? Taylor & Francis Inc.

  13. Differential expression of proteins and phosphoproteins during larval metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2011-09-03

    Background: The spontaneous metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I larvae into juveniles requires minor morphological changes, including segment formation, body elongation, and loss of cilia. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression patterns of both proteins and phosphoproteins during the transition from larvae to juveniles in this species. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by multiplex fluorescent staining and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis to identify the differentially expressed proteins as well as the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of both competent larvae and juveniles.Results: Twenty-three differentially expressed proteins were identified in the two developmental stages. Expression patterns of two of those proteins were examined at the protein level by Western blot analysis while seven were further studied at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Results showed that proteins related to cell division, cell migration, energy storage and oxidative stress were plentifully expressed in the competent larvae; in contrast, proteins involved in oxidative metabolism and transcriptional regulation were abundantly expressed in the juveniles.Conclusion: It is likely that these differentially expressed proteins are involved in regulating the larval metamorphosis process and can be used as protein markers for studying molecular mechanisms associated with larval metamorphosis in polychaetes. © 2011 Chandramouli et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Involvement of wnt signaling pathways in the metamorphosis of the bryozoan bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2012-03-20

    In this study, we analyzed the metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina. We observed the morphogenesis of the ancestrula. We defined three distinct pre-ancestrula stages based on the anatomy of the developing polypide and the overall morphology of pre-ancestrula. We then used an annotation based enrichment analysis tool to analyze the B. neritina transcriptome and identified over-representation of genes related to Wnt signaling pathways, suggesting its involvement in metamorphosis. Finally, we studied the temporal-spatial gene expression studies of several Wnt pathway genes. We found that one of the Wnt ligand, BnWnt10, was expressed spatially opposite to the Wnt antagonist BnsFRP within the blastemas, which is the presumptive polypide. Down-stream components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway were exclusively expressed in the blastemas. Bn?catenin and BnFz5/8 were exclusively expressed in the blastemas throughout the metamorphosis. Based on the genes expression patterns, we propose that BnWnt10 and BnsFRP may relate to the patterning of the polypide, in which the two genes served as positional signals and contributed to the polarization of the blastemas. Another Wnt ligand, BnWnt6, was expressed in the apical part of the pre-ancestrula epidermis. Overall, our findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway may be important to the pattern formation of polypide and the development of epidermis. © 2012 Wong et al.

  15. Proteomics insights: proteins related to larval attachment and metamorphosis of marine invertebrates

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2014-10-31

    The transition in an animal from a pelagic larval stage to a sessile benthic juvenile typically requires major morphological and behavioral changes. Larval competency, attachment and initiation of metamorphosis are thought to be regulated by intrinsic chemical signals and specific sets of proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate larval attachment and metamorphosis in marine invertebrates have yet to be fully elucidated. Despite the many challenges associated with analysis of the larvae proteome, recent proteomic technologies have been used to address specific questions in larval developmental biology. These and other molecular studies have generated substantial amount of information of the proteins and molecular pathways involved in larval attachment and metamorphosis. Furthermore, the results of these studies have shown that systematic changes in protein expression patterns and post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial for the transition from larva to juvenile. The degeneration of larval tissues is mediated by protein degradation, while the development of juvenile organs may require PTM. In terms of application, the identified proteins may serve as targets for antifouling compounds, and biomarkers for environmental stressors. In this review we highlight the strengths and limitations of proteomic tools in the context of the study of marine invertebrate larval biology.

  16. FMAj: a tool for high content analysis of muscle dynamics in Drosophila metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background During metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster, larval muscles undergo two different developmental fates; one population is removed by cell death, while the other persistent subset undergoes morphological remodeling and survives to adulthood. Thanks to the ability to perform live imaging of muscle development in transparent pupae and the power of genetics, metamorphosis in Drosophila can be used as a model to study the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. However, time-lapse microscopy generates sizeable image data that require new tools for high throughput image analysis. Results We performed targeted gene perturbation in muscles and acquired 3D time-series images of muscles in metamorphosis using laser scanning confocal microscopy. To quantify the phenotypic effects of gene perturbations, we designed the Fly Muscle Analysis tool (FMAj) which is based on the ImageJ and MySQL frameworks for image processing and data storage, respectively. The image analysis pipeline of FMAj contains three modules. The first module assists in adding annotations to time-lapse datasets, such as genotypes, experimental parameters and temporal reference points, which are used to compare different datasets. The second module performs segmentation and feature extraction of muscle cells and nuclei. Users can provide annotations to the detected objects, such as muscle identities and anatomical information. The third module performs comparative quantitative analysis of muscle phenotypes. We applied our tool to the phenotypic characterization of two atrophy related genes that were silenced by RNA interference. Reduction of Drosophila Tor (Target of Rapamycin) expression resulted in enhanced atrophy compared to control, while inhibition of the autophagy factor Atg9 caused suppression of atrophy and enlarged muscle fibers of abnormal morphology. FMAj enabled us to monitor the progression of atrophic and hypertrophic phenotypes of individual muscles throughout metamorphosis

  17. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M.; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Duncan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates. PMID:22308414

  18. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M; Baehrecke, Eric H; Duncan, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates.

  19. Turbine sound may influence the metamorphosis behaviour of estuarine crab megalopae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K Pine

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21-31% compared to silent control treatments, 38-47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46-60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment.

  20. Common and distinct roles of juvenile hormone signaling genes in metamorphosis of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Konopova

    Full Text Available Insect larvae metamorphose to winged and reproductive adults either directly (hemimetaboly or through an intermediary pupal stage (holometaboly. In either case juvenile hormone (JH prevents metamorphosis until a larva has attained an appropriate phase of development. In holometabolous insects, JH acts through its putative receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met to regulate Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and Broad-Complex (BR-C genes. While Met and Kr-h1 prevent precocious metamorphosis in pre-final larval instars, BR-C specifies the pupal stage. How JH signaling operates in hemimetabolous insects is poorly understood. Here, we compare the function of Met, Kr-h1 and BR-C genes in the two types of insects. Using systemic RNAi in the hemimetabolous true bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, we show that Met conveys the JH signal to prevent premature metamorphosis by maintaining high expression of Kr-h1. Knockdown of either Met or Kr-h1 (but not of BR-C in penultimate-instar Pyrrhocoris larvae causes precocious development of adult color pattern, wings and genitalia. A natural fall of Kr-h1 expression in the last larval instar normally permits adult development, and treatment with an exogenous JH mimic methoprene at this time requires both Met and Kr-h1 to block the adult program and induce an extra larval instar. Met and Kr-h1 therefore serve as JH-dependent repressors of deleterious precocious metamorphic changes in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous juveniles, whereas BR-C has been recruited for a new role in specifying the holometabolous pupa. These results show that despite considerable evolutionary distance, insects with diverse developmental strategies employ a common-core JH signaling pathway to commit to adult morphogenesis.

  1. Turbine Sound May Influence the Metamorphosis Behaviour of Estuarine Crab Megalopae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Matthew K.; Jeffs, Andrew G.; Radford, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that a shift towards renewable energy production is needed in order to avoid further anthropogenically induced climate change. The ocean provides a largely untapped source of renewable energy. As a result, harvesting electrical power from the wind and tides has sparked immense government and commercial interest but with relatively little detailed understanding of the potential environmental impacts. This study investigated how the sound emitted from an underwater tidal turbine and an offshore wind turbine would influence the settlement and metamorphosis of the pelagic larvae of estuarine brachyuran crabs which are ubiquitous in most coastal habitats. In a laboratory experiment the median time to metamorphosis (TTM) for the megalopae of the crabs Austrohelice crassa and Hemigrapsus crenulatus was significantly increased by at least 18 h when exposed to either tidal turbine or sea-based wind turbine sound, compared to silent control treatments. Contrastingly, when either species were subjected to natural habitat sound, observed median TTM decreased by approximately 21–31% compared to silent control treatments, 38–47% compared to tidal turbine sound treatments, and 46–60% compared to wind turbine sound treatments. A lack of difference in median TTM in A. crassa between two different source levels of tidal turbine sound suggests the frequency composition of turbine sound is more relevant in explaining such responses rather than sound intensity. These results show that estuarine mudflat sound mediates natural metamorphosis behaviour in two common species of estuarine crabs, and that exposure to continuous turbine sound interferes with this natural process. These results raise concerns about the potential ecological impacts of sound generated by renewable energy generation systems placed in the nearshore environment. PMID:23240063

  2. Post-embryonic transcriptomes of the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii: multigenic succession through metamorphosis.

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    Tomer Ventura

    Full Text Available Like many metazoans, the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii begins its post-embryonic life with a set of morphologically distinct planktonic larval stages, followed by a benthic post-larval stage during which the maturing organism differs from the larvae both ecologically and physiologically. Understanding of the molecular basis underlying morphogenesis in crustaceans is limited to the observation that methyl farnesoate, the non-epoxidated form of the insect juvenile hormone, acts as the active crustacean juvenoid. Molt steroids were also linked to morphogenesis and several other molecular pathways, such as Hedgehog and Wnt, are known to underlie morphogenesis in all metazoans examined and, as such, are thought to do the same in crustaceans. Using next generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced the transcriptomes of several larval and post-larval stages. De novo assembly, followed by bioinformatics analysis, revealed that many novel transcripts are over-expressed in either larvae- or post-larvae-stage prawn, shedding light on the molecular basis underlying M. rosenbergii metamorphosis. Fast larval molting rates and periodic morphological changes were reflected in over-expression of transcripts annotated to the cell cycle, DNA replication and morphogenic pathways (i.e., Hedgehog and Wnt. Further characterization of transcripts assigned to morphogenic pathways by real-time RT-PCR reconfirmed their over-expression in larvae, albeit with a more complex expression pattern when examined in the individual developmental stages. The expression level of an orthologue of cytochrome P450, 15A1, known to epoxidize methyl farnesoate in insects, was increased in the late larval and early post-larval stages, in accordance with the role of methyl farnesoate in crustacean metamorphosis. This study exemplifies the applicability of a high-throughput sequencing approach for studying complex traits, including metamorphosis, providing new insight into this

  3. Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection

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    Mukherjee Krishnendu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs and histone deacetylases (HDACs whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase, the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects and host defense (antimicrobial peptides, and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection.

  4. Spatial pattern analysis of nuclear migration in remodelled muscles during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleesha; Feng, Lin; Wasser, Martin

    2017-07-10

    Many human muscle wasting diseases are associated with abnormal nuclear localization. During metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster, multi-nucleated larval dorsal abdominal muscles either undergo cell death or are remodeled to temporary adult muscles. Muscle remodeling is associated with anti-polar nuclear migration and atrophy during early pupation followed by polar migration and muscle growth during late pupation. Muscle remodeling is a useful model to study genes involved in myonuclear migration. Previously, we showed that loss of Cathepsin-L inhibited anti-polar movements, while knockdown of autophagy-related genes affected nuclear positioning along the medial axis in late metamorphosis. To compare the phenotypic effects of gene perturbations on nuclear migration more objectively, we developed new descriptors of myonuclear distribution. To obtain nuclear pattern features, we designed an algorithm to detect and track nuclear regions inside live muscles. Nuclear tracks were used to distinguish between fast moving nuclei associated with fragments of dead muscles (sarcolytes) and slow-moving nuclei inside remodelled muscles. Nuclear spatial pattern features, such as longitudinal (lonNS) and lateral nuclear spread (latNS), allowed us to compare nuclear migration during muscle remodelling in different genetic backgrounds. Anti-polar migration leads to a lonNS decrease. As expected, lack of myonuclear migration caused by the loss of Cp1 was correlated with a significantly lower lonNS decrease. Unexpectedly, the decrease in lonNS was significantly enhanced by Atg9, Atg5 and Atg18 silencing, indicating that the loss of autophagy promotes the migration and clustering of nuclei. Loss of autophagy also caused a scattering of nuclei along the lateral axis, leading to a two-row as opposed to single row distribution in control muscles. Increased latNS resulting from knockdown of Atg9 and Atg18 was correlated with increased muscle diameter, suggesting that the wider muscle

  5. The ontogeny of choanocyte chambers during metamorphosis in the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica

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    Shunsuke Sogabe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aquiferous body plan of poriferans revolves around internal chambers comprised of choanocytes, a cell type structurally similar to choanoflagellates. These choanocyte chambers perform a range of physiological and developmental functions, including the capture of food and the generation of stem cells. Despite the increasing interest for choanocytes as sponge stem cells, there is limited knowledge on the development of choanocyte chambers. Using a combination of cell lineage tracing, antibody staining and EdU labeling, here we examine the development of choanocytes and the chambers they comprise during metamorphosis in the marine demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Results Lineage-tracing experiments show that larval epithelial cells transform into mesenchymal pluripotent stem cells, resembling archeocytes, within 24 h of initiating metamorphosis. By 36 h, some of these labeled archeocyte-like cells have differentiated into choanocytes that will form the first postlarval choanocyte chambers. Non-labeled cells also contribute to these primary choanocyte chambers, consistent with these chambers being a chimera of multiple transdifferentiated larval cell types and not the proliferation of a single choanocyte precursor. Moreover, cell proliferation assays demonstrate that, following the initial formation of choanocyte chambers, chambers grow at least partially by the proliferation of choanocytes within the chamber, although recruitment of individual cells into established chambers also appears to occur. EdU labeling of postlarvae and juveniles reveals that choanocyte chambers are the primary location of cell proliferation during metamorphosis. Conclusion Our results show that multiple larval cell lineages typically contribute to formation of individual choanocyte chambers at metamorphosis, contrary to previous reports in other species that show sponge choanocyte chambers form clonally. Choanocytes in postlarval and juvenile

  6. AESTHETICS OF OPPOSITION: THE POLITICS OF METAMORPHOSIS IN GERALD VIZENOR’S BEARHEART

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    Seyed Mohammad Marandi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chippewa novelist Gerald Vizenor puts across his interconnected politico-philosophical notions of “survivance” and “terminal creeds” in his early novel, Bearheart. To do so, Vizenor implemented some of the aesthetic strategies of magical realism. He filled his novel with an excessive amount of bizarrely sexual and violent scenes—which turn out to be magical—in order to “upset” the established standards of normality. Moreover, he used American Indian mythic folktales of transformation and metamorphosis, a magical realist technique, to re-shape the cultural and tribal identity in Bearheart’s modernized context.

  7. Involvement of a novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in larval metamorphosis of the polychaete Hydroides elegans (Haswell)

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2010-04-19

    Hydroides elegans is a common marine fouling organism in most tropical and subtropical waters. The life cycle of H. elegans includes a planktonic larval stage in which swimming larvae normally take 5 days to attain competency to settle. Larval metamorphosis marks the beginning of its benthic life; however, the endogenous molecular mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis remain largely unknown. In this study, a PCR-based suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed to screen the genes expressed in competent larvae but not in precompetent larvae. Among the transcripts isolated from the library, 21 significantly matched sequences in the GenBank. Many of these isolated transcripts have putative roles in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction pathway or in response to ROS stress. A putative novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which was also isolated with SSH screen, was then cloned and characterized. The MAPK inhibitors assay showed that both p38 MAPK inhibitors SB202190 and SB203580 effectively inhibited the biofilm-induced metamorphosis of H. elegans. A cell stressors assay showed that H2O2 effectively induced larval metamorphosis of H. elegans, but the inductivity of H2O2 was also inhibited by both SB inhibitors. The catalase assay showed that the catalase could effetely inhibit H. elegans larvae from responding to inductive biofilm. These results showed that the p38 MAPK-dependent pathway plays critical role in controlling larval metamorphosis of the marine polychaete H. elegans, and the reactive oxygen radicals produced by biofilm could be the cue inducing larval metamorphosis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Studies on the regulation of anuran metamorphosis by thyroid hormones and prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    Resorption of the tail of the anuran larva during metamorphosis is induced by the thyroid hormones. In contrast, the pituitary hormone prolactin favors growth of the tail fin and inhibits resorption. The present investigations were designed to explore the mechanisms by which the thyroid hormones and prolactin bring about their cellular effects. Incubation of explants of tail fin with derivatives of cAMP was shown to inhibit T 4 -induced resorption of explants in a manner similar to that of prolactin. Likewise, inhibition of phosphodiesterases also inhibited resorption. Prolactin, however, failed to alter the levels of cAMP in cultured explants of tail fin. Although cAMP antagonizes the resorptive effects of T 4 , prolactin apparently does not act by elevating cellular levels of that cyclic nucleotide. Newly synthesized proteins from explants of tail fin were examined by isotopical labeling followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine into four proteins was increased within 8 to 48 hours after exposure of explants to T 4 . Three of the same proteins appeared to be synthesized more rapidly in explants of fin from tadpoles at metamorphic climax than in fin from tadpoles of premetamorphic stages. These results indicate that treatment of explants with T 4 or elevation of endogenous levels of thyroid hormones during spontaneous metamorphosis increased the relative rates of synthesis of several proteins. Those proteins are potentially involved in initiating the effects of T 4 which lead to cell death and resorption of the tail

  9. Post-embryonic larval development and metamorphosis of the hydroid Eudendrium racemosum (Cavolini) (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, C.

    1990-09-01

    The morphology and histology of the planula larva of Eudendrium racemosum (Cavolini) and its metamorphosis into the primary polyp are described from light microscopic observations. The planula hatches as a differentiated gastrula. During the lecithotrophic larval period, large ectodermal mucous cells, embedded between epitheliomuscular cells, secrete a sticky slime. Two granulated cell types occur in the ectoderm that are interpreted as secretory and sensorynervous cells, but might also be representatives of only one cell type with a multiple function. The entoderm consists of yolk-storing gastrodermal cells, digestive gland cells, interstitial cells, cnidoblasts, and premature cnidocytes. The larva starts metamorphosis by affixing its blunt aboral pole to a substratum. While the planula flattens down, the mucous cells penetrate the mesolamella and migrate through the entoderm into the gastral cavity where they are lysed. Subsequently, interstitial cells, cnidoblasts, and premature cnidocytes migrate in the opposite direction, i.e. from entoderm to ectoderm. Then, the polypoid body organization, comprising head (hydranth), stem and foot, all covered by peridermal secretion, becomes recognisable. An oral constriction divides the hypostomal portion of the gastral cavity from the stomachic portion. Within the hypostomal entoderm, cells containing secretory granules differentiate. Following growth and the multiplication of tentacles, the head periderm disappears. A ring of gland cells differentiates at the hydranth's base. The positioning of cnidae in the tentacle ectoderm, penetration of the mouth opening and the multiplication of digestive gland cells enable the polyp to change from lecithotrophic to planktotrophic nutrition.

  10. CIRCADIAN METAMORPHOSIS IN THE URBAN LANDSCAPE FROM THE COMPLEX EPISTEMOLOGY METAMORFOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cardona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This work seeks to define a theoretical position that allows establishing another vision of the urban phenomenon as a concept of the bio being - anthropologic-cibercultural that lives and simultaneously it recreates the urban landscape, taking events and urban transformations happened during the day and the night. For it one proposes as point of item the definition of the poly-temporality concept from Edgar Morín (1998, of the duration and simultaneity of Bergson (2004, then ends in the matter of the circadian cycles, that is to say during a period of 24 hours, and the transformations both in morphology and in activities that happen in the urban contemporary landscape. In the definition of metamorphosis it splits of the position of Edgar Morín (2010 while the metamorphosis like alternative of redefinition of routes towards a healthy and ethical way of building economic - social and political solutions, which has direct inference in the urban phenomenon

  11. Ouro proteins are not essential to tail regression during Xenopus tropicalis metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yuya; Nakajima, Keisuke; Robert, Jacques; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2016-03-01

    Tail regression is one of the most prominent transformations observed during anuran metamorphosis. A tadpole tail that is twice as long as the tadpole trunk nearly disappears within 3 days in Xenopus tropicalis. Several years ago, it was proposed that this phenomenon is driven by an immunological rejection of larval-skin-specific antigens, Ouro proteins. We generated ouro-knockout tadpoles using the TALEN method to reexamine this immunological rejection model. Both the ouro1- and ouro2-knockout tadpoles expressed a very low level of mRNA transcribed from a targeted ouro gene, an undetectable level of Ouro protein encoded by a target gene and a scarcely detectable level of the other Ouro protein from the untargeted ouro gene in tail skin. Furthermore, congenital athymic frogs were produced by Foxn1 gene modification. Flow cytometry analysis showed that mutant frogs lacked splenic CD8(+) T cells, which play a major role in cytotoxic reaction. Furthermore, T-cell-dependent skin allograft rejection was dramatically impaired in mutant frogs. None of the knockout tadpoles showed any significant delay in the process of tail shortening during the climax of metamorphosis, which shows that Ouro proteins are not essential to tail regression at least in Xenopus tropicalis and argues against the immunological rejection model. © 2016 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. A new clarification method to visualize biliary degeneration during liver metamorphosis in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Davidson, Peter J.; Scott, Anne M.; Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Brant, Cory O.; Buchinger, Tyler; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called “CLARITY” was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

  13. A eukaryotic initiation factor 5C is upregulated during metamorphosis in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Du-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2009-03-08

    The orthologs of eukaryotic initiation factor 5C (eIF5C) are essential to the initiation of protein translation, and their regulation during development is not well known. A cDNA encoding a polypeptide of 419 amino acids containing an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a C-terminal eIF5C domain was cloned from metamorphic larvae of Helicoverpa armigera. It was subsequently named Ha-eIF5C. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) revealed a high expression of the mRNA of Ha-eIF5C in the head-thorax, integument, midgut, and fat body during metamorphosis. Immunohistochemistry suggested that Ha-eIF5C was distributed into both the cytoplasm and the nucleus in the midgut, fat body and integument. Ha-eIF5C expression was upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Furthermore, the transcription of Ha-eIF5C was down regulated after silencing of ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) or Ultraspiracle protein (USP) by RNAi. These results suggested that during metamorphosis of the cotton bollworm, Ha-eIF5C was upregulated by 20E through the EcR and USP transcription factors.

  14. A eukaryotic initiation factor 5C is upregulated during metamorphosis in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiao-Fan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The orthologs of eukaryotic initiation factor 5C (eIF5C are essential to the initiation of protein translation, and their regulation during development is not well known. Results A cDNA encoding a polypeptide of 419 amino acids containing an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a C-terminal eIF5C domain was cloned from metamorphic larvae of Helicoverpa armigera. It was subsequently named Ha-eIF5C. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR revealed a high expression of the mRNA of Ha-eIF5C in the head-thorax, integument, midgut, and fat body during metamorphosis. Immunohistochemistry suggested that Ha-eIF5C was distributed into both the cytoplasm and the nucleus in the midgut, fat body and integument. Ha-eIF5C expression was upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E. Furthermore, the transcription of Ha-eIF5C was down regulated after silencing of ecdysteroid receptor (EcR or Ultraspiracle protein (USP by RNAi. Conclusion These results suggested that during metamorphosis of the cotton bollworm, Ha-eIF5C was upregulated by 20E through the EcR and USP transcription factors.

  15. The evolution of amphibian metamorphosis: insights based on the transformation of the aortic arches of Pelobates fuscus (Anura)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolesová, H.; Lametschwandtner, A.; Roček, Zbyněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 210, č. 4 (2007), s. 379-393 ISSN 0021-8782 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Anura * circulatory system * development * evolution * metamorphosis Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.547, year: 2007

  16. Effects of environmental factors on growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam (Panopea japonica A. Adams, 1850 larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Huo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of temperature, salinity, diet, and stocking density on the growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam Panopea japonica larvae. The larvae all died at a temperature of 22 °C after day 12, suggesting that the larvae of P. japonica could not survive when the temperature was higher than 22 °C. P. japonica could be incubated at 19 °C for the fast growth, high survival and metamorphosis of larvae. The embryos all died when the salinity was below 25 ppt. The larvae showed poor survival when the salinity was below 25 ppt, with all larvae dying before day 12, suggesting that larvae are sensitive to low salinity. The optimum salinity for the growth, survival and metamorphosis of larvae was 32 ppt. The use of a mixture of Isochrysis galbana and Nitzschia closterium (1:1 as a food source for the P. japonica larvae improved their growth, survival, and metamorphosis. A density of 20 individuals/ml appeared to be optimal for normal D-larvae of Panopea japonica, and 3–9 larvae/ml was optimal for the growth and survival of the P. japonica larvae raised in the hatchery.

  17. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae edge-on, where the direct starlight is blocked by the dusty cocoon. Otherwise, the starlight would overwhelm the nebular light, making it very difficult to see the butterfly-shaped nebula. In a few hundred years, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star will energize the surrounding gas, causing it to glow brightly, and a planetary nebula is born. These observations were made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using three filters: yellow-green, blue, and near-infrared. The images were taken in 1997 by Sun Kwok and in 1996 by Matt Bobrowsky. Credits: Sun Kwok and Kate Su (University of Calgary), Bruce Hrivnak (Valparaiso University), and NASA ----------------- The Hubble Space Telescope Sees Remarkable Structure in the Heart of a Planetary Nebula [BOTTOM LEFT AND RIGHT] This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of NGC 6818 shows two distinct layers of gas (with dust): a spherical outer region and a brighter, vase-shaped interior 'bubble.' Astronomers believe that a fast wind - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - is creating the inner elongated shape. The central star of the planetary nebula appears as a tiny blue dot. The material in the wind is traveling so fast that it smashes through older, slower-moving stellar debris, causing a 'blowout' at both ends of the bubble (lower right and upper left). This nebula looks like a twin of NGC 3918, another planetary nebula that has been observed by the Hubble telescope. The structure of NGC 3918 is remarkably similar to that of NGC 6818. It has an outer spherical envelope and an inner, brighter, elongated bubble. A fast-moving wind also appears to have created an orifice at one end (bottom right-hand corner) of the inner bubble. There are even faint wisps of material that were probably blown out of this hole. In the opposite direction (top left-hand corner), there is a protrusion that seems on the verge of breaking through to form a hole. By finding and studying such similar objects, astronomers hope to learn crucial details about the evolutionary history of planetary nebulae. The Hubble telescope observation was taken March 10, 1997. This picture is a composite of images taken with three filters that are representative of the true colors of the object. Two of these are, respectively, in the light of a red and a blue spectral line of hydrogen - the major constituent of the nebula. The third image is in the light of a luminous green line due to doubly ionized oxygen. NGC 6818 is about 6,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The nebula has a diameter of about 0.5 light-years. Credits: Robert Rubin (NASA Ames Research Center), Reginald Dufour and Matt Browning (Rice University), Patrick Harrington (University of Maryland), and NASA

  18. Flux metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bais, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    Some consequences of a non-abelian fundamental group π 1 (G/H) are investigated in the context of spontaneously broken gauge theories. Vortices associated with elements of π 1 (G/H) which do not commute cannot pass through each other, without remaining attached. Various simple models featuring this phenomenon are presented. A rather general method for generating the relevant ansaetze for the fields is given as well. (orig.)

  19. Survival and metamorphosis rate of swimming crab Portunus pelagicus larvae with the use of phytoecdysteroid in the artificial feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Nikhlani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The survival rate of blue swimming crabs and the larval metamorphosis processes are still low in hatcheries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different phytoecdysteroids doses on both the survival and the rate of Blue swimmer crab larvae metamorphosis. The study consisted of four different phytoecdysteroids treatments, namely: control (0 mg/100 g of feed, 1 mg/100 g of feed, 2 mg/100 g of feed, and 4 mg/100 g of feed. Each treatment was replicated three times. The survival rate of the larvae was analyzed through analysis of variance, while the rate of larval metamorphosis was descriptively analyzed. The results showed that the dose of phytoecdysteroid of 2 mg/100 g of artificial feed resulted in the highest survival and the fastest metamorphosis speed of crab larvae for zoea-2 and zoea-3, and the dose of 4 mg/100 g of artificial feed for stadia megalopa and crablet. Keywords: phytoecdysteroids, survival rate, metamorphosis, blue swimming crab  ABSTRAK Kelangsungan hidup rajungan dalam pembenihan masih rendah, dan proses metamorfosis larva masih lambat. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengevaluasi pengaruh pemberian fitoekdisteroid dosis berbeda terhadap kelangsungan hidup dan kecepatan metamorfosis larva rajungan. Penelitian ini terdiri atas empat perlakuan dosis fitoekdisteroid yang berbeda, yaitu: kontrol (0 mg/100 g pakan, 1 mg/100 g pakan, 2 mg/100 g pakan, dan 4 mg/100 g pakan dengan masing-masing perlakuan dilakukan tiga kali ulangan. Kelangsungan hidup larva dianalisis menggunakan analisis sidik ragam, sedangkan kecepatan metamorfosis larva dianalisis secara deskriptif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dosis fitoekdisteroid sebanyak 2 mg/100 g pakan buatan menghasilkan kelangsungan hidup tertinggi dan proses metamorfosis larva rajungan tercepat untuk stadia zoea-2 dan zoea-3, serta  dosis 4 mg/100 g pakan buatan untuk stadia megalopa dan crablet. Kata kunci: fitoekdisteroid, kelangsungan

  20. Changes in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of chironomid larvae during growth, starvation and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Kikuchi, Eisuke; Takagi, Shigeto; Shikano, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    We conducted experiments to determine isotope changes in the deposit-feeding chironomid larvae Chironomus acerbiphilus during feeding, starvation and metamorphosis. Isotope changes in chironomid larvae occurred mainly during growth and rarely afterward. This finding indicates that chironomid isotope turnover mainly occurs in conjunction with growth and suggests that chironomid larvae only break down newly assimilated food for energy during periods of no growth. Chironomid delta(13)C values significantly increased throughout the starvation experiment, indicating that chironomids preferentially break down components with lower delta(13)C content during starvation. We found significant changes in chironomid isotope ratios ((15)N enrichment) during pupation. This evidence suggests that the physiological condition of animals (such as during an active growth phase or pre- or post-molting) is important to their stable isotope ratios.

  1. Narrative Metamorphosis Through Images: The Case of Opening Miniatures in the Estoire del

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Zor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with pictorial metamorphosis in the opening pages of two early 14th-century manuscripts of the Estoire del saint Graal. Firstly, the episodes depicted are analysed iconographically and formally. Secondly, it explores how pictorial narrative is established in the multi-compartmentalised miniature, that is how the images are linked internally in order to convey a narrative that has its beginning and its ending. Thirdly, it is shown how the images in the opening miniature communicate with other miniatures in the manuscript and how the course of interpretation, signaled by the opening miniature, is succeeded and confirmed by the selection of episodes which are subsequently depicted, as well as by the way in which the episodes depicted are pictorially interpreted.

  2. Towards cosmopolitan middle-range theorizing: A metamorphosis in the practice of social theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, Ulrich Beck has established himself as an important sociologist due in large part to the imaginative and skillful way in which he has continuously added new conceptual bricks to his theoretical edifice and cosmopolitan vision. His work at the present juncture is no exception......, spurred as it is by the urgency of responding to the global risks of climate change via reworking key categories of social theory. More strongly than existing notions of world risk society and second modernity, his new concept of metamorphosis (‘Verwandlung’) captures the way contemporary social upheavals...... imply a fundamental transformation in our very coordinates of social change, in the face of as-yet uncertain collective futures. Likewise, as Beck propounds in this issue of Current Sociology, the concept of emancipatory catastrophism starkly underlines the core moral ambiguity of global risks: (future...

  3. Detritus Quality and Locality Determines Survival and Mass, but Not Export, of Wood Frogs at Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovich, Joseph R; Barrett, Kyle; Crawford, John A

    2016-01-01

    Single-site experiments have demonstrated detritus quality in wetlands can have strongly negative, neutral, and even positive influences on wildlife. However, an examination of the influence of detritus quality across several regions is lacking and can provide information on whether impacts from variation in detritus quality are consistent across species with wide ranges. To address this gap in regional studies we examined effects of emergent and allochthonous detritus of different nutrient qualities on amphibians and assessed a mechanism that may contribute to potential impacts. We used aquatic mesocosms to raise wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) from two regions of the United States with whole plants from purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), leaf litter from native hardwood trees, and a mixture of both. We examined several metrics of amphibian fitness and life history, including survival, number of days to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. Further, we quantified whether the effects of detritus type could translate to variation in anuran biomass or standing stock of nitrogen or phosphorus export. Our results show detritus with high nutrient quality (purple loosestrife) negatively influenced survival of wood frogs, but increased size of metamorphic individuals in two different regions of the United States. Despite the decrease in survival, the increase in size of post-metamorphic anurans raised with high quality detritus resulted in anuran biomass and standing stock of N and P export being similar across treatments at both locations. These results further demonstrate the role of plant quality in shaping wetland ecosystem dynamics, and represent the first demonstration that effects are consistent within species across ecoregional boundaries.

  4. The thyroid gland and thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during early development and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Joseph G; Klaren, Peter H M; Mariavelle, Emeline; Das, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    The sheepshead minnow is widely used in ecotoxicological studies that only recently have begun to focus on disruption of the thyroid axis by xenobiotics and endocrine disrupting compounds. However, reference levels of the thyroid prohormone thyroxine (T4) and biologically active hormone 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and their developmental patterns are unknown. This study set out to describe the ontogeny and morphology of the thyroid gland in sheepshead minnow, and to correlate these with whole-body concentrations of thyroid hormones during early development and metamorphosis. Eggs were collected by natural spawning in our laboratory. T4 and T3 were extracted from embryos, larvae and juveniles and an enzyme-linked immunoassay was used to measure whole-body hormone levels. Length and body mass, hatching success, gross morphology, thyroid hormone levels and histology were measured. The onset of metamorphosis at 12-day post-hatching coincided with surges in whole-body T4 and T3 concentrations. Thyroid follicles were first observed in pre-metamorphic larvae at hatching and were detected exclusively in the subpharyngeal region, surrounding the ventral aorta. Follicle size and thyrocyte epithelial cell heights varied during development, indicating fluctuations in thyroid hormone synthesis activity. The increase in the whole-body T3/T4 ratio was indicative of an increase in outer ring deiodination activity. This study establishes a baseline for thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnows, which will be useful for the understanding of thyroid hormone functions and in future studies of thyroid toxicants in this species.

  5. Differential gene expression at coral settlement and metamorphosis--a subtractive hybridization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Hayward

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A successful metamorphosis from a planktonic larva to a settled polyp, which under favorable conditions will establish a future colony, is critical for the survival of corals. However, in contrast to the situation in other animals, e.g., frogs and insects, little is known about the molecular basis of coral metamorphosis. We have begun to redress this situation with previous microarray studies, but there is still a great deal to learn. In the present paper we have utilized a different technology, subtractive hybridization, to characterize genes differentially expressed across this developmental transition and to compare the success of this method to microarray. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH was used to identify two pools of transcripts from the coral, Acropora millepora. One is enriched for transcripts expressed at higher levels at the pre-settlement stage, and the other for transcripts expressed at higher levels at the post-settlement stage. Virtual northern blots were used to demonstrate the efficacy of the subtractive hybridization technique. Both pools contain transcripts coding for proteins in various functional classes but transcriptional regulatory proteins were represented more frequently in the post-settlement pool. Approximately 18% of the transcripts showed no significant similarity to any other sequence on the public databases. Transcripts of particular interest were further characterized by in situ hybridization, which showed that many are regulated spatially as well as temporally. Notably, many transcripts exhibit axially restricted expression patterns that correlate with the pool from which they were isolated. Several transcripts are expressed in patterns consistent with a role in calcification. CONCLUSIONS: We have characterized over 200 transcripts that are differentially expressed between the planula larva and post-settlement polyp of the coral, Acropora millepora

  6. Factors regulating the production of different inducers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa with reference to larval metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    and other environmental stimuli; hence, the behavioral and morphogenetic responses may be trig- gered by different inducers (Rodriguez et al. 1993). Settlement and metamorphosis are shown to be con- trolled by larval sensory recognition, which transduces... the external signals into signals within the organism (Pawlik 1992). Field and laboratory studies have shown that barna- cle cyprids prefer to metamorphose on or near con- specifics. The responsible settlement pheromone or positive cue has been recognized...

  7. Compromised metamorphosis and thyroid hormone changes in wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) raised on reclaimed wetlands on the Athabasca oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersikorn, Blair D.; Smits, Judit E.G.

    2011-01-01

    The wet landscape approach to oil sands tailings reclamation in the Athabasca Oil Sands region involves creating wetlands from fluid tailings in mined-out pits. We measured time to metamorphosis, thyroid hormone status, and detoxification enzyme (EROD) induction in Wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles raised on reclaimed oil sands wetlands of different ages [young (≤7 yr) vs. old (>7 yr)] and compared data with tadpoles raised on reference (control) wetlands. Metamorphosis was delayed or never occurred in tadpoles raised in young tailings; those exposed to older tailings developed similarly to those in reference wetlands. Thyroid hormone disruption likely played an important role in the metamorphosis delay as the T3:T4 ratio was lowest in tadpoles raised in young, tailings-affected wetlands. Our findings suggest tailings wetlands become less toxic with age, and that these amphibians will be able to complete their life cycle in tailing wetlands that have sufficiently detoxified with age. - This work provides guidance for reclamation of oil sands tailings and shows the usefulness of frogs and caging studies in environmental toxicology.

  8. Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera: Apidae) fat body persists through metamorphosis with a few apoptotic cells and an increased autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Douglas Elias; Azevedo, Dihego Oliveira; Campos, Lúcio Antônio Oliveira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Fat body, typically comprising trophocytes, provides energy during metamorphosis. The fat body can be renewed once the larval phase is complete or recycled and relocated to form the fat body of the adult insect. This study aims to identify the class of programmed cell death that occurs within the fat body cells during the metamorphosis of the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata. Using immunodetection techniques, the fat body of the post-defecating larvae and the white-, pink-, brown-, and black-eyed pupae were tested for cleaved caspase-3 and DNA integrity, followed by ultrastructural analysis and identification of autophagy using RT-PCR for the Atg1 gene. The fat body of M. quadrifasciata showed some apoptotic cells positive for cleaved caspase-3, although without DNA fragmentation. During development, the fat body cells revealed an increased number of mitochondria and free ribosomes, in addition to higher amounts of autophagy Atg1 mRNA, than that of the pupae. The fat body of M. quadrifasciata showed few cells which underwent apoptosis, but there was evidence of increased autophagy at the completion of the larval stage. All together, these data show that some fat body cells persist during metamorphosis in the stingless bee M. quadrifasciata.

  9. Dynamics and regulation of glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid metabolism in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D; Luo, W; Fan, L F; Liu, F L; Gu, J; Deng, H M; Zhang, C; Huang, L H; Feng, Q L

    2016-04-01

    Significant changes usually take place in the internal metabolism of insects during metamorphosis. The glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid (glycolysis-TCA) pathway is important for energy metabolism. To elucidate its dynamics, the mRNA levels of genes involved in this pathway were examined in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis, and the pyruvate content was quantified. The expression patterns of these genes in response to starvation were examined, and the interaction between protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) was studied. The results revealed that the expression or activities of most glycolytic enzymes was down-regulated in prepupae and then recovered in some degree in pupae, and all TCA-related genes were remarkably suppressed in both the prepupae and pupae. Pyruvate was enriched in the pupal midgut. Taken together, these results suggest that insects decrease both glycolysis and TCA in prepupae to save energy and then up-regulate glycolysis but down-regulate TCA in pupae to increase the supply of intermediates for construction of new organs. The expression of all these genes were down-regulated by starvation, indicating that non-feeding during metamorphosis may be a regulator of glycolysis-TCA pathway in the midgut. Importantly, interaction between PP1 and PFK was identified and is suggested to be involved in the regulation of glycolysis. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  10. Kafka: a metamorfose para os direitos humanos / Kafka: metamorphosis to human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilane Serratine Grubba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O artigo tem por objeto o Direito e a Literatura. Mais precisamente, objetiva vislumbrar a possibilidade de uma intersecção entre os campos cognitivos do Direito e da Literatura, para compreender a dignidade humana à luz da obra artístico-literária A metamorfose, de Franz Kafka. Assim, em primeiro lugar, o texto centrou-se na possibilidade do diálogo entre as dimensões do Direito e da Arte, essencialmente a Literatura. Como toda grande obra de arte, o livro analisado contém em seu seio uma semente de ruptura e de proposta de movimento criador. Permite aos seus leitores uma abertura de consciência ao novo, a vislumbrar mundos diversos, a pensar transformações dos espaços socioculturais. Assim, no segundo momento, a partir da ideia de que as grandes obras de arte permitem uma análise da sociedade concreta e imanente, o texto centrou-se na investigação da trama literária. Por fim, a partir da história narrada por Kafka e das críticas dos valores da sociedade presentes no texto, principalmente a anulação do sujeito – transformado em animal – partiu-se para a possibilidade de se pensar uma mudança, visando à dignidade humana no mundo contemporâneo, marcado pelo totalitarismo. Palavras-chave: Direito, Literatura, Dignidade Humana, Kafka, Metamorfose Abstract The article focuses on the Law and Literature. More precisely, it aims to glimpse the possibility of an intersection between the cognitive fields of law and literature, in order to understand human dignity in light of the artistic and literary work The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. Thus, first, the text centered on the possibility of dialogue between the dimensions of the law of the literature. Like any great work of art, the book analyzed contains in its bosom a seed burst and proposing creative movement. Allows its readers an opening of the new consciousness, a glimpse of different worlds, thinking sociocultural transformations of spaces. Thus, the second time

  11. Threshold Spaces Reconfiguration: On Pinocchio’s Metamorphosis, Between Collodi and Comencini

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    Pier Paolo Argiolas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamorphosis is a threshold infringement marking the passage to a new configuration; an intersemiotic translation is also a threshold infringement and a code one. In the comparison between Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio to Luigi Comencini’s 1972 TV adaptation of the same title, and taking into account three further threshold-spaces – intercodical (technical, chronological (historical, and interpretative (ethical-artistic –, this study aims to interpret the filmic adaptation, based on the addition to the original fabula of metamorphic stages which were not in the source-text: the reversible transformations of Pinocchio the puppet in Pinocchio the boy. Recurrent metamorphoses become narrative plot, associated with a moral meaning; denying Collodi’s narrative gratuitousness and dialectics of disorientation/re-collocation, Comencini replaces these interpretative bets with inferential intuitions connected to an ethical code. Furthermore, the comparison of the TV adaptation with the source-text allows for a clarification of some unresolved or ambigous passages of the latter, casting new light right on the metamorphic nature of Collodi’s Pinocchio.

  12. Phylogenetic distribution of extant richness suggests metamorphosis is a key innovation driving diversification in insects.

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    James L Rainford

    Full Text Available Insects and their six-legged relatives (Hexapoda comprise more than half of all described species and dominate terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Understanding the macroevolutionary processes generating this richness requires a historical perspective, but the fossil record of hexapods is patchy and incomplete. Dated molecular phylogenies provide an alternative perspective on divergence times and have been combined with birth-death models to infer patterns of diversification across a range of taxonomic groups. Here we generate a dated phylogeny of hexapod families, based on previously published sequence data and literature derived constraints, in order to identify the broad pattern of macroevolutionary changes responsible for the composition of the extant hexapod fauna. The most prominent increase in diversification identified is associated with the origin of complete metamorphosis, confirming this as a key innovation in promoting insect diversity. Subsequent reductions are recovered for several groups previously identified as having a higher fossil diversity during the Mesozoic. In addition, a number of recently derived taxa are found to have radiated following the development of flowering plant (angiosperm floras during the mid-Cretaceous. These results reveal that the composition of the modern hexapod fauna is a product of a key developmental innovation, combined with multiple and varied evolutionary responses to environmental changes from the mid Cretaceous floral transition onward.

  13. Phylogenetic Distribution of Extant Richness Suggests Metamorphosis Is a Key Innovation Driving Diversification in Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainford, James L.; Hofreiter, Michael; Nicholson, David B.; Mayhew, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Insects and their six-legged relatives (Hexapoda) comprise more than half of all described species and dominate terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Understanding the macroevolutionary processes generating this richness requires a historical perspective, but the fossil record of hexapods is patchy and incomplete. Dated molecular phylogenies provide an alternative perspective on divergence times and have been combined with birth-death models to infer patterns of diversification across a range of taxonomic groups. Here we generate a dated phylogeny of hexapod families, based on previously published sequence data and literature derived constraints, in order to identify the broad pattern of macroevolutionary changes responsible for the composition of the extant hexapod fauna. The most prominent increase in diversification identified is associated with the origin of complete metamorphosis, confirming this as a key innovation in promoting insect diversity. Subsequent reductions are recovered for several groups previously identified as having a higher fossil diversity during the Mesozoic. In addition, a number of recently derived taxa are found to have radiated following the development of flowering plant (angiosperm) floras during the mid-Cretaceous. These results reveal that the composition of the modern hexapod fauna is a product of a key developmental innovation, combined with multiple and varied evolutionary responses to environmental changes from the mid Cretaceous floral transition onward. PMID:25275450

  14. Triiodothyronine (T3) action on aquatic locomotor behavior during metamorphosis of the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Mongil, Marisabel; Venza, Celia J; Rivera, Amelia; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A; Burggren, Warren; Rojas, Legier V

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormones--particularly triiodothyronine, T3--play a critical role in the morphological transformations comprising metamorphosis in larval bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). Traditional staging criteria for anuran larvae incompletely distinguish physiological and behavioral changes during growth. We therefore first developed a new parameter to describe larval growth, the developmental index (DI), which is simply the ratio between the tail length of the larva and its head diameter. Using the DI we were able to identify two distinct populations classifying the larvae during growth along a continuous linear scale with a cutoff value of DI at 2.8. Classification based on the DI, used in this study, proved an effective complement to existing classifications based on developmental staging into pre- or pro-metamorphic stages. Exposure to T3 in the water induced a rapid (beginning within 5 min) and significant decrease (approximately 20-40%) in locomotor activity, measured as total distance traversed and velocity. The largest decrease occurred in more developed larvae (DI or =2.8). We discuss the significance of the possible role of an apoptotic volume decrease at the level of the neuromuscular junction.

  15. Development of tectal connectivity across metamorphosis in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S; Simmons, Andrea Megela

    2010-01-01

    In the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), the process of metamorphosis culminates in the appearance of new visual and visuomotor behaviors reflective of the emergence of binocular vision and visually-guided prey capture behaviors as the animal transitions to life on land. Using several different neuroanatomical tracers, we examined the substrates that may underlie these behavioral changes by tracing the afferent and efferent connectivity of the midbrain optic tectum across metamorphic development. Intratectal, tectotoral, tectotegmental, tectobulbar, and tecto-thalamic tracts exhibit similar trajectories of neurobiotin fiber label across the developmental span from early larval tadpoles to adults. Developmental variability was apparent primarily in intensity and distribution of cell and puncta label in target nuclei. Combined injections of cholera toxin subunit β and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin consistently label cell bodies, puncta, or fiber segments bilaterally in midbrain targets including the pretectal gray, laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis, and the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Developmentally stable label was observed bilaterally in medullary targets including the medial vestibular nucleus, lateral vestibular nucleus, and reticular gray, and in forebrain targets including the posterior and ventromedial nuclei of the thalamus. The nucleus isthmi, cerebellum, lateral line nuclei, medial septum, ventral striatum, and medial pallium show more developmentally variable patterns of connectivity. Our results suggest that even during larval development, the optic tectum contains substrates for integration of visual with auditory, vestibular, and somatosensory cues, as well as for guidance of motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Suitability of golf course ponds for amphibian metamorphosis when bullfrogs are removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Michelle D; Semlitsch, Raymond D; Mosby, Cory

    2008-02-01

    Managing areas designed for human recreation so that they are compatible with natural amphibian populations can reduce the negative impacts of habitat destruction. We examined the potential for amphibians to complete larval development in golf course ponds in the presence or absence of overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana), which are frequently found in permanent, human-made ponds. We reared larval American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (R. sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) with 0 or 5 overwintered bullfrog tadpoles in field enclosures located in ponds on golf courses or in experimental wetlands at a reference site. Survival to metamorphosis of American toads, southern leopard frogs, and spotted salamanders was greater in ponds on golf courses than at reference sites. We attributed this increased survival to low abundance of insect predators in golf course ponds. The presence of overwintered bullfrogs, however, reduced the survival of American toads, southern leopard frogs, and spotted salamanders reared in golf course ponds, indicating that the suitability of the aquatic habitats for these species partly depended on the biotic community present. Our results suggest that ponds in human recreational areas should be managed by maintaining intermediate hydroperiods, which will reduce the presence of bullfrog tadpoles and predators, such as fish, and which may allow native amphibian assemblages to flourish.

  17. Evolution of Ecdysis and Metamorphosis in Arthropods: The Rise of Regulation of Juvenile Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Sam P S; Huang, Juan; Bendena, William G; Tobe, Stephen S; Hui, Jerome H L

    2015-11-01

    Arthropods are the most successful group of animals, and are found in diverse habitats; they account for more than 80% of described animal species. A rigid exoskeleton is a common feature that is shared across the different groups of arthropods. The exoskeleton offers protection and is shed between developmental stages via a unique evolutionarily conserved process known as molting/ecdysis. Molting is triggered by steroid hormones, the ecdysteroids, and the regulation of their biosynthesis has long been proposed as a contributor to the success of arthropods during evolution. Nevertheless, how novelties arose that contributed to the diversifications of arthropods remain unclear. Juvenile hormones (JHs) are sequiterpenoids that were thought to be unique to insects, modulating the timing of metamorphosis in conjunction with the actions of ecdysteroids. Here, we revisit the old question of "the role that the sesquiterpenoids play in arthropod evolution" with a focus on the neglected non-insect arthropods. We hypothesize that the sesquiterpenoid, methyl farnesoate (MF), had already established regulatory functions in the last common ancestor of arthropods, and the difference in the regulation of biosynthesis and degradation of sesquiterpenoids, such as MF and JH, was another major driving force in the successful radiation of insects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Heteropathogenic virulence and phylogeny reveal phased pathogenic metamorphosis in Escherichia coli O2:H6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Schiller, Roswitha; Lammers, Lydia; Bauwens, Andreas; Fruth, Angelika; Middendorf, Barbara; Schmidt, M Alexander; Tarr, Phillip I; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic and intestinal pathogenic (diarrheagenic) Escherichia coli differ phylogenetically and by virulence profiles. Classic theory teaches simple linear descent in this species, where non-pathogens acquire virulence traits and emerge as pathogens. However, diarrheagenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O2:H6 not only possess and express virulence factors associated with diarrheagenic and uropathogenic E. coli but also cause diarrhea and urinary tract infections. These organisms are phylogenetically positioned between members of an intestinal pathogenic group (STEC) and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. STEC O2:H6 is, therefore, a 'heteropathogen,' and the first such hybrid virulent E. coli identified. The phylogeny of these E. coli and the repertoire of virulence traits they possess compel consideration of an alternate view of pathogen emergence, whereby one pathogroup of E. coli undergoes phased metamorphosis into another. By understanding the evolutionary mechanisms of bacterial pathogens, rational strategies for counteracting their detrimental effects on humans can be developed.

  19. The role of low levels of juvenile hormone Esterase in the metamorphosis of Manduca sexta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Browder

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The activity of juvenile hormone esterase (JHE in feeding fifth instar larvae of Manduca sexta increases gradually with larval weight and rises to a peak after larvae pass the critical weight when juvenile hormone secretion ceases. Starvation of larvae of Manduca sexta (L. that had exceeded the critical weight inhibited peak levels of JHE, but did not delay entry into the wandering stage when larvae leave the plant in search of a pupation site. This suggests that peak levels of JHE may not be essential for the normal timing of metamorphosis. Starved larvae pupated normally, indicating the peak of JHE was not necessary for a morphologically normal pupation. Treatments of larvae with the selective JHE inhibitor O-ethyl-S-phenyl phosphoramidothiolate (EPPAT that began immediately after larvae achieved the critical weight (6.0 to 6.5 grams for our strain of Manduca delayed entry into the wandering stage. By contrast, EPPAT treatment of larvae at weights above 8.0g had no effect on the subsequent timing of the onset of wandering. Therefore, although the normal timing of the onset of wandering does not require peak levels of JHE, it requires low to moderate levels of JHE to be present until larvae reach a weight of about 8.0g.

  20. Thematic, conceptual and iconic metamorphosis: the construction of a morphological history epistemological method

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    Maurício de Carvalho Ramos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, I propose the construction of an epistemological historical method through a morphological perspective. That involves the elaboration of a genetic rational process of conceptualization in which problems, themes and concepts organize in historical expressions increasingly more objective and determinated. Such expressions should be articulated generating a continuum of metamorphosis of a concept or conceptual core. This continuum should be capable of conferring intelligibility for scientific culture units without restrictions of spatial, temporal and conceptual amplitude. The connection of morphological and historical components that I propose is based on the results as well as the method used by Carlo Ginzburg in Myths, emblems and signs, especially in High and low: the theme of forbidden knowledge in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. After presenting a characterization of the minimal components of the historical epistemological method, I will start to incorporate elements of Ginsburg’s historical morphology through a dialogue in which I’ll try to understand how the author proceeds methodically and conceptually in his investigation. Finally, through a preliminary study of an alchemical emblem in which Hermes is the central figure, I will make a morphological experiment of application of this procedure to the scope of the scientific culture of chemistry

  1. Effects of cadmium, estradiol-17β and their interaction on gonadal condition and metamorphosis of male and female African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bibek; Patino, Reynaldo

    2010-01-01

    To assess interaction effects between cadmium (Cd, a putative xenoestrogen) and estradiol-17?? (E2) on sex differentiation and metamorphosis, Xenopus laevis were exposed to solvent-control (0.005% ethanol), Cd (10 ??g L-1), E2 (1 ??g L-1), or Cd and E2 (Cd + E2) in FETAX medium from fertilization to 75 d postfertilization. Each treatment was applied to four aquaria, each with 30 fertilized eggs. Mortality was recorded and animals were sampled as they completed metamorphosis (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 66). Gonadal sex of individuals (including tadpoles ???NF stage 55 at day 75) was determined gross-morphologically and used to compute sex ratios. Time course and percent completion of metamorphosis, snout-vent length (SVL), hindlimb length (HLL) and weight were analyzed for each gender separately. Survival rates did not differ among treatments. The E2 and Cd + E2 treatments significantly skewed sex ratios towards females; however, no sex-ratio differences were observed between the control and Cd treatments or between the E2 and Cd + E2 treatments. Time course of metamorphosis was generally delayed and percent completion of metamorphosis was generally reduced in males and females exposed to Cd, E2 or their combination compared to control animals. In males, but not females, the effect of Cd + E2 was greater than that of individual chemicals. Weight at completion of metamorphosis was reduced only in females and only by the Cd + E2 treatment. In conclusion, although Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration did not exhibit direct or indirect feminizing effects in Xenopus tadpoles, the metal and E2 both had similar inhibitory effects on metamorphosis that were of greater magnitude in males than females.

  2. Effects of cadmium, estradiol-17beta and their interaction on gonadal condition and metamorphosis of male and female African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bibek; Patino, Reynaldo

    2010-01-01

    To assess interaction effects between cadmium (Cd, a putative xenoestrogen) and estradiol-17beta (E(2)) on sex differentiation and metamorphosis, Xenopus laevis were exposed to solvent-control (0.005% ethanol), Cd (10microgL(-1)), E(2) (1microgL(-1)), or Cd and E(2) (Cd+E(2)) in FETAX medium from fertilization to 75d postfertilization. Each treatment was applied to four aquaria, each with 30 fertilized eggs. Mortality was recorded and animals were sampled as they completed metamorphosis (Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 66). Gonadal sex of individuals (including >or= tadpoles NF stage 55 at day 75) was determined gross-morphologically and used to compute sex ratios. Time course and percent completion of metamorphosis, snout-vent length (SVL), hindlimb length (HLL) and weight were analyzed for each gender separately. Survival rates did not differ among treatments. The E(2) and Cd+E(2) treatments significantly skewed sex ratios towards females; however, no sex-ratio differences were observed between the control and Cd treatments or between the E(2) and Cd+E(2) treatments. Time course of metamorphosis was generally delayed and percent completion of metamorphosis was generally reduced in males and females exposed to Cd, E(2) or their combination compared to control animals. In males, but not females, the effect of Cd+E(2) was greater than that of individual chemicals. Weight at completion of metamorphosis was reduced only in females and only by the Cd+E(2) treatment. In conclusion, although Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration did not exhibit direct or indirect feminizing effects in Xenopus tadpoles, the metal and E(2) both had similar inhibitory effects on metamorphosis that were of greater magnitude in males than females.

  3. Stress and serial adult metamorphosis: Multiple roles for the stress axis in socially regulated sex change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa K Solomon-Lane

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Socially regulated sex change in teleost fishes is a striking example of social status information regulating biological function in the service of reproductive success. The establishment of social dominance in sex changing species is translated into a cascade of changes in behavior, physiology, neuroendocrine function, and morphology that transforms a female into a male, or vice versa. The hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI, homologous to HP-adrenal axis in mammals and birds has been hypothesized to play a mechanistic role linking status to sex change. The HPA/I axis responds to environmental stressors by integrating relevant external and internal cues and coordinating biological responses including changes in behavior, energetics, physiology, and morphology (i.e., metamorphosis. Through actions of both corticotropin-releasing factor and glucocorticoids (GCs, the HPA/I axis has been implicated in processes central to sex change, including the regulation of agonistic behavior, social status, energetic investment, and life history transitions. In this paper, we review the hypothesized roles of the HPA/I axis in the regulation of sex change and how those hypotheses have been tested to date. We include original data on sex change in the bluebanded goby (Lythyrpnus dalli, a highly social fish capable of bidirectional sex change. We then propose a model for HPA/I involvement in sex change and discuss how these ideas might be tested in the future. Understanding the regulation of sex change has the potential to elucidate evolutionarily conserved mechanisms responsible for translating pertinent information about the environment into coordinated biological changes along multiple body axes.

  4. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, Vicki L.; Veldhoen, Nik; Lo, Bonnie P.; Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallée, Kurtis; Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C.; Elphick, James R.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2013-01-01

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26–28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 μg/L thyroxine (T 4 ), 0.3, 3 and 30 μg/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T 4 /TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T 4 treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors α and β, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 μg/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T 4 . The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  5. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlatt, Vicki L. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Veldhoen, Nik [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Lo, Bonnie P. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallee, Kurtis [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Emergencies Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, B.C. V7H 1B1 (Canada); Elphick, James R. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C., E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26-28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 {mu}g/L thyroxine (T{sub 4}), 0.3, 3 and 30 {mu}g/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T{sub 4}/TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T{sub 4} treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors {alpha} and {beta}, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 {mu}g/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T{sub 4}. The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  6. Survival and metamorphosis of larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) residing in Lakes Michigan and Huron near river mouths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Brenden, Travis O.; Swink, William D.; Lipps, Mathew A.

    2016-01-01

    Although population demographics of larval lampreys in streams have been studied extensively, demographics in lake environments have not. Here, we estimated survival and rates of metamorphosis for larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations residing in the Great Lakes near river mouths (hereafter termed lentic areas). Tagged larvae were stocked and a Bayesian multi-state tag-recovery model was used to investigate population parameters associated with tag recovery, including survival and metamorphosis probabilities. Compared to previous studies of larvae in streams, larval growth in lentic areas was substantially slower (Brody growth coefficient = 0.00132; estimate based on the recovery of six tagged larvae), survival was slightly greater (annual survival = 63%), and the length at which 50% of the larvae would be expected to metamorphose was substantially shorter (126 mm). Stochastic simulations were used to estimate the production of parasitic stage (juvenile) sea lamprey from a hypothetical population of larvae in a lentic environment. Production of juvenile sea lamprey was substantial because, even though larval growth in these environments was slow relative to stream environments, survival was high and length at metamorphosis was less. However, estimated production of juvenile sea lamprey was less for the lentic environment than for similar simulations for river environments where larvae grew faster. In circumstances where the cost to kill a larva with lampricide was equal and control funds are limited, sea lamprey control effort may be best directed toward larvae in streams with fast-growing larvae, because stream-produced larvae will most likely contribute to juvenile sea lamprey populations.

  7. Effects of hydroperiod duration on survival, developmental rate, and size at metamorphosis in boreal chorus frog tadpoles (Pseudacris maculata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Staci; Funk, W. Chris; Murphy, Melanie; Muths, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between climate-driven habitat conditions and survival is key to preserving biodiversity in the face of rapid climate change. Hydroperiod—the length of time water is in a wetland—is a critical limiting habitat variable for amphibians as larvae must metamorphose before ponds dry. Changes in precipitation and temperature patterns are affecting hydroperiod globally, but the impact of these changes on amphibian persistence is poorly understood. We studied the responses of Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) tadpoles to simulated hydroperiods (i.e., water level reductions) in the laboratory using individuals collected from ponds spanning a range of natural hydroperiods (Colorado Front Range, USA). To assess the effects of experimental hydroperiod reduction, we measured mortality, time to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. We found that tadpoles grew at rates reflecting the hydroperiods of their native ponds, regardless of experimental treatment. Tadpoles from permanent ponds metamorphosed faster than those from ephemeral ponds across all experimental treatments, a pattern which may represent a predation selection gradient or countergradient variation in developmental rates. Size at metamorphosis did not vary across experimental treatments. Mortality was low overall but varied with pond of origin. Our results suggest that adaptation to local hydroperiod and/or predation and temperature conditions is important in P. maculata. Moreover, the lack of a plastic response to reduced hydroperiods suggests that P. maculata may not be able to metamorphose quickly enough to escape drying ponds. These results have important implications for amphibian persistence in ponds predicted to dry more quickly due to rapid climate change.

  8. Transcriptome and quantitative proteome analysis reveals molecular processes associated with larval metamorphosis in the polychaete pseudopolydora vexillosa

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2013-03-01

    Larval growth of the polychaete worm Pseudopolydora vexillosa involves the formation of segment-specific structures. When larvae attain competency to settle, they discard swimming chaetae and secrete mucus. The larvae build tubes around themselves and metamorphose into benthic juveniles. Understanding the molecular processes, which regulate this complex and unique transition, remains a major challenge because of the limited molecular information available. To improve this situation, we conducted high-throughput RNA sequencing and quantitative proteome analysis of the larval stages of P. vexillosa. Based on gene ontology (GO) analysis, transcripts related to cellular and metabolic processes, binding, and catalytic activities were highly represented during larval-adult transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), calcium-signaling, Wnt/β-catenin, and notch signaling metabolic pathways were enriched in transcriptome data. Quantitative proteomics identified 107 differentially expressed proteins in three distinct larval stages. Fourteen and 53 proteins exhibited specific differential expression during competency and metamorphosis, respectively. Dramatic up-regulation of proteins involved in signaling, metabolism, and cytoskeleton functions were found during the larval-juvenile transition. Several proteins involved in cell signaling, cytoskeleton and metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins related to transcription and oxidative phosphorylation were down-regulated during competency. The integration of high-throughput RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomics allowed a global scale analysis of larval transcripts/proteins associated molecular processes in the metamorphosis of polychaete worms. Further, transcriptomic and proteomic insights provide a new direction to understand the fundamental mechanisms that regulate larval metamorphosis in polychaetes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Effects of cadmium on growth, metamorphosis and gonadal sex differentiation in tadpoles of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bibek; Patino, Reynaldo

    2009-01-01

    Xenopus laevis larvae were exposed to cadmium (Cd) at 0, 1, 8. 85 or 860 mu g L(-1) in FETAX medium from 0 to 86 d postfertilization. Premetamorphic tadpoles were sampled on day 3 1; pre and prometamorphic tadpoles on day 49; and frogs (NF stage 66) between days 50 and 86. Survival, snout-vent length (SVL), tail length, total length, hindlimb length (HLL), initiation of metamorphic climax, size at and completion of metamorphosis, and gonadal condition and sex ratio (assessed histologically) were determined. Survival was unaffected by Cd until day 49, but increased mortality was observed after day 49 at 860 mu g Cd L(-1). On day 31, when tadpoles were in early premetamorphosis, inhibitory effects on tadpole growth were observed only at 860 mu g Cd L(-1). On day 49, when most tadpoles where in late premetamorphosis/early prometamorphosis, reductions in SVL, HLL and total length were observed at 8 and 860 but not 85 mu g L(-1), thus creating a U-shaped size distribution at 0-85 mu g Cd L(-1). However, this U-shaped size pattern was not evident in postmetamorphic individuals. In fact, frog size at completion of metamorphosis was slightly smaller at 85 mu g Cd L(-1) relative to control animals. These observations confirmed a recent report of a Cd concentration-dependent bimodal growth pattern in late-premetamorphic Xenopus tadpoles, but also showed that growth responses to varying Cd concentrations change with development. The fraction of animals initiating or completing metamorphosis during days 50-86 was reduced in a Cd concentration-dependent manner. Testicular histology and population sex ratios were unaffected by Cd suggesting that, unlike mammals, Cd is not strongly estrogenic in Xenopus tadpoles.

  10. 2D Gel-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis during Larval Development and Metamorphosis of the Biofouling Polychaete Tubeworm Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-09-03

    Larval settlement and metamorphosis of a common biofouling polychaete worm, Hydroides elegans, involve remarkable structural and physiological changes during this pelagic to sessile habitat shift. The endogenous protein molecules and post-translational modifications that drive this larval transition process are not only of interest to ecologists but also to the antifouling paint industry, which aims to control the settlement of this biofouling species on man-made structures (e.g., ship hulls). On the basis of our recent proteomic studies, we hypothesize that rapid larval settlement of H. elegans could be mediated through changes in phosphorylation status of proteins rather than extensive de novo synthesis of proteins. To test this hypothesis, 2D gel-based multiplexed proteomics technology was used to monitor the changes in protein expression and phosphorylation status during larval development and metamorphosis of H. elegans. The protein expression profiles of larvae before and after they reached competency to attach and metamorphose were similar in terms of major proteins, but the percentage of phosphorylated proteins increased from 41% to 49% after competency. Notably, both the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of the metamorphosed individuals (adult) were distinctly different from that of the larvae, with only 40% of the proteins phosphorylated in the adult stage. The intensity ratio of all phosphoprotein spots to all total protein spots was also the highest in the competent larval stage. Overall, our results indicated that the level of protein phosphorylation might play a crucial role in the initiation of larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    the precursor protein for this metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones. The precursor protein is 514-amino acid residues long and contains 10 copies of the immature, authentic neuropeptide (Gln-Gln-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-Gly). All neuropeptide copies are preceded by Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequences...... a polyp, a medusa, and a planula larva stage. Recently, a neuropeptide, sea anemones that induces metamorphosis in a hydroid planula larva to become a hydropolyp [Leitz, T., Morand, K. & Mann, M. (1994) Dev. Biol. 163, 440-446]. Here, we have cloned...

  12. Geographic variation in host fish use and larval metamorphosis for the endangered dwarf wedgemussel

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barbara (St. John); Ferreri, C. Paola; Lellis, William A.; Wicklow, Barry J.; Cole, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Host fishes play a crucial role in survival and dispersal of freshwater mussels (Unionoida), particularly rare unionids at conservation risk. Intraspecific variation in host use is not well understood for many mussels, including the endangered dwarf wedgemussel (Alasmidonta heterodon) in the USA.Host suitability of 33 fish species for dwarf wedgemussel glochidia (larvae) from the Delaware and Connecticut river basins was tested in laboratory experiments over 9 years. Relative suitability of three different populations of a single host fish, the tessellated darter (Etheostoma olmstedi), from locations in the Connecticut, Delaware, and Susquehanna river basins, was also tested.Connecticut River basin A. heterodon metamorphosed into juvenile mussels on tessellated darter, slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr. Delaware River basin mussels metamorphosed using these three species, as well as brown trout (Salmo trutta), banded killifish (Fundulus diaphanus), mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdii), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), and shield darter (Percina peltata). Atlantic salmon, striped bass, and sculpins were highly effective hosts, frequently generating 5+ juveniles per fish (JPF) and metamorphosis success (MS; proportion of attaching larvae that successfully metamorphose) ≥ 0.4, and producing juveniles in repeated trials.In experiments on tessellated darters, mean JPF and MS values decreased as isolation between the mussel source (Connecticut River) and each fish source increased; mean JPF = 10.45, 6.85, 4.14, and mean MS = 0.50, 0.41, and 0.34 in Connecticut, Delaware, and Susquehanna river darters, respectively. Host suitability of individual darters was highly variable (JPF = 2–11; MS = 0.20–1.0).The results show that mussel–host fish compatibility in A. heterodon differs among Atlantic coastal rivers, and suggest that hosts including anadromous Atlantic salmon and striped bass may help sustain A. heterodon in parts of

  13. Human Development X: Explanation of Macroevolution — Top-Down Evolution Materializes Consciousness. The Origin of Metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyge Dahl Hermansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we first give a short discussion of the macroevolution viewing life as information-directed, complex, dynamic systems. On this basis, we give our explanation of the origin of life and discuss the top-down evolution of molecules, proteins, and macroevolution. We discuss these subjects according to our new holistic biological paradigm. In view of this, we discuss the macroevolution of the organism, the species, the biosphere, and human society. After this, we discuss the shift in evolution from natural selection to a new proposed process of nature called the “metamorphous top-down” evolution. We discuss the capability of the evolutionary shift to govern some of the processes that lead to the formation of new species. We discuss the mechanisms we think are behind this proposed shift in evolution and conclude that this event is able to explain the huge biological diversity of nature in combination with evolutionary natural selection. We also discuss this event of nature as an isolated, but integrated, part of the universe. We propose the most important genetic and biochemical process that we think is behind the evolutionary shift as a complicated symbiosis of mechanisms leading to metamorphosis in all biological individuals, from bacteria to humans. The energetic superorbital that manifests the consciousness governs all these processes through quantum chemical activity. This is the key to evolutionary shift through the consciousness, and we propose to call this process “adult human metamorphosis”.

  14. Heritage of the romantic philosophy in post-Linnaean botany Reichenbach's reception of Goethe's metamorphosis of plants as a methodological and philosophical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of the reception and development of Goethe's metamorphosis of plants as a methodological and philosophical framework in the history of botanical theories. It proposes a focus on the textbooks written by the German botanist Ludwig Reichenbach and his first attempt to use Goethe's idea of metamorphosis of plants as fundamental to his natural system of plants published under the title 'Botany for Women', in German Botanik für Damen (1828). In this book, Reichenbach paid particular attention to Goethe's sensitive views on the essence of nature; he regarded Goethe's idea of metamorphosis in the plant kingdom as an ideal model to interpret connections of natural phenomena, in particular as a conceptual frame for a natural system. Furthermore, he aimed to develop the philosophical statement of the metamorphosis, in which he called for nature-philosophical conceptions in order to materialize his representation of plant "affinities," and of a kind of "ontogeny" of the whole plant kingdom. This paper demonstrates that, between speculative views and empirical attempts, the extent to which Reichenbach actually belonged to a new "school" of thought, which left its mark on the history and philosophy of botany.

  15. Renaissance Epyllions: A Comparative Reading of Christopher Marlowe's "Hero and Leander," Thomas Lodge's "Scylla's Metamorphosis" and Francis Beaumont's "Salmacis and Hermaphroditus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Yazdan

    2016-01-01

    The present paper is supposed to compare and contrast three of these masterpieces written the Renaissance period. The epyllions under study are Christopher Marlowe's "Hero and Leander," Thomas Lodge's "Scylla's Metamorphosis" and Francis Beaumont's "Salmacis and Hermaphroditus." Bush believes that "the influence…

  16. [Light and electron microscopy analysis of the differentiation of oropharyngeal epithelium in Salamandra salamandra (L.) during metamorphosis (Urodela:Salamandridae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemen, G

    1985-01-01

    During metamorphosis the oropharyngeal-epithelium of Salamandra salamandra consists of cells partly with features typical for larvae partly with these characteristic for metamorphosed animals. In the stratum intermedium cells which in larvae develop to secreting non-ciliated pavement cells become precursors of ciliated cells. During this process mucus granulus were discharged and cells develop cilia. Cells of deepe layers stop the production of mucus granules; those granules, which are already present, disintegrate. Furthermore, new types of goblet cells (type 2 and 3 according to Clemen, 1984) arise. Goblet cells of older larvae (typ 1) are to be found nearly unchanged in metamorphosed animals. Older goblet cells degenerate. In the stratum superficiale during transformation of pavement cells to ciliated cells discharge of mucus and ciliogenesis run parallely. Some of the pavement cells, however, degenerate. The stratum basale remains unaltered.

  17. Distribution of BDE-99 and effects on metamorphosis of BDE-99 and -47 after oral exposure in Xenopus tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Gunnar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden) and Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: gunnar.carlsson@bvf.slu.se; Kulkarni, Pushkar [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Pia [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Norrgren, Leif [Division of Pathology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7028, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala (CRU), P.O. Box 7054, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    The high concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the environment have raised the need for generating more information about the impact of these substances on animals. To study the distribution of {sup 14}C-labelled 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether ({sup 14}C-BDE-99) in Xenopus tropicalis (West African clawed frog) {sup 14}C-BDE-99 was administered by dietary exposure to tadpoles at stage 54 or to juvenile frogs at stage 66. Whole-body autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting were used to examine the distribution of the substance at different survival times. Further, X. tropicalis tadpoles were dietarily exposed to the PBDE congeners BDE-47 and BDE-99 to study the effects on metamorphosis process. Measurements like body weight, body length, hind limb length and developmental stage as well as histological measurements on thyroid glands were performed after 14 days of exposure. Autoradiograms revealed high concentrations and long term retention of {sup 14}C-BDE-99 in adipose tissue and melanin in frogs exposed both as tadpoles and juveniles. Further, a difference in uptake was recorded between the exposures at stages 54 and 66, implying that the juvenile frogs have higher uptake and more prolonged retention of the chemical than the tadpoles. Hind limb length was reduced in tadpoles dietarily exposed to 1 mg/g feed of both BDE congeners. This was associated with reduced body weight and body length for BDE-47, suggesting general toxicity. Tadpoles exposed to BDE-99 also showed lower developmental stage but no effects on body weight or body length, suggesting possible thyroid hormone disruption. Higher concentrations of both congeners caused increased mortality. Thus, it can be concluded that in the present study, BDE-99 was retained for a longer period in the juvenile frogs than in metamorphosing tadpoles and that BDE-99 had an impact on X. tropicalis metamorphosis that might be of thyroid disrupting origin.

  18. Distribution of BDE-99 and effects on metamorphosis of BDE-99 and -47 after oral exposure in Xenopus tropicalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Gunnar; Kulkarni, Pushkar; Larsson, Pia; Norrgren, Leif

    2007-01-01

    The high concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the environment have raised the need for generating more information about the impact of these substances on animals. To study the distribution of 14 C-labelled 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether ( 14 C-BDE-99) in Xenopus tropicalis (West African clawed frog) 14 C-BDE-99 was administered by dietary exposure to tadpoles at stage 54 or to juvenile frogs at stage 66. Whole-body autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting were used to examine the distribution of the substance at different survival times. Further, X. tropicalis tadpoles were dietarily exposed to the PBDE congeners BDE-47 and BDE-99 to study the effects on metamorphosis process. Measurements like body weight, body length, hind limb length and developmental stage as well as histological measurements on thyroid glands were performed after 14 days of exposure. Autoradiograms revealed high concentrations and long term retention of 14 C-BDE-99 in adipose tissue and melanin in frogs exposed both as tadpoles and juveniles. Further, a difference in uptake was recorded between the exposures at stages 54 and 66, implying that the juvenile frogs have higher uptake and more prolonged retention of the chemical than the tadpoles. Hind limb length was reduced in tadpoles dietarily exposed to 1 mg/g feed of both BDE congeners. This was associated with reduced body weight and body length for BDE-47, suggesting general toxicity. Tadpoles exposed to BDE-99 also showed lower developmental stage but no effects on body weight or body length, suggesting possible thyroid hormone disruption. Higher concentrations of both congeners caused increased mortality. Thus, it can be concluded that in the present study, BDE-99 was retained for a longer period in the juvenile frogs than in metamorphosing tadpoles and that BDE-99 had an impact on X. tropicalis metamorphosis that might be of thyroid disrupting origin

  19. RNAi-mediated knockdown of SPOOK reduces ecdysteroid titers and causes precocious metamorphosis in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Tanaka, Seiji; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2017-09-01

    The Halloween gene SPOOK (SPO) is involved in the production of the active metabolite of ecdysteroid, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), in insects. A previous study showed that RNAi-mediated knockdown of SPO in Schistocerca gregaria last instar nymphs markedly reduced the hemolymph 20E titer, but did not affect metamorphosis. In the present study, the effects of SPO interference on development were re-examined in this locust. Injections of SPO double-stranded RNA (dsSPO) into nymphs at mid and late instars significantly delayed nymphal development and interfered with molting. The 20E levels of dsSPO-treated nymphs were generally low, with a delayed, small peak, suggesting that disturbance of the 20E levels caused the above developmental abnormalities. A small proportion of the dsSPO-injected nymphs metamorphosed precociously, producing adults and adultoids. Precocious adults were characterized by small body size, short wings with abbreviated venation, and normal reproductive activity. Fourth instar nymphs that precociously metamorphosed at the following instar exhibited temporal expression patterns of ecdysone-induced protein 93F and the juvenile hormone (JH) early-inducible gene Krüppel homolog 1 similar to those observed at the last instar in normal nymphs. Adultoids displayed mating behavior and adultoid females developed eggs, but never laid eggs. JH injection around the expected time of the 20E peak in the dsSPO-injected nymphs completely inhibited the appearance of adultoids, suggesting that appearance of adultoids might be due to a reduced titer of JH rather than of 20E. These results suggest that SPO plays an important role in controlling morphogenesis, metamorphosis, and reproduction in S. gregaria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitochondrial iron supply is required for the developmental pulse of ecdysone biosynthesis that initiates metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Jose V; Metzendorf, Christoph; Missirlis, Fanis; Lind, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of ecdysone, the key hormone that signals the termination of larval growth and the initiation of metamorphosis in insects, is carried out in the prothoracic gland by an array of iron-containing cytochrome P450s, encoded by the halloween genes. Interference, either with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in the prothoracic gland or with the ferredoxins that supply electrons for steroidogenesis, causes a block in ecdysone synthesis and developmental arrest in the third instar larval stage. Here we show that mutants in Drosophila mitoferrin (dmfrn), the gene encoding a mitochondrial carrier protein implicated in mitochondrial iron import, fail to grow and initiate metamorphosis under dietary iron depletion or when ferritin function is partially compromised. In mutant dmfrn larvae reared under iron replete conditions, the expression of halloween genes is increased and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), the active form of ecdysone, is synthesized. In contrast, addition of an iron chelator to the diet of mutant dmfrn larvae disrupts 20E synthesis. Dietary addition of 20E has little effect on the growth defects, but enables approximately one-third of the iron-deprived dmfrn larvae to successfully turn into pupae and, in a smaller percentage, into adults. This partial rescue is not observed with dietary supply of ecdysone's precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol, a precursor in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. The findings reported here support the notion that a physiological supply of mitochondrial iron for the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme is required in the prothoracic glands of insect larvae for steroidogenesis. Furthermore, mitochondrial iron is also essential for normal larval growth.

  1. Larval development and post-settlement metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus Pilsbry and the serpulid polychaete Pomatoleios kraussii Baird: Impact of a commonly used antifouling biocide, Irgarol 1051

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Shirayama, Y.

    Nauplii that survived to the cyprid instar stage when reared in the presence of Irgarol 1051 showed prolonged instar and total naupliar duration when compared to the controls The post-settlement metamorphosis of cyprids significantly varied with Irgarol...

  2. The effects of dexamethasone (DXM) and vitamin A on the growth and metamorphosis of gamma irradiated, thyroxine induced Bufo melanostictus tadpoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Haider, N.; Siddiqui, R.Q.R.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of vitamin A and dexamethasone (DXM) on the metamorphosis of irradiated tadpoles. Results indicate that hypervitaminosis A depresses the metamorphosing action of thyroxine for several days. On the contrary, dexamethasone accelerates the action of exogenous thyroxine on tadpoles. Thus present data suggest that DXM supresses STH synthesis and promotes TSH secretion. Moreover, muscle appears to be its target tissue and DXM seems to promote the proteolytic digestion of the larval tail. (author)

  3. Fish larval recruitment to reefs is a thyroid hormone-mediated metamorphosis sensitive to the pesticide chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Anne; François, Loïc; Barth, Paul; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Piganeau, Gwenaël; Leulier, Francois; Viriot, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Larval recruitment, the transition of pelagic larvae into reef-associated juveniles, is a critical step for the resilience of marine fish populations but its molecular control is unknown. Here, we investigate whether thyroid-hormones (TH) and their receptors (TR) coordinate the larval recruitment of the coral-reef-fish Acanthurus triostegus. We demonstrate an increase of TH-levels and TR-expressions in pelagic-larvae, followed by a decrease in recruiting juveniles. We generalize these observations in four other coral reef-fish species. Treatments with TH or TR-antagonist, as well as relocation to the open-ocean, disturb A. triostegus larvae transformation and grazing activity. Likewise, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide often encountered in coral-reefs, impairs A. triostegus TH-levels, transformation, and grazing activity, hence diminishing this herbivore’s ability to control the spread of reef-algae. Larval recruitment therefore corresponds to a TH-controlled metamorphosis, sensitive to endocrine disruption. This provides a framework to understand how larval recruitment, critical to reef-ecosystems maintenance, is altered by anthropogenic stressors. PMID:29083300

  4. Effects of trophic level and metamorphosis on discrimination of hydrogen isotopes in a plant-herbivore system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jacob M.; Wolf, Nathan; Stricker, Craig A.; Collier, Timothy R.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in ecological studies requires that we know the magnitude of discrimination factors between consumer and element sources. The causes of variation in discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen have been relatively well studied. In contrast, the discrimination factors for hydrogen have rarely been measured. We grew cabbage looper caterpillars (Trichoplusia ni) on cabbage (Brassica oleracea) plants irrigated with four treatments of deuterium-enriched water (δD = -131, -88, -48, and -2‰, respectively), allowing some of them to reach adulthood as moths. Tissue δD values of plants, caterpillars, and moths were linearly correlated with the isotopic composition of irrigation water. However, the slope of these relationships was less than 1, and hence, discrimination factors depended on the δD value of irrigation water. We hypothesize that this dependence is an artifact of growing plants in an environment with a common atmospheric δD value. Both caterpillars and moths were significantly enriched in deuterium relative to plants by ~45‰ and 23‰ respectively, but the moths had lower tissue to plant discrimination factors than did the caterpillars. If the trophic enrichment documented here is universal, δD values must be accounted for in geographic assignment studies. The isotopic value of carbon was transferred more or less faithfully across trophic levels, but δ15N values increased from plants to insects and we observed significant non-trophic 15N enrichment in the metamorphosis from larvae to adult.

  5. Effects of trophic level and metamorphosis on discrimination of hydrogen isotopes in a plant-herbivore system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Peters

    Full Text Available The use of stable isotopes in ecological studies requires that we know the magnitude of discrimination factors between consumer and element sources. The causes of variation in discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen have been relatively well studied. In contrast, the discrimination factors for hydrogen have rarely been measured. We grew cabbage looper caterpillars (Trichoplusia ni on cabbage (Brassica oleracea plants irrigated with four treatments of deuterium-enriched water (δD = -131, -88, -48, and -2‰, respectively, allowing some of them to reach adulthood as moths. Tissue δD values of plants, caterpillars, and moths were linearly correlated with the isotopic composition of irrigation water. However, the slope of these relationships was less than 1, and hence, discrimination factors depended on the δD value of irrigation water. We hypothesize that this dependence is an artifact of growing plants in an environment with a common atmospheric δD value. Both caterpillars and moths were significantly enriched in deuterium relative to plants by ∼45‰ and 23‰ respectively, but the moths had lower tissue to plant discrimination factors than did the caterpillars. If the trophic enrichment documented here is universal, δD values must be accounted for in geographic assignment studies. The isotopic value of carbon was transferred more or less faithfully across trophic levels, but δ(15N values increased from plants to insects and we observed significant non-trophic (15N enrichment in the metamorphosis from larvae to adult.

  6. Differential Survival among Batches of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L. from Fertilisation through to Post-Metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra E Petersen

    Full Text Available Aquaculture production of cod has decreased from over 20,000 tonnes in 2009 to less than 2,000 tonnes in 2014 and the industry faces many challenges, one of which is high and unpredictably variable mortality rates in the early life stages. Hence, full-cycle farming with hatchery produced juveniles is still considered unprofitable compared to fisheries and on-growing of wild cod. In the present study, potential batch differences in progeny survival of wild-caught, hatchery-spawned Faroe Bank cod (Gadus morhua L. were investigated at two defined periods during early life history; i the embryo stage (60 day degrees post fertilisation and ii the fry stage (110 days post hatch, post metamorphosis. The fry stage experiment was conducted in three replicates (N = 300 per replicate, and a panel of three polymorphic microsatellite markers was used for parental analysis. Mean survival rate at the embryo stage was 69% (± 20% SD. Survival was positively associated with egg diameter (P < 0.01, explaining 90% of the variation in egg survival rates. The data were too scarce to conclude either way concerning a possible correlation between survival rates between the two periods (P < 0.10. Offspring from three batches (from a total of eight dominated in the fry stage, contributing over 90% of the progeny, and results were consistent over all three replicate tanks. The skewed batch representation observed may be of relevance to the effective management of selective breeding programmes for cod.

  7. Drosophila motor neuron retraction during metamorphosis is mediated by inputs from TGF-β/BMP signaling and orphan nuclear receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Boulanger

    Full Text Available Larval motor neurons remodel during Drosophila neuro-muscular junction dismantling at metamorphosis. In this study, we describe the motor neuron retraction as opposed to degeneration based on the early disappearance of β-Spectrin and the continuing presence of Tubulin. By blocking cell dynamics with a dominant-negative form of Dynamin, we show that phagocytes have a key role in this process. Importantly, we show the presence of peripheral glial cells close to the neuro-muscular junction that retracts before the motor neuron. We show also that in muscle, expression of EcR-B1 encoding the steroid hormone receptor required for postsynaptic dismantling, is under the control of the ftz-f1/Hr39 orphan nuclear receptor pathway but not the TGF-β signaling pathway. In the motor neuron, activation of EcR-B1 expression by the two parallel pathways (TGF-β signaling and nuclear receptor triggers axon retraction. We propose that a signal from a TGF-β family ligand is produced by the dismantling muscle (postsynapse compartment and received by the motor neuron (presynaptic compartment resulting in motor neuron retraction. The requirement of the two pathways in the motor neuron provides a molecular explanation for the instructive role of the postsynapse degradation on motor neuron retraction. This mechanism insures the temporality of the two processes and prevents motor neuron pruning before postsynaptic degradation.

  8. Larval settlement and spat recovery rates of the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819) using different systems to induce metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, R C; Silva, F C; Gomes, C H M; Ferreira, J F; Melo, C M R

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed at the assessment, in the laboratory, of the larval settlement and spat recovery rates of oysters of the species Crassostrea brasiliana using plastic collectors, epinephrine (C9H13NO3 C4H6O6) and shell powder in settlement tanks. Polypropylene was used attached to bamboo frames. The material was chosen due to its pliability--that favours the spat detachment. Two experiments were carried out; the first between February and April 2008, and the second between November and December 2008 at the Marine Mussel Laboratory of Santa Catarina Federal University (Laboratório de Moluscos Marinhos da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina). In the first experiment, the scratched plastic collectors were tested consorting them with shell powder; on the second, the plastic collectors were tested consorted with shell powder, only shell powder and epinephrine as the metamorphosis stimulator. The quantification was carried out of the larvae settled in the plastic collectors, and of the recovery and integrity of the spats after their detachment. The first experiment has shown a recovery rate of 48.83% of the spats in comparison with the D larvae used. From this percentage, 4.9% settled in the plastic collectors and 43.93% in shell powder. The second experiment revealed 55.78% regarding the settled spats in comparison with the total of larvae used (using epinephrine), 78.62% in the treatment with the collector plus shell powder and 58.33% in the treatment only with shell powder. Thus, the use of the collector plus shell powder resulted in a greater spat recovery when compared to the other treatments.

  9. Fitness Effects of Chlorpyrifos in the Damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum Strongly Depend upon Temperature and Food Level and Can Bridge Metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizanne Janssens

    Full Text Available Interactions between pollutants and suboptimal environmental conditions can have severe consequences for the toxicity of pollutants, yet are still poorly understood. To identify patterns across environmental conditions and across fitness-related variables we exposed Enallagma cyathigerum damselfly larvae to the pesticide chlorpyrifos at two food levels or at two temperatures and quantified four fitness-related variables (larval survival, development time, mass at emergence and adult cold resistance. Food level and temperature did not affect survival in the absence of the pesticide, yet the pesticide reduced survival only at the high temperature. Animals reacted to the pesticide by accelerating their development but only at the high food level and at the low temperature; at the low food level, however, pesticide exposure resulted in a slower development. Chlorpyrifos exposure resulted in smaller adults except in animals reared at the high food level. Animals reared at the low food level and at the low temperature had a higher cold resistance which was not affected by the pesticide. In summary our study highlight that combined effects of exposure to chlorpyrifos and the two environmental conditions (i were mostly interactive and sometimes even reversed in comparison with the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, (ii strongly differed depending on the fitness-related variable under study, (iii were not always predictable based on the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, and (iv bridged metamorphosis depending on which environmental condition was combined with the pesticide thereby potentially carrying over from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems. These findings are relevant when extrapolating results of laboratory tests done under ideal environmental conditions to natural communities.

  10. Franz Kafka’s story The metamorphosis in the light of the theory of intentional object in Franz Brentano and Anton Marty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia KAMIŃSKA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How does it feel to be a worm? No doubt, it feels Kafkaesque. The metamorphosis (1915 is a story of an ordinary man, Gregor Samsa, who wakes up one morning as an ungeheures Ungeziefer or ‘giant vermin’. Is this only a bodily change, or has his mind been transformed as well? And how do the people around him cope with this transformation? In this paper, I am going to examine these issues by using tools from Franz Brentano’s (1838–1917 and Anton Marty’s (1847–1914 philosophy of mind and language. Rumour has it that Kafka’s stories were not only products of his own troubled soul, but were also profoundly influenced by the work of these two philosophers. In my paper, I will cover the following issues: the influence of Franz Brentano on Anton Marty and a fortiori on Franz Kafka (1883–1924, who was Marty’s student in Prague (and in this way, saying something about the School of Brentano; Brentano’s and Marty’s theory of correct and incorrect emotions, and its traces in Kafka’s The metamorphosis; Marty’s philosophy of language and communication as reflected in Kafka’s writings; and Brentano’s reism in comparison to Kafka’s nominalism, on the basis of Roberto Calasso’s interpretation of Kafka.

  11. Anticipation of Artemia sp. supply in the larviculture of the barber goby Elacatinus figaro (Gobiidae: Teleostei influenced growth, metamorphosis and alkaline protease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda da Silva-Souza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The barber goby Elacatinus figaro is considered endangered due to overexploitation by the ornamental industry. Farming marine ornamental fishes, especially the threatened ones, can be one of the measures to minimize the pressure on the natural stocks. Among the priority issues for their production is the determination of the most appropriate feeding management. The feeding protocol commonly used in the larviculture of barber goby, when the start of Artemia sp. offer occurred at the 18th DAH (days after hatching (treatment T18, was modified, by anticipating brine shrimp supply in 6 days (treatment T12. Alkaline proteases activity, growth and metamorphosis of larvae were evaluated in both protocols. Juveniles at T12 showed higher weight (0.04 ± 0.001 g and lower activity of total alkaline proteases (1.3 ± 0.2 mU mg-1 protein compared to T18 (0.02 ± 0.001 g; 2.8 ± 0.4 mU mg-1 protein, respectively. With anticipation of brine shrimp, the commencing and end of larval transformation was observed earlier (at 24 and 34 DAH, respectively in comparison to those with the supply of Artemia sp. at 18 DAH (27 and 41 DAH, respectively. Thus, the Artemia sp. anticipation was beneficial during the larviculture of the barber goby, considering that larvae reached metamorphosis earlier.

  12. The Metaphoros metamorphosis

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin, the Director-General announced the name of the winner of the architectural competition for the design of the sections of the CERN site adjacent to the route de Meyrin. In this issue, we invite you to take a detailed look at the winning project.   The route de Meyrin, between the Globe (on the right) and the Reception (behind the giant screen), as designed by Studio Bürgi. (Photo: Studio Bürgi sis - Camorino). "Metaphoros" is the name of the winning project submitted by the Ticino architects' office Studio Bürgi in the competition for the design of the sections of the CERN site adjacent to the route de Meyrin. “Metaphoros is derived from the Greek,” explains Paolo Bürgi, the landscape architect who heads the project. “It conveys the idea of transport, travel and communication, which are some of CERN’s defining characteristics!” The aim of the Meta...

  13. The Paranal Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Some years ago, the Paranal mountain was still a remote and inhospitable site, some 12 km from the Pacific Coast in the dry Atacama desert in northern Chile. Few aircraft passengers flying along that coast would notice anything particular about this peak, except perhaps that it was one of the tallest in the steep coastal mountain range. Already in the early 1960's, pioneer astronomers crossed this desolate region in search of suitable sites for future observatories. One of them, Jürgen Stock , did notice the Paranal peak as a possible candidate. However, without any water in this extremely dry area, how could any people, even hardy scientists, ever live up there? He then went on to discover La Silla, where ESO decided to build its first observatory in 1964. ESO presence at Paranal from 1983 In the beginning of the 1980's, when the main construction phase at La Silla was over, ESO launched a thorough search for the best possible site for the next-generation telescope, already then known as the "Very Large Telescope", or VLT. During this campaign, the Paranal mountain was visited by a small search troupe from this organisation, including the ESO Director General (1975 - 1987), Lo Woltjer . The first test measurements indicated a great potential for astronomical observations, both in term of clear nights and low humidity, the latter being particularly important for infrared observations. From 1983, ESO maintained a small site testing station at the top of Paranal. The meteorological conditions were registered around the clock and the atmospheric transparency and stability were recorded each night. At that time, the mountain Vizcachas, a site near ESO's first observatory, La Silla, and some 600 km further south, was also considered a possible site for the VLT. The data from the two sites were therefore carefully compared over a period of several years. Paranal becomes the site for the VLT Following the decision in December 1987 by the ESO Council to embark upon the VLT Project (with Massimo Tarenghi as Project Manager), Paranal was chosen as the site in 1991. In the meantime, the Chilean Government had resolved to donate an area of approx. 700 km 2 around this mountain to ESO, and construction work started the same year. The left photo shows Paranal at this stage. The development of Paranal included much blasting and heavy earthwork; about 350,000 m 3 of rock had to be moved to achieve a flat platform of sufficient size to house the various components of the VLT and, in particular, the spacious VLT Interferometer. The situation, right after this work, is depicted in the middle photo from 1994. An operational observatory The construction at Paranal progressed at high speed. It is hard to believe that just four years later, "First Light" was achieved with the first 8.2-m telescope, ANTU, in May 1998. Then followed KUEYEN (March 1999), MELIPAL (January 2000) and YEPUN (September 2000). The first two telescopes have now been "taken over" by the astronomers and Paranal has become an operational observatory with Roberto Gilmozzi as Director. Large numbers of scientists in the ESO member countries, and even more within international collaborations, are busy producing exciting research results, now increasingly visible in the world's professional journals and some of which are announced in the ESO Press Releases. The other two will soon be equipped with high-quality astronomical instruments; the first will be VIMOS at MELIPAL in the beginning of 2001. Both telescopes will become fully available to the astronomical community in the course of 2001. And now the VLT Interferometer... The next decisive step will happen already in early 2001, when the VLT Interferometer is expected to see "First Fringes", the equivalent of "First Light" for this type of facility. This is when two small "siderostats" on the Paranal platform will track and capture the light from one and the same (bright) star, directing the two beams towards the underground Interferometric Laboratory via a series of intermediate mirrors. Here, the critical technical elements are the "delay lines" in the Interferometric Tunnel, cf. ESO Press Photos 26a-e/00.They have already undergone the first tests with very positive results, so the ESO staff is in a confident mood. Later in 2001, two of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes will be coupled and interferometric test observations will be made on faint celestial objects. In the next years, the three movable 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes will be installed on the Paranal "railroad" and the VLT Interferometer will progressively enter into full operation. From a lonely mountain top to the world's foremost optical/infrared astronomical observatory, Paranal has indeed come a long way! This is the caption to ESO PR Photo 36/00 . It may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory.

  14. Effects of CFT Legumine (5% Rotenone) on tadpole survival and metamorphosis of Chiricahua leopard frogs Lithobates chiricahuensis, Northern leopard frogs L. pipiens, and American bullfrogs L. catesbeianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Guillermo; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Kruse, Carter G.

    2017-01-01

    Amphibians may experience collateral effects if exposed to CFT Legumine (5% rotenone), a piscicide that is used to remove invasive fish. A series of 48-h static toxicity tests assessed the acute effects of CFT Legumine on multi-aged tadpoles of the federally listed Chiricahua leopard frog Lithobates chiricahuensis, the widespread northern leopard frog L. pipiens, and the increasingly invasive American bullfrog L. catesbeianus. At the earliest Gosner stages (GS 21–25), Chiricahua leopard frogs were more sensitive to CFT Legumine (median lethal concentration [LC50] = 0.41–0.58 mg/L) than American bullfrogs (LC50 = 0.63–0.69 mg/L) and northern leopard frogs (LC50 = 0.91 and 1.17 mg/L). As tadpoles developed (i.e., increase in GS), their sensitivity to rotenone decreased. In a separate series of 48-h static nonrenewal toxicity tests, tadpoles (GS 21–25 and GS 31–36) of all three species were exposed to piscicidal concentrations of CFT Legumine (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/L) to assess postexposure effects on metamorphosis. In survivors of all three species at both life stages, the time to tail resorption was nearly doubled in comparison with that of controls. For example, mid-age (GS 31–36) Chiricahua leopard frog tadpoles required 210.7 h to complete tail resorption, whereas controls required 108.5 h. However, because tail resorption is a relatively short period in metamorphosis, the total duration of development (days from posthatch to complete metamorphosis) and the final weight did not differ in either age-group surviving nominal concentrations of 0.5-, 1.0-, and 2.0-mg/L CFT Legumine relative to controls. This research demonstrates that the CFT Legumine concentrations commonly used in field applications to remove unwanted fish could result in considerable mortality of the earliest stages of Lithobates species. In addition to acute lethality, piscicide treatments may result in delayed tail resorption, which places the tadpoles at risk by increasing

  15. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    cleavage sites, and therefore, are also likely to be produced from the precursor. Thus, there are at least 37 closely related neuropeptides localized on the precursor protein, making this precursor one of the most productive preprohormones known so far. This report also shows that unusual processing sites......Neuropeptides are an important group of hormones mediating or modulating neuronal communication. Neuropeptides are especially abundant in evolutionarily "old" nervous systems, such as those of cnidarians, the lowest animal group having a nervous system. Cnidarians often have a life cycle including...... the precursor protein for this metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones. The precursor protein is 514-amino acid residues long and contains 10 copies of the immature, authentic neuropeptide (Gln-Gln-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-Gly). All neuropeptide copies are preceded by Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequences...

  16. Chemical induction in mangrove crab megalopae, Ucides cordatus (Ucididae): Do young recruits emit metamorphosis-triggering odours as do conspecific adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simith, Darlan de Jesus de Brito; Abrunhosa, Fernando Araújo; Diele, Karen

    2013-10-01

    In many brachyuran species, including the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus, water-soluble chemicals (odours) emitted by adult residents trigger metamorphosis of megalopae, probably facilitating habitat selection and settlement near conspecific crab population. New field findings revealed that early benthic crab stages co-inhabit burrows of both juveniles and adults of U. cordatus which raised the question whether megalopae are also stimulated by sexually immature juveniles. Therefore, we tested in an experimental laboratory study the hypothesis that small benthic recruits and older juveniles also emit metamorphosis-stimulating odours as do conspecific adult crabs. U. cordatus megalopae were cultivated in eight conspecific odour-treatments containing seawater previously conditioned with crabs of different carapace widths (CW 0.15-5.0 cm) and in a control treatment with filtered seawater not conditioned with crabs. In all odour-treatments, including those with small immature crabs, the percentage of metamorphosed larvae was significantly higher (≥74%) and the average development was shorter (15.8-19.3 days) than in the control group, where only 30% moulted after 25.6 ± 6.6 days of megalopal development. In addition, megalopae developed 2.7 days faster when exposed to odours from young and older juveniles compared to those larvae kept in contact with odours from conspecific adults. Our results clearly demonstrate that the emission of metamorphic odours in U. cordatus is independent of size/age or sexual maturity. The responsiveness of megalopae to chemicals emitted by resident crabs of varying ages should aid the natural recovery of U. cordatus populations in areas significantly affected by size-selective fishery where only large conspecific adults are harvested.

  17. Controls on fluvial metamorphosis during global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (56 Ma) in Spain: extreme droughts, extreme floods or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelltort, Sebastien; Chen, Chen; Guerit, Laure; Foreman, Brady; Paola, Chris; Adatte, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    How does global warming change the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events? The response to this question is partly preserved in the geological record. 56 Ma ago, global temperatures increased during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), leading to a major biotic turnover, but how this event affected the nature of extreme events remains unknown. On several continents, fluvial systems with sinuous channels within fine-grained floodplains suddenly transformed at the P-E boundary into apparently coarser-grained braid plains with frequent lateral migrations, washing their muddy floodplains to the seas. This landscape transformation has been related to aridification and intensification of precipitation allowing transport of coarser material as a result of P-E global warming, with important implications for predicting the consequences of current global change. Here we test this hypothesis by quantifying the magnitude of grain size change and flow depth at a representative P-E locality in Northern Spain. We find that the size of pebbles in transport and flow depth remained similar to, or even smaller than, pre-PETM conditions. This suggests that, if more seasonal and extreme precipitation occurred, they are not necessarily borne out in the predicted deeper flow depths and coarser grain sizes, but rather trigger a shift to multiple active channels. However, an alternative or complementary explanation may rest in pollen data found in coeval marine records and which document a dramatic vegetation shift from permanent conifer forests prior to the crisis into periodic vegetation in brief periods of rain during the hyperthermal episode. Such change induced by long periods of intense droughts, could have enhanced erodibility of channel banks by decreasing root-controlled cohesion of fine-grained floodplains and interfluves, promoting their lateral mobility and the observed fluvial metamorphosis. Thus, although water is regarded as the main agent sculpting

  18. Effects of metamorphosis and captivity on the in vitro sensitivity of thyroid glands from the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, to bovine thyrotropin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M.F.; Norris, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of thyroid glands from the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, to bovine thyrotropin (bTSH) was tested in vitro. Thyroids were taken from subjects representing metamorphic stages I (premetamorphic larvae), II (onset of climax), and VII (completion of gill resorption), as well as from captivity control larvae. Exogenous TSH reduced the cumulative uptake of 125 I in vitro by thyroids from stage I larvae after 24 and 48 hr. The capacity of thyroids to release thyroxine (T4) in vitro was used subsequently as a measure of their responsiveness to TSH. Baseline levels of T4 release in vitro were variable but did not differ significantly among developmental stages. A low dose of bTSH (5 X 10(-6) IU/ml) did not increase in vitro T4 release compared with that of controls. A larger dose (5 X 10(-4) IU/ml) caused greater increases in T4 release from thyroids of stage II and VII subjects than from those of controls. This dose produced only a small response by thyroids from captivity-control subjects. The results suggest that the thyroids of Ambystoma increase in their capacity to respond to TSH during the process of metamorphosis

  19. Essential role of grim-led programmed cell death for the establishment of corazonin-producing peptidergic nervous system during embryogenesis and metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyunghee Lee

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, combinatorial activities of four death genes, head involution defective (hid, reaper (rpr, grim, and sickle (skl, have been known to play crucial roles in the developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD of various tissues. However, different expression patterns of the death genes also suggest distinct functions played by each. During early metamorphosis, a great number of larval neurons unfit for adult life style are removed by PCD. Among them are eight pairs of corazonin-expressing larval peptidergic neurons in the ventral nerve cord (vCrz. To reveal death genes responsible for the PCD of vCrz neurons, we examined extant and recently available mutations as well as RNA interference that disrupt functions of single or multiple death genes. We found grim as a chief proapoptotic gene and skl and rpr as minor ones. The function of grim is also required for PCD of the mitotic sibling cells of the vCrz neuronal precursors (EW3-sib during embryonic neurogenesis. An intergenic region between grim and rpr, which, it has been suggested, may enhance expression of three death genes in embryonic neuroblasts, appears to play a role for the vCrz PCD, but not for the EW3-sib cell death. The death of vCrz neurons and EW3-sib is triggered by ecdysone and the Notch signaling pathway, respectively, suggesting distinct regulatory mechanisms of grim expression in a cell- and developmental stage-specific manner.

  20. Mitosis and cell death in the optic lobes of workers, queens and drones of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roat, Thaisa Cristina; Landim, Carminda da Cruz

    2010-09-01

    Colonies of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, consist of males and two female castes: workers and queens. The castes and males from A. mellifera have a distinct morphology, physiology and behaviour that correlate with their roles in the society and are characterized by some brain polymorphisms. Compound eyes are one of the characteristics that differ among the castes and sexes. A. mellifera is a holometabolous insect; therefore, the development of adult organs during metamorphosis, which will produce these differences, requires the precise coordination of three main programmed cellular processes: proliferation, differentiation and death. These processes take place simultaneously during pupation. Our purpose was to investigate cell division and death in the optic lobes (OL) of workers, queens and males during pupation to identify how the differences in the compound eyes in adults of these classes are achieved. The results showed that OL differentiation follows a similar pattern in the three classes of individuals studied, without structural differences in their development. The main non-structural differences involve cell division, mortality rates and timing. The results suggest a modelling of the brain during differentiation, which contributes to the specific functions of each individual class.

  1. Fazer a REF é fazer política: memórias de uma metamorfose editorial Making REF is making politics: memories of an editorial metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzinete Simões Minella

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo pretende refletir sobre o novo modelo editorial inaugurado na Revista Estudos Feministas em 2002, ou seja, três anos após a sua instalação na Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC. Ao elaborar as memórias dessa metamorfose, nos primeiros itens, refiro-me às transições do formato da editoria da REF, às razões e aos critérios da sua nova estruturação, bem como aos significados da expansão da equipe diante da situação de algumas publicações feministas nacionais e internacionais. No último item elaboro um breve balanço das vantagens e dos desafios implicados nessa nova política editorial.This article focuses on the new editorial model launched in Revista Estudos Feministas in 2002, that is, three years after its installation in Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC. While firstly detailing the memories of such metamorphosis, the text refers to the transitions of REF's editorship format, to the purposes and criteria of the new structure, as well as the meanings of the team expansion in relation to some national and international feminist publications. Eventually the article briefly discusses the advantages and challenges implicated in this new editorial policy.

  2. The regulatory role of the NO/cGMP signal transduction cascade during larval attachment and metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is among the most dominant fouling species on intertidal rocky shores in tropical and subtropical areas and is thus a target organism in antifouling research. After being released from adults, the swimming nauplius undertakes six molting cycles and then transforms into a cyprid. Using paired antennules, a competent cyprid actively explores and selects a suitable substratum for attachment and metamorphosis (collectively known as settlement). This selection process involves the reception of exogenous signals and subsequent endogenous signal transduction. To investigate the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) during larval settlement of B. amphitrite, we examined the effects of an NO donor and an NO scavenger, two nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor on settling cyprids. We found that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibited larval settlement in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, both the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO and the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine hemisulfate (AGH) and S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMIS) significantly accelerated larval settlement. Suppression of the downstream guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity using a GC-selective inhibitor ODQ could also significantly accelerate larval settlement. Interestingly, the settlement inhibition effects of SNP could be attenuated by ODQ at all concentrations tested. In the developmental expression profiling of NOS and sGC, the lowest expression of both genes was detected in the cyprid stage, a crucial stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In summary, we concluded that NO regulates larval settlement via mediating downstream cGMP signaling.

  3. RNA interference of a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene reveals its roles during larval-pupal metamorphosis in Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke-Cai; Wang, Jia; Li, Jia-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qing; Pu, Po; Fan, Huan; Liu, Ying-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose is the major blood sugar in insects, which plays a crucial role as an instant source of energy and the starting substrate for chitin biosynthesis. In insects, trehalose is synthesized by catalysis of an important enzyme, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS). In the present study, a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene from Bactrocera minax (BmTPS) was cloned and characterized. BmTPS contained an open reading frame of 2445 nucleotides encoding a protein of 814 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 92.05kDa. BmTPS was detectable in all developmental stages of Bactrocera minax and expressed higher in the final- (third-) instar larvae. Tissue-specific expression patterns of BmTPS showed that it was mainly expressed in the fat body. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BmTPS and three genes in the chitin biosynthesis pathway. Moreover, injection of double-stranded RNA into third-instar larvae successfully silenced the transcription of BmTPS in B. minax, and thereby decreased the activity of TPS and trehalose content. Additionally, silencing of BmTPS inhibited the expression of three key genes in the chitin biosynthesis pathway and exhibited 52% death and abnormal phenotypes. The findings demonstrate that BmTPS is indispensable for larval-pupal metamorphosis. Besides, the establishment of RNAi experimental system in B. minax would lay a solid foundation for further investigation of molecular biology and physiology of this pest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup WeatherMax® on metamorphosis of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in natural wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctôt, C; Robertson, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Edge, C; Melvin, S D; Houlahan, J; Trudeau, V L

    2013-09-15

    Amphibian tadpoles develop in aquatic environments where they are susceptible to the effects of pesticides and other environmental contaminants. Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicide in the world and have been shown to affect survival and development of tadpoles under laboratory and mesocosm conditions. In the present study, whole wetland manipulations were used to determine if exposure to an agriculturally relevant application of Roundup WeatherMax(®), a herbicide formulation containing the potassium salt of glyphosate and an undisclosed surfactant, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) under natural conditions. Wetlands were divided in half with an impermeable curtain so that each wetland contained a treatment and control side. Tadpoles were exposed to two pulses of this herbicide at an environmentally realistic concentration (ERC, 0.21 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) and the predicted maximum environmental concentration (PMEC, 2.89 mg a.e./L), after which abundance, growth, development, and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results present little evidence that exposure to this herbicide affects abundance, growth and development of wood frog tadpoles. As part of the Long-term Experimental Wetlands Area (LEWA) project, this research demonstrates that typical agricultural use of Roundup WeatherMax(®) poses minimal risk to larval amphibian development. However, our gene expression data (mRNA levels) suggests that glyphosate-based herbicides have the potential to alter hormonal pathways during tadpole development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An evaluation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay and the Fish Short-Term Reproduction Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine; Marino, Troy; Thomas, Johnson; Sosinski, Lindsay; Neal, Barbara; Hammond, Larry

    2013-04-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was evaluated in both the Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA) and the Fish Short Term Reproduction Assay (FSTRA). In the AMA, tadpoles were exposed to mean measured 2,4-D concentrations of 0 (water control), 0.273, 3.24, 38.0 and 113 mg acid equivalents (ae)/L for either seven or 21 days. In the FSTRA, fathead minnows were exposed to mean measured 2,4-D concentrations of 0 (water control), 0.245, 3.14, 34.0, and 96.5 mg ae/L for 21 days. The respective concentrations of 2,4-D were not overtly toxic to either Xenopus laevis tadpoles or fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In the AMA, there were no signs of either advanced or delayed development, asynchronous development, or significant histopathological effects of the thyroid gland among 2,4-D exposed tadpoles evaluated on either day seven or day 21 of the exposure. Therefore, following the AMA decision logic, 2,4-D is considered "likely thyroid inactive" in the AMA with a No Observable Effect Concentration (NOEC) of 113 mg ae 2,4-D/L. In the FSTRA, there were no significant differences between control and 2,4-D exposed fish in regard to fertility, wet weight, length, gonado-somatic indices, tubercle scores, or blood plasma concentrations of vitellogenin. Furthermore, there were no treatment-related histopathologic changes in the testes or ovaries in any 2,4-D exposed group. The only significant effect was a decrease in fecundity among fish exposed to 96.5 mg ae 2,4-D/L. The cause of the reduced fecundity at the highest concentration of 2,4-D tested in the assay was most likely due to a generalized stress response in the fish, and not due to a specific endocrine mode of action of 2,4-D. Based on fish reproduction, the NOEC in the FSTRA was 34.0 mg ae 2,4-D/L. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The B vitamins nicotinamide (B3) and riboflavin (B2) stimulate metamorphosis in larvae of the deposit-feeding polychaete Capitella teleta: implications for a sensory ligand-gated ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Robert T; Pechenik, Jan A; Biggers, William J; Scavo, Gia; Lehman, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Marine sediments can contain B vitamins, presumably incorporated from settled, decaying phytoplankton and microorganisms associated with decomposition. Because B vitamins may be advantageous for the energetically intensive processes of metamorphosis, post-metamorphic growth, and reproduction, we tested several B vitamins to determine if they would stimulate larvae of the deposit-feeding polychaete Capitella teleta to settle and metamorphose. Nicotinamide and riboflavin individually stimulated larvae of C. teleta to settle and metamorphose, generally within 1-2 hours at nicotinamide concentrations as low as 3 µM and riboflavin concentrations as low as 50 µM. More than 80% of the larvae metamorphosed within 30 minutes at a nicotinamide concentration of 7 µM. The pyridine channel agonist pyrazinecarboxamide also stimulated metamorphosis at very low concentrations. In contrast, neither lumichrome, thiamine HCl, pyridoxine HCl, nor vitamin B12 stimulated larvae of C. teleta to metamorphose at concentrations as high as 500 µM. Larvae also did not metamorphose in response to either nicotinamide or pyrazinecarboxamide in calcium-free seawater or with the addition of 4-acetylpyridine, a competitive inhibitor of the pyridine receptor. Together, these results suggest that larvae of C. teleta are responding to nicotinamide and riboflavin via a chemosensory pyridine receptor similar to that previously reported to be present on crayfish chela and involved with food recognition. Our data are the first to implicate B vitamins as possible natural chemical settlement cues for marine invertebrate larvae.

  7. Metabolomic insights into the effects of thyroid hormone on Rana [Lithobates] catesbeiana metamorphosis using whole-body Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehr, Teesha C; Koide, Emily M; Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Helbing, Caren C

    2018-02-19

    Anuran metamorphosis involves the transformation of an aquatic tadpole into a juvenile frog. This process is completely dependent upon thyroid hormones (THs). Although much research has been focused on changes in gene expression programs during this postembryonic developmental period, transitions in the metabolic profiles are relatively poorly understood. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a technique that generates highly multiplexed mass spectra while retaining spatial location information on a thin tissue section. Reconstructed ion heat maps are correlated with morphology of the tissue section for biological interpretation. The present study is the first to use whole-body MALDI-MSI on tadpoles to gain insights into anuran metamorphosis. Approximately 1000 features were detected in each of five tissues examined (brain, eye, liver, notochord, and tail muscle) from premetamorphic North American bullfrog (Rana [Lithobates] catesbeiana) tadpoles. Of these detected metabolites, 1700 were unique and 136 were significantly affected by exposure to 50 nM thyroxine for 48 h. Of the significantly-affected metabolites, 64 features were tentatively identified using the MassTRIX annotation tool. All tissues revealed changes in lipophilic compounds including phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylethanolamines, and phosphatidylserines. These lipophilic compounds made up the largest portion of significantly-affected metabolites indicating that lipid signaling is a major target of TH action in frog tadpoles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The metamorphosis of amphibian toxicogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caren eHelbing

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Amphibians are important vertebrates in toxicology often representing both aquatic and terrestrial forms within the life history of the same species. Of the thousands of species, only two have substantial genomics resources: the recently published genome of the Pipid, Xenopus (Silurana tropicalis, and transcript information (and ongoing genome sequencing project of Xenopus laevis. However, many more species representative of regional ecological niches and life strategies are used in toxicology worldwide. Since Xenopus species diverged from the most populous frog family, the Ranidae, ~200 million years ago, there are notable differences between them and the even more distant Caudates (salamanders and Caecilians. These differences include genome size, gene composition, and extent of polyploidization. Application of toxicogenomics to amphibians requires the mobilization of resources and expertise to develop de novo sequence assemblies and analysis strategies for a broader range of amphibian species. The present mini-review will present the advances in toxicogenomics as pertains to amphibians with particular emphasis upon the development and use of genomic techniques (inclusive of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics and the challenges inherent therein.

  9. The societal metamorphosis of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forscher, F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper proposes that in its largest dimension, energy management will help to bring about needed morphogenic readjustment. The individual, the private sector, and the government, in all their decisions everywhere, must include the concept of energy. Energy management must, in effect, become a subconscious habit of each of us, like the time of day is a subconscious state of mind.

  10. The Metamorphosis by K. (12)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin we reported on the first run of the new NA62 experiment. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to take a look at the production of the experiment's new kaon beam.   The start of the K12 beam line as seen during the installation of the shielding. 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, 10-6 mbar… send in the protons! Since Thursday 1 November, the P42 beam line of the SPS has once again been sending protons to the beryllium target to produce the K12 kaon beam line eagerly awaited by the NA62 collaboration. This was no trivial matter! The first step was to clear the decks by dismantling the entire H10 beam line and NA60 experiment, as well as most of the NA48 experiment - representing some 1000 tonnes of equipment in total! Next came the complete renovation of the infrastructure, which dated back to 1979. The operation called on the expertise of virtually all branches of the EN and GS departments, as well as the Radiation Protection group: from ...

  11. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  12. The Metamorphosis of School Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Franklin

    1998-01-01

    Discusses ways that schools can evolve to support new teaching and learning paradigms into the new millennium. Argues that 21st-century schools will be smaller, cheaper, and more efficient; simply constructed; revenue generators that are privately financed; integrated with social, governmental, and business entities; will provide multiple,…

  13. Neuroendocrine gene expression reveals a decrease in dopamine D2B receptor with no changes in GnRH system during prepubertal metamorphosis of silvering in wild Japanese eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Shan-Ru; Yueh, Wen-Shiun; Pen, Yi-Ting; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chen, Guan-Ru; Dufour, Sylvie; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2014-09-15

    Silvering is a prepubertal metamorphosis preparing the eel to the oceanic reproductive migration. A moderate gonad development occurs during this metamorphosis from the sedentary yellow stage to the migratory silver stage. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular aspects of various endocrine parameters of BPG axis at different ovarian developmental stages in wild yellow and silver female Japanese eels. The GSI of the sampled female eels ranged between 0.18 and 2.3%, corresponding to yellow, pre-silver and silver stages. Gonad histology showed changes from previtellogenic oocytes in yellow eels to early vitellogenic oocytes in silver eels. Both serum E2 and T concentrations significantly increased with ovarian development indicating a significant activation of steroidogenesis during silvering. In agreement with previous studies, significant increases in pituitary gonadotropin beta subunits FSH-β and LH-β transcripts were also measured by qPCR, supporting that the activation of pituitary gonadotropin expression is likely responsible for the significant ovarian development observed during silvering. We investigated for the first time the possible brain neuroendocrine mechanisms involved in the activation of the pituitary gonadotropic function during silvering. By analyzing the expression of genes representative of the stimulatory GnRH control and the inhibitory dopaminergic control. The transcript levels of mGnRH and the three GnRH receptors did not change in the brain and pituitary between yellow and silver stages, suggesting that gene expression of the GnRH system is not significantly activated during silvering. The brain transcript levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, limiting enzyme of DA synthesis did not change during silvering, indicating that the DA synthesis activity was maintained. In contrast, a significant decrease in DA-D2B receptor expression in the forebrain and pituitary was observed, with no changes in DA-D2A receptor. The decrease in the

  14. For a dialectic of metamorphosis: the new public and the kaleidoscopic museum Por uma dialética da metamorfose: o novo público e o museu caleidoscópico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Ferreira Azzi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dialogue established between the young public and museums, analyzing the contemporaneity of traditional museum discourse. In the light of concepts such as sharing of the sensitive, dialectal images, metamorphosis of artwork and cyberspace, developed by the theoreticians Jacques Rancière, Georges Didi-Huberman, André Malraux and Pierre Lévy, my intention is to question the potential interaction and production of senses exploited, or not, in museum spaces. O artigo põe em cena o diálogo estabelecido pela relação entre público jovem e museus, analisando a contemporaneidade do discurso museológico tradicional. À luz de conceitos como partilha do sensível, imagens dialéticas, metamorfose da obra de arte e ciberespaço, desenvolvidos respectivamente pelos teóricos André Malraux, Georges Didi-Huberman, Jacques Rancière e Pierre Lévy, pretende-se interrogar o potencial de interação e de produção de sentidos utilizado, ou não, pelo espaço museal.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of five different elongation factor 1 alpha genes in the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup: Differential gene expression and thyroid hormones dependence during metamorphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchado Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A is one of the four subunits composing eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1. It catalyzes the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the A-site of the ribosome in a GTP-dependent manner during protein synthesis, although it also seems to play a role in other non-translational processes. Currently, little information is still available about its expression profile and regulation during flatfish metamorphosis. With regard to this, Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis is a commercially important flatfish in which eEF1A gene remains to be characterized. Results The development of large-scale genomics of Senegalese sole has facilitated the identification of five different eEF1A genes, referred to as SseEF1A1, SseEF1A2, SseEF1A3, SseEF1A4, and Sse42Sp50. Main characteristics and sequence identities with other fish and mammalian eEF1As are described. Phylogenetic and tissue expression analyses allowed for the identification of SseEF1A1 and SseEF1A2 as the Senegalese sole counterparts of mammalian eEF1A1 and eEF1A2, respectively, and of Sse42Sp50 as the ortholog of Xenopus laevis and teleost 42Sp50 gene. The other two elongation factors, SseEF1A3 and SseEF1A4, represent novel genes that are mainly expressed in gills and skin. The expression profile of the five genes was also studied during larval development, revealing different behaviours. To study the possible regulation of SseEF1A gene expressions by thyroid hormones (THs, larvae were exposed to the goitrogen thiourea (TU. TU-treated larvae exhibited lower SseEF1A4 mRNA levels than untreated controls at both 11 and 15 days after treatment, whereas transcripts of the other four genes remained relatively unchanged. Moreover, addition of exogenous T4 hormone to TU-treated larvae increased significantly the steady-state levels of SseEF1A4 with respect to untreated controls, demonstrating that its expression is up-regulated by THs. Conclusion We

  16. Effects of larval crowding on development time, survival and weight at metamorphosis in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae Efectos del hacinamiento larval en el tiempo de desarrollo, la supervivencia y el peso en la metamorfosis de Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Maciá

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of larval crowding on survival, weight at metamorphosis and development time were assessed in the dengue mosquito, Aedes aegypti L., under a controlled environment. Larval cohorts were bred at 7 different densities (4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 and 256 larvae / 175 ml pot, while keeping constant water volume and food amount and quality, under controlled temperature and photoperiod. Natural detritus, mainly leaves, obtained from containers naturally colonized by A. aegypti, were used as a source of nutrients for larvae. Development time, mortality, mass at metamorphosis, and total biomass were recorded for each density. Development time ranged from 4 to 23 days in males, and from 5 to 24 in females, whereby larvae took longer to develop at 64 (females and 128 (males larvae per recipient. At high densities there was a male-biased sex proportion. At densities equal to or higher than 0.4 larvae/ml (0.32 larvae/cm² there was an increase of mortality. An inverse relationship between larval density and pupal weight was detected. Biomass per individual reached asymptotic values of about 1 mg/individual at a density of 128 individuals/pot (0.64 larvae/cm². This experiment shows that this southern strain of A. aegypti is sensitive to crowding in small containers.Los efectos del hacinamiento larval sobre el tiempo de desarrollo, la supervivencia y el peso en la metamorfosis fueron estudiados en el mosquito del dengue, Aedes aegypti L., en el laboratorio. Se criaron cohortes de larvas en 7 densidades (4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 y 256 larvas/ recipiente de 175 ml mientras se mantuvo constante el volumen de agua y la calidad y cantidad de alimento, bajo fotoperíodo y temperatura controlados. Se usaron detritos naturales, principalmente hojas, obtenidos de contenedores colonizados naturalmente por A. aegypti como fuente de nutrientes para las larvas. En cada densidad se registraron el tiempo de desarrollo, la mortalidad, el peso en la metamorfosis y la

  17. REAL MUSEUM, IMAGINARY MUSEUM: REFLECTIONS ON THE CONCEPT OF THE MUSEUM AS A STAGE FOR METAMORPHOSIS = MUSEO REAL, MUSEO IMAGINARIO: REFLEXIONES EN TORNO AL CONCEPTO DE MUSEO COMO ESCENARIO DE METAMORFOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Marcén Guillén

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ever since its inception as public institution in the 18th century, the museum has favoured several interpretations of the work of art, alterations that imply both a change in its semantic and a revision of the very same concept of art. These metamorphoses take place not only within the confined walls of the traditional museum but also in many wall-less museums. Approaches such as the imaginary museum, virtual and endless repertoire of pieces of art, open countless perspectives to how the museums are perceived as containers of the western memory. This paper focuses on the role of the museum as metamorphosis scenery through the thoughts of artists, writers and intellectuals that have felt attracted to this question since the dawn of the museum.Desde sus inicios como institución pública en el siglo XVIII, el museo ha propiciado diversas interpretaciones de la obra de arte, que entrañan tanto un cambio en la semántica del objeto artístico como una revisión del concepto mismo de arte. Estas metamorfosis se producen no solo en el ámbito físico del museo tradicional sino también en las múltiples variedades del museo sin muros. Planteamientos como el del museo imaginario, repertorio virtual e inacabable de obras de arte, abren innumerables perspectivas en lo que se refiere a la institución museística como receptáculo de la memoria occidental. El presente artículo plantea un recorrido por el papel del museo como escenario de metamorfosis a través de las reflexiones de artistas, literatos e intelectuales que se han sentido atraídos por esta sugerente cuestión desde los albores de la institución museística.

  18. Metamorphosis: Phases of UF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.H. [Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A 15-minute videotape is presented. The subject matter is 150 grams of UF{sub 6} sealed in a glass tube. Close-up views show the UF{sub 6} as phase changes are effected by the addition or removal of heat from the closed system. The solid-to-liquid transition is shown as heat is added, both slowly and rapidly. The solid phases which result from freezing and from desublimation are contrasted. In the solid state, uranium hexafluoride is a nearly-white, dense crystalline solid. The appearance of this solid depends on whether it is formed by freezing from the liquid or by desublimation from the vapor phase. If frozen from the liquid, the solid particles take the form of irregularly shaped coarse grains, while the solid product of desublimation tends to be a rather formless mass without individually distinguishable particles. The changes in state are presented in terms of the UF{sub 6} phase diagram.

  19. [Popular science: metamorphosis of knowledge in film].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Far from being merely a medium of simplification and conveyance of scientific facts, motion pictures exhibit an important epistemic function. On the one hand, the medium film is itself a product of research in various fields, on the other hand, it retroacts on perception and problem-solving in science, thereby influencing and changing research practices. The paper aims at describing these reciprocal effects and synergies by discussing two examples: first by the film "The principles of Einstein's theory of relativity", first released in Germany in 1922, second by the film "Mathematical image of the struggle for life", produced in 1937 for the inauguration of the "Palace of discoveries" in Paris, demonstrating the latest developments in evolutionary theory. It becomes evident that picture media have the capacity to transform the symbolic dimension of things and bodies, thereby offering new access to reality, which not only fascinated the spectators, but also inspired scientific research.

  20. Metamorphosis in balanomorphan, pedunculated, and parasitic barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju

    2012-01-01

    irreversibly cemented itself to a substratum. In both Megabalanus rosa and Lepas, the settled cyprid first passes through a quiescent period of tissue reorganization, in which the body is raised into a position vertical to the substratum. In Lepas, this is followed by extension of the peduncle. In both Lepas...... larva to an attached suspension feeder (Thoracica) or an endoparasite (Rhizocephala). The cyprids and juveniles are so different in morphology that they are functionally incompatible. The drastic reorganization of the body implicated in the process can therefore only commence after the cyprid has...... and M. rosa, the juvenile must free itself from the cypris cuticle by an active process before it can extend the cirri for suspension feeding. In M. rosa, the juvenile performs intensely pulsating movements that result in shedding of the cypris carapace ~8¿h after settlement. Lepas sp. sheds the cypris...

  1. Metamorphosis in the cirripede crustacean Balanus amphitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruzzo, Diego; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Stalked and acorn barnacles (Cirripedia Thoracica) have a complex life cycle that includes a free-swimming nauplius larva, a cypris larva and a permanently attached sessile juvenile and adult barnacle. The barnacle cyprid is among the most highly specialized of marine invertebrate larvae and its ...

  2. Normality. The Metamorphosis of an Immutable Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Petra Marinescu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present article discusses the realm of “normality” starting from the paradox standing behind the concept: a bench-mark always on the move. As a social concept, “normality” is based on the word “norm” understood as what is socially acceptable or desirable in terms of looks, attitudes or behaviours. Implications: The individual who doesn’t obey the rule is prone to being considered “deviant”. The present paper deals with the problematic brought by this labelling, with the subjective motivational process that leads to the social exclusion of the individuals who don’t behave in the spirit of the accepted norm and also with the methods people make use of in order to cope with their new status. Value: “Normality”, a concept apparently denoting stability, has to adapt to various contexts and this thesis seems puzzling. The first and most important condition is that of the highly subjective human nature that comes in contradiction with stability and perfection – features defining the Latin “norma”, meaning “right” angle. And still individuals themselves are the ones creating and imposing social norms. Approach: In order to try to find an explanation, the paper makes use of the realm of deviance studies and presents the reader with some paradoxical examples as the biblical one where the ejection from Paradise was caused by the crossing of a norm whereas the word “normality” or “normal” cannot be found in the Christian Holy Book. To further picture the dynamics of “normality”, a case study analysing the women’s social status in three different centuries as reflected in painting was included in the article.

  3. The Current Metamorphosis of Instrumental Rationality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hauser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 7 (2014), s. 517-523 ISSN 2159-5321 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : instrumental reason * Lukács * Adorno * Horkheimer * postmodern pluralism * capitalism Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  4. Romania: Childbearing metamorphosis within a changing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Schröder

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1989, the socialist regime in Romania collapsed and the state's coercive pro-natalist policy ended. Since then, fertility has gone through major changes, namely, a massive reduction in fertility and important structural changes: birth postponement, an end to universal childbearing, and the emergence of non-marital births. Family formation has been postponed, but a pattern of early marriage still persists compared to other European countries. Although unmarried cohabitation is rising, it is rarely seen as an alternative to marriage. Modern contraceptive methods are being used increasingly, but traditional contraceptive methods continue to be widespread. Abortion, which was re-legalized in 1989 and made available after two decades of prohibition, has been practiced extensively ever since, especially after first birth. Romanians in 2004 continue to have a universal preference for parenting. However, the preference for the two-child family has declined and the desire for a larger family has become the exception. The transformation of the socialist regime into a democratic society with a market economy generated a socio-economic crisis, and the majority of social benefits have therefore been oriented towards alleviating poverty. Other social policies, including those affecting the family, were redefined. However, fewer funds were made available than for those geared to promote economic development or reduce poverty and, as a consequence, their impact on childbearing has been small.

  5. Chameleon or Phoenix: The Metamorphosis of TAFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Damon

    1998-01-01

    Examines aspects of the history of technical and vocational education (TAFE) in Australia: technical education system in Victoria; dissolution of the binary system in higher education; and new instructional discourses and practices shaping TAFE. Speculates on the potential reemergence of the binary system and future prospects for TAFE. (SK)

  6. Metamorphosis and the Management of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Talk of educational reform and of the importance of "the management of change" in education and elsewhere is still in vogue. However it often seems concerned to persuade us that if we engage fully with change rather than resisting it we will find our lives more meaningful, thus omitting the important matter of the goal of the change in…

  7. Fermion boson metamorphosis in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Y.K.

    1982-01-01

    In two-dimensional field theories many features are especially transparent if the Fermi fields are represented by non-local expressions of the Bose fields. Such a procedure is known as boson representation. Bilinear quantities appear in the Lagrangian of a fermion theory transform, however, as simple local expressions of the bosons so that the resulting theory may be written as a theory of bosons. Conversely, a theory of bosons may be transformed into an equivalent theory of fermions. Together they provide a basis for generating many interesting equivalences between theories of different types. In the present work a consistent scheme for constructing a canonical Fermi field in terms of a real scalar field is developed and such a procedure is valid and consistent with the tenets of quantum field theory is verified. A boson formulation offers a unifying theme in understanding the structure of many theories. This is illustrated by the boson formulation of a multifermion theory with chiral and internal symmetries. The nature of dynamical generation of mass when the theory undergoes boson transmutation and the preservation of continuous chiral symmetry in the massive case are examined. The dynamics of the system depends to a great extent on the specific number of fermions and different models of the same system can have very different properties. Many unusual symmetries of the fermion theory, such as hidden symmetry, duality and triality symmetries, are only manifest in the boson formulation. The underlying connections between some models with U(N) internal symmetry and another class of fermion models built with Majorana fermions which have O(2N) internal symmetry are uncovered

  8. THEME OF METAMORPHOSIS IN THE NOVELS BY ERHAN BENER KEDİ VE ÖLÜM, BÖCEK AND DÖNÜŞLER AND ALIKE POINTS IN THEM ERHAN BENER’İN KEDİ VE ÖLÜM, BÖCEK VE DÖNÜŞLERADLI ROMANLARINDA DÖNÜŞÜM/METAMORFOZ İZLEĞİ VE ORTAK YÖNLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman KOLCU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erhan Bener who is a important writer in Turkish literature, especially in the field of novel writing, gave place to theme of metamorphosis in the novels by him Kedi ve Ölüm, Böcek and Dönüşler.Theme of metamorphosis was used in the topic of fatal death of the protagonist and his relations with his wife in the novel named Kedi ve Ölüm. In the novel named Böcek, it fuctioned as a key for the novel as well as Commissar Recai’s views about life and people. In Dönüşler, a fantastic novel, it constituted directly the main topic of the work. In the article, the novels are examined and discussed by considering the novel by Franz Kafka The Metamorphosis that gives place to theme of metamorphosis as a main topic and a classical work of world literature, and Vladimir Nabokov’s views about it. In the context of the theme, alike points and elements in them are pointed out Türk edebiyatında, özellikle roman sahasında, önemli yazarlardan biri olan Erhan Bener, Kedi ve Ölüm, Böcek ve Dönüşler adlı romanlarında dönüşüm/metamorfoz izleğine ağırlıklı olarak yer verir. Dönüşüm/metamorfoz, Kedi ve Ölüm’de başkahramanın mukadder ölümü ve ikinci karısıyla ilgili olarak gündeme gelmekte, Böcek’te Komiser Recai’nin hayata ve insanlara bakışını ve bu arada romanı anlamada başlıca anahtar işlevi görmekte, fantastik bir roman olan Dönüşler’de ise doğrudan doğruya eserin ana konusunu oluşturmaktadır. Bu makalede söz konusu üç eser, Franz Kafka’nın dünya edebiyatının klasiklerinden biri olan ve dönüşüm/metamorfoz izleğini merkeze yerleştirdiği Dönüşüm adlı eseri ile Vladimir Nabokov’un bu eserle ilgili görüşleri de dikkate alınarak incelenmekte ve değerlendirilmektedir. Söz konusu eserlerde dönüşüm izleği bağlamında yer alan ortak yönler ve unsurlar da ele alınmaktadır.

  9. Organization and metamorphosis of glia in the Drosophila visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tara N; Nuschke, Andrea C; Nern, Aljoscha; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2012-07-01

    The visual system of Drosophila is an excellent model for determining the interactions that direct the differentiation of the nervous system's many unique cell types. Glia are essential not only in the development of the nervous system, but also in the function of those neurons with which they become associated in the adult. Given their role in visual system development and adult function we need to both accurately and reliably identify the different subtypes of glia, and to relate the glial subtypes in the larval brain to those previously described for the adult. We viewed driver expression in subsets of larval eye disc glia through the earliest stages of pupal development to reveal the counterparts of these cells in the adult. Two populations of glia exist in the lamina, the first neuropil of the adult optic lobe: those that arise from precursors in the eye-disc/optic stalk and those that arise from precursors in the brain. In both cases, a single larval source gives rise to at least three different types of adult glia. Furthermore, analysis of glial cell types in the second neuropil, the medulla, has identified at least four types of astrocyte-like (reticular) glia. Our clarification of the lamina's adult glia and identification of their larval origins, particularly the respective eye disc and larval brain contributions, begin to define developmental interactions which establish the different subtypes of glia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. EdF: high tension(s) metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussely, F.; Arnoux, P.; Baritault, A.; Alto, P.; Castets, C.; Secondi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Electricite de France, the French electric utility, has to face a formidable mutation. The deregulation of the power market will lead to a social, commercial, judicial, financial and international 'big-bang'. The company has been weakened by disappointing results and by an embarrassing running into debts. This dossier analyzes the consequences of the deregulation of the French power market on the future evolution of EdF. It includes the analysis made by a French economist, E. Cohen, an interview and a portrait of F. Roussely, head of EdF, a presentation of Easenergy, a start-up of EdF which makes partnerships with US energy-related companies, the worries of EdF's employees and the redistribution of the syndicates power inside the company, the controversy around EdF's 2002 results and the points that remained in the shade, EdF's European competitors and the progressive opening of the French power market, EDF's production tool and its availability (58 nuclear reactors, 538 hydroelectric power plants and 26 thermal power plants), the costly foreign markets strategy of EdF and the under-capitalization of the company. (J.S.)

  11. Migration and Metamorphosis in Marie Ndiaye's Trois Femmes Puissantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B. Gaensbauer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In her 2009 Goncourt-Prize-winning novel, Trois femmes puissantes ( Three Strong Women, Marie Ndiaye experiments with a polyphonic, semi-fantastical rendering of identity-threatening displacements experienced by three women from different socio-geographic backgrounds. In a brief "Counterpoint" at the end of each of the novel's three sections--a narrative take on the musical technique employed by Ndiaye to introduce new focalizations and unexpected turns of events that complicate interpretations of the characters' behavior--each of the women is perceived as metamorphosed into a bird or a birdlike persona. This essay examines the innovative embedding of the shape-shifts in Trois femmes puissantes in both harrowing socio-political realities and the ambiguities of the fantastic and superstition to convey the dehumanizing, unequal power relations governing contemporary women's migration struggles.

  12. KAFKA'S ESCAPE FROM REALITY TO ONEIRICISM IN METAMORPHOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    BOŞNAK, Metin

    2018-01-01

    Kafka's life story is in great part the key to his ouvre. Born in Prague as the son of well-to-do Jewish parents, he was a pupil at the Gymnasium and thereafter was a student at Prague University, first of chemistry and German language and literature, from which he switched over to law. He made friends with a fellow student, Max Brod, who, after Kafka"s early death, published his friend"s work.Kafka was a jew, and once described himself as "the eternal Jew... wandering sen...

  13. KAFKA'S ESCAPE FROM REALITY TO ONEIRICISM IN METAMORPHOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    BOŞNAK, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Kafka's life story is in great part the key to his ouvre. Born in Prague as the son of well-to-do Jewish parents, he was a pupil at the Gymnasium and thereafter was a student at Prague University, first of chemistry and German language and literature, from which he switched over to law. He made friends with a fellow student, Max Brod, who, after Kafka"s early death, published his friend"s work.Kafka was a jew, and once described himself as "the eternal Jew... wandering senselessly through a s...

  14. [HELLP syndrome--metamorphosis of pre-eclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, W; von Rath, W

    1992-10-01

    During an eight year period, 100 patients with the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome were treated at the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of 2 University Hospitals (Technische Universität München and Universität Göttingen). The clinical treatment concepts, which were used in common at the two hospitals, are presented and differ from the common clinical management of pre-eclampsia. The results and therapy concepts are compared and critically reviewed. In recent years, the number of diagnoses and cases of HELLP syndrome has been increasing. Case reports, epidemiological statistics and maternal and perinatal mortality rates indicate a change of the "Gestalt" of preeclampsia due to the HELLP syndrome and its complications.

  15. Hunger of Memory: The Metamorphosis of a Disadvantaged Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Linda

    1982-01-01

    Reviews "Hunger of Memory," a 1981 book by Richard Rodriguez. Contrasts demands by university students that they be taught by minority faculty members with Rodriguez's awareness that cultural differences between instructors and disadvantaged students are an important factor in enabling such students to join the educational elite in…

  16. Metamorphosis and gonad maturation in the horn fly Haematobia irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Alicia L; Forneris, Natalia S; Filiberti, Adrián; Argaraña, Carlos E; Rabossi, Alejandro; Quesada-Allué, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    The bloodsucking horn fly, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most damaging pests of pasture cattle in many areas of the world. Both male and female imagoes spend their adult stage on the host, while immature stages develop in dung. Our goal was to determine if the progress of H. irritans gonad maturation can be correlated with eye and cuticle pigmentation events that occur during development of the imago within the puparium. The progression of germline cell divisions in immature gonads was analyzed from the beginning of the third larval instar (48 hours after egg hatch) until imago ecdysis. In the developing male larval gonad, meiosis began 72 hours after egg hatch, whereas in females oogonia were premeiotic at 72 hours. Meiosis was not detected in females until the mid-pharate adult stage, 120 hours after puparium formation. Therefore, gonad maturation in females appears to be delayed 144 hours with respect to that in males. In the stages within the puparium, the timing of germline cell division events was correlated with the progress of pigmentation of the eyes and cuticle as external markers.

  17. Metamorphosis of the Body in (PostSoviet Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Elina Imposti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nel contributo si fa una rassegna delle modalità di rappresentazione del corpo nella cultura russo-sovietica a partire dalla Rivoluzione d’Ottobre per giungere agli anni successivi alla dissoluzione dell’URSS. Si prendono in esame testi visivi e letterari. Si parte dai manifesti di propaganda e dalle opere di artisti ufficiali come Vera Muchina nei vent’anni successivi alla Rivoluzione per poi passare a quelle degli artisti non conformisti, come Neizvestnyj e Jankilevskij, che dagli anni Sessanta cominciarono ad organizzare mostre alternative ai circuiti ufficiali, raffigurando il corpo umano con modalità antitetiche rispetto ai canoni vigenti. Si procede poi ad un parallelo con la produzione letteraria della scrittrice Ljudmila Petruševskaja, coetanea degli artisti non conformisti, che sviluppa un discorso analogo nei suoi racconti e nelle sue pièces teatrali. Si passa infine ad un’artista contemporanea, Irina Nakhova, che negli ultimi venti-trenta anni ha sviluppato ulteriormente la decostruzione del modello di corporeità dominante in epoca sovietica.

  18. The metamorphosis of a collaborative team: from creation to operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Tracey L; Orchard, Carole; Houghton, Pamela; Ogrin, Rajna

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports on the process of developing a community-based interprofessional team to provide diabetes related foot ulcer care. A new interprofessional team was formed in a local community, and the process of building a successful team was examined by the adoption of an exploratory qualitative case study approach that gathered a series of one-on-one interviews with participants at three points in time - prior to the team's formation, two months into the team's operation, and finally seven months later - shortly before the team and its clinic closed. Interviews were also conducted with a small sample of the team's patients. The factors linked to the successes and challenges of building a care team in a community setting are explored. Informants highlighted the value of regular team meetings, role clarity, and a commitment to patient-centered care. However effective collaboration was not sufficient to maintain the team in the face of poor institutional and government support.

  19. From Policy to Guidelines: Metamorphosis of Lifelong Learning in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sayantan

    2013-01-01

    In this era of globalisation, the present perception of lifelong learning (LLL) in the Indian policy domain has been going through major changes in an attempt to make it nationally realistic yet globally viable. In this process, all facets of the concept of LLL are constantly metamorphosing, and this in many ways outperforms the older perception…

  20. Photo-triggered solvent-free metamorphosis of polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoshi; Toyota, Taro

    2017-09-11

    Liquefaction and solidification of materials are the most fundamental changes observed during thermal phase transitions, yet the design of organic and polymeric soft materials showing isothermal reversible liquid-nonliquid conversion remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that solvent-free repeatable molecular architectural transformation between liquid-star and nonliquid-network polymers that relies on cleavage and reformation of a covalent bond in hexaarylbiimidazole. Liquid four-armed star-shaped poly(n-butyl acrylate) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) with 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole end groups were first synthesized. Subsequent oxidation of the 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoles into 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radicals and their coupling with these liquid star polymers to form hexaarylbiimidazoles afforded the corresponding nonliquid network polymers. The resulting nonliquid network polymers liquefied upon UV irradiation and produced liquid star-shaped polymers with 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radical end groups that reverted to nonliquid network polymers again by recoupling of the generated 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radicals immediately after terminating UV irradiation.The design of organic and polymeric soft materials showing isothermal reversible liquid-nonliquid conversion is challenging. Here, the authors show solvent-free repeatable molecular architectural transformation between liquid-star and non-liquid-network polymers by the cleavage and reformation of covalent bonds in the polymer chain.

  1. Salamander blue-sensitive cones lost during metamorphosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Znoiko, S.; Grip, W.J. de; Crouch, R.K.; Ma, J.X.

    2008-01-01

    The tiger salamander lives in shallow water with bright light in the aquatic phase, and in dim tunnels or caves in the terrestrial phase. In the aquatic phase, there are five types of photoreceptors--two types of rods and three types of cones. Our previous studies showed that the green rods and

  2. [Metamorphosis of the uterus from Hippocrates to Ambroise Pare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasen, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    The treatise Des monstres et prodiges (1579, 1585) by Ambroise Paré includes a vignette depicting a monstrous embryo in the form of a human head surrounded by snakes. This picture belongs to the iconographic tradition relating to the Graeco-Roman mythology of sexuality and procreation. It derives from the belief in the womb's animal nature, illustrated on magic Graeco-Roman and Byzantine gemstones, where the uterus is shown in turn as a cupping vessel, a scarab-beetle, an octopus or the head of Gorgo.

  3. Anthropomorphism, Cosmomorphism, Metamorphosis. Between images and media environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara SIMONIGH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio explora algunos de los fenómenos de la cultura visual que contribuyen a reforzar el paradigma antropocéntrico a través de una mimesis de formas auto-referenciales. Esto se basa principalmente en ciertas tipologías del antropomorfismo y en estructuras específicas del complejo identificación proyección, promovido por medios cinéticos y audiovisuales.

  4. La Metamorfosis de la Escuela. (The Metamorphosis of the School)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illich, Ivan

    1970-01-01

    The author attacks present school systems as hindrances to education, arguing that everyone has a right to an equal part of a nation's educational budget. One solution he proposes is to offer everyone an equal share of public resources by providing both children and adults with one month of intensive education each year, and supplementing this…

  5. Metamorphosis of NPP A1, V1, V2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobak, D.; Moncekova, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this book the history of construction, commissioning and exploitation of NPP A1, NPP V1 and NPP V2 in Jaslovske Bohunice is presented on documentary photos. Vicinity around of these NPPs is presented, too

  6. From trench to governance: A necessary metamorphosis for hamas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper focuses on the hard line position of the Bush Administration towards. Hamas in the wake of its victory at the polls in Palestine and the seeming disagreement amongst members of the Middle East Quartet. Citing and commencing with the George Washington Administration, the paper presents a global overview of ...

  7. Becoming Butterflies: Making Metamorphosis Meaningful for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Rebecca M.; Baggett, Paige V.; Shaw, Edward L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Although butterflies are a common topic of study in many early childhood classrooms, integrating art production broadens the scope of the study and allows children to deepen their knowledge and understanding through creative self-expression. This article presents a set of integrated activities that focus on helping children fully grasp the process…

  8. Unconventional Warfare: A Mission Metamorphosis for the 21st Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    attachments included a 1.5 million-candlepower variable beam illuminator that could light up an area the size of a football field. A definite asset for...hand, it was obvious that the U.S. training had brought changes; the rebels fought more like soldiers and less like hooligans . Within months

  9. Germany's Metamorphosis: Memory and the Holocaust in the Berlin Repulic

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Alison

    2013-01-01

    I want to focus on two recent debates in Germany from the same inaugural period of Germany’s SPD–Green government, which both have as their focus the contestation of memory in relation to the Holocaust. In both debates the Holocaust serves as a negative myth of origin and a primal phantasmatic scene of guilt and shame around which German national identifications are organised. The first is the Walser–Bubis debate and the second the much more protracted but no less fierce debate about the buil...

  10. Germany's Metamorphosis: Memory and the Holocaust in the Berlin Repulic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Lewis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available I want to focus on two recent debates in Germany from the same inaugural period of Germany’s SPD–Green government, which both have as their focus the contestation of memory in relation to the Holocaust. In both debates the Holocaust serves as a negative myth of origin and a primal phantasmatic scene of guilt and shame around which German national identifications are organised. The first is the Walser–Bubis debate and the second the much more protracted but no less fierce debate about the building of a Holocaust memorial in Berlin, which peaked around the same time. Both debates are important in the German context because they come at the end of a long period of Christian Democratic (CDU rule and at the beginning of a new SPD era in German politics. They are significant, moreover, because they appear to send contradictory messages about German self- understanding to the international community.

  11. Da metamorfose da intencionalidade à metamorfose do sentido: uma leitura de Levinas = From the metamorphosis of intentionality to the metamorphosis of sense: a reading of Levinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza, Ricardo Timm de

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ao ler Levinas, a impressão que se tem, muitas vezes, é de que se trata de um pensamento elaborado como que de “fora para dentro”, em que se chega às questões mais técnicas e pontuais não por uma necessidade interna da argumentação, mas por uma necessidade externa de fidelidade ao movimento filosófico-motivacional maior da reflexão como um todo. O objetivo do presente texto consiste em ilustrar alguns aspectos desta dialética que acaba por confluir em uma releitura da própria ideia de sentido; para tanto, examinaremos o ensaio “Humanismo e An-arquia”, procurando evidenciar como, à proposta de metamorfose ética da intencionalidade, ali presente, segue-se uma proposta maior de metamorfose de sentido do próprio filosofar

  12. Optimized axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) husbandry, breeding, metamorphosis, transgenesis and tamoxifen-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Murawala, Prayag; Andreas, Heino; Kappert, Verena; Schuez, Maritta; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Crawford, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2014-03-01

    The axolotl (Mexican salamander, Ambystoma mexicanum) has become a very useful model organism for studying limb and spinal cord regeneration because of its high regenerative capacity. Here we present a protocol for successfully mating and breeding axolotls in the laboratory throughout the year, for metamorphosing axolotls by a single i.p. injection and for axolotl transgenesis using I-SceI meganuclease and the mini Tol2 transposon system. Tol2-mediated transgenesis provides different features and advantages compared with I-SceI-mediated transgenesis, and it can result in more than 30% of animals expressing the transgene throughout their bodies so that they can be directly used for experimentation. By using Tol2-mediated transgenesis, experiments can be performed within weeks (e.g., 5-6 weeks for obtaining 2-3-cm-long larvae) without the need to establish germline transgenic lines (which take 12-18 months). In addition, we describe here tamoxifen-induced Cre-mediated recombination in transgenic axolotls.

  13. Metamorphosis of helical magnetorotational instability in the presence of axial electric current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priede, Jānis

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents numerical linear stability analysis of a cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow of liquid metal carrying axial electric current in a generally helical external magnetic field. Axially symmetric disturbances are considered in the inductionless approximation corresponding to zero magnetic Prandtl number. Axial symmetry allows us to reveal an entirely new electromagnetic instability. First, we show that the electric current passing through the liquid can extend the range of helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI) indefinitely by transforming it into a purely electromagnetic instability. Two different electromagnetic instability mechanisms are identified. The first is an internal pinch-type instability, which is due to the interaction of the electric current with its own magnetic field. Axisymmetric mode of this instability requires a free-space component of the azimuthal magnetic field. When the azimuthal component of the magnetic field is purely rotational and the axial component is nonzero, a new kind of electromagnetic instability emerges. The latter, driven by the interaction of electric current with a weak collinear magnetic field in a quiescent fluid, gives rise to a steady meridional circulation coupled with azimuthal rotation.

  14. Metamorphosis of helical magnetorotational instability in the presence axial electric current

    OpenAIRE

    Priede, Jānis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents numerical linear stability analysis of a cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow of liquid metal carrying axial electric current in a generally helical external magnetic field. Axially symmetric disturbances are considered in the inductionless approximation corresponding to zero magnetic Prandtl number. Axial symmetry allows us to reveal an entirely new electromagnetic instability. First, we show that the electric current passing through the liquid can extend the range of helical ...

  15. The Metamorphosis of Polyphemus's Gaze in Marij Pregelj's Painting (1913-1967

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Mikuž

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1949-1951 Marij Pregelj, one of the most interesting Slovenian modernist painters, illustrated his version of Homer's Iliad and Odsssey. His illustrations were presented in the time of socialist realist aesthetics announce a reintegration of Slovenian art into the global (Western context. Among the illustrations is the figure of Cyclops devouring Odysseus' comrades. The image of the one-eyed giant Polyphemus is one which concerned Pregelj all his life: the painter, whose vocation is most dependent on the gaze, can show one eye in profile. And the profiles of others' faces and of his own face interested Pregelj his whole life through. Not only people but also objects were one-eyed: the rosette of a cathedral, which changes into a human figure, a washing machine door, a meat grinder's orifice, a blind “windeye” or window, and so on. The themes of his final two paintings, which he, already more than a year before his boding senseless death at the age of 54, executed but did not complete, are Polyphemus and the Portrait of His Son Vasko. In the first, blood flows from the pricked-out eye towards a stylized camera, in the second, the gaze of the son, an enthusiastic filmmaker, extends to the camera that will displace the father's brush.

  16. The Metamorphosis of Populism in the Arab World: Gamal Abdel Nasser

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina NEDELCU

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the way populism manifested in the Arab World. The best example of populism is provided by Gamal Abdel Nasser, who exceeded the borders of his country and managed to mobilize a large part of the Middle East. The paper analyses his legitimation mechanisms, which endured his access to masses, thus turning him into the voice of the Arabs for a decade. The emergence and legitimation of Nasser’s political movement was possible due to the interaction of local and global factors...

  17. Exploring the Historical Dimensions of "Bildung" and Its Metamorphosis in the Context of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Irene

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I endeavor to explore the historical dimensions of "Bildung" by first focusing on the German linguist and philosopher Wilhelm von Humboldt and his theory of "Bildung." The article then addresses the transformation of Humboldt's neo-humanistic ideal into a governmentrun institutionalized "Bildung"…

  18. Paradigm shift, metamorphosis of medical ethics, and the rise of bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Telles de Almeida

    Full Text Available Both the increasing incorporation of medical technology and new social demands (including those for health care beginning in the 1960s have brought about significant changes in medical practice. This situation has in turn sparked a growth in the philosophical debate over problems pertaining to ethical practice. These issues no longer find answers in the Hippocratic ethical model. The authors believe that the crisis in Hippocratic ethics could be described as a period of paradigm shift in which a new set of values appears to be emerging. Beginning with the bioethics movement, the authors expound on the different ethical theories applied to medical practice and conclude that principlism is the most appropriate approach for solving the new moral dilemma imposed on clinical practice.

  19. 'I Like the Metamorphosis of the Characters': Dynamics of Transnational Television Comedy Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Lockyer, S; Popa, D

    2016-01-01

    This article contributes to debates on transnational television comedy audiences through analysis of Eastern European audiences’ engagement with British television comedy. Using questionnaire and focus group data it examines the extent and nature of British television comedy engagement by Romanian audiences and the limits of broadcasting British television comedy to Romanian audiences. The research reveals Romanian audiences’ high involvement with television comedy. Over half of questionna...

  20. Trialkyltin rexinoid-X receptor agonists selectively potentiate thyroid hormone induced programs of xenopus laevis metamorphosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengeling, Brenda J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Furlow, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    The trialkyltins tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) can function as rexinoid-X receptor (RXR) agonists. We recently showed that RXR agonists can alter thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in a mammalian pituitary TH-responsive reporter cell line, GH3.TRE-Luc. The prevalence of TBT and TPT in the

  1. Green Dentistry, A Metamorphosis Towards an Eco-Friendly Dentistry: A Short Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Varun; Sharma, Rachna; Yadav, Lalita; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry is most importantly and foremost a healing profession. In today’s world, it is very necessary to understand the importance of being eco-friendly in every facet of our lives, including dental practice which has a huge impact on the environment due to the large amount of metallic waste generated by various dental procedures along with excessive use of water and electricity, which specifically emphasis the thrust to move towards ‘Green dentistry’. Green dentistry is an innovative way o...

  2. Green dentistry, a metamorphosis towards an eco-friendly dentistry: a short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Varun; Sharma, Rachna; Yadav, Lalita; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2014-07-01

    Dentistry is most importantly and foremost a healing profession. In today's world, it is very necessary to understand the importance of being eco-friendly in every facet of our lives, including dental practice which has a huge impact on the environment due to the large amount of metallic waste generated by various dental procedures along with excessive use of water and electricity, which specifically emphasis the thrust to move towards 'Green dentistry'. Green dentistry is an innovative way of dental practice which is environment friendly and at the same time conserves money and time by reducing waste, conserving energy and decreasing pollution with the use of latest techniques and procedures. Green dentistry therefore, protects the environment and mankind from the hazards of rapid urbanisation in developing countries. The authors wish to emphasize the practice of eco-friendly, green dentistry in a developing country like India which needs to conserve resources and curb environmental pollution.

  3. Transgenerational metamorphosis in Shakespeare’s Winter’s tale and the eurozone crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Wooster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale – set in Palermo, and also Bohemia - suggests that where there is close affection and love there also may be more exposure to envy, jealousy, uncontrolled anger,attempts to punish, and guilt. It involves inter-sibling and inter-group dynamics, attributions, misattributions, but also transgenerational metapmorphosis creating new meanings, and how envy and jealousy - if reconciled – may redeem guilt and generate psychic surpluses rather than only deficits. The paper outlines these but also relates such dynamics to the current crisis of the Eurozone and Kleinian splitting and projective identification. It suggests that the crisis is the first time Germany that Germany has been able to split from guilt (Schuld – especially for the Holocaust – and been able to project guilt for debt (also Schuld in German onto the peripheral European countries, and that transgenerational metapmorphosis will depend on recovering the good in credit as the inverse of debt. Key words: Jealousy, Guilt, Debt.

  4. Transgenerational metamorphosis in Shakespeare’s Winter’s tale and the eurozone crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Wooster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale – set in Palermo, and also Bohemia - suggests that where there is close affection and love there also may be more exposure to envy, jealousy, uncontrolled anger,attempts to punish, and guilt. It involves inter-sibling and inter-group dynamics, attributions, misattributions, but also transgenerational metapmorphosis creating new meanings, and how envy and jealousy - if reconciled – may redeem guilt and generate psychic surpluses rather than only deficits. The paper outlines these but also relates such dynamics to the current crisis of the Eurozone and Kleinian splitting and projective identification. It suggests that the crisis is the first time Germany that Germany has been able to split from guilt (Schuld – especially for the Holocaust – and been able to project guilt for debt (also Schuld in German onto the peripheral European countries, and that transgenerational metapmorphosis will depend on recovering the good in credit as the inverse of debt. Keywords: Jealousy; Guilt; Debt 

  5. "A Dance with the Butterflies:" A Metamorphosis of Teaching and Learning through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a web-based collaborative project called "A Dance with the Butterflies" that applied the brain-based research of the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST) and principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to Pre-K-4 science curriculum. Learning experiences were designed for students to invoke the Recognition,…

  6. Exclusion and renewal : identity and Jewishness in Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" and David Vogel's Married Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Francina Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    In this study I explore literary structures of identity-formation in the works of assimilated/acculturated Jewish writers: Kafka’s novella “The Metamorphosis” (“Die Verwandlung”, 1912) and David Vogel’s Hebrew novel Married Life. 1929) These authors wrote their works when the failure of Jewish

  7. Metaphor and metamorphosis : Paul Ricoeur and Gilles Deleuze on the emergence of novelty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation develops a new reading of the works of two French philosophers, Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) and Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995). through a focus on their understanding of the emergence of novelty. Ricoeur’s conception of novelty is understood in terms of a living metaphor. The living

  8. Receptivity of winter flounder larvae to artificial diet from the yolk-sac stage to metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Ben Khemis, I.; Litvak, Matthew Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    diet acceptance and age was found to be a dome-shaped function (incidence of ingested food = −0.0233 day2 + 1.101 day − 4.9428, r2 = 0.85). Here, our analysis suggests that winter flounder should be exposed to artificial diets by 26 days post-hatch at 10 °C, after this time receptivity declines...

  9. Discursive Power and the New Labor Force: The Metamorphosis of a Speech Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the results of a six-month ethnographic case study of a French immigrant of Senegalese descent and how he recreates the culture of an American company's speech community. Data were collected through interviews, field notes, and shadowing the participant at his place of employment. The transcribed interviews and field notes…

  10. Ovid’s Aeginetan plague and the metamorphosis of the Georgics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, M.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the ancient literary tradition upon the Georgics is as broad as it is profound , but in Virgil’s highly allusive didactic poem, the description of the Noric cattle plague at the end of Georgics 3 holds a unique position. As R.F. THOMAS comments, "nowhere else does Virgil draw so

  11. Quantum top secret. The solution of the quantum puzzle. Metamorphosis of a picture of world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingert, M.

    2008-01-01

    Many physicists believe that because of unexplained causes, which must anyway be concerned with the quantum puzzle and the mysterious consciousness, it would be no more possible to understand the real structure of the reality - this subtle smiling of the nature, which irritates the physicists since 100 years and the disturbed the theoretical physics so much that they threw the towel. Since nature is considered as absurd, strange, and crazy - and quantum theory as very complicated. But in reality the basic experiments are of a touching simplicity, which seems only completely unintelligible in the picture of world of mechanics. For these experiments show that the concept of body of mechanics and the body conceptions of the thinking cannot at all match the structure of nature. If this is objectively taken notice of without doubting on the existence of a reality, the experiments show the real, unveiled face of the nature. Light and matter must then consist of fields, which can themselves divide by non-mechanical way, so with wholeness, comparable only with cell division and branching processes in biology. Either it is completely crazy - or the only logic interpretation, which hitherto only no physicist risked to think. For these experiments disprove the atom and elementary-particle hypothesis, the picture of world of mechanics, and also the quantum-mechanical interpretation - and indeed uniquely. This knowledge could break the Gordian knot, solve the quantum puzzle, and also give away the secret of the thinking spirit

  12. Significance of biofilm proteins in modulating cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; KrishnaKumar, S.

    and cleaned using nylon brush to remove all the epiphytes. Equal weight/volume of deionized, RO pure water was used to crush the adults using a pestle and mortar. Subsequently, the mixture was centrifuged at 12 000 x g for 5 min. The supernatant... Marine Biology and Ecology, 313, 191-209. Desai D.V., Anil A.C. (2004) The impact of food type, temperature and starvation on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica). Journal of Experimental Marine Biology...

  13. Influence of diatom exopolymers and biofilms on metamorphosis in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    1993). In these studies, the inductive effect of biofilms on larval settle- ment is attributed to bacteria and their components in biofilms. In addition, many invertebrates show a gre- garious response towards adult and juvenile con- specifics (e... bacterial cells. Thereafter, the diatom cells were incu- bated overnight in nutrient-enriched media (f/2) con- taining 1 mg ml –1 lysozyme to remove Gram-negative bacteria (Kim et al. 1999). The cultures were again re- peatedly sterilely washed...

  14. “Draw yourself out of it”: : Miriam Katin’s Graphic Metamorphosis of Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, D.M.

    2018-01-01

    Miriam Katin's two graphic memoirs We Are on Our Own [(2006). Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly] and Letting It Go [(2013). Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly] both reflect on how the trauma of the Holocaust can be transformed through and in art. In the former Katin details how she and her mother narrowly escape

  15. “Draw yourself out of it” : Miriam Katin’s graphic metamorphosis of trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Miriam Katin's two graphic memoirs We Are on Our Own [(2006). Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly] and Letting It Go [(2013). Montreal: Drawn & Quarterly] both reflect on how the trauma of the Holocaust can be transformed through and in art. In the former Katin details how she and her mother narrowly escape

  16. Driving-induced metamorphosis of transport in arrays of coupled resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2018-02-01

    We propose a driving scheme, wherein different parts of a system are driven with different, generally incommensurate, frequencies. Such driving provides a flexible handle to control various properties of the system and to obtain new types of effective (static) Hamiltonians with arbitrary static on-site potential, be it deterministic or random. This allows us to obtain reconfigurable changes in transport, from ballistic to localized (including sub- and superdiffusion), depending on the driving protocol. The versatile reconfigurability extends also to scattering from (locally) driven extended targets. We demonstrate our scheme using an analytically solvable example of a one-dimensional tight-binding chain with appropriately driven couplings between nearby sites.

  17. Environmental and facility conditions promote singular gravity responses of transcriptome during Drosophila metamorphosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Genome-wide transcriptional profiling showed that reducing gravity levels in the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in Drosophila gene...

  18. Masks and metamorphosis of female creativity - Doll by Milena Pavlović Barili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Petrija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the painting Doll by Milena Pavlović Barili in the context of anthropology, fine arts and feminist studies. Phantasmic figures in the painting are discussed as symbols of transformation, gender and sexual identity tittuping, and their scenic “masking” as a platform for finding comprehensive creative personality, ironizing biological “specialization of females”. The name Doll suggests pondering about gender roles, because a doll is a must toy for girls, thus preparing them for motherhood and housework; in addition, it also carries a status of (beautiful an object manipulated in men's world. Attaching a male head onto the ”Doll’s” body can be seen as a form of revolt and struggle to overcome inferior position. On one hand, the male head, with its size and audacity pushes into the background body /object doll-girl, while on the other hand, the head as a symbol of "men’s intelligence" provides subjectivity to the "doll" and the desired superiority in the world of male dominance. The Doll, with the characteristics of male power, simultaneously conceals and highlights the vulnerability and social marginalization of femininity. At the same time, in the desire for self-realization, the doll can fall into the trap of imitating men-- the struggle to gain power, but also could mean a recognition of one’s own/ female inadequacy and inferior position. However, the male’s naked body, deprived of the face and hands - and hence subjectivity and activity -is turned into a (beautiful object and pushed into the background, emphasizing the ambiguity of the relationship of "male" and "female" position and hence opening up the possibility of various interpretations of the painting within the theory of gender, sexuality and creativity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47016: Interdisciplinarno istraživanje kulturnog i jezičkog nasleđa Srbije. Izrada multimedijalnog internet-portala Pojmovnik srpske kulture

  19. Activities of natural methyl farnesoids on pupariation and metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl farnesoate (MF) and juvenile hormone (JH III), which respectively bind to the receptors USP and MET, and bisepoxy JH III (bisJHIII) were assessed for several activities during Drosophila larval development, and during prepupal development to eclosed adults. Dietary MF and JH III were similar...

  20. Russian comparative embryology takes form: a conceptual metamorphosis toward "evo-devo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    This essay recapitulates major paths followed by the Russian tradition of what we refer to today as evolutionary developmental biology ("evo-devo"). The article addresses several questions regarding the conceptual history of evolutionary embryological thought in its particularly Russian perspective: (1) the assertion by the St. Petersburg academician Wolff regarding the possible connections between environmental modifications during morphogenesis and the "transformation" of species, (2) the discovery of shared "principles" underlying animal development by von Baer, (3) the experimental expression of Baer's principles by Kowalevsky and Mechnikoff, (4) Severtsov's theory of phylembryogenesis, (5) Filatov's approach to the study of evolution using comparative "developmental mechanics", and (6) Shmalgausen's concept of "stabilizing" selection as an attempt to elucidate the evolution of developmental mechanisms. The focus on comparative evolutionary embryology, which was established by Kowalevsky and Mechnikoff, still continues to be popular in present-day "evo-devo" research in Russia. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. PATIENT-CITIZEN-CONSUMERS: JUDICIALIZATION OF HEALTH AND METAMORPHOSIS OF BIOPOLITICS

    OpenAIRE

    Biehl,João

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Situated at the meeting points of Law and Medicine, the "judicialization of the right to health" is a contested and hotly debated phenomenon in Brazil. While government officials and some scholars argue that it is driven by urban elites and private interests, and used primarily to access high-cost drugs, empirical evidence refute narratives depicting judicialization as a harbinger of inequity and an antagonist of the public health system. This article's quantitative and ethnographic ...

  2. Larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus albicostatus (Cirripedia: Thoracica); implications of temperature, food concentration and energetics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Shirayama, Y.

    The influence of food concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 x 105 cells ml sup(-1)) and temperatures (20 and 30 degrees C) on the survival, development, organic carbon and nitrogen content of Balanus albicostatus larvae was evaluated The effect of food...

  3. Intra-cavity metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam to flat-top distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available .co.za Laser Resonators, Microresonators, and Beam Control XVI, edited by Alexis V. Kudryashov, Alan H. Paxton, Vladimir S. Ilchenko, Lutz Aschke, Kunihiko Washio, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8960, 89601H · © 2014 SPIE · CCC code: 0277-786X/14/$18 · doi: 10.... and Paré C., “Super-Gaussian output from a CO2 laser by using a graded-phase mirror resonator,” Opt. Lett. 17(10), 739 – 741 (1992). [5] Paré C., and Bélanger P. A., “Custom laser resonators using graded-phase mirrors,” IEEE J. of Quantum Elec. 28...

  4. Ovid’s Aeginetan plague and the metamorphosis of the Georgics

    OpenAIRE

    Heerink, M.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the ancient literary tradition upon the Georgics is as broad as it is profound , but in Virgil’s highly allusive didactic poem, the description of the Noric cattle plague at the end of Georgics 3 holds a unique position. As R.F. THOMAS comments, "nowhere else does Virgil draw so deeply from a single source" . This source is Lucretius’ account of the human plague of Athens in the sixth book of his De Rerum Natura, which in its turn draws heavily on Thucydides’ account of the s...

  5. From Peripheral to Central, the Story of Melanie's Metamorphosis in an Urban Middle School Science Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edna; Barton, Angela Calabrese

    2008-01-01

    Identity formation is a critical dimension of how and why students engage in science to varying degrees. In this paper, we use the lens of identity formation, and in particular identities in practice, to make sense of how and why Melanie, over the course of sixth grade, transformed from a marginalized member of the science class with a failing…

  6. Studies on some cues regulating metamorphosis of the larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.

    type at different concentrations (Table 2.1). Factor df SS MS Fs A (sugar type) 2 0.83 0.41 B (larval batch) 2 0.08 0.04 C (Conc.) 3 2.8 0.93 A*B 4 0.04 0.01 1.75ns A*C 6 0...-coated surfaces Non-coated surfaces df SS MS Fs SS MS Fs A (Sugar type) 2 5.2 2.6 1.2 0.6 B (Cyprid age) 1 2.2 2.2 4.2 4.2 C (Conc.) 3 0.4 0.13 1 0.3 A*B 2 0.9 0.5 4.85* 0.9 0.4 6.03** A*C 6 2.8 0.5 4.89* 2.7 0.4 6...

  7. Ontogenetic changes in the bacterial symbiont community of the tropical demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: metamorphosis is a new beginning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Fieth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts, which is known in many species of sponge (Porifera, is expected to promote strong fidelity between the partners. Combining 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and electron microscopy, we have assayed the relative abundance of vertically-inherited bacterial symbionts in several stages of the life cycle of Amphimedon queenslandica, a tropical coral reef sponge. We reveal that adult A. queenslandica house a low diversity microbiome dominated by just three proteobacterial OTUs, with a single gammaprotebacterium clearly dominant through much of the life cycle. This ontogenetic perspective has revealed that, although vertical transmission occurs very early in development, the inherited symbionts do not maintain proportional dominance of the bacterial community at every developmental stage. A reproductive bottleneck in the A. queenslandica life cycle is larval settlement, when a free-swimming pelagic larva settles out of the water column onto the benthos and completes metamorphoses into the sessile body plan within just 3 to 4 days. During this dramatic life cycle transition, an influx of environmentally-derived bacteria leads to a major reorganization of the microbiome, potentially challenging the fidelity and persistence of the vertically-inherited symbiotic relationships. However, dominance of the primary, vertically-inherited symbionts is restored in adult sponges. The mechanisms underlying ontogenetic changes in the bacterial community are unknown, including how the dominance of the primary symbionts is restored in the adult sponge – does the host or symbiont regulate this process? Using high-resolution transcriptional profiling in multiple stages of the A. queenslandica life cycle combined with this natural perturbation of the microbiome immediately following larval settlement, we are beginning to identify candidate host genes associated with animal-bacterial crosstalk. Among the sponge host genes upregulated during the times of active microbiome assembly, there is an enrichment of genes potentially involved in innate immunity, including scavenger receptors, and of genes containing eukaryote-like domains, which have elsewhere been implicated in host-symbiont interactions. Intriguingly, we also see an enrichment of sponge genes arising from ancient horizontal transfer events from bacteria, which raises the possibility that host-bacterial associations in the evolutionary past may help to regulate host-bacterial associations in the ecological present.

  8. Ontogenetic Changes in the Bacterial Symbiont Community of the Tropical Demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica: Metamorphosis Is a New Beginning

    OpenAIRE

    Fieth, Rebecca A.; Gauthier, Marie-Emilie A.; Bayes, Joanne; Green, Kathryn M.; Degnan, Sandie M.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transmission of bacterial symbionts, which is known in many species of sponge (Porifera), is expected to promote strong fidelity between the partners. Combining 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and electron microscopy, we have assayed the relative abundance of vertically-inherited bacterial symbionts in several stages of the life cycle of Amphimedon queenslandica, a tropical coral reef sponge. We reveal that adult A. queenslandica house a low diversity microbiome dominated by just t...

  9. Retention of Escherichia coli by house fly and stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) during pupal metamorphosis and eclosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, K; Lysyk, T J; Selinger, L B

    2005-05-01

    Populations of Escherichia coli obtained by feeding larval house flies, Musca domestica L. and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), persisted through the pupal stage. The abundance of E. coli in house fly pupae increased initially then declined before adult emergence. Abundance of E. coli in stable fly pupae increased through pupal development and remained high. Infected stable fly pupal cases typically contained more E. coli than house fly pupal cases. A greater proportion of emerging adult house flies were infected with E. coli compared with stable flies; however, the abundance of E. coli on infected flies was similar between species. Adult flies contained 0.04-0.19% of the E. coli in the pupal cases. The proportion of infected house fly adults and the amount of E. coli on the infected flies were related to the levels of E. coli in the pupal cases; however, these relationships did not occur with the stable fly. Results suggest that retention of E. coli from larval to adult house flies could play a role in the transmission and spread of E. coli, whereas stable fly adults probably play a minor role in E. coli spread. However, pupae of both species have potential to act as reservoirs for E. coli.

  10. Interaction between Drosophila bZIP proteins Atf3 and Jun prevents replacement of epithelial cells during metamorphosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekyrová, Petra; Bohmann, D.; Jindra, Marek; Uhlířová, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 1 (2010), s. 141-150 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : epithelial cell replacement * cell adhesion * epidermis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 6.898, year: 2010

  11. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-01-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmissi...

  12. Cypris metamorphosis, injection and earliest internal development of theRrizocephalan Loxothylacus panopaei (Gissler). Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, H

    2001-01-01

    Rhizocephala is a group of crustaceans that exclusively parasitizes other crustaceans. It is taxonomically placed within the class Cirripedia, the barnacles, with which it shares a unique larval type, the cyprid. The main objective of the cyprid is to find and irreversibly attach to a suitable su...

  13. Induced metamorphosis in crustacean y-larvae: towards a solution to a 100-year-old riddle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Høeg, Jens T; Grygier, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The y-larva, a crustacean larval type first identified more than 100 years ago, has been found in marine plankton samples collected in the arctic, temperate and tropical regions of all oceans. The great species diversity found among y-larvae (we have identified more than 40 species......-larvae into a novel, highly reduced juvenile stage by applying the crustacean molting hormone 20-HE. The new stage is slug-like, unsegmented and lacks both limbs and almost all other traits normally characterizing arthropods, but it is capable of vigorous peristaltic motions. CONCLUSION: From our observations on live...

  14. Metamorphosis and the aesthetics of loss: II. Lady of the woods--the transformative lens of Francesca Woodman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutter, Adele

    2011-12-01

    As interpreted by the celebrated American photographer, Francesca Woodman, the myth of Apollo and Daphne forms an allegorical locus for the transitions and tensions of adolescence and young adulthood. Woodman's employment of this myth and related themes is also expressive of a preoccupying topos of regressive longings. Seamlessly extending Ovid's transformation of the metamorphic myths into poetic epic, her work delves deeply into their driving purpose: to make sense of change, of loss, and of life itself. Over the millennia, classical myth is infused and enriched with personal meaning by the reanimating, clarifying and transformative lens of art. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  15. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  16. K/Ar hornblende ages from the higher Himalaya: implications for India-Asia collision and Himalayan metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorkhabi, R.B.; Stump, A.K.; Jain, A.K.; Manickavasagam, R.M.; Nishimura Susumu

    1993-01-01

    Two amphibolite samples from the Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC) belt from the Suru Valley, Zanskar, have yielded Eocene K/Ar hornblende cooling ages between 40 and 45 Ma, thus indicating much older peak metamorphic conditions in northern parts of the Indian Plate. These ages are in conformity with almost identical ages from metamorphic complexes across the Nanga Parbat syntaxis in Pakistan and reveal a 65 to 70-Ma collision phase of the Indian indentor in the NW-Himalaya. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs

  17. The metamorphosis of supernova SN 2008D/XRF 080109: a link between supernovae and GRBs/hypernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzali, Paolo A; Valenti, Stefano; Della Valle, Massimo; Chincarini, Guido; Sauer, Daniel N; Benetti, Stefano; Pian, Elena; Piran, Tsvi; D'Elia, Valerio; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Margutti, Raffaella; Pasotti, Francesco; Antonelli, L Angelo; Bufano, Filomena; Campana, Sergio; Cappellaro, Enrico; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fiore, Fabrizio; Fugazza, Dino; Gilmozzi, Roberto; Hunter, Deborah; Maguire, Kate; Maiorano, Elisabetta; Marziani, Paola; Masetti, Nicola; Mirabel, Felix; Navasardyan, Hripsime; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Palazzi, Eliana; Pastorello, Andrea; Panagia, Nino; Pellizza, L J; Sari, Re'em; Smartt, Stephen; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanaka, Masaomi; Taubenberger, Stefan; Tominaga, Nozomu; Trundle, Carrie; Turatto, Massimo

    2008-08-29

    The only supernovae (SNe) to show gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or early x-ray emission thus far are overenergetic, broad-lined type Ic SNe (hypernovae, HNe). Recently, SN 2008D has shown several unusual features: (i) weak x-ray flash (XRF), (ii) an early, narrow optical peak, (iii) disappearance of the broad lines typical of SN Ic HNe, and (iv) development of helium lines as in SNe Ib. Detailed analysis shows that SN 2008D was not a normal supernova: Its explosion energy (E approximately 6x10(51) erg) and ejected mass [ approximately 7 times the mass of the Sun (M(middle dot in circle))] are intermediate between normal SNe Ibc and HNe. We conclude that SN 2008D was originally a approximately 30 M(middle dot in circle) star. When it collapsed, a black hole formed and a weak, mildly relativistic jet was produced, which caused the XRF. SN 2008D is probably among the weakest explosions that produce relativistic jets. Inner engine activity appears to be present whenever massive stars collapse to black holes.

  18. Effects of larval crowding on development time, survival and weight at metamorphosis in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo MACIÁ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los efectos del hacinamiento larval sobre el tiempo de desarrollo, la supervivencia y el peso en la metamorfosis fueron estudiados en el mosquito del dengue, Aedes aegypti L., en el laboratorio. Se criaron cohortes de larvas en 7 densidades (4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 y 256 larvas/ recipiente de 175 ml mientras se mantuvo constante el volumen de agua y la calidad y cantidad de alimento, bajo fotoperíodo y temperatura controlados. Se usaron detritos naturales, principalmente hojas, obtenidos de contenedores colonizados naturalmente por A. aegypti como fuente de nutrientes para las larvas. En cada densidad se registraron el tiempo de desarrollo, la mortalidad, el peso en la metamorfosis y la biomasa total. El tiempo de desarrollo varió entre 4 y 23 días en los machos, y 5 a 24 días en hembras; fue más prolongado a la densidad de 64 (en las hembras y 128 (en los machos larvas por recipiente. En densidades altas la proporción de sexos favoreció los machos. Hubo un incremento en la mortalidad en densidades iguales o mayores que 0,4 larvas/ ml (0,32 larvas/cm2. Se detectó una relación inversa entre la densidad larval y el peso de las pupas. La biomasa por individuo alcanzó un valor asintótico de aproximadamente 1 mg/individuo en una densidad de 128 individuos/ recipiente (0,64 larvas/cm2. Las poblaciones de A. aegypti, cercanas a su extremo sur de distribución, serían sensibles al hacinamiento en pequeños contenedores de agua.

  19. Impact of Irgarol 1051 on the larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus amphitirite Darwin, diatom, Amphora coffeaformis and natural biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    cells mm -2 respectively. DISCUSSION Irgarol 1051 is a widely used antifouling additive; however, its increased occurrence in the marine environment is of concern. Irgarol 1051 is prevalent in tropical marine ecosystems and is a potent inhibitor... 1051 Material Safety Data Sheet 638/9501. Ciba Geigy Limited, Additives Division, Basle, Switzerland. Cole JJ. 1982. Interactions between bacteria and algae in aquatic ecosystems. Ann Rev Ecol Sys. 13:291-314. CSC. 2001. Summary of Ecological...

  20. Molecular evidence for increased regulatory conservation during metamorphosis, and against deleterious cascading effects of hybrid breakdown in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artieri Carlo G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Speculation regarding the importance of changes in gene regulation in determining major phylogenetic patterns continues to accrue, despite a lack of broad-scale comparative studies examining how patterns of gene expression vary during development. Comparative transcriptional profiling of adult interspecific hybrids and their parental species has uncovered widespread divergence of the mechanisms controlling gene regulation, revealing incompatibilities that are masked in comparisons between the pure species. However, this has prompted the suggestion that misexpression in adult hybrids results from the downstream cascading effects of a subset of genes improperly regulated in early development. Results We sought to determine how gene expression diverges over development, as well as test the cascade hypothesis, by profiling expression in males of Drosophila melanogaster, D. sechellia, and D. simulans, as well as the D. simulans (♀ × D. sechellia (♂ male F1 hybrids, at four different developmental time points (3rd instar larval, early pupal, late pupal, and newly-emerged adult. Contrary to the cascade model of misexpression, we find that there is considerable stage-specific autonomy of regulatory breakdown in hybrids, with the larval and adult stages showing significantly more hybrid misexpression as compared to the pupal stage. However, comparisons between pure species indicate that genes expressed during earlier stages of development tend to be more conserved in terms of their level of expression than those expressed during later stages, suggesting that while Von Baer's famous law applies at both the level of nucleotide sequence and expression, it may not apply necessarily to the underlying overall regulatory network, which appears to diverge over the course of ontogeny and which can only be ascertained by combining divergent genomes in species hybrids. Conclusion Our results suggest that complex integration of regulatory circuits during morphogenesis may lead to it being more refractory to divergence of underlying gene regulatory mechanisms - more than that suggested by the conservation of gene expression levels between species during earlier stages. This provides support for a 'developmental hourglass' model of divergence of gene expression in Drosophila resulting in a highly conserved pupal stage.

  1. Influence of bacterial exopolymers and the adult extract of Balanus amphitrite and Cthamalus sp. on cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Mitbavkar, S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Settlement of barnacle, a major fouling organism is believed to be controlled to a great extent by substratum characteristics such as, presence of conspecific adults or "gregariousness" inducing factors. Exopolymers secreted by bacteria can also...

  2. Use of Sindbis virus-mediated RNA interference to demonstrate a conserved role of Broad-Complex in insect metamorphosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, Miroslava; Foy, B. D.; Beaty, B. J.; Olson, K. E.; Riddiford, L. M.; Jindra, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 26 (2003), s. 15607-15612 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Green fluorescent protein-steroid-hormone ecdysone Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.272, year: 2003

  3. Larval development and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia; Thoracica): Significance of food concentration, temperature and nucleic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.

    The influence of food concentration (Chaetoceros calcitrans at 1 x 10 sup(5) and 2 x 10 sup(5) cells ml sup(-1)) and temperature (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C) on the nucleic acid content of the nauplii and the cyprids of Balanus amphitrite...

  4. Defining American Heroes: Analyzing the Metamorphosis of the War Hero in Twentieth Century War Films Using Joseph Campbell's, "Hero's Journey."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Luci A.

    In "The Hero's Journey" Joseph Campbell identifies the patterns that inform the myths of the "hero" throughout recorded history. By using Campbell's template, this paper examines how the American war hero is portrayed and has been portrayed in film. The paper states that Americans not only define their war heroes in films but…

  5. Architecture as spatial–textile storytelling: Metamorphosis of frieze as a narrative medium mediating the Panathenaia festival

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Fangqing

    2017-01-01

    Classical temples constructed by an entire class are considered as a democratic artifact that symbolizes social and communal beliefs and embodies religious significance. In contrast with these meanings that existing scholars have addressed, this paper investigates the extent to which architecture, as both shelter and artwork, serve as a medium of spatial–textile storytelling, providing a rich sensory context that represents and mediates culture. This study is drawn from a case study of the...

  6. Architecture as spatial–textile storytelling: Metamorphosis of frieze as a narrative medium mediating the Panathenaia festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Lu

    2016-12-01

    The paper concludes that the significance of the religious Panathenaia festival is not merely depicted by the peplos identified on the central east Ionic frieze, but is also expressed in the entire representational scheme of the Ionic frieze, along with the overall spatial configuration of the Parthenon. Architecture, instantiated by the Parthenon, is regarded as spatial–textile storytelling to communicate meanings.

  7. Metamorphosis-Hybrid, Perception of Time-Space: an attempt to understand the essence of art, the human act of redefining in the face of art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Alexandre Capellato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a dialogue on what art is, through a semiotic perspective (Peirce, researching artists such as Jan Svankmajer, Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dali, and others, to find possible arguments that lead to a new perception of art, its technical and symbolic functionality, as well as the process of continuity where the work of art is placed in its function as a sign. In order to carry out this analysis, we consider the creative process up to its condition before the spectator, considering every constructive and perceptive signs that put 'something' in the condition to match the definition of art.

  8. Nanoparticle Metamorphosis: An in Situ High-Temperature Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Structural Evolution of Heterogeneous Au:Fe 2 O 3 Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2014-05-27

    High-temperature in situ electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction have revealed that Au and Fe2O3 particles fuse in a fluid fashion at temperatures far below their size-reduced melting points. With increasing temperature, the fused particles undergo a sequence of complex structural transformations from surface alloy to phase segregated and ultimately core-shell structures. The combination of in situ electron microscopy and spectroscopy provides insights into fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic aspects governing the formation of heterogeneous nanostructures. The observed structural transformations present an interesting analogy to thin film growth on the curved surface of a nanoparticle. Using single-particle observations, we constructed a phase diagram illustrating the complex relationships among composition, morphology, temperature, and particle size. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  9. Rapid MRI using a modified Dixon technique: a non-invasive and effective method for detection and monitoring of fatty metamorphosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbein, M.H.; Stevens, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are frequently associated with obesity. Weight loss is the mainstay of therapy for these conditions. In this case report, we used a modification of the Dixon method to demonstrate normalization of hepatic fat content in an obese individual with fatty liver following weight reduction. This technique involves fast gradient echo instead of spin echo, which has been utilized previously, as the former provides an accurate and more rapid means of assessing hepatic fat content. This technique is recommended for the assessment of hepatic steatosis in at-risk subjects. (orig.)

  10. Rapid MRI using a modified Dixon technique: a non-invasive and effective method for detection and monitoring of fatty metamorphosis of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, M.H. [Pediatric Gastroenterology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL (United States); Stevens, W.R. [St. John' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Springfield, IL (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are frequently associated with obesity. Weight loss is the mainstay of therapy for these conditions. In this case report, we used a modification of the Dixon method to demonstrate normalization of hepatic fat content in an obese individual with fatty liver following weight reduction. This technique involves fast gradient echo instead of spin echo, which has been utilized previously, as the former provides an accurate and more rapid means of assessing hepatic fat content. This technique is recommended for the assessment of hepatic steatosis in at-risk subjects. (orig.)

  11. Extra-intestinal localization of Goussia sp (Apicomplexa) oocysts in Rana dalmatina (Anura: Ranidae), and the fate of infection after metamorphosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, M.; Modrý, David

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 3 (2006), s. 237-241 ISSN 0177-5103 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/1544; GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Goussia * Rana * Coccidia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.509, year: 2006

  12. “A BIZARRE DOMESTIC METAMORPHOSIS1”: GENDER ROLES, POWER RELATIONS AND THREATENED HOMES IN SHIRLEY JACKSON’S LIKE MOTHER USED TO MAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas Cohen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available American writer Shirley Jackson (1916-1965 inserted cryptic thematic-elements in herstories, thus creating a mythology inherent to her literary cosmos. The present concern is to analyzehow these inconspicuous elements contribute to a better understanding of the short story Like MotherUsed to Make (featured in the 1948 collection The Lottery and Other Stories. The intention is todecode some of these recondite elements and discuss their contribution to the interpretation of thistale. To aid in the analysis, an informal methodological approach was devised taking intoconsideration two hypothetical readers, namely a “novice Jackson reader” and an “experiencedJackson reader”. This system intends to service as an example of how pervasive these cryptic elementscan be. In the study of Like Mother Used to Make, special attention was devoted to the (frustratedexpectations regarding gender roles and power relations between the three main characters: the meekDavid Turner, his loud neighbor Marcia (for whom he is romantically attracted to and an ill-timedvisitor (who will offer unexpected danger, considering that David’s home will be threatened by thepresence of this mysterious third party, a figure who inhabits the depths of Shirley Jackson’s Lore, themalignant demon James Harris

  13. Acetylations of Ftz-F1 and histone H4K5 are required for the fine-tuning of ecdysone biosynthesis during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsos, Barbara N; Pankotai, Tibor; Kovács, Dávid; Popescu, Christina; Páhi, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M

    2015-08-01

    The molting during Drosophila development is tightly regulated by the ecdysone hormone. Several steps of the ecdysone biosynthesis have been already identified but the regulation of the entire process has not been clarified yet. We have previously reported that dATAC histone acetyltransferase complex is necessary for the steroid hormone biosynthesis process. To reveal possible mechanisms controlled by dATAC we made assumptions that either dATAC may influence directly the transcription of Halloween genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis or it may exert an indirect effect on it by acetylating the Ftz-F1 transcription factor which regulates the transcription of steroid converting genes. Here we show that the lack of dATAC complex results in increased mRNA level and decreased protein level of Ftz-F1. In this context, decreased mRNA and increased protein levels of Ftz-F1 were detected upon treatment of Drosophila S2 cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. We showed that Ftz-F1, the transcriptional activator of Halloween genes, is acetylated in S2 cells. In addition, we found that ecdysone biosynthetic Halloween genes are transcribed in S2 cells and their expression can be influenced by deacetylase inhibitors. Furthermore, we could detect H4K5 acetylation at the regulatory regions of disembodied and shade Halloween genes, while H3K9 acetylation is absent on these genes. Based on our findings we conclude that the dATAC HAT complex might play a dual regulatory role in Drosophila steroid hormone biosynthesis through the acetylation of Ftz-F1 protein and the regulation of the H4K5 acetylation at the promoters of Halloween genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metamorphosis in the Porosity of Recycled Concretes Through the Use of a Recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET Additive. Correlations between the Porous Network and Concrete Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Mendivil-Escalante

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of construction, sustainable building materials are currently undergoing a process of technological development. This study aims to contribute to understanding the behavior of the fundamental properties of concretes prepared with recycled coarse aggregates that incorporate a polyethylene terephthalate (PET-based additive in their matrix (produced by synthesis and glycolysis of recycled PET bottles in an attempt to reduce their high porosity. Techniques to measure the gas adsorption, water porosity, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to evaluate the effect of the additive on the physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of these concretes. Porosity reductions of up to 30.60% are achieved with the addition of 1%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 7% and 9% of the additive, defining a new state in the behavioral model of the additive (the overdosage point in the concrete matrix; in addition, the porous network of these concretes and their correlation with other physical and mechanical properties are also explained.

  15. Effects of water temperature on breeding phenology, growth, and metamorphosis of foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii): a case study of the regulated mainstem and unregulated tributaries of California's Trinity River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara Wheeler; James Bettaso; Donald Ashton; Hartwell Welsh

    2014-01-01

    Many riverine organisms are well adapted to seasonally dynamic environments, but extreme changes in flow and thermal regimes can threaten sustainability of their populations in regulated rivers. Altered thermal regimes may limit recruitment to populations by shifting the timing of breeding activities and affecting the growth and development of early life stages. Stream...

  16. Effects of water temperature on breeding phenology, growth and timing of metamorphosis of foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) on the mainstem and selected tributaries of California's Trinity River - 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara Wheeler; James Bettaso; Donald Ashton; Hartwell Welsh

    2013-01-01

    The cold temperatures maintained in the Trinity River are beneficial to fish but may be problematic for foothill yellow-legged frogs. We examined the timing of breeding, reproductive output, and growth and development of tadpoles for populations of foothill yellow-legged frogs on the mainstem and six tributaries of the Trinity River. On the colder mainstem, onset of...

  17. Juditos ir Salomėjos mitologinių įvaizdžių metamorfozė: nuo antitezės iki sintezės = The metamorphosis of Judith's and Salome's mythological images: from antithesis to synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jekentaitė-Kuzmickienė, Leonarda

    2006-01-01

    The famous representative of the Vienna Secession, Gustav Klimt, painted two pictures that show a beautiful woman holding a man’s head in her hand. The paintings are called Judith I and Judith II, but sometimes one of them is called ‘Salome’. This article uses Biblical mythology as the basis of an analysis of the paradoxical coalescing of these two different characters. Judith – a Jewish heroine – has seduced and killed Holofern to save her nation from inevitable destruction. In the Old Testa...

  18. Metamorfosis de la política educativa en Europa: de los Programas Sectoriales al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior / Metamorphosis of the educational policy in Europe: from Sectorial Programs to the European Higher Education Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Arriazu Muñoz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La educación constituye un ámbito esencial en el diseño estratégico de las decisiones económicas, políticas, sociales y culturales de la Unión Europea. Desde la aprobación del Tratado de París en 1951 hasta día de hoy, la política educativa europea ha promovido y afianzado un cúmulo de programas extensibles a distintos niveles y contextos geográficos. Uno de los más relevantes en la actualidad tiene que ver con la adaptación/armonización de las estructuras universitarias en un marco común denominado Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES. Tras casi seis décadas de progresos y avances educativos, es necesario examinar la forma en que estas actuaciones han sido planteadas e implementadas desde las instancias políticas. Para abordar esta cuestión se propone desarrollar un análisis retrospectivo que describa los aspectos más representativos de las decisiones y acuerdos aprobados en materia educativa, advirtiendo la importancia o condicionamiento que ha tenido el contexto sociológico de la Unión Europea. La intención con ello es conformar una visión interdependiente entre el pasado y el presente político, que contribuya a entender mejor los avatares y directrices generales hacia las que se encauza el modelo educativo europeo del Siglo XXI.Abstract: Education constitutes an essential aspect of the economical, political, social and cultural strategies adopted in the European Union. From the Treaty of Paris in 1951 to today, educational policy in Europe has been promoted and consolidated through a combination of programs in different levels and contexts. One of the most important areas at this moment is the result of the European Higher Education Area, which is defined as a process to harmonize European higher education. After almost six decades of educational progress, it is necessary to reflect on how the educational policy has been defined and implemented by the politicians in Europe. A retrospective analysis is described which presents relevant aspects of political decisions in the educational field which have an impact on the social context in the European Union. The aim is to set up an interdependent vision between the past and the present to contribute towards understanding the problems and general directions of the educational model in Europe for the 21st Century.

  19. METAMORPHOSIS OF INHABITED SPACE” ACCORDING TO A NEW ECONOMIC ACTIVITY: THE EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION OF ROCKS ORMANENTAIS SOIL IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF BARRA DE SÃO FRANCISCO - NORTH OF ESPÍRITO SANTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Castro Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The northwestern state of Espírito Santo has experienced a ‘boom’ economic driven by mining activities related to the exploitation of ornamental rocks, granite being primarily responsible for this whole dynamic. The lands of the region, in particular the urban areas of the municipality of Barra de São Francisco, has been the subject of strong speculation due to increasing investments in the sector of ornamental rocks. This sector has changed the dynamics of the city francisquense, formerly based on agricultural activities, they had coffee in conilon the mainstay of its economy, as well as the (re configuration space of the city as a whole. The purpose of the study is presented in evidence and clues pointing to think about the growth of cities rationally use and occupation of urban areas and neighborhoods, and with the planned management of policies that promote the participation of stakeholders in identifying conflicts. These policies must be compatible with the perspectives involved, seeking to stimulate activities economically viable and to keep an ordering in the appropriation of the landscape.

  20. Deindustrialization or metamorphosis of the industry. The new relationship between the manufacturing and tertiary activities; Desindustrializacion o metamorfosis de la instria?. La nueva relacion entre las actividades manufacturera y terciaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baro Tomas, E.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of the manufacturing industry in recent decades has been subject to a complex process of transformation. Relevant changes have occurred in the composition of these activities, in the nature thereof and in the relationships established between the various productive sectors, especially the manufacturing sectors and an important part of the tertiary sectors. The analysis of these transformations requires a new viewpoint of what currently constitutes the industrial sector and, especially, a new definition of its effective perimeter. This new perimeter should incorporate a significant portion of tertiary activities: the services for production. In sum, we must put more emphasis on the complementary relationships that exist between the two types of activities, rather than considering the deindustrialization process as a simple shift of industrial activities by service activities. (Author) 33 refs.

  1. External morphology of the two cypridiform ascothoracid-larva instars of Dendrogaster: The evolutionary significance of the two-step metamorphosis and comparison of lattice organs between larvae and adult males (Crustacea, Thecostraca, Ascothoracida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbasov, G.A.; Grygier, M.J.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2008-01-01

    (cyprid) and Facetotecta (y-cyprid), and we discuss the evolutionary significance of these ontogenies. We found lattice organs in both the second ascothoracid-larvae and in adult males of Dendrogaster. We could not observe both ascothoracid-larvae and males in any single species, but our data suggests...... that the lattice organs change significantly at the molt between these two instars. The lattice organs of second ascothoracid-larvae have no distinct keel and are situated in wide, shallow pits, whereas they have the ground pattern "crest-in-a-trough" morphology in adult males of two additional species examined...... for comparison. The positions of the terminal pores of lattice organs 1 and 2 also seem to change during maturation. These findings show that comparative data on lattice organ morphology for phylogenetic purposes must derive from strictly homologous instars, viz., the second ascothoracid-larva (a...

  2. La isla en peso de Virgilio Piñera: metamorfosis de un tigre que no existe / The Whole Island, by Virgilio Piñera: metamorphosis of a non-existent tiger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de las Nieves Hernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Este artículo aborda los tópicos de la cubanidad y la muerte en el poema "La isla en peso" del escritor cubano Virgilio Piñera. Es un ejercicio de lectura que focaliza adrede aspectos temáticos, si bien no excluye acercamientos a los planos formales o compositivos. La estrategia piñeriana enmarca o devela el punto de vista del sujeto lírico, respondiendo a una tensión entre el yo y lo otro que no halla nunca soluciones definitorias, y que constituye el mecanismo discursivo central de lo que aquí llamaremos ‘retorica del silencio’, opuesta y complementaria de otra, la ‘retórica del énfasis’. ABSTRACT: This article deals with the themes of Cuban identity and death in the poem “La isla en peso” by the Cuban writer Virgilio Piñera. It is a reading which deliberately focuses on thematic aspects, though it doesn't exclude approaches to the formal or compositional levels. Piñera's strategy frames or reveals the lyric subject's point of view, responding to a tension between the “self” and the “other” which never finds definitive resolution and represents the central discursive mechanism of what we will call here the 'rhetoric of silence', contrary and complementary to the other, the 'rhetoric of emphasis'.

  3. Endocrinology of insects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Downer, Roger G. H; Laufer, Hans

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Organization of the neuroendocrine system - Chemistry of insect hormones and neurohormones - Regulation of metamorphosis - Regulation of reproduction - Regulation of growth and development...

  4. Teaching and Learning with Butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Saul

    1996-01-01

    Presents butterflies as an introduction to natural history. Describes observation tips and metamorphosis of butterflies in the classroom. Includes butterfly resources for naturalists and educators. (AIM)

  5. The influence of dietary concentrations of arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid at various stages of larval ontogeny on eye migration, pigmentation and prostaglandin content of common sole larvae ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Banta, G.

    2008-01-01

    metamorphosis. Initiation of metamorphosis (i.e. start of eye migration) was related to the size of larvae and not related to ARA or EPA content. Dietary EPA or DHA did not retard the advance of eye migration. More than 90 % of highly malpigmented juveniles, (i.e. "albinos") had a permanent aberrant eye...

  6. Effects of the amphibian chytrid fungus and four insecticides on Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhez, Peter; Boone, Michelle D.; Fellers, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Chemical contamination may influence host-pathogen interactions, which has implications for amphibian population declines. We examined the effects of four insecticides alone or as a mixture on development and metamorphosis of Pacific Treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla) in the presence or absence of the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis [Bd]). Bd exposure had a negative impact on tadpole activity, survival to metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and time of tail absorption (with a marginally negative effect on mass at metamorphosis); however, no individuals tested positive for Bd at metamorphosis. The presence of sublethal concentrations of insecticides alone or in a mixture did not impact Pacific Treefrog activity as tadpoles, survival to metamorphosis, or time and size to metamorphosis. Insecticide exposure did not influence the effect of Bd exposure. Our study did not support our prediction that effects of Bd would be greater in the presence of expected environmental concentrations of insecticide(s), but it did show that Bd had negative effects on responses at metamorphosis that could reduce the quality of juveniles recruited into the population.

  7. Characterizing thermal performance of an important pollinator, the alfalfa leafcutting bee Megachile rotundata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, undergoes metamorphosis in the spring when temperatures can be highly variable. It is unknown how cold tolerance varies across metamorphosis. We found earlier stages were more tolerant to cold exposure than later stages. Furthermore, we found exposur...

  8. Relationship between Malaria Vector Densities in Artificial Container ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was speedy rate of development in the life stages of Anopheles sp in the urban area with its peak of complete metamorphosis occurring at the 7th day of the study whereas in the rural area, the peak of its complete metamorphosis occurred at the 12th day. Statistically, there existed significant differences between daily ...

  9. Metamorfoses da cidade portuária: transformações da relação entre o porto e a cidade de Lisboa Métamorphoses de la ville portuaire: transformations de la relation entre le port et la ville de Lisbonne Port city metamorphosis: transformations of the relationship between the port and the city of Lisbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O processo de evolução dos portos no período moderno tem sido determinado pela mutabilidade das funções portuárias, induzida por factores como as evoluções tecnológicas nos navios, nos equipamentos de apoio à movimentação de mercadorias ou nas técnicas de armazenagem, transformações nos padrões do comércio internacional, modificações na organização dos transportes marítimos ou alargamento e complexificação das cadeias logísticas globais. Como resultado destas mutações, assiste-se a uma concomitante evolução da estrutura, morfologia e extensão dos espaços ocupados por actividades portuárias e actividades complementares. Neste contexto, a relação entre o porto e a cidade de Lisboa (Portugal é marcada por uma grande complexidade desde logo imprimida pela tradição histórica que a mesma encerra e pela magnitude e intensidade de um processo que envolve a principal infra-estrutura do sistema portuário nacional e a maior cidade do país. Note-se, porém, que de uma relação simbiótica cidade-porto, em que o porto exercia um papel estrutural na organização da cidade e das suas funções, evoluiu-se para uma relação em que a cidade, polarizadora do sistema urbano regional e principal elemento de integração nacional na rede urbana peninsular e europeia, se autonomiza e assume um carácter eminentemente generalista, economicamente diversificado e funcionalmente complexo. Não obstante esta evolução, o porto mantém-se como ponto nodal de integração da cidade-região em sistemas globais de fluxos materiais e imateriais. Tratando-se de um elemento progressivamente menos integrado na estrutura urbana e funcional da cidade, o porto contínua assim a marcar a cadência de importantes mutações e transformações. Com efeito, à luz de conceptualizações e sistematizações teóricas e da análise das evidências empíricas, analisa-se a evolução da relação entre o porto e a cidade de Lisboa (incidindo nas dimensões funcional, urbanística e económica e apresenta-se um esquema de base para a definição de um modelo original que identifique, explique e caracterize as grandes fases desta dinâmica relacional.Le processus d´évolution des ports à l´époque moderne a été déterminé par la mutabilité des fonctions portuaires, induite par des facteurs comme les évolutions technologiques des navires, des équipements d´appui à la manipulation des marchandises ou des techniques d´entreposage; les transformations du commerce international, les modifications dans l´organisation des transports maritimes ou l´élargissement et la complexification des chaînes logistiques globales. Comme résultat de ces mutations, nous assistons à un évolution concomittante de la structure, de la morphologie et de l´extension des espaces occupés par des activités portuaires et des activités complémentaires. Dans ce contexte, la relation entre le port et la ville de Lisbonne (Portugal est actuellement marquée par une grande complexité qui met fin à une tradition historique ainsi que par la magnitude et l´intensité d´un processus mettant en jeu la principale infrastructure portuaire nationale et la plus grande ville du pays. Nous notons toutefois que nous passons d´une relation symbiotique ville-port, dans laquelle la ville était polarisatrice d´un système urbain régional et le principal élément de l´intégration nationale dans le réseau urbain de la péninsule ibérique et de l´Europe, à une situation où elle s´autonomize et assume un caractère éminemment généraliste, économiquement diversifié et fonctionnellement complexe. Malgré cette évolution, le port demeure un point nodal de l´intégration de la ville-région dans des systèmes globaux de flux matériels et immatériels. Même étant un élément progressivemment moins intégré à la structure urbaine et fonctionnelle de la ville, le port n´en continue pas moins à marquer la cadence d´importantes mutations et transformations. En effet, à la lumière de conceptualisations et systématisations théoriques et de l´analyse des évidences empiriques, nous analysons l´évolution de la relation entre le port et la ville de Lisbonne (incluant ses dimensions fonctionnelle, urbanistique et économique et présentons un schéma de base pour la définition d´un modèle original identifiant, expliquant et caractérisant les grandes phases de cette dynamique relationnelle.The evolution of ports in modern times has been defined by a change in port functions, caused by such factors as the development of technology on ships, of support equipment for the transport of merchandise or storage techniques, changes in the standards of international commerce, changes to the organisation of maritime transportation or the growth and increased complexity of global logistic chains. As a result of these changes, there has been a simultaneous evolution in the structure, morphology and extent of the spaces occupied by ports and complementary activities. In this context, the relationship between the port and city of Lisbon (Portugal is characterised by a great complexity imprinted from the onset through the historic traditions that it holds and through the magnitude and intensity of a process that involves the main infra-structure of the national port system and the country’s largest city. It can be noted, however, that a symbiotic port-city relationship, in which the port exerted a structural role in the organisation of the city and its functions, has developed into a relationship where the city, the hub of a regional urban system and a main element within the peninsular and European urban network, has become autonomous and developed a generalised character, economically diverse and functionally complex. Despite this evolution, the port remains a nodal point in the integration of the city-region in global systems of physical and non-physical fluxes. As it becomes increasingly less integrated in the urban and functional structure of the city, the port continues to keep the pace of important changes and transformations In effect, in light of theoretical conceptualisation and systemisation and analyses of empirical evidence, the evolution of the relationship between the port and the city of Lisbon (focussing on functional, urban and economic dimensions can be analysed and a plan outlined  to determine an original model that identifies, explains and characterises the main phases of the relationship dynamic.

  10. De l’usure au pouvoir de l’argent : les métamorphoses d’un mythe antijuif à travers la caricature en Angleterre From Usury to High Finance: The Metamorphosis of an AntiJewish Myth viewed through English Caricatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienne Germain

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available “Jewish Money Power”, the “Wandering Jew” and the “Blood Libel” (ritual murder myths are the three pillars of the anti-Semitic iconography which developed during the Middle Ages. Throughout the centuries, their evolution has continuously reflected the beliefs and tastes of the various societies which have used them to stereotype Jewish otherness. Far from being exhaustive, the intent of this article, based on a limited number of caricatures, is to stress the changes which took place over the centuries in numerous and varied portrayals of the “Jewish Money Power”: from the Jew in his capacity as money lender to the Jew as stockbroker, to more contemporary images of the Jewish banker and international financier, monopolising high finance, insinuating himself in all fields and plotting to dominate and destroy the Christian world. Having explained the various transformations in context, this analysis of selected Jewish graphic portrayals will also highlight the constant use of physical features and characteristics that have contributed to creating a misleading image of the Jews and encouraged anti-Semitism.

  11. Structure-function relationships in the integument of Salamandra salamandra during ontogenetic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzoli, Aurora; Gambarelli, A; Gabbay, Shosh; Rozman, A; Katz, U

    2002-06-01

    Morphological, cytological and transport properties of the integument of Salamandra salamandra were investigated during natural ontogenetic development, from birth to adult. Three stages were operationally defined: I, larvae, from birth to metamorphosis; II, metamorphosis (judged externally by the colour change and loss of the gills); and III, post-metamorphosis to adult. Pieces of skin were fixed at various stages for immunocytochemical examinations, and the electrical properties were investigated on parallel pieces. Distinct cellular changes take place in the skin during metamorphosis, and lectin (PNA, WGA and ConA) binding indicates profound changes in glycoprotein composition of cell membranes, following metamorphosis. Band 3 and carbonic anhydrase I (CA I) were confined to mitochondria-rich (MR)-like cells, and were detected only in the larval stage. CA II on the other hand, was detected both in MR-like and in MR cells following metamorphosis. The electrical studies show that the skin becomes more tight (transepithelial resistance increases) upon metamorphosis, followed by manifestation of amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (I(SC)) indicating that functional Na+ uptake has been acquired. The skin of metamorphosed adults had no finite transepithelial Cl- conductance, and band 3 was not detected in its MR cells. The functional properties of MR-like and MR cells remain to be established.

  12. Effects of alumina refinery wastewater and signature metal constituents at the upper thermal tolerance of: 2. The early life stages of the coral Acropora tenuis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, Andrew P.; Harford, Andrew J.; Parry, David L.; Dam, Rick A. van

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: →Methodology to assess relevant toxicants to sensitive early life histories of coral. → Explored the thermal sensitivity of fertilisation and larval metamorphosis in a coral. → First study to identify IC 50 s for Al, Ga and V in corals (at summer temperature). → First study to test the effects of an alumina outfall wastewater on coral. → Found additive effects of wastewater and high SST on fertilisation and metamorphosis. - Abstract: The success of early life history transitions of the coral Acropora tenuis were used as endpoints to evaluate thermal stress and the effects of wastewater discharged to a tropical marine environment. The studies assessed the effects of: (i) temperature; (ii) three signature metals of the wastewater, aluminium (Al), vanadium (V) and gallium (Ga); and (iii) the wastewater (at 27 o C and 32 o C) on fertilisation and larval metamorphosis. The median inhibition temperatures for fertilisation and metamorphosis were 32.8 o C and 33.0 o C, respectively. Fertilisation IC 50 s for Al, V and Ga were 2997, 2884 and 3430 μg L -1 , respectively. Metamorphosis IC 50 s for Al, V and Ga were 1945, 675 and 3566 μg L -1 , respectively. The wastewater only affected fertilisation and metamorphosis at moderate concentrations (IC 50 s = 63% and 67%, v/v, respectively, at 27 o C), posing a low risk to this species in the field. The effects of wastewater and temperature on fertilisation and metamorphosis were additive.

  13. Using Literature to Enhance Course Content in Education Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    Focuses attention on the kinds of literature that are helpful in fostering thoughtful reflection in special education graduate courses. Discusses several specific examples, such as Franz Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men." (PA)

  14. The Paradoxical Paradigm: Aviation Leadership, 1918-1926: How William Moffett Changed the Navy and How Billy Mitchell Prevented the Formation of a Separate Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivy, Jack

    1997-01-01

    ... that inevitably led to independence. The author's contention is that Rear Admiral William Moffett's superior leadership and acute understanding of his organization brought about the metamorphosis of the Navy into a modern combat force...

  15. LALIGENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    . Femi. Osofisan .... Her interactions with. Miriam exposed her to need to be financially independent, hence her metamorphosis to a self-reliant, hardworking and independent woman that seeks to champion the course ... can't make up for love.

  16. In vivo deiodinase inhibition by iopanoic acid causes thyroid axis disruption and dysmorphogenesis in model amphibian species Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiodinase (DIO) enzymes activate, deactivate and catabolize thyroid hormones (THs) and play an important role in thyroid-mediated amphibian metamorphosis. DIOs have been implicated as putative targets of xenobiotics leading to thyroid disruption. In an effort to characterize bi...

  17. [Change of a releasing mechanism involved in pre-catching behavior during the development of Salamandra salamandra (L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himstedt, W; Freidank, U; Singer, E

    1976-07-01

    Preycatching behaviour in salamanders (Salamandra salamandra L.) was studied before (60 larvae) and after metamorphosis (50 juveniles) to find out whether there are differences in releasing mechanisms depending on the developmental stage. Responses to prey dummies of different size, shape and orientation were recorded. With advancing age salamanders respond more selectively, preferring "wormlike" dummies. The releasing mechanism is narrowed down during 10 months after metamorphosis. This is not caused by learning processes.

  18. La posición de Pleurodema borellii en las razas sexuales (Anura: Leptodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rengel, Dora

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex differentiation was studied in tadpoles of Pleurodema borellii which lives in different geographic area of Argentina, fixed at various stages of metamorphosis. Gonads are sexually undifferentiated till the larva reach about 20 mm body length stage. Nevertheless sex differentiations occurs before metamorphosis take place, at about 30 mm. body length stage; gonads show macroscopic and microscopic difference at this time. Therefore P. borellii seems to belong to a "differentiated race".

  19. Long term ex vivo culturing of Drosophila brain as a method to live image pupal brains: insights into the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinovich, Dana; Mayseless, Oded; Schuldiner, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Holometabolous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster, undergo complete metamorphosis that includes a pupal stage. During metamorphosis, the Drosophila nervous system undergoes massive remodeling and growth, that include cell death and large-scale axon and synapse elimination as well as neurogenesis, developmental axon regrowth, and formation of new connections. Neuronal remodeling is an essential step in the development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Research on the ster...

  20. EVI and MDS/EVI are required for adult intestinal stem cell formation during postembryonic vertebrate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Morihiro; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2018-01-01

    The gene ectopic viral integration site 1 (EVI) and its variant myelodysplastic syndrome 1 (MDS)/EVI encode zinc-finger proteins that have been recognized as important oncogenes in various types of cancer. In contrast to the established role of EVI and MDS/EVI in cancer development, their potential function during vertebrate postembryonic development, especially in organ-specific adult stem cells, is unclear. Amphibian metamorphosis is strikingly similar to postembryonic development around birth in mammals, with both processes taking place when plasma thyroid hormone (T3) levels are high. Using the T3-dependent metamorphosis in Xenopus tropicalis as a model, we show here that high levels of EVI and MDS/EVI are expressed in the intestine at the climax of metamorphosis and are induced by T3. By using the transcription activator-like effector nuclease gene editing technology, we have knocked out both EVI and MDS/EVI and have shown that EVI and MDS/EVI are not essential for embryogenesis and premetamorphosis in X. tropicalis On the other hand, knocking out EVI and MDS/EVI causes severe retardation in the growth and development of the tadpoles during metamorphosis and leads to tadpole lethality at the climax of metamorphosis. Furthermore, the homozygous-knockout animals have reduced adult intestinal epithelial stem cell proliferation at the end of metamorphosis (for the few that survive through metamorphosis) or during T3-induced metamorphosis. These findings reveal a novel role of EVI and/or MDS/EVI in regulating the formation and/or proliferation of adult intestinal adult stem cells during postembryonic development in vertebrates.-Okada, M., Shi, Y.-B. EVI and MDS/EVI are required for adult intestinal stem cell formation during postembryonic vertebrate development. © FASEB.

  1. To eat or not to eat: ontogeny of hypothalamic feeding controls and a role for leptin in modulating life-history transition in amphibian tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Melissa Cui; Hu, Caroline; Pelletier, Chris; Denver, Robert J

    2018-03-28

    Many animal life histories entail changing feeding ecology, but the molecular bases for these transitions are poorly understood. The amphibian tadpole is typically a growth and dispersal life-history stage. Tadpoles are primarily herbivorous, and they capitalize on growth opportunities to reach a minimum body size to initiate metamorphosis. During metamorphic climax, feeding declines, at which time the gastrointestinal (GI) tract remodels to accommodate the carnivorous diet of the adult frog. Here we show that anorexigenic hypothalamic feeding controls are absent in the tadpole, but develop during metamorphosis concurrent with the production of the satiety signal leptin. Before metamorphosis there is a large increase in leptin mRNA in fat tissue. Leptin receptor mRNA increased during metamorphosis in the preoptic area/hypothalamus, the key brain region involved with the control of food intake and metabolism. This corresponded with an increase in functional leptin receptor, as evidenced by induction of socs3 mRNA and phosphorylated STAT3 immunoreactivity, and suppression of feeding behaviour after injection of recombinant frog leptin. Furthermore, we found that immunoneutralization of leptin in tadpoles at metamorphic climax caused them to resume feeding. The absence of negative regulation of food intake in the tadpole allows the animal to maximize growth prior to metamorphosis. Maturation of leptin-responsive neural circuits suppresses feeding during metamorphosis to facilitate remodelling of the GI tract. © 2018 The Author(s).

  2. Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Whalan

    Full Text Available In sessile marine invertebrates, larval settlement is fundamental to population maintenance and persistence. Cues contributing to the settlement choices and metamorphosis of larvae have important implications for the success of individuals and populations, but cues mediating larval settlement for many marine invertebrates are largely unknown. This study assessed larval settlement in two common Great Barrier Reef sponges, Coscinoderma matthewsi and Rhopaloeides odorabile, to cues that enhance settlement and metamorphosis in various species of scleractinian coral larvae. Methanol extracts of the crustose coralline algae (CCA, Porolithon onkodes, corresponding to a range of concentrations, were used to determine the settlement responses of sponge larvae. Cnidarian neuropeptides (GLW-amide neuropeptides were also tested as a settlement cue. Settlement in both sponge species was approximately two-fold higher in response to live chips of CCA and optimum concentrations of CCA extract compared to 0.2 µm filtered sea water controls. Metamorphosis also increased when larvae were exposed to GLW-amide neuropeptides; R. odorabile mean metamorphosis reached 42.0±5.8% compared to 16.0±2.4% in seawater controls and in C. matthewsi mean metamorphosis reached 68.3±5.4% compared to 36.7±3.3% in seawater controls. These results demonstrate the contributing role chemosensory communication plays in the ability of sponge larvae to identify suitable habitat for successful recruitment. It also raises the possibility that larvae from distinct phyla may share signal transduction pathways involved in metamorphosis.

  3. Vitro culture of axe-head glochidia in pink heelsplitter Potamilus alatus and mechanism of its high host specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Bo Wen

    Full Text Available The basal media M199 or MEM was utilized in the classical method of vitro culture of glochidia where 1-5% CO2 was required to maintain stable physiological pH for completion of non-parasitic metamorphosis. The classical method encounters a great challenge to those glochidia which undergo development of visceral tissue but significantly increase in size during metamorphosis. The improved in vitro culture techniques and classical methods were firstly compared for non-parasitic metamorphosis and development of glochidia in pink heelsplitter. Based on the improved method, the optimal vitro culture media was further selected from 14 plasmas or sera, realizing the non-parasitic metamorphosis of axe-head glochidia for the first time. The results showed that addition of different plasma (serum had significant effect on glochidial metamorphosis in pink heelsplitter. Only glochidia in the skewband grunt and red drum groups could complete metamorphosis, the metamorphosis rate in skewband grunt was 93.3±3.1% at 24±0.5°C, significantly higher than in marine and desalinated red drum. Heat-inactivated treatment on the plasma of yellow catfish and Barbus capito had significant effect on glochidia survival and shell growth. The metamorphosis rate also varied among different gravid period, and generally decreased with gravid time. Further comparison of free amino acid and fatty acid indicated that the taurine of high concentration was the only amino acid that might promote the rapid growth of glochidial shell, and the lack of adequate DPA and DHA might be an important reason leading to the abnormal foot and visceral development. Combined with our results of artificial selection of host fish, we tentatively established the mechanism of its host specialists in pink heelsplitter for the first time. This is the first report on non-parasite metamorphosis of axe-head glochidia based on our improved vitro culture method, which should provide important reference to

  4. Vitro culture of axe-head glochidia in pink heelsplitter Potamilus alatus and mechanism of its high host specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai Bo; Jin, Wu; Ma, Xue Yan; Zheng, Bing Qing; Xu, Pao; Xu, Liang; Hua, Dan; Yuan, Xin Hua; Gu, Ruo Bo

    2018-01-01

    The basal media M199 or MEM was utilized in the classical method of vitro culture of glochidia where 1-5% CO2 was required to maintain stable physiological pH for completion of non-parasitic metamorphosis. The classical method encounters a great challenge to those glochidia which undergo development of visceral tissue but significantly increase in size during metamorphosis. The improved in vitro culture techniques and classical methods were firstly compared for non-parasitic metamorphosis and development of glochidia in pink heelsplitter. Based on the improved method, the optimal vitro culture media was further selected from 14 plasmas or sera, realizing the non-parasitic metamorphosis of axe-head glochidia for the first time. The results showed that addition of different plasma (serum) had significant effect on glochidial metamorphosis in pink heelsplitter. Only glochidia in the skewband grunt and red drum groups could complete metamorphosis, the metamorphosis rate in skewband grunt was 93.3±3.1% at 24±0.5°C, significantly higher than in marine and desalinated red drum. Heat-inactivated treatment on the plasma of yellow catfish and Barbus capito had significant effect on glochidia survival and shell growth. The metamorphosis rate also varied among different gravid period, and generally decreased with gravid time. Further comparison of free amino acid and fatty acid indicated that the taurine of high concentration was the only amino acid that might promote the rapid growth of glochidial shell, and the lack of adequate DPA and DHA might be an important reason leading to the abnormal foot and visceral development. Combined with our results of artificial selection of host fish, we tentatively established the mechanism of its host specialists in pink heelsplitter for the first time. This is the first report on non-parasite metamorphosis of axe-head glochidia based on our improved vitro culture method, which should provide important reference to fundamental theory

  5. Relationships among developmental stage, metamorphic timing, and concentrations of elements in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodgrass, J.W.; Hopkins, W.A.; Roe, J.H. [Towson University, Towson, MD (United States). Dept. for Biological Science

    2003-07-01

    We collected bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) larvae from a coal combustion waste settling basin to investigate the effects of developmental stage and timing of metamorphosis on concentrations of a series of trace elements in bullfrog tissues. Bullfrogs at four stages of development (from no hind limbs to recently metamorphosed juveniles) and bullfrogs that metamorphosed in the fall or overwintered in the contaminated basin and metamorphosed in the spring were analyzed for whole-body concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ag, Sr, and Se. After the effects of dry mass were removed, tissue concentrations of six elements (Al, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, As, and Pb) decreased from the late larval stage through metamorphosis. Decreases in concentrations through metamorphosis ranged from 40% for Cu to 97% for Al. Tissue concentrations of these elements were also similar or higher in spring; Al and Cr concentrations were 34 and 90% higher in the spring, respectively, whereas As, Ni, Cu, and Pb concentrations were {lt} 10% higher. Concentrations of Cd, Se, and Ag varied among seasons but not among stages; Cd and Ag concentrations were 40 and 62% lower, respectively, and Se concentrations were 21% higher in spring. Concentrations of Zn varied only among stages; concentrations decreased gradually through late larval stage and then increased through metamorphosis. Concentrations of Sr varied among stages, but this variation was dependent on the season. Concentrations of Sr were higher in larval stages during the spring, but because concentrations of Sr increased 122% through metamorphosis in the fall and only 22% in the spring, concentrations were higher in fall metamorphs when compared with spring metamorphs. Our results indicate that metamorphosis and season of metamorphosis affects trace element concentrations in bullfrogs and may have important implications for the health of juveniles and the transfer of pollutants from the aquatic to the terrestrial environment.

  6. Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metts, Brian S.; Buhlmann, Kurt A.; Scott, David E.; Tuberville, Tracey D.; Hopkins, William A.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a mesocosm study to assess the individual and interactive effects of previous maternal exposure and larval exposure to trace element-laden sediments on southern toads (Bufo terrestris). Previous maternal exposure to coal combustion wastes (CCW) reduced larval survival to metamorphosis up to 57% compared to larvae of unexposed females. Larvae reared on CCW accumulated significant concentrations of trace elements resulting in extended larval periods, reduced growth rates, and reduced mass at metamorphosis. However, the effects were dependent on age of sediments, suggesting the effects of contaminants from CCW may be partially ameliorated over time through the reduced bioavailability of trace elements in aged CCW. Most importantly, maternal exposure to contaminants coupled with larval exposure to fresh CCW interacted to reduce survival to metamorphosis by 85% compared to reference conditions. Our study yields further evidence that disposal of CCW in aquatic basins potentially creates ecological traps for some amphibian populations. - Highlights: ► The interaction of maternal exposure and larval exposure to CCW reduced survival. ► Previous maternal exposure to CCW had a latent effect on survival to metamorphosis. ► Larval southern toads exposed to CCW experienced prolonged larval periods. ► Larval southern toads exposed to CCW had reduced growth rates. ► Larval southern toads exposed to CCW had reduced mass at metamorphosis. - Maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes interact to decrease survival in larval amphibians.

  7. Juvenile frogs compensate for small metamorph size with terrestrial growth: Overcoming the effects of larval density and insecticide exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    I reared four species of anurans (Rana sphenocephala [Southern Leopard Frog], Rana blairi [Plains Leopard Frog], Rana clamitans [Green Frog], and Bufo woodhousii [Woodhouse's Toad]) for seven to 12 months in small, outdoor terrestrial enclosures (1 x 2 m) to examine the consequences of larval competition (via density) and contaminant exposure (via the insecticide carbaryl). I added six Rana clamitans, eight Rana sphenocephala, eight Rana blairi, and 10 Bufo woodhousii to terrestrial enclosures shortly after metamorphosis and recaptured them during the following spring. All anurans from low-density ponds were significantly larger than those from high-density ponds, but these size differences did not significantly affect survival to or size at spring emergence. However, R. sphenocephala, R. blairi, and R. clamitans that survived to spring had been larger at metamorphosis on average than those that did not survive; in contrast, B. woodhousii that survived the winter were smaller at metamorphosis on average than those that did not survive. Carbaryl exposure affected mass at metamorphosis of R. clamitans and B. woodhousii that were added to enclosures, but this difference disappeared or did not increase by spring emergence. Overall, exposure to carbaryl during the larval period did not have any apparent effects on survival or growth during the terrestrial phase. In my study, anurans were able to offset small size at metamorphosis with terrestrial growth, although there was a trend of reduced overwinter survival for ranid species that metamorphosed at a smaller size. Copyright 2005 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  8. Pre-settlement processes of northern rock sole (Lepidopsetta polyxystra) in relation to interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Erin J.; Miller, Jessica A.; Hurst, Thomas P.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the effects of climate variability on growth dynamics and timing of early life history events in marine fishes can provide insights into survival, recruitment and productivity. We examined interannual variation in indicators of larval growth rates, size at hatch and metamorphosis, and the timing of metamorphosis of northern rock sole (Lepidopsetta polyxystra) over 5 years in two nurseries at Kodiak Island, Alaska, USA. Variation in early life characteristics was quantified using laboratory-validated otolith structural analysis and related to water temperature and spring bloom dynamics in the Gulf of Alaska. Overall, results indicated that temperature contributed more to interannual variation in northern rock sole growth, size and phenology patterns than phytoplankton dynamics. Size at hatch was positively related to winter-spring spawning temperatures. Larval growth metrics were generally consistent with thermal effects as temperatures above 4 °C appear necessary, but are not sufficient to support rapid growth. Reflecting the cumulative effects of temperature, the timing of metamorphosis was related to both seasonal and interannual variation in temperature with earlier dates of metamorphosis in warmer years. Conversely, fish size at metamorphosis was similar across years, suggesting that the competency to metamorphose is related to attainment of a minimum size. These results demonstrate the important role of temperature in regulating early life history phenology of northern rock sole and suggest that temperature-driven phenological shifts may also influence the time of spawning and hatching.

  9. Larval exposure to predator cues alters immune function and response to a fungal pathogen in post-metamorphic wood frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Maya L; Buck, Julia C; Gervasi, Stephanie; Blaustein, Andrew R; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Bier, Mark E; Hempel, John; Relyea, Rick A

    2013-09-01

    For the past several decades, amphibian populations have been decreasing around the globe at an unprecedented rate. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the fungal pathogen that causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, is contributing to amphibian declines. Natural and anthropogenic environmental factors are hypothesized to contribute to these declines by reducing the immunocompetence of amphibian hosts, making them more susceptible to infection. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced in the granular glands of a frog's skin are thought to be a key defense against Bd infection. These peptides may be a critical immune defense during metamorphosis because many acquired immune functions are suppressed during this time. To test if stressors alter AMP production and survival of frogs exposed to Bd, we exposed wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles to the presence or absence of dragonfly predator cues crossed with a single exposure to three nominal concentrations of the insecticide malathion (0, 10, or 100 parts per billion [ppb]). We then exposed a subset of post-metamorphic frogs to the presence or absence of Bd zoospores and measured frog survival. Although predator cues and malathion had no effect on survival or size at metamorphosis, predator cues increased the time to metamorphosis by 1.5 days and caused a trend of a 20% decrease in hydrophobic skin peptides. Despite this decrease in peptides determined shortly after metamorphosis, previous exposure to predator cues increased survival in both Bd-exposed and unexposed frogs several weeks after metamorphosis. These results suggest that exposing tadpoles to predator cues confers fitness benefits later in life.

  10. Developmental toxicity of two common corn pesticides to the endangered southern bell frog (Litoria raniformis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choung, Catherine B., E-mail: Catherine.Choung@mq.edu.au [Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Hyne, Ross V. [Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Office of Environment and Heritage, PO Box 29, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Mann, Reinier M. [Centre for Environmental Sustainability, University of Technology - Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Stevens, Mark M. [EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (Industry and Investment NSW and Charles Sturt University), Yanco Agricultural Institute, Private Mail Bag, Yanco, NSW 2703 (Australia); Hose, Grant C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    To examine the link between corn agriculture and the observed decline of the endangered southern bell frog (SBF), the effects of two corn crop pesticides on larval growth and development were investigated. Tadpoles were exposed to terbufos sulfone (10 {mu}g/L), a major breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos, and the herbicide atrazine (25 {mu}g/L) individually and as a mixture until the completion of metamorphosis. Atrazine did not interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone or result in significant effects on growth and development alone, although there was some indication of accelerated metamorphosis in the pilot study. Terbufos sulfone alone and as a mixture (terbufos/atrazine) significantly slowed larval development and ultimately delayed metamorphosis. The observed developmental effects from an environmentally relevant concentration of terbufos sulfone indicates a risk posed by this persistent degradation product to the endangered SBF, which breeds and develops in the rice bays adjacent to corn fields treated with pesticides. - Highlights: > The effect of terbufos sulfone and atrazine on larval growth and development was investigated. > Terbufos sulfone alone significantly slowed development and delayed metamorphosis of tadpoles. > Atrazine had no observable effects alone nor did it interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone. > The developmental effects indicates a risk to endangered southern bell frogs in the irrigation area. > The results highlight the toxicological importance of some pesticide breakdown products. - A breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos retards development and delays metamorphosis of southern bell frog tadpoles.

  11. Developmental toxicity of two common corn pesticides to the endangered southern bell frog (Litoria raniformis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choung, Catherine B.; Hyne, Ross V.; Mann, Reinier M.; Stevens, Mark M.; Hose, Grant C.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the link between corn agriculture and the observed decline of the endangered southern bell frog (SBF), the effects of two corn crop pesticides on larval growth and development were investigated. Tadpoles were exposed to terbufos sulfone (10 μg/L), a major breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos, and the herbicide atrazine (25 μg/L) individually and as a mixture until the completion of metamorphosis. Atrazine did not interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone or result in significant effects on growth and development alone, although there was some indication of accelerated metamorphosis in the pilot study. Terbufos sulfone alone and as a mixture (terbufos/atrazine) significantly slowed larval development and ultimately delayed metamorphosis. The observed developmental effects from an environmentally relevant concentration of terbufos sulfone indicates a risk posed by this persistent degradation product to the endangered SBF, which breeds and develops in the rice bays adjacent to corn fields treated with pesticides. - Highlights: → The effect of terbufos sulfone and atrazine on larval growth and development was investigated. → Terbufos sulfone alone significantly slowed development and delayed metamorphosis of tadpoles. → Atrazine had no observable effects alone nor did it interact synergistically with terbufos sulfone. → The developmental effects indicates a risk to endangered southern bell frogs in the irrigation area. → The results highlight the toxicological importance of some pesticide breakdown products. - A breakdown product of the insecticide terbufos retards development and delays metamorphosis of southern bell frog tadpoles.

  12. Amphibian Population Sensitivity to Environmental and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticipating chronic effects of contaminant exposure on amphibian species is complicated both by toxicological and ecological uncertainty. Data for both chemical exposures and amphibian vital rates, including altered growth, are sparse. Developmental plasticity in amphibians further complicates evaluation of chemical impacts as metamorphosis is also influenced by other biotic and abiotic stressors, such as temperature, hydroperiod, predation, and conspecific density. Determining the effect of delayed tadpole development on survival through metamorphosis and subsequent recruitment must include possible effects of pond drying accelerating metamorphosis near the end of the larval stage. This model considers the combined influence of delayed onset of metamorphosis in a cohort as well as accelerated metamorphosis toward the end of the hydroperiod and determines the net influence of counteracting forces on tadpole development and survival. Amphibian populations with greater initial density dependence have less capacity for developmental plasticity and are therefore more vulnerable to delayed development and reduced hydroperiod. The consequential reduction in larval survival has a relatively greater impact on species with a shorter lifespan, allowing for fewer breeding seasons during which to successfully produce offspring. In response to risk assessment approaches that consider only survival and reproductive endpoints in population evaluation, we calculate conta

  13. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) adversely affects the life-cycle of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bots, Jessica, E-mail: Jessica.bots@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); De Bruyn, Luc, E-mail: luc.debruyn@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Kliniekstraat 25, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Snijkers, Tom, E-mail: tomsnijkers@gmail.co [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Van den Branden, Bert, E-mail: bvandenbranden@gmail.co [Department PIH Environment, University College West Flanders (HOWEST), Graaf K. 11 de Goedelaan 5, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Van Gossum, Hans, E-mail: hans.vangossum@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    We evaluated whether life-time exposure to PFOS affects egg development, hatching, larval development, survival, metamorphosis and body mass of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata). Eggs and larvae were exposed to five concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 000 mug/L. Our results show reduced egg hatching success, slower larval development, greater larval mortality, and decreased metamorphosis success with increasing PFOS concentration. PFOS had no effect on egg developmental time and hatching or on mass of adults. Eggs were the least sensitive stage (NOEC = 10 000 mug/L). Larval NOEC values were 1000 times smaller (10 mug/L). Successful metamorphosis was the most sensitive response trait studied (NOEC < 10 mug/L). The NOEC value suggests that E. cyathigerum is amongst the most sensitive freshwater organisms tested. NOEC for metamorphosis is less than 10-times greater than the ordinary reported environmental concentrations in freshwater, but is more than 200-times smaller than the greatest concentrations measured after accidental releases. - Long-term laboratory exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid reduces survival and interferes with metamorphosis of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata).

  14. Transgenerational interactions between a pesticide and warming in a vector mosquito

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, T.; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, R.

    Climate change imposes a strong pressure on the persistence of natural populations and together with pollution it exerts a global threat to biodiversity. While many transgenerational studies have revealed the capacity of species to adapt to a temperature increase, it remains unknown if this ability...... studied effects on larval survival and age and size at metamorphosis. In both generations, warming and the pesticide reduced larval survival and accelerated development in the survivors. While warming reduced size at metamorphosis, pesticide exposure did not affect size. As expected, the effect...... of chlorpyrifos on mortality was stronger under warming. We could show delayed effects of parental rearing temperature on their offspring with parents reared at 24°C producing offspring with a lower survival, slower development, but a larger size at metamorphosis. For survival the effect was particularly strong...

  15. Effects of dietary vanadium on growth and lipid storage in a larval anuran: Results from studies employing ad libitum and rationed feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Christopher L. [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, P.O. Box 38, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States)], E-mail: Rowe@cbl.umces.edu; Heyes, Andrew [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, P.O. Box 38, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States); Hopkins, William [Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 100 Cheatham Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2009-01-31

    Vanadium (V) exerts a variety of effects related to metabolic function in vertebrates, including modifying glycolytic pathways and lipid metabolism. However, little is known about toxicity of V to wildlife in natural systems. We conducted parallel, independent studies to evaluate the effect of dietary exposure to vanadium on survival, metabolism, growth, and lipid storage of larval leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala). In one study ('Ad lib') larvae were fed unlimited food and in the other ('Ration') larvae were fed a restricted diet. Experimental diets contained 10 ppm dw V{sub total} (Control, 'C'), 109 ppm (Low, 'L'), and 363 ppm (High, 'H'). In neither study did V affect metabolic rate or survival to forelimb emergence. However, in the Ration study, 31% of individuals in H that had initiated metamorphosis died prior to completion of metamorphosis, compared with 22% in M and 9% in C, however the difference was not significant at {alpha} = 0.05. Mortality during metamorphosis in the Ad lib study was more variable, yet followed a similar trend (26, 14, and 12% mortality in H, L, and C). In both studies, individuals that died during the metamorphic period were smaller at the time of forelimb emergence than those that survived. In the Ration study, individuals in H also had significantly lower growth rates, delayed metamorphosis, and reduced lipid content at metamorphosis compared to C and L. Growth was not affected by V in the Ad lib study. Our results suggest that habitat contamination by V may present risks to amphibians during the metamorphic period attributable to energetic responses influencing size at the initiation of metamorphosis and body lipid stores. Furthermore, while we cannot make formal comparisons between the studies, our results imply that protocols that employ ad libitum feeding regimes could fail to capture the effects of contaminants as they may be expressed in natural situations in which resources

  16. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from Hydra magnipapillata containing multiple copies of Hydra-L Wamide (Leu-Trp-NH2) neuropeptides: evidence for processing at Ser and Asn residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    The simple, freshwater polyp Hydra is often used as a model to study development in cnidarians. Recently, a neuropeptide, cloned a preprohormone...... from Hydra magnipapillata containing 11 (eight different) immature neuropeptide sequences that are structurally related to the metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anermones. During the final phase of our cloning experiments, another research team independently isolated and sequenced five...... most frequent one being Gly-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Leu-Trp-NH2; Hydra-LWamide l; three copies). Based on their structural similarities with the metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide from sea anemones, the mature peptides derived from the Hydra-LWamide preprohormone are potential candidates for being...

  17. Developmental dynamics of Ambystoma tigrinum in a changing landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMenamin Sarah K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of pond habitat is catastrophic to aquatic larval amphibians, but even reduction in the amount of time a breeding site holds water (hydroperiod can influence amphibian development and limit reproductive success. Using the landscape variation of a glacial valley in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as the context for a natural experiment, we examined variation in growth pattern and life history of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum and determined how these developmental characteristics varied with hydroperiod over several summers. Results In ponds that dried early in the season, maximum larval size was reduced relative to the sizes achieved in permanent ponds. Ephemeral ponds were associated with early metamorphosis at small body sizes, while permanent ponds facilitated longer larval periods and later metamorphosis. Paedomorphosis resulted from indefinite metamorphic postponement, and was identified only in the most permanent environments. Patterns of growth and allometry were similar between ponds with different hydroperiods, but considerable life history variation was derived from modulating the timing of and size at metamorphosis. Considering maximum rates of growth and inferring the minimum size at metamorphosis across 25 ponds over the course of three years, we calculated that hydroperiods longer than three months are necessary to support these populations through metamorphosis and/or reproductive maturity. Conclusions Landscape heterogeneity fosters life history variation in this natural population. Modulation of the complex ambystomatid life cycle allows this species to survive in unpredictable environments, but current trends towards rapid pond drying will promote metamorphosis at smaller sizes and could eliminate the paedomorphic phenotype from this region. Metamorphosis at small size is has been linked to altered fitness traits, including reduced survival and fecundity. Thus, widespread

  18. A novel length back-calculation approach accounting for ontogenetic changes in the fish length - otolith size relationship during the early life of sprat (Sprattus sprattus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenther, Claudia C.; Temming, Axel; Baumann, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    An individual-based length back-calculation method was developed for juvenile Baltic sprat (Sprattus sprattus), accounting for ontogenetic changes in the relationship between fish length and otolith length. In sprat, metamorphosis from larvae to juveniles is characterized by the coincidence of low...... length growth, strong growth in body height, and maximal otolith growth. Consequently, the method identifies a point of metamorphosis for an individual as the otolith radius at maximum increment widths. By incorporating this information in our back-calculation method, estimated length growth...

  19. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleanya, LUM. Vol 8, No 1 (2005) - Articles From trench to governance: A necessary metamorphosis for hamas. Abstract. ISSN: 1119-443X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact ...

  20. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IFMs) undergo post-transcriptional and post-translational isoform changes during pupal to adult metamorphosis to meet the high energy and mechanical demands of flight. Using a newly generated Gal4 strain (UH3-Gal4) which is expressed ...

  1. Drosophila Kruppel homolog 1 represses lipolysis through interactions with dFOXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key endocrine signal involved in insect molting and metamorphosis. Recent studies suggest that JH is involved in not only development programming, but also in metabolic control. However, how JH modulates metabolism remains largely unknown. It has been shown that JH induces...

  2. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: A Rare Crippling And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, (FOP), the most disabling condition of extra skeletal ossification is a rare genetic disorder which causes immobility through progressive metamorphosis of skeletal muscles and soft connective tissue into a second skeleton of heterotopic bone. It presents classically at birth with clinical ...

  3. The lingual epithelium of Salamandra salamandra: metamorphotic changes during its ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolka, A; Clemen, G

    1998-12-01

    The development of the epithelia of the secondary tongue of Salamandra salamandra is described on the basis of light microscopic and scanning electron microscopic studies of defined developmental stages. A glandular area with radial ridges and furrows is formed anterior to the primary tongue during the larval phase. Epithelial cones--each a compact anlage of a gland lying in the furrows--displace the lamina propria. The glandular area grows upward and latero-caudad during metamorphosis and forms the secondary tongue by fusing with the primary tongue. Lumina within the gland anlage appear at the beginning of metamorphosis. They open as glandular tubules towards the oral cavity at the climax of metamorphosis. The epithelial lining becomes single layered and differentiates into gland cells. The glands are increasingly surrounded by fibers of the musculus genioglossus. At the orifice of the gland, the gland cells mingle with the multilayered epithelium of the surface of the tongue. This contains two types of goblet cells in addition to the villus-shaped covering cells which leave gaps for the taste buds. The goblet cells are formed before (type I) and during (type II) metamorphosis and replace the typical larval goblet cells. The new mushroom-shaped part of the secondary tongue is characterized by aborally running septae of connective tissue, visible after digestion with pankreatin. The tip of the primary tongue which originally covers the glandular part becomes completely integrated. It is characterized by crypts which become shallower caudally.

  4. Nectar and pollen feeding by insect herbivores and implications for multitrophic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wäckers, F.L.; Romeis, J.; van Rijn, P.

    2007-01-01

    Among herbivorous insects with a complete metamorphosis the larval and adult stages usually differ considerably in their nutritional requirements and food ecology. Often, feeding on plant structural tissue is restricted to the larval stage, whereas the adult stage feeds primarily or exclusively on

  5. Hydroperiod and cattle use associated with lower recruitment in an r-selected amphibian with a declining population trend in the Klamath Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther M. Cole; Rosemary Hartman; Malcolm P. North

    2016-01-01

    Recent population declines in amphibians associated with mortality in early life stages highlight the need for a better understanding of the environmental factors related to successful survival to metamorphosis. In our study, we closely examine the relative importance of environmental factors to three stages of recruitment for Cascade frogs (Rana cascadae...

  6. The Psychiatrist, The Mentally Ill and Nigerian Law - A Fate, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant portion of Nigeria's laws evolved from British laws as a result of colonial relationship. In Britain, over the ages, the laws constituting sources of Nigeria's laws have undergone metamorphosis to adapt with changes. However such laws continue to exist in Nigeria's law books in the same form they were in Britain ...

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Community DNA. Bioprospecting the lat gene in soil samples. 597. Competition. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana ... Early Pliocene. Insights from stable light isotopes on enamel defects and wean- ing in Pliocene herbivores. 765. Earthworm. Reconfirmation of antimicrobial ...

  8. Getting Started with Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana temporalis is influenced by genetic relatedness of the cohort. S Girish S K Saidapur. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 489-496 ...

  10. Flight biomechanics of developmentally-induced size variation in the solitary bee Osmia lignaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body size covaries with morphology, functional performance, and fitness. For insects, variation in adult phenotypies are derived from developmental variation in larval growth and metamorphosis. In this study, we asked how larval growth impacted adult morphology in Osmia lignaria—especially traits th...

  11. Response of cyprid specific genes to natural settlement cues in the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Honglei

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR was used to further our understanding of the molecular processes involved in the attachment and metamorphosis of larval barnacles. We report the effects of natural settlement cues (microbial biofilms and conspecific settlement-inducing factor) on the expression profiles of six barnacle cyprid specific (bcs) genes in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite Darwin. Genes bcs-1 to bcs-5 all showed marked decreases in their expression between initial cyprid attachment and the completion of metamorphosis, whereas bcs-6 showed significant up-regulation. Generally, settlement cues exerted no significant effect on the decreasing trend of bcs-1 to bcs-5 expression during attachment and metamorphosis. However, the expression of bcs-6 increased prior to cyprid attachment in response to both settlement cues. This elevated expression of bcs-6 gene indicates the importance and key regulatory role of this specific gene to larval attachment and metamorphosis in this barnacle species. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors, supplement to: Dineshram, R; Chandramouli, K; Ko, W K Ginger; Zhang, Huoming; Qian, Pei Yuan; Ravasi, Timothy; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen (2016): Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors. Global Change Biology, 22(6), 2054-2068

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R

    2016-01-01

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs.

  13. 04 Botha 03.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    24 Jul 2008 ... stergod in /Xam-mitologie wat meestal die vorm van 'n bidsprinkaan aanneem. Hierdie droom kan ook verwys na Franz Kafka se Metamorphosis(1915) oor die jong reisende verkoopsman, Gregor Samsa, wat oornag in 'n insek verander. Dit wil voorkom of die mans in die kamp hoofsaaklik oor vroue en die ...

  14. Space for Performing Teacher Identity: Through the Lens of Kafka and Hegel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkison, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Franz Kafka's 1912 novella "The Metamorphosis" provides an analogy for a consideration of the process of teacher identity formation and performance. Gregor Samsa awoke to find himself transformed into a giant beetle. He faced a complete loss of identity as he lost connection with the micro-political space that formed the context of his former role…

  15. Malattia, animalità e resistenza: il "multiforme ingegno" di Franz Kafka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Carofalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamorphosis and survival are the main themes at the core of Bulgarian philosopher Elias Canetti’s thought. In the following essay we will see how these two themes dominate Franz Kafka’s works, especially if we look at the images of the animal and the ill body.

  16. The reupholster of stained glass designs and “ the deceptive silence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflecting on the seminal theme of Biography as a provisional means of accessing artistic substance, this study dares a reading of the metamorphosis of the artistry of the Nigerian glass designs of Frank Ugiomoh and Nsikak Essien. Utilising an empirical analysis, principal art works of these masters are examined. However ...

  17. DNA barcoding of a new record of epi-endophytic green algae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-13

    Jul 13, 2014 ... nuisance for algal pure culture, and a number of techniques were developed to get rid of them (e.g. Dauby and Poulicek. 1995; Shacklock and Doyle ... Asian countries for promoting sea urchin larval settlement and metamorphosis in aquaculture fields (Kitamura et al. 1993). Ulvella leptochaete (Huber) ...

  18. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid (HPT) Axis in Frogs and its Role in Frog Development and Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metamorphosis of the amphibian tadpole is a thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent developmental process. For this reason, the tadpole is considered to be an ideal bioassay system to identify disruption of thyroid function by environmental contaminants. Here we provide an in-depth review...

  19. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, Ramadoss

    2016-03-19

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    by information in the hormonal signal but by that in the programme laid down earlier during postembryonic development. The amphibian larval brain is a major TH target with a wide variety of changes taking place during metamorphosis in both the anatomical and functional characteristics ranging from morphogenesis to cell ...

  1. Single-copy nuclear genes resolve the phylogeny of the holometabolous insects

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegmann, Brian M; Trautwein, Michelle D; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cassel, Brian K; Bertone, Matthew A; Winterton, Shaun L; Yeates, David K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Evolutionary relationships among the 11 extant orders of insects that undergo complete metamorphosis, called Holometabola, remain either unresolved or contentious, but are extremely important as a context for accurate comparative biology of insect model organisms. The most phylogenetically enigmatic holometabolan insects are Strepsiptera or twisted wing parasites, whose evolutionary relationship to any other insect order is unconfirmed. They have been controversially propo...

  2. ARMED FORCES AND INTERVENTION IN TROPICAL AFRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of what they have done, and because of what everyone now realises they might do. How can we explain this dramatic metamorphosis? Major-General. Yakubu Gowan, Commander-In-Chlef of the Armed Forces and Head of the Federal Military. Government. Military Indigenisation and Professionalism. Prior to the departure ...

  3. Seasonality in polyps of a tropical cubozoan: A latina nr mordens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Courtney

    Full Text Available A latina nr mordens have been located in large predictable spawning aggregations near Osprey Reef in the Coral Sea eight to ten days after a full moon; however, polyps have never been located in-situ. The polyp stage contributes to the abundance of medusae through asexual reproduction and metamorphosis, and may influence the periodicity of medusae by metamorphosis of the polyp. To elucidate the relationship between medusae periodicity and polyp ecology, polyps were exposed to thermal and osmotic treatments in order to determine the theoretical environmental limits to their distribution. Maximum fecundity occurred in thermal treatments of 21 to 25ºC and the theoretical minimum thermal requirement for population stability was approximately 17ºC. Polyps were also exposed to five feeding regimes and fecundity was found to be positively correlated with feeding frequency. Thermal and osmotic variations did not induce metamorphosis in this species, however, reduced food did. The implications of asexual reproduction and cues for metamorphosis in relation to population dynamics of this species are discussed.

  4. Is hexamerin receptor a GPI-anchored protein in Achaea janata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... The process of uptake of hexamerins during metamorphosis from insect haemolymph by fat body cells is reminiscent of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Previously, we had identified a hexamerin-binding protein (HBP) and reported for the first time that uptake of hexamerins is dependent on the ...

  5. Eesti mood Berliinis / Maarja Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tali, Maarja

    1998-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise konkursi 'Smirnoff Fashion Awards' finaalvõistlus teemal 'Metamorphosis' 21. juulil Berliinis. Eesti eelvooru võitnud Aldo Järvsoo tööst 'Est', esinemisest. I koht - Elena Zarubina (Venemaa), II - Manija Ismat (Inglismaa), III - Desmond Yang (Hok¡Cai, Singapur). Kommentaar A. Järvsoolt

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243500 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243500 J100074H18 At5g39970.1 68418.m04847 expressed protein low similarity to up...-regulated by thyroid hormone in tadpoles; expressed specifically in the tail and only at metamorphosis; mem...brane bound or extracellular protein; C-terminal basic region [Xenopus laevis] GI:1234787 0.0 ...

  7. Blue light-induced immunosuppression in Bactrocera dorsalis adults, as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, K; Noor, M; Hori, M; Ali, A; Hussain, A; Peng, W; Chang, C-J; Zhang, H

    2017-12-01

    Detrimental effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on living organisms are well understood, little is known about the effects of blue light irradiation. Although a recent study revealed that blue light caused more harmful effects on insects than UV light and blue light irradiation killed insect pests of various orders including Diptera, the effects of blue light on physiology of insects are still largely unknown. Here we studied the effects of blue light irradiation on cuticular melanin in larval and the immune response in adult stage of Bactrocera dorsalis. We also evaluated the effects of blue light exposure in larval stage on various age and mass at metamorphosis and the mediatory role of cuticular melanin in carryover effects of larval stressors across metamorphosis. We found that larvae exposed to blue light decreased melanin contents in their exoskeleton with smaller mass and delayed metamorphosis than insects reared without blue light exposure. Across metamorphosis, lower melanotic encapsulation response and higher susceptibility to Beauveria bassiana was detected in adults that had been exposed to blue light at their larval stage, thereby constituting the first evidence that blue light impaired adult immune function in B. dorsalis as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

  8. High temperatures influence sexual development differentially in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samadhan Krushna Phuge

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... These results suggest that high temperature probably acts through stress hormones and favours the small-sized sex. Keywords. Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis; gonadal development; metamorphosis; sex ratio; temperature-dependent sex determination. 1. Introduction. The process of gonadal sex determination ...

  9. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 2. Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717). Harini Nagendra. General Article Volume 21 Issue 2 February 2016 pp 115-124 ... Keywords. Environmental history; insect metamorphosis; life cycle analysis; tropical biodiversity; women in science.

  10. Interpreting in vivo Effects of Thyroid Synthesis Inhibitors through the Lens of in vitro and ex vivo Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA has been charged to evaluate chemicals for their ability to disrupt endocrine pathways including estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone. Amphibian metamorphosis, which is regulated by thyroid hormone, is an ideal model system for investigating disruption of the thyroi...

  11. Emerging Economies Research Dialogue | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The process of globalization has created a new world order, both economic and political, involving substantial changes in the relative weight of different countries and regions. In this new world order, the so-called emerging economies are increasingly poised to assume an enhanced role. So far this global metamorphosis ...

  12. Essential fatty acids influence metabolic rate and tolerance of hypoxia in Dover sole ( Solea solea ) larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, David; Lund, Ivar; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2008-01-01

    ) in normoxia, and significantly higher O-2 partial pressure (PO2) thresholds in progressive hypoxia for their regulation of RMR (P-crit) and for the onset of agitation, respiratory distress and loss of equilibrium. Metamorphosis was associated with an overall decline in RMR and increase in P...

  13. An analysis of processes that can shape higher education research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is not only about African postgraduates at University of Natal: it is also an attempt to delineate what shapes research into Higher Education done under differing conditions and for different purposes (part 1). As material to illustrate this research metamorphosis, the material from an investigation into postgraduates ...

  14. AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Metamorphosis of Bourgeoisie Politics in a Modern Nigerian Capitalist State · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Wilfred Terlumun Uji, Ahar Clement Uhembe, 55-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijah.v4i3.5 ...

  15. Xenopus laevis deiodinase 3 expression for in vitro screening of potential chemical inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal sequential development and metamorphosis of amphibian tissues and organs. Critical to this process are the deiodinase (DIO) enzymes which catalyze the removal of an iodine from thyroid hormones to either activate or inactivate the hormone...

  16. Interactive effect of elevated pCO2 and temperature on the larval development of an inter-tidal organism, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Baragi, L.V.; Anil, A.C.

    inter-tidal organism, to investigate the effect of these variables on its larval development and metamorphosis. Four alternate combinations of temperature and pCO2: (1) control (~30 °C and ~400 μatm); (2) elevated pCO2 (~30 °C...

  17. Identification and regulation of the juvenile hormone esterase gene in the Colorado potato beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermunt, A.M.W.

    1999-01-01

    A number of important physiological processes in insects is controlled by the titer of juvenile hormone (JH). The juvenile (larval) stage is maintained at a high JH titer, whereas the onset of metamorphosis is induced by a low JH titer. Reproduction by adults requires often a high JH titer.

  18. Metamorfosi e natura nella poetica di Gabriele d'Annunzio | Meda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article deals with the concepts of metamorphosis and nature as key elements in D'Annunzio's art. In his view, the poet himself is transformed by the practice of his own art into an Hermetic figure, who — like Hermes, the god who guides the souls of the dead across the threshold dividing the world of the living and the ...

  19. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  20. Gestalt Revisited: Spin-Offs and Assessment in International University Co-Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    International university co-operation is in a constant state of metamorphosis. Its future rests upon extraneous forces such as globalization and internationalization and also upon those who make policy decisions. Many international university organizations are auditing their programs and initiatives to such a degree that the cost effectiveness of…

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster ... Drosophila metamorphosis is characterized by the histolysis of larval structures by programmed cell death, which paves the way for the establishment of adult-specific structures under the ...

  2. Respiratory metabolism of salivary glands during the late larval and prepupal development of Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farkaš, R.; Sláma, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, October 01 (2015), s. 109-117 ISSN 0022-1910 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : salivary glands * in vitro culture * metamorphosis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.267, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191015001328

  3. Observations on the breeding of toads in a restricted habitat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevent the overpopulation of the pond by tadpoles. Never- theless fairly large quantities of tadpoles did develop, and metamorphosis of some of them into toadlets was observed every year. The garden seems to have been an unfavourable biotope for the futher development of the toadlets, however, as juvenile toads were ...

  4. High temperatures influence sexual development differentially in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samadhan Krushna Phuge

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... stage 42 (during feeding stages F; figure 1). 2.3 Post-experimental rearing and evaluation of effect of temperature. On reaching stage 42 (forelimb emergence), tadpoles from all the groups were transferred in separate plastic tubs with some water to facilitate metamorphosis. The larval life duration of each ...

  5. Comparative Glycoproteome Analysis: Dynamics of Protein Glycosylation during Metamorphic Transition from Pelagic to Benthic Life Stages in Three Invertebrates

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2012-02-03

    The life cycle of most benthic marine invertebrates has two distinct stages: the pelagic larval stage and the sessile juvenile stage. The transition between the larval stage and the juvenile stage is often abrupt and may be triggered by post-translational modification of proteins. Glycosylation, a very important post-translational modification, influences the biological activity of proteins. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by glycoprotein-specific fluorescence staining and mass spectrometry with the goal of identifying glycosylation pattern changes during larval settlement and metamorphosis in barnacles, bryozoans, and polychaetes. Our results revealed substantial changes in the protein glycosylation patterns from larval to juvenile stages. Before metamorphosis, the degree of protein glycosylation was high in the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite and the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa, whereas it increased after metamorphosis in the bryozoan Bugula neritina. We identified 19 abundant and differentially glycosylated proteins in these three species. Among the proteins, cellular stress- and metabolism-related proteins exhibited distinct glycosylation in B. amphitrite and B. neritina, whereas fatty acid metabolism-related proteins were abundantly glycosylated in P. vexillosa. Furthermore, the protein and gene expression analysis of some selected glycoproteins revealed that the degree of protein glycosylation did not always complement with transcriptional and translational changes associated with the larval-juvenile transition. The current study provides preliminary information on protein glycosylation in marine invertebrates that will serve as a solid basis for future comprehensive analysis of glycobiology during larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Reproductive Maturation of the Tropical Clawed Frog, Xenopus tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The model species Xenopus tropicalis is being widely used in developmental biology and amphibian toxicology studies. In order to increase our understanding of the role of steroid hormones in maturation in this species, we collected baseline reproductive data from metamorphosis t...

  7. se-p-te-mber-19-9-6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cumstances these frogs lay about 680 eggs that have a 91 % chance of hatching. But the tad- poles have only about a 5% chance of actually making it to metamorphosis and only about half of these frogs survive a full year. All these numbers taken together mean that only about. 2.5% or 17 of the 680 eggs laid, actually sur-.

  8. Isolation, characterization, and expression analyses of ecdysone receptor 1, ecdysone receptor 2 and ultraspiracle genes in varroa destructor mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is a honeybee ectoparasite considered the most important pest in apiaries throughout the US. Ecdysone receptor is a hormone secreted by the prothoracic gland of insects that controls ecdysis and stimulates metamorphosis. The ecdysone receptor is a nuclear receptor...

  9. Muslim Encounters With the Colonial State: The Making of ÔQadis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay examines the bureaucratization and institutionalization of qadis in colonial Nairobi from two view points. First, that qadis, their authority, position, social status, the exactness of their jurisdiction, the metamorphosis and evolution of the courts was influenced by the peculiarities of colonial history. Second, its ...

  10. The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei: how many instars are there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    After more than a century since the description of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), and dozens of scientific articles on the basic biology of the insect, there is still debate on the number of female larval instars. This paper analyzes the metamorphosis of H. hampei females thr...

  11. Hoopoes, cuckoos and birds of prey: the authorship of Sophocles, Fr. 581 R. (Arist., HA 633a 17-28 (Tereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam Librán Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some mythographical and ornithological details in S., Fr. 581 R. (Tereus’ metamorphosis into both a hoopoe and a hawk; Itys’ transformation into a raptor, preserved by Aristotle, HA 633a17-28, are not compatible with what can be known of Sophocles’ Tereus. Such a discrepance casts doubts on the Sophoclean authorship of the fragment.

  12. 1 An Analysis of Zooplankton Fauna Associated with Mangrove and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... their metamorphosis to juvenile stages (Haywood & Kenyon, 2009). Migration of decapods might be one of the reason for their recorded absence. The mangrove habitat structure and hydrography difference between the two mangrove sites might also justify this occurrence since at site 2, the mangroves are ...

  13. Interactive Problem-Solving Interventions as Instrument of Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This structural and conceptual metamorphosis in the international conflict paradigm has required the international community to rethink the traditional and formal conflict management and third party intervention techniques and instruments such as negotiation and mediation. In the course of achieving these goals, conflict ...

  14. The Mexican Axolotl in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests and describes laboratory activities in which the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw) is used, including experiments in embryology and early development, growth and regeneration, neoteny and metamorphosis, genetics and coloration, anatomy and physiology, and behavior. Discusses care and maintenance of animals. (CS)

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    biochemistry and developmental biology of thyroid hormone – work which led to a major pre-occupation of ..... bone. Movement of water and Na+ ions across cell membranes. Calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Morphogenesis, gene switching and cell death in amphibian larval metamorphosis. Regulation of metabolism.

  16. BDE-47 causes developmental retardation with down-regulated expression profiles of ecdysteroid signaling pathway-involved nuclear receptor (NR) genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Kim, Duck-Hyun; Jeong, Chang-Bum [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Un-Ki [Marine Ecological Risk Assessment Center, West Sea Fisheries Research Institute, National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Incheon 46083 (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Bingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The developmental rate was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) in response to BDE-47. • Expression profiles of nearly all NR genes were the highest at naupliar stages 5–6. • USP, HR96, and FTZ-F1 genes showed significant sex differences (P < 0.05) over different developmental stages. • NR gene expression patterns showed significant decreases (P<0.05) in response to BDE-47. • BDE-47 leads to molting and metamorphosis retardation and suppresses transcription of NR genes. - Abstract: 2,2′,4,4′-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) in marine environments. Despite its adverse effects (e.g. developmental retardation) in ecdysozoa, the effects of BDE-47 on transcription of ecdysteroid signaling pathway-involved-nuclear receptor (NR) genes and metamorphosis-related genes have not been examined in copepods. To examine the deleterious effect of BDE-47 on copepod molting and metamorphosis, BDE-47 was exposed to the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus japonicus, followed by monitoring developmental retardation and transcriptional alteration of NR genes. The developmental rate was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) in response to BDE-47 and the agricultural insecticide gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane. Conversely, the ecdysteroid agonist ponasterone A (PoA) led to decreased molting and metamorphosis time (P < 0.05) from the nauplius stage to the adult stage. In particular, expression profiles of all NR genes were the highest at naupliar stages 5–6 except for SVP, FTZ-F1, and HR96 genes. Nuclear receptor USP, HR96, and FTZ-F1 genes also showed significant sex differences (P < 0.05) in gene expression levels over different developmental stages, indicating that these genes may be involved in vitellogenesis. NR gene expression patterns showed significant decreases (P < 0.05) in response to BDE-47 exposure, implying that molting and metamorphosis retardation is likely associated with NR gene expression. In summary, BDE-47

  17. Comparative analysis of proteome maps of silkworm hemolymph during different developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silkworm Bombyx mori is a lepidopteran insect with four developmental stages: egg, larva (caterpillar, pupa, and adult. The hemolymph of the silkworm is in an open system that circulates among all organs, and functions in nutrient and hormone transport, injury, and immunity. To understand the intricate developmental mechanisms of metamorphosis, silkworm hemolymph from different developmental stages, including the 3rd day of fifth instar, the 6th day of fifth instar, the 3rd day of pupation, the 8th day of pupal stage and the first day of the moth stage, was investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Results Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that from the larval to moth stages, silkworm hemolymph proteins changed markedly. Not only did major proteins such as SP1, SP2, and the 30 K lipoprotein change, but other proteins varied greatly at different stages. To understand the functions of these proteins in silkworm development, 56 spots were excised from gels for analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. We identified 34 proteins involved in metamorphosis, programmed cell death, food digestion, metabolism, and nutrient storage and transport. Most proteins showed different expression at different stages, suggesting functions in development and metamorphosis. An abundance of proteins related to immunity were found, including hemolin, prophenoloxidase, serine proteinase-like protein, paralytic peptide-binding protein, and protease inhibitor. Conclusions Proteomics research not only provides the opportunity for direct investigation of protein expression patterns, but also identifies many attractive candidates for further study. Two-dimensional maps of hemolymph proteins expressed during the growth and metamorphosis of the silkworm offer important insights into hemolymph function and insect metamorphosis.

  18. Effects of two stressors on amphibian larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P; Hinton, Thomas G

    2012-05-01

    In parallel with a renewed interest in nuclear power and its possible environmental impacts, a new environmental radiation protection system calls for environmental indicators of radiological stress. However, because environmental stressors seldom occur alone, this study investigated the combined effects of an ecological stressor (larval density) and an anthropogenic stressor (ionizing radiation) on amphibians. Scaphiopus holbrookii tadpoles reared at different larval densities were exposed to four low irradiation dose rates (0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d(-1)) from (137)Cs during the sensitive period prior to and throughout metamorphosis. Body size at metamorphosis and development rate served as fitness correlates related to population dynamics. Results showed that increased larval density decreased body size but did not affect development rate. Low dose rate radiation had no impact on either endpoint. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of dietary arachidonic acid combined with light intensity and tank colour on pigmentation of common sole (Solea solea L.) larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    Supplementation of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) is known to cause hypopigmentation in common sole larvae (Solea solea L.). This study examined a possible link between dietary ARA supplementation - light intensity and tank colour on pigment defects in common sole larvae. Larval tissue ARA...... treated with the ARA supplemented emulsion during premetamorphosis showed partly or complete dorsal hypopigmentation. There were no significant effects of light intensity or tank background colour in combination with ARA on malpigmentation. Larval hypopigmentation was below 10% in the groups not treated...... to be related to a higher feed intake. Early pigment cell (chromatophor) development until 11 dph (i.e. start of metamorphosis) was not significantly related to dietary treatment, but during metamorphosis (from 16 dph) total chromatophore concentration (cells larvae (-1)) was significantly lower for larvae...

  20. Reestruturação do capital e indústria calçadista na região do Cariri - CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ricardo Silva Beserra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the industry of footwear (shoes from the Cariri region is one of the most important of Ceará stare. At last 20 years this branch of activity had sustain a substancial expansion associate to succession of transformations. The present work focuses the new territorial configurations which have was present in the region, that is product of industrial development and of the global dynamic capital. This metamorphosis is associate to another group of changes into politic-economical plan of the state, country an the world. This metamorphosis are intimately related. This present analisis is purposively critic and it intends to understand the industry how productive activity to be able transforming the geographic space content. This space is not saw how a stage of human activity, but it is saw how a historical and social production, which is a element condiction of all human activity

  1. Water contamination reduces the tolerance of coral larvae to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Negri

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are highly susceptible to climate change, with elevated sea surface temperatures (SST posing one of the main threats to coral survival. Successful recruitment of new colonies is important for the recovery of degraded reefs following mortality events. Coral larvae require relatively uncontaminated substratum on which to metamorphose into sessile polyps, and the increasing pollution of coastal waters therefore constitutes an additional threat to reef resilience. Here we develop and analyse a model of larval metamorphosis success for two common coral species to quantify the interactive effects of water pollution (copper contamination and SST. We identify thresholds of temperature and pollution that prevent larval metamorphosis, and evaluate synergistic interactions between these stressors. Our analyses show that halving the concentration of Cu can protect corals from the negative effects of a 2-3°C increase in SST. These results demonstrate that effective mitigation of local impacts can reduce negative effects of global stressors.

  2. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species......’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  3. Metamorfosi figura del desiderio impuro. Venus and Adonis tra poesia e performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lombardi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay analyses the different figures of desire in Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis. Through the analysis of the rhetorical strategies, and the intertextual resonances, it examines the function of metamorphosis in the interaction between language and performative dynamics, with reference to the recent Italian rewriting and representation of the text made by Valter Malosti. Metamorphosis is read as a figure of ‘impure’ desire not only as it makes identities more fluid and interchangeable, by challenging individual and social roles (such as male/female, active/passive, divine/human, nature/culture etc., but also as it contributes to break the dichotomy between realty and ideal, and between life and death, by emphasizing the strength of the passions – enhanced by the relationship between poetry and performance – against death and reification.

  4. Transgenerational effects of ocean warming on the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chong; Zhang, Lisheng; Shi, Dongtao; Ding, Jingyun; Yin, Donghong; Sun, Jiangnan; Zhang, Baojing; Zhang, Lingling; Chang, Yaqing

    2018-04-30

    Transgenerational effects, which involve both selection and plasticity, are important for the evolutionary adaptation of echinoderms in the changing ocean. Here, we investigated the effects of breeding design and water temperature for offspring on fertilization, hatchability, larval survival, size, abnormality and metamorphosis of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius, whose dams and sires were exposed to long-term (~15 months) elevated temperature (~3°C above ambient) or ambient temperature. There was no transgenerational effect on fertilization and metamorphosis of S. intermedius, while negative transgenerational effects were found in hatchability and most traits of larval size. Dam and sire effects were highly trait and developmental stage dependent. Interestingly, we found S. intermedius probably cannot achieve transgenerational acclimation to long-term elevated temperature for survival provided their offspring were exposed to an elevated temperature. The present study enriches our understanding of transgenerational effects of ocean warming on sea urchins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Como desaparecer sendo todas as coisas: derivação e polimorfia em Francesca Woodman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Infante da Câmara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Este ensaio parte da obra de Francesca Woodman para traçar, sobre a mesma, um fio narrativo sustentado nas ideias de dispersão, metamorfose e construção identitária. Considera algumas das suas principais temáticas, assim como os géneros e movimentos artísticos com que mais tem sido identificada, para alargar alguns posicionamentos críticos daí decorrentes. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Francesca Woodman, fotografia, corpo, desejo, metamorfose, extravasação. _____________________ ABSTRACT: This essay is based on the work of Francesca Woodman to draw a narrative thread based on the ideas of dispersion, metamorphosis and identity construction. It considers some of its main themes, as well as the artistic genres and movements with which it has been most identified, in order to broaden some critical positions resulting from it. KEYWORDS: Francesca Woodman, photography, body, desire, metamorphosis, extravasation.

  6. An infinite family of superintegrable deformations of the Coulomb potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Sarah [Centre de recherches mathematiques, CP 6128 succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Winternitz, Pavel, E-mail: post@CRM.UMontreal.C, E-mail: wintern@CRM.UMontreal.C [Centre de recherches mathematiques and Departement de mathematiques et de statistique, CP 6128 succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2010-06-04

    We introduce a new family of Hamiltonians with a deformed Kepler-Coulomb potential dependent on an indexing parameter k. We show that this family is superintegrable for all rational k and compute the classical trajectories and quantum wavefunctions. We show that this system is related, via coupling constant metamorphosis, to a family of superintegrable deformations of the harmonic oscillator given by Tremblay, Turbiner and Winternitz. In doing so, we prove that all Hamiltonians with an oscillator term are related by coupling constant metamorphosis to systems with a Kepler-Coulomb term, both on Euclidean space. We also look at the effect of the transformation on the integrals of the motion, the classical trajectories and the wavefunctions, and give the transformed integrals explicitly for the classical system. (fast track communication)

  7. ”En människa är det”: Flickskap i Jessica Schiefauers Pojkarna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecka Fokin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses Jessica Schiefauer’s prize-winning young adult novel Pojkarna (The Boys, where a magical metamorphosis from girl to boy takes place. The novel raises questions about girlhood and gender: what is it like not being able to, or not want to, identify with a specific gender? The paper analyses how girlhood is constructed in Pojkarna, and discusses the novel as fantastic realism and thus as an eclectic form of fantasy literature. The argument of the article is that the novel, through its depiction of gender, contributes to a renewal of the fantastic genre. This article examines how girlhood is constructed through metamorphoses, performativity, spatiality and mirroring. The narrative does not demand a reversion to realism, utilizing the subversiveness of the fantastic genre to its fullest. Thus the potential of the magical metamorphosis, to another gender, remains at the end of the novel.

  8. Immunocytochemistry and metamorphic fate of the larval nervous system of Triphyllozoon mucronatum (Ectoprocta: Gymnolaemata: Cheilostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanninger, Andreas; Koop, Demian; Degnan, Bernard M.

    2005-01-01

    and FMRFamide and followed the fate of immunoreactive cells through metamorphosis. The larval serotonergic nervous system of Triphyllozoon mucronatum consists of an apical commissure, one pair of lateral axons, a coronate nerve net, an internal nerve mesh, and one pair of axons innervating the frontal organ....... FMRFamide is only found in the larval commissure and in the lateral axons. The entire serotonergic and FMRFamidergic nervous system is lost during metamorphosis and the adult neural structures form independent of the larval ones. In the postlarval zooid, both neurotransmitters are detected in the cerebral...... commissure, in cell bodies located at the base of the lophophore, and in neurites connecting these somata to the cerebral commissure. These findings differ significantly from that observed in other lophotrochozoans, where certain larval neural features are either incorporated in the adult nervous system and...

  9. The Documentary Handbook

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Wright, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Documentary Handbook takes a thematic approach to documentary, including chapters on the myriad mutant forms we watch today - from the cinematic releases of Michael Moore to low-budget internet efforts like Video Nation, from 'shock docs' to reality television. The book charts the evolution of the documentary form from screen art to core television genre, its metamorphosis into many different types of factual TV and its current emergence in forms of new media.\\ud \\ud 'The Documentary Hand...

  10. Effects of the soya isoflavone genistein in early life stages of the Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis: Thyroid, estrogenic and metabolic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasquete, Carmen; Úbeda-Manzanaro, Maria; Ortiz-Delgado, Juan Bosco

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the effects induced by environmentally relevant concentrations of the isoflavone genistein (3mg/L and 10mg/L) during early life stages of the Senegalese sole. Throughout the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, several neurohormonal regulatory thyroid signalling patterns (thyroglobulin/Tg, thyroid peroxidase/TPO, transthyretin/TTR, thyroid receptors/TRβ, and iodothrynonine deiodinases, Dio2 and Dio3) were analysed. Furthermore, the expression patterns of estrogen receptor ERβ and haemoprotein Cyp1a were also evaluated. In the control larvae, progressive increases of constitutive hormonal signalling pathways have been evidenced from the pre-metamorphosis phase onwards, reaching the highest expression basal levels at the metamorphosis (Tg, TPO, Dio2) and/or during post-metamorphosis (TTR, TRβ, ERβ). When the early larvae were exposed to both genistein concentrations (3mg/L and 10mg/L), a statistically significant down-regulation of TPO, TTR and Tg mRNA levels was clearly detected at the metamorphic stages. In addition, the Dio2 and Dio3 transcript expression levels were also down and up-regulated when exposed to both genistein concentrations. In the larvae exposed to genistein, no statistically significant responses were recorded for the TRβ expression patterns. Nevertheless, the ERβ and Cyp1a transcript levels were up-regulated at the middle metamorphic stage (S2, at 16 dph) in the larvae exposed to high genistein concentrations and, only the ERβ was down-regulated (S1, at 12dph) at the lower doses. Finally, all these pointed out imbalances were only temporarily disrupted by exposure to genistein, since most of the modulated transcriptional signals (i.e. up or down-regulation) were quickly restored to the baseline levels. Additionally, the control and genistein-exposed Senegalese sole specimens showed characteristic ontogenetic patterns and completely suitable for an optimal development, metamorphosis, and growth. Copyright © 2017

  11. Neuroendocrine control of Drosophila larval light preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Romero, Nuria M.; Martin, Francisco A.

    2013-01-01

    Animal development is coupled with innate behaviors that maximize chances of survival. Here, we show that the prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH), a neuropeptide that controls the developmental transition from juvenile stage to sexual maturation, also regulates light avoidance in Drosophila...... animals toward a darker environment to initiate the immobile maturation phase. Thus, PTTH controls the decisions of when and where animals undergo metamorphosis, optimizing conditions for adult development....

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mcbee

    2001-10-01

    Oct 1, 2001 ... hbr-blogs.html, accessed 21.10.2011, p. 1. Menasse (1986), “Characteristics of Leaders of. Change”, http://www.sedl.org/change/ leadership/character.html, accessed 21.10.2011, p. 1. Mireku-Gyimah, D. and Bedai, E. K. (2003), “The. Establishment of Tarkwa School of Mines and its Metamorphosis into the ...

  13. THE DEXTERITY OF LEADERSHIP ENTRENCHES THE SCHOLASTIC ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrarup\tGUPTA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leadership is an encyclopedic concept for a successful business formation. A business is a commercial activity to run a very thoughtful transaction in terms of money. Leadership consists of the perceptual vision and mission to establish a promising business concept for an upcoming recognition and the indelible goodwill as well. More over Leaders do inspire the entire organizational authority to accept the destined organizational metamorphosis for promoting the organizational elegance in deed.

  14. THE DEXTERITY OF LEADERSHIP ENTRENCHES THE SCHOLASTIC ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Rudrarup GUPTA; Alexandru‐Mircea NEDELEA

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is an encyclopedic concept for a successful business formation. A business is a commercial activity to run a very thoughtful transaction in terms of money. Leadership consists of the perceptual vision and mission to establish a promising business concept for an upcoming recognition and the indelible goodwill as well. More over Leaders do inspire the entire organizational authority to accept the destined organizational metamorphosis for promoting the organizational elegance in deed.

  15. In memory of Patrick Manson, founding father of tropical medicine and the discovery of vector-borne infections

    OpenAIRE

    To, Kelvin KW; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    Patrick Manson, a clinician-scientist serving in China (1866?1889), discovered that many tropical infectious diseases require a vector peculiar to warm climate for person to person transmission. He demonstrated the nocturnal periodicity of microfilariae in the blood of patients with elephantiasis. These microfilariae undergo metamorphosis when ingested by the mosquito acting as the vector for the completion of their life cycle. Furthermore, he demonstrated the linkage between the lung fluke a...

  16. Changes in biomass and chemical composition during lecithotrophic larval development of the Southern king crab, Lithodes santolla (Molina)

    OpenAIRE

    Lovrich, G. A.; Thatje, S.; Calcagno, J. A.; Anger, Klaus; Kaffenberger, A.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in biomass and elemental composition (dry mass, W; carbon, C; nitrogen, N; hydrogen, H) were studied in the laboratory during complete larval and early juvenile development of the southern king crab, Lithodes santolla (Molina), formerly known as Lithodes antarcticus (Jacquinot). At 6±0.5 °C, total larval development from hatching to metamorphosis lasted about 10 weeks, comprising three demersal zoeal stages and a benthic megalopa, with mean stage durations of 4, 7, 11 and 47 days, res...

  17. Lipid, fatty acid and protein utilization during lecithotrophic larval development of Lithodes santolla (Molina) and Paralomis granulosa (Jacquinot)

    OpenAIRE

    Kattner, G.; Graeve, M.; Calcagno, J.A.; Lovrich, G.A.; Thatje, S.; Anger, K.

    2003-01-01

    During the larval development of the subantarctic king crab, Lithodes santolla, and stone crab, Paralomis granulosa, we compared changes in the carbon, fatty acid and protein contents of larvae reared under constant conditions from hatching to metamorphosis, either in presence or absence of food (Artemia spp. nauplii). In both species the feeding condition had no influence on any of the chemical parameters studied, indicating a fully lecithotrophic (i.e. non-feeding) mode of development from ...

  18. A Model for Taxonomic Work on Homoxenous Coccidia: Redescription, Host Specificity, and Molecular Phylogeny of Eimeria ranae Dobell, 1909, with a Review of Anuran-Host Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, Miloslav; Jirků, Milan; Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, Julius; Modrý, David

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2009), s. 39-51 ISSN 1066-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/1544 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Amphibia * Anura * experimental infections * metamorphosis * morphotypes * SSU rDNA sequence * tadpoles * ultrastructure Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2009

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  20. Malattia, animalità e resistenza: il "multiforme ingegno" di Franz Kafka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Carofalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ILLNESS, ANIMALITY AND RESISTANCE: FRANZ KAFKA’S “MUCH TURNED TALENT”   Metamorphosis and survival are the main themes at the core of Bulgarian philosopher Elias Canetti’s thought. In the following essay we will see how these two themes dominate Franz Kafka’s works, especially if we look at the images of the animal and the ill body.

  1. Investigation of road salts and biotic stressors on freshwater wetland communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Devin K; Mattes, Brian M; Hintz, William D; Schuler, Matthew S; Stoler, Aaron B; Lind, Lovisa A; Cooper, Reilly O; Relyea, Rick A

    2017-02-01

    The application of road deicing salts has led to the salinization of freshwater ecosystems in northern regions worldwide. Increased chloride concentrations in lakes, streams, ponds, and wetlands may negatively affect freshwater biota, potentially threatening ecosystem services. In an effort to reduce the effects of road salt, operators have increased the use of salt alternatives, yet we lack an understanding of how these deicers affect aquatic communities. We examined the direct and indirect effects of the most commonly used road salt (NaCl) and a proprietary salt mixture (NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 ), at three environmentally relevant concentrations (150, 470, and 780 mg Cl - /L) on freshwater wetland communities in combination with one of three biotic stressors (control, predator cues, and competitors). The communities contained periphyton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and two tadpole species (American toads, Anaxyrus americanus; wood frogs, Lithobates sylvaticus). Overall, we found the two road salts did not interact with the natural stressors. Both salts decreased pH and reduced zooplankton abundance. The strong decrease in zooplankton abundance in the highest NaCl concentration caused a trophic cascade that resulted in increased phytoplankton abundance. The highest NaCl concentration also reduced toad activity. For the biotic stressors, predatory stress decreased whereas competitive stress increased the activity of both tadpole species. Wood frog survival, time to metamorphosis, and mass at metamorphosis all decreased under competitive stress whereas toad time to metamorphosis increased and mass at metamorphosis decreased. Road salts and biotic stressors can both affect freshwater communities, but their effects are not interactive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Developmental checkpoints and feedback circuits time insect maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim Furbo; Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    metamorphosis and reproductive maturation. The past few years have seen significant progress in understanding the interplay of mechanisms that coordinate timing of ecdysone production and release. These studies show that the neuroendocrine system monitors complex size-related and nutritional signals, as well...... that coordinate the juvenile-adult transition suggests that insights from the fruit fly Drosophila will provide a framework for future investigation of developmental timing in metazoans....

  3. Feeding on intertidal microbial mats by postlarval tiger shrimp, Penaeus semisulcatus De Haan

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Maslamani, I.; Le Vay, L.; Kennedy, H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments investigated the potential role of microbial mats in nutrition of the early settlement stages of Penaeus semisulcatus. From 3 days post-metamorphosis, the microbial mat supported high growth and survival rates in postlarvae, equivalent to that supported by a control diet of Artemia nauplii and mussel. Examination of gut contents indicated that benthic postlarvae feed indiscriminately on the microbial mat. However, when postlarvae were fed separated size-fractions of th...

  4. Drosophila larval to pupal switch under nutrient stress requires IP3R/Ca2+ signalling in glutamatergic interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakumar, Siddharth; Richhariya, Shlesha; Reddy, O Venkateswara; Texada, Michael J; Hasan, Gaiti

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest Insect larvae must feed voraciously to accumulate enough nutrients to tide them over the pupal stage of their lifecycle. Unlike larvae, pupae do not feed but instead use their stored energy reserves to fuel their metamorphosis into adults. To maximise their chances of survival, insect larvae must carefully time their transformation into pupae based on both the availability of nutrients in the environment and their own energy stores. The circuit of neurons within the larval nervou...

  5. A Comparative Analysis into U.S. Military Abuses at the My Lai Massacre and Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    volunteer’s participation ultimately benefits this ideology.121 116 This is known as the Lucifer Effect ...i.e., the metamorphosis of God’s favorite angel, Lucifer , into Satan, captured by psychologist Zimbardo in his book The Lucifer Effect ...Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. Zimbardo’s reference to the Lucifer Effect , which is analogous to his model of how ordinary people do “evil” things, is

  6. Larval Environment Alters Amphibian Immune Defenses Differentially across Life Stages and Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Krynak

    Full Text Available Recent global declines, extirpations and extinctions of wildlife caused by newly emergent diseases highlight the need to improve our knowledge of common environmental factors that affect the strength of immune defense traits. To achieve this goal, we examined the influence of acidification and shading of the larval environment on amphibian skin-associated innate immune defense traits, pre and post-metamorphosis, across two populations of American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana, a species known for its wide-ranging environmental tolerance and introduced global distribution. We assessed treatment effects on 1 skin-associated microbial communities and 2 post-metamorphic antimicrobial peptide (AMP production and 3 AMP bioactivity against the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. While habitat acidification did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis or juvenile mass, we found that a change in average pH from 7 to 6 caused a significant shift in the larval skin microbial community, an effect which disappeared after metamorphosis. Additionally, we found shifts in skin-associated microbial communities across life stages suggesting they are affected by the physiological or ecological changes associated with amphibian metamorphosis. Moreover, we found that post-metamorphic AMP production and bioactivity were significantly affected by the interactions between pH and shade treatments and interactive effects differed across populations. In contrast, there were no significant interactions between treatments on post-metamorphic microbial community structure suggesting that variation in AMPs did not affect microbial community structure within our study. Our findings indicate that commonly encountered variation in the larval environment (i.e. pond pH and degree of shading can have both immediate and long-term effects on the amphibian innate immune defense traits. Our work suggests that the susceptibility of amphibians to emerging diseases could be

  7. Comparison of thyroid hormone-dependent gene responses in vivo and in organ culture of the American bullfrog (Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana) lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Nik; Stevenson, Mitchel R; Helbing, Caren C

    2015-12-01

    Postembryonic frog development requires a thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphic transition from an aquatic larva to a terrestrial frog. Such change in environment involves lung maturation in preparation for breathing air. However, little is known regarding the underlying molecular events and the role of THs in this process. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we evaluated Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana lung mRNA transcripts representing key elements of TH and oxidative stress signaling pathways during natural and TH-induced precocious metamorphosis. TH induction was evaluated in two ways: 1) in vivo through interperitoneal injection of 10pmol/g body weight of 3,3', 5-triiodothyronine (T3) into premetamorphic tadpoles and analysis after 48h, and 2) in serum-free organ culture in the presence of 10nM T3 after 48h. Abundance of transcripts encoding the transcriptional regulators TH receptors α and β, TH-induced bZip protein, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein 1 was increased during postembryonic development and following administration of exogenous THs to premetamorphic tadpoles in vivo and culture. In contrast, mRNA representing Krüppel-like factor 9 and cold-inducible RNA binding protein revealed differential effects between natural and precocious metamorphosis. Elevated levels of catalase and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase mRNA were observed at the end of metamorphosis with transcript levels displaying minimal TH-dependency. No change in stress-responsive heat shock protein 30 mRNA abundance was noted. The results support a role for TH-dependent reprogramming of the lung transcriptome during frog development and reveal a requirement for increased antioxidant capacity following anuran metamorphosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of ontogenetic and environmental changes in the otolith microchemistry of juvenile sole ( Solea solea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pontual, Hélène; Lagardère, Françoise; Amara, Rachid; Bohn, Marcel; Ogor, André

    2003-11-01

    We analysed otolith composition, specifically Sr/Ca ratios, with the aim of determining whether metamorphosis and the transition to benthic life of Bay of Biscay sole occur in marine or estuarine conditions. Otoliths of wild juveniles (0-group) collected in two estuarine nurseries showed characteristic Sr/Ca chronologies, with a significant decrease of the Sr/Ca ratio from the core to the accessory growth centres. As the otolith Sr/Ca ratio decreases in respect of the ambient salinity, this could suggest a relative synchronism in the timing of estuarine nursery entrance. In order to validate this hypothesis, hatchery-produced larvae were reared in a tidal marsh mesocosm until they completed metamorphosis (around 1 month post-hatching) and settled on the bottom. The otoliths from these juveniles exhibited a similar Sr/Ca pattern, which could not be explained as a result of habitat changes, and especially salinity variations, but rather reflected an ontogenetic signal. Since both wild and reared soles achieved high growth rates during metamorphosis, this suggests a link between a high metabolic rate and the observed Sr/Ca drop. In addition, ontogenetic changes during this transitional phase could involve the setting of functional mechanisms, responsible for the regulation of free Sr 2+ in either plasma or endolymph or both. Nevertheless, this common trend appeared to be modulated by environmental cues: Sr/Ca ratios were significantly higher for reared fish compared to wild fish during the larval period. A possible explanation is that experienced temperatures were much higher in the incubator than in the field. Furthermore, Sr/Ca values obtained in the otolith juvenile area, with the lowest ratios for soles from the Loire nursery, suggest that the salinity regime of estuarine nurseries could exert an environmental control on otolith Sr/Ca ratios, thus providing ecological records of up-estuary migration after metamorphosis.

  9. Multiple and Symbol Operators: the Battle for Market Leadership in the Irish Grocery Market

    OpenAIRE

    O'Callaghan, Edmund; Wilcox, Mary

    2002-01-01

    The Irish grocery retailing market, one of the most competitive in Europe, has undergone a metamorphosis in recent years. The demise of many small grocers, an increased concentration of multiples and the galvanization of the independent sector through symbol group participation has intensified competitive rivalry. The two largest multiples ie. Tesco Ireland and Dunnes Stores continually vie for number one position nationally. In recent years, Musgrave have galvanised the independent sector an...

  10. Maria Angelina Doukaina Palaiologina and her depictions in post-byzantine mural paintings

    OpenAIRE

    Agoritsas Demetrios C.

    2014-01-01

    The Serbian Despot of Ioannina Thomas Preljubović and his wife Maria Angelina Doukaina Palaiologina were frequently connected with religious endowments and artefacts that were donated in churches and monasteries. One of them, an icon of the “Doubting Thomas” with the depiction of Maria Palaiologina among the Apostles, was donated by Maria to the monastery of Metamorphosis (Great Meteoron) most probably in the memory of her husband Thomas. This rare iconogra...

  11. Systemic concepts in literature and art

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The examination of literature and art has been one of psychotherapy's most powerful ways of explicating its theories and disseminating its concepts. In this study, I have explored various concepts of family psychotherapy by applying them to three works of imaginative literature, and one work of sculpture: Luigi Pirandello's play, Six Characters in Search of an Author, Franz Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis, Robinson Jeffers' poem, "The Purse-Seine," and the ancient Roma...

  12. Environmental Impact Research Program. Gravel Bar Mussel Communities: A Community Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    ends in thle -interior intestine, the rest ol thle gilt tube( (posterior intestine and rectum" is anatomicall 1vndU-erent i- ;ited. It ends in the...by most before metamorphosis. Further, even the normal species of vertebrate host can acquire an immunity to subsequent glochidial infection (Arev 193...1932c. A microscopical study of glochidial immunity . Journal of Morphology. 53:367-379. Arthur, J. N.; W. B. Horning. 1969. The uses of artificial

  13. Critical disease windows shaped by stress exposure alter allocation trade-offs between development and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Lucas J; Crespi, Erica J; Warne, Robin W

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous environmental stressors are often thought to alter animal susceptibility to pathogens and contribute to disease emergence. However, duration of exposure to a stressor is likely critical, because while chronic stress is often immunosuppressive, acute stress can temporarily enhance immune function. Furthermore, host susceptibility to stress and disease often varies with ontogeny; increasing during critical developmental windows. How the duration and timing of exposure to stressors interact to shape critical windows and influence disease processes is not well tested. We used ranavirus and larval amphibians as a model system to investigate how physiological stress and pathogenic infection shape development and disease dynamics in vertebrates. Based on a resource allocation model, we designed experiments to test how exposure to stressors may induce resource trade-offs that shape critical windows and disease processes because the neuroendocrine stress axis coordinates developmental remodelling, immune function and energy allocation in larval amphibians. We used wood frog larvae (Lithobates sylvaticus) to investigate how chronic and acute exposure to corticosterone, the dominant amphibian glucocorticoid hormone, mediates development and immune function via splenocyte immunohistochemistry analysis in association with ranavirus infection. Corticosterone treatments affected immune function, as both chronic and acute exposure suppressed splenocyte proliferation, although viral replication rate increased only in the chronic corticosterone treatment. Time to metamorphosis and survival depended on both corticosterone treatment and infection status. In the control and chronic corticosterone treatments, ranavirus infection decreased survival and delayed metamorphosis, although chronic corticosterone exposure accelerated rate of metamorphosis in uninfected larvae. Acute corticosterone exposure accelerated metamorphosis increased survival in infected larvae. Interactions

  14. Multiple Approaches for Testing Novel Coatings in the Laboratory and in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with Emphasis on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Multiple Approaches for Testing Novel Coatings in the Laboratory and in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii with Emphasis on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates 5a...on the Global, Problem-Fouling Invertebrates ONR AWARD NUMBER: N00014-11-1-0167 PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATOR: Michael G. Hadfield, Ph.D...luteoviolacea a phage tail-like component that is capable of inducing the metamorphosis of a marine invertebrate . However, our continued studies in the

  15. Brief notes on the seminar: "Manifestation of instantaneity in the phenomenology of borderline pathology. Artistic fragments" (by G. Stanghellini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Mauro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes an analysis of the metamorphosis of temporality in late modernity and the changes that this transformation gives to the forms of identity and psychopathological vulnerability, particularly in the relationship between the temporal dimension of instantaneity and borderline phenomenology. It is dealt with in depth artistic production, through which it is possible to re-cross the clinical experience of the therapeutic relationship.Keywords: Istantaneity; Borderline phenomenolgy; Art production

  16. Importance of juvenile hormone signaling arises with competence of insect larvae to metamorphose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smýkal, Vlastimil; Daimon, T.; Kayukawa, T.; Takaki, Keiko; Shinoda, T.; Jindra, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 390, č. 2 (2014), s. 221-230 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960906 Grant - others:Marie Curie Fellowship Award(CZ) GA 276569; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) 25252059 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insect metamorphosis * hormonal signaling * juvenile hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.547, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012160614001419

  17. Larvicidal benzoquinone from Embelia schimperi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Kiprono

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatographic analysis of air-dried berries of Embelia schimperi led to the isolation of methyl vilangin (1, which was characterized on the basis of physical and spectroscopic data. The compound was found to be lethal against 2nd instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (yellow fever vector by first stopping the process of metamorphosis from the 2nd instar stage to the other stages and finally causing mortality to the larvae.

  18. Distribution of tributyltin (TBT) in the Mandovi estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.

    induce the settlement and metamorphosis of larvae of invertebrates such as barnacles, mussels, oysters, and algal spores. This results in the development of macrofouling visible to the naked eye. Biofilm and macrofouling together are defined as biofouling..., induce metal corrosion, impair heat-transfer efficiency of heat conductors, block flow in pipelines, reduce the life span of offshore platforms, etc. Such effects can cause huge economic losses to several industries, including naval and commercial...

  19. Behavioural Response Thresholds in New Zealand Crab Megalopae to Ambient Underwater Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A.; Radford, Craig A.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    A small number of studies have demonstrated that settlement stage decapod crustaceans are able to detect and exhibit swimming, settlement and metamorphosis responses to ambient underwater sound emanating from coastal reefs. However, the intensity of the acoustic cue required to initiate the settlement and metamorphosis response, and therefore the potential range over which this acoustic cue may operate, is not known. The current study determined the behavioural response thresholds of four species of New Zealand brachyuran crab megalopae by exposing them to different intensity levels of broadcast reef sound recorded from their preferred settlement habitat and from an unfavourable settlement habitat. Megalopae of the rocky-reef crab, Leptograpsus variegatus, exhibited the lowest behavioural response threshold (highest sensitivity), with a significant reduction in time to metamorphosis (TTM) when exposed to underwater reef sound with an intensity of 90 dB re 1 µPa and greater (100, 126 and 135 dB re 1 µPa). Megalopae of the mud crab, Austrohelice crassa, which settle in soft sediment habitats, exhibited no response to any of the underwater reef sound levels. All reef associated species exposed to sound levels from an unfavourable settlement habitat showed no significant change in TTM, even at intensities that were similar to their preferred reef sound for which reductions in TTM were observed. These results indicated that megalopae were able to discern and respond selectively to habitat-specific acoustic cues. The settlement and metamorphosis behavioural response thresholds to levels of underwater reef sound determined in the current study of four species of crabs, enables preliminary estimation of the spatial range at which an acoustic settlement cue may be operating, from 5 m to 40 km depending on the species. Overall, these results indicate that underwater sound is likely to play a major role in influencing the spatial patterns of settlement of coastal crab

  20. Žena jako téma výtvarného umění

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanová, Zdeňka

    2009-01-01

    Work sight: theoretical study with an art project Subject: art metamorphosis in woman theme in the context of the 20th and 21st century Aim: to show the role of a women - artist in contemporary art, orientation in idea feminism and gender in the context of art, to cause the interest in a new point of view that women - artist take to art production Contribution, knowledge: a sight of women - artist, who deal with the theme of woman

  1. The ontogenetic shift in thermoregulatory behaviour of newt larvae: testing the "enemy-free temperatures" hypothesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolinský, Radovan; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 2 (2009), s. 180-186 ISSN 0952-8369 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0953; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Aeshna * fundamental thermal niche * metamorphosis * preferred body temperature s * Triturus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.545, year: 2009

  2. Duke Humphrey of Gloucester in the eyes of posterity: Lancastrian rule and Tudor propaganda

    OpenAIRE

    Petrina, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The century following Duke Humphrey’s death has transmitted an image of “the Good Duke” that modern historiography may find misleading. Contemporary scholarship is interested in his role as the promoter of humanism in fifteenth-century England; yet, though in the course of his life there were acknowledgements of his patronage, the years immediately following his death saw his image undergo a metamorphosis. His role as a proto-humanist was quickly forgotten, while the political resonance of hi...

  3. Embryology at the Universities of Lwow and Wroclaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorzalek, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Embryological research at the University of Wroclaw covers hormonal control of metamorphosis, primarily invertebrate embryology and gametogenesis, vertebrate myogenesis and the developmental impact of external factors. Developmental studies at the University of Wroclaw are a continuation of those conducted at the former Jan Kazimierz (Johannes Casimirus) University in Lwow before World War II. The Wroclaw embryological school is best characterized as comparative embryology which approaches embryonic development experimentally as well as through the analysis of its natural diversity.

  4. Effect of dietary arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on survival, growth and pigmentation in larvae of common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    on Artemia enriched with 10 formulated emulsions, differing in inclusions of ARA, EPA, and DHA. The specific growth rate of the sole larvae until late metamorphosis, 21 days after hatching (dah) was 20 to 27% d(-1). Even though the relative tissue essential fatty acid (EFA) concentrations significantly...... resulted in a lower growth rate, which suggests that visual aberrations affected prey capture. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Larval settlement preferences and post-settlement survival of the threatened Caribbean corals Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritson-Williams, R.; Paul, Valerie J.; Arnold, S. N.; Steneck, R. S.

    2010-03-01

    The settlement specificity of two threatened Caribbean corals, Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis, was tested by measuring their rates of larval metamorphosis in response to crustose coralline algae (CCA) and other substrata. In the no-choice experiments, the coral larvae were placed in six treatments: filtered seawater (FSW), a fragment of biofilmed dead skeleton of A. palmata, or a fragment of one of four species of CCA ( Hydrolithon boergesenii, Porolithon pachydermum, Paragoniolithon solubile, and Titanoderma prototypum). Within each CCA treatment, there were three different substrata on which to settle and metamorphose: (1) the CCA surface, (2) the rock under the CCA, or (3) the plastic dish. The 5-day-old larvae of both A. palmata and A. cervicornis had similar rates of total metamorphosis (all substrata combined) in every treatment (excluding FSW) even in the absence of CCA. However, there were differences in larval behavior among the CCA species since the larvae settled and metamorphosed on different substrata in the presence of different CCA species. In the no-choice experiments the larvae of both corals had higher rates of metamorphosis on the top surfaces of H. boergesenii and/or T. prototypum than on P. pachydermum. In the choice experiments, the coral larvae were offered two species of CCA in the same dish. When given a choice, both species of coral larvae had more settlement and metamorphosis on the surface of H. boergesenii or T. prototypum or clean rock than onto the surface of P. solubile. After 6 weeks in the field, transplanted A. palmata recruits had approximately 15% survival on both T. prototypum and H. boergesenii, but A. cervicornis recruits only survived on T. prototypum (13%). Some, but not all, CCA species facilitated the larval settlement and post-settlement survival of these two threatened corals, highlighting the importance of benthic community composition for successful coral recruitment.

  6. Hoods

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Hoods is a concert-length chamber opera based on Euripides' Hekabe and Little Red Riding Hood, parallel stories of women in extremis. Setting myth and fairytale in the context perpetual war, the opera explores themes of violence, gender, and metamorphosis. Three singers each play multiple roles from the alternating stories. Recordings of helicopters, animals, stomachs, and voices accompany live chamber music by an ensemble of flute/bass flute, clarinet, French horn, percussion, cello, and con...

  7. A New Paradigm for the Iraq Police: Applying Community-Oriented Policing to Iraqi Police Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    analysis, the establishment of criminal databases , and the use of polygraph tests. He believed in training all police officers in criminal...level of mutual confidence. There was a lack of formal crime prevention studies in the country. There was a lack of a criminal database arranging...Iraq, 1953, 23. 56 John F. Devlin. "Baath Party: Rise and Metamorphosis." JSTOR . December 1991. http://www.jstor.org/stabel/2165277 (accessed January

  8. E-Model for Online Learning Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogo, Ellen J; Portillo, Karen M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the students' perspectives on the phenomenon of online learning communities while enrolled in a graduate dental hygiene program. A qualitative case study method was designed to investigate the learners' experiences with communities in an online environment. A cross-sectional purposive sampling method was used. Interviews were the data collection method. As the original data were being analyzed, the researchers noted a pattern evolved indicating the phenomenon developed in stages. The data were re-analyzed and validated by 2 member checks. The participants' experiences revealed an e-model consisting of 3 stages of formal learning community development as core courses in the curriculum were completed and 1 stage related to transmuting the community to an informal entity as students experienced the independent coursework in the program. The development of the formal learning communities followed 3 stages: Building a Foundation for the Learning Community, Building a Supportive Network within the Learning Community and Investing in the Community to Enhance Learning. The last stage, Transforming the Learning Community, signaled a transition to an informal network of learners. The e-model was represented by 3 key elements: metamorphosis of relationships, metamorphosis through the affective domain and metamorphosis through the cognitive domain, with the most influential element being the affective development. The e-model describes a 4 stage process through which learners experience a metamorphosis in their affective, relationship and cognitive development. Synergistic learning was possible based on the interaction between synergistic relationships and affective actions. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  9. Genres, forms and status: a pharmacy for transmission - DOI: 10.3395/reciis.v3i3.294en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Temperville

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the notions of genre and form via a new reading of Derrida and shows that the ineffable nature of pharmakon throws light on how permanence, hybridation and metamorphosis are present in digital documents. The notion of context comes to the fore and problems of legibility and legitimation are understood to be a constant feature in the reception of documents.

  10. Duchovní život muže - laika. Teologická a psychologická východiska, sociální proměny a výhledy do budoucna

    OpenAIRE

    Šmídek, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Title : Spiritual life of a male laic. Theological and psychological base, social metamorphosis and expectations. Keywords : male spirituality, masculinity, marriage life, gender studies, spiritual theology. Annotation : Spiritual life of a man living in a marriage is explored from various points of view. Studying biblical narratives about the creation of man showed constitutive differences between male and female, as well as their special symmetry connected with life roles. Differences in Je...

  11. Liberalization assessment: The Greek cruise market

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanidaki, Evangelia; Lekakou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    More than thirty years, after the metamorphosis of the cruise industry from an expensive type of vacation for the elite to an affordable alternative for the mass market, cruise shipping records high rates of growth. The Greek cruise market has been liberalized since 1999, when the Regulation of the European Commission 3577/92 came into force, allowing cruise ships flying European flags to operate in Greek waters and to use national ports as homeports. Restrictions were in force only for the n...

  12. Effects of temperature on embryonic and larval development and growth in the natterjack toad (Bufo calamita in a semi-arid zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanuy, D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature affects the duration of embryonic and larval periods in amphibians. Plasticity in time to metamorphosis is especially important in amphibian populations of Mediterranean semi-arid zones where temperatures are high and precipitation is low, increasing the rate of pond desiccation. In order to test the influence of water temperature on the larval development and growth of the natterjack toad (Bufo calamita, we collected two spawns in a semi¿arid zone at Balaguer (Lleida, NE Iberian peninsula. Approximately 50 (+/-10 eggs (stage 14-16 were raised in the lab at different temperature conditions: 10, 15, 20, 22.5 and 25ºC with 12:12 photoperiod. The results show a lengthening of development time with decreasing temperatures and a better survival performance of B. calamita to high temperatures. However, mean size at metamorphosis was not different across treatments, thus, suggesting that this population of B. calamita requires a minimum size to complete the metamorphosis. This study is the first approach to examine the effects that climatic factors have on the growth and development of B. calamita in semi-arid zones.

  13. Fossil evidence for key innovations in the evolution of insect diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David B.; Ross, Andrew J.; Mayhew, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the taxonomic richness of the insects, comprising over half of all described species, is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Previously, several evolutionary novelties (key innovations) have been posited to contribute to that richness, including the insect bauplan, wings, wing folding and complete metamorphosis, but evidence over their relative importance and modes of action is sparse and equivocal. Here, a new dataset on the first and last occurrences of fossil hexapod (insects and close relatives) families is used to show that basal families of winged insects (Palaeoptera, e.g. dragonflies) show higher origination and extinction rates in the fossil record than basal wingless groups (Apterygota, e.g. silverfish). Origination and extinction rates were maintained at levels similar to Palaeoptera in the more derived Polyneoptera (e.g. cockroaches) and Paraneoptera (e.g. true bugs), but extinction rates subsequently reduced in the very rich group of insects with complete metamorphosis (Holometabola, e.g. beetles). Holometabola show evidence of a recent slow-down in their high net diversification rate, whereas other winged taxa continue to diversify at constant but low rates. These data suggest that wings and complete metamorphosis have had the most effect on family-level insect macroevolution, and point to specific mechanisms by which they have influenced insect diversity through time. PMID:25165766

  14. A histological atlas of the tissues and organs of neotenic and metamorphosed axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Turan; İlhan, Ayşe Elif; Aytürk, Nilüfer; Yıldırım, Berna; Öztürk, Gürkan; Keskin, İlknur

    2016-09-01

    Axolotl (Ambystoma Mexicanum) has been emerging as a promising model in stem cell and regeneration researches due to its exceptional regenerative capacity. Although it represents lifelong lasting neoteny, induction to metamorphosis with thyroid hormones (THs) treatment advances the utilization of Axolotl in various studies. It has been reported that amphibians undergo anatomical and histological remodeling during metamorphosis and this transformation is crucial for adaptation to terrestrial conditions. However, there is no comprehensive histological investigation regarding the morphological alterations of Axolotl organs and tissues throughout the metamorphosis. Here, we reveal the histological differences or resemblances between the neotenic and metamorphic axolotl tissues. In order to examine structural features and cellular organization of Axolotl organs, we performed Hematoxylin & Eosin, Luxol-Fast blue, Masson's trichrome, Alcian blue, Orcein and Weigart's staining. Stained samples from brain, gallbladder, heart, intestine, liver, lung, muscle, skin, spleen, stomach, tail, tongue and vessel were analyzed under the light microscope. Our findings contribute to the validation of the link between newly acquired functions and structural changes of tissues and organs as observed in tail, skin, gallbladder and spleen. We believe that this descriptive work provides new insights for a better histological understanding of both neotenic and metamorphic Axolotl tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction to snow rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmollin, Vincent de

    1978-01-01

    The tests described in the thesis are rotating shearing tests, with rotational constant speed ranging between 0.00075 rpm and 0.75 rpm. The results obtained are similar to those observed with compression tests at constant speed, except that shearing tests are carried out with densities nearly constant. So, we show three different domains when the rotation speed increases: 1) viscous (without failure) 2) brittle of first type (cycles of brittle failures) and 3) brittle of second type (only one brittle failure and solid friction). These results show clearly that the fundamental mechanism that rules the mechanisms of snow, is fast metamorphosis of bonds, binding ice grains: this metamorphosis is important when solicitation speeds are low (permanent rate of shearing in viscous domain, regeneration of the failure surfaces in the brittle domain of the first type) and this metamorphosis does not exist when speed increases (only one failure and solid friction in the brittle domain of second type). It is also included an important bibliographic analysis of the snow mechanics, and an experimental and theoretical study about shock wave propagation in natural snow covers. (author) [fr

  16. Larval growth rate and sex determine resource allocation and stress responsiveness across life stages in juvenile frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Robin W; Crespi, Erica J

    2015-03-01

    The extent to which interactions between environmental stressors and phenotypic variation during larval life stages impose carry-over effects on adult phenotypes in wildlife are not clear. Using semi-natural mesocosms, we examined how chronically low food availability and size-specific phenotypes in larval amphibians interact and carry over to influence frog growth, resource allocation, endocrine activity and survival. We tagged three cohorts of larvae that differed in body size and developmental stage at 3 weeks after hatching, and tracked them through 10 weeks after metamorphosis in high and low food conditions. We found that growth and development rates during the early tadpole stage not only affected metamorphic rates, but also shaped resource allocation and stress responsiveness in frogs: the slowest growing larvae from low-food mesocosms exhibited a suppressed glucocorticoid response to a handling stressor; reduced growth rate and fat storage as frogs. We also show for the first time that larval developmental trajectories varied with sex, where females developed faster than males especially in food-restricted conditions. Last, while larval food restriction profoundly affected body size in larvae and frogs, time to metamorphosis was highly constrained, which suggests that the physiology and development of this ephemeral pond-breeding amphibian is adapted for rapid metamorphosis despite large potential variation in nutrient availability. Taken together, these results suggest that larval phenotypic variation significantly influences multiple dimensions of post-metamorphic physiology and resource allocation, which likely affect overall performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of the herbicide diuron on the early life history stages of coral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negri, Andrew [Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3 Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia)]. E-mail: a.negri@aims.gov.au; Vollhardt, Claudia [Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3 Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia); Humphrey, Craig [Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3 Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia); Heyward, Andrew [Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3 Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia); Jones, Ross [Centre for Marine Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Queensland Health Scientific Services, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains 4108 (Australia); Eaglesham, Geoff [Bermuda Biological Station for Research, Inc, Ferry Reach, St George' s GE 01 (Bermuda); Fabricius, Katharina [Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3 Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    The effects of the herbicide diuron on the early life history stages of broadcast spawning and brooding corals were examined in laboratory experiments. Fertilisation of Acropora millepora and Montipora aequituberculata oocytes were not inhibited at diuron concentrations of up to 1000{mu}gl{sup -1}. Metamorphosis of symbiont-free A. millepora larvae was only significantly inhibited at 300{mu}gl{sup -1} diuron. Pocillopora damicornis larvae, which contain symbiotic dinoflagellates, were able to undergo metamorphosis after 24h exposure to diuron at 1000{mu}gl{sup -1}. Two-week old P. damicornis recruits on the other hand were as susceptible to diuron as adult colonies, with expulsion of symbiotic dinoflagellates (bleaching) evident at 10{mu}gl{sup -1} diuron after 96h exposure. Reversible metamorphosis was observed at high diuron concentrations, with fully bleached polyps escaping from their skeletons. Pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) chlorophyll fluorescence techniques demonstrated a reduction in photosynthetic efficiency ({delta}F/F{sub m}{sup '}) in illuminated P. damicornis recruits after a 2h exposure to 1{mu}gl{sup -1} diuron. The dark-adapted quantum yields (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) also declined, indicating chronic photoinhibition and damage to photosystem II.

  18. Effects of the herbicide diuron on the early life history stages of coral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, Andrew; Vollhardt, Claudia; Humphrey, Craig; Heyward, Andrew; Jones, Ross; Eaglesham, Geoff; Fabricius, Katharina

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the herbicide diuron on the early life history stages of broadcast spawning and brooding corals were examined in laboratory experiments. Fertilisation of Acropora millepora and Montipora aequituberculata oocytes were not inhibited at diuron concentrations of up to 1000μgl -1 . Metamorphosis of symbiont-free A. millepora larvae was only significantly inhibited at 300μgl -1 diuron. Pocillopora damicornis larvae, which contain symbiotic dinoflagellates, were able to undergo metamorphosis after 24h exposure to diuron at 1000μgl -1 . Two-week old P. damicornis recruits on the other hand were as susceptible to diuron as adult colonies, with expulsion of symbiotic dinoflagellates (bleaching) evident at 10μgl -1 diuron after 96h exposure. Reversible metamorphosis was observed at high diuron concentrations, with fully bleached polyps escaping from their skeletons. Pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) chlorophyll fluorescence techniques demonstrated a reduction in photosynthetic efficiency (ΔF/F m ' ) in illuminated P. damicornis recruits after a 2h exposure to 1μgl -1 diuron. The dark-adapted quantum yields (F v /F m ) also declined, indicating chronic photoinhibition and damage to photosystem II

  19. Discovery of fossil lamprey larva from the Lower Cretaceous reveals its three-phased life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mee-mann; Wu, Feixiang; Miao, Desui; Zhang, Jiangyong

    2014-10-28

    Lampreys are one of the two surviving jawless vertebrate groups and one of a few vertebrate groups with the best exemplified metamorphosis during their life cycle, which consists of a long-lasting larval stage, a peculiar metamorphosis, and a relatively short adulthood with a markedly different anatomy. Although the fossil records have revealed that many general features of extant lamprey adults were already formed by the Late Devonian (ca. 360 Ma), little is known about the life cycle of the fossil lampreys because of the lack of fossilized lamprey larvae or transformers. Here we report the first to our knowledge discovery of exceptionally preserved premetamorphic and metamorphosing larvae of the fossil lamprey Mesomyzon mengae from the Lower Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, China. These fossil ammocoetes look surprisingly modern in having an eel-like body with tiny eyes, oral hood and lower lip, anteriorly positioned branchial region, and a continuous dorsal skin fin fold and in sharing a similar feeding habit, as judged from the detritus left in the gut. In contrast, the larger metamorphosing individuals have slightly enlarged eyes relative to large otic capsules, thickened oral hood or pointed snout, and discernable radials but still anteriorly extended branchial area and lack a suctorial oral disk, which characterize the early stages of the metamorphosis of extant lampreys. Our discovery not only documents the larval conditions of fossil lampreys but also indicates the three-phased life cycle in lampreys emerged essentially in their present mode no later than the Early Cretaceous.

  20. Fossil evidence for key innovations in the evolution of insect diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David B; Ross, Andrew J; Mayhew, Peter J

    2014-10-22

    Explaining the taxonomic richness of the insects, comprising over half of all described species, is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Previously, several evolutionary novelties (key innovations) have been posited to contribute to that richness, including the insect bauplan, wings, wing folding and complete metamorphosis, but evidence over their relative importance and modes of action is sparse and equivocal. Here, a new dataset on the first and last occurrences of fossil hexapod (insects and close relatives) families is used to show that basal families of winged insects (Palaeoptera, e.g. dragonflies) show higher origination and extinction rates in the fossil record than basal wingless groups (Apterygota, e.g. silverfish). Origination and extinction rates were maintained at levels similar to Palaeoptera in the more derived Polyneoptera (e.g. cockroaches) and Paraneoptera (e.g. true bugs), but extinction rates subsequently reduced in the very rich group of insects with complete metamorphosis (Holometabola, e.g. beetles). Holometabola show evidence of a recent slow-down in their high net diversification rate, whereas other winged taxa continue to diversify at constant but low rates. These data suggest that wings and complete metamorphosis have had the most effect on family-level insect macroevolution, and point to specific mechanisms by which they have influenced insect diversity through time. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Interactive effects of ocean acidification, elevated temperature, and reduced salinity on early-life stages of the pacific oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ginger W K; Dineshram, R; Campanati, Camilla; Chan, Vera B S; Havenhand, Jon; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2014-09-02

    Ocean acidification (OA) effects on larvae are partially attributed for the rapidly declining oyster production in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This OA effect is a serious concern in SE Asia, which produces >80% of the world's oysters. Because climate-related stressors rarely act alone, we need to consider OA effects on oysters in combination with warming and reduced salinity. Here, the interactive effects of these three climate-related stressors on the larval growth of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were examined. Larvae were cultured in combinations of temperature (24 and 30 °C), pH (8.1 and 7.4), and salinity (15 psu and 25 psu) for 58 days to the early juvenile stage. Decreased pH (pH 7.4), elevated temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu) significantly delayed pre- and post-settlement growth. Elevated temperature lowered the larval lipid index, a proxy for physiological quality, and negated the negative effects of decreased pH on attachment and metamorphosis only in a salinity of 25 psu. The negative effects of multiple stressors on larval metamorphosis were not due to reduced size or depleted lipid reserves at the time of metamorphosis. Our results supported the hypothesis that the C. gigas larvae are vulnerable to the interactions of OA with reduced salinity and warming in Yellow Sea coastal waters now and in the future.

  2. Effects of the nematode Gyrinicola batrachiensis on development, gut morphology, and fermentation in bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana): a novel mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Gregory S; Bjorndal, Karen A

    2005-08-01

    We describe a novel mutualism between bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) and a tadpole-specific gastrointestinal nematode (Gyrinicola batrachiensis). Groups of tadpoles were inoculated with viable or nonviable nematode eggs, and development, morphology, and gut fermentation activity were compared between nematode-infected and uninfected tadpoles. Nematode infection accelerated tadpole development; the mean time to metamorphosis was 16 d shorter and the range of times to metamorphosis was narrower in nematode-infected tadpoles than in uninfected tadpoles. At metamorphosis, infected and uninfected bullfrogs did not differ in body size or condition. Colon width, wet mass of colon contents, and concentrations of most fermentation byproducts (short-chain fatty acids: SCFAs) in the hindgut were greater in infected tadpoles. Furthermore, in vitro fermentation yields for all SCFAs combined were over twice as high in infected tadpoles than in uninfected tadpoles. One explanation for accelerated development in infected tadpoles is the altered hindgut fermentation associated with the nematodes. Energetic contributions of fermentation were estimated to be 20% and 9% of the total daily energy requirement for infected and uninfected tadpoles, respectively. Infection by G. batrachiensis nematodes potentially confers major ecological and evolutionary advantages to R. catesbeiana tadpoles. The mutualism between these species broadens our understanding of the taxonomic diversity and physiological contributions of fermentative gut symbionts and suggests that nematodes inhabiting the gut regions of other ectothermic herbivores might have beneficial effects in those hosts. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Effects of fluoride on development and growth of Rana chensinensis embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihong; Dong, Suiming; Zhao, Hongfeng; Deng, Hongzhang; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined the adverse effects of fluoride exposure on embryos and larvae of Rana chensinensis. Survival, morphological abnormalities, growth and development, time to metamorphosis and size at metamorphic climax of R. chensinensis were examined. Our results showed that embryos malformation occurred in all fluoride treatments. Morphological abnormalities of embryos are characterized by axial flexures, the extrusion of fin axis, edema, and ruffled dorsal and ventral fin. Additionally, 4.1mg F(-)/L and above could significantly inhibit embryos growth and development. On day 15, total length and weight of tadpole were significantly lower in 19.6 and 42.4 mg F(-)/L treatments compared to control. However, significant reductions in total length and weight were observed only at 42.4 mg F(-)/L on day 30. Moreover, significant metamorphic delay and decrease in the size at metamorphic climax were found in larvae exposed to 42.4 mg F(-)/L. Taken together, embryos of R. chensinensis are more vulnerable to fluoride exposure than their tadpoles. Our results suggested that the presence of high concentrations fluoride might increase mortality risk and a reduction in juvenile recruitment in the field by increasing embryos malformation, delaying metamorphosis and decreasing size at metamorphosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: Effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Doyle, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Subchronic and chronic developmental effects of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles on Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Shawna; Long, Monique; Wages, Mike; Maul, Jonathan D; Theodorakis, Christopher W; Cobb, George P

    2015-09-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles, such as copper oxide (CuO), are mass produced for use in a variety of products like coatings and ceramics. Acute exposure to CuO nanoparticles has caused toxicity to many aquatic organisms, yet there is no information on the effect of prolonged CuO nanomaterial exposures. This study examined effects of chronic exposure to CuO nanoparticles on Xenopus laevis growth and development. Experiments included a 14 d subchronic exposure and a 47 d chronic exposure throughout metamorphosis. The subchronic exposure caused mortality in all tested CuO concentrations, and significant growth effects occurred after exposure to 2.5 mg L(-1) CuO. Chronic exposure to 0.3 mg L(-1) CuO elicited significant mortality and affected the rate of metamorphosis. Exposure to lower concentrations of CuO stimulated metamorphosis and growth, indicating that low dose exposure can have hormetic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitric oxide affects ERK signaling through down-regulation of MAP kinase phosphatase levels during larval development of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immacolata Castellano

    Full Text Available In the ascidian Ciona intestinalis larval development and metamorphosis require a complex interplay of events, including nitric oxide (NO production, MAP kinases (ERK, JNK and caspase-3 activation. We have previously shown that NO levels affect the rate of metamorphosis, regulate caspase activity and promote an oxidative stress pathway, resulting in protein nitration. Here, we report that NO down-regulates MAP kinase phosphatases (mkps expression affecting positively ERK signaling. By pharmacological approach, we observed that the reduction of endogenous NO levels caused a decrease of ERK phosphorylation, whereas increasing levels of NO induced ERK activation. We have also identified the ERK gene network affected by NO, including mpk1, mpk3 and some key developmental genes by quantitative gene expression analysis. We demonstrate that NO induces an ERK-independent down-regulation of mkp1 and mkp3, responsible for maintaining the ERK phosphorylation levels necessary for transcription of key metamorphic genes, such as the hormone receptor rev-erb and the van willebrand protein vwa1c. These results add new insights into the role played by NO during larval development and metamorphosis in Ciona, highlighting the cross-talk between different signaling pathways.

  7. Influence of light and salinity on behaviour of larval Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) and implications for inshore migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden Burke, John; Tanaka, Masaru; Seikai, Tadahisa

    Vertical movements are a fundamental part of tidal transport, a migration strategy found in many coastal fishes. Because light is considered important to vertical migration, the ontogeny of eye development, phototaxis and vertically oriented behaviour were examined for different metamorphic stages of Japanese flounder larvae ( Paralichthys olivaceus). The timing of rod recruitment to the retina and the development of the ability to dark adapt were investigated histologically. Phototaxis experiments were conducted to determine when during development phototactic behaviour changed. Observations of vertical movements were made using infrared sensitive video equipment. Larvae raised at S=32 were observed at S=30, 32 and 34 under changing light conditions. Light was increased from nocturnal to daytime levels in log steps while swimming and settling behaviour was observed. Settling behaviour was apparent during the early stages of metamorphosis and increased with development. Larvae in the early stages of metamorphosis responded to night time light levels by swimming up. Larvae were more active in water of higher salinity relative to their acclimation salinity and were more likely to settle in water of lower salinity. During the late stages of metamorphosis, the importance of light to activity decreased, increasing the relative importance of salinity. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that tidal migration develops as diurnal vertical migration controlled by light is replaced by tidal movement cued by changes in salinity. Our findings suggest that efficient transport of larvae inshore depends on a clear salinity signal and that variability in such a signal may influence migration success.

  8. Microscopic observations show invasion of inflammatory cells in the limb blastema and epidermis in pre-metamorphic frog tadpoles which destroy the Apical Epidermal CAP and impede regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Some limb regeneration in tadpoles of Rana dalmatina occurs at stages 44-48 when small hind-limbs are present while scarring occurs at stages 51-52 when forelimbs have developed and metamorphosis is approaching. Ultrastructural analysis of cells forming the regenerating blastema detects mesenchymal cells and an Apical Epidermal Cap (AEC) in regenerating limb blastema 5-6 days post-amputation at stages 46-48. In contrast, granulocytes and numerous macrophages and lymphocytes prevail over mesenchymal cells in limb blastema at stages 51-52, which are destined to form scars. An increase in inflammatory cells in limb blastema prior to metamorphosis suggests a negative influence of immune cells on limb regeneration. Inflammatory cells invade the apical wound epidermis where stem keratinocytes are likely destroyed, impeding the formation of an AEC, the microregion which leads to limb regeneration. The invasion of immune cells, however, may also represent a physiological consequence of the death of cell populations in the tadpoles occurring with approaching metamorphosis. The passage from an aquatic to a terrestrial life in this frog elicits the typical amniote scarring reaction after wounding, and the limb cannot regenerate. The present observations sustain the hypothesis that the evolution of the adaptive immunity in tetrapods while efficiently preserving adult self-condition, determined the loss of tissue regeneration since the embryonic antigens evocated in blastema cells are removed by immune cells of the adult. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Acetyl-L-carnitine suppresses thyroid hormone-induced and spontaneous anuran tadpole tail shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Hideki; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Masanao; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Katsu, Kenjiro; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Sasaki, Junzo; Inoue, Masayasu; Utsumi, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) plays a crucial role in apoptotic tail shortening during anuran metamorphosis. L-carnitine is known to shuttle free fatty acids (FFAs) from the cytosol into mitochondria matrix for β-oxidation and energy production, and in a previous study we found that treatment with L-carnitine suppresses 3, 3', 5-triiodothyronine (T3 ) and FFA-induced MPT by reducing the level of FFAs. In the present study we focus on acetyl-L-carnitine, which is also involved in fatty acid oxidation, to determine its effect on T3 -induced tail regression in Rana rugosa tadpoles and spontaneous tail regression in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The ladder-like DNA profile and increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 indicative of apoptosis in the tails of T3 -treated tadpoles were found to be suppressed by the addition of acetyl-L-carnitine. Likewise, acetyl-L-carnitine was found to inhibit thyroid hormone regulated spontaneous metamorphosis in X. laevis tadpoles, accompanied by decreases in caspase and phospholipase A2 activity, as well as non-ladder-like DNA profiles. These findings support our previous conclusion that elevated levels of FFAs initiate MPT and activate the signaling pathway controlling apoptotic cell death in tadpole tails during anuran metamorphosis. © 2013 The Authors.

  10. Conservation in the involvement of heterochronic genes and hormones during developmental transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Fernando; Larraín, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Developmental transitions include molting in some invertebrates and the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians. While the study of Caenorhabditis elegans larval transitions was crucial to determine the genetic control of these transitions, Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis have been classic models to study the role of hormones in metamorphosis. Here we review how heterochronic genes (lin-4, let-7, lin-28, lin-41), hormones (dafachronic acid, ecdysone, thyroid hormone) and the environment regulate developmental transitions. Recent evidence suggests that some heterochronic genes also regulate transitions in higher organisms that they are controlled by hormones involved in metamorphosis. We also discuss evidence demonstrating that heterochronic genes and hormones regulate the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells. We propose the hypothesis that developmental transitions are regulated by an evolutionary conserved mechanism in which heterochronic genes and hormones interact to control stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell cycle exit, quiescence and differentiation and determine the proper timing of developmental transitions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these studies to understand post-embryonic development, puberty and regeneration in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Toxicity of Naphthalene and Benzene on Tribollium castaneum Herbst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaro-Castro, Nerlis; Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2017-06-21

    Naphthalene and benzene are widely-used volatile organic compounds. The aim of this research was to examine the toxicological effects of naphthalene and benzene against Tribolium castaneum as an animal model. Adult insects were exposed to these aromatic compounds to assess mortality after 4-48 h of exposure. The lethal concentration 50 (LC 50 ) for naphthalene, naphthalin, and benzene were 63.6 µL/L, 20.0 µL/L, and 115.9 µL/L in air, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed expression changes in genes related to oxidative stress and metabolism [Glutathione S-Transferase (Gst), and Cytochrome P450 6BQ8 (Cyp6bq8)]; reproduction and metamorphosis [Hormone receptor in 39-like protein (Hr39), Ecdysone receptor: (Ecr), and Chitin synthase 2 (Chs2)]; and neurotransmission [Histamine-gated chloride channel 2 (Hiscl2)] in insects exposed for 4 h to 70.2 µL/L naphthalene. Adults exposed to benzene (80 µL/L; 4 h) overexpressed genes related to neurotransmission [GABA-gated anion channel (Rdl), Hiscl2, and GABA-gated ion channel (Grd)]; reproduction and metamorphosis [Ultraspiracle nuclear receptor (USP), Ecr; and Hr39]; and development (Chs2). The data presented here provides evidence that naphthalene and benzene inhalation are able to induce alterations on reproduction, development, metamorphosis, oxidative stress, metabolism, neurotransmission, and death of the insect.

  12. Effects of long-term exposure to two fungicides, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole, on survival and life history traits of Italian tree frog (Hyla intermedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Guardia, Antonello; Macirella, Rachele; Sesti, Settimio; Crescente, Antonio; Brunelli, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides have become an issue of great concern but, at present, the effects of these substances on amphibians remain poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of two commonly used fungicides, tebuconazole and pyrimethanil, on Italian Tree Frog (Hyla intermedia), a species frequently found in agricultural areas. Tadpoles were exposed to fungicides from developmental Gosner stage 25 (GS 25) to completion of metamorphosis (GS 46) and the whole exposure period lasted 78 days. For both tested fungicides we used two concentrations (5 and 50μg/L) that are comparable to those detected in surface waters, near agricultural fields. A variety of sublethal effects-on growth, development, behavior, and physiology-may be used for evaluating alterations induced by pollutants in amphibians. We estimated whether pyrimethanil and tebuconazole exposure impacted on H. intermedia life history traits. For this purpose, survival, growth, development, initiation of metamorphosis, success and size at metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of morphological abnormalities were evaluated. We showed, for all considered endpoints, that the exposure to tebuconazole exerts more harmful effects on H. intermedia than does exposure to pyrimethanil. Before the onset of metamorphic climax we showed, for both fungicides, that the low concentrations (5μg/L) induced significantly greater effects than the higher ones (50μg/L) on survival and deformity incidence. During the metamorphic climax, a complete reversal of this nonlinear trend takes place, and the percentage of animals initiating metamorphosis was reduced in fungicide-exposed groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strong correlation emerged between fungicide exposure and the incidence of morphological abnormalities such as tail malformations, scoliosis, edema, mouth and limb deformities. Exposure to tested

  13. Farnesol-like endogenous sesquiterpenoids in vertebrates: the probable but overlooked functional "inbrome" anti-aging counterpart of juvenile hormone of insects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold eDe Loof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature on the question whether the juvenile stage of vertebrates is hormonally regulated is scarce. It seems to be intuitively assumed that this stage of development is automated, and does not require any specific hormone(s. Such reasoning mimics the state of affairs in insects until it was shown that surgical removal of a tiny pair of glands in the head, the corpora allata, ended larval life and initiated metamorphosis. Decades later, the responsible hormone was found and named juvenile hormone (JH because when present, it makes a larva molt into another larval stage. JH is a simple ester of farnesol, a sesquiterpenoid present in all eukaryotes. Whereas vertebrates do not have an anatomical counterpart of the corpora allata, their tissues do contain farnesol-like sesquiterpenoids (FLS. Some display typical JH activity when tested in appropriate insect bioassays. Some FLS are intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway of cholesterol, a compound that insects and nematodes (= Ecdysozoa cannot synthesize by themselves. They ingest it as a vitamin. Until a recent (2014 reexamination of the basic principle underlying insect metamorphosis, it had been completely overlooked that the Ca2+-pump (SERCA blocker thapsigargin is a sesquiterpenoid that mimics the absence of JH in inducing apoptosis. In our opinion, being in the juvenile state is primarily controlled by endogenous FLS that participate in controlling the activity of Ca2+-ATPases in the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum (SERCAs, not only in insects but in all eukaryotes. Understanding the control mechanisms of being in the juvenile state may boost research not only in developmental biology in general, but also in diseases that develop after the juvenile stage, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease. It may also help to better understand some of the causes of obesity, a syndrome that holometabolous last larval insects severely suffer from, and for which they found a very drastic but efficient solution, namely

  14. Neurometamorphosis of the ear in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, and its homologue in the earless forest tent caterpillar moth, Malacosoma disstria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, F P; Fullard, J H

    1996-10-01

    The adult gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae: Noctuoidea) has a pair of metathoracic tympanic ears that each contain a two-celled auditory chordotonal organ (CO). The earless forest tent caterpillar moth, Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae: Bombycoidea), has a homologous pair of three-celled, nonauditory hindwing COs in their place. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the adult CO in both species arises from a preexisting larval organ or if it develops as a novel structure during metamorphosis. We describe the larval metathoracic nervous system of L. dispar and M. disstria, and identify a three-celled chordotonal organ in the anatomically homologous site as the adult CO. If the larval CO is severed from the homologue of the adult auditory nerve (IIIN1b1) in L. dispar prior to metamorphosis, the adult develops an ear lacking an auditory organ. Axonal backfills of the larval IIIN1b1 nerve in both species reveal three chordotonal sensory neurons and one nonchordotonal multipolar cell. The axons of these cells project into tracts of the central nervous system putatively homologous with those of the auditory pathway in adult L. dispar. Following metamorphosis, M. disstria moths retain all four cells (three CO and one multipolar) while L. dispar adults possess two cells that service the auditory CO and one nonauditory, multipolar cell. We conclude that the larval IIIN1b1 CO is the precursor of both the auditory organ in L. dispar and the putative proprioceptor CO in M. disstria and represents the premetamorphic condition of these insects. The implications of our results in understanding the evolution of the ear in the Lepidoptera and insects in general are discussed.

  15. Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Berg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac® is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  16. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment on Rana sphenocephala tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, D.W.; Krest, S.K.; Ortiz-Santaliestra, M.

    2006-01-01

    We exposed larval southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to lead-contaminated sediments to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of this metal. Tadpoles were laboratory-raised from early free-swimming stage through metamorphosis at lead concentrations of 45, 75, 180, 540, 2360, 3940, 5520, and 7580 mg/kg dry weight in sediment. Corresponding pore water lead concentrations were 123, 227, 589, 1833, 8121, 13,579, 19,038, and 24,427 ug/L. Tadpoles exposed to lead concentrations in sediment of 3940 mg/kg or higher died within 2 to 5 days of exposure. At lower concentrations, mortality through metamorphosis ranged from 3.5% at 45 mg/kg lead to 37% at 2360 mg/kg lead in sediment. The LC50 value for lead in sediment was 3728 mg/kg (95% CI=1315 to 72,847 mg/kg), which corresponded to 12,539 ug/L lead in pore water (95% CI= 4000 to 35,200 ug/L). Early growth and development were depressed at 2,360 mg/kg lead in sediment (8100 ug/L in pore water) but differences were not evident by the time of metamorphosis. The most obvious effect of lead was its pronounced influence on skeletal development. Whereas tadpoles at 45 mg/kg lead in sediment did not display permanent abnormalities, skeletal malformations increased in frequency and severity at all higher lead concentrations. By 2360 mg/kg, 100% of surviving metamorphs displayed severe spinal problems, reduced femur and humerus lengths, deformed digits, and other bone malformations. Lead concentrations in tissues correlated positively with sediment and pore water concentrations.

  17. Nitric oxide signaling differentially affects habitat choice by two larval morphs of the sea slug Alderia willowi: mechanistic insight into evolutionary transitions in dispersal strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Melissa R; Phuong, Mark A; Bishop, Cory; Krug, Patrick J

    2013-03-15

    In many marine animals, adult habitat is selected by lecithotrophic (non-feeding) larvae with a limited lifespan. In generalist species, larvae may increasingly accept sub-optimal habitat over time as energy stores are depleted ('desperate larva' hypothesis). If the fitness cost of suboptimal habitat is too high, larvae of specialists may prolong the searching phase until they encounter a high-quality patch or die ('death before dishonor' hypothesis). In generalists, starvation is hypothesized to lead to a decline in inhibitory nitric oxide (NO) signaling, thereby triggering metamorphosis. Here, we document alternative functions for identified signaling pathways in larvae having 'desperate' versus 'death before dishonor' strategies in lecithotrophic clutches of a habitat specialist, the sea slug Alderia willowi. In an unusual dimorphism, each clutch of A. willowi hatches both non-selective larvae that settle soon after hatching and siblings that delay settlement in the absence of cues from the alga Vaucheria, the sole adult food. Pharmacological manipulation of NO signaling induced metamorphosis in non-selective but not selective stages. However, decreased NO signaling in selective larvae lowered the threshold for response to habitat cues, mimicking the effect of declining energy levels. Manipulation of cGMP or dopamine production induced metamorphosis in selective and non-selective larvae alike, highlighting a distinct role for the NO pathway in the two larval morphs. We propose a model in which NO production (1) links nitrogen metabolism with sensory receptor signaling, and (2) shifts from a regulatory role in 'desperate larva' strategies to a modulatory role in 'death before dishonor' strategies. This study provides new mechanistic insight into how the function of conserved signaling pathways may change in response to selection on larval habitat choice behaviors.

  18. The pay-offs of maternal care increase as offspring develop, favouring extended provisioning in an egg-feeding frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, M B; Moore, M P; Martin, R A; Richards-Zawacki, C L; Sprehn, C G

    2016-10-01

    Offspring quantity and quality are components of parental fitness that cannot be maximized simultaneously. When the benefits of investing in offspring quality decline, parents are expected to shift investment towards offspring quantity (other reproductive opportunities). Even when mothers retain complete control of resource allocation, offspring control whether to allocate investment to growth or development towards independence, and this shared control may generate parent-offspring conflict over the duration of care. We examined these predictions by, in a captive colony, experimentally removing tadpoles of the strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) from the mothers that provision them with trophic eggs throughout development. Tadpoles removed from their mothers were no less likely to survive to nutritional independence (i.e. through metamorphosis) than were those that remained with their mothers, but these offspring were smaller at metamorphosis and were less likely to survive to reach adult size, even though they were fed ad libitum. Tadpoles that remained with their mothers developed more slowly than those not receiving care, a pattern that might suggest that offspring extracted more care than was in mothers' best interests. However, the fitness returns of providing care increased with offspring development, suggesting that mothers would be best off continuing care until tadpoles initiated metamorphosis. Although the benefits of parental investment in offspring quality are often thought to asymptote at high levels, driving parent-offspring conflict over weaning, this assumption may not hold over natural ranges of investment, with selection on both parents and offspring favouring extended durations of parental care. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Gender-related sensitivity of development and growth to real microgravity in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Eberhard R; Gabriel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of organisms to microgravity can induce morphological, physiological, and behavioral modifications which normalize after re-entry in 1g-condition within hours to few weeks. Development of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, their metamorphosis, and adults' growth were monitored for 3 years after their flight on the 12-day Soyuz mission TMA13 to the International Space Station. At onset of microgravity, tadpoles had just developed the hind limb (stage 47) or forelimb bud (stage 50). Recordings during the first 4 days after landing revealed no differences of developmental progresses and growth between flight and ground tadpoles. Further development and growth were strongly retarded in all animals; nevertheless, significant differences appeared between flight and ground groups during this postflight period. They include (1) acceleration of development in stage 47 but not stage 50 flight tadpoles; (2) earlier metamorphosis of stage 47 flight tadpoles compared to their 1g-ground controls while stage 50 flight tadpoles metamorphosed later than their ground controls; (3) maintenance of a tail during the juvenile stage exclusively in some stage 47 flight animals, and (4) accelerated growth of stage 47 male flight toads but retarded growth of stage 50 flight males compared to the respective 1g-ground control males. No difference of growth was detected between flight and ground females after metamorphosis. All differences between flight and ground animals disappeared 1 year after landing. We conclude (1) that limited spatial and nutritional conditions during the mission period caused developmental retardation, and (2) that the thyroid gland of Xenopus is susceptible to spatial environment, in particular, during the period of beginning activation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The potential effects of pre-settlement processes on post-settlement growth and survival of juvenile northern rock sole (Lepidopsetta polyxystra) in Gulf of Alaska nursery habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Erin J.; Miller, Jessica A.; Hurst, Thomas P.; Jiang, Duo

    2017-04-01

    Early life history traits in marine fish such as growth, size, and timing of life history transitions often vary in response to environmental conditions. Identifying the potential effects of trait variation across life history stages is critical to understanding growth, recruitment, and survival. Juvenile northern rock sole (Lepidopsetta polyxystra) were collected (2005, 2007, 2009-2011) from two coastal nurseries in the Gulf of Alaska during the early post-settlement period (July-August) to examine variation in early life history traits in relation to water temperature and juvenile densities in nurseries as well as to evaluate the potential for carry-over effects. Size-at-hatch, larval growth, metamorphosis size and timing, and post-metamorphic and recent growth of juveniles were quantified using otolith structural analysis and compared across years and sites. Additionally, traits of fish caught in July and August were compared for evidence of selective mortality. Post-metamorphic and recent growth were related to temperatures in nurseries as well as temperatures during the larval period, indicating a direct influence of concurrent nursery temperatures and a potential indirect effect of thermal conditions experienced by larvae. Correlations between metamorphic traits and fish size at capture demonstrated that interannual variation in size persisted across life history stages regardless of post-settlement growth patterns. No evidence of density-dependent growth or growth-selective mortality were detected during the early post-settlement period; however, differences in hatch size and metamorphosis timing between fish collected in July and August indicate a selective loss of individuals although the pattern varied across years. Overall, variation in size acquired early in life and temperature effects on the phenology of metamorphosis may influence the direction of selection and survival of northern rock sole.

  1. Malformations and mortality in the Asian Common Toad induced by exposure to pleurolophocercous cercariae (Trematoda: Cryptogonimidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Tkach, Vasyl V; Navaratne, Ayanthi N; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H; Rajakaruna, Rupika S

    2013-06-01

    Malformations and increased mortality due to infection by the digenetic trematode, Riberioa ondatrae have been reported for many species of amphibians. Severe malformations have also been reported in the Common Hourglass Tree Frog, Polypedates cruciger induced by pleurolophocercous cercariae in Sri Lanka in addition to the changes in the behaviour, development and survival of the host. We exposed pre-limb bud stage tadpoles (Gosner stages 25-26) of the Asian Common Toad, Duttaphrynus melanostictus to the same pleurolophocercous type cercariae under laboratory conditions. Molecular and morphological identification showed that these cercariae belonged Acanthostomum burminis infecting freshwater snakes as definitive hosts. These cercariae induced malformations (27.8%) and reduced survival to metamorphosis (53.8%). The magnitude of the effects increased with the dose of cercariae. Types of malformations were mainly axial, such as scoliosis and kyphosis. Severe limb malformations such as extra or missing limbs as reported for amphibians exposed to R. ondatrae were not observed in the D. melanostictus. Same authors reported a higher percentage of malformations previously when P. cruciger was exposed to the cercariae A. burminis compared to D. melanostictus. However, tadpoles of D. melanostictus, which are smaller compared to those of P. cruciger, experienced higher mortality than P. cruciger tadpoles. Trematode induced malformations and mortality in amphibians are highly variable and depend on multiple factors such as host species differences such as resistance to infection and tolerance, life-history characteristics such as size at metamorphosis and length of the metamorphosis period, and other factors such as size of the amphibian at the time of trematode exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Nitrate and Nitrite on Thyroid Hormone Responsive and Stress-Associated Gene Expression in Cultured Rana catesbeiana Tadpole Tail Fin Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinther, Ashley; Edwards, Thea M.; Guillette, Louis J.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signaling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin) assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO3–N) and 0.5 and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO2–N) in the absence and presence of 10 nM T3. Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI), both of which are TH-responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signaling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30, and catalase (CAT) transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T3. Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action. PMID:22493607

  3. Influence of nitrate and nitrite on thyroid hormone-responsive and stress-associated gene expression in cultured Rana catesbeiana tadpole tail fin tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eHinther

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signalling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 mg/L and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO3-N and 0.5 mg/L and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO2-N in the absence and presence of 10 nM T3. Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI, both of which are thyroid hormone responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signalling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30 (HSP30 and catalase (CAT transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T3. Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action.

  4. Influence of Nitrate and Nitrite on Thyroid Hormone Responsive and Stress-Associated Gene Expression in Cultured Rana catesbeiana Tadpole Tail Fin Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinther, Ashley; Edwards, Thea M; Guillette, Louis J; Helbing, Caren C

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are common aqueous pollutants that are known to disrupt the thyroid axis. In amphibians, thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis is affected, although whether the effect is acceleration or deceleration of this developmental process varies from study to study. One mechanism of action of these nitrogenous compounds is through alteration of TH synthesis. However, direct target tissue effects on TH signaling are hypothesized. The present study uses the recently developed cultured tail fin biopsy (C-fin) assay to study possible direct tissue effects of nitrate and nitrite. Tail biopsies obtained from premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles were exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L nitrate (NO(3)-N) and 0.5 and 5 mg/L nitrite (NO(2)-N) in the absence and presence of 10 nM T(3). Thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) and Rana larval keratin type I (RLKI), both of which are TH-responsive gene transcripts, were measured using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. To assess cellular stress which could affect TH signaling and metamorphosis, heat shock protein 30, and catalase (CAT) transcript levels were also measured. We found that nitrate and nitrite did not significantly change the level of any of the four transcripts tested. However, nitrate exposure significantly increased the heteroscedasticity in response of TRβ and RLKI transcripts to T(3). Alteration in population variation in such a way could contribute to the previously observed alterations of metamorphosis in frog tadpoles, but may not represent a major mechanism of action.

  5. Identification of organ-autonomous constituents of the molecular memory conferred by thyroid hormone exposure in cold temperature-arrested metamorphosing Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Hammond, S; Jackman, Kevin W; Partovi, Shireen H; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C

    2016-03-01

    Environmental temperature modulates thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent metamorphosis in some amphibian species. The North American bullfrog--Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana - tadpole is naturally adapted to a wide range of temperatures over multiple seasons. Cold temperatures delay while warmer temperatures accelerate metamorphosis. Exogenous TH exposure of premetamorphic tadpoles results in a rapid precocious induction of metamorphosis at warm temperatures (20-25 °C). The same exposure at cold temperatures (4-5 °C) does not elicit an overt metamorphic response. However, a molecular memory of TH exposure is established such that cold, TH-exposed tadpoles returned to permissive warm temperatures will rapidly execute TH-induced genetic programs. Previous mRNA profiling has identified TH-regulated transcription factors encoded by thra, thrb, thibz, klf9, and cebp1 as components of the molecular memory after one week post-exposure. However, a further hierarchy may exist within the initiation phase since many gene transcripts demonstrated tissue-specific patterns. Whether the molecular memory is organ autonomous or requires additional modulating factors is unknown. Herein we examine tail fin and back skin and determine that thibz is the only transcript that is TH-responsive after 2 days post-exposure at low temperature in both tissues in the intact animal. In back skin, cebp1 is also TH-responsive under these conditions. Serum-free tail fin organ culture (C-Fin) reveals that the thibz response is organ autonomous whereas cultured back skin (C-Skin) results suggest that thibz and cebp1 require an additional factor for induction from elsewhere within the intact animal. Subsequent investigations are now possible to identify endogenous factors that modulate the molecular memory in intact animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long term ex-vivo culturing of Drosophila brain as a method to live image pupal brains: insights into the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana eRabinovich

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Holometabolous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster, undergo complete metamorphosis that includes a pupal stage. During metamorphosis, the Drosophila nervous system undergoes massive remodeling and growth, that include cell death and large-scale axon and synapse elimination as well as neurogenesis, developmental axon regrowth and formation of new connections. Neuronal remodeling is an essential step in the development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Research on the stereotypic remodeling of Drosophila mushroom body (MB γ neurons has contributed to our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of remodeling but our knowledge of the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. A major hurdle in understanding various dynamic processes that occur during metamorphosis is the lack of time-lapse resolution. The pupal case and opaque fat bodies that enwrap the central nervous system (CNS make live-imaging of the central brain in-vivo impossible. We have established an ex-vivo long-term brain culture system that supports the development and neuronal remodeling of pupal brains. By optimizing culture conditions and dissection protocols, we have observed development in culture at kinetics similar to what occurs in vivo. Using this new method, we have obtained the first time-lapse sequence of MB γ neurons undergoing remodeling in up to a single cell resolution. We found that axon pruning is initiated by blebbing, followed by one-two nicks that seem to initiate a more widely spread axon fragmentation. As such, we have set up some of the tools and methodologies needed for further exploration of the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling, not limited to the MB. The long-term ex-vivo brain culture system that we report here could be used to study dynamic aspects of neurodevelopment of any Drosophila neuron.

  7. Warmer temperature modifies effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on hormone profiles in leopard frog tadpoles (Lithobates pipiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mariella B; Brown, Cherry T; Karasov, William H

    2017-01-01

    Amphibian populations have been declining, and climate change and exposure to environmental contaminants are thought to be involved. Higher water temperature accelerates larval development; however, its combined effects with contaminants and their influence on hormones during metamorphosis are poorly understood. The authors investigated changes in whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) and corticosterone concentrations in developing leopard frogs reared at 23 °C and 28 °C on diets with 0 ng g -1 , 6 ng g -1 , and 37 ng g -1 of a technical mixture of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE; DE-71) from 10 d to 44 d (premetamorphosis to late climax; Gosner Stages 28 to 46). Unlike controls, PBDE-exposed tadpoles (6 ng g -1 ) reared at 23 °C failed to show any increase in T3 concentrations throughout metamorphosis, and exposed tadpoles reared at 28 °C showed a lower peak at climax compared to controls. Corticosterone levels progressively increased throughout metamorphosis, but the levels were higher in PBDE-exposed tadpoles compared to controls at both temperatures. At the warmer temperature, corticosterone increase occurred earlier (at early climax) in controls and exposed tadpoles compared to tadpoles reared at the cooler temperature (late climax), coinciding with the faster development observed at 28 °C. Tadpoles reared at 28 °C were longer and developed faster than tadpoles reared at 23 °C. At both temperatures, PBDE exposure decreased T3 and increased corticosterone concentrations, which can potentially impair developing tadpoles. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:120-127. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Larval and post-larval stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas are resistant to elevated CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W K Ginger

    Full Text Available The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3-0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas, especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century.

  9. Morphological and functional aspects of the epidermis of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus throughout development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Alonso, R; Megías, M; Pombal, M A; Molist, P

    2017-07-01

    The development of the epidermis of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus along the whole life cycle was studied using conventional staining techniques and lectin histochemistry. The epidermis undergoes variations in morphology and thickness throughout development. The simple cuboidal epithelium found in the epidermis of prolarvae becomes stratified cubic in the adult by increasing the number of cell layers. The cuticle thickness undergoes a steady increase during the larval period. There are changes in the glycoconjugate composition of the three main cell types of the P. marinus epidermis, mucous, granular and skein cells, which are more pronounced after metamorphosis. The Alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) histochemical method shows the presence of both acidic and neutral glycoconjugates in the mucous cells, indicating their secretory function. Moreover, lectin analysis reveals a mucous secretion containing glycoconjugates such as sulphated glycosaminoglycans (N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine) and N-glycoproteins rich in mannose. Although granular cells are AB-PAS negative, they exhibit a similar glycoconjugate composition to the mucous cells. Moreover, granular cells show sialic acid positivity in larvae but this monosaccharide residue is not detected after metamorphosis. The skein cells, a unique cell of lampreys, are negative to AB-PAS staining but they mostly contain l-fucose and sialic acid residues, which also disappear after metamorphosis. The function of the granular and skein cells is still unknown but the role of their glycoconjugate composition is discussed. In addition, a different cellular origin is suggested for these two types of cells. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. The Drosophila melanogaster Eip74EF-PA transcription factor directly binds the sciarid BhC4-1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Henrique Oliveira; Sanchez, Danilo Garcia; de Freitas Oliveira, Lucas; Kobarg, Jörg; Monesi, Nadia

    2017-11-01

    The DNA puff BhC4-1 gene of Bradysia hygida (Diptera, Sciaridae) is amplified and expressed in the salivary glands at the end of the last larval instar. Even though there are no BhC4-1 orthologs in Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms that regulate BhC4-1 gene expression in B. hygida are for the most part conserved in D. melanogaster. The BhC4-1 promoter contains a 129bp (-186/-58) cis-regulatory module (CRM) that drives developmentally regulated expression in transgenic salivary glands at the onset of metamorphosis. Both in the sciarid and in transgenic D. melanogaster, BhC4-1 gene expression is induced by the increase in ecdysone titers that triggers metamorphosis. Genetic interaction experiments revealed that in the absence of the Eip74EF-PA early gene isoform BhC4-1-lacZ levels of expression in the salivary gland are severely reduced. Here we show that the overexpression of the Eip74EF-PA transcription factor is sufficient to anticipate BhC4-1-lacZ expression in transgenic D. melanogaster. Through yeast one-hybrid assays we confirm that the Eip74EF-PA transcription factor directly binds to the 129 bp sciarid CRM. Together, these results contribute to the characterization of an insect CRM and indicate that the ecdysone gene regulatory network that promotes metamorphosis is conserved between D. melanogaster and the sciarid B. hygida. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Settlement induction of Acropora palmata planulae by a GLW-amide neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, P. M.; Szmant, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Complex environmental cues dictate the settlement of coral planulae in situ; however, simple artificial cues may be all that is required to induce settlement of ex situ larval cultures for reef re-seeding and restoration projects. Neuropeptides that transmit settlement signals and initiate the metamorphic cascade have been isolated from hydrozoan taxa and shown to induce metamorphosis of reef-building Acropora spp. in the Indo-Pacific, providing a reliable and efficient settlement cue. Here, the metamorphic activity of six GLW-amide cnidarian neuropeptides was tested on larvae of the Caribbean corals Acropora palmata, Montastraea faveolata and Favia fragum. A. palmata planulae were induced to settle by the exogenous application of the neuropeptide Hym-248 (concentrations ≥1 × 10-6 M), achieving 40-80% attachment and 100% metamorphosis of competent planulae (≥6 days post-fertilization) during two spawning seasons; the remaining neuropeptides exhibited no activity. Hym-248 exposure rapidly altered larval swimming behavior (96% metamorphosis after 6 h. In contrast , M. faveolata and F. fragum planulae did not respond to any GLW-amides tested, suggesting a high specificity of neuropeptide activators on lower taxonomic scales in corals. Subsequent experiments for A. palmata revealed that (1) the presence of a biofilm did not enhance attachment efficiency when coupled with Hym-248 treatment, (2) neuropeptide-induced settlement had no negative effects on early life-history developmental processes: zooxanthellae acquisition and skeletal secretion occurred within 12 days, colonial growth occurred within 36 days, and (3) Hym-248 solutions maintained metamorphic activity following storage at room temperature (10 days), indicating its utility in remote field settings. These results corroborate previous studies on Indo-Pacific Acropora spp. and extend the known metamorphic activity of Hym-248 to Caribbean acroporids. Hym-248 allows for directed and reliable settlement of

  12. Effects of salinity stress on Bufo balearicus and Bufo bufo tadpoles: Tolerance, morphological gill alterations and Na+/K+-ATPase localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Bonacci, Antonella; Coscarelli, Francesca; Tripepi, Manuela; Brunelli, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater habitats are globally threatened by human-induced secondary salinization. Amphibians are generally poorly adapted to survive in saline environments. We experimentally investigated the effects of chronic exposure to various salinities (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% seawater, SW) on survival, larval growth and metamorphosis of tadpoles from two amphibian populations belonging to two species: the green toad Bufo balearicus and the common toad Bufo bufo. In addition, gill morphology of tadpoles of both species after acute exposure to hypertonic conditions (20%, 25%, and 30% SW) was examined by light and electron microscopy. Tadpoles experienced 100% mortality above 20% SW in B. balearicus while above 15% SW in B. bufo. We detected also sublethal effects of salinity stress on growth and metamorphosis. B. bufo cannot withstand chronic exposure to salinity above 5% SW, tadpoles grew slower and were significantly smaller than those in control at metamorphosis. B. balearicus tolerated salinity up to 20% SW without apparent effects during larval development, but starting from 15% SW tadpoles metamorphosed later and at a smaller size compared with control. We also revealed a negative relation between increasing salt concentration and gill integrity. The main modifications were increased mucous secretion, detachment of external layer, alteration of epithelial surface, degeneration phenomena, appearance of residual bodies, and macrophage immigration. These morphological alterations of gill epithelium can interfere with respiratory function and both osmotic and acid-base regulation. Significant variations in branchial Na + /K + -ATPase activity were also observed between two species; moreover an increase in enzyme activity was evident in response to SW exposure. Epithelial responses to increasing salt concentration were different in the populations belonging to two species: the intensity of histological and ultrastructural pathology in B. bufo was greater and we

  13. Laboratory assessment of the antifouling potential of a soluble-matrix paint laced with the natural compound polygodial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick Louis; Heasman, Kevin; Jeffs, Andrew; Kuhajek, Jeanne

    2013-09-01

    Polygodial is a potent and selective inhibitor of ascidian metamorphosis that shows promise for controlling fouling by ascidians in bivalve aquaculture. The current study examined the potency of, and associated effects of seawater exposure on, a rosin-based soluble-matrix paint laced with 0.08-160 ng polygodial g(-1) wet paint matrix. Paint-coated surfaces were soaked in seawater for 0, 2, 4 or 12 weeks prior to screening for antifouling activity using a bioassay based on the nuisance ascidian Ciona savignyi Herdman. Mortality was greater (mean 50% lethal concentration: 5 ± 2 ng g(-1); mean 75% lethal concentration: 17 ± 4 ng g(-1)) and metamorphosis was inhibited (mean 50% anti-metamorphic concentration: 2 ± 0.4 ng g(-1); mean 75% anti-metamorphic concentration: 15 ± 10 ng g(-1)) in C. savignyi larvae exposed to polygodial-laced soluble-matrix paints, relative to control paints without polygodial. Soaking in seawater prior to testing reduced the efficacy of the formulation up to nearly 12-fold, but even after soaking for 12 weeks paints laced with polygodial at 160 ng g(-1) wet paint matrix prevented ⩾90% of the larvae of C. savignyi from completing metamorphosis. The outcome of this experiment provides a positive first step in evaluating the suitability of polygodial-laced soluble-matrix paints for use in aquaculture.

  14. Microarray analysis of a salamander hopeful monster reveals transcriptional signatures of paedomorphic brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta Srikrishna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum is considered a hopeful monster because it exhibits an adaptive and derived mode of development - paedomorphosis - that has evolved rapidly and independently among tiger salamanders. Unlike related tiger salamanders that undergo metamorphosis, axolotls retain larval morphological traits into adulthood and thus present an adult body plan that differs dramatically from the ancestral (metamorphic form. The basis of paedomorphic development was investigated by comparing temporal patterns of gene transcription between axolotl and tiger salamander larvae (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum that typically undergo a metamorphosis. Results Transcript abundances from whole brain and pituitary were estimated via microarray analysis on four different days post hatching (42, 56, 70, 84 dph and regression modeling was used to independently identify genes that were differentially expressed as a function of time in both species. Collectively, more differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified as unique to the axolotl (n = 76 and tiger salamander (n = 292 than were identified as shared (n = 108. All but two of the shared DEGs exhibited the same temporal pattern of expression and the unique genes tended to show greater changes later in the larval period when tiger salamander larvae were undergoing anatomical metamorphosis. A second, complementary analysis that directly compared the expression of 1320 genes between the species identified 409 genes that differed as a function of species or the interaction between time and species. Of these 409 DEGs, 84% exhibited higher abundances in tiger salamander larvae at all sampling times. Conclusions Many of the unique tiger salamander transcriptional responses are probably associated with metamorphic biological processes. However, the axolotl also showed unique patterns of transcription early in development. In particular, the axolotl showed a genome

  15. Euler's fluid equations: Optimal control vs optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Darryl D.

    2009-01-01

    An optimization method used in image-processing (metamorphosis) is found to imply Euler's equations for incompressible flow of an inviscid fluid, without requiring that the Lagrangian particle labels exactly follow the flow lines of the Eulerian velocity vector field. Thus, an optimal control problem and an optimization problem for incompressible ideal fluid flow both yield the same Euler fluid equations, although their Lagrangian parcel dynamics are different. This is a result of the gauge freedom in the definition of the fluid pressure for an incompressible flow, in combination with the symmetry of fluid dynamics under relabeling of their Lagrangian coordinates. Similar ideas are also illustrated for SO(N) rigid body motion.

  16. HANS BELLMER, UN ARTISTE PHILOSOPHE OU L'IDENTITE EN QUESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARYVONNE PERROT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available If the surrealist group has attracted the interest of philosophers, one can also note that some of these artists have attempted to develop their own philosophical reflection. This was the case of Hans Bellmer obsessed with the themes of desire, body and metamorphosis and, through that, with the games of identity and otherness. The anatomy of the image, one of Bellmer’s essential books, also shows the role of the artistic creation in the efforts to illuminate the “enigma of existence”.

  17. Los ojos de Amanda Berenguer y de Marosa di Giorgio para una exégesis de “El Jardín de las delicias” de El Bosco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Cancellier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available If in Hieronymus Bosch’s (1453-­‐‑1516 hybrids and metamorphosis Marosa di Giorgio (1932-­‐‑2004 absorbs the most symbolic and disturbing aspects of his “maravilloso negro”, in the same flamish painter Amanda Berenguer (1921-­‐‑2010 finds the inspiration for a subversive discourse. Writings and images enlighten and strengthen each other while the two extraordinary texts of uruguayan literature (Papeles salvajes and Los culos de El Bosco intertwine and converse with triptych of The Garden of Earthly Delights, thus participating in its own complex exegesis.

  18. Jan Fabre: death and rebirth of the theater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giambrone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jan Fabre is one of the most controversial European scene figures. His interests range from visual arts to theater and dance. His works, disturbing and provocative, are very contemporary in style and language, while referring to the tradition of Flemish painting. With his performances Fabre demolishes traditional theatre conventions. Theatrical device questioning leads him to disorganize dynamics of representation and to elaborate the concept of crisis until death and apocalypse boundaries. In representing death, Fabre revives theater, according to the principle of metamorphosis. His entire choreography can be defined by balance seeking between opposite poles, good and evil, stasis and movement, beauty and chaos, life and death.

  19. Ultrastructure of epidermis of Salamandra salamandra followed throughout ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburg, M R; Lewinson, D

    1977-07-15

    Ventral epidermal ultrastructure of the amphibian urodele Salamandra salamandra is described and followed throughout its life cycle. Tadpoles were divided into five categories on the basis of the organization of their epidermis and the ultrastructure of its cells. In newly hatched tadpoles the epidermis is arranged in two layers and four types of cells were recognized. The number of epidermal layers increases in the metamorphosing tadpole. At this stage the layers become organized in four strata. Metamorphosis involves the disappearance of some cell types and the appearance of others, typical of the adult epidermis. The significance of these ontogenetic changes in epidermal ultrastructure is discussed in respect to aquatic and terrestrial life habits.

  20. The influence of prey experience on movement pattern preference in Salamandra salamandra (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthardt, G; Roth, G

    1979-11-01

    Groups of juvenile Salamandra salamandra were raised selectively with different types of prey. The influence of these conditions on the movement pattern preference was studied during the first six months after metamorphosis. Responses to a black horizontal bar moving continuously or stepwise at step frequencies between 0.25 and 8 steps/s were tested. The differently raised groups showed significant differences in their respective preference for stimulus movement patterns which corresponded with the movement pattern of their food. At the same time, superimposed upon this learning process, a general increase in the relative efficiency of continuous stimulus movement with regard to stepwise stimulus movement could be observed.

  1. Drosophila molting neurohormone bursicon is a heterodimer and the natural agonist of the orphan receptor DLGR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendive, Fernando M; Van Loy, Tom; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2005-01-01

    Bursicon is a neurohumoral agent responsible for tanning and hardening of the cuticle and expansion of the wings during the final phase of insect metamorphosis. Although the hormonal activity was described more than 40 years ago, the molecular nature of bursicon has remained elusive. We identify...... here Drosophila bioactive bursicon as a heterodimer made of two cystine knot polypeptides. This conclusion was reached in part from the unexpected observation that in the genome of the honey bee, the orthologs of the two Drosophila proteins are predicted to be fused in a single open reading frame...

  2. A non-feeding pilidium with apparent prototroch and telotroch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslakova, Svetlana A; von Dassow, George

    2012-11-01

    The nemertean pilidium larva is a long-lived planktotrophic form which is challenging to homologize to other invertebrate larval forms. Here we report a reduced, lecithotrophic pilidium which superficially resembles a trochophore. We document the pilidium-like catastrophic metamorphosis of this larva, including devouring of the larval body. Sequences of COI and 16S rRNA show that this larva belongs to an undescribed lineiform species. This novel larval form highlights the long-standing question, is the trochophore a conserved larval ground-plan or a functional design arrived at by convergence? Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Development of a lecithotrophic pilidium larva illustrates convergent evolution of trochophore-like morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Marie K; Maslakova, Svetlana A

    2017-01-01

    The pilidium larva is an idiosyncrasy defining one clade of marine invertebrates, the Pilidiophora (Nemertea, Spiralia). Uniquely, in pilidial development, the juvenile worm forms from a series of isolated rudiments called imaginal discs, then erupts through and devours the larval body during catastrophic metamorphosis. A typical pilidium is planktotrophic and looks like a hat with earflaps, but pilidial diversity is much broader and includes several types of non-feeding pilidia. One of the most intriguing recently discovered types is the lecithotrophic pilidium nielseni of an undescribed species, Micrura sp. "dark" (Lineidae, Heteronemertea, Pilidiophora). The egg-shaped pilidium nielseni bears two transverse circumferential ciliary bands evoking the prototroch and telotroch of the trochophore larva found in some other spiralian phyla (e.g. annelids), but undergoes catastrophic metamorphosis similar to that of other pilidia. While it is clear that the resemblance to the trochophore is convergent, it is not clear how pilidium nielseni acquired this striking morphological similarity. Here, using light and confocal microscopy, we describe the development of pilidium nielseni from fertilization to metamorphosis, and demonstrate that fundamental aspects of pilidial development are conserved. The juvenile forms via three pairs of imaginal discs and two unpaired rudiments inside a distinct larval epidermis, which is devoured by the juvenile during rapid metamorphosis. Pilidium nielseni even develops transient, reduced lobes and lappets in early stages, re-creating the hat-like appearance of a typical pilidium. Notably, its two transverse ciliary bands can be ontogenetically linked to the primary ciliary band spanning the larval lobes and lappets of the typical planktotrophic pilidium. Our data shows that the development of pilidium nielseni differs remarkably from that of the trochophore, even though their larval morphology is superficially similar. Pilidium nielseni 's

  4. Mortality rates of juvenile starfish Acanthaster planci and Nardoa spp measured on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia and in Okinawa, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Keesing, Jk; Wiedermeyer, Wl; Okaji, K; Halford, Ar; Hall, Kc; Cartwright, Cm

    1996-01-01

    Acanthaster planci (L.) and Nardoa novaecaladoniae (Perrier, 1875) are two coral reef asteroids having planktotrophic and lecithotrophic larval development, respectively. Comparative sizes at metamorphosis are 0.5 to 0.7 mm for A. planci and 1.2 to 1.6 mm for N. novaecaladonine. Mortality rates of small juveniles (one month old) of each species were measured experimentally in the field on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Mortality rates of N. novaecaladoniae were low (1.5 %.d(-1)) compared ...

  5. Ligand-binding properties of a juvenile hormone receptor, Methoprene-tolerant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charles, J.-P.; Iwema, T.; Epa, V. C.; Takaki, Keiko; Ryneš, J.; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 52 (2011), s. 21128-21133 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1032; GA AV ČR IAA500960906 Grant - others:Marie-Curie Fellowship Award(CZ) 276569 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : structure modeling * insecticide action * metamorphosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.681, year: 2011

  6. Complementary radiochronological study of the Francevillian series and its environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, M.; Leclerc, J.; Weber, F.

    The use of the K-Ar method to date biotites extracted from two gneiss samples from the Chaillu Massif shows that the substratum of the Francevillian did not undergo metamorphosis after 2,700 MY. The age of the dolorite veins is pinpointed by the method of the K-Ar internal isochrone at about 1,000 MY. A program is in progress to give a more precise Rb-Sr isochrone than the one published in 1965, and to try, by standard geochronological methods, to remove the uncertainty in the 1,800 to 2,000 MY estimated age of the nuclear reaction

  7. 谷崎における反転する女人の身体 : 時代別の推移をめぐって

    OpenAIRE

    吉, 美顯; Gil, Mi Hyun

    2001-01-01

    The key point of discourse in this paper is the metamorphosis of the female body in Tanizaki's works. This question is explored by examining the female form of his heroines in the Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods. In the Meiji period, Tanizaki creates a diabolical woman through a combination of tatoos and the female form. The Taisho period finds him in pursuit of women of Western appearance. One such heroine is worshipped by her lover even after her unfaithfulness. The Showa period sees Taniza...

  8. Vertical distributions of autumn spawned larval herring (Clupea harengus L.) in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, M.; Brander, Keith; Munk, Peter

    1991-01-01

    in all stages of development, from yolk-sac to pre-metamorphosis (35 mm). During diel migrations larvae were closer to the surface during daylight than at night. The amplitude of diel vertical migrations increased with the length of the larvae. Semi-diel cycles in the vertical distributions were rare......, and appeared to be related to the tidal cycle rather than crepuscular periods. Diel cycles in vertical distribution could not be detected at sites in the southeastern North Sea, characterized by water depths less than 45 m, high vertical shear and high light attenuation coefficients. It is suggested...

  9. [Don Quijote, a lucid mad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Fernández, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 50-year-old hidalgo who believed to be transformed into a knight-errant named Don Quijote is a megalomaniac systematized delusion of transformation of the self, a delusion of metamorphosis in reference to the patient's own identity. The outward projection of this syndrome produces some delusional misidentifications of others, things and animals and include elements of a persecutory delusion which increase the grandiosity of the self. At the same time the hidalgo was maniac with a pathway of bipolar disorder. The phenomenon of donquijotismo is described as the defence of wasted causes and Sancho Panza as an illiterate Sócrates.

  10. Effects of two endocrine disruptors Prochloraz and Ethinylestradiol on development of Rana Temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Korsgaard, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    on the effect of endocrine disruptors on the sexsteroid axis and reproductive function. However, another hormone system, the thyroid hormone axis may equally well be affected by xenobiotics. Thyroid hormones are essential in stimulating all aspects of amphibian metamorphosis and thyroid hormone disruptors may...... of phenotypic males. Moreover, ethinylestradiol caused estrogen-dependent induction of the egg yolk precursor protein vitellogenin. These results show that gonadal development and vitellogenin induction may be used as biomarkers for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Most studies have focused...

  11. Looking at Animals without Seeing Them: Havelock Ellis in the “Circe” Episode of Ulysses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Crowley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Taking wing from Joyce’s reading of Havelock Ellis’s Studies in the Psychology of Sex, in which the Irish writer found an account of cross-species sexual contact, this essay explores Leopold Bloom’s animal metamorphosis in the “Circe” episode of Ulysses. It argues that this encounter with the nonhuman animal is subordinated to the cause of working through barriers of human difference. In the process, the animal that enables this reconciliation disappears. Unable to represent animal interiority, “Circe” settles for merely probing their interiors.

  12. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  13. Evolution of morphology, ontogeny and life cycles within the Crustacea Thecostraca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Perez-Losada, M; Glenner, H

    2009-01-01

    for the Cirripedia and reinforce the concept that this larva was a prerequisite to the tremendous success of that taxon. The evolution of parasitism, obligatory in three major taxa, is discussed. We conclude that the last common ancestor to the Cirripedia was most likely a suspension feeder, and the advanced...... metamorphosis and endoparasitism known from the Rhizocephala and strongly indicated for the Facetotecta are the result of convergent evolution. We also discuss reproductive systems, which range from separate sexes, over hermaphrodites combined with a separate male sex (androdioecy), to pure hermaphroditism...

  14. Cypris settlement and dwarf male formation in the barnacle Scalpellum scalpellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spremberg, U.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Buhl-Mortensen, L.

    2012-01-01

    Cypris settlement and metamorphosis into dwarf males were studied in the androdioecious barnacle Scalpellum scalpellum using field collected samples from the North Sea, and experiments with laboratory reared larvae, observed with video. In the field sample, dwarf males were always situated...... surfaces of the adults, or on their hydroid substratum, always developed into hermaphrodites. The numbers settling as males did not differ significantly from those settling as hermaphrodites, suggesting that genetic sex determination may operate in S. scalpellum. The N. Sea sample comprised 52 adult...

  15. Reproductive Medicine in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Norin

    2017-05-01

    Reproduction of amphibians includes ovulation, spermiation, fertilization, oviposition, larval stage and development, and metamorphosis. A problem at any stage could lead to reproductive failure. To stimulate reproduction, environmental conditions must be arranged to simulate changes in natural habits. Reproductive life history is well documented in amphibians; a thorough knowledge of this subject will aid the practitioner in diagnosis and treatment. Technologies for artificial reproduction are developing rapidly, and some protocols may be transferable to privately kept or endangered species. Reproductive tract disorders are rarely described; no bacterial or viral diseases are known that specifically target the amphibian reproductive system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Desdoblamiento y transformación de la identidad del personaje en / Mygale / de Thierry Jonquet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Camero Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available From the studies of mythocritique and mythanalyse, this article proposes a study of Mygale, Thierry Jonquet’s story, where the stereotypes of the crime novel pass in the background for the benefit of the treatment of the problem of the metamorphosis, the transsexuality and the processing of the identity. The analysis of the structural constituents of the novel: characters, narrative authorities, speech, writing and mythical transposition (Pygmalion, reveal the interest of a novel strongly anchored in the contemporary reality which does not give up for all that the ancient imagination.

  17. Fused embryos and pre-metamorphic conjoined larvae in a broadcast spawning reef coral [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusion of embryos or larvae prior to metamorphosis is rarely known to date in colonial marine organisms. Here, we document for the first time that the embryos of the broadcast spawning coral Platygyra daedalea could fuse during blastulation and further develop into conjoined larvae, and the settlement of conjoined larvae immediately resulted in inborn juvenile colonies. Fusion of embryos might be an adaptive strategy to form pre-metamorphic chimeric larvae and larger recruits, thereby promoting early survival. However, future studies are needed to explore whether and to what extent fusion of coral embryos occurs in the field, and fully evaluate its implications.

  18. Aquaculture and feeding ecology: Feeding behaviour in turbot larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruno, Eleonora

    , larvae of flatfishes undergo a particularly evident and dramatic metamorphosis, because flatfishes completely reprogram their body to move from the pelagic habitat, in the water column, to the benthic habitat, on the sea floor. Due to the complex morphological and physiological changes, in aquaculture...... capture success. This thesis is part of a large international project aimed at improving the rearing techniques of high value fish species larvae fed with calanoid copepods, their natural prey, to achieve high levels of survival and quality. In fact, fish aquaculture is becoming increasingly important...

  19. Documentary images:aesthetic subjectivities e apolitical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Correa Araujo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to analyze images in three categories of films that contemplate dictatorial political regimes: documentaries, films based on real facts and feature films. I argue that images of the three categories can document “factuality” and are what I call “documental images”. Furthermore, they can contribute for a “metamorphosis-memory”, a kind of memory that reconstructs itself continuously according to new representations of dictatorships in films. The frame of reference includes theories by Bakhtin, Baudrillard, Benjamin, Debord, Derrida, Halbwachs,Metz, Nichols and Sarlo, among others.

  20. Sustainability: an Approach in Planning to Raise the Quality of Life Through Open Space Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Y. Khobragade

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A presentation of the notion of sustainable development through the eye of a town planner, by elucidating how open space development would change the character of the city and augment towards harmony in the socio-environmental chords of sustainable development. It is an attempt to put forward awareness about the sustainability and environmental risk to ultimately reconcile ecological, social and economic factors of society. It is an attempt to reflect on socio-environmental dimension of the open space planning by addressing urban metamorphosis.