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Sample records for metalloproteins

  1. Metalloprotein Crystallography: More than a Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah E J; Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Drennan, Catherine L

    2016-04-19

    Metal ions and metallocofactors play important roles in a broad range of biochemical reactions. Accordingly, it has been estimated that as much as 25-50% of the proteome uses transition metal ions to carry out a variety of essential functions. The metal ions incorporated within metalloproteins fulfill functional roles based on chemical properties, the diversity of which arises as transition metals can adopt different redox states and geometries, dictated by the identity of the metal and the protein environment. The coupling of a metal ion with an organic framework in metallocofactors, such as heme and cobalamin, further expands the chemical functionality of metals in biology. The three-dimensional visualization of metal ions and complex metallocofactors within a protein scaffold is often a starting point for enzymology, highlighting the importance of structural characterization of metalloproteins. Metalloprotein crystallography, however, presents a number of implicit challenges including correctly incorporating the relevant metal or metallocofactor, maintaining the proper environment for the protein to be purified and crystallized (including providing anaerobic, cold, or aphotic environments), and being mindful of the possibility of X-ray induced damage to the proteins or incorporated metal ions. Nevertheless, the incorporated metals or metallocofactors also present unique advantages in metalloprotein crystallography. The significant resonance that metals undergo with X-ray photons at wavelengths used for protein crystallography and the rich electronic properties of metals, which provide intense and spectroscopically unique signatures, allow a metalloprotein crystallographer to use anomalous dispersion to determine phases for structure solution and to use simultaneous or parallel spectroscopic techniques on single crystals. These properties, coupled with the improved brightness of beamlines, the ability to tune the wavelength of the X-ray beam, the availability of

  2. Metatheases: artificial metalloproteins for olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, D F; Gotzen, S; Okuda, J

    2016-10-21

    The incorporation of organometallic catalyst precursors in proteins results in so-called artificial metalloenzymes. The protein structure will control activity, selectivity and stability of the organometallic site in aqueous medium and allow non-natural reactions in biological settings. Grubbs-Hoveyda type ruthenium catalysts with an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) as ancillary ligand, known to be active in olefin metathesis, have recently been incorporated in various proteins. An overview of these artificial metalloproteins and their potential application in olefin metathesis is given.

  3. Metalloproteins in the evolution of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammack, R; Rao, K K; Hall, D O

    1981-01-01

    Certain metalloproteins are common to all photosynthetic electron transfer chains. These include soluble proteins such as ferredoxins and cytochromes of the c2 type, and membrane-bound components such as cytochrome b, c1 and the Rieske iron-sulphur protein. The sequence of electron transfer Quinone leads to (cyt b, Fe-S, cyt c1) leads to cyt c2 indicates a common precursor to these systems and to the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In cyanobacteria the cytochrome c2 can be interchanged with the copper protein plastocyanin, and furthermore in chloroplasts of higher plants the latter is used exclusively. The ferredoxins in anaerobic photosynthetic bacteria are mostly of the [4Fe-4S] type, probably derived from those of the fermentative bacteria. These could readily be formed in the earliest cells from iron, sulphide and a very simple peptide. In the oxygen-evolving cyanobacteria and the aerobic halobacteria the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins predominate. The electron transfer chains of the cyanobacteria have been incorporated almost unchanged into the chloroplasts of plants. The electron transfer chains of purple photosynthetic bacteria were probably the precursors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, as shown by similarities of cytochromes c2 and succinate dehydrogenase. However a different origin of the eukaryotic cytoplasm is indicated by the presence of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase.

  4. Au-Biocompatible metallic nanostructures in metalloprotein electrochemistry and electrocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm

    2012-01-01

    Molecular scale metallic nanoparticles coated by molecular monolayers and immobilized on single-crystal Au-electrode surfaces are efficient catalysts in metalloprotein voltammetry. Nanoparticles prepared by a new ‘‘green’’ method also exhibit strong electrocatalysis in both protein electrochemist...... and fuel cell related processes. In this communication we highlight some recent observations and discuss their possible physical origins....

  5. Electrochemical Bioelectronic Device Consisting of Metalloprotein for Analog Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Yoo, Si-Youl; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an analog type logical device that combines metalloprotein and organic/inorganic materials and can make an interactive analog decision. Myoglobin is used as a functional biomolecule to generate electrochemical signals, and its original redox signal is controlled with various mercapto-acids by the distance effect between myoglobin and a metal surface in the process of electron transfer. Controlled signals are modulated with the introduction of inorganic materials including nanoparticles and metal ions. By forming a hybrid structure with various constituents of organic/inorganic materials, several functions for signal manipulation were achieved, including enhancement, suppression, and shift. Based on the manipulated signals of biomolecules, a novel logical system for interactive decision-making processes is proposed by selectively combining different signals. Through the arrangement of various output signals, we can define interactive logical results regulated by an inherent tendency (by metalloprotein), personal experience (by organic spacer sets), and environments (by inorganic materials). As a practical application, a group decision process is presented using the proposed logical device. The proposed flexible logic process could facilitate the realization of an artificial intelligence system by mimicking the sophisticated human logic process.

  6. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  7. From Metalloproteins to Coordination Chemistry: A Learning Exercise to Teach Transition Metal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglinski, John; Graham, Duncan; Kennedy, Alan R.; Gibson, Lorraine T.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise is organized to reinforce the fundamental rules of coordination chemistry through a biological study of metalloproteins. The work, which is divided into four well-defined activities, involves a major application of computer databases to address chemical problems.

  8. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J; Li, Hongbin

    2015-06-25

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions.

  9. On the use of pseudocontact shifts in the structure determination of metalloproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marlene R; Hansen, D. Flemming; Ayna, Umit

    2006-01-01

    The utility of pseudocontact shifts in the structure refinement of metalloproteins has been evaluated using a native, paramagnetic Cu2+ metalloprotein, plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.), as a model protein. First, the possibility of detecting signals of nuclei spatially close to the pa......The utility of pseudocontact shifts in the structure refinement of metalloproteins has been evaluated using a native, paramagnetic Cu2+ metalloprotein, plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.), as a model protein. First, the possibility of detecting signals of nuclei spatially close......, using both the Cu+ plastocyanin and Cd2+-substituted plastocyanin as the diamagnetic references, it is found that the Cd2+-substituted protein with the same electrical charge of the metal ion as the paramagnetic Cu2+ plastocyanin provides the most appropriate diamagnetic reference signals. Third......, it is found that reliable pseudocontact shifts cannot be obtained from the chemical shifts of the 15N nuclei in plastocyanin, most likely because these shifts are highly dependent on even minor differences in the structure of the paramagnetic and diamagnetic proteins. Finally, the quality of the obtained 1H...

  10. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will A; Khare, Sagar D; Noy, Dror

    2016-05-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. This article is part of a Special issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MDB: the Metalloprotein Database and Browser at The Scripps Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnetto, Jesus M; Hennessy, Sean W; Roberts, Victoria A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Tainer, John A; Pique, Michael E

    2002-01-01

    The Metalloprotein Database and Browser (MDB; http://metallo.scripps.edu) at The Scripps Research Institute is a web-accessible resource for metalloprotein research. It offers the scientific community quantitative information on geometrical parameters of metal-binding sites in protein structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The MDB also offers analytical tools for the examination of trends or patterns in the indexed metal-binding sites. A user can perform interactive searches, metal-site structure visualization (via a Java applet), and analysis of the quantitative data by accessing the MDB through a web browser without requiring an external application or platform-dependent plugin. The MDB also has a non-interactive interface with which other web sites and network-aware applications can seamlessly incorporate data or statistical analysis results from metal-binding sites. The information contained in the MDB is periodically updated with automated algorithms that find and index metal sites from new protein structures released by the PDB.

  12. A simple approach to the solvent reorganisation Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, E-r, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded...

  13. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Grace O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here

  16. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Design and fine-tuning redox potentials of metalloproteins involved in electron transfer in bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Lu, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Redox potentials are a major contributor in controlling the electron transfer (ET) rates and thus regulating the ET processes in the bioenergetics. To maximize the efficiency of the ET process, one needs to master the art of tuning the redox potential, especially in metalloproteins, as they represent major classes of ET proteins. In this review, we first describe the importance of tuning the redox potential of ET centers and its role in regulating the ET in bioenergetic processes including photosynthesis and respiration. The main focus of this review is to summarize recent work in designing the ET centers, namely cupredoxins, cytochromes, and iron-sulfur proteins, and examples in design of protein networks involved these ET centers. We then discuss the factors that affect redox potentials of these ET centers including metal ion, the ligands to metal center and interactions beyond the primary ligand, especially non-covalent secondary coordination sphere interactions. We provide examples of strategies to fine-tune the redox potential using both natural and unnatural amino acids and native and nonnative cofactors. Several case studies are used to illustrate recent successes in this area. Outlooks for future endeavors are also provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Online immunocapture ICP-MS for the determination of the metalloprotein ceruloplasmin in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernevic, Bogdan; El-Khatib, Ahmed H; Jakubowski, Norbert; Weller, Michael G

    2018-04-02

    The human copper-protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) is the major copper-containing protein in the human body. The accurate determination of Cp is mandatory for the reliable diagnosis of several diseases. However, the analysis of Cp has proven to be difficult. The aim of our work was a proof of concept for the determination of a metalloprotein-based on online immunocapture ICP-MS. The immuno-affinity step is responsible for the enrichment and isolation of the analyte from serum, whereas the compound-independent quantitation with ICP-MS delivers the sensitivity, precision, and large dynamic range. Off-line ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was used in parallel to confirm the elution profile of the analyte with a structure-selective method. The total protein elution was observed with the 32 S mass trace. The ICP-MS signals were normalized on a 59 Co signal. The human copper-protein Cp could be selectively determined. This was shown with pure Cp and with a sample of human serum. The good correlation with off-line ELISA shows that Cp could be captured and eluted selectively from the anti-Cp affinity column and subsequently determined by the copper signal of ICP-MS.

  19. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteins 9 attenuated Candida albicans induced inflammation in mouse cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C; Yang, M G

    2016-10-31

    Since the severe corneal ulceration of mouse cornea is known to occur with inflammation. As one of imperative matrix metalloproteinase, the potential roles of matrix metalloproteins 9 (MMP9) in corneal ulceration and keratitis are still unveiled caused by fungal invasion. In this study, Candida albicans (CA) inoculated wild-type KM mice cornea was used as a model pathogen in corneal inflammation.  CA invasion significantly stimulated the expression of collagen IV and MMP9 detected by RT-PCR, Real-time PCR and Immunofluorescent staining in mouse cornea as soon as 6 hours post infection, and relatively decreased at 1 day post infection. For examining the role of MMP9 in fungal keratitis, the mice corneas were subconjunctivally injected MMP9 antibody or recombinant MMP9 protein 6 hours prior to CA inoculation, using rabbit IgG as control. Subconjunctival injection of recombinant MMP9 protein prior to CA inoculation enhanced, whereas MMP9 antibody attenuated corneal ulceration and inflammation, examining basement membrane, fungal load, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proinflammatory cytokines including Macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP2), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Inhibition of MMP9 could potentially attenuate Candida albicans induced inflammation in mouse cornea.

  20. Applications of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and low temperature XMCD to metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-01-01

    The author has used the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and ultra-low temperature X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) to study the environments of the metal sites in metalloproteins. EXAFS has been used to study the Zn site in spinach carbonic anhydrase. The EXAFS, in parallel with site directed mutagenesis studies, indicate that the active site Zn is in a cys-cys-his-H{sub 2}O environment, very different from the mammalian carbonic anhydrase active site. Nitrogenase, the primary enzyme in biological nitrogen fixation, contains two complex metal clusters of unique structure. EXAFS studies at the Fe and Mo K-edges of nitrogenase solutions and crystals yielded information about the various metal-metal distances in these two clusters. The author assigned 4 Fe and 3 Mo interactions >4 {angstrom}. Single crystal Mo K-edge EXAFS then found a very long Fe-Fe distance of {approximately}5.1 {angstrom}. These distances were then used to further refine the proposed crystallographic models to their highest accuracy yet. Studies were carried further by examining nitrogenas in oxidized and reduced forms--states for which there is no crystallographic information. Small structural changes were observed and an EXAFS model was put forth that attempts to deconvolute the EXAFS distances of the two metal clusters. Nitrogenase Apo I, a genetic mutant of nitrogenase which is though to contain only one of the two different metal clusters, was also examined using EXAFS. These studies showed results consistent with current models, yet the metal clusters were very disordered. Finally, ultra-low temperature methods were used to further the development of XMCD as a technique for studying biological systems. Experiments were performed on the copper in plastocyanin. Data was collected that definitively proves that the sample surface was at 0.55 {+-} 0.05 K. This result opens the door to further study of more complex biological metal clusters.

  1. Transition metals at the host–pathogen interface: How Neisseria exploit human metalloproteins for acquiring iron and zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Wilma; Hadley, Rose C.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Transition metals are essential nutrients for all organisms and important players in the host-microbe interaction. During bacterial infection, a tug-of-war between the host and microbe for nutrient metals occurs: the host innate immune system responds to the pathogen by reducing metal availability and the pathogen tries to outmaneuver this response. The outcome of this competition, which involves metal-sequestering host-defense proteins and microbial metal acquisition machinery, is an important variable for whether infection occurs. One strategy bacterial pathogens employ to overcome metal restriction involves hijacking abundant host metalloproteins. The obligate human pathogens Neisseria spp. express TonB-dependent transport systems that capture human metalloproteins, extract the bound metal ions, and deliver these nutrients into the bacterial cell. This Essay highlights structural and mechanistic investigations that provide insights into how Neisseria acquire iron from the Fe(III)-transport protein transferrin, the Fe(III)-chelating host-defense protein lactoferrin, and the oxygen-transport protein hemoglobin, and obtain zinc from the metal-sequestering antimicrobial protein calprotectin. PMID:28487398

  2. Global Structural Flexibility of Metalloproteins Regulates Reactivity of Transition Metal Ion in the Protein Core: An Experimental Study Using Thiol-subtilisin as a Model Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Takashi; Kono, Takamasa; Shobu, Isamu; Ishida, Masaya; Gonda, Katsuya; Hirota, Shun

    2018-02-21

    The functions of metal-containing proteins (metalloproteins) are determined by the reactivities of transition metal ions at their active sites. Because protein macromolecular structures have several molecular degrees of freedom, global structural flexibility may also regulate the properties of metalloproteins. However, the influence of this factor has not been fully delineated in mechanistic studies of metalloproteins. Accordingly, we have investigated the relationship between global protein flexibility and the characteristics of a transition metal ion in the protein core using thiol-subtilisin (tSTL) with a Cys-coordinated Cu 2+ ion as a model system. Although tSTL has two Ca 2+ -binding sites, the Ca 2+ -binding status hardly affects its secondary structure. Nevertheless, guanidinium-induced denaturation and amide H/D exchange indicated the increase in the structural flexibility of tSTL by the removal of bound Ca 2+ ions. Electron paramagnetic resonance and absorption spectral changes have revealed that the protein flexibility determines the characteristics of a Cu 2+ ion in tSTL. Therefore, global protein flexibility should be recognized as an important factor that regulates the properties of metalloproteins. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A Novel Secretory Poly-Cysteine and Histidine-Tailed Metalloprotein (Ts-PCHTP) from Trichinella spiralis (Nematoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoslavov, Georgi; Jordanova, Rositsa; Teofanova, Denitsa; Georgieva, Katya; Hristov, Petar; Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Liebau, Eva; Bankov, Ilia

    2010-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis is an unusual parasitic intracellular nematode causing dedifferentiation of the host myofiber. Trichinella proteomic analyses have identified proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and the host and are probably important for the infection and pathogenesis. Many parasitic proteins, including a number of metalloproteins are unique for the nematodes and trichinellids and therefore present good targets for future therapeutic developments. Furthermore, detailed information on such proteins and their function in the nematode organism would provide better understanding of the parasite - host interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification, biochemical characterization and localization of a novel poly-cysteine and histidine-tailed metalloprotein (Ts-PCHTP). The native Ts-PCHTP was purified from T. spiralis muscle larvae that were isolated from infected rats as a model system. The sequence analysis showed no homology with other proteins. Two unique poly-cysteine domains were found in the amino acid sequence of Ts-PCHTP. This protein is also the first reported natural histidine tailed protein. It was suggested that Ts-PCHTP has metal binding properties. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) assay revealed that it binds significant concentrations of iron, nickel and zinc at protein:metal ratio of about 1∶2. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the Ts-PCHTP is localized in the cuticle and in all tissues of the larvae, but that it is not excreted outside the parasite. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that Ts-PCHTP is the first described member of a novel nematode poly-cysteine protein family and its function could be metal storage and/or transport. Since this protein family is unique for parasites from Superfamily Trichinelloidea its potential applications in diagnostics and treatment could be exploited in future. PMID:20967224

  4. A novel secretory poly-cysteine and histidine-tailed metalloprotein (Ts-PCHTP from Trichinella spiralis (Nematoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Radoslavov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trichinella spiralis is an unusual parasitic intracellular nematode causing dedifferentiation of the host myofiber. Trichinella proteomic analyses have identified proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and the host and are probably important for the infection and pathogenesis. Many parasitic proteins, including a number of metalloproteins are unique for the nematodes and trichinellids and therefore present good targets for future therapeutic developments. Furthermore, detailed information on such proteins and their function in the nematode organism would provide better understanding of the parasite-host interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we report the identification, biochemical characterization and localization of a novel poly-cysteine and histidine-tailed metalloprotein (Ts-PCHTP. The native Ts-PCHTP was purified from T. spiralis muscle larvae that were isolated from infected rats as a model system. The sequence analysis showed no homology with other proteins. Two unique poly-cysteine domains were found in the amino acid sequence of Ts-PCHTP. This protein is also the first reported natural histidine tailed protein. It was suggested that Ts-PCHTP has metal binding properties. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF assay revealed that it binds significant concentrations of iron, nickel and zinc at protein:metal ratio of about 1:2. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the Ts-PCHTP is localized in the cuticle and in all tissues of the larvae, but that it is not excreted outside the parasite. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Ts-PCHTP is the first described member of a novel nematode poly-cysteine protein family and its function could be metal storage and/or transport. Since this protein family is unique for parasites from Superfamily Trichinelloidea its potential applications in diagnostics and treatment could be exploited in future.

  5. A Computational Framework for Proteome-Wide Pursuit and Prediction of Metalloproteins using ICP-MS and MS/MS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trauger Sunia A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal-containing proteins comprise a diverse and sizable category within the proteomes of organisms, ranging from proteins that use metals to catalyze reactions to proteins in which metals play key structural roles. Unfortunately, reliably predicting that a protein will contain a specific metal from its amino acid sequence is not currently possible. We recently developed a generally-applicable experimental technique for finding metalloproteins on a genome-wide scale. Applying this metal-directed protein purification approach (ICP-MS and MS/MS based to the prototypical microbe Pyrococcus furiosus conclusively demonstrated the extent and diversity of the uncharacterized portion of microbial metalloproteomes since a majority of the observed metal peaks could not be assigned to known or predicted metalloproteins. However, even using this technique, it is not technically feasible to purify to homogeneity all metalloproteins in an organism. In order to address these limitations and complement the metal-directed protein purification, we developed a computational infrastructure and statistical methodology to aid in the pursuit and identification of novel metalloproteins. Results We demonstrate that our methodology enables predictions of metal-protein interactions using an experimental data set derived from a chromatography fractionation experiment in which 870 proteins and 10 metals were measured over 2,589 fractions. For each of the 10 metals, cobalt, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tungsten, uranium, vanadium, and zinc, clusters of proteins frequently occurring in metal peaks (of a specific metal within the fractionation space were defined. This resulted in predictions that there are from 5 undiscovered vanadium- to 13 undiscovered cobalt-containing proteins in Pyrococcus furiosus. Molybdenum and nickel were chosen for additional assessment producing lists of genes predicted to encode metalloproteins or metalloprotein

  6. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO3, 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py − Me-NH2 and Pluronic® P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr_LPE are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs namely, monolayer graphene, Gr_LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic® P-123, graphene oxide (GO and its reduced form (rGO on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (kET using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical wiring of the redox centers

  7. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sanju, E-mail: sanju.gupta@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States); Biotechnology Center, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States); Irihamye, Aline [Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd. Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO{sub 3}), 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py − Me-NH{sub 2}) and Pluronic{sup ®} P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr-LPE) are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy) techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) namely, monolayer graphene, Gr-LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic{sup ®} P-123), graphene oxide (GO) and its reduced form (rGO) on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c) [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb) [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET) kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (k{sub ET}) using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure) upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical

  8. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: Implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Zhicheng; Nguyen, Bao D.; La Mar, Gerd N.

    2000-01-01

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift, which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein

  9. The Possible Role of Smoking and Mild Inflammation on Iron, Copper Ions and Related Metalloproteins in Male Volunteers Working in Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahgat, M.M.; Amer, M.M.; Michael, M.I.; El Daly, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress implies that cells have intact pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant systems that continuously generate and detoxify oxidants during normal aerobic metabolism. When additional oxidative events occur, the pro-oxidant systems out balance the anti-oxidant, potentially producing oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids ultimately leading to cell death in severe oxidative stress. A disturbance in pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant systems results from a myriad of different oxidative challenges, including radiation, metabolism of environmental pollutants and administered drugs and immune system response to disease or infection. Forty male volunteers have participated in this study to evaluate the effect of smoking and mild infection on ferric and copper ions, related metalloproteins and glutathione peroxidase in males working in the radiation fields. The results denoted that those two stress ors added further imbalance in the pro oxidant-antioxidant status

  10. Development of a methodology based on metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions and mass spectrometry to determine the metal binding sites in copper metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihyeon; Vachet, Richard W

    2003-03-01

    Efforts have been made to develop a method that uses metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) reactions and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the binding site of copper in metalloproteins. This method uses MCO reactions to oxidize the amino acids in the metal-binding site and MS to identify the amino acids that have been oxidized. Several reaction conditions, including Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2, Cu(II)/O2/H2O2, and Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2/H2O2, have been tested at varying concentrations to find the optimum conditions for specific oxidation of only the amino acids bound to copper. For small peptides, such as angiotensin I (Agt I) and [Gln11]-amyloid-beta-protein fragment 1-16 (A beta(1-16)), the optimum conditions for specific modification involve the use of Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2. For a larger protein, azurin, the speed and specificity of the MCO reactions are enhanced by the presence of a relatively high concentration of ascorbate (100 mM) and a small concentration of H2O2 (1 mM). Optimized reaction conditions combined with MS/MS and MSn analysis on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer allow the copper-binding sites to be specifically identified. For Agt I and A beta(1-16), the amino acids bound to copper can be identified without any false positives. For azurin, four of the five amino acids bound to copper are identified with one false positive. This false positive, however, corresponds to the oxidation of Met44, which is probably due to its susceptibility to oxidation and its proximity to the only residue not identified (i.e., Gly45). The results altogether suggest that MCO reactions and MS provide a very promising approach for identifying the amino acid residues bound to copper in metalloproteins.

  11. Detection of metalloproteins in human liver cytosol by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence after sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yuxi; Chen Chunying; Zhang Peiqun; Chai Zhifang; He Wei; Huang Yuying

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of analysis of metals in protein bands with synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation is introduced and applied to human liver cytosol. Through a step of drying the gel before SRXRF determination, the continuous background resulting mainly from the Compton-scattering of X-rays by the gel matrix was substantially reduced, and the detection of biological trace elements, such as Cu, Fe, and Zn in protein bands was thereby made possible. With the new procedure, six Zn-containing proteins with molecular weights (MWs) of 17.5, 20.5, 27, 35, 55, and 63 kDa, respectively were found in human liver cytosol, among which the 63 kDa Zn-containing band was shown to be the dominant form of zinc. In addition, at least four Fe containing proteins with MWs of 20, 23, 43, and 83.5 kDa, respectively, were present in the samples. The metal contents in some metalloproteins, such as the 63 kDa Zn-containing protein, the 23 and 83.5 kDa Fe-containing proteins, and a 22 kDa Cu-containing protein were more closely related to the metal level in the sample. It is demonstrated that the procedure could be widely used to further investigate metal-binding proteins in biological samples

  12. Metalloproteins during development of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma resistant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Chekhun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was focused on the detection of changes in serum and tumor metal-containing proteins in animals during development of doxorubicin-resistant phenotype in malignant cells after 12 courses of chemotherapy. We found that on every stage of resistance development there was a significant increase in content of ferritin and transferrin proteins (which take part in iron traffick and storage in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tissue. We observed decreased serum ferritin levels at the beginning stage of the resistance development and significant elevation of this protein levels in the cases with fully developed resistance phenotype. Transferrin content showed changes opposite to that of ferritin. During the development of resistance phenotype the tumor tissue also exhibited increased ‘free iron’ concentration that putatively correlate with elevation of ROS generation and levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 active forms. The tumor non-protein thiol content increases gradually as well. The serum of animals with early stages of resistance phenotype development showed high ceruloplasmin activity and its significant reduction after loss of tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin. Therefore, the development of resistance phenotype in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma is accompanied by both the deregulation of metal-containing proteins in serum and tumor tissue and by the changes in activity of antioxidant defense system. Thus, the results of this study allow us to determine the spectrum of metal-containing proteins that are involved in the development of resistant tumor phenotype and that may be targeted for methods for doxorubicin sensitivity correction therapy.

  13. role of some transition metals and metalloproteins on oxidative stress formation among ionizing radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    this study was established to evaluate the role of working in radiation field for different prolonged periods on some oxidant/antioxidant parameters and to estimate the role of other additional factors such as age, smoking and inflammation on the progress of oxidative stress on the chosen volunteers. one hundred and twenty six male volunteers working in the nuclear research center and hot laboratories center were assessed in the present study, they were arranged as 70 radiation exposed workers and 56 control individuals. the radiation exposed workers were rearranged into 50 non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics; 10 individuals were smokers, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic and other 10 volunteers with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (esr), non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics

  14. Radiation effects and metalloproteins studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurzbach, J.A.

    1975-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study the bonding structure at the iron site of cytochrome c and the bonding of rare earth ions to the phosphate oxygens of ATP. Radiation effects are studied on several amino acid and simple peptide model systems. The emission spectrum of the x-ray source is calculated from literature references. The distributions of photon energy as a function of photon frequency and as a function of take-off angle are obtained. From these distributions, the radiation dose absorbed by an organic sample is found to be 10 6 rads/sec. The C 1s and N 1s spectra of amino acids and peptides are studied to characterize an internal reference standard for protein XPS spectra. Samples of native cytochrome c prepared from solutions of pH 1.5, 3, 7, and 11 are studied. Control samples include porphyrin cytochrome c (PCC), the metal free analogue of the native protein, and microperoxidase (MP), a mixture of heme peptides derived from the peptic digestion of cytochrome c. These samples show two S 2p peaks. The first peak has a binding energy (BE) of 163 eV, which corresponds to the S containing amino acids; the second peak is shifted to 167 eV. This large shift may be the result of Fe-S binding, or oxidation, or both. Low spin ferricytochrome c and ferri-MP were found to have Fe 3p BE's that are unusually low (51 eV) compared to other ferric compounds (54 to 58 eV) and even Fe metal (53 eV). X-ray crystal structures of these compounds show that low spin heme Fe lies in the porphyrin plane; while, high spin heme Fe is displaced above the plane. The N 1s and P 2p spectra of ATP show no change except slight broadening when Nd 3+ is substituted for Na + . Thus, there is no inconsistency with proposals that rare earth ions might be useful as substitutes for alkali metal ions and alkaline earth ions in proteins

  15. Radiation effects and metalloproteins studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzbach, J.A.

    1975-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study the bonding structure at the iron site of cytochrome c and the bonding of rare earth ions to the phosphate oxygens of ATP. Radiation effects are studied on several amino acid and simple peptide model systems. The emission spectrum of the x-ray source is calculated from literature references. The distributions of photon energy as a function of photon frequency and as a function of take-off angle are obtained. From these distributions, the radiation dose absorbed by an organic sample is found to be 10/sup 6/ rads/sec. The C 1s and N 1s spectra of amino acids and peptides are studied to characterize an internal reference standard for protein XPS spectra. Samples of native cytochrome c prepared from solutions of pH 1.5, 3, 7, and 11 are studied. Control samples include porphyrin cytochrome c (PCC), the metal free analogue of the native protein, and microperoxidase (MP), a mixture of heme peptides derived from the peptic digestion of cytochrome c. These samples show two S 2p peaks. The first peak has a binding energy (BE) of 163 eV, which corresponds to the S containing amino acids; the second peak is shifted to 167 eV. This large shift may be the result of Fe-S binding, or oxidation, or both. Low spin ferricytochrome c and ferri-MP were found to have Fe 3p BE's that are unusually low (51 eV) compared to other ferric compounds (54 to 58 eV) and even Fe metal (53 eV). X-ray crystal structures of these compounds show that low spin heme Fe lies in the porphyrin plane; while, high spin heme Fe is displaced above the plane. The N 1s and P 2p spectra of ATP show no change except slight broadening when Nd/sup 3 +/ is substituted for Na/sup +/. Thus, there is no inconsistency with proposals that rare earth ions might be useful as substitutes for alkali metal ions and alkaline earth ions in proteins.

  16. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    by estimation of the water content by thermogravimetric analysis. Bone tissue from dogs treated with strontiummalonate was studied using XAS. A new approach for analysing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model, from which the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... and R6) were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) to 1.40 Å, 1.30 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by XAS including both extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES...

  17. Electrochemistry of Single Metalloprotein and DNA‐Based Molecules at Au(111) Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Zeng, Dongdong; Karlsen, Kasper Kannegård

    2013-01-01

    have been primary targets, with a view on stabilizing the ds‐ONs and improving voltammetric signals of intercalating electrochemical redox probes. Voltammetric signals of the intercalator anthraquinone monosulfonate (AQMS) at ds‐DNA/Au(111) surfaces diluted by mercaptohexanol are significantly...

  18. Broad-temperature range spectroscopy of the two-centre modular redox metalloprotein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Harnung, S.E.; Trabjerg, I.

    2003-01-01

    /VIS, MCD, CD, and EPR spectroscopy. The UV/VIS spectra of grey DFx at room temperature is characterised by broad charge transfer (CT) transitions associated with oxidised centre 1 (495 and 368 nm) and II (335 and 635 nm). The transitions are resolved at 78 K, substantiated by VT-MCD and -CD. The data offer......The electronic-vibrational couplings of the two-centre non-heme iron protein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin (DFx) in three oxidation states, i.e. fully oxidised (grey), half-oxidised (pink), and fully reduced (colourless), have been investigated by variable temperature (VT) UV...

  19. The ybeY protein from Escherichia coli is a metalloprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Chenyang; Fedorov, Elena V.; Shi, Wuxian; Ramagopal, U. A.; Thirumuruhan, R.; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Almo, Steve C.; Fiser, Andras; Chance, Mark R.; Fedorov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    The ybeY protein from E. coli is reported at a 2.7 Å resolution with a metal ion. The three-dimensional crystallographic structure of the ybeY protein from Escherichia coli (SwissProt entry P77385) is reported at 2.7 Å resolution. YbeY is a hypothetical protein that belongs to the UPF0054 family. The structure reveals that the protein binds a metal ion in a tetrahedral geometry. Three coordination sites are provided by histidine residues, while the fourth might be a water molecule that is not seen in the diffraction map because of its relatively low resolution. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the purified protein suggests that the metal is a nickel ion. The structure of ybeY and its sequence similarity to a number of predicted metal-dependent hydrolases provides a functional assignment for this protein family. The figures and tables of this paper were prepared using semi-automated tools, termed the Autopublish server, developed by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium, with the goal of facilitating the rapid publication of crystallographic structures that emanate from worldwide Structural Genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative

  20. Activation of dioxygen by copper metalloproteins and insights from model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, David A; Diaz, Daniel E; Liu, Jeffrey J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-04-01

    Nature uses dioxygen as a key oxidant in the transformation of biomolecules. Among the enzymes that are utilized for these reactions are copper-containing metalloenzymes, which are responsible for important biological functions such as the regulation of neurotransmitters, dioxygen transport, and cellular respiration. Enzymatic and model system studies work in tandem in order to gain an understanding of the fundamental reductive activation of dioxygen by copper complexes. This review covers the most recent advancements in the structures, spectroscopy, and reaction mechanisms for dioxygen-activating copper proteins and relevant synthetic models thereof. An emphasis has also been placed on cofactor biogenesis, a fundamentally important process whereby biomolecules are post-translationally modified by the pro-enzyme active site to generate cofactors which are essential for the catalytic enzymatic reaction. Significant questions remaining in copper-ion-mediated O 2 -activation in copper proteins are addressed.

  1. Development of High Resolution X-Ray spectrometers for the Investigation of Bioinorganic Chemistry in Metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, Owen Byron [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Metals play as varied a role in biology as the proteins they are part of. They are involved in structure formation, they help transfer material and information, and they catalyze chemical reactions. Other proteins transport material or information, such as hemoglobin that distributes O2 and takes up CO2, or insulin that signals cells to increase glucose uptake in response to high blood glucose levels. Again other proteins promote chemical reactions, such as photosystem II responsible for photosynthetic oxygen evolution or nitrogenase which catalyzes the reduction of N2 to NH3. All of these proteins require the presence of a metal ion for their activity.

  2. [Homologies between hemerythrins of sipunculids and cadmium-binding metalloprotein (MP II) from a polychaete annelid, Nereis diversicolor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuynck, S; Sautiere, P; van Beeumen, J; Dhainaut-Courtois, N

    1991-01-01

    The determination of the first 33 amino acids of the Cd-binding-protein (MP II) of Nereis diversicolor (Annelida, Polychaeta) shows a homology of 79 and 61% with 2 respiratory proteins of sipunculids, respectively the myohemerythrin and the hemerythrin. The positive reaction obtained by immunocytochemistry over the hemerythrocytes of Sipunculus nudus using antibodies raised against MP II and the presence of iron on the MP II reinforce this similarity.

  3. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  4. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F.; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co o...

  5. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins and high-valent metal-complexes at room temperature using free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kubin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L-edge of 3d transition metals provides unique information on the local metal charge and spin states by directly probing 3d-derived molecular orbitals through 2p-3d transitions. However, this soft x-ray technique has been rarely used at synchrotron facilities for mechanistic studies of metalloenzymes due to the difficulties of x-ray-induced sample damage and strong background signals from light elements that can dominate the low metal signal. Here, we combine femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser with a novel x-ray fluorescence-yield spectrometer to overcome these difficulties. We present L-edge absorption spectra of inorganic high-valent Mn complexes (Mn ∼ 6–15 mmol/l with no visible effects of radiation damage. We also present the first L-edge absorption spectra of the oxygen evolving complex (Mn4CaO5 in Photosystem II (Mn < 1 mmol/l at room temperature, measured under similar conditions. Our approach opens new ways to study metalloenzymes under functional conditions.

  6. L-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dilute Systems Relevant to Metalloproteins Using an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitzner, Rolf; Rehanek, Jens; Kern, Jan; Gul, Sheraz; Hattne, Johan; Taguchi, Taketo; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Weniger, Christian; Schroeder, Henning; Quevedo, Wilson; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Han, Guangye; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Kubicek, Katharina; Schreck, Simon; Kunnus, Kristjan; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Minitti, Michael P.; Turner, Joshua J.; Moeller, Stefan; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bogan, Michael J.; Nordlund, Dennis; Schlotter, William F.; Messinger, Johannes; Borovik, Andrew; Techert, Simone; de Groot, Frank M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Foehlisch, Alexander; Erko, Alexei; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Wernet, Philippe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    L-edge spectroscopy of 3d transition metals provides important electronic structure information and has been used in many fields. However, the use of this method for studying dilute aqueous systems, such as metalloenzymes, has not been prevalent because of severe radiation damage and the lack of

  7. The Au-S bond and SAM-protein contact in long-range electron transfer of pure and biomimetic metalloproteins via functionalized alkanethiol linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    is exceedingly sensitive to the structure of the thiol-based SAM molecules, testifying to the crucial importance of SAM packing and Au-S binding, and of the SAM link to the protein. Some of the subtleties are illustrated simpler by similar size (5-6 nm) nanoparticles (NPs). Biomimetic NPs must possess a certain...

  8. Molar absorption coefficients and stability constants of metal complexes of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR): Revisiting common chelating probe for the study of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyła, Anna; Pomorski, Adam; Krężel, Artur

    2015-11-01

    4-(2-Pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) is one of the most popular chromogenic chelator used in the determination of the concentrations of various metal ions from the d, p and f blocks and their affinities for metal ion-binding biomolecules. The most important characteristics of such a sensor are the molar absorption coefficient and the metal-ligand complex dissociation constant. However, it must be remembered that these values are dependent on the specific experimental conditions (e.g. pH, solvent components, and reactant ratios). If one uses these values to process data obtained in different conditions, the final result can be under- or overestimated. We aimed to establish the spectral properties and the stability of PAR and its complexes accurately with Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+) and Pb(2+) at a multiple pH values. The obtained results account for the presence of different species of metal-PAR complexes in the physiological pH range of 5 to 8 and have been frequently neglected in previous studies. The effective molar absorption coefficient at 492 nm for the ZnHx(PAR)2 complex at pH7.4 in buffered water solution is 71,500 M(-1) cm(-1), and the dissociation constant of the complex in these conditions is 7.08×10(-13) M(2). To confirm these values and estimate the range of the dissociation constants of zinc-binding biomolecules that can be measured using PAR, we performed several titrations of zinc finger peptides and zinc chelators. Taken together, our results provide the updated parameters that are applicable to any experiment conducted using inexpensive and commercially available PAR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca; Langton, David J; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co or other elements, but the current analytical methods used to investigate the processes involved do not provide sufficient information to understand the size or composition of the wear particles generated in vivo. In this qualitative feasibility study, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate metal protein binding and the size and composition of wear metal particles present in serum and hip aspirates from MoM hip replacement patients. A well-established HPLC anion exchange chromatography (AEC) separation system coupled to ICP-MS was used to confirm the metal-protein associations in the serum samples. Off-line single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) analysis was used to confirm the approximate size distribution indicated by AF(4) of the wear particles in hip aspirates. In the serum samples, AF(4) -ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with transferrin (Tf) and Co with albumin (Alb) and an unidentified species; AEC-ICP-MS confirmed these associations and also indicated an association of Cr with Alb. In the hip aspirate sample, AF(4)-ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with Alb and Tf and that Co was associated with Alb and two unidentified compounds; AEC analysis confirmed the Cr results and the association of Co with Alb and a second compound. Enzymatic digestion of the hip aspirate sample, followed by separation using AF(4) with detection by UV absorption (280 nm), multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS, suggested that the sizes of the Cr-, Co- and Mo-containing wear particles in a hip aspirate sample were in the range 40-150 nm. Off-line spICP-MS was used to confirm these findings for the Co- and Cr-containing nanoparticles. Whilst limited in scope, the results are sufficient to show the interaction of ions with transport proteins and give an indication of particle size, providing useful pathological indices. As such, the methods indicate a new way forward for in vivo investigation of the processes which lead to tissue necrosis and hip loosening in patients with MoM hip replacements.

  10. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  11. Structural studies on metal-containing enzymes: T4 endonuclease VII and D. gigas formate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, H.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many biological processes require metal ions, and many of these metal-ion functions involve metalloproteins. The metal ions in metalloproteins are often critical to the protein's function, structure, or stability. This thesis focuses on two of these proteins, bacteriophage T4 endonuclease

  12. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Bioinorganic Chemistry, Activation of Molecular Oxygen, Functional Models for Metalloproteins, Interaction of Metal Complexes with DNA ..... Physical Biochemistry, Chemistry of Macromolecules, Biophysics of Proteins, Enzymes & Thermodynamics, Food Chemistry, Nutrition, Food Biotechnology and Food ...

  13. Valence-to-core-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Eleanor R.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can provide detailed insight into the electronic and geometric structures of transition-metal active sites in metalloproteins and chemical catalysts. However, standard XAS spectra inherently represent an average contribution from the entire coordination...

  14. Characterization of biological macromolecules by electrophoresis and neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, S.F.; Hancock, D.; Zeisler, R.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure combining polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) with INAA and autoradiography was developed to study biological macromolecules and their associated trace elements. Results from the application of this method to several metalloproteins are presented. (author)

  15. Promiscuous behaviour of the bacterial metallohydrolase DapE : an evolutionary and mechanistic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Uda, Narasimha Rao

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity, defined as functional properties other than those for which they are evolved, is considered a key factor in the evolution of new enzyme functions. Many metalloproteins can be alternatively metallated, which may lead to metal-dependent promiscuity. The mechanisms and evolutionary implications of metal-mediated promiscuity appear to be underexplored, especially considering that approximately one-third of structurally characterized proteins are thought to be metalloproteins. ...

  16. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  17. Relationship between serum zinc levels and preeclampsia at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Preeclampsia is one of the common conditions in the pregnant mothers in Zambia. This condition has been shown in some studies to be associated with increased oxidative stress. This study aimed at evaluating the association of zinc, an important cofactor in the antioxidant metalloproteins in the aetiology of ...

  18. Sarkar, Prof. Sabyasachi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Chemistry. Sarkar, Prof. Sabyasachi Ph.D. (Gorakhpur). Date of birth: 17 May 1947. Specialization: Graphene & Carbon Quantum Dots, Drug Delivery, Bio-geoinorganic Chemistry, Structure-functional analogues of metallo-proteins, Carbon Quantum Dots, Bio- ...

  19. Expanding the biological periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, Javier; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2010-08-27

    Metal ions play an indispensable role in biology, enabling enzymes to perform their functions and lending support to the structures of numerous macromolecules. Despite their prevalence and importance, the metalloproteome is still relatively unexplored. Cvetkovic et al. (2010) now describe an approach to identify metalloproteins on a genome-wide scale. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metallothioneins (MTs), a low-mass class of metalloproteins, are characterized by a high thiolate sulphur and metal content. MTs are involved in metal homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification, and are efficient scavengers of free radicals. This article describes zinc release from human MT-1 and modification of its amino ...

  1. Metallothioneins are multipurpose neuroprotectants during brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) constitute a family of cysteine-rich metalloproteins involved in cytoprotection during pathology. In mammals there are four isoforms (MT-I - IV), of which MT-I and -II (MT-I + II) are the best characterized MT proteins in the brain. Accumulating studies have demonstrated MT...

  2. Effects of gamma-ray-induced free radicals on the metal content and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metallothioneins (MTs), a low-mass class of metalloproteins, are characterized by a high thiolate sulphur and metal content. MTs are involved in metal homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification, and are efficient scavengers of free radicals. This article describes zinc release from human MT-1 and modification of its amino ...

  3. Rao, Prof. Chebrolu Pulla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2012 Section: Chemistry. Rao, Prof. Chebrolu Pulla Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 13 May 1954. Specialization: Bioinorganic Chemistry, Supramolecular Chemistry, Ion & Molecular Receptors, Metalloproteins & Metalloenzymes Address: Institute Chair Professor, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of ...

  4. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  5. A hypothesis on chemical mechanism of the effect of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Penghui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies have shown that hydrogen can play important roles on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other protective effects. Ohsawa et al have proved that hydrogen can electively and directly scavenge hydroxyl radical. But this mechanism cannot explain more new experimental results. In this article, the hypothesis, which is inspired by H2 could bind to the metal as a ligand, come up to explain its extensive biology effect: Hydrogen could regulate particular metalloproteins by bonding (M–H2 interaction it. And then it could affect the metabolization of ROS and signal transduction. Metalloproteins may be ones of the target molecules of H2 action. Metal ions may be appropriate role sites for H2 molecules. The hypothesis pointed out a new direction to clarify its mechanisms.

  6. Surface Immobilized His-tagged Azurin as a Model Interface for the Investigation of Vectorial Electron Transfer in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalini, Stefano; Berto, Marcello; Kovtun, Alessandro; Operamolla, Alessandra; Di Rocco, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Liscio, Andrea; Farinola, Gianluca M.; Borsari, Marco; Bortolotti, Carlo A.

    2015-01-01

    A model system for the electrochemical investigation of vectorial electron transfer in biological systems was designed, assembled and characterized. Gold electrodes, functionalized with a -OCH 3 terminated, aromatic self-assembled monolayer, were used as a substrate for the adsorption of variants of copper-containing, redox metalloprotein azurin. The engineered azurin bears a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus. Thanks to the presence of the solvent exposed tag, which chelates Cu 2+ ions in solution, we introduced an exogenous redox centre. The different reduction potentials of the two redox centres and their positioning with respect to the surface are such that electron transfer from the exogenous copper centre and the electrode is mediated by the native azurin active site, closely paralleling electron transfer processes in naturally occurring multicentre metalloproteins.

  7. Estudo metaloproteômico do mércurio em amostras de tecido hepático de peixes coletados na área de influência do AHE JIRAU - Bacia do rio Madeira

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, José Cavalcante Souza [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation work , we sought to evaluate and quantify the amount of mercury present in samples of fish jaraqui , tucunaré and filhote from the influence area of the AHE JIRAU - the Madeira basin , aiming to define a protein biomarker (metalloproteins, metallothionein) for monitoring this toxic metals in the environment. For this research, we used techniques of proteomics: two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), mass spectrometry. atomic absorption spectrometry and bioinformatics. ...

  8. Optisch detektierte paramagnetische Resonanz-Spektroskopie am Rubin

    OpenAIRE

    Schweika-Kresimon, Marc Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The optically detected paramagnetic resonance has been proven to be a valuable method for the investigation of the electronic structure of transition metal in metallo-proteins. Up to now a model has been used for the interpretation of the experimental spectra which described this experiment on the basis of circular magnetic dichroism, which is induced by a rotating transverse magnetization. This model of magnetic circular dichroism induced by a rotating magnetization is just applicable to sp...

  9. Copper in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yruela, Inmaculada

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential metal for normal plant growth and development, although it is also potentially toxic. Copper participates in numerous physiological processes and is an essential cofactor for many metalloproteins, however, problems arise when excess copper is present in cells. Excess copper inhibits plant growth and impairs important cellular processes (i.e., photosynthetic electron transport). Since copper is both an essential cofactor and a toxic element, involving a complex network o...

  10. The Effects of Nitroxyl (HNO) on H2O2 Metabolism and Possible Mechanisms of HNO Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Matthew I.; Fields, Hannah F.; Lujan, Timothy S.; Cantrell, Megan M.; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO) possesses unique and potentially important biological/physiological activity that is currently mechanistically ill-defined. Previous work has shown that the likely biological targets for HNO are thiol proteins, oxidized metalloproteins (i.e. ferric heme proteins) and, most likely, selenoproteins. Interestingly, these are the same classes of proteins that interact with H2O2. In fact, these classes of proteins not only react with H2O2, and thus potentially responsible for the sig...

  11. Tanshinone IIA mitigates peritoneal fibrosis by inhibiting EMT via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LY364947 group, and 2 transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) groups (TGF-β+ 50 μM T-IIA and TGF-β+. 100 μM T- IIA). The expression levels of mRNA and protein of TGF-β, smad2, smad7, α-smooth muscle actin(α-SMA), fibronectin, collagen І, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, matrix metalloprotein-2(MMP-2), and. MMP-9 in the ...

  12. From Sensors to Silencers: Quinoline- and Benzimidazole-Sulfonamides as Inhibitors for Zinc Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Derived from the extensive work in the area of small molecule zinc(II) ion sensors, chelating fragment libraries of quinoline- and benzimidazole-sulfonamides have been prepared and screened against several different zinc(II)-dependent matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The fragments show impressive inhibition of these metalloenzymes and preferences for different MMPs based on the nature of the chelating group. The findings show that focused chelator libraries are a powerful strategy for the discovery of lead fragments for metalloprotein inhibition. PMID:20507095

  13. Heavy Metals and Metalloids As a Cause for Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Tamás, Markus J.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional...

  14. The Role of Copper in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Francis M.

    My research concerns the fundamental atomistic mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and the methodologies by which they may be discerned. This thesis consists of three primary parts. The introductory material is the raison d'etre for this work and a critical overview of the specific physics, mathematics and algorithms used in this research. The methods are presented along with specific details in order to facilitate future replication and enhancement. With the groundwork of mechanisms and methods out of the way, we then explore a nouveau atomistic mechanism describing the onset of Parkinson's disease, a disease that has been closely linked to misfolded metalloproteins. Further exploration of neurodegeneration takes place in the following chapter, where a remedial approach to Alzheimer's disease via a simulated chelation of a metalloprotein is undertaken. Altogether, the methods and techniques applied here allow for simulated exploration of both the atomistic mechanisms of neurodegeneration and their potential remediation strategies. The beginning portion of the research efforts explore protein misfolding dynamics in the presence a copper ion. Misfolding of the human alpha-synuclein (aS) protein has been implicated as a central constituent in neurodegenerative disease. In Parkinson's disease (PD) in particular, aS is thought to be the causative participant when found concentrated into neuritic plaques. Here we propose a scenario involving the metal ion Cu2+ as the protein misfolding initiator of fibrillized aS, the chief component of neuritic plaques. From experimental results we know these misfolded proteins have a rich beta--sheet signature, a marker that we reproduce with our simulated model. This model identifies a process of structural modifications to a natively unfolded alpha-synuclein resulting in a partially folded intermediate with a well defined nucleation site. It serves as a precursor to the fully misfolded protein. Understanding the nucleation

  15. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingdong; Chi Qijin; Albrecht, Tim; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Welinder, Anne C.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class of metallic and semiconductor-based nanoparticles, nano-arrays, nanotubes, and nanopits. Others are based on self-assembled molecular monolayers. The latter extend to bioelectrochemical systems with redox metalloproteins and DNA-based molecules as targets. We overview here some recent achievements in areas of interfacial electrochemical ET systems, mapped to the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Focus is on both experimental and theoretical studies in our group. Systems addressed are organized monolayers of redox active transition metal complexes, and metalloproteins and metalloenzymes on single-crystal Au(1 1 1)-electrode surfaces. These systems have been investigated by voltammetry, spectroscopy, microcantilever technology, and scanning probe microscopy. A class of Os-complexes has shown suitable as targets for electrochemical in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), with close to single-molecule scanning tunnelling spectroscopic (STS) features. Mapping of redox metalloproteins from the three major classes, i.e. blue copper proteins, heme proteins, and iron-sulfur proteins, at the monolayer and single-molecule levels have also been achieved. In situ STM and spectroscopy of redox molecules and biomolecules have been supported by new theoretical frames, which extend established theory of interfacial electrochemical ET. The electrochemical nanoscale and single-molecule systems discussed are compared with other recent nanoscale and single-molecule systems with conspicuous device-like properties, particularly unimolecular rectifiers and single-molecule transistors. Both of these show analogies to electrochemical in situ STM features of redox molecules and

  16. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...... upon azide complexation. Application of this method allows for rapid analysis of ligand binding in metalloproteins in dilute aqueous solution and could in the future, when combined with theoretical studies, increase the obtainable structural resolution of proteins beyond that of X-ray analysis....

  17. Electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry towards the single-molecule level: Theoretical notions and systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Albrecht, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Surface structures controlled at the nanometer and single-molecule levels, with functions crucially determined by interfacial electron transfer (ET) are broadly reported in recent years, with different kinds of electrochemically controlled nanoscale/single molecule systems. One is the broad class...... tunnelling spectroscopic (STS) features. Mapping of redox metalloproteins from the three major classes, i.e. blue copper proteins, heme proteins, and iron-sulfur proteins, at the monolayer and single-molecule levels have also been achieved. In situ STM and spectroscopy of redox molecules and biomolecules...

  18. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal hip prosthesis has had a revival due to their excellent wear properties. However, particulate wear debris and metal ions liberated from the CoCrMo alloys might cause carcinogenicity, hypersensitivity, local and general tissue toxicity, genotoxici...... and that they accumulate in liver and kidney tissue. That the liberated metal ions affect the tissues is supported by an up-regulation of the detoxifying/pacifying metalloprotein I/II in the liver. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  19. Tuning affinity and reversibility for O2 binding in dinuclear Co(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Mads Sørensen; Johansson, Frank Bartnik; Seidler-Egdal, Rune Kirk

    2013-01-01

    )]2+ and [Co2(bpbp)- (O2)(CCl3CO2)]2+. The O2 affinities can be qualitatively correlated with both the pKa value of the parent acetic or chloroacetic acid and the redox potential of the O2 2−/O2˙− couple measured for the peroxidebridged complexes. The redox potential varies between 510 mV (vs. Fc0...... qualitatively consistent with the expectation from the pKa of the parent 1-naphthoic acid. Introduction Reversible dioxygen binding is a life-supporting process for respiring organisms carried out by three classes of metalloproteins: hemoglobin, hemerythrin, and hemocyanin, the latter two...

  20. Metal-molecular assembly for functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, Yutaka; Negishi, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Michito; Uemura, Takashi; Takaya, Hikaru; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on modern coordination chemistry, covering porous coordination polymers, metalloproteins, metallopeptides, nanoclusters, nanocapsules, aligned polymers, and fullerenes. As well, it deals with applications to electronic devices and surface characterization. These wide-ranging topics are integrally described from the perspectives of dimensionality (one-, two-, and three-dimension), new materials design, synthesis, molecular assembly, function and application. The nine chapters making up this book have been authored by scientists who are at the cutting edge of research in this p

  1. The Rossendorf Beamline at ESRF (ROBL-CRG). Bi-annual report 2003/04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheinost, A.C.; Schell, N. (eds.)

    2005-01-01

    In this report the work performed at the Rossendorf beam-line at the ESRF is described. It concerns neptunium (IV) uptake by iron metalloproteins, in-situ speciation of actinides using a newly developed spectro-electrochemical cell, quantitative antimony speciation in Swiss shooting-range soils, in-situ studies of ITO film properties and structure during annealing in vacuum, high-temperature investigations of Si/SiGe based quantum cascade structures using X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, and in-situ characterization of stress states in copper dual inlaid interconnects at high temperatures by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. (HSI)

  2. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd[sup 3+] + L(ligand), [RuL[sub 5]H[sub 2]O][sup 2+], laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO)[sub 6] + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd[sup 3+] ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]-2,2'-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  3. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd{sup 3+} + L(ligand), [RuL{sub 5}H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+}, laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO){sub 6} + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd{sup 3+} ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO){sub 6}-2,2`-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  4. 'DRF-G - Grenoble Department of Fundamental Research. Activity report 1985, Nr 20. Volume II: 'Chemical Physics' 'Biology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains synthetic reports of researches performed in chemistry, in the field of biological and medical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance, and in biology during the 1981-1983 period or only during 1983. As far as chemistry is concerned, the following topics have been addressed: conducting organic polymers, organic and analytic electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, molecular dynamics, vegetal macromolecules, nucleic acids. As far as biology is concerned, the following topics have been addressed: systems associated with membranes, metalloproteins, cell biology and differentiation, immuno-chemistry, haematology, vegetal physiology, structural studies of proteins. Staff lists of researchers are provided for chemistry laboratories and biology laboratories, as well a list of publications

  5. Teoretická bioanorganická chemie a spektroskopie

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bím, Daniel; Gutten, Ondrej; Chalupský, Jakub; Srnec, Martin; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 5 (2016), s. 354-364 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S; GA ČR GA15-19143S; GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : theoretical bioinorganic chemistry * transition metal ion containing systems * quantum chemistry methods * reaction mechanism * metalloproteins * metal ions binding selectivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/docs/full/2016_05_354-364.pdf

  6. Single-molecule conductivity of non-redox and redox molecules at pure and gold-mined Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Ulstrup, Jens

    media supported by comprehensive theoretical frames, have emerged as core approaches in these exciting areas. Single-molecule redox electrochemistry is rooted in two major areas. One is the preparation of well-defined (atomically planar) electrode surfaces modified by molecular monolayers (SAMs). High...... to surface-mined Au-atoms. In addition the SAMs ensure protein/enzyme immobilization gentle enough that the proteins retain electron transfer or enzyme activity in a variety of local environments. The second area is the mapping and control of the immobilized redox molecules and metalloproteins themselves...

  7. X-ray fluorescent microscopy reveals large-scale relocalization and extracellular translocation of cellular copper during angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finney, L.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Zhang, W.; Rodi, D.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Ikpatt, F.; Olopade, O. I.; Glesne, D.

    2007-01-01

    Although copper has been reported to influence numerous proteins known to be important for angiogenesis, the enhanced sensitivity of this developmental process to copper bioavailability has remained an enigma, because copper metalloproteins are prevalent and essential throughout all cells. Recent developments in x-ray optics at third-generation synchrotron sources have provided a resource for highly sensitive visualization and quantitation of metalloproteins in biological samples. Here, we report the application of x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to in vitro models of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, revealing a surprisingly dramatic spatial relocalization specific to capillary formation of 80-90% of endogenous cellular copper stores from intracellular compartments to the tips of nascent endothelial cell filopodia and across the cell membrane. Although copper chelation had no effect on process formation, an almost complete ablation of network formation was observed. XFM of highly vascularized ductal carcinomas showed copper clustering in putative neoangiogenic areas. This use of XFM for the study of a dynamic developmental process not only sheds light on the copper requirement for endothelial tube formation but highlights the value of synchrotron-based facilities in biological research

  8. LARGE SCALE PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION, AND 65CU SOLID STATE NMR OF AZURIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, A.; Heck, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper details a way to produce azurin with an effi ciency over 10 times greater than previously described and demonstrates the fi rst solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 65Cu(I) in a metalloprotein. A synthetic gene for azurin based upon the DNA sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa including the periplasmic targeting sequence was subcloned into a T7 overexpression vector to create the plasmid pGS-azurin, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The leader sequence on the expressed protein causes it to be exported to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli. Bacteria grown in a fermentation unit were induced to overexpress the azurin, which was subsequently purifi ed through an endosmotic shock procedure followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 1,500 mg of azurin were purifi ed per liter of culture. 65Cu(II) was added to apo-azurin and then reduced. The 65Cu metal cofactor in azurin was observed with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any structural variations that accompanied copper reduction. This is the fi rst solid state NMR spectra of a copper(I) metalloprotein. Analysis of the NMR spectra is being used to complement hypotheses set forth by x-ray diffraction and computational calculations of electron transfer mechanisms in azurin.

  9. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Okabe, Takahiro; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α 2 β 2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm 3 ) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  10. Identifying proteins that can form tyrosine-cysteine crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinie, Ryan J; Godakumbura, Pahan I; Porter, Elizabeth G; Divakaran, Anand; Burkhart, Brandon J; Wertz, John T; Benson, David E

    2012-10-01

    Protein cofactors represent a unique class of redox active posttranslational protein modifications formed in or by metalloproteins. Once formed, protein cofactors provide a one-electron oxidant, which is tethered to the protein backbone. Twenty-five proteins are known to contain protein cofactors, but this number is likely limited by the use of crystallography as the identification technique. In order to address this limitation, a search of all reported protein structures for chemical environments conducive to forming a protein cofactor through tyrosine and cysteine side chain crosslinking yielded three hundred candidate proteins. Using hydrogen bonding and metal center proximity, the three hundred proteins were narrowed to four highly viable candidates. An orphan metalloprotein (BF4112) was examined to validate this methodology, which identifies proteins capable of crosslinking tyrosine and cysteine sidechains. A tyrosine-cysteine crosslink was formed in BF4112 using copper-dioxygen chemistry, as in galactose oxidase. Liquid chromatography-MALDI mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy confirmed tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation in BF4112. This finding demonstrates the efficacy of these predictive methods and the minimal constraints, provided by the BF4112 protein structure, in tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation. This search method, when coupled with physiological evidence for crosslink formation and function as a cofactor, could identify additional protein-derived cofactors.

  11. Sulfur analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giner Martínez-Sierra, J.; Galilea San Blas, O.; Marchante Gayón, J.M.; García Alonso, J.I., E-mail: jiga@uniovi.es

    2015-06-01

    In recent years the number of applications of sulfur (S) analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as detector has increased significantly. In this article we describe in some depth the application of ICP-MS for S analysis with emphasis placed on the sulfur-specific detection by hyphenated techniques such as LC, GC, CE and LA coupled on-line to ICP-MS. The different approaches available for sulfur isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS are also detailed. Particular attention has been paid to the quantification of peptides/proteins and the analysis of metallopeptides/metalloproteins via sulfur by LC–ICP-MS. Likewise, the speciation analysis of metal-based pharmaceuticals and metallodrugs and non-metal selective detection of pharmaceuticals via S are highlighted. Labeling procedures for metabolic applications are also included. Finally, the measurement of natural variations in S isotope composition with multicollector ICP-MS instruments is also covered in this review. - Highlights: • Emphasis placed on the sulfur-specific detection by chromatographic techniques coupled on-line to ICP-MS. • Different instrumental approaches available for sulfur measurements by ICP-MS. • Quantification of proteins and the analysis of metalloproteins via sulfur by LC-ICP-MS. • Labelling procedures for metabolic applications are also included. • The measurement of natural variations in S isotope composition with multicollector ICP-MS.

  12. Speciation of protein-bound trace elements by gel electrophoresis and atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Renli; McLeod, Cameron W; Tomlinson, Kerry; Poole, Robert K

    2004-08-01

    The metabolism of trace elements, in particular their binding to proteins in biological systems is of great importance in biochemical, toxicological, and pharmacological studies. As a result there has been a sustained interest over the last two decades in the speciation of protein-bound metals. Various analytical approaches have been employed, combining efficient separation of metalloproteins by liquid chromatography or electrophoresis with high-sensitivity elemental detection. Slab-gel electrophoresis (GE) is a key platform for high-resolution protein separation, and has been combined with autoradiography and various atomic spectrometric techniques for in-gel determination of protein-bound metals. Recently, the combination of GE with state-of-the-art inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), particularly when linked to laser ablation (LA) for direct gel interrogation, has opened up new opportunities for rapid characterization of metalloproteins. The use of GE and atomic spectrometry for the speciation of protein-bound trace elements is reviewed in this paper. Technical requirements for gel electrophoresis/atomic spectrometric measurement are considered in terms of method compatibilities, detection capability and potential usefulness. The literature is also surveyed to illustrate current status and future trends. Copyright 2004 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co.

  13. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Shibayama, Naoya, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Okabe, Takahiro [Division of Biophysics, Department of Physiology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke 329-0498 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Asa-Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Kimura, Koji [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Park, Sam-Yong [Drug Design Laboratory, Department of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Material Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α{sub 2}β{sub 2} tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm{sup 3}) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  14. Metallofoldamers supramolecular architectures from helicates to biomimetics

    CERN Document Server

    Maayan, Galia

    2013-01-01

    Metallofoldamers are oligomers that fold into three-dimensional structures in a controlled manner upon coordination with metal ions. Molecules in this class have shown an impressive ability to form single-handed helical structures and other three-dimensional architectures. Several metallofoldamers have been applied as sensors due to their selective folding when binding to a specific metal ion, while others show promise for applications as responsive materials on the basis of their ability to fold and unfold upon changes in the oxidation state of the coordinated metal ion, and as novel catalysts. Metallofoldamers: From Helicates to Biomimetic Architectures describes the variety of interactions between oligomers and metal species, with a focus on non-natural synthetic molecules. Topics covered include: the major classes of foldamers and their folding driving force metalloproteins and metalloenzymes helicates: self-assembly, structure and applications abiotic metallo-DNA metallo-PNA and iDNA metallopeptides inte...

  15. Two-point anchoring of a lanthanide-binding peptide to a target protein enhances the paramagnetic anisotropic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saio, Tomohide; Ogura, Kenji; Yokochi, Masashi; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Paramagnetic lanthanide ions fixed in a protein frame induce several paramagnetic effects such as pseudo-contact shifts and residual dipolar couplings. These effects provide long-range distance and angular information for proteins and, therefore, are valuable in protein structural analysis. However, until recently this approach had been restricted to metal-binding proteins, but now it has become applicable to non-metalloproteins through the use of a lanthanide-binding tag. Here we report a lanthanide-binding peptide tag anchored via two points to the target proteins. Compared to conventional single-point attached tags, the two-point linked tag provides two to threefold stronger anisotropic effects. Though there is slight residual mobility of the lanthanide-binding tag, the present tag provides a higher anisotropic paramagnetic effect

  16. Ligations of Gold Atoms with Iron Porphyrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ulstrup, Jens

    electrochemistry and electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM) are explained with this theory. Iron porphyrin is a well-known active redox center of cytochrome c and hemoglobin/myoglobin assisting membrane-crossing electron transfer or blood oxygentransport. The electronic states...... and configurations of iron porphyrin affect the electrochemical properties of the metalloproteins, where the artificial constructed proteins are designed by the mutations of amino residues or the structural optimizations of iron porphyrins. Iron porphyrin adsorption on graphite and graphene surfaces by п-п electron...... stacking has been widely studied and the catalytic activity found to be enhanced warranting the notion of enzyme mimics. Weak physisorption was, however, recently observed by in situ STM, but the electronic properties of iron porphyrin adsorbed on gold has not been addressed before. This issue is, however...

  17. Green Synthesis of Gold nanoparticles with Starch-glucose and Application in Bioelectrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm; Zhang, Jingdong

    2009-01-01

    A method for gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis from buffered glucose and starch solution has been developed and the particles investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemistry. The synthesis proceeds smoothly in neutral...... with quite uniform AuNPs. Other buffers do not result in well-defined nanoparticle structures. Typical AuNP diameters from MES and phosphate buffers (PB) are 4 ± 1 nm and 13 ± 2 nm with plasmon band peaks at 521 nm and 523 nm, respectively. The role of the phosphate buffer is mainly to control the pH, while......). Electrochemistry of the buffers at such single-crystal gold electrode surfaces has offered a more detailed understanding of the buffer effect. The AuNPs have been successfully used in bioelectrochemistry, and found to efficiently enhance interfacial electrochemical electron transfer of the metalloprotein yeast...

  18. A Mini HIP HOP Assay Uncovers a Central Role for Copper and Zinc in the Antifungal Mode of Action of Allicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Thomas A K; Panaretou, Barry

    2017-05-10

    Garlic contains the organosulfur compound allicin which exhibits potent antifungal activity. Here we demonstrate the use of a highly simplified yeast chemical genetic screen to characterize its mode of action. By screening 24 validated yeast gene deletion "signature" strains for which hypersensitivity is characteristic for common antifungal modes of action, yeast lacking the high affinity Cu 2+ transporter Ctr1 was found to be hypersensitive to allicin. Focusing on transition metal related genes identified two more hypersensitive strains lacking the Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ transcription factors Mac1 and Zap1. Hypersensitivity in these strains was reversed by the addition of Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions, respectively. The results suggest the antifungal activity of allicin is mediated through restricted Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ uptake or inhibition of Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ metalloproteins. As certain antimicrobial modes of action are much more common than others, the approach taken here provides a useful way to identify them early on.

  19. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure

  1. In Situ STM and AFM of the Copper Protein Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Madsen, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning tunnel (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the in situ mode under potentiostatic control have opened new perspectives for mapping the two-dimensional organization of surface adsorbates in aqueous solution. In situ STM and AFM, however, also raise recognized problems. In the context...... exponentially with increasing distance with a decay constant of 0.4–0.5 Å−1. In comparison in situ AFM shows structures laterally convoluted with the tip while the vertical extension is in the same range as the structural size of azurin. The results are of interest in relation to electron tunnel mechanisms...... of redox metalloproteins and in technological contexts such as electrochemical biosensors, microbial corrosion and broadly for protein adsorption from biological liquids....

  2. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    probably also coordinated to carboxylate groups, present in plastocyanin, and in stellacyanin 12 A and 6 A, respectively, from the copper center. The salient feature emerging from examination of the three copper proteins is that a pi-facilitated electron transfer (E.T.) pathway may be operative; in azurin......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...... probably a regulatory alternative to the E.T. site recognized at the exposed, "Northern" imidazole coordinated to copper in all these proteins....

  3. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Link between aluminum neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum is an old element that has been known for a long time, but some of its properties are only now being discovered. Although environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life; in fact, because of its specific chemical properties, aluminum inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and exerts various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. Aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin. It has been suggested that there is a relationship between exposure to aluminum and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, as well as Alzheimer' s disease: however, this claim remains to be verified. In this chapter, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity and the link between Alzheimer' s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, based on recent findings on metal-metal interactions and the functions of metalloproteins in synapses.

  5. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Myoglobin-Catalyzed Olefination of Aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vikas; Fasan, Rudi

    2016-02-12

    The olefination of aldehydes constitutes a most valuable and widely adopted strategy for constructing carbon-carbon double bonds in organic chemistry. While various synthetic methods have been made available for this purpose, no biocatalysts are known to mediate this transformation. Reported herein is that engineered myoglobin variants can catalyze the olefination of aldehydes in the presence of α-diazoesters with high catalytic efficiency (up to 4,900 turnovers) and excellent E diastereoselectivity (92-99.9 % de). This transformation could be applied to the olefination of a variety of substituted benzaldehydes and heteroaromatic aldehydes, also in combination with different alkyl α-diazoacetate reagents. This work provides a first example of biocatalytic aldehyde olefination and extends the spectrum of synthetically valuable chemical transformations accessible using metalloprotein-based catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  8. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...... electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...

  9. Studies on the superoxide dismutase activity in the cytosolic fractions of the liver and spleen of gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byoung Rai; Chung, Doo Young; Yang, Jong Dai; Cha, Jong Hee

    1985-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase(SOD, superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a metalloprotein ubiquitously present in all aerobic living cells. At present, three types of SOD: copper and zinc-containing (Cu, Zn-SOD), manganese-containing(Mn-SOD) and iron-containing(Fe-SOD) enzyme have been isolated from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. As a scanvenger of euperoxide radicals in biological tissues, these metalloenzymes are undoubtedly of importance in the protection of living organisms against the effect of highly toxic superoxide radicals. A variety of biologically important processes are accompaied by formation of these radiation. The present paper report the results of experiments dealing with SOD activity in the cytosolic fraction of the liver and spleen of mice exposed to 400R whole-body irradiation. The whole-body irradiation caused a decrease in the specific activity of SOD in the both liver and spleen which persist more than 21 days.(Author)

  10. EXAFS analysis of a human Cu,Zn SOD isoform focused using non-denaturing gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevreux, Sylviane; Roudeau, Stephane; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Alliot, Isabelle; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean Louis

    2009-01-01

    Isoelectric point isoforms of a metalloprotein, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), separated on electrophoresis gels were analyzed using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Mutations of this protein are involved in familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The toxicity of mutants could be relied to defects in the metallation state. Our purpose is to establish analytical protocols to study metallation state of protein isoforms such as those from CuZnSOD. We previously highlighted differences in the copper oxidation state between CuZnSOD isoforms using XANES. Here, we present the first results for EXAFS analyses performed at Cu and Zn K-edge on the majoritary expressed isoform of human CuZnSOD separated on electrophoresis gels.

  11. Multinuclear NMR studies of hemoproteins and their model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in both solution and solid state has been used to study the active site structure of various hemoproteins, and the nature of the iron-oxygen bond in oxyhemoglobin. The first iron-57 NMR spectra of a metalloprotein, carbonmonoxymyoglobin, has been obtained, yielding the isotropic chemical shift, the anisotropy of the chemical shielding tensor and the rotational correlation time of the protein. The oxygen-17 NMR signals from CO ligands bound to oxygen-transport hemoproteins are much narrower than expected, and the lineshape is non-Lorentzian. The results indicate that the unusual linewidths and lineshapes originate from the multiexponential nature of quadrupolar relaxation outside of the extreme narrowing limit, permitting determinations of the oxygen-17 nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and the rotational correlation time of the proteins

  12. The interactions between CdTe quantum dots and proteins: understanding nano-bio interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreeram S. Joglekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite remarkable developments in the nanoscience, relatively little is known about the physical (electrostatic interactions of nanoparticles with bio macromolecules. These interactions can influence the properties of both nanoparticles and the bio-macromolecules. Understanding this bio-interface is a prerequisite to utilize both nanoparticles and biomolecules for bioengineering. In this study, luminescent, water soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA were synthesized by organometallic method and then interaction between nanoparticles (QDs and three different types of proteins (BSA, Lysozyme and Hemoglobin were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy at pH= 7.4. Based on fluorescence quenching results, Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv, binding constant (Kq and binding sites (n for proteins were calculated. The results show that protein structure (e.g.,globular, metalloprotein, etc. has a significant role in Protein-Quantum dots interactions and each type of protein influence physicochemical properties of Quantum dots differently.

  13. Use of mass spectrometry techniques for the characterization of metal bound to proteins (metallomics) in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Ariza, J.L.; Garcia-Barrera, T.; Lorenzo, F.; Bernal, V.; Villegas, M.J.; Oliveira, V.

    2004-01-01

    The need to determine the individual chemical species (speciation), especially when they are known to have a differential action and behavior in relation to toxicity, mobility, or bioavailability, is discussed. The analytical approaches for small mass metal species characterization, as well as sample treatment and storage, is now well established on the basis of chromatographic-atomic detector combinations. The description of a new scenario centered on endogenous and exogenous metallic species in biological systems, bioactive macromolecules, such as proteins, DNA restriction fragments, phytochelatins, metallothioneins and others is fulfilled. Many of these systems are not well known at present and require a new generation of analytical tools that substitute the traditional atomic detectors based in the use of photons (atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), flame photoionization detector (FPD), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS)) by mass detectors (mass spectrometry (MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) that characterize ions. The photonic analytical tool is now being substituted by the ionic paradigm. Many cases related to biological molecules involving proteins and multiprotein systems, in which metals frequently participate (metallomics) are described, and a generic metallomics analytical approach is proposed for the identification and quantification of metalloproteins, and other metallomacromolecules present in life systems, on the basis of three experimental focuses: (i) a separation technique - selectivity component; (ii) an element-high sensitivity detector--sensitivity component; and (iii) a molecule-specific detector, generally based on mass spectrometry-structural component. This multiplexed analytical approach brings together both elemental and molecular detectors for easy metalloproteins identification. Finally, the possibilities of the metallomics approach in

  14. Heterologous expression and maturation of an NADP-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenase: a key enzyme in biofuel production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsong Sun

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins. Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2. The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins.

  15. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  16. Absolute quantification of superoxide dismutase in cytosol and mitochondria of mice hepatic cells exposed to mercury by a novel metallomic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Sevillano, M.A.; García-Barrera, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Huelva 21007 (Spain); Research Center on Health and Environment (CYSMA), University of Huelva (Spain); International Campus of Excellence on Agrofood (ceiA3), University of Huelva (Spain); Navarro, F. [International Campus of Excellence on Agrofood (ceiA3), University of Huelva (Spain); Department of Environmental Biology and Public Health, Cell Biology, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, University of Huelva, Campus El Carmen, Huelva 21007 (Spain); Gómez-Ariza, J.L., E-mail: ariza@uhu.es [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Huelva 21007 (Spain); Research Center on Health and Environment (CYSMA), University of Huelva (Spain); International Campus of Excellence on Agrofood (ceiA3), University of Huelva (Spain)

    2014-09-09

    Highlights: • Identification and quantification of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in mice hepatic cells. • IDA-ICP-MSis applied to obtain a high degree of accuracy, precision and sensibility. • This methodology reduces the time of analysis and avoids clean-up procedures. • The application of this method to Hg-exposed mice reveals perturbations in Cu,Zn-SOD. - Abstract: In the last years, the development of new methods for analyzing accurate and precise individual metalloproteins is of increasing importance, since numerous metalloproteins are excellent biomarkers of oxidative stress and diseases. In that way, methods based on the use of post column isotopic dilution analysis (IDA) or enriched protein standards are required to obtain a sufficient degree of accuracy, precision and high limits of detection. This paper reports the identification and absolute quantification of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) in cytosol and mitochondria from mice hepatic cells using a innovative column switching analytical approach. The method consisted of orthogonal chromatographic systems coupled to inductively coupling plasma-mass spectrometry equipped with a octopole reaction systems (ICP-ORS-MS) and UV detectors: size exclusion fractionation (SEC) of the cytosolic and mitochondrial extracts followed by online anion exchange chromatographic (AEC) separation of Cu/Zn containing species. After purification, Cu,Zn-SOD was identified after tryptic digestion by molecular mass spectrometry (MS). The MS/MS spectrum of a doubly charged peptide was used to obtain the sequence of the protein using the MASCOT searching engine. This optimized methodology reduces the time of analysis and avoids the use of sample preconcentration and clean-up procedures, such as cut-off centrifuged filters, solid phase extraction (SPE), precipitation procedures, off-line fractions insolates, etc. In this sense, the method is robust, reliable and fast with typical chromatographic run time less than 20 min

  17. Shaping mechanisms of metal specificity in a family of metazoan metallothioneins: evolutionary differentiation of mollusc metallothioneins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atrian Sílvia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The degree of metal binding specificity in metalloproteins such as metallothioneins (MTs can be crucial for their functional accuracy. Unlike most other animal species, pulmonate molluscs possess homometallic MT isoforms loaded with Cu+ or Cd2+. They have, so far, been obtained as native metal-MT complexes from snail tissues, where they are involved in the metabolism of the metal ion species bound to the respective isoform. However, it has not as yet been discerned if their specific metal occupation is the result of a rigid control of metal availability, or isoform expression programming in the hosting tissues or of structural differences of the respective peptides determining the coordinative options for the different metal ions. In this study, the Roman snail (Helix pomatia Cu-loaded and Cd-loaded isoforms (HpCuMT and HpCdMT were used as model molecules in order to elucidate the biochemical and evolutionary mechanisms permitting pulmonate MTs to achieve specificity for their cognate metal ion. Results HpCuMT and HpCdMT were recombinantly synthesized in the presence of Cd2+, Zn2+ or Cu2+ and corresponding metal complexes analysed by electrospray mass spectrometry and circular dichroism (CD and ultra violet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Both MT isoforms were only able to form unique, homometallic and stable complexes (Cd6-HpCdMT and Cu12-HpCuMT with their cognate metal ions. Yeast complementation assays demonstrated that the two isoforms assumed metal-specific functions, in agreement with their binding preferences, in heterologous eukaryotic environments. In the snail organism, the functional metal specificity of HpCdMT and HpCuMT was contributed by metal-specific transcription programming and cell-specific expression. Sequence elucidation and phylogenetic analysis of MT isoforms from a number of snail species revealed that they possess an unspecific and two metal-specific MT isoforms, whose metal specificity was

  18. Urban Biomining: Biological Extraction of Metals and Materials from Electronics Waste Using a Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Rothschild, L.

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life electronics waste (e-waste) containing toxic and valuable materials is a rapidly progressing human health and environmental issue. Using synthetic biology tools, we have developed a recycling method for e-waste. Our innovation is to use a recombinant version of a naturally-occurring silica-degrading enzyme to depolymerize the silica in metal- and glass- containing e-waste components, and subsequently, to use engineered bacterial surfaces to bind and separate metals from a solution. The bacteria with bound metals can then be used as "bio-ink" to print new circuits using a novel plasma jet electronics printing technology. Here, we present the results from our initial studies that focus on the specificity of metal-binding motifs for a cognate metal. The candidate motifs that show high affinity and specificity will be engineered into bacterial surfaces for downstream applications in biologically-mediated metal recycling. Since the chemistry and role of Cu in metalloproteins is relatively well-characterized, we are using Cu as a proxy to elucidate metal and biological ligand interactions with various metals in e-waste. We assess the binding parameters of 3 representative classes of Cu-binding motifs using isothermal titration calorimetry; 1) natural motifs found in metalloproteins, 2) consensus motifs, and 3) rationally designed peptides that are predicted, in silico, to bind Cu. Our results indicate that naturally-occurring motifs have relative high affinity and specificity for Cu (association constant for Cu Ka 104 M-1, Zn Ka 103 M-1) when competing ions are present in the aqueous milieu. However, motifs developed through rational design by applying quantum mechanical methods that take into account complexation energies of the elemental binding partners and molecular geometry of the cognate metal, not only show high affinity for the cognate metal (Cu Ka 106 M-1), but they show specificity and discrimination against other metal ions that would be

  19. N-Phenethyl caffeamide and photodamage: protecting skin by inhibiting type I procollagen degradation and stimulating collagen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chen, Chien-Wen; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    Skin is mainly damaged by genetic and environmental factors such as ultraviolet (UV) light and pollutants. UV light is a well-known factor that causes various types of skin damage and premature aging. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage by activating the metalloproteinases that break down type I collagen. This study investigated the antioxidant and antiphotodamage activity and mechanisms of N-phenethyl caffeamide (K36) in human skin fibroblasts. The results indicated that K36 demonstrated strong 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity, which dose-dependently reduced the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS in human dermal fibroblasts. K36 prevented UVB-irradiation-induced type I collagen degradation by inhibiting the expression of matrix metalloproteins-1, -3, and -9 and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Furthermore, K36 elevated collagen synthesis in skin fibroblasts by inhibiting UVB-induced Smad7 overexpression. K36 downregulated the expression of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our results indicated that K36 exhibited antioxidant properties and prevented skin collagen degradation caused by UV exposure and the stimulation of collagen synthesis, which suggests the potential use of K36 in preventing photodamage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biosynthesis, isolation and characterization of {sup 57}Fe-enriched Phaseolus vulgaris ferritin after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppler, Matthias [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Zurich (Switzerland); Meile, Leo [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Food Biotechnology, Zurich (Switzerland); Walczyk, Thomas [National University of Singapore, Department of Chemistry and Department of Biochemistry, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-01-15

    Ferritin is the major iron storage protein in the biosphere. Iron stores of an organism are commonly assessed by measuring the concentration of the protein shell of the molecule in fluids and tissues. The amount of ferritin-bound iron, the more desirable information, still remains inaccessible owing to the lack of suitable techniques. Iron saturation of ferritin is highly variable, with a maximum capacity of 4,500 iron atoms per molecule. This study describes the direct isotopic labeling of a complex metalloprotein in vivo by biosynthesis, in order to measure ferritin-bound iron by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin was produced by cloning and overexpressing the Phaseolus vulgaris ferritin gene pfe in Escherichia coli in the presence of {sup 57}FeCl{sub 2}. Recombinant ferritin was purified in a fully assembled form and contained approximately 1,000 iron atoms per molecule at an isotopic enrichment of more than 95% {sup 57}Fe. We did not find any evidence of species conversion of the isotopic label for at least 5 months of storage at -20 C. Transfer efficiency of enriched iron into [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin of 20% was sufficient to be economically feasible. Negligible amounts of non-ferritin-bound iron in the purified [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin solution allows for use of this spike for quantification of ferritin-bound iron by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  1. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  2. Simulation insight into the cytochrome c adsorption on graphene and graphene oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; Zhou, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Graphene-based materials might serve as an ideal platform for the regulation and promotion of metalloprotein electron transfer (ET); however, the underpinning mechanism at the molecular level has not yet been fully revealed. The orientation of cytochrome c (Cyt c) on surfaces is vital for ET. In this work, the orientation of Cyt c on graphene and graphene oxide (GO) surfaces, as well as the dominant driving forces, the conformational change and the ET pathways were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Cyt c is adsorbed onto the GO surface mainly through lysine residues; whereas hydrophobic interaction contributes to the Cyt c adsorption on graphene surface. There is no significant conformational change of Cyt c upon adsorption. The heme plane of Cyt c tends to be horizontally oriented and far away from the graphene surface, which is not conducive to ET. On the GO surface, the heme plane is slightly deviated from the normal direction to the surface and the axial ligand Met80 is much closer to the surface, which facilitates the ET. These findings shed some light on the ET mechanism of Cyt c on graphene-based materials and provide guidance for the development of bionic electronic devices.

  3. Metals on the move: zinc ions in cellular regulation and in the coordination dynamics of zinc proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Homeostatic control maintains essential transition metal ions at characteristic cellular concentrations to support their physiological functions and to avoid adverse effects. Zinc is especially widely used as a catalytic or structural cofactor in about 3000 human zinc proteins. In addition, the homeostatic control of zinc in eukaryotic cells permits functions of zinc(II) ions in regulation and in paracrine and intracrine signaling. Zinc ions are released from proteins through ligand-centered reactions in zinc/thiolate coordination environments, and from stores in cellular organelles, where zinc transporters participate in zinc loading and release. Muffling reactions allow zinc ions to serve as signaling ions (second messengers) in the cytosol that is buffered to picomolar zinc ion concentrations at steady-state. Muffling includes zinc ion binding to metallothioneins, cellular translocations of metallothioneins, delivery of zinc ions to transporter proteins, and zinc ion fluxes through cellular membranes with the result of removing the additional zinc ions from the cytosol and restoring the steady-state. Targets of regulatory zinc ions are proteins with sites for transient zinc binding, such as membrane receptors, enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and sensor proteins that control gene expression. The generation, transmission, targets, and termination of zinc ion signals involve proteins that use coordination dynamics in the inner and outer ligand spheres to control metal ion association and dissociation. These new findings establish critically important functions of zinc ions and zinc metalloproteins in cellular control.

  4. Captopril/enalapril inhibit promiscuous esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase at micromolar concentrations: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hadi; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2017-03-01

    The inhibitory activity of captopril, a thiol-containing competitive inhibitor of the angiotensin-converting enzyme, ACE, against esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase, CA was investigated. This small molecule, as well as enalapril, was selected in order to represents both thiol and carboxylate, as two well-known metal binding functional groups of metalloprotein inhibitors. Since captopril, has also been observed to inhibit other metalloenzymes such as tyrosinase and metallo-beta lactamase through binding to the catalytic metal ions and regarding CA as a zinc-containing metallo-enzyme, in the current study, we set out to determine whether captopril/enalapril inhibit CA esterase activity of the purified human CA II or not? Then, we revealed the inhibitors' potencies (IC 50 , K i and K diss values) and also mode of inhibition. Our results also showed that enalapril is more potent CA inhibitor than captopril. Since enalapril represents no sulfhydryl moiety, thus carboxylate group may have a determinant role in inhibiting of CA esterase activity, the conclusion confirmed by molecular docking studies. Additionally, since CA inhibitory potencies of captopril/enalapril were much lower than those of classic sulfonamide drugs, the findings of the current study may explain why these drugs exhibit no effective CA inhibition at the concentrations reached in vivo and also may shed light on the way of generating new class of inhibitors that will discriminately inhibit various CA isoforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fixating on metals: new insights into the role of metals in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Manuel; Matthiadis, Anna; Sáez, Ángela; Long, Terri A

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the most promising and immediate alternatives to the overuse of polluting nitrogen fertilizers for improving plant nutrition. At the core of this process are a number of metalloproteins that catalyze and provide energy for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, eliminate free radicals produced by this process, and create the microaerobic conditions required by these reactions. In legumes, metal cofactors are provided to endosymbiotic rhizobia within root nodule cortical cells. However, low metal bioavailability is prevalent in most soils types, resulting in widespread plant metal deficiency and decreased nitrogen fixation capabilities. As a result, renewed efforts have been undertaken to identify the mechanisms governing metal delivery from soil to the rhizobia, and to determine how metals are used in the nodule and how they are recycled once the nodule is no longer functional. This effort is being aided by improved legume molecular biology tools (genome projects, mutant collections, and transformation methods), in addition to state-of-the-art metal visualization systems.

  6. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT AND IRON ABSORPTION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys O. LATUNDE-DADA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Iron is an important element in many metabolic processes. The bioavailability of iron is a function of solubilization and reduction of Fe3+ in the stomach, hydrolysis, neutralization, ligand complexes and transport through the mucus layer of the intestine. The bioavailibility of non-heme Fe is determined by enhancers of iron absorption such as meat, amino acids, organic acids, antagonized by the inhibitors as bran, phytate and fibre. Haem Fe is absorbed directly as an intact metalloprotein porphyrin complex. The pathways of inorganic Fe into the mucosa cell Include endocytosis, electrogenic fatty acid mediated transcellular pathway, nonspecific paracellular permeation ar probably facilitated transcellular diffusion. The redox model proposes the reduction of Fe3+ by a transplasma membrane ferric reductase in lhe duodenal mucosa and the translocation of the Fe2+ across the cell probably by the nonesterified fatty acid. The mucin-mobilferrin-integrin pathway on the other hand involves the delivery of Fe-mucin complex in the lumen to the integrins of mucosa surface for translocation lo mobllferrin in the cytosol. The transfer of absorbed Fe iron from the mucosa into the blood is dependent on a number of regulatory intracellular and systemic factors

  7. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macomber, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nickel has long been known to be an important human toxicant, including having the ability to form carcinomas, but until recently nickel was believed to be an issue only to microorganisms living in nickel-rich serpentine soils or areas contaminated by industrial pollution. This assumption was overturned by the discovery of a nickel defense system (RcnR/RcnA) found in microorganisms that live in a wide range of environmental niches, suggesting that nickel homeostasis is a general biological concern. To date, the mechanisms of nickel toxicity in microorganisms and higher eukaryotes are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize nickel homeostasis processes used by microorganisms and highlight in vivo and in vitro effects of exposure to elevated concentrations of nickel. On the basis of this evidence we propose four mechanisms of nickel toxicity: 1) nickel replaces the essential metal of metalloproteins, 2) nickel binds to catalytic residues of non-metalloenzymes; 3) nickel binds outside the catalytic site of an enzyme to inhibit allosterically, and 4) nickel indirectly causes oxidative stress. PMID:21799955

  8. A water-soluble conjugated polymer for protein identification and denaturation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingling; Wu, Chunxian; Zhu, Chunlei; Duan, Xinrui; Liu, Libing; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Shu

    2010-12-03

    Rapid and sensitive methods to detect proteins and protein denaturation have become increasingly needful in the field of proteomics, medical diagnostics, and biology. In this paper, we have reported the synthesis of a new cationic water-soluble conjugated polymer that contains fluorene and diene moieties in the backbone (PFDE) for protein identification by sensing an array of PFDE solutions in different ionic strengths using the linear discriminant analysis technique (LDA). The PFDE can form complexes with proteins by electrostatic and/or hydrophobic interactions and exhibits different fluorescence response. Three main factors contribute to the fluorescence response of PFDE, namely, the net charge density on the protein surface, the hydrophobic nature of the protein, and the metalloprotein characteristics. The denaturation of proteins can also be detected using PFDE as a fluorescent probe. The interactions between PFDE and proteins were also studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) techniques. In contrast to other methods based on conjugated polymers, the synthesis of a series of quencher or dye-labeled acceptors or protein substrates has been avoided in our method, which significantly reduces the cost and the synthetic complexity. Our method provides promising applications on protein identification and denaturation detection in a simple, fast, and label-free manner based on non-specific interaction-induced perturbation of PFDE fluorescence response.

  9. Using model complexes to augment and advance metalloproteinase inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Faith E; Cohen, Seth M

    2004-05-17

    The tetrahedral zinc complex [(Tp(Ph,Me))ZnOH] (Tp(Ph,Me) = hydrotris(3,5-phenylmethylpyrazolyl)borate) was combined with 2-thenylmercaptan, ethyl 4,4,4-trifluoroacetoacetate, salicylic acid, salicylamide, thiosalicylic acid, thiosalicylamide, methyl salicylate, methyl thiosalicyliate, and 2-hydroxyacetophenone to form the corresponding [(Tp(Ph,Me))Zn(ZBG)] complexes (ZBG = zinc-binding group). X-ray crystal structures of these complexes were obtained to determine the mode of binding for each ZBG, several of which had been previously studied with SAR by NMR (structure-activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance) as potential ligands for use in matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. The [(Tp(Ph,Me))Zn(ZBG)] complexes show that hydrogen bonding and donor atom acidity have a pronounced effect on the mode of binding for this series of ligands. The results of these studies give valuable insight into how ligand protonation state and intramolecular hydrogen bonds can influence the coordination mode of metal-binding proteinase inhibitors. The findings here suggest that model-based approaches can be used to augment drug discovery methods applied to metalloproteins and can aid second-generation drug design.

  10. Purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, G. [Presidency College, Chennai 600 005 (India); Malathy, P.; Gunasekaran, K. [University of Madras, Chennai 600 025 (India); Harikrishna Etti, S. [GKM College of Engineering and Technology, Kamaraj Salai, Chennai 600 063 (India); Aravindhan, S., E-mail: aravindhanpresidency@gmail.com [Presidency College, Chennai 600 005 (India)

    2014-10-25

    The great cormorant hemoglobin has been isolated, purified and crystallized and the three dimensional structure is solved using molecular replacement technique. Haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein that is present in the red blood cells of all vertebrates. In recent decades, there has been substantial interest in attempting to understand the structural basis and functional diversity of avian haemoglobins. Towards this end, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies have been carried out on cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350, NaCl and glycerol as precipitants. The crystals belonged to the trigonal system P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.64, c = 153.38 Å, β = 120.00°; a complete data set was collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. Matthews coefficient analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on avian haemoglobin from pigeon (Columba livia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya Moorthy, Pon.; Neelagandan, K.; Balasubramanian, M.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Haemoglobin is a physiologically significant metalloprotein that is involved in the exchange of gases for sustaining life. The respiratory system of birds is unique and complex compared with that of mammals. Many investigations of avian haemoglobins have revealed the presence of inositol pentaphosphate (IP5), a principal allosteric effector that is involved in regulation of their function. Structural investigations of avian haemoglobins are presently not adequate to explain their function. Efforts have been made in this direction in order to understand the oxygen-binding affinity involved in adapting to hypoxia in avian haemoglobins. Fresh whole blood was collected from pigeon (Columba livia) and purified using a DEAE cellulose anion-exchange chromatographic column. Crystallization of pigeon haemoglobin was accomplished using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as a precipitant in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer pH 5.5 with 1 M NaCl. Data collection was carried out using a MAR345 image-plate detector system. The crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Pigeon haemoglobin crystallizes in a triclinic space group, with two whole biological molecules in the asymmetric unit and with unit-cell parameters a = 55.005, b = 65.528, c = 104.370 Å, α = 78.742, β = 89.819, γ = 65.320°. PMID:19194000

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on avian haemoglobin from pigeon (Columba livia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathya Moorthy, Pon.; Neelagandan, K.; Balasubramanian, M.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Crystallization of pigeon haemoglobin at low pH (5.5) and high ionic concentration (1 M) using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method is reported. Haemoglobin is a physiologically significant metalloprotein that is involved in the exchange of gases for sustaining life. The respiratory system of birds is unique and complex compared with that of mammals. Many investigations of avian haemoglobins have revealed the presence of inositol pentaphosphate (IP5), a principal allosteric effector that is involved in regulation of their function. Structural investigations of avian haemoglobins are presently not adequate to explain their function. Efforts have been made in this direction in order to understand the oxygen-binding affinity involved in adapting to hypoxia in avian haemoglobins. Fresh whole blood was collected from pigeon (Columba livia) and purified using a DEAE cellulose anion-exchange chromatographic column. Crystallization of pigeon haemoglobin was accomplished using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as a precipitant in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer pH 5.5 with 1 M NaCl. Data collection was carried out using a MAR345 image-plate detector system. The crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Pigeon haemoglobin crystallizes in a triclinic space group, with two whole biological molecules in the asymmetric unit and with unit-cell parameters a = 55.005, b = 65.528, c = 104.370 Å, α = 78.742, β = 89.819, γ = 65.320°

  13. The role of sulfur and sulfur isotope dilution analysis in quantitative protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    The element sulfur is almost omnipresent in all natural proteomes and plays a key role in protein quantification. Incorporated in the amino acids cysteine and methionine, it has been served as target for many protein-labeling reactions in classic quantitative proteomic approaches based on electrospray or MALDI mass spectrometry. This critical review discusses the potential and limitations of sulfur isotope dilution analysis (IDA) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for absolute protein quantification. The development of this approach was made possible due to the improved sensitivity and accuracy of sulfur isotope ratio measurement by ICP-MS in recent years. The unique feature of ICP-MS, compound-independent ionization, enables compound (species)-unspecific sulfur IDA. This has the main advantage that only one generic sulfur standard (i.e., one isotopically labeled sulfur spike) is required to quantify each peptide or protein in a sample provided that they are completely separated in chromatography or electrophoresis and that their identities are known. The principles of this approach are illustrated with selected examples from the literature. The discussion includes also related fields of P/S and metal/S ratio measurements for the determination of phosphorylation degrees of proteins and stoichiometries in metalloproteins, respectively. Emerging new areas and future trends such as protein derivatization with metal tags for improved sensitivity of protein detection in ICP-MS are discussed.

  14. Structure And Specificity of a Quorum-Quenching Lactonase (AiiB) From Agrobacterium Tumefaciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D.; Thomas, P.W.; Momb, J.; Hoang, Q.Q.; Petsko, G.A.; Ringe, D.; Fast, W.

    2009-06-03

    N-Acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) mediated quorum-sensing regulates virulence factor production in a variety of Gram-negative bacteria. Proteins capable of degrading these autoinducers have been called 'quorum-quenching' enzymes, can block many quorum-sensing dependent phenotypes, and represent potentially useful reagents for clinical, agricultural, and industrial applications. The most characterized quorum-quenching enzymes to date are the AHL lactonases, which are metalloproteins that belong to the metallo-beta-lactamase superfamily. Here, we report the cloning, heterologous expression, purification, metal content, substrate specificity, and three-dimensional structure of AiiB, an AHL lactonase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Much like a homologous AHL lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis, AiiB appears to be a metal-dependent AHL lactonase with broad specificity. A phosphate dianion is bound to the dinuclear zinc site and the active-site structure suggests specific mechanistic roles for an active site tyrosine and aspartate. To our knowledge, this is the second representative structure of an AHL lactonase and the first of an AHL lactonase from a microorganism that also produces AHL autoinducers. This work should help elucidate the hydrolytic ring-opening mechanism of this family of enzymes and also facilitate the design of more effective quorum-quenching catalysts.

  15. Drosophila glob1 is required for the maintenance of cytoskeletal integrity during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Renu; Sarkar, Surajit

    2016-11-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) are evolutionarily conserved heme-containing metallo-proteins of the Globin protein family that harbour the characteristic "globin fold." Hemoglobins have been functionally diversified during evolution and their usual property of oxygen transport is rather a recent adaptation. Drosophila genome possesses three globin genes (glob1, glob2, and glob3), and we have reported earlier that adequate expression of glob1 is required for various aspects of development, as well as to regulate the cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The present study illustrates the explicit role of Drosophila globin1 in progression of oogenesis. We demonstrate a dynamic expression pattern of glob1 in somatic and germ cell derivatives of developing egg chambers during various stages of oogenesis, which largely confines around the F-actin-rich cellular components. Reduced expression of glob1 leads to various types of abnormalities during oogenesis, which were primarily mediated by the inappropriately formed F-actin-based cytoskeleton. Our subsequent analysis in the somatic and germ line clones shows cell autonomous role of glob1 in the maintenance of the integrity of F-actin-based cytoskeleton components in the somatic and germ cell derivatives. Our study establishes a novel role of glob1 in maintenance of F-actin-based cytoskeleton during progression of oogenesis in Drosophila. Developmental Dynamics 245:1048-1065, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Zinc diethyldithiocarbamate allergenicity: potential haptenation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipinda, Itai; Hettick, Justin M; Simoyi, Reuben H; Siegel, Paul D

    2008-08-01

    Zinc diethyldithiocarbamate (ZDEC) and its disulfide, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (TETD), are rubber accelerators and contact allergens that cross-react in some individuals. This study explored potential protein haptenation mechanisms of ZDEC and its oxidation products. ZDEC oxidation/reduction products and sites of protein binding were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) was employed to probe haptenation mechanisms of ZDEC by examining its allergenicity along with its oxidation products and through elimination of oxidation and chelation mechanisms by substituting cobalt for zinc [cobalt (II) dithiocarbamate, CoDEC]. Oxidation of ZDEC by hypochlorous acid (bleach, HOCl), iodine, or hydrogen peroxide resulted in production of TETD, tetraethylthiocarbamoyl disulfide, and tetraethyldicarbamoyl disulfide (TEDCD). Albumin thiols reduced TETD with subsequent mixed disulfide formation/haptenation. ZDEC directly chelated the copper ion on the active site of the superoxide dismutase, whereas CoDEC did not bind to Cu proteins or form mixed disulfides with free thiols. ZDEC, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, TEDCD, and TETD were all positive in the LLNA except CoDEC, which was non-allergenic. The thiol is the critical functional group in ZDEC's allergenicity, and haptenation is predominantly through chelation of metalloproteins and formation of mixed disulfides.

  17. Effects of macro-nutrient, micro-nutrient composition and cooking conditions on in vitro digestibility of meat and aquatic dietary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiaqiang; Taylor, Cheryl; Nebl, Thomas; Ng, Ken; Bennett, Louise E

    2018-07-15

    Animal and aquatic meats represent important sources of dietary protein and micro-nutrients. Although red and processed meats carry some risks for human health, sensory and nutritional advantages drive meat consumption. Therefore, it is important to understand how meat processing and cooking influence healthiness. The research aim was to investigate relationships of meat composition (proximates, amino acids and minerals) and cooking conditions (raw, 90 s microwave, 200 °C oven for 10 or 30 min) on protein digestibility, for a selection of four animal (beef, chicken, pork, kangaroo) and four aquatic meats (salmon, trout, prawn, oyster). Lean meats were minced before cooking followed by in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion and analysed for progress of hydrolysis, and size ranges of peptides using MALDI-TOF-MS. Correlation matrix analysis between compositional and functional parameters indicated that digestibility was significantly linked with protein and metal concentrations, likely reflecting moisture-dependent solubility and inter-mixing of sarcoplasmic metallo-proteins and insoluble myofibrillar proteins. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Suppression of ERK1/2 and hypoxia pathways by four Phyllanthus species inhibits metastasis of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sau H. Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapies remain far from ideal due to drug resistance; therefore, novel chemotherapeutic agents with higher effectiveness are crucial. The extracts of four Phyllanthus species, namely Phyllanthus niruri, Phyllanthus urinaria, Phyllanthus watsonii, and Phyllanthus amarus, were shown to induce apoptosis and inhibit metastasis of breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7. The main objective of this study was to determine the pathways utilized by these four Phyllanthus species to exert anti-metastatic activities. A cancer 10-pathway reporter was used to investigate the pathways affected by the four Phyllanthus species. Results indicated that these Phyllanthus species suppressed breast carcinoma metastasis and proliferation by suppressing matrix metalloprotein 2 and 9 expression via inhibition of the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK pathway. Additionally, inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α in the hypoxia pathway caused reduced vascular endothelial growth factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, resulting in anti-angiogenic effects and eventually anti-metastasis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified numerous proteins suppressed by these Phyllanthus species, including invasion proteins, anti-apoptotic protein, protein-synthesis proteins, angiogenic and mobility proteins, and various glycolytic enzymes. Our results indicated that ERK and hypoxia pathways are the most likely targets of the four Phyllanthus species for the inhibition of MCF-7 metastasis.

  19. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  20. Iron mediates catalysis of nucleic acid processing enzymes: support for Fe(II) as a cofactor before the great oxidation event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C Denise; Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Athavale, Shreyas S; Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-04-20

    Life originated in an anoxic, Fe2+-rich environment. We hypothesize that on early Earth, Fe2+ was a ubiquitous cofactor for nucleic acids, with roles in RNA folding and catalysis as well as in processing of nucleic acids by protein enzymes. In this model, Mg2+ replaced Fe2+ as the primary cofactor for nucleic acids in parallel with known metal substitutions of metalloproteins, driven by the Great Oxidation Event. To test predictions of this model, we assay the ability of nucleic acid processing enzymes, including a DNA polymerase, an RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase, to use Fe2+ in place of Mg2+ as a cofactor during catalysis. Results show that Fe2+ can indeed substitute for Mg2+ in catalytic function of these enzymes. Additionally, we use calculations to unravel differences in energetics, structures and reactivities of relevant Mg2+ and Fe2+ complexes. Computation explains why Fe2+ can be a more potent cofactor than Mg2+ in a variety of folding and catalytic functions. We propose that the rise of O2 on Earth drove a Fe2+ to Mg2+ substitution in proteins and nucleic acids, a hypothesis consistent with a general model in which some modern biochemical systems retain latent abilities to revert to primordial Fe2+-based states when exposed to pre-GOE conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. An ArsR/SmtB family member is involved in the regulation by arsenic of the arsenite oxidase operon in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinier, Danielle; Slyemi, Djamila; Byrne, Deborah; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The genetic organization of the aioBA operon, encoding the arsenite oxidase of the moderately acidophilic and facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, is different from that of the aioBA operon in the other arsenite oxidizers, in that it encodes AioF, a metalloprotein belonging to the ArsR/SmtB family. AioF is stabilized by arsenite, arsenate, or antimonite but not molybdate. Arsenic is tightly attached to AioF, likely by cysteine residues. When loaded with arsenite or arsenate, AioF is able to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the aio operon at two distinct positions. In Thiomonas arsenitoxydans, the promoters of aioX and aioB are convergent, suggesting that transcriptional interference occurs. These results indicate that the regulation of the aioBA operon is more complex in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans than in the other aioBA containing arsenite oxidizers and that the arsenic binding protein AioF is involved in this regulation. On the basis of these data, a model to explain the tight control of aioBA expression by arsenic in Thiomonas arsenitoxydans is proposed. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Werner coordination chemistry and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Orvig, Chris

    2013-02-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are capturing the world's attention as being the next set of diseases we must tackle collectively. Not only are the patients experiencing gradual cognitive and physical decline in most cases, but these diseases are fatal with no prevention currently available. As these diseases are progressive, providing care and symptom treatment for the ageing population is becoming both a medical and a financial challenge. This review discusses how Werner coordination chemistry plays a role in three diseases - those of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prions. Metal ions are considered to be involved in these diseases in part via their propensity to cause toxic aggregation of proteins. First, the coordination of metal ions, with emphasis on copper(II), to metalloproteins that are hallmarks of these diseases - amyloid β, α-synuclein, and prion, respectively - will be discussed. We will present the current understanding of the metal coordination environments created by the amino acids of these proteins, as well as metal binding affinity. Second, a diverse set of examples of rationally designed metal chelators to outcompete this deleterious binding will be examined based on coordination mode and affinity toward bio-relevant metal ions. Overall, this review will give a general overview of protein and metal chelator coordination environments in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Determination of kinetics and the crystal structure of a novel type 2 isopentenyl diphosphate: dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Janczak, Matthew W; Neti, Syam Sundar; Rothman, Steven C; Schubert, Heidi L; Cornish, Rita M; Matagne, Andre; Wouters, Johan; Poulter, C Dale

    2014-07-07

    Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) is a key enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and is required for all organisms that synthesize isoprenoid metabolites from mevalonate. Type 1 IDI (IDI-1) is a metalloprotein that is found in eukaryotes, whereas the type 2 isoform (IDI-2) is a flavoenzyme found in bacteria that is completely absent from human. IDI-2 from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Steady-state kinetic studies of the enzyme indicated that FMNH2 (KM =0.3 μM) bound before isopentenyl diphosphate (KM =40 μM) in an ordered binding mechanism. An X-ray crystal structure at 1.4 Å resolution was obtained for the holoenzyme in the closed conformation with a reduced flavin cofactor and two sulfate ions in the active site. These results helped to further approach the enzymatic mechanism of IDI-2 and, thus, open new possibilities for the rational design of antibacterial compounds against sequence-similar and structure-related pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis or Staphylococcus aureus. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Development of an x-ray beam line at the NSLS for studies in materials science using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Although only in operation since May, 1985, the X-11 participation research team (PRT) at the NSLS has already demonstrated that it is one of the leading centers of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). During this time, results have been obtained and programs initiated in a number of areas, for example: interfaces, including deposited metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems, multilayers and ion implanted layers; electrochemical systems, including Pt electrode fuel cells, Ni oxide battery electrodes, conducting polymers, passivation and corrosion; catalysts, including highly-dispersed supported metal catalysts and zeolite systems; quasi-crystals, heavy fermion systems, uranium and neptunium compounds, rare gas clusters, disordered metals and semiconductors, ferroelectric transition; and, biological systems and related models, including synthetic porphyrins and a number of metalloproteins. In concert with these scientific results have been a number of developments involving the technique itself. These include implementation of unique optical systems on both the A and B lines for optical performance over their designed energy ranges, advances in experimental capability, particular in glancing angle studies, optimization of ion chambers for surface studies, the improvement of electron yield detectors, and improved software for data acquisition and analysis. This report emphasizes some of the research highlights and significant developments of our PRT which occurred during the past year. A detailed bibliography of papers and talks resulting from work done at our beamline and the progress reports for our PRT which were in the 1985 NSLS Annual Report are appended

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a Cu/Zn SOD gene (BcCSD1) from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lijie; Huang, Qiang; Yan, Bin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhongyin; Pan, Jingxian; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are a family of metalloproteins extensively exists in eukaryote, which plays an essential role in stress-tolerance of higher plants. A full-length cDNA encoding Cu/Zn SOD (BcCSD1) was isolated from young seedlings of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that BcCSD1 belonged to the plant SOD super family and had the closest relationship with SOD from Brassica napus. Tissue expression pattern analysis revealed that the BcCSD1 was constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, and strongest in leaf, moderate in stem, lowest in root. The expression profiles under different stress treatments such as drought, NaCl, high temperature and ABA were also investigated, and the results revealed that BcCSD1 was a stress-responsive gene, especially to ABA. These results provide useful information for further understanding the role of BcCSD1 resistant to abiotic stress in Brassica campestris in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of heavy metals on Drosophila larvae and a metallothionein cDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroni, G.; Lastowski-Perry, D.; Otto, E.; Watson, D.

    1986-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae reared on food containing radioactive cadmium retained over 80% of it, mostly in the intestinal epithelium. The majority of this radioactivity was associated with a soluble protein of less than 10,000 molecular weight. Synthesis of this cadmium-binding protein was induced by the metal as demonstrated by incorporation of radioactive cysteine. Most copper ingested by larvae was also found to associate with a low molecular weight, inducible protein, but some of it was found in an insoluble fraction. A D. melanogaster cDNA clone was isolated based on its more intense hybridization to copies of RNA sequences from copper-fed larvae than from control larvae. This clone showed strong hybridization to mouse metallothionein-I cDNA at reduced stringency. Its nucleotide sequence includes an open-reading segment which codes for a 40 amino acid protein; this protein was identified as metallothionein based on its similarity to the amino-terminal portion of mammalian and crab metalloproteins. The ten cysteine residues present occur in five pairs of near-vicinal cysteines (Cys-X-Cys). This cDNA sequence hybridized to a 400-nucleotide polyadenylated RNA whose presence in the cells of the alimentary canal of larvae was stimulated by ingestion of cadmium or copper; in other tissues this RNA was present at much lower levels.

  7. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chu, W.S.; Yang, F.F.; Yu, M.J.; Chen, D.L.; Guo, X.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, D.W.; Shi, N. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Marcelli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Niu, L.W.; Teng, M.K. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Gong, W.M. [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Benfatto, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Wu, Z.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, Frascati 00044 (Italy)], E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2007-09-21

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase (LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  8. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W.S.; Yang, F.F.; Yu, M.J.; Chen, D.L.; Guo, X.Y.; Zhou, D.W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L.W.; Teng, M.K.; Gong, W.M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase (LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations

  9. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  10. Reversible S-nitrosylation in an engineered azurin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shiliang; Liu, Jing; Cowley, Ryan E.; Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Yu, Yang; Robinson, Howard; Nilges, Mark J.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Solomon, Edward I.; Lu, Yi

    2016-04-25

    S-Nitrosothiols are known as reagents for NO storage and transportation and as regulators in many physiological processes. Although the S-nitrosylation catalysed by haem proteins is well known, no direct evidence of S-nitrosylation in copper proteins has been reported. Here, we report reversible insertion of NO into a copper–thiolate bond in an engineered copper centre in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin by rational design of the primary coordination sphere and tuning its reduction potential by deleting a hydrogen bond in the secondary coordination sphere. The results not only provide the first direct evidence of S-nitrosylation of Cu(II)-bound cysteine in metalloproteins, but also shed light on the reaction mechanism and structural features responsible for stabilizing the elusive Cu(I)–S(Cys)NO species. The fast, efficient and reversible S-nitrosylation reaction is used to demonstrate its ability to prevent NO inhibition of cytochrome bo3 oxidase activity by competing for NO binding with the native enzyme under physiologically relevant conditions.

  11. Fluorescence-detected X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of well-defined Mn(II) and Ni(II) doped in MgO crystals: credential evaluation for measurements on biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Bryant, Craig; LeGros, M; Wang, Xin; Cramer, S P

    2012-10-18

    L(2,3)-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra have been measured for the well-defined dilute Ni(II) and Mn(II) ions doped into a MgO crystal, with sub-Kelvin dilution refrigerator cooling and 2 T magnetic field magnetization. A 30-element Ge array X-ray detector has been used to measure the XMCD for these dilute ions, whose concentrations are 1400 ppm for Ni(II) and 10,000 ppm for Mn(II). Large XMCD effects have been observed for both Ni(II) and Mn(II), and multiplet simulation described the observed spectra. The fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectrum and XMCD of Ni(II) in MgO are comparable with both theoretical calculations and the total electron yield measured ions in similar chemical environments, at least qualitatively validating the use of the sensitive fluorescence detection technique for studying XMCD for dilute 3d metal ions, such as various metalloproteins. Sum rule analyses on the XMCD spectra are also performed. In addition, these XMCD measurements have also been used to obtain the sample's magnetization curve and the beamline's X-ray helicity curve. This study also illustrated that bend magnet beamlines are still useful in examining XMCD on dilute and paramagnetic metal sites.

  12. Spectroscopic Signature of a Ubiquitous Metal Binding Site in the Metallo-beta-lactamase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Campos-Bermudez; J Gonzalez; D Tierney; A Vila

    2011-12-31

    The metallo-{beta}-lactamase (M{beta}L) superfamily is a functionally diverse group of metalloproteins sharing a distinctive {alpha}{beta}/{alpha}{beta} fold and a characteristic metal binding motif. A large number of open reading frames identified in genomic sequencing efforts have been annotated as members of this superfamily through sequence comparisons. However, structural and functional studies performed on purified proteins are normally needed to unequivocally include a newly discovered protein in the M{beta}L superfamily. Here we report the spectroscopic characterization of recombinant YcbL, a gene product annotated as a member of the M{beta}L superfamily whose function in vivo remains unknown. By taking advantage of the structural features characterizing the M{beta}L superfamily metal binding motif, we performed spectroscopic studies on Zn(II)- and Co(II)-substituted YcbL to structurally interrogate the metal binding site. The dinuclear center in Co(II)-YcbL was shown to display characteristic electronic absorption features in the visible region, which were also observed in an engineered M{beta}L aimed at mimicking this metal site. Thus, the spectroscopic features reported herein can be employed as a signature to readily identify and characterize the presence of these ubiquitous metal binding sites.

  13. Synthesis and secretion of transferrin by a bovine trabecular meshwork cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bertazolli-Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The trabecular meshwork (TM is the main outflow pathway in the mammalian eye. Oxidative damage to TM cells has been suggested to be an important cause of impairment of TM functions, leading to deficient drainage of aqueous humor, with deleterious consequences to the eye. Transferrin, a metalloprotein involved in iron transport, has been characterized as an intrinsic eye protein. Since transferrin is implicated in the control of oxidative stress, the objective of the present study was to determine if a bovine TM cell line (CTOB synthesizes and secretes transferrin. The CTOB cell line was cultured in the presence of 35S-methionine and the incubation medium was submitted to immunoprecipitation. Total RNAs from CTOB and isolated bovine TM (freshly isolated, incubated or not were subjected to the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the amplification products were sequenced. Also, both CTOB and histological TM preparations were processed for transferrin immunolocalization. A labeled peptide of about 80 kDa, the expected size for transferrin, was immunopurified from CTOB samples obtained from the incubation assays. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequencing experiments detected the presence of transferrin mRNA in CTOB and isolated bovine TM. Reactivity to antibodies against transferrin was observed both in CTOB and TM. The results obtained in all of these experiments indicated that the TM is capable of synthesizing and secreting transferrin. The possible implications for the physiology of the eye are discussed.

  14. Chemical surface tuning electrocatalysis of redox-active nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    This work focuses on electron transfer (ET) and electrocatalysis of inorganic hybrid Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs, 6 nm) immobilized on different chemical surfaces. Through surface self-assembly chemistry, we have enabled to tune chemical properties of the electrode surface. Stable immobili......This work focuses on electron transfer (ET) and electrocatalysis of inorganic hybrid Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs, 6 nm) immobilized on different chemical surfaces. Through surface self-assembly chemistry, we have enabled to tune chemical properties of the electrode surface. Stable...... PBNPs are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Reversible electron transfer (ET) was detected by cyclic voltammetry (CV) of the PBNPs on all the surfaces. ET kinetics can be controlled by adjusting the chain length of the SAMs. The rate constants are found to depend exponentially on the ET...... distance, with a decay factor (β) of ca. 0.9, 1.1, 1.3 per CH2, respectively. This feature suggests a tunneling mechanism adopted by the nanoparticles, resembling that for metalloproteins in a similar assembly. High-efficient electrocatalysis towards the reduction of H2O2 is observed, and possible...

  15. Mechanism of Iron-Dependent Repressor (IdeR Activation and DNA Binding: A Molecular Dynamics and Protein Structure Network Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteins form a major class of enzymes in the living system that are involved in crucial biological functions such as catalysis, redox reactions and as 'switches' in signal transductions. Iron dependent repressor (IdeR is a metal-sensing transcription factor that regulates free iron concentration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IdeR is also known to promote bacterial virulence, making it an important target in the field of therapeutics. Mechanistic details of how iron ions modulate IdeR such that it dimerizes and binds to DNA is not understood clearly. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamic simulations and integrated it with protein structure networks to study the influence of iron on IdeR structure and function. A significant structural variation between the metallated and the non-metallated system is observed. Our simulations clearly indicate the importance of iron in stabilizing its monomeric subunit, which in turn promotes dimerization. However, the most striking results are obtained from the simulations of IdeR-DNA complex in the absence of metals, where at the end of 100ns simulations, the protein subunits are seen to rapidly dissociate away from the DNA, thereby forming an excellent resource to investigate the mechanism of DNA binding. We have also investigated the role of iron as an allosteric regulator of IdeR that positively induces IdeR-DNA complex formation. Based on this study, a mechanistic model of IdeR activation and DNA binding has been proposed.

  16. Nitrite and nitrite reductases: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Nicoletta; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2012-08-15

    Nitrite, previously considered physiologically irrelevant and a simple end product of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, is now envisaged as a reservoir of NO to be activated in response to oxygen (O(2)) depletion. In the first part of this review, we summarize and compare the mechanisms of nitrite-dependent production of NO in selected bacteria and in eukaryotes. Bacterial nitrite reductases, which are copper or heme-containing enzymes, play an important role in the adaptation of pathogens to O(2) limitation and enable microrganisms to survive in the human body. In mammals, reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions is carried out in tissues and blood by an array of metalloproteins, including heme-containing proteins and molybdenum enzymes. In humans, tissues play a more important role in nitrite reduction, not only because most tissues produce more NO than blood, but also because deoxyhemoglobin efficiently scavenges NO in blood. In the second part of the review, we outline the significance of nitrite in human health and disease and describe the recent advances and pitfalls of nitrite-based therapy, with special attention to its application in cardiovascular disorders, inflammation, and anti-bacterial defence. It can be concluded that nitrite (as well as nitrate-rich diet for long-term applications) may hold promise as therapeutic agent in vascular dysfunction and ischemic injury, as well as an effective compound able to promote angiogenesis.

  17. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  18. The Effect of Salts in Promoting Specific and Competitive Interactions between Zinc Finger Proteins and Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongyu; Yuan, Siming; Zheng, Shihui; Chen, Yuting; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Yangzhong; Huang, Guangming

    2017-12-01

    Specific protein-metal interactions (PMIs) fulfill essential functions in cells and organic bodies, and activation of these functions in vivo are mostly modulated by the complex environmental factors, including pH value, small biomolecules, and salts. Specifically, the role of salts in promoting specific PMIs and their competition among various metals has remained untapped mainly due to the difficulty to distinguish nonspecific PMIs from specific PMIs by classic spectroscopic techniques. Herein, we report Hofmeister salts differentially promote the specific PMIs by combining nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry and spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence measurement and circular dichroism). Furthermore, to explore the influence of salts in competitive binding between metalloproteins and various metals, we designed a series of competitive experiments and applied to a well-defined model system, the competitive binding of zinc (II) and arsenic (III) to holo-promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML). These experiments not only provided new insights at the molecular scale as complementary to previous NMR and spectroscopic results, but also deduced the relative binding ability between zinc finger proteins and metals at the molecular scale, which avoids the mass spectrometric titration-based determination of binding constants that is frequently affected and often degraded by variable solution conditions including salt contents. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Phenoloxidase and its zymogen are required for the larval-pupal transition in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ping-Ping; Xie, Yi-Fei; Shen, Guang-Mao; Wei, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Phenoloxidases (POs) play a key role in melanin production, are involved in invertebrate immune mechanisms, and are considered important enzymes in the insect development process. In the present study, we report the developmental stage and tissue-specific expression patterns of BdPPO1 and PO activity from Bactrocera dorsalis. The results showed that the activity of PO and its zymogen expression were closely related to the development of B. dorsalis during the larval-pupal transition, particularly in the integument. Additionally, biochemical characterization showed that PO from different developmental stages and tissues all had maximum activity at pH 7.5 and 37°C. After feeding a metal ion-containing artificial diet, the activity of PO and expression of BdPPO1 were significantly increased, indicating that PO was a metalloprotein and it could be activated by Zn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Cu2+. The functional analysis showed that the expression of BdPPO1 could be regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) after injection. Furthermore, injection of the double-stranded RNA of BdPPO1 into the 3rd instar larvae significantly reduced mRNA levels after 24 h and 48 h, and resulted in a lower pupation rate and abnormal phenotype. These results expand the understanding of the important role of PO and its zymogen in the growth of B. dorsalis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physics-based scoring of protein-ligand interactions: explicit polarizability, quantum mechanics and free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict the interaction of a ligand with its receptor is a key limitation in computer-aided drug design approaches such as virtual screening and de novo design. In this article, we examine current strategies for a physics-based approach to scoring of protein-ligand affinity, as well as outlining recent developments in force fields and quantum chemical techniques. We also consider advances in the development and application of simulation-based free energy methods to study protein-ligand interactions. Fuelled by recent advances in computational algorithms and hardware, there is the opportunity for increased integration of physics-based scoring approaches at earlier stages in computationally guided drug discovery. Specifically, we envisage increased use of implicit solvent models and simulation-based scoring methods as tools for computing the affinities of large virtual ligand libraries. Approaches based on end point simulations and reference potentials allow the application of more advanced potential energy functions to prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Comprehensive evaluation of polarizable force fields and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical and QM methods in scoring of protein-ligand interactions is required, particularly in their ability to address challenging targets such as metalloproteins and other proteins that make highly polar interactions. Finally, we anticipate increasingly quantitative free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods that are practical for optimization of hits obtained from screened ligand libraries.

  1. Zinc Binding by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element in all organisms. A common method for the prevention of zinc deficiency is pharmacological supplementation, especially in a highly available form of a metalloprotein complex. The potential of different microbes to bind essential and toxic heavy metals has recently been recognized. In this work, biosorption of zinc by lactic acid bacteria (LAB has been investigated. Specific LAB were assessed for their ability to bind zinc from a water solution. Significant amount of zinc ions was bound, and this binding was found to be LAB species-specific. Differences among the species in binding performance at a concentration range between 10–90 mg/L were evaluated with Langmuir model for biosorption. Binding of zinc was a fast process, strongly influenced by ionic strength, pH, biomass concentration, and temperature. The most effective metal-binding LAB species was Leuconostoc mesenteroides (27.10 mg of Zn2+ per gram of dry mass bound at pH=5 and 32 °C, during 24 h. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis and electron microscopy demonstrated that passive adsorption and active uptake of the zinc ions were involved.

  2. $^{111m}$Cd- and $^{199m}$Hg-derivatives of blue oxidases

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The rack-induced bonding concept (H.B.Gray & B.G.~Malmstroem, Comments Inorg. Chem, 2, 203, 1983) postulates that the bound metal ion in metalloproteins is forced to adopt a coordination geometry determined by the rigid peptide conformation of the protein. Alternatively, the metal ion could create its own favoured coordination geometry in a soft peptide conformation. In order to decide who is slave or master the changes of coordination and rigidity of metal sites in blue copper proteins due to metal and ligand exchange were studied by $^{111m}$Cd and $^{199m}$Hg $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$-perturbed angular correlation (PAC). To get a better understanding of the so called " Type 1 Copper Site " of the blue oxidases laccase (LAC) and ascorbate oxidase (AO) we concentrated our investigations on the small blue copper proteins azurin and plastocyanin. \\\\ \\\\In azurin~(Az), the metal ligand methionine 121~(M121) was replaced by several amino acids, e.g. asparagine~(N), glutamic acid~(E), via site directed mutagenesis. Di...

  3. Structural Analysis of the Hg(II)-Regulatory Protein Tn501 MerR from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Huang, Shanqing; Liu, Pingying; Liu, Xichun; He, Yafeng; Chen, Weizhong; Hu, Qingyuan; Wei, Tianbiao; Gan, Jianhua; Ma, Jing; Chen, Hao

    2016-09-01

    The metalloprotein MerR is a mercury(II)-dependent transcriptional repressor-activator that responds to mercury(II) with extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity. It’s widely distributed in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria but with barely detectable sequence identities between the two sources. To provide structural basis for the considerable biochemical and biophysical experiments previously performed on Tn501 and Tn21 MerR from Gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed the crystal structure of mercury(II)-bound Tn501 MerR. The structure in the metal-binding domain provides Tn501 MerR with a high affinity for mercury(II) and the ability to distinguish mercury(II) from other metals with its unique planar trigonal coordination geometry, which is adopted by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The mercury(II) coordination state in the C-terminal metal-binding domain is transmitted through the allosteric network across the dimer interface to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain. Together with the previous mutagenesis analyses, the present data indicate that the residues in the allosteric pathway have a central role in maintaining the functions of Tn501 MerR. In addition, the complex structure exhibits significant differences in tertiary and quaternary structural arrangements compared to those of Bacillus MerR from Gram-positive bacteria, which probably enable them to function with specific promoter DNA with different spacers between -35 and -10 elements.

  4. Survey of chemical speciation of trace elements using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Information concerning the chemical state of trace elements in biological systems generally has not been available. Such information for toxic elements and metals in metalloproteins could prove extremely valuable in the elucidation of their metabolism and other biological processes. The shielding of core electrons by binding electrons affect the energy required for creating inner-shell holes. Furthermore, the molecular binding and the symmetry of the local environment of an atom affect the absorption spectrum in the neighborhood of the absorption edge. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) using synchrotron radiation excitation can be used to provide chemical speciation information for trace elements at concentrations as low as 10 ppM. The structure and position of the absorption curve in the region of an edge can yield vital data about the local structure and oxidation state of the trace element in question. Data are most easily interpreted by comparing the observed edge structure and position with those of model compounds of the element covering the entire range of possible oxidation states. Examples of such analyses are reviewed. 14 refs., 1 fig

  5. Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation reveal fundamental differences in metal assimilation and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Andrew [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Menon, Angeli [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Scott, Israel [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Poole, Farris [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Vaccaro, Brian [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Thorgersen, Michael P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Geller, Jil [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hurt Jr., Richard Ashley [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Steven D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elias, Dwayne A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-03-26

    Although as many as half of all proteins are thought to require a metal cofactor, the metalloproteomes of microorganisms remain relatively unexplored. Microorganisms from different environments are likely to vary greatly in the metals that they assimilate, not just among the metals with well-characterized roles but also those lacking any known function. Herein we investigated the metal utilization of two microorganisms that were isolated from very similar environments and are of interest because of potential roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, such as uranium and chromium. The metals assimilated and their concentrations in the cytoplasm of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) and Enterobacter cloacae strain Hanford (EcH) varied dramatically, with a larger number of metals present in Enterobacter. For example, a total of 9 and 19 metals were assimilated into their cytoplasmic fractions, respectively, and DvH did not assimilate significant amounts of zinc or copper whereas EcH assimilated both. However, bioinformatic analysis of their genome sequences revealed a comparable number of predicted metalloproteins, 813 in DvH and 953 in EcH. These allowed some rationalization of the types of metal assimilated in some cases (Fe, Cu, Mo, W, V) but not in others (Zn, Nd, Ce, Pr, Dy, Hf and Th). It was also shown that U binds an unknown soluble protein in EcH but this incorporation was the result of extracellular U binding to cytoplasmic components after cell lysis.

  6. Immunoelectron microscopic studies on metallothionein induction in Nile cichlid due to heavy metal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Singh, L.; Das, T.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants and many of them are toxic even in low concentrations. The uncontrolled input of such elements in milieu is undesirable because once accumulated, are hard to remove. The release of toxic metals in biologically available forms by human activity may damage or alter both natural and man-made ecosystems. The cellular adaptation to toxicity of metals is one of the important factors for organisms living in the stressful conditions. The major type of cellular effect at the cytoplasmic level involves binding of metals through specific metal binding proteins. One of these metalloproteins is metallothionein (MT), MT is a low-molecular-weight (6-7 kDa) cysteine rich protein ubiquitous in the animal kingdom and can bind with essential (Cu + and Zn 2+ ) and nonessential (Cd 2+ , Hg 2+ and Ag + ) metals with a high thermodynamic and low kinetic stability. Again, the induction of MT by other heavy metals such as Cr, Mn and Pb was also reported by several workers

  7. The structure of RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans reveals that DMSP lyases in the DddP-family are metalloenzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Hehemann

    Full Text Available Marine microbes degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, which is produced in large quantities by marine algae and plants, with DMSP lyases into acrylate and the gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS. Approximately 10% of the DMS vents from the sea into the atmosphere and this emission returns sulfur, which arrives in the sea through rivers and runoff, back to terrestrial systems via clouds and rain. Despite their key role in this sulfur cycle DMSP lyases are poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of the putative DMSP lyase RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans, which belongs to the abundant DddP family. This structure, determined to 2.15 Å resolution, shows that RdDddP is a homodimeric metalloprotein with a binuclear center of two metal ions located 2.7 Å apart in the active site of the enzyme. Consistent with the crystallographic data, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF revealed the bound metal species to be primarily iron. A 3D structure guided analysis of environmental DddP lyase sequences elucidated the critical residues for metal binding are invariant, suggesting all proteins in the DddP family are metalloenzymes.

  8. Probing the Molecular Mechanism of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by NO in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Qiming; Zhou, Yajun; Tan, Li; Nagawa, Shingo; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-02-23

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heme-containing metalloprotein in NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. NO binds to the heme of sGC to catalyze the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP, which plays a critical role in several physiological processes. However, the molecular mechanism for sGC to mediate the NO signaling remains unclear. Here fluorophore FlAsH-EDT 2 and fluorescent proteins were employed to study the NO-induced sGC activation. FlAsH-EDT 2 labeling study revealed that NO binding to the H-NOX domain of sGC increased the distance between H-NOX and PAS domain and the separation between H-NOX and coiled-coil domain. The heme pocket conformation changed from "closed" to "open" upon NO binding. In addition, the NO-induced conformational change of sGC was firstly investigated in vivo through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The results both in vitro and in vivo indicated the conformational change of the catalytic domain of sGC from "open" to "closed" upon NO binding. NO binding to the heme of H-NOX domain caused breaking of Fe-N coordination bond, initiated the domain moving and conformational change, induced the allosteric effect of sGC to trigger the NO-signaling from H-NOX via PAS &coiled-coil to the catalytic domain, and ultimately stimulates the cyclase activity of sGC.

  9. Generation, Characterization, and Tunable Reactivity of Organometallic Fragments Bound to a Protein Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Hanna M; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2015-07-01

    Organotransition metal complexes catalyze important synthetic transformations, and the development of these systems has rested on the detailed understanding of the structures and elementary reactions of discrete organometallic complexes bound to organic ligands. One strategy for the creation of new organometallic systems is to exploit the intricate and highly structured ligands found in natural metalloproteins. We report the preparation and characterization of discrete rhodium and iridium fragments bound site-specifically in a κ(2)-fashion to the protein carbonic anhydrase as a ligand. The reactions of apo human carbonic anhydrase with [Rh(nbd)2]BF4 or [M(CO)2(acac)] (M=Rh, Ir) form proteins containing Rh or Ir with organometallic ligands. A colorimetric assay was developed to quantify rapidly the metal occupancy at the native metal-binding site, and (15)N-(1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to establish the amino acids to which the metal is bound. IR spectroscopy and EXAFS revealed the presence and number of carbonyl ligands and the number total ligands, while UV-vis spectroscopy provided a signature to readily identify species that had been fully characterized. Exploiting these methods, we observed fundamental stoichiometric reactions of the artificial organometallic site of this protein, including reactions that simultaneously form and cleave metal-carbon bonds. The preparation and reactivity of these artificial organometallic proteins demonstrate the potential to study a new genre of organometallic complexes for which the rates and outcomes of organometallic reactions can be controlled by genetic manipulation of the protein scaffold.

  10. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  11. Factors governing the metal coordination number in metal complexes from Cambridge Structural Database analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Minko; Wang, Jonathan; Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2006-02-02

    The metal coordination number (CN) is a key determinant of the structure and properties of metal complexes. It also plays an important role in metal selectivity in certain metalloproteins. Despite its central role, the preferred CN for several metal cations remains ambiguous, and the factors determining the metal CN are not fully understood. Here, we evaluate how the CN depends on (1) the metal's size, charge, and charge-accepting ability for a given set of ligands, and (2) the ligand's size, charge, charge-donating ability, and denticity for a given metal by analyzing the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) structures of metal ions in the periodic table. The results show that for a given ligand type, the metal's size seems to affect its CN more than its charge, especially if the ligand is neutral, whereas, for a given metal type, the ligand's charge and charge-donating ability appear to affect the metal CN more than the ligand's size. Interestingly, all 98 metal cations surveyed could adopt more than than one CN, and most of them show an apparent preference toward even rather than odd CNs. Furthermore, as compared to the preferred metal CNs observed in the CSD, those in protein binding sites generally remain the same. This implies that the protein matrix (excluding amino acid residues in the metal's first and second coordination shell) does not impose severe geometrical restrictions on the bound metal cation.

  12. Heavy metals and metalloids as a cause for protein misfolding and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, Markus J; Sharma, Sandeep K; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-02-25

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  13. Heavy Metals and Metalloids As a Cause for Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus J. Tamás

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  14. Direct Detection of Oxygen Ligation to the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkar, Yulia; Long, Xi; Glatzel, Pieter; Brudvig, Gary W.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Collins, Terrence J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-06-16

    Ligands play critical roles during the catalytic reactions in metalloproteins through bond formation/breaking, protonation/deprotonation, and electron/spin delocalization. While there are well-defined element-specific spectroscopic handles, such as X-ray spectroscopy and EPR, to follow the chemistry of metal catalytic sites in a large protein matrix, directly probing particular ligand atoms like C, N, and O is challenging due to their abundance in the protein. FTIR/Raman and ligand-sensitive EPR techniques such as ENDOR and ESEEM have been applied to study metal-ligand interactions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can also indirectly probe the ligand environment; its element-specificity allows us to focus only on the catalytic metal site, and EXAFS and XANES provide metal-ligand distances, coordination numbers, and symmetry of ligand environments. However, the information is limited, since one cannot distinguish among ligand elements with similar atomic number (i.e. C, N. and O). As an alternative and a more direct method to probe the specific metal-ligand chemistry in the protein matrix, we investigated the application of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Using this technique we have identified the oxo-bridging ligands of the Mn{sub 4}Ca complex of photosystem II (PS II), a multisubunit membrane protein, that catalyzes the water oxidizing reaction. The catalytic mechanism has been studied intensively by Mn XAS. The fundamental question of this reaction, however, is how the water molecules are ligated to the Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster and how the O-O bond formation occurs before the evolution of O{sub 2}. This implies that it is necessary to follow the chemistry of the oxygen ligands in order to understand the mechanism.

  15. Multi-frequency and high-field EPR study of manganese(III) protoporphyrin IX reconstituted myoglobin with an S=2 integer electron spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Yashiro, Haruhiko; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Hori, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the electronic state of Mn(III) center with an integer electron spin S=2 in the manganese(III) protoporphyrin IX reconstituted myoglobin, Mn(III)Mb, by means of multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (MFEPR) spectroscopy. Using a bimodal cavity resonator, X-band EPR signal from Mn(III) center in the Mn(III)Mb was observed near zero-field region. The temperature dependence of this signal indicates a negative axial zero-field splitting value, DEPR analysis shows that this signal is attributed to the transition between the closely spaced M(s)=+/-2 energy levels for the z-axis, corresponding to the heme normal. To determine the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters, EPR experiments on the Mn(III)Mb were performed at various temperatures for some frequencies between 30GHz and 130GHz and magnetic fields up to 14T. We observed several EPR spectra which are analyzed with a spin Hamiltonian for S=2, yielding highly accurate ZFS parameters; D=-3.79cm(-1) and |E|=0.08cm(-1) for an isotropic g=2.0. These ZFS parameters are compared with those in some Mn(III) complexes and Mn(III) superoxide dismutase (SOD), and effects on these parameters by the coordination and the symmetry of the ligands are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, these EPR spectra in the Mn(III)Mb are the very first MFEPR spectra at frequencies higher than Q-band in a metalloprotein with an integer spin.

  16. Project in determination of crystal structure of nitrogen fixation proteins from azospirilum brasiliense and herbaspirilum seropedicae by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Valma M.; Leggs, Luciana A.; Delboni, Luis F.; Chubatsu, LedaS.; Souza, Emanuel M.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Yates, Geoffrey M.; Pedrosa, Fabio O. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica

    1996-12-31

    Full text. Biological nitrogen fixation is essential for maintaining the nitrogen cycle on earth and of high importance for Brazilian agriculture. The nitrogenase enzyme system, which provides the biochemical machinery for nitrogen fixation, consists of two component metalloproteins, the molybdenumiron (Mo Fe) protein and the iron (Fe) protein. Nitrogen fixation is a very energy-intensive process, requiring around 16 moles of ATP for each mol of N{sub 2} fixed (reduced). As a consequence, synthesis and activity of nitrogenase is tighty regulated at two levels: general and specific. The general level regulation is mediated by the ntr (nitrogen regulation) system. Two gene products are involved: the ntrB gene product (NtrB) is responsible for the activation of the ntrC gene product (NtrC) by phosphorylating a conserved Asp54, which activates the expression of the nifA gene. The nif specific control system is mediated by the NifA protein, which binds to a DNA specific sequence (UAS, Upstream Activator Sequence) and activates nif promoter transcriptions by RNA polymerase-{sup {alpha}54}, following ATP hydrolysis. The aim of this project is to solve the crystal structure of dinitrogenase reductase (iron protein) and dinitrogenase (molybdenum-iron protein) from Azospirilim brasiliense and the regulatory proteins NifA from Herbaspirillum seropedicae and NtrC Azospirillum brasiliense. The three dimensional structure of the proteins involved in this project will allow a better understanding of the mechanism of biological nitrogen fixation. To this end, the data collection will probably be done at the LNLS facilities which will be available in the near future. (author)

  17. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Significance of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Dispersion in the dc and ac Voltammetry of Surface-Confined Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Morris, Graham P.

    2015-05-05

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Commonly, significant discrepancies are reported in theoretical and experimental comparisons of dc voltammograms derived from a monolayer or close to monolayer coverage of redox-active surface-confined molecules. For example, broader-than-predicted voltammetric wave shapes are attributed to the thermodynamic or kinetic dispersion derived from distributions in reversible potentials (E0) and electrode kinetics (k0), respectively. The recent availability of experimentally estimated distributions of E0 and k0 values derived from the analysis of data for small numbers of surface-confined modified azurin metalloprotein molecules now allows more realistic modeling to be undertaken, assuming the same distributions apply under conditions of high surface coverage relevant to voltammetric experiments. In this work, modeling based on conventional and stochastic kinetic theory is considered, and the computationally far more efficient conventional model is shown to be equivalent to the stochastic one when large numbers of molecules are present. Perhaps unexpectedly, when experimentally determined distributions of E0 and k0 are input into the model, thermodynamic dispersion is found to be unimportant and only kinetic dispersion contributes significantly to the broadening of dc voltammograms. Simulations of ac voltammetric experiments lead to the conclusion that the ac method, particularly when the analysis of kinetically very sensitive higher-order harmonics is undertaken, are far more sensitive to kinetic dispersion than the dc method. ac methods are therefore concluded to provide a potentially superior strategy for addressing the inverse problem of determining the k0 distribution that could give rise to the apparent anomalies in surface-confined voltammetry.

  18. In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles using Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauthal, Preeti; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi

    2013-01-01

    In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold (Au-NPs) and silver (Ag-NPs) nanoparticles was investigated in the present study. Natural precursor Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract was used as a reducing agent for the nanoparticle synthesis. The free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1'-diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS assay. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Appearance of optical absorption peak at 537 nm (2.20 keV) and 435 nm (3 keV) within 0.08 and 0.5 h of reaction time was confirmed the presence of metallic Au and Ag nanoclusters, respectively. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with majority of particle below 20 nm (TEM) for both Au-NPs and Ag-NPs were synthesized. XRD pattern confirmed the existence of pure nanocrystalline Au-NPs while few additional peaks in the vicinity of fcc silver-speculated crystallization of metalloproteins of fruit extract on the surface of the Ag-NPs and vice versa. FTIR spectra was supported the role of amino acids of protein/enzymes of fruit extract for synthesis and stabilization of nanoparticles. Dose-dependent scavenging activity was observed for Au-NPs and Ag-NPs in both DPPH and ABTS in-vitro assay. 50 % scavenging activity for DPPH were 11.27 and 16.18 mg and for ABTS 3.40 and 7.12 mg with Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, respectively.

  19. Detailed assignment of the magnetic circular dichroism and UV-vis spectra of five-coordinate high-spin ferric [Fe(TPP)(Cl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulat, Florian; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2008-06-02

    High-spin (hs) ferric heme centers occur in the catalytic or redox cycles of many metalloproteins and exhibit very complicated magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and UV-vis absorption spectra. Therefore, detailed assignments of the MCD spectra of these species are missing. In this study, the electronic spectra (MCD and UV-vis) of the five-coordinate hs ferric model complex [Fe(TPP)(Cl)] are analyzed and assigned for the first time. A correlated fit of the absorption and low-temperature MCD spectra of [Fe(TPP)(Cl)] lead to the identification of at least 20 different electronic transitions. The assignments of these spectra are based on the following: (a) variable temperature and variable field saturation data, (b) time-dependent density functional theory calculations, (c) MCD pseudo A-terms, and (d) correlation to resonance Raman (rRaman) data to validate the assignments. From these results, a number of puzzling questions about the electronic spectra of [Fe(TPP)(Cl)] are answered. The Soret band in [Fe(TPP)(Cl)] is split into three components because one of its components is mixed with the porphyrin A2u72-->Eg82/83 (pi-->pi*) transition. The broad, intense absorption feature at higher energy from the Soret band is due to one of the Soret components and a mixed sigma and pi chloro to iron CT transition. The high-temperature MCD data allow for the identification of the Q v band at 20 202 cm(-1), which corresponds to the C-term feature at 20 150 cm(-1). Q is not observed but can be localized by correlation to rRaman data published before. Finally, the low energy absorption band around 650 nm is assigned to two P-->Fe charge transfer transitions, one being the long sought after A1u(HOMO)-->d pi transition.

  20. Changes in concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed sericea lespedeza leaf meal pellets with or without dietary sodium molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, M; Burke, J M; Coffey, K P; Kegley, E B; Miller, J E; Smyth, E; Welborn, M G; Terrill, T H; Mosjidis, J A; Rosenkrans, C

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged feeding of sericea lespedeza (SL) previously led to reduced serum concentrations of Mo, a cofactor in an enzyme complex that may be involved in weight gain. The current objective was to determine the effect of Mo supplementation on changes in serum, fecal, urine, and liver concentrations of trace minerals in lambs fed SL leaf meal pellets. Thirty ram lambs weaned in May (84 ± 1.5 d of age and 27 ± 1.1 kg; D 0) were blocked by BW, breed type (full or three-fourths Katahdin), and EBV of parasite resistance and randomly assigned to be fed 900 g/d of an alfalfa-based supplement (CON; = 10) or a SL-based supplement ( = 20) for 103 d. Supplements were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric and to meet trace mineral requirements. Within the SL group, individual lambs were administered either 5 mL water or 5 mL of water with 163.3 mg of sodium molybdate (SLMO). Serum was collected on d 28, 56, and 104; a liver sample was collected by biopsy on d 104 to determine concentrations of trace minerals. Data were analyzed using a mixed model and orthogonal contrasts. Serum concentrations of Mo increased in response to the drench and were greatest in SLMO lambs and then CON lambs and lowest in SL lambs ( trace minerals associated with metalloproteins-Mo, copper, selenium, and zinc-were reduced in the liver of SL- and/or SLMO-fed lambs. These reductions could be associated with the lower weight gains previously observed after prolonged feeding of SL.

  1. The clinical value of inflammatory biomarkers in coronary artery disease: PTX3 as a new inflammatory marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tangmeng; Huang, Lili; Liu, Cunfei; Shan, Shengshuai; Li, Qing; Ke, Li; Cheng, Bei

    2017-10-15

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that several inflammatory biomarkers, including pentraxin 3 (PTX3), matrix metalloprotein 9 (MMP9), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), are differentially elevated in coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aims to compare the associations between plasma levels of these biomarkers and CAD, identifying the best biomarker that has the most powerful association with CAD. Blood samples were collected from 64 patients admitted to the Department of Cardiology, 31 of whom had CAD and 33 of whom were CAD-free. Plasma levels of PTX3, MMP9, and IL-6 were measured via ELISA. The coronary Gensini score was used to evaluate the severity of coronary artery lesions. PTX3 levels and NLR levels between the CAD group and the CAD-free group were statistically significant (P<0.05). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that PTX3 levels and NLR levels were independently associated with CAD (r=1.3, P<0.05; r=1.8, P<0.05). Only PTX3 was associated with the severity of coronary artery stenosis. A PTX3 threshold of 4.38ng/mL maximized true-positive and false-negative results. PTX3 displayed a greater area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) than NLR, MMP9, and IL-6 (0.733 versus 0.612 versus 0.725 versus 0.518). Compared to NLR, MMP9, and IL-6, PTX3 displayed greater AUC and association with CAD. PTX3 may become a potentially powerful inflammatory biomarker for CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression and biological function of MEF2D in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiwang; Feng, Chan; Lu, Yonglin; Gao, Yong; Lin, Yun; Dong, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the expression, clinical significance, biological function, and potential mechanism of MEF2D in pancreatic cancer, the expression of MEF2D in human pancreatic cancer tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues was analyzed through immunohistochemical staining. The association between MEF2D expression, clinicopathological parameters, overall survival, and disease-free survival was evaluated. Human pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-1 and SW1990 were selected to investigate the effect of MEF2D knockdown on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Western blot analysis was used to assess the effect of MEF2D expression on the Akt/GSK pathway, as well as the protein expression of cyclin B1, cyclin D1, matrix metalloprotein (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Our results revealed that the expression of MEF2D was increased in pancreatic cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and the increased expression of MEF2D was associated with tumor size, histological differentiation, and TNM stage of pancreatic cancer patients. Moreover, the expression of MEF2D was an independent prognostic indicator for pancreatic cancer patients. In addition, knockdown of MEF2D in pancreatic cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion by down-regulating the protein expression of cyclin B1, cyclin D1, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Knockdown of MEF2D reduced the levels of phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β. Our data indicated that MEF2D expression was increased in pancreatic cancer and was an independent molecular prognostic factor for pancreatic cancer patients. Furthermore, we showed that MEF2D controlled cell proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities in pancreatic cancer via the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  3. IL-1F5, F6, F8, and F9: a novel IL-1 family signaling system that is active in psoriasis and promotes keratinocyte antimicrobial peptide expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew; Xing, Xianying; Guzman, Andrew M.; Riblett, MaryBeth; Loyd, Candace M.; Ward, Nicole L.; Wohn, Christian; Prens, Errol P.; Wang, Frank; Maier, Lisa E.; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    IL-1F6, IL-1F8 and IL-1F9 and the IL-1R6(RP2) receptor antagonist IL-1F5 constitute a novel IL-1 signaling system that is poorly characterized in skin. To further characterize these cytokines in healthy and inflamed skin, we studied their expression in healthy control (NN), uninvolved psoriasis (PN) and psoriasis plaque (PP) skin using QRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Expression of IL-1F5, -1F6, -1F8, and -1F9 were increased 2-3 orders of magnitude in PP versus PN skin, which was supported immunohistologically. Moreover, treatment of psoriasis with etanercept led to significantly decreased IL-1F5, -1F6, -1F8 and -1F9 mRNAs, concomitant with clinical improvement. Similarly increased expression of IL-1F5, -1F6, -1F8 and -1F9 was seen in the involved skin of two mouse models of psoriasis. Suggestive of their importance in inflamed epithelia, IL-1α and TNF-α induced IL-1F5, -1F6, -1F8, and -1F9 transcript expression by normal human keratinocytes. Microarray analysis revealed that these cytokines induce the expression of anti-microbial peptides and matrix metalloproteins by reconstituted human epidermis. In particular, IL-1F8 increased mRNA expression of HBD2, HBD3 and CAMP and protein secretion of HBD2 and HBD3. Collectively, our data suggest important roles for these novel cytokines in inflammatory skin diseases and identify these peptides as potential targets for antipsoriatic therapies. PMID:21242515

  4. Refolding of laccase from Trametes versicolor using aqueous two phase systems: Effect of different additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Trasviña, Calef; Mayolo-Deloisa, Karla; González-Valdez, José; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2017-07-21

    Protein refolding is a strategy used to obtain active forms of proteins from inclusion bodies. On its part, laccase is an enzyme with potential for different biotechnological applications but there are few reports regarding its refolding which in many cases is considered inefficient due to the poor obtained refolding yields. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems (ATPS) have been used for the refolding of proteins getting acceptable recovery percentages since PEG presents capacity to avoid protein aggregation. In this work, 48 PEG-phosphate ATPS were analyzed to study the impact of different parameters (i.e. tie line length (TLL), volume ratio (V R ) and PEG molecular weight) upon the recovery and refolding of laccase. Additionally, since laccase is a metalloprotein, the use of additives (individually and in mixture) was studied with the aim of favoring refolding. Results showed that laccase presents a high affinity for the PEG-rich phase obtaining recovery values of up to 90%. Such affinity increases with increasing TLL and decreases when PEG molecular weight and V R increase. In denatured state, this PEG-rich phase affinity decreases drastically. However, the use of additives such as l-cysteine, glutathione oxidized, cysteamine and Cu +2 was critical in improving refolding yield values up to 100%. The best conditions for the refolding of laccase were obtained using the PEG 400gmol -1 , TLL 45% w/w, V R 3 ATPS and a mixture of 2.5mM cysteamine with 1mM Cu +2 . To our knowledge, this is the first time that the use of additives and the behavior of the mixture of such additives to enhance refolding performance in ATPS is reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pengcheng; Song, Guangji; Shi, Mengyang; Zhou, Yafei; Liu, Yang; Lei, Jun; Chen, Peng; Yin, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Colistin is considered a last-resort antibiotic against most gram-negative bacteria. Recent discoveries of a plasmid-mediated, transferable mobilized colistin-resistance gene ( mcr-1) on all continents have heralded the imminent emergence of pan-drug-resistant superbacteria. The inner-membrane protein MCR-1 can catalyze the transfer of phosphoethanolamine (PEA) to lipid A, resulting in colistin resistance. However, little is known about the mechanism, and few drugs exist to address this issue. We present crystal structures revealing the MCR-1 catalytic domain (cMCR-1) as a monozinc metalloprotein with ethanolamine (ETA) and d-glucose, respectively, thus highlighting 2 possible substrate-binding pockets in the MCR-1-catalyzed PEA transfer reaction. Mutation of the residues involved in ETA and d-glucose binding impairs colistin resistance in recombinant Escherichia coli containing full-length MCR-1. Partial analogs of the substrate are used for cocrystallization with cMCR-1, providing valuable information about the family of PEA transferases. One of the analogs, ETA, causes clear inhibition of polymyxin B resistance, highlighting its potential for drug development. These data demonstrate the crucial role of the PEA- and lipid A-binding pockets and provide novel insights into the structure-based mechanisms, important drug-target hot spots, and a drug template for further drug development to combat the urgent, rising threat of MCR-1-mediated antibiotic resistance.-Wei, P., Song, G., Shi, M., Zhou, Y., Liu, Y., Lei, J., Chen, P., Yin, L. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

  6. The Yin and Yang of Copper During Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besold, Angelique N.; Culbertson, Edward M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2017-01-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for both pathogens and the animal hosts they infect. However, copper can also be toxic in cells due to its redox properties and ability to disrupt active sites of metalloproteins, such as Fe-S enzymes. Through these toxic properties, copper is an effective antimicrobial agent and an emerging concept in innate immunity is that the animal host intentionally exploits copper toxicity in antimicrobial weaponry. In particular, macrophages can attack invading microbes with high copper and this metal is also elevated at sites of lung infection. In addition, copper levels in serum rise during infection with a wide array of pathogens. To defend against this toxic copper, the microbial intruder is equipped with a battery of copper detoxification defenses that promote survival in the host, including copper exporting ATPases and copper binding metallothioneins. However, it is important to remember that copper is also an essential nutrient for microbial pathogens and serves as important cofactor for enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase for respiration, superoxide dismutase for anti-oxidant defense and multi-copper oxidases that act on metals and organic substrates. We therefore posit that the animal host can also thwart pathogen growth by limiting their copper nutrients, similar to the well-documented nutritional immunity effects for starving microbes of essential zinc, manganese and iron micronutrients. This review provides both sides of the copper story and evaluates how the host can exploit either copper-the-toxin or copper-the-nutrient in antimicrobial tactics at the host-pathogen battleground.  PMID:26790881

  7. Structure and properties of the dendron-encapsulated polyoxometalate (C(52)H(60)NO(12))(12)[(Mn(H(2)O))(3)(SbW(9)O(33))(2)], a first generation dendrizyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, Dirk; Bredenkötter, Björn; Tellenbröker, Jörg; Kögerler, Paul; Kurth, Dirk G; Lehmann, Pit; Schnablegger, Heimo; Schwahn, Dietmar; Piepenbrink, Markus; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-09-04

    Combining analytical and theoretical methods, we present a detailed study of a heteropolytungstate cluster encapsulated in a shell of dendritically branching surfactants, namely (C(52)H(60)NO(12))(12)[(Mn(H(2)O))(3)(SbW(9)O(33))(2)], 3. This novel surfactant-encapsulated cluster (SEC) self-assembles spontaneously from polyoxometalate-containing solutions treated with a stoichiometric amount of dendrons. Compound 3 exhibits a discrete supramolecular architecture in which a single polyoxometalate anion resides in a compact shell of dendrons. Our approach attempts to combine the catalytic activity of polyoxometalates with the steric properties of tailored dendritic surfactants into size-selective catalytic systems. The structural characterization of the SEC is based on analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The packing arrangement of dendrons at the cluster surface is gleaned from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which suggests a highly porous shell structure due to the dynamic formation of internal clefts and cavities. From analysis of the MD trajectory of 3, a theoretical neutron-scattering function is derived that is in good agreement with experimental SANS data. Force field parameters used in MD simulations are partially derived from a quantum mechanical geometry optimization of [(Zn(H(2)O))(3)(SbW(9)O(33))(2)](12)(-), 2b, at the density functional theory (DFT) level. DFT calculations are corroborated by X-ray structure analysis of Na(6)K(6)[(Zn(H(2)O))(3)(SbW(9)O(33))(2)].23H(2)O, which is isostructural with the catalytically active Mn derivative 2a. The combined use of theoretical and analytical methods aims at rapidly prototyping smart catalysts ("dendrizymes"), which are structurally related to naturally occurring metalloproteins.

  8. Formation of a homocitrate-free iron-molybdenum cluster on NifEN: implications for the role of homocitrate in nitrogenase assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Aaron Wolfe; Blank, Michael Aaron; Yoshizawa, Janice Mariko; Lee, Chi Chung; Wiig, Jared Andrew; Hu, Yilin; Hodgson, Keith Owen; Hedman, Britt; Ribbe, Markus Walter

    2010-03-28

    Molybdenum (Mo)-dependent nitrogenase is a complex metalloprotein that catalyzes the biological reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) at the molybdenum-iron cofactor (FeMoco) site of its molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein component. Here we report the formation of a homocitrate-free, iron-molybdenum ("FeMo") cluster on the biosynthetic scaffold of FeMoco, NifEN. Such a NifEN-associated "FeMo" cluster exhibits EPR features similar to those of the NifEN-associated, fully-complemented "FeMoco", which originate from the presence of Mo in both cluster species; however, "FeMo" cluster and "FeMoco" display different temperature-dependent changes in the line shape and the signal intensity of their respective EPR features, which reflect the impact of homocitrate on the redox properties of these clusters. XAS/EXAFS analysis reveals that the Mo centers in both "FeMo" cluster and "FeMoco" are present in a similar coordination environment, although Mo in "FeMo" cluster is more loosely coordinated as compared to that in "FeMoco" with respect to the Mo-O distances in the cluster, likely due to the absence of homocitrate that normally serves as an additional ligand for the Mo in the cluster. Subsequent biochemical investigation of the "FeMo" cluster not only facilitates the determination of the sequence of events in the mobilization of Mo and homocitrate during FeMoco maturation, but also permits the examination of the role of homocitrate in the transfer of FeMoco between NifEN and MoFe protein. Combined outcome of these studies establishes a platform for future structural analysis of the interactions between NifEN and MoFe protein, which will provide useful insights into the mechanism of cluster transfer between the two proteins.

  9. The crystal structure of 1-D-myo-inosityl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside deacetylase (MshB) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a zinc hydrolase with a lactate dehydrogenase fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Jason T; Garen, Craig; Cherney, Maia M; Newton, Gerald; Arad, Dorit; Av-Gay, Yossef; Fahey, Robert C; James, Michael N G

    2003-11-21

    Mycothiol (1-D-myo-inosityl 2-(N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl)amido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, MSH or AcCys-GlcN-inositol (Ins)) is the major reducing agent in actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biosynthesis of MSH involves a deacetylase that removes the acetyl group from the precursor GlcNAc-Ins to yield GlcN-Ins. The deacetylase (MshB) corresponds to Rv1170 of M. tuberculosis with a molecular mass of 33,400 Da. MshB is a Zn2+ metalloprotein, and the deacetylase activity is completely dependent on the presence of a divalent metal cation. We have determined the x-ray crystallographic structure of MshB, which reveals a protein that folds in a manner resembling lactate dehydrogenase in the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain consisting of two beta-sheets and two alpha-helices. The zinc binding site is in the N-terminal domain occupying a position equivalent to that of the NAD+ co-factor of lactate dehydrogenase. The Zn2+ is 5 coordinate with 3 residues from MshB (His-13, Asp-16, His-147) and two water molecules. One water would be displaced upon binding of substrate (GlcNAc-Ins); the other is proposed as the nucleophilic water assisted by the general base carboxylate of Asp-15. In addition to the Zn2+ providing electrophilic assistance in the hydrolysis, His-144 imidazole could form a hydrogen bond to the oxyanion of the tetrahedral intermediate. The extensive sequence identity of MshB, the deacetylase, with mycothiol S-conjugate amidase, an amide hydrolase that mediates detoxification of mycothiol S-conjugate xenobiotics, has allowed us to construct a faithful model of the catalytic domain of mycothiol S-conjugate amidase based on the structure of MshB.

  10. Evaluation of gel electrophoresis conditions for the separation of metal-tagged proteins with subsequent laser ablation ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Andrea; Pioselli, Barbara; Munro, Caroline; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Feldmann, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Although laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS has been reported for the determination of metalloproteins separated by gel electrophoretic techniques (GE), systematic studies that define the conditions essential for successful measurements are still scarce. In this paper we present the results of our studies of basic conditions for the effective application of GE-LA-ICP-MS for the separation of metal-binding proteins, focusing on their stability during GE and post-separation gel treatment. The stability of metal-protein complexes (haemoglobin, myoglobin, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, transferrin, albumin, cytochrome c) during GE is dependent on the nature of the metal-protein interaction and the principle of separation. We have observed that non-denaturing GE is a suitable separation technique for most metal-protein complexes (e.g. Zn in carbonic anhydrase and Fe in Tf and myoglobin were quantitatively recovered in a spiked liver cytosol), whereas separation by denaturing GE strongly impaired the stability of the complexes. Equally important is the post-separation treatment of the gel to enable successful detection of the metal. LA-ICP-MS requires drying of the gel without loss of protein-bound metal or cracking of the gel. This was successfully achieved using glycerol followed by heating. We demonstrate that staining of the gel prior to LA-ICP-MS using silver or Coomassie blue is not recommended, since most protein-bound metal is lost during the staining procedure. Furthermore it has been shown that only line scanning with a speed of less than 30 microm/s can reliably distinguish between lines 1 mm apart, while raster spot analysis carries the risk of misinterpretation due to contamination in/on inhomogeneous gels.

  11. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of Kα and Kβ emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS

  12. Project in determination of crystal structure of nitrogen fixation proteins from azospirilum brasiliense and herbaspirilum seropedicae by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Valma M.; Leggs, Luciana A.; Delboni, Luis F.; Chubatsu, LedaS.; Souza, Emanuel M.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Yates, Geoffrey M.; Pedrosa, Fabio O.

    1996-01-01

    Full text. Biological nitrogen fixation is essential for maintaining the nitrogen cycle on earth and of high importance for Brazilian agriculture. The nitrogenase enzyme system, which provides the biochemical machinery for nitrogen fixation, consists of two component metalloproteins, the molybdenumiron (Mo Fe) protein and the iron (Fe) protein. Nitrogen fixation is a very energy-intensive process, requiring around 16 moles of ATP for each mol of N 2 fixed (reduced). As a consequence, synthesis and activity of nitrogenase is tighty regulated at two levels: general and specific. The general level regulation is mediated by the ntr (nitrogen regulation) system. Two gene products are involved: the ntrB gene product (NtrB) is responsible for the activation of the ntrC gene product (NtrC) by phosphorylating a conserved Asp54, which activates the expression of the nifA gene. The nif specific control system is mediated by the NifA protein, which binds to a DNA specific sequence (UAS, Upstream Activator Sequence) and activates nif promoter transcriptions by RNA polymerase- α54 , following ATP hydrolysis. The aim of this project is to solve the crystal structure of dinitrogenase reductase (iron protein) and dinitrogenase (molybdenum-iron protein) from Azospirilim brasiliense and the regulatory proteins NifA from Herbaspirillum seropedicae and NtrC Azospirillum brasiliense. The three dimensional structure of the proteins involved in this project will allow a better understanding of the mechanism of biological nitrogen fixation. To this end, the data collection will probably be done at the LNLS facilities which will be available in the near future. (author)

  13. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Heme Proteins Involved in Microbial Exoelectric Activity and Small Molecule-Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Vogler, Malvina M.

    2018-01-01

    Heme proteins, also termed cytochromes, are a widespread class of metalloproteins containing an Fe-protoporphyrin IX cofactor. They perform numerous functions in nature such as oxygen-transport by hemoglobin, monooxygenation reactions catalyzed by Cytochrome P-450, and electron transfer reactions during photosynthesis. The differences between proteincofactor binding characteristics and the cofactor environment greatly influence the extensive range of functions. In this dissertation, proteins from the Mtr pathway of Shewanella oneidensis are characterized. These c-type cytochromes contain multiple heme cofactors per protein molecule that covalently attach to the protein amino acid sequence and are involved in electron transfer to extracellular metal oxides during anaerobic conditions. Successful recombinant expression of pathway components MtrC and MtrA is achieved in Escherichia coli. Heme-dependent gel staining and UV/Vis spectroscopy show characteristic c-type cytochrome characteristics. Mass spectrometry confirms that the correct extensive post-translational modifications were performed and the ten heme groups were incorporated per protein of MtrC and MtrA and the correct lipid-anchor was attached to extracellular MtrC. Raman spectroscopy measurements of MtrA provide intriguing structural information and highlight the strong influence of the heme cofactors within the protein structure. Next, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein is analyzed. It was previously identified via a motif search of the plant genome, based on conserved residues in the H4 NOX pocket. Here, the incorporation of a heme b cofactor is confirmed. UV/Vis spectroscopy under anaerobic conditions demonstrates reversible binding of nitric oxide to the heme iron and depicts the previously published characteristic absorption maxima for other H-NOX proteins.

  15. MpaA is a murein-tripeptide-specific zinc carboxypeptidase that functions as part of a catabolic pathway for peptidoglycan-derived peptides in γ-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Hervé, Mireille; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Thomas, Gavin H

    2012-12-15

    The murein peptide amidase MpaA is a cytoplasmic enzyme that processes peptides derived from the turnover of murein. We have purified the enzyme from Escherichia coli and demonstrated that it efficiently hydrolyses the γ-D-glutamyl-diaminopimelic acid bond in the murein tripeptide (L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-Dap), with Km and kcat values of 0.41±0.05 mM and 38.3±10 s-1. However, it is unable to act on the murein tetrapeptide (L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-Dap-D-Ala). E. coli MpaA is a homodimer containing one bound zinc ion per chain, as judged by mass spectrometric analysis and size-exclusion chromatography. To investigate the structure of MpaA we solved the crystal structure of the orthologous protein from Vibrio harveyi to 2.17 Å (1Å=0.1 nm). Vh_MpaA, which has identical enzymatic and biophysical properties to the E. coli enzyme, has high structural similarity to eukaryotic zinc carboxypeptidases. The structure confirms that MpaA is a dimeric zinc metalloprotein. Comparison of the structure of MpaA with those of other carboxypeptidases reveals additional structure that partially occludes the substrate-binding groove, perhaps explaining the narrower substrate specificity of the enzyme compared with other zinc carboxypeptidases. In γ-proteobacteria mpaA is often located adjacent to mppA which encodes a periplasmic transporter protein previously shown to bind murein tripeptide. We demonstrate that MppA can also bind murein tetrapeptide with high affinity. The genetic coupling of these genes and their related biochemical functions suggest that MpaA amidase and MppA transporter form part of a catabolic pathway for utilization of murein-derived peptides that operates in γ-proteobacteria in addition to the established murein recycling pathways.

  16. Understanding the binding of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases by molecular docking, quantum mechanical calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and a MMGBSA/MMBappl study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanya; Adekoya, Olayiwola Adedotun; Jayaram, B

    2015-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) consist of a class of proteins required for normal tissue function. Their over expression is associated with many disease states and hence the interest in MMPs as drug targets. Almost all MMP inhibitors have been reported to fail in clinical trials due to lack of specificity. Zinc in the binding site of metalloproteinases performs essential biological functions and contributes to the binding affinity of inhibitors. The multiple possibilities for coordination geometry and the consequent charge on the zinc atom indicate that parameters developed are not directly transferable across different families of zinc metalloproteinases with different zinc coordination geometries, active sites and ligand architectures which makes it difficult to evaluate metal-ligand interactions. In order to assist in drug design endeavors for MMP targets, a computationally tractable pathway is presented, comprising docking of small molecule inhibitors against the target MMPs, derivation of quantum mechanical charges on the zinc ion in the active site and the amino acids coordinating with zinc including the inhibitor molecule, molecular dynamics simulations on the docked ligand-MMP complexes and evaluation of binding affinities of the ligand-MMP complexes via an accurate scoring function for zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes. The above pathway was applied to study the interaction of inhibitor Batimastat with MMPs, which resulted in a high correlation between the predicted binding free energies and experiment, suggesting the potential applicability of the pathway. We then proceeded to formulate a few design principles which identify the key protein residues for generating molecules with high affinity and specificity against each of the MMPs.

  17. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  18. In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles using Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauthal, Preeti; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi, E-mail: mausumi_mukhopadhyay@yahoo.com [S.V. National Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (India)

    2013-01-15

    In-vitro free radical scavenging activity of biosynthesized gold (Au-NPs) and silver (Ag-NPs) nanoparticles was investigated in the present study. Natural precursor Prunus armeniaca (apricot) fruit extract was used as a reducing agent for the nanoparticle synthesis. The free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were observed by modified 1,1 Prime -diphynyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH and 2,2 Prime -azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), ABTS assay. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Appearance of optical absorption peak at 537 nm (2.20 keV) and 435 nm (3 keV) within 0.08 and 0.5 h of reaction time was confirmed the presence of metallic Au and Ag nanoclusters, respectively. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with majority of particle below 20 nm (TEM) for both Au-NPs and Ag-NPs were synthesized. XRD pattern confirmed the existence of pure nanocrystalline Au-NPs while few additional peaks in the vicinity of fcc silver-speculated crystallization of metalloproteins of fruit extract on the surface of the Ag-NPs and vice versa. FTIR spectra was supported the role of amino acids of protein/enzymes of fruit extract for synthesis and stabilization of nanoparticles. Dose-dependent scavenging activity was observed for Au-NPs and Ag-NPs in both DPPH and ABTS in-vitro assay. 50 % scavenging activity for DPPH were 11.27 and 16.18 mg and for ABTS 3.40 and 7.12 mg with Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, respectively.

  19. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  20. Protein-folding location can regulate manganese-binding versus copper- or zinc-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Steve; Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Reale, Brian; Bessant, Conrad; Sato, Katsuko; Cheek, Timothy R; Gray, Joe; Banfield, Mark J; Dennison, Christopher; Robinson, Nigel J

    2008-10-23

    Metals are needed by at least one-quarter of all proteins. Although metallochaperones insert the correct metal into some proteins, they have not been found for the vast majority, and the view is that most metalloproteins acquire their metals directly from cellular pools. However, some metals form more stable complexes with proteins than do others. For instance, as described in the Irving-Williams series, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) typically form more stable complexes than Mn(2+). Thus it is unclear what cellular mechanisms manage metal acquisition by most nascent proteins. To investigate this question, we identified the most abundant Cu(2+)-protein, CucA (Cu(2+)-cupin A), and the most abundant Mn(2+)-protein, MncA (Mn(2+)-cupin A), in the periplasm of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Each of these newly identified proteins binds its respective metal via identical ligands within a cupin fold. Consistent with the Irving-Williams series, MncA only binds Mn(2+) after folding in solutions containing at least a 10(4) times molar excess of Mn(2+) over Cu(2+) or Zn(2+). However once MncA has bound Mn(2+), the metal does not exchange with Cu(2+). MncA and CucA have signal peptides for different export pathways into the periplasm, Tat and Sec respectively. Export by the Tat pathway allows MncA to fold in the cytoplasm, which contains only tightly bound copper or Zn(2+) (refs 10-12) but micromolar Mn(2+) (ref. 13). In contrast, CucA folds in the periplasm to acquire Cu(2+). These results reveal a mechanism whereby the compartment in which a protein folds overrides its binding preference to control its metal content. They explain why the cytoplasm must contain only tightly bound and buffered copper and Zn(2+).

  1. Stepwise O-Atom Transfer in Heme-Based Tryptophan Dioxygenase: Role of Substrate Ammonium in Epoxide Ring Opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Inchul; Ambler, Brett R; Wherritt, Daniel; Griffith, Wendell P; Maldonado, Amanda C; Altman, Ryan A; Liu, Aimin

    2018-03-28

    Heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases are established immunosuppressive metalloproteins with significant biomedical interest. Here, we synthesized two mechanistic probes to specifically test if the α-amino group of the substrate directly participates in a critical step of the O atom transfer during catalysis in human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Substitution of the nitrogen atom of the substrate to a carbon (probe 1) or oxygen (probe 2) slowed the catalytic step following the first O atom transfer such that transferring the second O atom becomes less likely to occur, although the dioxygenated products were observed with both probes. A monooxygenated product was also produced from probe 2 in a significant quantity. Analysis of this new product by HPLC coupled UV-vis spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies concluded that this monooxygenated product is a furoindoline compound derived from an unstable epoxyindole intermediate. These results prove that small molecules can manipulate the stepwise O atom transfer reaction of TDO and provide a showcase for a tunable mechanism by synthetic compounds. The product analysis results corroborate the presence of a substrate-based epoxyindole intermediate during catalysis and provide the first substantial experimental evidence for the involvement of the substrate α-amino group in the epoxide ring-opening step during catalysis. This combined synthetic, biochemical, and biophysical study establishes the catalytic role of the α-amino group of the substrate during the O atom transfer reactions and thus represents a substantial advance to the mechanistic comprehension of the heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases.

  2. Effect of interventional treatment with p53 on the invasion and metastasis of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Caixia; Feng Yan; Gu Tao; Li Chunmei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interventional treatment with p53 on the invasion and metastasis of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits. Methods: VX2 carcinoma cells were surgically implanted into the left hepatic lobe in 48 New Zealand white rabbits, and the rabbit hepatic carcinoma models were thus established. The rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups with 12 rabbits in each group. After hepatic arterial catheterization was completed physiological saline (control group), Lipiodol (Group A), Ad-p53 (Group B) and Lipiodol+Ad-p53 (Group C) were respectively infused into the rabbits of four groups via common hepatic artery. One week after the procedure the rabbits were sacrificed and the livers were removed for the determination of matrix metalloprotein-2 (MMP-2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of the tumor with immunohistochemistry technique. Results: The tumor growth in study groups (group A, B and C) was markedly suppressed, which was significantly different in comparison with that in control group (P 0.05). The positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF in group B and C were significantly lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). The positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF of the rabbits with metastasis were markedly higher than those without metastasis(P < 0.05). MMP-2 bore a certain relationship with VEGF and PCNA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The increase of the positive rates of MMP-2, PCNA and VEGF indicates that the tumor possesses higher possibility for developing metastasis, proliferation and vascular formation. The interventional treatment with Adp53 or Lipiodol+Ad-p53 can inhibit the growth, metastasis and vascular formation of VX2 liver tumor in experimental rabbits. (J Intervent Radiol, 2010, 19 : 800-804) (authors)

  3. Study of solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces in Cu–isoleucine complex by surface X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, Pilar, E-mail: ferreres@esrf.fr [SpLine Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, 38000 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R. [SpLine Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, 38000 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The enzymes could be understood like structures formed by amino acids bonded with metals, which act as active sites. The research on the coordination of metal–amino acid complexes will bring light on the behavior of metal enzymes, due to the close relation existing between the atomic structure and the functionality. The Cu–isoleucine bond is considered as a good model system to attain a better insight into the characteristics of naturally occurring copper metalloproteins. The surface structure of metal–amino acid complex could be considered as a more realistic model for real systems under biologic working conditions, since the molecular packing is decreased. In the surface, the structural constrains are reduced, keeping the structural capability of surface complex to change as a function of the surrounding environment. In this work, we present a surface X-ray diffraction study on Cu–isoleucine complex under different ambient conditions. Cu(Ile){sub 2} crystals of about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm have been growth, by seeding method in a supersaturated solution, presenting a surface of high quality. The sample for the surface diffraction study was mounted on a cell specially designed for solid/liquid or solid/gas interface analysis. The Cu–isoleucine crystal was measured under a protective dry N{sub 2} gas flow and in contact with a saturated metal amino acid solution. The bulk and the surface signals were compared, showing different atomic structures. In both cases, from surface diffraction data, it is observed that the atomic structure of the top layer undergoes a clear structural deformation. A non-uniform surface relaxation is observed producing an inhomogeneous displacement of the surface atoms towards the surface normal.

  4. 2008 GRC Iron Sulfur Enzymes-Conference to be held June 8-13, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Stephen [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins are among the most common and ancient enzymes and electron-transfer agents in nature. They play key roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the metabolism of small molecules such as H2, CO, and N2. The Iron Sulfur Enzyme Gordon Research Conference evolved from an earlier GRC on Nitrogen Fixation that began in 1994. The scope of the current meeting has broadened to include all enzymes or metalloproteins in which Fe-S bonds play a key role. This year's meeting will focus on the biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters, as well as the structure and mechanism of key Fe-S enzymes such as hydrogenase, nitrogenase and its homologues, radical SAM enzymes, and aconitase-related enzymes. Recent progress on the role of Fe-S enzymes in health, disease, DNA/RNA-processing, and alternative bio-energy systems will also be highlighted. This conference will assemble a broad, diverse, and international group of biologists and chemists who are investigating fundamental issues related to Fe-S enzymes, on atomic, molecular, organism, and environmental scales. The topics to be addressed will include: Biosynthesis & Genomics of Fe-S Enzymes; Fundamental Fe-S Chemistry; Hydrogen and Fe-S Enzymes; Nitrogenase & Homologous Fe-S Enzymes; Fe-S Enzymes in Health & Disease; Radical SAM and Aconitase-Related Fe-S Enzymes; Fe-S Enzymes and Synthetic Analogues in BioEnergy; and Fe-S Enzymes in Geochemistry and the Origin of Life.

  5. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  6. Islands of non-essential genes, including a DNA translocation operon, in the genome of bacteriophage 0305ϕ8-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathria, Saurav; Rolando, Mandy; Lieman, Karen; Hayes, Shirley; Hardies, Stephen; Serwer, Philip

    2012-01-01

    We investigate genes of lytic, Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriophage 0305ϕ8-36 that are non-essential for laboratory propagation, but might have a function in the wild. We isolate deletion mutants to identify these genes. The non-permutation of the genome (218.948 Kb, with a 6.479 Kb terminal repeat and 247 identified orfs) simplifies isolation of deletion mutants. We find two islands of non-essential genes. The first island (3.01% of the genomic DNA) has an informatically identified DNA translocation operon. Deletion causes no detectable growth defect during propagation in a dilute agarose overlay. Identification of the DNA translocation operon begins with a DNA relaxase and continues with a translocase and membrane-binding anchor proteins. The relaxase is in a family, first identified here, with homologs in other bacteriophages. The second deleted island (3.71% of the genome) has genes for two metallo-protein chaperonins and two tRNAs. Deletion causes a significant growth defect. In addition, (1) we find by “in situ” (in-plaque) single-particle fluorescence microscopy that adsorption to the host occurs at the tip of the 486 nm long tail, (2) we develop a procedure of 0305ϕ8-36 purification that does not cause tail contraction, and (3) we then find by electron microscopy that 0305ϕ8-36 undergoes tail tip-tail tip dimerization that potentially blocks adsorption to host cells, presumably with effectiveness that increases as the bacteriophage particle concentration increases. These observations provide an explanation of the previous observation that 0305ϕ8-36 does not lyse liquid cultures, even though 0305ϕ8-36 is genomically lytic. PMID:22666654

  7. Blood-based protein biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doecke, James D; Laws, Simon M; Faux, Noel G; Wilson, William; Burnham, Samantha C; Lam, Chiou-Peng; Mondal, Alinda; Bedo, Justin; Bush, Ashley I; Brown, Belinda; De Ruyck, Karl; Ellis, Kathryn A; Fowler, Christopher; Gupta, Veer B; Head, Richard; Macaulay, S Lance; Pertile, Kelly; Rowe, Christopher C; Rembach, Alan; Rodrigues, Mark; Rumble, Rebecca; Szoeke, Cassandra; Taddei, Kevin; Taddei, Tania; Trounson, Brett; Ames, David; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N

    2012-10-01

    To identify plasma biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Baseline plasma screening of 151 multiplexed analytes combined with targeted biomarker and clinical pathology data. General community-based, prospective, longitudinal study of aging. A total of 754 healthy individuals serving as controls and 207 participants with AD from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle study (AIBL) cohort with identified biomarkers that were validated in 58 healthy controls and 112 individuals with AD from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. A biomarker panel was identified that included markers significantly increased (cortisol, pancreatic polypeptide, insulinlike growth factor binding protein 2, β(2) microglobulin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, carcinoembryonic antigen, matrix metalloprotein 2, CD40, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, superoxide dismutase, and homocysteine) and decreased (apolipoprotein E, epidermal growth factor receptor, hemoglobin, calcium, zinc, interleukin 17, and albumin) in AD. Cross-validated accuracy measures from the AIBL cohort reached a mean (SD) of 85% (3.0%) for sensitivity and specificity and 93% (3.0) for the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. A second validation using the ADNI cohort attained accuracy measures of 80% (3.0%) for sensitivity and specificity and 85% (3.0) for area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This study identified a panel of plasma biomarkers that distinguish individuals with AD from cognitively healthy control subjects with high sensitivity and specificity. Cross-validation within the AIBL cohort and further validation within the ADNI cohort provides strong evidence that the identified biomarkers are important for AD diagnosis.

  8. Relation between some environmental pollutants and recurrent spontaneous abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza A. Saad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive health is exquisitely sensitive to characteristics of an individual’s environment including physical, biological, behavioral, cultural and socioeconomic factors. This study was launched to elucidate the effect of the exposure to chemical pollutants as aromatic amines viz. (benzidine, mono-acetyl benzidine, diacetyl benzidine, α,β-naphthylamine as well as the biological pollutants e.g., human cytomegalovirus (HCMV as risk factors for recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA through determination of MDA as a marker of oxidative stress and determination of some antioxidant markers. The results of the current study revealed that the aborter mothers were being exposed to environmental pollutants as aromatic amines which were manifested by the presence of benzidine, mono-acetyl-benzidine, di-acetyl-benzidine, α,β-naphthylamine in most of their urine samples, where the level of aromatic amines were more 13.6, 10, 15, and 4-folds than the control group, respectively. Also, the data suggest that in early pregnancy failure there is an increase in markers of oxidative stress and a probable decrease in maternal antioxidant defenses (22 nmol/ml and 17 mg/l, 550 U/l, respectively. Generation of ROS in large quantities, in the first trimester placenta which has limited antioxidant defenses may cause DNA damage, oxidation of protein and lipid resulting in extensive cell death. Also, it was demonstrated that high elevation of HCMV inhibits cytotrophoblasts proliferation, migration invasion and matrix metalloproteins (MMP expression. Obviously, placental toxicological responses are partly due to pharmaco/toxico dynamic responses to the chemicals. Conclusively, the aforementioned findings emphasis that, the exposures to environmental chemical and/or biological risk factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

  9. Molecular biology of microbial hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignais, P M; Colbeau, A

    2004-07-01

    Hydrogenases (H2ases) are metalloproteins. The great majority of them contain iron-sulfur clusters and two metal atoms at their active center, either a Ni and an Fe atom, the [NiFe]-H2ases, or two Fe atoms, the [FeFe]-H2ases. Enzymes of these two classes catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen gas (H2 2 H+ + 2 e-) and play a central role in microbial energy metabolism; in addition to their role in fermentation and H2 respiration, H2ases may interact with membrane-bound electron transport systems in order to maintain redox poise, particularly in some photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria. Recent work has revealed that some H2ases, by acting as H2-sensors, participate in the regulation of gene expression and that H2-evolving H2ases, thought to be involved in purely fermentative processes, play a role in membrane-linked energy conservation through the generation of a protonmotive force. The Hmd hydrogenases of some methanogenic archaea constitute a third class of H2ases, characterized by the absence of Fe-S cluster and the presence of an iron-containing cofactor with catalytic properties different from those of [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-H2ases. In this review, we emphasise recent advances that have greatly increased our knowledge of microbial H2ases, their diversity, the structure of their active site, how the metallocenters are synthesized and assembled, how they function, how the synthesis of these enzymes is controlled by external signals, and their potential use in biological H2 production.

  10. Comparative genomic analyses of nickel, cobalt and vitamin B12 utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co are trace elements required for a variety of biological processes. Ni is directly coordinated by proteins, whereas Co is mainly used as a component of vitamin B12. Although a number of Ni and Co-dependent enzymes have been characterized, systematic evolutionary analyses of utilization of these metals are limited. Results We carried out comparative genomic analyses to examine occurrence and evolutionary dynamics of the use of Ni and Co at the level of (i transport systems, and (ii metalloproteomes. Our data show that both metals are widely used in bacteria and archaea. Cbi/NikMNQO is the most common prokaryotic Ni/Co transporter, while Ni-dependent urease and Ni-Fe hydrogenase, and B12-dependent methionine synthase (MetH, ribonucleotide reductase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase are the most widespread metalloproteins for Ni and Co, respectively. Occurrence of other metalloenzymes showed a mosaic distribution and a new B12-dependent protein family was predicted. Deltaproteobacteria and Methanosarcina generally have larger Ni- and Co-dependent proteomes. On the other hand, utilization of these two metals is limited in eukaryotes, and very few of these organisms utilize both of them. The Ni-utilizing eukaryotes are mostly fungi (except saccharomycotina and plants, whereas most B12-utilizing organisms are animals. The NiCoT transporter family is the most widespread eukaryotic Ni transporter, and eukaryotic urease and MetH are the most common Ni- and B12-dependent enzymes, respectively. Finally, investigation of environmental and other conditions and identity of organisms that show dependence on Ni or Co revealed that host-associated organisms (particularly obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have a tendency for loss of Ni/Co utilization. Conclusion Our data provide information on the evolutionary dynamics of Ni and Co utilization and highlight widespread use of these metals in the three

  11. Study of interactions between metal ions and protein model compounds by energy decomposition analyses and the AMOEBA force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhifeng; Qi, Rui; Liu, Chengwen; Ren, Pengyu

    2017-10-01

    The interactions between metal ions and proteins are ubiquitous in biology. The selective binding of metal ions has a variety of regulatory functions. Therefore, there is a need to understand the mechanism of protein-ion binding. The interactions involving metal ions are complicated in nature, where short-range charge-penetration, charge transfer, polarization, and many-body effects all contribute significantly, and a quantitative description of all these interactions is lacking. In addition, it is unclear how well current polarizable force fields can capture these energy terms and whether these polarization models are good enough to describe the many-body effects. In this work, two energy decomposition methods, absolutely localized molecular orbitals and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, were utilized to study the interactions between Mg2+/Ca2+ and model compounds for amino acids. Comparison of individual interaction components revealed that while there are significant charge-penetration and charge-transfer effects in Ca complexes, these effects can be captured by the van der Waals (vdW) term in the AMOEBA force field. The electrostatic interaction in Mg complexes is well described by AMOEBA since the charge penetration is small, but the distance-dependent polarization energy is problematic. Many-body effects were shown to be important for protein-ion binding. In the absence of many-body effects, highly charged binding pockets will be over-stabilized, and the pockets will always favor Mg and thus lose selectivity. Therefore, many-body effects must be incorporated in the force field in order to predict the structure and energetics of metalloproteins. Also, the many-body effects of charge transfer in Ca complexes were found to be non-negligible. The absorption of charge-transfer energy into the additive vdW term was a main source of error for the AMOEBA many-body interaction energies.

  12. Surface Induced Dissociation Coupled with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Unveils Heterogeneity of a 211 kDa Multicopper Oxidase Protein Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Romano, Christine A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2018-01-01

    Manganese oxidation is an important biogeochemical process that is largely regulated by bacteria through enzymatic reactions. However, the detailed mechanism is poorly understood due to challenges in isolating and characterizing these unknown enzymes. A manganese oxidase, Mnx, from Bacillus sp. PL-12 has been successfully overexpressed in active form as a protein complex with a molecular mass of 211 kDa. We have recently used surface induced dissociation (SID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to release and detect folded subcomplexes for determining subunit connectivity and quaternary structure. The data from the native mass spectrometry experiments led to a plausible structural model of this multicopper oxidase, which has been difficult to study by conventional structural biology methods. It was also revealed that each Mnx subunit binds a variable number of copper ions. Becasue of the heterogeneity of the protein and limited mass resolution, ambiguities in assigning some of the observed peaks remained as a barrier to fully understanding the role of metals and potential unknown ligands in Mnx. In this study, we performed SID in a modified Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The high mass accuracy and resolution offered by FTICR unveiled unexpected artificial modifications on the protein that had been previously thought to be iron bound species based on lower resolution spectra. Additionally, isotopically resolved spectra of the released subcomplexes revealed the metal binding stoichiometry at different structural levels. This method holds great potential for in-depth characterization of metalloproteins and protein-ligand complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. SCMHBP: prediction and analysis of heme binding proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Fan; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Srinivasulu, Yerukala; Vasylenko, Tamara; Lai, Shih-Chung; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chen, Yi-Hsiung; Huang, Hui-Ling; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Heme binding proteins (HBPs) are metalloproteins that contain a heme ligand (an iron-porphyrin complex) as the prosthetic group. Several computational methods have been proposed to predict heme binding residues and thereby to understand the interactions between heme and its host proteins. However, few in silico methods for identifying HBPs have been proposed. This work proposes a scoring card method (SCM) based method (named SCMHBP) for predicting and analyzing HBPs from sequences. A balanced dataset of 747 HBPs (selected using a Gene Ontology term GO:0020037) and 747 non-HBPs (selected from 91,414 putative non-HBPs) with an identity of 25% was firstly established. Consequently, a set of scores that quantified the propensity of amino acids and dipeptides to be HBPs is estimated using SCM to maximize the predictive accuracy of SCMHBP. Finally, the informative physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids are identified by utilizing the estimated propensity scores to be used to categorize HBPs. The training and mean test accuracies of SCMHBP applied to three independent test datasets are 85.90% and 71.57%, respectively. SCMHBP performs well relative to comparison with such methods as support vector machine (SVM), decision tree J48, and Bayes classifiers. The putative non-HBPs with high sequence propensity scores are potential HBPs, which can be further validated by experimental confirmation. The propensity scores of individual amino acids and dipeptides are examined to elucidate the interactions between heme and its host proteins. The following characteristics of HBPs are derived from the propensity scores: 1) aromatic side chains are important to the effectiveness of specific HBP functions; 2) a hydrophobic environment is important in the interaction between heme and binding sites; and 3) the whole HBP has low flexibility whereas the heme binding residues are relatively flexible. SCMHBP yields knowledge that improves our understanding of HBPs rather than merely

  14. Escherichia coli SufE sulfur transfer protein modulates the SufS cysteine desulfurase through allosteric conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Dai, Yuyuan; Outten, F Wayne; Busenlehner, Laura S

    2013-12-20

    Fe-S clusters are critical metallocofactors required for cell function. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is carried out by assembly machinery consisting of multiple proteins. Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins work together to mobilize sulfide and iron, form the nascent cluster, traffic the cluster to target metalloproteins, and regulate the assembly machinery in response to cellular Fe-S cluster demand. A complex series of protein-protein interactions is required for the assembly machinery to function properly. Despite considerable progress in obtaining static three-dimensional structures of the assembly proteins, little is known about transient protein-protein interactions during cluster assembly or the role of protein dynamics in the cluster assembly process. The Escherichia coli cysteine desulfurase SufS (EC 2.8.1.7) and its accessory protein SufE work together to mobilize persulfide from L-cysteine, which is then donated to the SufB Fe-S cluster scaffold. Here we use amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize SufS-SufE interactions and protein dynamics in solution. HDX-MS analysis shows that SufE binds near the SufS active site to accept persulfide from Cys-364. Furthermore, SufE binding initiates allosteric changes in other parts of the SufS structure that likely affect SufS catalysis and alter SufS monomer-monomer interactions. SufE enhances the initial l-cysteine substrate binding to SufS and formation of the external aldimine with pyridoxal phosphate required for early steps in SufS catalysis. Together, these results provide a new picture of the SufS-SufE sulfur transferase pathway and suggest a more active role for SufE in promoting the SufS cysteine desulfurase reaction for Fe-S cluster assembly.

  15. Kinetic and mechanistic considerations to assess the biological fate of peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, Sebastián; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Peroxynitrite, the product of the reaction between superoxide radicals and nitric oxide, is an elusive oxidant with a short half-life and a low steady-state concentration in biological systems; it promotes nitroxidative damage. We will consider kinetic and mechanistic aspects that allow rationalizing the biological fate of peroxynitrite from data obtained by a combination of methods that include fast kinetic techniques, electron paramagnetic resonance and kinetic simulations. In addition, we provide a quantitative analysis of peroxynitrite production rates and conceivable steady-state levels in living systems. The preferential reactions of peroxynitrite in vivo include those with carbon dioxide, thiols and metalloproteins; its homolysis represents only peroxynitrite consumption leading to the formation of strong one-electron oxidants, carbonate radicals and nitrogen dioxide. On the other hand, peroxynitrite is rapidly reduced by peroxiredoxins, which represent efficient thiol-based peroxynitrite detoxification systems. Glutathione, present at mM concentration in cells and frequently considered a direct scavenger of peroxynitrite, does not react sufficiently fast with it in vivo; glutathione mainly inhibits peroxynitrite-dependent processes by reactions with secondary radicals. The detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine, a molecular footprint, can demonstrate peroxynitrite formation in vivo. Basal peroxynitrite formation rates in cells can be estimated in the order of 0.1 to 0.5μMs(-1) and its steady-state concentration at ~1nM. The analysis provides a handle to predict the preferential fate and steady-state levels of peroxynitrite in living systems. This is useful to understand pathophysiological aspects and pharmacological prospects connected to peroxynitrite. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and biophysics of membrane proteins. Guest Editor: Christine Winterbourn. © 2013.

  16. Cadmium-113 NMR spin-lattice relaxation and exchange kinetics in concanavalin A: A double saturation transfer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Yang, Ping P.; Palmert, Allen R.

    The field dependence of the 113Cd relaxation rate in cadmium-substituted Concanavalin A was investigated at three magnetic field strengths, 2.3, 4.7, and 9.4 T. Because of the anomalously large relaxation rate observed for the resonance corresponding to free cadmium in the system and our prior knowledge that cadmium is undergoing chemical exchange in this system, a detailed analysis was undertaken of the relaxation data obtained at 9.4 T to investigate the relative importance of chemical exchange dynamics upon the observed relaxation time constants. The differential equations for the resulting restricted three-site exchange network can be solved in closed form by employing a double saturation transfer experiment in conjunction with a saturation-recovery T1 experiment. The analysis of these data demonstrate that chemical exchange processes contribute 14, 75, and 20% to the observed relaxation time constants for the 113Cd resonances for the S1 site, free cadmium and the S2 site respectively. If the possibility of exchange contributions to the NOE were ignored, then the observed field dependence of T1 could not be discussed in terms of conventional single correlation time theories of relaxation. In this case the data could be discussed in terms of correlation times involving overall motion of the protein coupled with correlation times describing "internal motions." These internal motions may be the result of the formation of "abortive" complexes with exogenous ligands for those metalloproteins where the metal can be readily removed from the protein. However, for Con A, it is shown that the weak field dependence observed for the heteronuclear NOE is not due to internal motions, but rather to exchange processes.

  17. Role of Metallothionein in Post-Burn Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yongjun; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Xuefeng; Chen, Xuelian; Liu, Hairong; Liu, Yueming

    2016-04-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of low molecular-weight and cysteine-rich metalloproteins that regulate metal metabolism and protect cells from oxygen free radicals. Recent studies suggested that MTs have some anti-inflammatory effects. However, the role of MTs in post-burn inflammation remains unclear. This study is designed to investigate the role of MTs in post-burn inflammation in a mouse burn model. MT-I/II null (-/-) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice were randomly divided into sham burn, burn, Zn treated, and Zn-MT-2 treated groups. The inflammatory cytokines levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was determined by spectrophotometry. In in vitro study, exogenous MT-2 was added to macrophages that were stimulated with burn serum in the presence or absence of a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. The IL-6 and TNF-α messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of p38 expression were determined by Western blot. Burn induced increased inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factors-α, and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 production in burn wound and serum. The MPO activities in the lung and heart were also increased after burn. These effects were significantly more prominent in MT (-/-) mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, these effects were inhibited by administration of exogenous MT-2 to both WT and MT (-/-) mice. Exogenous MT-2 inhibited the p38 expression and abrogated the increase of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression from macrophages that were stimulated with burn serum. The effect of MT-2 was not further strengthened in the presence of SB203580. MTs may have a protective role against post-burn inflammation and inflammatory organ damage, at least partly through inhibiting the p38 MAPK signaling.

  18. Recent advances in cytochrome c biosensing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Pandiaraj; Kaushik, Ajeet; Karunakaran, Chandran; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2017-01-15

    This review is an attempt, for the first time, to describe advancements in sensing technology for cytochrome c (cyt c) detection, at point-of-care (POC) application. Cyt c, a heme containing metalloprotein is located in the intermembrane space of mitochondria and released into bloodstream during pathological conditions. The release of cyt c from mitochondria is a key initiative step in the activation of cell death pathways. Circulating cyt c levels represents a novel in-vivo marker of mitochondrial injury after resuscitation from heart failure and chemotherapy. Thus, cyt c detection is not only serving as an apoptosis biomarker, but also is of great importance to understand certain diseases at cellular level. Various existing techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), Western blot, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), spectrophotometry and flow cytometry have been used to estimate cyt c. However, the implementation of these techniques at POC application is limited due to longer analysis time, expensive instruments and expertise needed for operation. To overcome these challenges, significant efforts are being made to develop electrochemical biosensing technologies for fast, accurate, selective, and sensitive detection of cyt c. Presented review describes the cutting edge technologies available in the laboratories to detect cyt c. The recent advancements in designing and development of electrochemical cyt c biosensors for the quantification of cyt c are also discussed. This review also highlights the POC cyt c biosensors developed recently, that would prove of interest to biologist and therapist to get real time informatics needed to evaluate death process, diseases progression, therapeutics and processes related with mitochondrial injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ferric complexes of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinones characterized by density functional theory and Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Safařík, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2012-04-16

    Deferiprone and other 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinones are used in metal chelation therapy of iron overload. To investigate the structure and stability of these compounds in the natural aqueous environment, ferric complexes of deferiprone and amino acid maltol conjugates were synthesized and studied by computational and optical spectroscopic methods. The complexation caused characteristic intensity changes, a 300× overall enhancement of the Raman spectrum, and minor changes in UV-vis absorption. The spectra were interpreted on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals with CPCM solvent model were found to be the most suitable for simulations of the UV-vis spectra, whereas B3LYP, B3LYPD, B3PW91, M05-2X, M06, LC-BLYP, ωB97XD, and CAM-B3LYP functionals were all useful for simulation of the Raman scattering. Characteristic Raman band frequencies for 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinones were assigned to molecular vibrations. The computed conformer energies consistently suggest the presence of another isomer of the deferiprone-ferric complex in solution, in addition to that found previously by X-ray crystallography. However, the UV-vis and Raman spectra of the two species are similar and could not be resolved. In comparison to UV-vis, the Raman spectra and their combination with calculations appear more promising for future studies of iron sequestrating drugs and artificial metalloproteins as they are more sensitive to structural details. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. A cleanroom sleeping environment's impact on markers of oxidative stress, immune dysregulation, and behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Scott; Zinn, Gregory M; Boggess, Andrew; Fahrenholz, Timothy; Kern, John C; Kingston, H M Skip

    2015-03-19

    An emerging paradigm suggests children with autism display a unique pattern of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic triggers that make them susceptible to developing dysfunctional heavy metal and chemical detoxification systems. These abnormalities could be caused by alterations in the methylation, sulfation, and metalloprotein pathways. This study sought to evaluate the physiological and behavioral effects of children with autism sleeping in an International Organization for Standardization Class 5 cleanroom. Ten children with autism, ages 3-12, slept in a cleanroom for two weeks to evaluate changes in toxin levels, oxidative stress, immune dysregulation, and behavior. Before and after the children slept in the cleanroom, samples of blood and hair and rating scale scores were obtained to assess these changes. Five children significantly lowered their concentration of oxidized glutathione, a biomarker of oxidative stress. The younger cohort, age 5 and under, showed significantly greater mean decreases in two markers of immune dysregulation, CD3% and CD4%, than the older cohort. Changes in serum magnesium, influencing neuronal regulation, correlated negatively while changes in serum iron, affecting oxygenation of tissues, correlated positively with age. Changes in serum benzene and PCB 28 concentrations showed significant negative correlations with age. The younger children demonstrated significant improvements on behavioral rating scales compared to the older children. In a younger pair of identical twins, one twin showed significantly greater improvements in 4 out of 5 markers of oxidative stress, which corresponded with better overall behavioral rating scale scores than the other twin. Younger children who slept in the cleanroom altered elemental levels, decreased immune dysregulation, and improved behavioral rating scales, suggesting that their detoxification metabolism was briefly enhanced. The older children displayed a worsening in behavioral rating scale

  1. The teratogenicity of cadmium-metallothionein in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, M.; Holt, D.; Brown, N.; Hard, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    A single dose in the range 0.25-1.9 mg metallothionein-bound cadmium (MT-Cd)/kg body weight, when administered parenterally to the rat between day 8 and day 14 of gestation, is teratogenic. In vitro, the development of the isolated rat conceptus is unaffected by the addition of 1.5 μM MT-Cd to the culture medium whereas the same concentration of ionic Cd (as CdCl 2 ) is lethal. At short times after injection of 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight on gd 12, the maximal foetal and placental contents of Cd are low in comparison with those after a teratogenic dose of CdCl 2 and are of the same order as those in the embryo and placenta + yolk sac of the rat conceptus, cultured in the presence of the highest no-effect concentration of CdCl 2 . From this evidence, it is concluded that the uptake by the conceptus in vivo of either CdMT, or of Cd liberated therefrom, is unlikely to contribute to the teratogenic response. In the pregnant, as in the non-pregnant rat, the kidney appears to be the only organ that is affected directly by the metalloprotein. All doses in the range 0.25-1.0 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight are nephrotoxic and result in prolonged anorexia in the pregnant animal. While some of the foetal deformities that occur in the CdMT-dosed animal seem to be direct consequences of the renal dysfunction, others apparently are secondary to the maternal anorexia. In rats that are injected i.p on gd 12 with 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg renal uptake of Cd is slower, but the final concentration is higher than in animals that are given the same dose i.v. At this and the higher dose levels structural and/or functional damage to the kidneys also is greater in i.p.-, than in i.v.-dosed animals. The incidence of foetal malformations, however, is similar in the i.p. and i.v. groups and varies little over the dose range. (orig./MG)

  2. A New Sample Substrate for Imaging and Correlating Organic and Trace Metal Composition in Biological Cells and Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.; Wang, Q.; Smith, R.; Zhong, H.; Elliott, D.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes involve alterations in the chemical makeup of tissue. Synchrotron-based infrared (IR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopes are becoming increasingly popular tools for imaging the organic and trace metal compositions of biological materials, respectively, without the need for extrinsic labels or stains. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) provides chemical information on the organic components of a material at a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 2-10 μm in the mid-infrared region. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe is a complementary technique used to probe trace element content in the same systems with a similar spatial resolution. However to be most beneficial, it is important to combine the results from both imaging techniques on a single sample, which requires precise overlap of the IR and X-ray images. In this work, we have developed a sample substrate containing a gold grid pattern on its surface, which can be imaged with both the IR and X-ray microscopes. The substrate consists of a low trace element glass slide that has a gold grid patterned on its surface, where the major and minor parts of the grid contain 25 and 12 nm gold, respectively. This grid pattern can be imaged with the IR microscope because the reflectivity of gold differs as a function of thickness. The pattern can also be imaged with the SXRF microprobe because the Au fluorescence intensity changes with gold thickness. The tissue sample is placed on top of the patterned substrate. The grid pattern's IR reflectivity image and the gold SXRF image are used as fiducial markers for spatially overlapping the IR and SXRF images from the tissue. Results show that IR and X-ray images can be correlated precisely, with a spatial resolution of less than one pixel (i.e., 2-3 microns). The development of this new tool will be presented along with applications to paraffin-embedded metalloprotein crystals, Alzheimer's disease, and hair

  3. Substrate and Lewis Acid Coordination Promote O-O Bond Cleavage of an Unreactive L2CuII2(O22-) Species to Form L2CuIII2(O)2 Cores with Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Cowley, Ryan E; Díaz, Daniel E; Peterson, Ryan L; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-03-01

    Copper-dependent metalloenzymes are widespread throughout metabolic pathways, coupling the reduction of O 2 with the oxidation of organic substrates. Small-molecule synthetic analogs are useful platforms to generate L/Cu/O 2 species that reproduce the structural, spectroscopic, and reactive properties of some copper-/O 2 -dependent enzymes. Landmark studies have shown that the conversion between dicopper(II)-peroxo species (L 2 Cu II 2 (O 2 2- ) either side-on peroxo, S P, or end-on trans-peroxo, T P) and dicopper(III)-bis(μ-oxo) (L 2 Cu III 2 (O 2- ) 2 : O) can be controlled through ligand design, reaction conditions (temperature, solvent, and counteranion), or substrate coordination. We recently published ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 , 8513 , DOI: 10.1021/ja300674m ) the crystal structure of an unusual S P species [(MeAN) 2 Cu II 2 (O 2 2- )] 2+ ( S P MeAN , MeAN: N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) that featured an elongated O-O bond but did not lead to O-O cleavage or reactivity toward external substrates. Herein, we report that S P MeAN can be activated to generate O MeAN and perform the oxidation of external substrates by two complementary strategies: (i) coordination of substituted sodium phenolates to form the substrate-bound O MeAN -RPhO - species that leads to ortho-hydroxylation in a tyrosinase-like fashion and (ii) addition of stoichiometric amounts (1 or 2 equiv) of Lewis acids (LA's) to form an unprecedented series of O-type species (O MeAN -LA) able to oxidize C-H and O-H bonds. Spectroscopic, computational, and mechanistic studies emphasize the unique plasticity of the S P MeAN core, which combines the assembly of exogenous reagents in the primary (phenolates) and secondary (Lewis acids association to the MeAN ligand) coordination spheres with O-O cleavage. These findings are reminiscent of the strategy followed by several metalloproteins and highlight the possible implication of O-type species in copper-/dioxygen-dependent enzymes

  4. Highly selective BSA imprinted polyacrylamide hydrogels facilitated by a metal-coding MIP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharif, H F; Yapati, H; Kalluru, S; Reddy, S M

    2015-12-01

    We report the fabrication of metal-coded molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using hydrogel-based protein imprinting techniques. A Co(II) complex was prepared using (E)-2-((2 hydrazide-(4-vinylbenzyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol; along with iron(III) chloroprotoporphyrin (Hemin), vinylferrocene (VFc), zinc(II) protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin (PP), these complexes were introduced into the MIPs as co-monomers for metal-coding of non-metalloprotein imprints. Results indicate a 66% enhancement for bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein binding capacities (Q, mg/g) via metal-ion/ligand exchange properties within the metal-coded MIPs. Specifically, Co(II)-complex-based MIPs exhibited 92 ± 1% specific binding with Q values of 5.7 ± 0.45 mg BSA/g polymer and imprinting factors (IF) of 14.8 ± 1.9 (MIP/non-imprinted (NIP) control). The selectivity of our Co(II)-coded BSA MIPs were also tested using bovine haemoglobin (BHb), lysozyme (Lyz), and trypsin (Tryp). By evaluating imprinting factors (K), each of the latter proteins was found to have lower affinities in comparison to cognate BSA template. The hydrogels were further characterised by thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to assess optimum polymer composition. The development of hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymer (HydroMIPs) technology for the memory imprinting of proteins and for protein biosensor development presents many possibilities, including uses in bio-sample clean-up or selective extraction, replacement of biological antibodies in immunoassays and biosensors for medicine and the environment. Biosensors for proteins and viruses are currently expensive to develop because they require the use of expensive antibodies. Because of their biomimicry capabilities (and their potential to act as synthetic antibodies), HydroMIPs potentially offer a route to the development of new low-cost biosensors. Herein, a metal ion-mediated imprinting approach was employed to metal-code our

  5. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  6. Using tyrosinase as a monophenol monooxygenase: A combined strategy for effective inhibition of melanin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Baek, Kiheon; Lee, Ju-Eun; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-04-01

    Tyrosinase is a binuclear copper-containing metalloprotein that leads the fast and regio-selective o-hydroxylation of monophenols to o-diphenols. However, the subsequent second oxidation to produce o-quinones, i.e., melanin precursors, from the o-diphenols has restricted its use to the production of functional o-diphenol derivatives. Herein, we present a combined strategy for the effective inhibition of melanin formation in tyrosinase reaction, which allows the use of tyrosinase as a monophenol monooxygenase. The o-diphenolic products were protected from being oxidized in the tyrosinase reaction by borate ions and L-ascorbic acid (LAA). Borate-o-diphenol complexes were favorable formed at high pH and consequentially protected the o-diphenolic products from the catecholase activity of tyrosinase. LAA not only directly reduced the byproduct, o-quinones, into o-diphenols but also assisted the completion of the tyrosinase reaction cycle by removing a hydroxyl group attached to the copper metal cluster at the active site of the met-form tyrosinase. The regio-selective o-hydroxylation of 7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone (daidzein) to produce 7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (3'-ODI) was successfully carried out by whole E. coli cell biotransformation with heterologously expressed tyrosinase from Bacillus megaterium. The yield of this o-hydroxylation of 5 mM daidzein in one-pot 400 mL reaction was ca. 100% in 90 min and the productivity was 16.3 mg 3'-ODI · L(-1)  ·  h(-1)  ·  DCW mg(-1), which is considerably higher than that of other monooxygenases. The method effectively abolished melanin synthesis, so that the o-diphenolic product remained stable without enzyme inactivation. Other monophenolic phytochemicals such as resveratrol and genistein could be subjected to the same strategy. After 1 h, 1 mM of genistein and resveratrol were both converted to orobol and piceatannol, respectively, with ca. 95% conversion yield. These results support the strong

  7. COMe: the ontology of bioinorganic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contrino Sergio

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many characterised proteins contain metal ions, small organic molecules or modified residues. In contrast, the huge amount of data generated by genome projects consists exclusively of sequences with almost no annotation. One of the goals of the structural genomics initiative is to provide representative three-dimensional (3-D structures for as many protein/domain folds as possible to allow successful homology modelling. However, important functional features such as metal co-ordination or a type of prosthetic group are not always conserved in homologous proteins. So far, the problem of correct annotation of bioinorganic proteins has been largely ignored by the bioinformatics community and information on bioinorganic centres obtained by methods other than crystallography or NMR is only available in literature databases. Results COMe (Co-Ordination of Metals represents the ontology for bioinorganic and other small molecule centres in complex proteins. COMe consists of three types of entities: 'bioinorganic motif' (BIM, 'molecule' (MOL, and 'complex proteins' (PRX, with each entity being assigned a unique identifier. A BIM consists of at least one centre (metal atom, inorganic cluster, organic molecule and two or more endogenous and/or exogenous ligands. BIMs are represented as one-dimensional (1-D strings and 2-D diagrams. A MOL entity represents a 'small molecule' which, when in complex with one or more polypeptides, forms a functional protein. The PRX entities refer to the functional proteins as well as to separate protein domains and subunits. The complex proteins in COMe are subdivided into three categories: (i metalloproteins, (ii organic prosthetic group proteins and (iii modified amino acid proteins. The data are currently stored in both XML format and a relational database and are available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/come/. Conclusion COMe provides the classification of proteins according to their 'bioinorganic' features

  8. Bidirectional Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ruthenium(II)-Tris-bipyridyl-Modified PpcA, a Multi-heme c -Type Cytochrome from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokhan, Oleksandr; Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Schiffer, Marianne; Mulfort, Karen L.; Tiede, David. M.

    2015-06-18

    metalloprotein designs that support multiple electron transfer redox chemistry.

  9. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifácio, Cecília; Auchère, Françoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J., E-mail: mromao@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu Kα X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 Å, β = 106.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.60 Å resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 Å, β = 104.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.55 Å. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (λ = 1.542 Å) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  10. Apoprotein Structure and Metal Binding Characterization of a de Novo Designed Peptide, α3DIV, that Sequesters Toxic Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Dzul, Stephen P; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Stemmler, Timothy L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-05-12

    De novo protein design is a biologically relevant approach that provides a novel process in elucidating protein folding and modeling the metal centers of metalloproteins in a completely unrelated or simplified fold. An integral step in de novo protein design is the establishment of a well-folded scaffold with one conformation, which is a fundamental characteristic of many native proteins. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of apo α3DIV at pH 7.0, a de novo designed three-helix bundle peptide containing a triscysteine motif (Cys18, Cys28, and Cys67) that binds toxic heavy metals. The structure comprises 1067 NOE restraints derived from multinuclear multidimensional NOESY, as well as 138 dihedral angles (ψ, φ, and χ1). The backbone and heavy atoms of the 20 lowest energy structures have a root mean square deviation from the mean structure of 0.79 (0.16) Å and 1.31 (0.15) Å, respectively. When compared to the parent structure α3D, the substitution of Leu residues to Cys enhanced the α-helical content of α3DIV while maintaining the same overall topology and fold. In addition, solution studies on the metalated species illustrated metal-induced stability. An increase in the melting temperatures was observed for Hg(II), Pb(II), or Cd(II) bound α3DIV by 18-24 °C compared to its apo counterpart. Further, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis on Hg(II)-α3DIV produced an average Hg(II)-S bond length at 2.36 Å, indicating a trigonal T-shaped coordination environment. Overall, the structure of apo α3DIV reveals an asymmetric distorted triscysteine metal binding site, which offers a model for native metalloregulatory proteins with thiol-rich ligands that function in regulating toxic heavy metals, such as ArsR, CadC, MerR, and PbrR.

  11. Surface Redox Chemistry of Immobilized Nanodiamond: Effects of Particle Size and Electrochemical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; McDonald, B.; Carrizosa, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    processes in the presence of specific redox-active molecules via feedback mechanism. Apparently, FcMeOH+ tended to have electrostatic affinity for negatively charged ND surface functionalities, corroborated by present experiments. We also attempted to study biocatalytic process using model metalloprotein (cytochrome c; Cyt c) immobilized on ND particles for investigating interfacial electron transfer kinetics and compared with those of functionalized graphene (graphene oxide; GO and reduced GO). The findings are discussed in terms of interplay of sp 3-bonded C (ND core) and sp 2-bonded C (ND shell and graphene-based systems).

  12. Teratogenicity of cadmium-metallothionein in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, M.; Holt, D.; Brown, N.; Hard, G.C.

    1988-06-01

    A single dose in the range 0.25-1.9 mg metallothionein-bound cadmium (MT-Cd)/kg body weight, when administered parenterally to the rat between day 8 and day 14 of gestation, is teratogenic. In vitro, the development of the isolated rat conceptus is unaffected by the addition of 1.5 ..mu..M MT-Cd to the culture medium whereas the same concentration of ionic Cd (as CdCl/sub 2/) is lethal. At short times after injection of 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight on gd 12, the maximal foetal and placental contents of Cd are low in comparison with those after a teratogenic dose of CdCl/sub 2/ and are of the same order as those in the embryo and placenta + yolk sac of the rat conceptus, cultured in the presence of the highest no-effect concentration of CdCl/sub 2/. From this evidence, it is concluded that the uptake by the conceptus in vivo of either CdMT, or of Cd liberated therefrom, is unlikely to contribute to the teratogenic response. In the pregnant, as in the non-pregnant rat, the kidney appears to be the only organ that is affected directly by the metalloprotein. All doses in the range 0.25-1.0 mg MT-Cd/kg body weight are nephrotoxic and result in prolonged anorexia in the pregnant animal. While some of the foetal deformities that occur in the CdMT-dosed animal seem to be direct consequences of the renal dysfunction, others apparently are secondary to the maternal anorexia. In rats that are injected i.p on gd 12 with 0.25 mg MT-Cd/kg renal uptake of Cd is slower, but the final concentration is higher than in animals that are given the same dose i.v. At this and the higher dose levels structural and/or functional damage to the kidneys also is greater in i.p.-, than in i.v.-dosed animals. The incidence of foetal malformations, however, is similar in the i.p. and i.v. groups and varies little over the dose range.

  13. Physiological impacts of acute Cu exposure on deep-sea vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus under a deep-sea mining activity scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Inês; Goulart, Joana; Martins, Eva; Morales-Román, Rosa; Marín, Sergio; Riou, Virginie; Colaço, Ana; Bettencourt, Raul

    2017-12-01

    Over the past years, several studies have been dedicated to understanding the physiological ability of the vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus to overcome the high metal concentrations present in their surrounding hydrothermal environment. Potential deep-sea mining activities at Azores Triple junction hydrothermal vent deposits would inevitably lead to the emergence of new fluid sources close to mussel beds, with consequent emission of high metal concentrations and potential resolubilization of Cu from minerals formed during the active phase of the vent field. Copper is an essential metal playing a key role in the activation of metalloenzymes and metalloproteins responsible for important cellular metabolic processes and tissue homeostasis. However, excessive intracellular amounts of reactive Cu ions may cause irreversible damages triggering possible cell apoptosis. In the present study, B. azoricus was exposed to increasing concentrations of Cu for 96h in conditions of temperature and hydrostatic pressure similar to those experienced at the Lucky Strike hydrothermal vent field. Specimens were kept in 1L flasks, exposed to four Cu concentrations: 0μg/L (control), 300, 800 and 1600μg/L and pressurized to 1750bar. We addressed the question of how increased Cu concentration would affect the function of antioxidant defense proteins and expression of antioxidant and immune-related genes in B. azoricus. Both antioxidant enzymatic activities and gene expression were examined in gills, mantle and digestive gland tissues of exposed vent mussels. Our study reveals that stressful short-term Cu exposure has a strong effect on molecular metabolism of the hydrothermal vent mussel, especially in gill tissue. Initially, both the stress caused by unpressurization or by Cu exposure was associated with high antioxidant enzyme activities and tissue-specific transcriptional up-regulation. However, mussels exposed to increased Cu concentrations showed both antioxidant and immune

  14. Quantification of trace elements in protein bands by synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence after isoelectric focusing separation of human hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yuxi; Chen Chunying; Li Bai; He Wei; Huang Yuying; Chai Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The role and effects of a trace element in a particular organism strongly depend on its particular chemical forms in which the element is present. Therefore, the bulk content or concentration of an element in the organism of interest is often meaningless in judging its biological significance. To understand bioavailability, transportation, cell uptake, metabolism, toxicity, and other biological behaviors of trace elements in the body, information is needed about speciation of trace element, especially about distribution of metal-containing proteins. Development of appropriate methods for speciation analysis is therefore required. Synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) is a sensitive method for multielemental analysis with detection limit of 10 ng/g. It has been successfully used for imaging and quantifying trace elements in various pathological and healthy tissues, even in a single cell, to help understand the mechanism of diseases and the biochemistry of elements. In our previous work, the technique was combined with electrophoresis to study distribution of metalloproteins in biological samples, but the quantitative analysis of trace elements in protein bands after electrophoresis was still unrealized. In this study, a procedure has been proposed for quantification of Fe, Cu, and Zn in protein bands with SRXRF analysis after isoelectric focusing (IEF) separation. Calibration standards were prepared by adding certain amounts of metal ions and free-metal proteins to electrophoresis gel. Human hemoglobin was separated with IEF, and Fe, Cu, and Zn in protein bands were analyzed by SRXRF. The calibration curves can be obtained in a range of 0-8 mg/kg metals and a linear relationship between dosage of metals and fluorescent intensity can be observed (r 2 > 0.99). The method provides the detection limits of 2.43, 1.12, and 0.96 mg/kg for Fe, Cu and Zn, and the recoveries of 90.4 and 115.7 % for Fe and Zn, respectively. The hyphenated technique of SRXRF and IEF

  15. Non-enzymatic modifications in metallothioneins connected to lipid membrane damages: structural and biomimetic studies under reductive radical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Carla; Melchiorre, Michele; Atrian, Silvia; Capdevila, Merce'

    2013-10-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins with the ability to coordinate heavy metal atoms through metal-thiolate bonds, which are widely distributed among the animal and plant kingdoms. Multifunctional roles for MTs have been proposed, including their ability to scavenger various radicals and reactive oxygen species. In the present article we summarize available information of four MT polypeptides from different organisms, forming metal complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) or Cu (I) ions. Non-enzymatic modifications of MTs under ionizing radiations and their consequences on the lipidic membrane compartment were studied by Raman spectroscopy and a biomimetic model, respectively. The latter is based on liposome technology and allows to measure the trans unsaturated fatty acid content as a result of reductive radical stress on MTs. The effect of radical stress on the cell metabolism and functions is a very active field of research connecting various disciplines in life sciences. In this contest tandem radical damage has been the subject of recent investigations that pointed out its harmfulness in the general scenario of establishing the consequences of radical stress. By using biomimetic models of tandem damage we have for the first time tested the capability of metallothioneins (MTs), small metalloproteins rich of Cys residues, to damage another cell compartment like lipid membranes when they are undergone to reductive radical stress. The connection of MT reactivity with membrane lipid transformation can give a contribution to the puzzling context of radical stress occurring to biomolecules and the role as biological signaling. To this purpose, MT polypeptides from different organisms, exhibiting different sequence peculiarities, have been analyzed here. The spectroscopic analysis of these systems has allowed to identify modifications affecting metal-thiolate clusters, cystines, and Met residues, acting as efficient interceptors of reducing radical species

  16. Azotobacter vinelandii metal storage protein: "classical" inorganic chemistry involved in Mo/W uptake and release processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemberg, Jörg; Schneider, Klaus; Fenske, Dirk; Müller, Achim

    2008-03-03

    The release of Mo (as molybdate) from the Mo storage protein (MoSto), which is unique among all existing metalloproteins, is strongly influenced by temperature and pH value; other factors (incubation time, protein concentration, degree of purity) have minor, though significant effects. A detailed pH titration at 12 degrees C revealed that three different steps can be distinguished for the Mo-release process. A proportion of approximately 15% at pH 6.8-7.0, an additional 25% at pH 7.2-7.5 and ca. 50% (up to 90% in total) at pH 7.6-7.8. This triphasic process supports the assumption of the presence of different types of molybdenum-oxide-based clusters that exhibit different pH lability. The complete release of Mo was achieved by increasing the temperature to 30 degrees C and the pH value to >7.5. The Mo-release process does not require ATP; on the contrary, ATP prevents, or at least reduces the degree of metal release, depending on the concentration of the nucleotide. From this point of view, the intracellular ATP concentration is suggested to play-in addition to the pH value-an indirect but crucial role in controlling the extent of Mo release in the cell. The binding of molybdenum to the apoprotein (reconstitution process) was confirmed to be directly dependent on the presence of a nucleotide (preferably ATP) and MgCl2. Maximal reincorporation of Mo required 1 mM ATP, which could partly be replaced by GTP. When the storage protein was purified in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 (1 mM each), the final preparation contained 80 Mo atoms per protein molecule. Maximal metal loading (110-115 atoms/MoSto molecule) was only achieved, if Mo was first completely released from the native protein and subsequently (re-) bound under optimal reconstitution conditions: 1 h incubation at pH 6.5 and 12 degrees C in the presence of ATP, MgCl2 and excess molybdate. A corresponding tungsten-containing storage protein ("WSto") could not only be synthesized in vivo by growing cells, but

  17. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    crystallography therefore remains the only approach where diffraction data can be collected at room temperature without radiation damage issues and the only approach to locate mobile or highly polarized H atoms and protons. Here a review of the current status of sub-atomic X-ray and neutron macromolecular crystallography is given and future prospects for combined approaches are outlined. New results from two metalloproteins, copper nitrite reductase and cytochrome c', are also included, which illustrate the type of information that can be obtained from sub-atomic-resolution (∼0.8 Å) X-ray structures, while also highlighting the need for complementary neutron studies that can provide details of H atoms not provided by X-ray crystallography.

  18. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    . Neutron crystallography therefore remains the only approach where diffraction data can be collected at room temperature without radiation damage issues and the only approach to locate mobile or highly polarized H atoms and protons. Here a review of the current status of sub-atomic X-ray and neutron macromolecular crystallography is given and future prospects for combined approaches are outlined. New results from two metalloproteins, copper nitrite reductase and cytochrome c′, are also included, which illustrate the type of information that can be obtained from sub-atomic-resolution (∼0.8 Å X-ray structures, while also highlighting the need for complementary neutron studies that can provide details of H atoms not provided by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP