WorldWideScience

Sample records for metallicity classical cepheids

  1. Resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuti, Mine; Aikawa, Toshiki

    1981-01-01

    To investigate resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids, the non-linear radial oscillation of stars is studied based on the assumption that the non-adiabatic perturbation is expressed in terms of van der Pol's type damping. Two- and three-wave resonance in this system is applied to classical cepheids to describe their bump and double-mode behavior. The phase of bump and the depression of amplitude are explained for bump cepheids. The double-periodicity is shown by the enhancement of the third overtone in three-wave resonance. Non-linear effect on resonant period is also discussed briefly. (author)

  2. Pulsation Models for Ultra-low (Z = 0.0004) Metallicity Classical Cepheids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Ramos, R. Contreras; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    Classical Cepheids are primary distance indicators playing a fundamental role in the calibration of the extragalactic distance scale. The possible dependence of their characteristic period-luminosity (PL) relation on chemical composition is still debated in the literature, and the behavior of these

  3. Classical Cepheids, what else?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bono, G.; Inno, L.; Matsunaga, N.; Genovali, K.; Lemasle, B.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present new and independent estimates of the distances to the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) using near-infrared (NIR) and optical-NIR period-Wesenheit (PW) relations. The slopes of the PW relations are, within the dispersion, linear over the entire period range and independent of metal content. The

  4. How rotation affects masses and ages of classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard I.; Ekström, Sylvia; Georgy, Cyril; Meynet, Georges; Saio, Hideyuki

    2017-09-01

    Classical Cepheid variable stars are both sensitive astrophysical laboratories and accurate cosmic distance tracers. We have recently investigated how the evolutionary effects of rotation impact the properties of these important stars and here provide an accessible overview of some key elements as well as two important consequences. Firstly, rotation resolves the long-standing Cepheid mass discrepancy problem. Second, rotation increases main sequence lifetimes, i.e, Cepheids are approximately twice as old as previously thought. Finally, we highlight the importance of the short-period ends of Cepheid period distributions as indicators for model adequacy.

  5. New NIR light-curve templates for classical Cepheids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inno, L.; Matsunaga, N.; Romaniello, M.; Bono, G.; Monson, A.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Persson, E.; Buonanno, R.; Freedman, W.; Gieren, W.; Groenewegen, M.A.T.; Ita, Y.; Laney, C.D.; Lemasle, B.; Madore, B.F.; Nagayama, T.; Nakada, Y.; Nonino, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Primas, F.; Scowcroft, V.; Soszyński, I.; Tanabé, T.; Udalski, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present new near-infrared (NIR) light-curve templates for fundamental (FU, J, H, KS) and first overtone (FO, J) classical Cepheids. The new templates together with period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit (PW) relations provide Cepheid distances from single-epoch observations with a precision

  6. Monitoring Period and Amplitude Changes in Classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Engle, Scott; Guinan, Edward; Wells, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Classical Cepheids are a specific class of radially pulsating variable stars and are fundamentally important to Astronomy and Cosmology. Their pulsations can be used to determine accurate distances, both inside the Milky Way and to other galaxies throughout the Universe, via the well-studied Period-Luminosity Relationship (the Leavitt Law). This makes Cepheids “standard candles,” and they are helping Astronomers refine the expansion rate and age of the Universe.Though Cepheid pulsations were long-theorized to be completely stable, we now know that they undergo small but observable changes in their pulsation periods. The rates of the period change give us invaluable information on the Cepheids themselves, and the advent of reliable all-sky photometry surveys has allowed Cepheid pulsations to be monitored more easily than ever before.Five Cepheids were analyzed for this study – AA Gem, BB Gem, RZ Gem, AD Gem, and DX Gem. Photometric data were obtained from two sources: ASAS (the All-Sky Automated Survey) and the RCT (Robotically Controlled Telescope) at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, whose consortium Villanova is a member of. This photometry is combined with available data from the literature. The two instruments combined give a longer time span, and increased precision, from which period variations can be monitored. This gives us an excellent look at how the pulsations of these 5 Cepheids are evolving over time. The pulsation behavior of the 5 Cepheids studies will be presented, along with their calculated stellar parameters.

  7. Long-period classical Cepheids - Theory versus observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, T. R.; Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    New full amplitude models of classical Cepheids having periods longer than 13 days have been calculated, allowing the complete systematics of the observed light and velocity curves of classical Cepheids to be discussed in detail. Assuming that a normal evolutionary mass-luminosity relation is obeyed, the models reproduce such empirical phenomena as the full Hertzsprung progression of light and velocity curves and the gradual shift in phase of the Hertzsprung bump, together with the persistence in phase of the postmaximum shoulder on the light curve. Also reproduced are the retardation of maximum expansion velocity after maximum light, the correlation of light and velocity amplitudes, and the period-amplitude scatter diagram for both the light and the velocity amplitude. The average period predicted for a Cepheid light curve type is noted to be about 40 percent longer than that actually observed.

  8. A Precision Determination of the Effect of Metallicity on Cepheid Absolute Magnitudes in VIJHK Bands from Magellanic Cloud Cepheids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielgórski, Piotr; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Zgirski, Bartłomiej; Graczyk, Dariusz [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Gieren, Wolfgang; Górski, Marek [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Storm, Jesper [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Matsunaga, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Soszyński, Igor, E-mail: pwielgor@camk.edu.pl [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, PL-00-478 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-20

    Using high-quality observed period–luminosity ( P – L ) relations in both Magellanic Clouds in the VIJHK s bands and optical and near-infrared Wesenheit indices, we determine the effect of metallicity on Cepheid P – L relations by comparing the relative distance between the LMC and SMC as determined from the Cepheids to the difference in distance between the Clouds that has been derived with very high accuracy from late-type eclipsing binary systems. Within an uncertainty of 3%, which is dominated by the uncertainty on the mean difference in metallicity between the Cepheid populations in the LMC and SMC, we find metallicity effects smaller than 2% in all bands and in the Wesenheit indices, consistent with a zero metallicity effect. This result is valid for the metallicity range from −0.35 dex to −0.75 dex corresponding to the mean [Fe/H] values for classical Cepheids in the LMC and SMC, respectively. Yet most Cepheids in galaxies beyond the Local Group and located in the less crowded outer regions of these galaxies do fall into this metallicity regime, making our result important for applications to determine the distances to spiral galaxies well beyond the Local Group. Our result supports previous findings that indicated a very small metallicity effect on the near-infrared absolute magnitudes of classical Cepheids, and resolves the dispute about the size and sign of the metallicity effect in the optical spectral range. It also resolves one of the most pressing problems in the quest toward a measurement of the Hubble constant with an accuracy of 1% from the Cepheid–supernova Ia method.

  9. The orbit and companions of the classical Cepheid FF Aql

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Welch, Douglas L.; Scarfe, Colin D.; Teays, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    New radial velocities of the classical Cepheid FF Aql have been obtained and combined with previous observations to provide a revised orbit. A companion has been detected at 1800 A in IUE spectra with a spectral type of A9 V to F3 V. If the Cepheid has an evolutionary mass, then the mass ratio is M1/M2 = 3.8. A companion recently detected by speckle interferometry is in a longer-period orbit if it is a physical companion. In this case it is also an evolved star. The possible fourth member of the system, the visual companion, is unlikely to be a member of the system. The companion at 6 arcsec is unlikely to be a physical companion. Cepheids (in the 'free-fall' descending branch of the light curve) and nonvariable supergiants are shown to have a different spectral slope between 2900 and 1800 A for the same (B-V)0. IUE spectra of Polaris are rediscussed using other Cepheid spectra as comparison stars, and it is concluded that there is probably no sign of a companion.

  10. Monitoring Period and Amplitude Changes in Classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Engle, Scott G.; Wells, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Cepheid Variable Stars, which are located on the Instability Strip of the Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram, can be used as “standard candle” distance markers (Fiorentino 2007). This came about after the discovery of the Period-Luminosity Relationship (the Leavitt Law), and they have since become a cornerstone of the Cosmic Distance Scale and are helping to further refine the Hubble Constant. Cepheids will cross the Instability Strip, either in a “redward” (cooler) or “blueward” (hotter) direction depending on the stage in which the Cepheid is evolving (Neilson 2012). While Cepheids were originally believed to have regular periods, many are now known to have varying periods, dating back to Eddington (1919). Therefore, Cepheids must be closely monitored in order to deduce where these period variations are coming from - either from inside the star itself or from some outside source. Determining period changes in Cepheids can reveal important information (e.g. evolutionary states, potential companions, etc.).Photometric data were taken for two Cepheids from two different sources and analyzed. The Cepheids in question are AA Gem and BB Gem, both located in the Gemini constellation. Data for these two stars were taken from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) and from the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory, on which Villanova has guaranteed access. ASAS observes automatically each clear night, and has done so for several years, making it an excellent source for obtaining Cepheid data. The RCT telescope also operates automatically, observing from a preset target list, and achieves a much higher precision than ASAS can. Multi-aperture photometry was performed on the AA Gem and BB Gem RCT images, in Astroimagej. The data were then separated into different seasons, and Fourier fits were applied to the light curves in Kephem (written by Andrej Prša and collaborators). These results were then analyzed via the Hertzsprung Method to

  11. New Period-Luminosity and Period-Color relations of classical Cepheids: I. Cepheids in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammann, G. A.; Sandage, A.; Reindl, B.

    2003-06-01

    321 Galactic fundamental-mode Cepheids with good B, V, and (in most cases) I photometry by Berdnikov et al. (\\cite{Berdnikov:etal:00}) and with homogenized color excesses E(B-V) based on Fernie et al. (\\cite{Fernie:etal:95}) are used to determine their period-color (P-C) relation in the range 0.4BBW) distances (Gieren et al. \\cite{Gieren:etal:98}) are used in a first step to determine the absorption coefficients {cal R}B=4.17, {cal R}V=3.17, and {cal R}I=1.89 appropriate for Cepheids of intermediate color. The two sets of Galactic Cepheids with known distances define two independent P-L relations which agree very well in slope; their zero points agree to within 0fm12 +/-0fm04 . They are therefore combined into a single mean Galactic P-LB,V,I relation. The analysis of HIPPARCOS parallaxes by Groenewegen & Oudmaijer (\\cite{Groenewegen:Oudmaijer:00}) gives absolute magnitudes which are brighter by 0fm21 +/-0fm11 in V and 0fm18 +/-0fm12 in I at log P=0.85. Agreement with P-L relations from different model calculations for the case [Fe/H] = 0 is impressive to poor. Galactic Cepheids are redder in (B-V)0 than those in LMC and SMC as shown by the over 1000 Cloud Cepheids with good standard B, V, I photometry by Udalski et al. (\\cite{Udalski:etal:99b},c); the effect is less pronounced in (V-I)0. Also the (B-V)0, (V-I)0 two-color diagrams differ between Cepheids in the Galaxy and the Clouds, attributed both to the effects of metallicity differences on the spectral energy distributions of the Cepheids and to a shift in the effective temperature of the middle of the instability strip for LMC and SMC relative to the Galaxy by about Delta log Te ~ 0.02 at MV=-4fm0 , hotter for both LMC and SMC. Differences in the period-color relations between the Galaxy and the Clouds show that there cannot be a universal P-L relation from galaxy-to-galaxy in any given color. The inferred non-uniqueness of the slope of the P-L relations in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC is born out by the

  12. The occurrence of binary evolution pulsators in classical instability strip of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczmarek, P.; Wiktorowicz, G.; Iłkiewicz, K.; Smolec, R.; Stępień, K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Belczynski, K.

    2017-04-01

    Single star evolution does not allow extremely low-mass stars to cross the classical instability strip (IS) during the Hubble time. However, within binary evolution framework low-mass stars can appear inside the IS once the mass transfer (MT) is taken into account. Triggered by a discovery of low-mass (0.26 M⊙) RR Lyrae-like variable in a binary system, OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792, we investigate the occurrence of similar binary components in the IS, which set up a new class of low-mass pulsators. They are referred to as binary evolution pulsators (BEPs) to underline the interaction between components, which is crucial for substantial mass-loss prior to the IS entrance. We simulate a population of 500 000 metal-rich binaries and report that 28 143 components of binary systems experience severe MT (losing up to 90 per cent of mass), followed by at least one IS crossing in luminosity range of RR Lyrae (RRL) or Cepheid variables. A half of these systems enter the IS before the age of 4 Gyr. BEPs display a variety of physical and orbital parameters, with the most important being the BEP mass in range 0.2-0.8 M⊙, and the orbital period in range 10-2 500 d. Based on the light curve only, BEPs can be misclassified as genuine classical pulsators, and as such they would contaminate genuine RRL and classical Cepheid variables at levels of 0.8 and 5 per cent, respectively. We state that the majority of BEPs will remain undetected and we discuss relevant detection limitations.

  13. Very slow classical Cepheids - Theoretical models with periods longer than 50 days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, T. R.; Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Systematics of the light curves of classical Cepheids with the longest known periods have been investigated with the help of full-amplitude models of pulsating stellar envelopes. For periods exceeding about 60 days, flat-topped light curves of the S Vul type are found to replace the smooth, asymmetric light curves characteristic of the slightly faster Cepheids. Predicted light and velocity amplitudes (although not the predicted radius amplitudes) agree well with observations. Variables with fluctuating light minima are observed to lie well off the mean period-luminosity relation, as are a few other (more stable?) variables with similarly long periods. The explanation for the long periods is probably low effective temperature rather than a low stellar mass. Because of the abnormal slowness of the classical Cepheids with periods longer than about 100 days, it is recommended that these variables not be used to calibrate the mean period-luminosity relation. Analogies between the slow classical Cepheids and the slow Population II Cepheids are drawn.

  14. New Classical Cepheids in the Inner Part of the Northern Galactic Disk, and Their Kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanioka, Satoshi [Department of Astronomical Science, School of Physical Sciences, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsunaga, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Fukue, Kei [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Inno, Laura [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bono, Giuseppe [Instituto Nazionale de Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Kobayashi, Naoto, E-mail: matsunaga@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Infrared High-resolution spectroscopy (LiH), Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2017-06-20

    The characteristics of the inner Galaxy remain obscured by significant dust extinction, hence infrared surveys are useful for finding young Cepheids whose distances and ages can be accurately determined. A near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic survey was carried out and three classical Cepheids were unveiled in the inner disk, around 20° and 30° in Galactic longitude. The targets feature small Galactocentric distances, 3–5 kpc, and their velocities are important, as they may be under the environmental influence of the Galactic bar. While one of the Cepheids has a radial velocity consistent with the Galactic rotation, the other two are moving significantly slower. We also compare their kinematics with that of high-mass star-forming regions with measured parallactic distances.

  15. The Secret Lives of Cepheids: Completing the Picture with HST-COS Observations of the Nearest Classical Cepheids, Polaris and delta Cephei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Scott

    2017-08-01

    Classical Cepheids, although well studied in terms of their cosmologically important Period-Luminosity Law, are proving to be increasingly complex and astrophysically intriguing in terms of atmospheric energetics. This proposal expands on data collected by us in previous cycles to probe Cepheid atmospheres, understand their heating mechanisms and answer important questions. Our previous COS FUV spectra revealed a wealth of 10,000-300,000K plasma emission lines, phase-locked with each Cepheid's pulsation periods, showing that a pulsation-driven heating mechanism is at work. To significantly expand the parameter space of the Cepheid sample, we propose four visits to the nearest and brightest Cepheid, Polaris. Only two COS spectra of Polaris were acquired previously. But we have now seen that Cepheids undergo fairly large FUV emission line variations (flux level differences of 20x and more). Observations of the ultra-low amplitude Polaris will offer remarkable insights into the effects that even minimal pulsations have on a cool supergiant atmosphere, especially when compared to full amplitude Cepheids and also non-pulsating supergiants in the instability strip. We have also recently proven that delta Cep is an X-ray variable, with a tight pulsation phase-range where the star's X-ray activity increases by over 4x. However, no COS spectra exist at this phase, which will be necessary to determine atmospheric densities and dynamics during the X-ray enhancement. When combined with our existing X-ray and FUV data set, the proposed COS data will advance a much deeper understanding of Cepheids and their atmospheric plasmas.

  16. X-Ray, UV and Optical Observations of Classical Cepheids: New Insights into Cepheid Evolution, and the Heating and Dynamics of Their Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G. Engle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To broaden the understanding of classical Cepheid structure, evolution and atmospheres, we have extended our continuing secret lives of Cepheids program by obtaining XMM/Chandra X-ray observations, and Hubble space telescope (HST / cosmic origins spectrograph (COS FUV-UV spectra of the bright, nearby Cepheids Polaris, δ Cep and β Dor. Previous studies made with the international ultraviolet explorer (IUE showed a limited number of UV emission lines in Cepheids. The wellknown problem presented by scattered light contamination in IUE spectra for bright stars, along with the excellent sensitivity & resolution combination offered by HST/COS, motivated this study, and the spectra obtained were much more rich and complex than we had ever anticipated. Numerous emission lines, indicating 104 K up to ~3 × 105 K plasmas, have been observed, showing Cepheids to have complex, dynamic outer atmospheres that also vary with the photospheric pulsation period. The FUV line emissions peak in the phase range φ ≈ 0.8-1.0 and vary by factors as large as 10×. A more complete picture of Cepheid outer atmospheres is accomplished when the HST/COS results are combined with X-ray observations that we have obtained of the same stars with XMM-Newton & Chandra. The Cepheids detected to date have X-ray luminosities of log LX ≈ 28.5-29.1 ergs/sec, and plasma temperatures in the 2–8 × 106 K range. Given the phase-timing of the enhanced emissions, the most plausible explanation is the formation of a pulsation-induced shocks that excite (and heat the atmospheric plasmas surrounding the photosphere. A pulsation-driven α2 equivalent dynamo mechanism is also a viable and interesting alternative. However, the tight phase-space of enhanced emission (peaking near 0.8-1.0 φ favor the shock heating mechanism hypothesis.

  17. Distribution and Kinematics of Classical Cepheids in the Galactic Outer Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel’nik A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The existence of an outer ring in the Galaxy can explain the kinematics of OB associations in the Perseus and Sagittarius stellar-gas complexes. Moreover, it can also explain the orientation of the Carina arm with respect to the major axis of the bar. We show in this paper that the morphological and kinematical features of the sample of classical Cepheids are consistent with the presence of an R1R′2 ring in the Galaxy.

  18. NO EVIDENCE FOR CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS AND A NEW DWARF GALAXY BEHIND THE GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Kozłowski, S. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-10

    Based on data from the ongoing OGLE Galaxy Variability Survey (OGLE GVS), we have verified observed properties of stars detected by the near-infrared VVV survey in a direction near the Galactic plane at longitude l ≈ −27° and recently tentatively classified as classical Cepheids belonging to, hence claimed, a dwarf galaxy at a distance of about 90 kpc from the Galactic Center. Three of four stars are detected in the OGLE GVS I-band images. We show that two of the objects are not variable at all, and the third one with a period of 5.695 days and a nearly sinusoidal light curve of an amplitude of 0.5 mag cannot be a classical Cepheid and is very likely a spotted object. These results together with a very unusual shape of the K{sub s}-band light curve of the fourth star indicate that it is very likely that none of them is a Cepheid and, thus there is no evidence for a background dwarf galaxy. Our observations show that great care must be taken when classifying objects by their low-amplitude close-to-sinusoidal near-infrared light curves, especially with a small number of measurements. We also provide a sample of high-amplitude spotted stars with periods of a few days that can mimic pulsations and even eclipses.

  19. THE VMC SURVEY. XIX. CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Naples (Italy); Moretti, M. I. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Penteli (Greece); Clementini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Cioni, M.-R. L. [Universität Potsdam, Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Grijs, R. de [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Emerson, J. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Koninklijke Sterrenwacht van België, Ringlaan 3, B-1180, Brussel (Belgium); Ivanov, V. D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Piatti, A. E., E-mail: ripepi@oacn.inaf.it [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, 5000, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2016-06-01

    The “VISTA near-infrared YJK {sub s}  survey of the Magellanic Clouds System” (VMC) is collecting deep K {sub s}-band time-series photometry of pulsating variable stars hosted by the two Magellanic Clouds and their connecting Bridge. In this paper, we present Y , J , K {sub s} light curves for a sample of 4172 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) Classical Cepheids (CCs). These data, complemented with literature V values, allowed us to construct a variety of period–luminosity (PL), period–luminosity–color (PLC), and period–Wesenheit (PW) relationships, which are valid for Fundamental (F), First Overtone (FO), and Second Overtone (SO) pulsators. The relations involving the V , J , K {sub s} bands are in agreement with their counterparts in the literature. As for the Y band, to our knowledge, we present the first CC PL, PW, and PLC relations ever derived using this filter. We also present the first near–infrared PL, PW, and PLC relations for SO pulsators to date. We used PW( V , K {sub s}) to estimate the relative SMC–LMC distance and, in turn, the absolute distance to the SMC. For the former quantity, we find a value of Δ μ  = 0.55 ± 0.04 mag, which is in rather good agreement with other evaluations based on CCs, but significantly larger than the results obtained from older population II distance indicators. This discrepancy might be due to the different geometric distributions of young and old tracers in both Clouds. As for the absolute distance to the SMC, our best estimates are μ {sub SMC} = 19.01 ± 0.05 mag and μ {sub SMC} = 19.04 ± 0.06 mag, based on two distance measurements to the LMC which rely on accurate CC and eclipsing Cepheid binary data, respectively.

  20. Metallicity effect on the cepheid period-luminosity relation and H-0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu, JP

    in the first article, we presented a review on the Cepheid PL relation as a tool for measuring distances, and showed the sensitivity of the method to metallicity. Accounting for it brings the recent differing estimates of H-0 into agreement. (C) Academie des Sciences/Elsevier, Paris.

  1. A new determination of the Period-Radius relation for Classical Galactic Cepheids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Bono, G.; Lub, J.; Pedicelli, S.; Pel, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Using a modified version of the CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven system, we derive the radii of a sample of Galactic Cepheids with period from few days up to 40 days. We test our results by performing a comparison with the radii obtained from interferometric measurements, finding an

  2. ``But I am constant as the North Star*'' - The Return of Polaris as a Low Amplitude Classical Cepheid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. J.; Tracey, J. C.; Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2002-12-01

    * Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare Polaris ( ≈ +2.0 mag; B-V = +0.60; F7 Ib) is a low amplitude Classical Cepheid with a pulsation period of P = 3.97 days. Polaris is one of the nearest (dHipparcos = 132 +/- 8 pc) and brightest Cepheid. This Cepheid (Polaris A) is the luminous member of the multiple star system (ADS 1477). Over the last century amazing changing have been occurring for this famous star. The pulsation period has been increasing a rate of dP/dt = +3.2 sec/yr while the light amplitude has decreased from ~0.12 mag (1900s) to ~0.02 mag (early1990s). A recent summary and thorough discussion of Polaris's interesting properties are given by Evans et al. (2002, ApJ, 567, 1121). We have been carrying out photoelectric photometry of Polaris starting in early 2002. This photometry is a continuation of the work done on Polaris by Kamper and Fernie. Our observations were made to obtain new epochal light curves and accurate times of maximum light. We secured well defined 450 nm and 550 nm light curves from which we extracted accurate measures of light amplitudes of 0.033 +/- 0.004 mag and 0.028 +/- 0.003 mag, respectively. These light amplitudes are slightly larger than those observed during the early 1990s. So it appears that the century long decrease in the light amplitude has halted (or paused). Our time of maximum light was combined with previous timings and reaffirms the increase in period of +3.2 sec/yr. These observations lend strong support to overtone nature of Polaris's pulsations, whose transition from moderate to low amplitude pulsator will be discussed in more detail in this poster. In addition to the long-term secular increase in the Polaris's pulsation period, an analysis of the O-Cs indicates +/-0.25 day cyclic oscillations in the apparent period with time scale of 11-12 years. The nature of these period oscillations is being investigated and will be discussed. We gratefully acknowledge the support for this research from NSF/RUI Grant AST 00

  3. The VMC survey - XXIII. Model fitting of light and radial velocity curves of Small Magellanic Cloud classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, M.; Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Clementini, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Ragosta, F.; de Grijs, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Ivanov, V. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of the χ2 minimization model fitting technique applied to optical and near-infrared photometric and radial velocity data for a sample of nine fundamental and three first overtone classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The near-infrared photometry (JK filters) was obtained by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey 'VISTA near-infrared Y, J, Ks survey of the Magellanic Clouds system' (VMC). For each pulsator, isoperiodic model sequences have been computed by adopting a non-linear convective hydrodynamical code in order to reproduce the multifilter light and (when available) radial velocity curve amplitudes and morphological details. The inferred individual distances provide an intrinsic mean value for the SMC distance modulus of 19.01 mag and a standard deviation of 0.08 mag, in agreement with the literature. Moreover, the intrinsic masses and luminosities of the best-fitting model show that all these pulsators are brighter than the canonical evolutionary mass-luminosity relation (MLR), suggesting a significant efficiency of core overshooting and/or mass-loss. Assuming that the inferred deviation from the canonical MLR is only due to mass-loss, we derive the expected distribution of percentage mass-loss as a function of both the pulsation period and the canonical stellar mass. Finally, a good agreement is found between the predicted mean radii and current period-radius (PR) relations in the SMC available in the literature. The results of this investigation support the predictive capabilities of the adopted theoretical scenario and pave the way for the application to other extensive data bases at various chemical compositions, including the VMC Large Magellanic Cloud pulsators and Galactic Cepheids with Gaia parallaxes.

  4. The Near-infrared Optimal Distances Method Applied to Galactic Classical Cepheids Tightly Constrains Mid-infrared Period–Luminosity Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu; Chen, Xiaodian; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai

    2018-01-01

    Classical Cepheids are well-known and widely used distance indicators. As distance and extinction are usually degenerate, it is important to develop suitable methods to robustly anchor the distance scale. Here, we introduce a near-infrared optimal distance method to determine both the extinction values of and distances to a large sample of 288 Galactic classical Cepheids. The overall uncertainty in the derived distances is less than 4.9%. We compare our newly determined distances to the Cepheids in our sample with previously published distances to the same Cepheids with Hubble Space Telescope parallax measurements and distances based on the IR surface brightness method, Wesenheit functions, and the main-sequence fitting method. The systematic deviations in the distances determined here with respect to those of previous publications is less than 1%–2%. Hence, we constructed Galactic mid-IR period–luminosity (PL) relations for classical Cepheids in the four Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) bands (W1, W2, W3, and W4) and the four Spitzer Space Telescope bands ([3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0]). Based on our sample of hundreds of Cepheids, the WISE PL relations have been determined for the first time; their dispersion is approximately 0.10 mag. Using the currently most complete sample, our Spitzer PL relations represent a significant improvement in accuracy, especially in the [3.6] band which has the smallest dispersion (0.066 mag). In addition, the average mid-IR extinction curve for Cepheids has been obtained: {A}W1/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.560, {A}W2/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.479, {A}W3/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.507, {A}W4/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.406, {A}[3.6]/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.481, {A}[4.5]/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.469, {A}[5.8]/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.427, and {A}[8.0]/{A}{K{{s}}}≈ 0.427 {mag}.

  5. Gaia's Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars and luminosity calibrations based on Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementini, Gisella; Eyer, Laurent; Muraveva, Tatiana; Garofalo, Alessia; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Sarro, Luis; Palmer, Max; Luri, Xavier; Molinaro, Roberto; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Szabados, Laszlo; Anderson, Richard I.; Musella, Ilaria

    2017-09-01

    Gaia Data Release 1 contains parallaxes for more than 700 Galactic Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars, computed as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). We have used TGAS parallaxes, along with literature (V, I, J, Ks, W1) photometry and spectroscopy, to calibrate the zero point of the period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit relations of classical and type II Cepheids, and the near-infrared period-luminosity, period-luminosity-metallicity and optical luminosity-metallicity relations of RR Lyrae stars. In this contribution we briefly summarise results obtained by fitting these basic relations adopting different techniques that operate either in parallax or distance (absolute magnitude) space.

  6. Ultra Long Period Cepheids: a primary standard candle up to the Hubble flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, Abhijit; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Aloisi, Alessandra; van der Marel, Roeland; Annibali, Francesca; Clementini, Gisella; Tosi, Monica; Marconi, Marcella; Musella, Ilaria

    The cosmological distance ladder crucially depends on Classical Cepheids (CCs, with P=3-70d), which are primary distance indicators up to 25 Mpc. Within this volume, only a few SNe Ia have been calibrated through CCs, and even these carry uncertainties from the non-linearity and the metallicity

  7. The Carnegie Chicago Hubble Program: The Mid-Infrared Colours of Cepheids and the Effect of Metallicity on the CO Band-Head at 4.6 Micron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Seibert, Mark; Freedman, Wendy L.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andrew J.; Rich, Jeffery A.; Rigby, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    We compare mid-infrared (IR) 3.6 and 4.5 micron Warm Spitzer observations for Cepheids in the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using models, we explore in detail the effect of the CO rotation-vibration band-head at 4.6 micron on the mid-IR photometry. We confirm the temperature sensitivity of the CO band-head at 4.6 micron and find no evidence for an effect at 3.6 micron. We compare the ([3.6]-[4.5]) period-colour relations in the MW, LMC and SMC. The slopes of the period-colour relations for the three galaxies are in good agreement, but there is a trend in zero-point with metallicity, with the lowest metallicity Cepheids having redder mid-IR colours. Finally, we present a colour-[Fe/H] relation based on published spectroscopic metallicities. This empirical relation, calibrated to the metallicity system of Genovali et al., demonstrates that the ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour provides a reliable metallicity indicator for Cepheids, with a precision comparable to current spectroscopic determinations.

  8. VLA observations of Cepheid variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.L.; Duric, N.

    1988-01-01

    The 3-sigma, 5 GHz flux-density upper limits between 120 and 180 microJy have been obtained for the classical Cepheids FF Aql, Eta Aql, SU Cas, Delta Cep, and T Mon, and the Type II Cepheids CS Cas and SW Tau using the VLA. On the basis of assumptions outlined in the main text, upper limits for the ionized mass-loss rates of order 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -7th solar masses/yr are derived for these stars. 13 references

  9. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Cepheid Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Team

    2018-01-01

    Galactic Cepheid variable stars have been used for over a century as standard candles and as the first rung of the cosmic distance ladder, integral to the calculation of the Hubble constant. However, it is challenging to observe Cepheids within the Milky Way Galaxy because of extinction, and there are still uncertainties in the Cepheid period-luminosity relation (or Leavitt Law) that affect these important distance calculations. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey has provided spectra for a large sample of Galactic Cepheids, but the standard chemical abundance pipeline (ASPCAP) processing is not well-suited to pulsational variables, preventing us from using them to study metallicity effect in the Leavitt Law with standard processing. Using a standalone version of the ASPCAP pipeline, we present an analysis of individual visit spectra from a test sample of nine APOGEE Cepheids, and we compare its output to the stars’ literature abundance values. Based on the results of this comparison, we will be able to improve the standard analysis and process the entirety of APOGEE’s Cepheid catalogue to improve its abundance measurements. The resulting abundance data will allow us to constrain the effect of metallicity on the Leavitt Law and thus allow for more accurate Cepheid distance measurements for the determination of the Hubble constant.

  10. The Cepheid mass discrepancy and pulsation-driven mass loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neilson, H.R.; Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.

    2011-01-01

    Context. A longstanding challenge for understanding classical Cepheids is the Cepheid mass discrepancy, where theoretical mass estimates using stellar evolution and stellar pulsation calculations have been found to differ by approximately 10−20%. Aims. We study the role of pulsation-driven mass loss

  11. Period Variations for the Cepheid VZ Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirorattanakul, Krittanon; Engle, Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Wells, Mark; Laney, Clifton D.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-12-01

    The Cepheid Period-Luminosity law is a key rung on the extragalactic distance ladder. However, numerous Cepheids are known to undergo period variations. Monitoring, refining, and understanding these period variations allows us to better determine the parameters of the Cepheids themselves and of the instability strip in which they reside, and to test models of stellar evolution. VZ Cyg, a classical Cepheid pulsating at ˜4.864 days, has been observed for over 100 years. Combining data from literature observations, the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) transit survey, and new targeted observations with the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak, we find a period change rate of dP/dt = -0.0642 ± 0.0018 s yr-1. However, when only the recent observations are examined, we find a much higher period change rate of dP/dt = -0.0923 ± 0.0110 s yr-1. This higher rate could be due to an apparent long-term (P ≈ 26.5 years) cyclic period variation. The possible interpretations of this single Cepheid’s complex period variations underscore both the need to regularly monitor pulsating variables and the important benefits that photometric surveys such as KELT can have on the field. Further monitoring of this interesting example of Cepheid variability is recommended to confirm and better understand the possible cyclic period variations. Further, Cepheid timing analyses are necessary to fully understand their current behaviors and parameters, as well as their evolutionary histories.

  12. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, A.H.

    1974-11-01

    A method for including the solution of the transfer equation in a standard Henyey type hydrodynamic code was developed. This modified Henyey method was used in an implicit hydrodynamic code to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12(d) including radiative transfer effects in the optically thin zones. It was found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere are not responsible for the large microturbulent velocities observed in Cepheids but may be responsible for the occurrence of supersonic microturbulence. It was found that the splitting of the cores of the strong lines is due to shock induced temperature inversions in the line forming region. The adopted light, color, and velocity curves were used to study three methods frequently used to determine the mean radii of Cepheids. It is concluded that an accuracy of 10 percent is possible only if high quality observations are used. (auth)

  13. Tuning the Cepheid distance scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing observational programs (both from the ground and space) will provide a significantly larger sample of galaxies with well-studied Cepheids both within the Local Group and in more distant galaxies. Recent efforts in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale utilizing Cepheids in star clusters in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds are described. Some of the significant advantages of utilizing LMC Cepheids in particular are emphasized, and the current status of the field is summarized.

  14. Gaia Data Release 1. Testing parallaxes with local Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaia Collaboration; Clementini, G.; Eyer, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Muraveva, T.; Garofalo, A.; Sarro, L. M.; Palmer, M.; Luri, X.; Molinaro, R.; Rimoldini, L.; Szabados, L.; Musella, I.; Anderson, R. I.; Prusti, T.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Evans, D. W.; Jansen, F.; Jordi, C.; Klioner, S. A.; Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Mignard, F.; Panem, C.; Pourbaix, D.; Randich, S.; Sartoretti, P.; Siddiqui, H. I.; Soubiran, C.; Valette, V.; van Leeuwen, F.; Walton, N. A.; Aerts, C.; Arenou, F.; Cropper, M.; Drimmel, R.; Høg, E.; Katz, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; O'Mullane, W.; Grebel, E. K.; Holland, A. D.; Huc, C.; Passot, X.; Perryman, M.; Bramante, L.; Cacciari, C.; Castañeda, J.; Chaoul, L.; Cheek, N.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Guerra, R.; Hernández, J.; Jean-Antoine-Piccolo, A.; Masana, E.; Messineo, R.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Ordóñez-Blanco, D.; Panuzzo, P.; Portell, J.; Richards, P. J.; Riello, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Tanga, P.; Thévenin, F.; Torra, J.; Els, S. G.; Gracia-Abril, G.; Comoretto, G.; Garcia-Reinaldos, M.; Lock, T.; Mercier, E.; Altmann, M.; Andrae, R.; Astraatmadja, T. L.; Bellas-Velidis, I.; Benson, K.; Berthier, J.; Blomme, R.; Busso, G.; Carry, B.; Cellino, A.; Cowell, S.; Creevey, O.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Ridder, J.; de Torres, A.; Delchambre, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; Ducourant, C.; Frémat, Y.; García-Torres, M.; Gosset, E.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hauser, M.; Hestroffer, D.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Huckle, H. E.; Hutton, A.; Jasniewicz, G.; Jordan, S.; Kontizas, M.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Manteiga, M.; Moitinho, A.; Muinonen, K.; Osinde, J.; Pancino, E.; Pauwels, T.; Petit, J.-M.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Robin, A. C.; Siopis, C.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sozzetti, A.; Thuillot, W.; van Reeven, W.; Viala, Y.; Abbas, U.; Abreu Aramburu, A.; Accart, S.; Aguado, J. J.; Allan, P. M.; Allasia, W.; Altavilla, G.; Álvarez, M. A.; Alves, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Anglada Varela, E.; Antiche, E.; Antoja, T.; Antón, S.; Arcay, B.; Bach, N.; Baker, S. G.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barache, C.; Barata, C.; Barbier, A.; Barblan, F.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Barros, M.; Barstow, M. A.; Becciani, U.; Bellazzini, M.; Bello García, A.; Belokurov, V.; Bendjoya, P.; Berihuete, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bienaymé, O.; Billebaud, F.; Blagorodnova, N.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Boch, T.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourda, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Breddels, M. A.; Brouillet, N.; Brüsemeister, T.; Bucciarelli, B.; Burgess, P.; Burgon, R.; Burlacu, A.; Busonero, D.; Buzzi, R.; Caffau, E.; Cambras, J.; Campbell, H.; Cancelliere, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carlucci, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castellani, M.; Charlot, P.; Charnas, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Clotet, M.; Cocozza, G.; Collins, R. S.; Costigan, G.; Crifo, F.; Cross, N. J. G.; Crosta, M.; Crowley, C.; Dafonte, C.; Damerdji, Y.; Dapergolas, A.; David, P.; David, M.; De Cat, P.; de Felice, F.; de Laverny, P.; De Luise, F.; De March, R.; de Souza, R.; Debosscher, J.; del Pozo, E.; Delbo, M.; Delgado, A.; Delgado, H. E.; Di Matteo, P.; Diakite, S.; Distefano, E.; Dolding, C.; Dos Anjos, S.; Drazinos, P.; Durán, J.; Dzigan, Y.; Edvardsson, B.; Enke, H.; Evans, N. W.; Eynard Bontemps, G.; Fabre, C.; Fabrizio, M.; Falcão, A. J.; Farràs Casas, M.; Federici, L.; Fedorets, G.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Fernique, P.; Fienga, A.; Figueras, F.; Filippi, F.; Findeisen, K.; Fonti, A.; Fouesneau, M.; Fraile, E.; Fraser, M.; Fuchs, J.; Gai, M.; Galleti, S.; Galluccio, L.; Garabato, D.; García-Sedano, F.; Garralda, N.; Gavras, P.; Gerssen, J.; Geyer, R.; Gilmore, G.; Girona, S.; Giuffrida, G.; Gomes, M.; González-Marcos, A.; González-Núñez, J.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Granvik, M.; Guerrier, A.; Guillout, P.; Guiraud, J.; Gúrpide, A.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Guy, L. P.; Haigron, R.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Haywood, M.; Heiter, U.; Helmi, A.; Hobbs, D.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, B.; Holland, G.; Hunt, J. A. S.; Hypki, A.; Icardi, V.; Irwin, M.; Jevardat de Fombelle, G.; Jofré, P.; Jonker, P. G.; Jorissen, A.; Julbe, F.; Karampelas, A.; Kochoska, A.; Kohley, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Kontizas, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Kordopatis, G.; Koubsky, P.; Krone-Martins, A.; Kudryashova, M.; Bachchan, R. K.; Lacoste-Seris, F.; Lanza, A. F.; Lavigne, J.-B.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lebreton, Y.; Lebzelter, T.; Leccia, S.; Leclerc, N.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Lemaitre, V.; Lenhardt, H.; Leroux, F.; Liao, S.; Licata, E.; Lindstrøm, H. E. P.; Lister, T. A.; Livanou, E.; Lobel, A.; Löffler, W.; López, M.; Lorenz, D.; MacDonald, I.; Magalhães Fernandes, T.; Managau, S.; Mann, R. G.; Mantelet, G.; Marchal, O.; Marchant, J. M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P. M.; Marschalkó, G.; Marshall, D. J.; Martín-Fleitas, J. M.; Martino, M.; Mary, N.; Matijevič, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Messina, S.; Michalik, D.; Millar, N. R.; Miranda, B. M. H.; Molina, D.; Molinaro, M.; Molnár, L.; Moniez, M.; Montegriffo, P.; Mor, R.; Mora, A.; Morbidelli, R.; Morel, T.; Morgenthaler, S.; Morris, D.; Mulone, A. F.; Narbonne, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nicastro, L.; Noval, L.; Ordénovic, C.; Ordieres-Meré, J.; Osborne, P.; Pagani, C.; Pagano, I.; Pailler, F.; Palacin, H.; Palaversa, L.; Parsons, P.; Pecoraro, M.; Pedrosa, R.; Pentikäinen, H.; Pichon, B.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pineau, F.-X.; Plachy, E.; Plum, G.; Poujoulet, E.; Prša, A.; Pulone, L.; Ragaini, S.; Rago, S.; Rambaux, N.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Ranalli, P.; Rauw, G.; Read, A.; Regibo, S.; Reylé, C.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Riva, A.; Rixon, G.; Roelens, M.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Rowell, N.; Royer, F.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sadowski, G.; Sagristà Sellés, T.; Sahlmann, J.; Salgado, J.; Salguero, E.; Sarasso, M.; Savietto, H.; Schultheis, M.; Sciacca, E.; Segol, M.; Segovia, J. C.; Segransan, D.; Shih, I.-C.; Smareglia, R.; Smart, R. L.; Solano, E.; Solitro, F.; Sordo, R.; Soria Nieto, S.; Souchay, J.; Spagna, A.; Spoto, F.; Stampa, U.; Steele, I. A.; Steidelmüller, H.; Stephenson, C. A.; Stoev, H.; Suess, F. F.; Süveges, M.; Surdej, J.; Szegedi-Elek, E.; Tapiador, D.; Taris, F.; Tauran, G.; Taylor, M. B.; Teixeira, R.; Terrett, D.; Tingley, B.; Trager, S. C.; Turon, C.; Ulla, A.; Utrilla, E.; Valentini, G.; van Elteren, A.; Van Hemelryck, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Varadi, M.; Vecchiato, A.; Veljanoski, J.; Via, T.; Vicente, D.; Vogt, S.; Voss, H.; Votruba, V.; Voutsinas, S.; Walmsley, G.; Weiler, M.; Weingrill, K.; Wevers, T.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Žerjal, M.; Zucker, S.; Zurbach, C.; Zwitter, T.; Alecu, A.; Allen, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amorim, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Arsenijevic, V.; Azaz, S.; Balm, P.; Beck, M.; Bernstein, H.-H.; Bigot, L.; Bijaoui, A.; Blasco, C.; Bonfigli, M.; Bono, G.; Boudreault, S.; Bressan, A.; Brown, S.; Brunet, P.-M.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Butkevich, A. G.; Carret, C.; Carrion, C.; Chemin, L.; Chéreau, F.; Corcione, L.; Darmigny, E.; de Boer, K. S.; de Teodoro, P.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Delle Luche, C.; Domingues, C. D.; Dubath, P.; Fodor, F.; Frézouls, B.; Fries, A.; Fustes, D.; Fyfe, D.; Gallardo, E.; Gallegos, J.; Gardiol, D.; Gebran, M.; Gomboc, A.; Gómez, A.; Grux, E.; Gueguen, A.; Heyrovsky, A.; Hoar, J.; Iannicola, G.; Isasi Parache, Y.; Janotto, A.-M.; Joliet, E.; Jonckheere, A.; Keil, R.; Kim, D.-W.; Klagyivik, P.; Klar, J.; Knude, J.; Kochukhov, O.; Kolka, I.; Kos, J.; Kutka, A.; Lainey, V.; LeBouquin, D.; Liu, C.; Loreggia, D.; Makarov, V. V.; Marseille, M. G.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Massart, B.; Meynadier, F.; Mignot, S.; Munari, U.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Nordlander, T.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Ocvirk, P.; Olias Sanz, A.; Ortiz, P.; Osorio, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Ouzounis, A.; Park, P.; Pasquato, E.; Peltzer, C.; Peralta, J.; Péturaud, F.; Pieniluoma, T.; Pigozzi, E.; Poels, J.; Prat, G.; Prod'homme, T.; Raison, F.; Rebordao, J. M.; Risquez, D.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; Rosen, S.; Ruiz-Fuertes, M. I.; Russo, F.; Serraller Vizcaino, I.; Short, A.; Siebert, A.; Silva, H.; Sinachopoulos, D.; Slezak, E.; Soffel, M.; Sosnowska, D.; Straižys, V.; ter Linden, M.; Terrell, D.; Theil, S.; Tiede, C.; Troisi, L.; Tsalmantza, P.; Tur, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vachier, F.; Valles, P.; Van Hamme, W.; Veltz, L.; Virtanen, J.; Wallut, J.-M.; Wichmann, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zschocke, S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Parallaxes for 331 classical Cepheids, 31 Type II Cepheids, and 364 RR Lyrae stars in common between Gaia and the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1) as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). Aims: In order to test these first parallax measurements of the primary standard candles of the cosmological distance ladder, which involve astrometry collected by Gaia during the initial 14 months of science operation, we compared them with literature estimates and derived new period-luminosity (PL), period-Wesenheit (PW) relations for classical and Type II Cepheids and infrared PL, PL-metallicity (PLZ), and optical luminosity-metallicity (MV-[Fe/H]) relations for the RR Lyrae stars, with zero points based on TGAS. Methods: Classical Cepheids were carefully selected in order to discard known or suspected binary systems. The final sample comprises 102 fundamental mode pulsators with periods ranging from 1.68 to 51.66 days (of which 33 with σϖ/ϖType II Cepheids include a total of 26 W Virginis and BL Herculis stars spanning the period range from 1.16 to 30.00 days (of which only 7 with σϖ/ϖcomputed using multi-band (V,I,J,Ks) photometry and spectroscopic metal abundances available in the literature, and by applying three alternative approaches: (I) linear least-squares fitting of the absolute magnitudes inferred from direct transformation of the TGAS parallaxes; (II) adopting astrometry-based luminosities; and (III) using a Bayesian fitting approach. The last two methods work in parallax space where parallaxes are used directly, thus maintaining symmetrical errors and allowing negative parallaxes to be used. The TGAS-based PL,PW,PLZ, and MV- [Fe/H] relations are discussed by comparing the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud provided by different types of pulsating stars and alternative fitting methods. Results: Good agreement is found from direct comparison of the parallaxes of RR Lyrae stars for which both

  15. The evolution of the Cepheid stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiosi, C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of intermediate and high mass stars is reviewed focusing on the interpretation of Pop I Cepheids. First, a summary is given of the classical results of stellar evolution theory for the main evolutionary phases (main sequence and core He-burning) all over the HR diagram, putting into evidence the various points of disagreement with current observational data. Second, models incorporating the effect of convective overshoot, are reviewed, and studies are presented on the rich, young clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud, in which the models are compared with the observational data. Arguments are given to favor the adoption of models with convective overshoot instead of the classical ones. Third, new results are presented for pulsational models of the Cepheid stars, and the shape of the instability strip in the HR diagram, the number frequency-period distribution, and the mass discrepancy are discussed. 81 refs

  16. The Araucaria Project. The Distance to the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 7793 from Near-infrared Photometry of Cepheid Variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zgirski, Bartlomiej; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Wielgorski, Piotr; Narloch, Weronika; Graczyk, Dariusz [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Gieren, Wolfgang; Gorski, Marek [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Astronomia, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Karczmarek, Paulina [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478, Warsaw (Poland); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio, E-mail: bzgirski@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: pietrzyn@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: pwielgor@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: wnarloch@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: darek@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: mgorski@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: pkarczmarek@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Following the earlier discovery of classical Cepheid variables in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 7793 from an optical wide-field imaging survey, we have performed deep near-infrared J - and K -band follow-up photometry of a subsample of these Cepheids to derive the distance to this galaxy with a higher accuracy than what was possible from optical photometry alone, by minimizing the effects of reddening and metallicity on the distance result. Combining our new near-infrared period–luminosity relations with previous optical photometry, we obtain a true distance modulus to NGC 7793 of (27.66 ± 0.04) mag (statistical) ±0.07 mag (systematic), i.e., a distance of (3.40 ± 0.17) Mpc. We also determine the mean reddening affecting the Cepheids to be E(B − V) = (0.08 ± 0.02) mag, demonstrating that there is significant dust extinction intrinsic to the galaxy in addition to the small foreground extinction. A comparison of the new, improved Cepheid distance to earlier distance determinations of NGC 7793 from the Tully–Fisher and TRGB methods is in agreement within the reported uncertainties of these previous measurements.

  17. The Araucaria Project. The Distance to the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 7793 from Near-infrared Photometry of Cepheid Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgirski, Bartlomiej; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Karczmarek, Paulina; Gorski, Marek; Wielgorski, Piotr; Narloch, Weronika; Graczyk, Dariusz; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    Following the earlier discovery of classical Cepheid variables in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 7793 from an optical wide-field imaging survey, we have performed deep near-infrared J- and K-band follow-up photometry of a subsample of these Cepheids to derive the distance to this galaxy with a higher accuracy than what was possible from optical photometry alone, by minimizing the effects of reddening and metallicity on the distance result. Combining our new near-infrared period-luminosity relations with previous optical photometry, we obtain a true distance modulus to NGC 7793 of (27.66 ± 0.04) mag (statistical) ±0.07 mag (systematic), I.e., a distance of (3.40 ± 0.17) Mpc. We also determine the mean reddening affecting the Cepheids to be E(B - V) = (0.08 ± 0.02) mag, demonstrating that there is significant dust extinction intrinsic to the galaxy in addition to the small foreground extinction. A comparison of the new, improved Cepheid distance to earlier distance determinations of NGC 7793 from the Tully-Fisher and TRGB methods is in agreement within the reported uncertainties of these previous measurements.

  18. Gaia’s Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars and luminosity calibrations based on Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementini Gisella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaia Data Release 1 contains parallaxes for more than 700 Galactic Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars, computed as part of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS. We have used TGAS parallaxes, along with literature (V, I, J, Ks, W1 photometry and spectroscopy, to calibrate the zero point of the period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit relations of classical and type II Cepheids, and the near-infrared period-luminosity, period-luminosity-metallicity and optical luminosity-metallicity relations of RR Lyrae stars. In this contribution we briefly summarise results obtained by fitting these basic relations adopting different techniques that operate either in parallax or distance (absolute magnitude space.

  19. Cepheids and their 'Cocoons'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at Cerro Paranal, Chile, and the CHARA Interferometer at Mount Wilson, California, a team of French and North American astronomers has discovered envelopes around three Cepheids, including the Pole star. This is the first time that matter is found surrounding members of this important class of rare and very luminous stars whose luminosity varies in a very regular way. Cepheids play a crucial role in cosmology, being one of the first "steps" on the cosmic distance ladder. ESO PR Photo 09/06 ESO PR Photo 09/06 Model Image of Cepheid L Carinae (VINCI, MIDI/VLTI) The southern Cepheid L Carinae was observed with the VINCI and MIDI instrument at the VLTI, while Polaris (the Pole Star) and Delta Cephei (the prototype of its class) were scrutinised with FLUOR on CHARA, located on the other side of the equator. FLUOR is the prototype instrument of VINCI. Both were built by the Paris Observatory (France). For most stars, the observations made with the interferometers follow very tightly the theoretical stellar models. However, for these three stars, a tiny deviation was detected, revealing the presence of an envelope. "The fact that such deviations were found for all three stars, which however have very different properties, seems to imply that envelopes surrounding Cepheids are a widespread phenomenon", said Pierre Kervella, one of the lead authors. The envelopes were found to be 2 to 3 times as large as the star itself. Although such stars are rather large - about fifty to several hundreds of solar radii - they are so far away that they can't be resolved by single telescopes. Indeed, even the largest Cepheids in the sky subtend an angle of only 0.003 arc second. To observe this is similar to viewing a two-storey house on the Moon. Astronomers have thus to rely on the interferometric technique, which combines the light of two or more distant telescopes, thereby providing the angular resolution of a unique telescope as

  20. GALACTIC CEPHEIDS WITH SPITZER. II. SEARCH FOR EXTENDED INFRARED EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmby, P.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Huelsman, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Bono, G.; Su, K. Y. L.; Welch, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars (S Mus and δ Cep) is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars (GH Lup, l Car, T Mon, and X Cyg) show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass-loss rate upper limits for S Mus and δ Cep are in the range from 10 -9 to 10 -8 M sun yr -1 , with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 10 -6 M sun yr -1 . Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass-loss rate we estimate for our sources show that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass-loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  1. THE PULSATION MODE AND DISTANCE OF THE CEPHEID FF AQUILAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D. G. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada); Kovtyukh, V. V. [Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, and Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, T. G. Shevkenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine); Luck, R. E. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Berdnikov, L. N., E-mail: turner@ap.smu.ca, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: rel2@case.edu, E-mail: leonid.berdnikov@gmail.com [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow M. V. Lomonosov State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-20

    The determination of pulsation mode and distance for field Cepheids is a complicated problem best resolved by a luminosity estimate. For illustration a technique based on spectroscopic luminosity discrimination is applied to the 4.47 day s-Cepheid FF Aql. Line ratios in high dispersion spectra of the variable yield values of (M{sub V} ) = -3.40 {+-} 0.02 s.e. ({+-}0.04 s.d.), average effective temperature T{sub eff} = 6195 {+-} 24 K, and intrinsic color ((B) - (V)){sub 0} = +0.506 {+-} 0.007, corresponding to a reddening of E{sub B-V} = 0.25 {+-} 0.01, or E{sub B-V}(B0) = 0.26 {+-} 0.01. The skewed light curve, intrinsic color, and luminosity of FF Aql are consistent with fundamental mode pulsation for a small-amplitude classical Cepheid on the blue side of the instability strip, not a sinusoidal pulsator. A distance of 413 {+-} 14 pc is estimated from the Cepheid's angular diameter in conjunction with a mean radius of (R) = 39.0 {+-} 0.7 R{sub Sun} inferred from its luminosity and effective temperature. The dust extinction toward FF Aql is described by a ratio of total-to-selective extinction of R{sub V} = A{sub V} /E(B - V) = 3.16 {+-} 0.34 according to the star's apparent distance modulus.

  2. The period-luminosity and period-radius relations of Type II and anomalous Cepheids in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Jurkovic, M. I.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Type II Cepheids (T2Cs) and anomalous Cepheids (ACs) are pulsating stars that follow separate period-luminosity relations. Aims: We study the period-luminosity (PL) and period-radius (PR) relations for T2Cs and ACs in the Magellanic Clouds. Methods: In an accompanying paper we determined the luminosities and effective temperatures for the 335 T2Cs and ACs in the LMC and SMC discovered in the OGLE-III survey, by constructing the spectral energy distribution (SED) and fitting this with model atmospheres and a dust radiative transfer model (in the case of dust excess). Building on these results we studied the PL and PR relations of these sources. Using existing pulsation models for RR Lyrae and classical Cepheids we derive the period-luminosity-mass-temperature-metallicity relations and then estimate the pulsation mass. Results: The PL relation for the T2Cs does not appear to depend on metallicity and is Mbol = + 0.12-1.78log P (for P conflict with the standard picture of (single-star) post-AGB evolution, where the masses are either too large (≳1 M⊙) or too small (≲0.4 M⊙). Full Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A29

  3. Classics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 4 Issue 11 November 1999 pp 88-88 Classics. Introduction to Classics Essay · Max Delbrück · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 4 Issue 11 November 1999 pp 89-102 Classics. A Physicist Looks at Biology · Max Delbrück · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 5 Issue 3 March 2000 pp 105-105 Classics. Introduction.

  4. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  5. The period-luminosity relation for Cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the empirical determination of the period-luminosity-colour relation for classical Cepheids are presented. In this study the quantitative effects of random errors, reddening, sample size and the presence of both colour and period cut-offs (imposed by the finite extent of the instability strip) on the observational redetermination of the original relation are evaluated. Both random errors in the photometry and correlated errors in the reddening corrections are shown to have systematic effects. Especially sensitive to these errors is the colour coefficient in the period-luminosity-colour relation, where the ratio of the error to the width of the instability strip is the determining factor. With present observations only broad confidence limits can be placed on present knowledge of the intrinsic period-luminosity-colour relation and/or its variations from galaxy to galaxy. (author)

  6. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. I. Deep envelope models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, A.H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks has been modified to include radiative transfer effects. This modified code has been used to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12). It is shown that in this particular model the hydrogen ionization region plays only a small role in producing the observed phase lag between the light and velocity curves. The cause of the bumps on the model's light curve is examined, and a mechanisnm is presented to explain those Cepheids with two secondary features on their light curves. This mechanism is shown to be consistent with the Hertzsprung sequence only if the evolutionary mass-luminosity law is used

  7. On the intrinsic colours of cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    Some consequences from new data on the photometrically obtained intrinsic colours are considered. It is shown that the small amplitude and almost sinusoidal light-curve cepheids (Cs-subtype) increase their pulsation amplitude towards the red instability strip edge, differing from the other galactic cepheids. This feature is discussed in connection with Efremov's (1968) hypothesis that the Cs-cepheids first cross the instability strip from left to right. The galactic cepheid period-colour relation obtained by Dean, Warren and Cousins (1978) satisfies rather well the LMC cepheid observations and, consequently, considerations for the period-luminosity relations are made. The residuals from the PL relation proposed by us correlate with the colour residuals from the DWC period-colour relation ΔV/delta(B-V) being equal to 2.7. The luminosity effect as a possible cause of the discrepancy between the spectroscopic cepheid colours and the photometric colours is briefly discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Cepheid radii and effective temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernley, J.A.; Skillen, I.; Jameson, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    New infrared photometry for the Cepheid variables T Vul, δ Cephei and XCyg is presented. Combining this with published infrared photometry of T Vul, ηAql, S Sge and XCyg and published optical photometry we use the infrared flux method to determine effective temperatures and angular radii at all phases of the pulsation cycle. These angular radii combined with published radial velocity curves then give the radii of the stars. Knowing the radii and effective temperatures we obtain the absolute magnitudes. (author)

  9. MULTI-EPOCH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF IZw18: CHARACTERIZATION OF VARIABLE STARS AT ULTRA-LOW METALLICITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, G.; Ramos, R. Contreras; Clementini, G.; Tosi, M.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Aloisi, A.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Annibali, F.; Saha, A.

    2010-01-01

    Variable stars have been identified for the first time in the very metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy IZw18, using deep multi-band (F606W, F814W) time-series photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 34 candidate variable stars in the galaxy. We classify three of them as Classical Cepheids, with periods of 8.71, 125.0, and 130.3 days, respectively, and other two as long period variables with periodicities longer than 100 days. These are the lowest metallicity Classical Cepheids known so far, thus providing the opportunity to explore and fit models of stellar pulsation for Classical Cepheids at previously inaccessible metallicities. The period distribution of the confirmed Cepheids is markedly different from what is seen in other nearby galaxies, which is likely related to the star bursting nature of IZw18. The long period Cepheids we have detected in IZw18 seem to indicate that massive stars at the metallicity of IZw18 (Z = 0.0004) may cross the instability strip long enough to be observed. By applying to the 8.71 days Cepheid theoretical Wesenheit (V, I) relations based on new pulsation models of Classical Cepheids specifically computed for the extremely low metallicity of this galaxy (Z = 0.0004, Y = 0.24), we estimate the distance modulus of IZw18 to be μ 0 = 31.4 ± 0.3 (D = 19.0 +2.8 -2.5 Mpc) for canonical models of Classical Cepheids, and of 31.2 ± 0.3 mag (D = 17.4 +2.6 -2.2 Mpc) using over luminous models. The theoretical modeling of the star's light curves provides μ 0 = 31.4± 0.2 mag, D = 19.0 +1.8 -1.7 Mpc, in good agreement with the results from the theoretical Wesenheit relations. These pulsation distances bracket the distance of 18.2 ±1.5 Mpc inferred by Aloisi et al. using the galaxy's red giant branch tip.

  10. Cepheids : the period-luminosity relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu, JP

    1997-01-01

    The Cepheids are relatively young, bright, periodic supergiant variable stars showing a correlation between their periods and luminosities. Since the beginning of the century, the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation has been the corner stone of distance determination, and of the measure of the

  11. Classical and quantum effects in noble metal and graphene plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    such as nonclassical electrodynamics with a nonlocal response of the plasmons. Nonlocal effects are being explored both theoretically and experimentally in different charge-conducting material systems with examples ranging from sub-10 nanometer noble metal particles to one-atom thin disks of doped graphene....

  12. Confronting Cepheids Models with Interferometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardetto, N.

    In the last years, some issues concerning Cepheids have been resolved, based on observations and modeling. However, as usual, new difficulties arise. The link between the dynamical structure of Cepheid atmosphere and the distance scale calibration in the universe is now clearly established. To support observations, we currently need fully consistent hydrodynamical models, including pulsating and evolutionary theories, convective energy transport, adaptive numerical meshes, and a refined calculation of the radiative transfer within the pulsating atmosphere, and also in the expected circumstellar envelope (hereafter CSE). Confronting such models with observations (spectral line profiles, spatial- and spectral- visibility curves), will permit to resolve and/or strengthen subtle questions concerning (1) the limb-darkening, (2) the dynamical structure of Cepheids' atmosphere, (3) the expected interaction between the atmosphere and the CSE, and (4) it will bring new insights in determining the fundamental parameters of Cepheids. All these physical quantities are supposed furthermore to be linked to the pulsation period of Cepheids. From these studies, it will be possible to paint a glowing picture of all Cepheids within the instability strip, allowing an unprecedent calibration of the period-luminosity relation (hereafter PL relation), leading to new insights in the fields of extragalactic distance scales and cosmology.

  13. Simultaneous Deep Tunneling and Classical Hopping for Hydrogen Diffusion on Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Richardson, Jeremy O.; Chen, Ji; Li, Xin-Zheng; Michaelides, Angelos

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogen diffusion on metals exhibits rich quantum behavior, which is not yet fully understood. Using simulations, we show that many hydrogen diffusion barriers can be categorized into those with parabolic tops and those with broad tops. With parabolic-top barriers, hydrogen diffusion evolves gradually from classical hopping, to shallow tunneling, to deep tunneling as the temperature (T ) decreases, and noticeable quantum effects persist at moderate T . In contrast, with broad-top barriers quantum effects become important only at low T and the classical-to-quantum transition is sharp, at which classical hopping and deep tunneling both occur. This coexistence indicates that more than one mechanism contributes to the quantum reaction rate. The conventional definition of the classical-to-quantum crossover T is invalid for the broad tops, and we give a new definition. Extending this, we propose a model to predict the transition T for broad-top diffusion, providing a general guide for theory and experiment.

  14. More Surprises from the Eclipsing Cepheid TYC 1031 1262 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Thomas W.

    2017-06-01

    TYC 1031 1262 1 (aka ASAS J182611+1212.6) was the first reported eclipsing Cepheid in the Galaxy (Antipin 2007). In June 2007 AAVSO initiated a campaign to monitor the star and, for the past decade, a sequence of CSB/SJU undergraduate students have continued to monitor this star. In addition to its eclipses and ellipsoidal variation (orbital period: 51.31 ± .01 d) the star has proven to be a bit of a puzzle. It has been classified as type II (Antipin 2007), classical (Schmidt, 2009), and anomalous (Sipahi, 2013). Sipahi measured its radial velocities, found it was a double-lined eclipsing binary, and concluded it consisted of two bright giant stars: F8II+G6II (with masses 1.64 and .93 M⊙). They measured a period increase of about 2.5 min yr-1 which they associated with mass loss as the Cepheid almost fills its Roche lobe. The AAVSO campaign data and our own data were collected after the data reported by Sipahi and they consistently show a period decrease of 1.44 ± .05 min yr-1 or a pulse acceleration of 13.3 ± .5 rad/decade2. Taken together these results suggest period oscillation rather than a secular trend.

  15. The Baade-Becker-Wesselink technique and the fundamental astrophysical parameters of Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, Alexey S.; Dambis, Andrey K.; Zabolotskikh, Marina V.; Berdnikov, Leonid N.; Gorynya, Natalia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Baade-Becker-Wesselink (BBW) method remains one of most often used tools to derive a full set of Cepheid astrophysical parameters. The surface brightness version of the BBW technique was preferentially used during the past few decades to calculate Cepheid radii and to improve period-luminosity-colour relations. Its implementation requires a priori knowledge of Cepheid reddening values. We propose a new version of the BBW technique, which allows one to independently determine the colour excess and the intrinsic colour of a radially pulsating star, in addition to its radius, luminosity and distance. The new technique is a generalization of the Balona light curve-modelling approach. The method also allows calibration of the function F(CI0) = BC(CI0) + 10 log [T eff (CI0)] for the class of pulsating stars considered. We apply this technique to a number of classical Cepheids with very accurate light and radial-velocity curves. The new technique can also be applied to other pulsating variables, e.g., RR Lyrae stars. We also discuss the possible dependence of the projection factor on the pulsation phase.

  16. Exploring the η Aquila System: Another Cepheid Parallax and Further Evidence for a Tertiary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, George Frederick; Barnes, Thomas G.; Evans, Nancy; Cochran, William; McArthur, Barbara E.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    We report progress towards a re-analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric data, originally acquired to determine a parallax for and absolute magnitudes of the classical Cepheid, η Aquila. This object was not included in past Cepheid Period-Luminosity Relation (PLR) work (Benedict et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 1810), because we had an insufficient number of epochs with which to establish a suspected and complicating companion orbit. Our new investigation is considerably aided by including a significant number of radial velocity measures (RV) from six sources, including new, high-quality Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra. We first derive a 12 Fourier coefficient description of the Cepheid pulsation, solving for velocity offsets required to bring the six RV data sets into coincidence. We next model the RV residuals to that fit with an orbit. The resulting orbit has very high eccentricity. The astrometric residuals show only a very small perturbation, consistent with a prediction from the spectroscopic orbit. We finally include that orbit in a combined astrometry and radial velocity model. This modeling, similar to that presented in Benedict and Harrison (2017, AJ, 153, 258) yields a parallax, allowing inclusion of η Aquila in a PLR. It also establishes a Cepheid/companion mass ratio for the early-type star companion identified in IUE spectra (Evans 1991, ApJ, 372, 597).

  17. A spectroscopic study of southern binary Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, O. K. L.; Albrow, Michael D.; Cottrell, P. L.; Fokin, A.

    2004-05-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations have been made of a number of southern binary Cepheids to determine their dynamical masses. The stars are part of a long-term program to observe southern variable starsf or which a valuable long-term database has been obtained. The most recent radial velocities have a precision of ~300 ms-1, allowing the detection of velocity differences of ~1 kms-1 with confidence. Masses were determined for three systems: the 9-day Cepheid S Mus (6.0±0.4 MSolar), the double-mode Cepheid Y Car (4.5±1.8 MSolar) and the 5-day Cepheid V350 Sgr (6.0±0.9 MSolar). For five Cepheids (YZ Car, AX Cir, V636 Sco, W Sgr and T Mon) new or improved orbital solutions were found. Line level effects have been observed in several species of lines. Most Cepheids were observed to show the same progression of line level effects. Using non-linear radiative hydrodynamical models, we have compared the results of these models with our observations. These have shown that AX Cir and YZ Car have the following properties: L = 2050 LSolar, M = 4.8 MSolar, Teff = 5900 K and L = 9350 LSolar, M = 7.7 MSolar, Teff = 5590 K. Our models show no strong shockwaves being produced. Good agreement was found between the observed and modelled spectral lines Fe I 5576Å, SiII 6347Å, BaII 5853Å and CaII 8542Å.

  18. Anomalous Cepheids and population II blue stragglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, James M.

    Recent studies of anomalous Cepheids (ACs) and population II blue stragglers (BSs), including photometrically variable BSs (VBSs), are reviewed. The VBSs represent about 25 percent of the BSs, the majority of which are SX Phe short-period variables in the Cepheid instability strip. Mass estimates derived using various techniques suggest that both ACs and BSs are relatively massive (about 1.0-1.6 solar mass). The recent discovery that two BSs in the globular cluster NGC 5466 are contact binaries, and the earlier discovery that one of the BSs in Omega Cen is an eclipsing binary, provide direct evidence that at least some BSs are binary systems.

  19. The Carnegie Hubble Program: The Distance and Structure of the SMC as Revealed by Mid-Infrared Observations of Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Monson, Andy; Persson, S. E.; Rich, Jeff; Seibert, Mark; Rigby, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Using Spitzer observations of classical Cepheids we have measured the true average distance modulus of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) to be18.96 +/- 0.01 stat +/- 0.03sys mag (corresponding to 62+/- 0.3kpc), which is 0.48 +/- 0.01 mag more distant than the LMC. This is in agreement with previous results from Cepheid observations, as well as with measurements from other indicators such as RR Lyrae stars and the tip of the red giant branch. Utilizing the properties of the mid-infrared Leavitt Law we measured precise distances to individual Cepheids in the SMC, and have confirmed that the galaxy is tilted and elongated such that its eastern side is up to20 kpc closer than its western side. This is in agreement with the results from red clump stars and dynamical simulations of the Magellanic Clouds and Stream.

  20. Baade-Wesselink radii for NGC 1866 Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe; Mateo, Mario; Madore, Barry F.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities and CCD photometry suitable for a Baade-Wesselink analysis are now available for six short-period Cepheids (HV12198, HV12199, HV12202, HV12203, HV12204, and V4) in the LMC cluster NGC 1866. As a prerequisite for such an analysis, O-C diagrams have been constructed and examined for seven of the NGC 1866 Cepheids (HV12197, HV12198, HV12199, HV12200, HV12202, HV12203, and HV12204), yielding improved periods and estimates of the rate of period change in these coeval variables. One star, HV12198, shows possible evidence for period change, but the phase mismatch due to that change is small enough to have negligible effect on its Baade-Wesselink radius. The computed radii are in good agreement with the Baade-Wesselink, theoretical and cluster/association period-radius relations of Fernie (1984) and the Galactic relation of Coulson and Caldwell (1989). The Flower (1977) color-effective temperature relation and the Becker et al. (1977) mass-luminosity relation lead to mean masses of 4.9 + or - 0.5 solar masses and 4.6 + or - 0.5 solar masses for the respective metallicities of (Y,Z) = (0.0273,0.0016) and (0.026,0.02). Pulsation constants are also computed for these stars.

  1. Capturing the H 2 –Metal Interaction in Mg-MOF-74 Using Classical Polarization

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony

    2014-10-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of H2 sorption were performed in Mg-MOF-74, a metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays very high H2 sorption affinity. Experimental H2 sorption isotherms and isosteric heats of adsorption (Qst) values were reproduced using a general purpose materials sorption potential that includes many-body polarization interactions. In contrast, using two models that include only charge-quadrupole interactions failed to reproduce such experimental measurements even though they are the type normally employed in such classical force field calculations. Utilizing the present explicit polarizable model in GCMC simulation resulted in a Mg2+-H2 distance of 2.60 Å, which is close to a previously reported value that was obtained using electronic structure methods and comparable to similar experimental measurements. The induced dipole distribution obtained from simulation assisted in the characterization of two previously identified sorption sites in the MOF: the Mg2+ ions and the oxido group of the linkers. The calculated two-dimensional quantum rotational levels for a H2 molecule sorbed onto the Mg2+ ion were in good agreement with experimental inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data. Although the H2-metal interaction in MOFs may be thought of as a quantum mechanical effect, this study demonstrates how the interaction between the sorbate molecules and the open-metal sites in a particular highly sorbing MOF can be captured using classical simulation techniques that involve a polarizable potential.

  2. CCD BVI c observations of Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Zhujko, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    In 2008-2013, we obtained 11333 CCD BVI c frames for 57 Cepheids from the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We performed our observations with the 76-cm telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO, South Africa) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Astronomical Observatory of the Universidad Católica del Norte (OCA, Chile) using the SBIG ST-10XME CCD camera. The tables of observations, the plots of light curves, and the current light elements are presented. Comparison of our light curves with those constructed from photoelectric observations shows that the differences between their mean magnitudes exceed 0ṃ05 in 20% of the cases. This suggests the necessity of performing CCD observations for all Cepheids.

  3. The Cepheid bump progression and amplitude equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Buchler, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the characteristic and systematic behavior of the low-order Fourier amplitudes and phases of hydrodynamically generated radial velocity and light curves of Cepheid model sequences is very well captured not only qualitatively but also quantitatively by the amplitude equation formalism. The 2:1 resonance between the fundamental and the second overtone plays an essential role in the behavior of the models 8 refs

  4. Power ultrasound in metal-assisted synthesis: From classical Barbier-like reactions to click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintas, Pedro; Palmisano, Giovanni; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2011-07-01

    The search for more efficient and greener synthetic procedures to obtain highly functionalized chemical structures has always found in metal-assisted reactions a noteworthy strategy. All these reactions fall in the main domain of sonochemistry; in fact few techniques can compete with power ultrasound in so efficiently activating a metal surface, thus enhancing and accelerating its subsequent reaction with an organic substrate. Young researchers will certainly benefit from the rich literature and past experience of several pioneers who have, since the early eighties, laid the foundations of modern sonochemical synthetic protocols. Herein we provide a concise overview that describes how ultrasound acts in such a way as to make it a fundamental tool in improving the classical one-step coupling promoted by zero-valent metal species, usually referred to as Barbier-like reactions. From early hallmarks to recent accomplishments, especially the latest Cu-catalyzed alkyne-azide reaction (the so-called Click reaction), intended to be a universal ligation in chemistry and biology; we highlight the role and crucial effects of sonication on these processes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure factor of liquid alkali metals using a classical-plasma reference system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1983-11-01

    The paper presents calculations of the liquid structure factor of the alkali metals near freezing, starting from the classical plasma of bare ions as reference liquid. The indirect ion-ion interaction arising from electronic screening is treated by an optimized random phase approximation (ORPA), imposing physical requirements as in the original ORPA scheme developed by Weeks, Chandler and Andersen for liquids with strongly repulsive core potentials. A comparison of the results with computer simulation data for a model of liquid rubidium shows that the present approach overcomes the well-known difficulties met in applying to these metals the standard ORPA based on a reference liquid of neutral hard spheres. The optimization scheme is also shown to be equivalent to a reduction of the range of the indirect interaction in momentum space, as proposed empirically in earlier work. Comparison with experiment for the other alkalis shows that a good overall representation of the data can be obtained for sodium, potassium and cesium, but not for lithium, when one uses a very simple form of the electron-ion potential adjusted to the liquid compressibility. The small-angle scattering region is finally examined more carefully in the light of recent data of Waseda, with a view to possible refinements of the pseudopotential model. (author)

  6. KIC2569073, A second Cepheid in the Kepler FOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One particularly interesting new variable discovered via Kepler’s 200x200 pixel superstamp images is KIC2569073. With a period of 14.66 days and 0.04mag variability it is only the second Cepheid in the Kepler field, or a rotationally modulated variable. We discuss its classification as a Type II W Virginis Class Cepheid, and present the cycle-to-cycle period variations of this star, as well as the first direct observations of granulation noise within a Cepheid.

  7. Galactic bulge population II Cepheids in the VVV survey: period-luminosity relations and a distance to the Galactic centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Rejkuba, M.; Minniti, D.; Surot, F.; Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Romaniello, M.; Kanbur, S. M.; Singh, H. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Multiple stellar populations of different ages and metallicities reside in the Galactic bulge that trace its structure and provide clues to its formation and evolution. Aims: We present the near-infrared observations of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge from VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey. The JHKs photometry together with optical data from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) survey provide an independent estimate of the distance to the Galactic centre. The old, metal-poor and low-mass population II Cepheids are also investigated as useful tracers for the structure of the Galactic bulge. Methods: We identify 340 population II Cepheids in the VVV survey Galactic bulge catalogue based on their match with the OGLE-III Catalogue. The single-epoch JH and multi-epoch Ks observations complement the accurate periods and optical (VI) mean-magnitudes from OGLE. The sample consisting of BL Herculis and W Virginis subtypes is used to derive period-luminosity relations after correcting mean-magnitudes for the extinction. Our Ks-band period-luminosity relation, Ks = -2.189(0.056) [log (P)-1] + 11.187(0.032), is consistent with published work for BL Herculis and W Virginis variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Results: We present a combined OGLE-III and VVV catalogue with periods, classification, mean magnitudes, and extinction for 264 Galactic bulge population II Cepheids that have good-quality Ks-band light curves. The absolute magnitudes for population II Cepheids and RR Lyraes calibrated using Gaia and Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes, together with calibrated magnitudes for Large Magellanic Cloud population II Cepheids, are used to obtain a distance to the Galactic centre, R0 = 8.34 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.41(syst.), which changes by with different extinction laws. While noting the limitation of small number statistics, we find that the present sample of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge shows a nearly spheroidal

  8. Cepheids in Magellanic Cloud star clusters - Fundamental and overtone pulsators in NGC 2157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Madore, Barry F.

    1990-01-01

    CCD survey data are employed to examine Cepheids in young Magellanic Cloud star clusters. The properties of three Cepheids observed in NGC 2157 are described. It is detected that the two short-period (3 days) Cepheids have photometric properties that correspond to overtone pulsators and the long-period (7.7 days) Cepheid pulses in the fundamental mode. The pulsational masses for the three Cepheids are calculated to be about 5 solar masses. This mass value does not correlate with the average pulsational mass for Cepheids of 3.0 + or - 0.4 solar masses. The potential cause of this deviation in evolutionary/pulsational mass is investigated.

  9. The MACHO Project SMC Variable Star Inventory: I. The Second-overtone Mode of Cepheid Pulsation From First/Second Overtone (1H/2H) Beat Cepheids

    OpenAIRE

    The MACHO Collaboration; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.; Marshall, S. L.; Peterson, B. A.; Quinn, P. J.; Rodgers, A. W.

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery of 20 1H/2H and 7 F/1H beat Cepheids in the SMC by the MACHO Project. We utilize the 20 1H/2H stars to determine lightcurve shape for the SMC second-overtone (2H) mode of Cepheid pulsation. We predict, similar to the findings of Alcock et al. (1997, ApJ, submitted), that 2H Cepheids will have nearly or purely sinusoidal light variations; that the P-L relation for 2H Cepheids will not be distinguishable from the P-L relation for 1H Cepheids within photometric accuracy; ...

  10. THE PULSATION MODE OF THE CEPHEID POLARIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D. G. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, Halifax NS B3H 3C3 (Canada); Kovtyukh, V. V.; Usenko, I. A. [Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, and Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, T. G. Shevkenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine); Gorlova, N. I., E-mail: turner@ap.smu.ca [Institute of Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-01-01

    A previously derived photometric parallax of 10.10 {+-} 0.20 mas, d = 99 {+-} 2 pc, is confirmed for Polaris by a spectroscopic parallax derived using line ratios in high dispersion spectra for the Cepheid. The resulting estimates for the mean luminosity of (M{sub V} ) = -3.07 {+-} 0.01 s.e., average effective temperature of (T{sub eff}) = 6025 {+-} 1 K s.e., and intrinsic color of ((B) - (V)){sub 0} = +0.56 {+-} 0.01 s.e., which match values obtained previously from the photometric parallax for a space reddening of E{sub B-V} = 0.02 {+-} 0.01, are consistent with fundamental mode pulsation for Polaris and a first crossing of the instability strip, as also argued by its rapid rate of period increase. The systematically smaller Hipparcos parallax for Polaris appears discrepant by comparison.

  11. Three-colour photometry of four suspected double-mode cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, C.D.; Andrews, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    UBV photometry of the cepheids DY Car, EY Car, FZ Car and TZ Mus covering several periods show no evidence for the variable light curves to be expected if they were in fact double-mode cepheids. (author)

  12. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of Sextans A. II. Cepheids and distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolphin, AE; Saha, A; Skillman, ED; Dohm-Palmer, RC; Tolstoy, E; Cole, AA; Gallagher, JS; Hoessel, JG; Mateo, M

    We have identified 82 short-period variable stars in Sextans A from deep Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations. All the periodic variables appear to be short-period Cepheids, with periods as small as 0.8 days for fundamental mode Cepheids and 0.5 days for first-overtone Cepheids. These objects

  13. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    OpenAIRE

    C. Spathis; A. Birbas; K. Georgakopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions ...

  14. A Method for Improving Galactic Cepheid Reddenings and Distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories Carnegie Institution for Science 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Freedman, Wendy L.; Moak, Sandy, E-mail: barry.f.madore@gmail.com, E-mail: sandymoak@gmail.com, E-mail: wfreedman@uchicago.edu [Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-06-10

    We present a new photometric method by which improved high-precision reddenings and true distance moduli can be determined to individual Galactic Cepheids once distance measurements are available. We illustrate that the relative positioning of stars in the Cepheid period–luminosity (PL) relation (Leavitt law) is preserved as a function of wavelength. This information then provides a powerful constraint for determining reddenings to individual Cepheids, as well as their distances. As a first step, we apply this method to the 59 Cepheids in the compilation of Fouqué et al. Updated reddenings, distance moduli (or parallaxes), and absolute magnitudes in seven (optical through near-infrared) bands are given. From these intrinsic quantities, multiwavelength PL and color–color relations are derived. We find that the V -band period–luminosity–color relation has an rms scatter of only 0.06 mag, so that individual Cepheid distances can be measured to 3%, compared with dispersions of 6 to 13% for the one-parameter K through B PL relations, respectively. This method will be especially useful in conjunction with the new accurate parallax sample upcoming from Gaia .

  15. CLUSTERED CEPHEID VARIABLES 90 KILOPARSECS FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Saito, Roberto [Departamento de Fisica-Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Rod. Marechal Rondon s/n-Jardim Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sergipe (Brazil); Quillen, Alice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester NY 14627 (United States); Gran, Felipe [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica of Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Klein, Christopher; Blitz, Leo, E-mail: chakrabarti@astro.rit.edu [Astronomy Department, UC Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Distant regions close to the plane of our Galaxy are largely unexplored by optical surveys as they are hidden by dust. We have used near-infrared data (which minimizes dust obscuration) from the ESO Public survey VISTA Variables of the Via Lactea to search for distant stars at low latitudes. We have discovered four Cepheid variables within an angular extent of 1° centered at a Galactic longitude of l = −27.°4 and a Galactic latitude of b = −1.°08. We use the tightly constrained period–luminosity relationship that these pulsating stars obey to derive distances. We infer an average distance to these Cepheid variables of 90 kpc. The Cepheid variables are highly clustered in angle (within 1°) and in distance (the standard deviation of the distances is 12 kpc). These young (∼100 Myr old), pulsating stars are unexpected at such large distances from the Galactic disk, which terminates at ∼15 kpc. The highly clustered nature in distance and angle of the Cepheid variables suggests that the stars may be associated with a dwarf galaxy; its location and mass were earlier predicted by a dynamical analysis. The Cepheids are at an average distance of ∼2 kpc from the plane and their maximum projected separation is ∼1 kpc.

  16. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spathis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions continue to shrink, shot noise has to be considered when the channel resistance becomes comparable to the barrier resistance at the source-channel junction. By adopting a semi-classical approach and taking retrospectively into account transport, short-channel and quantum effects, we investigate the partitioning between shot and thermal noise, and formulate a predictive model that describes the noise characteristics of modern devices.

  17. Semi-classical noise investigation for sub-40nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spathis, C.; Birbas, A.; Georgakopoulou, K.

    2015-08-01

    Device white noise levels in short channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) dictate the performance and reliability of high-frequency circuits ranging from high-speed microprocessors to Low-Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and microwave circuits. Recent experimental noise measurements with very short devices demonstrate the existence of suppressed shot noise, contrary to the predictions of classical channel thermal noise models. In this work we show that, as the dimensions continue to shrink, shot noise has to be considered when the channel resistance becomes comparable to the barrier resistance at the source-channel junction. By adopting a semi-classical approach and taking retrospectively into account transport, short-channel and quantum effects, we investigate the partitioning between shot and thermal noise, and formulate a predictive model that describes the noise characteristics of modern devices.

  18. On the estimation of emissivity of metals within the framework of electron classical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvarev, K.M.; Baum, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    The well-known Hagen-Rubens and Ashkinass-Foot equations used for calculating the spectral and integral emissive powers of metals usually yield enhanced values of optical characteristics. Improved formulas for estimating emissive characteristics of metals from their electric conductivity are obtained with an allowance for the relaxation time and in the free-electron model approximation

  19. Observations of the Cepheid T Vul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, K.; Baldwin, S. L.; Grill, M. R.

    2002-05-01

    Twenty nights of UBV photoelectric photometry are presented for the bright, northern Cepheid, T Vul. These observations were obtained in the fall of 2001 using the Phoenix-10 automatic photoelectric telescope at the Fairborn Observatory in southern Arizona. We calculated the phase using the epoch and period suggested by L. Szaboados of 2441705.127 + 4.435452 (Comm. Konkoly Obs., No. 96).. There were no errant points, and we obtained even phase coverage, although there were insufficient observations near the maxima to reliably calculate a new value. This project was the primary part of a class on observational astronomy at the Superstition Mountain campus of Central Arizona College. One of us, Lapa, has had a somewhat unusual pre-college education consisting of six years of home schooling. Lapa entered Central Arizona College, a two-year community college, at age fourteen. Now fifteen, he has completed three semesters at Central Arizona College and currently carries a 4.0 average. Lapa plans on completing his Associates of Science Degree at the community college level and continuing on at a university. All three authors wish to thank their instructor, Russell Genet, for making this exciting class possible. We also wish to thank Kenneth Kissell for his help in selecting T Vul, Douglas Hall for his suggestions with respect to a comparison and check star, Michael Seeds for managing the robotic telescope, and Louis Boyd for operating the telescope. We also wish to thank these gentlemen for the time they took to talk to our entire class on speaker-phone conference calls. Hands-on research has been a great community-college introduction to science for all of us.

  20. Cardiac autonomic regulation during exposure to auditory stimulation with classical baroque or heavy metal music of different intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Joice A T; Nogueira, Marcela L; Roque, Adriano L; Guida, Heraldo L; De Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Raimundo, Rodrigo Daminello; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Ribeiro, Vivian L; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-03-01

    The effects of chronic music auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system have been investigated in the literature. However, data regarding the acute effects of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic regulation are lacking. The literature has indicated that auditory stimulation with white noise above 50 dB induces cardiac responses. We aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal music of different intensities on cardiac autonomic regulation. The study was performed in 16 healthy men aged 18-25 years. All procedures were performed in the same soundproof room. We analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) in time (standard deviation of normal-to-normal R-R intervals [SDNN], root-mean square of differences [RMSSD] and percentage of adjacent NN intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms [pNN50]) and frequency (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF] and LF/HF ratio) domains. HRV was recorded at rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the volunteers were exposed to one of the two musical styles (classical baroque or heavy metal music) for five minutes through an earphone, followed by a five-minute period of rest, and then they were exposed to the other style for another five minutes. The subjects were exposed to three equivalent sound levels (60-70dB, 70-80dB and 80-90dB). The sequence of songs was randomized for each individual. Auditory stimulation with heavy metal music did not influence HRV indices in the time and frequency domains in the three equivalent sound level ranges. The same was observed with classical baroque musical auditory stimulation with the three equivalent sound level ranges. Musical auditory stimulation of different intensities did not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men.

  1. Monitoring Cepheid variables using the new BYU Observation Deck Robotic Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Adam Garth; Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    In January 2017 work was completed on the new observation deck of the Eyring Science Center on the Brigham Young University campus. This deck was designed with pedestals to currently hold up to 5 robotic telescope systems. One of the first test projects was to monitor a sample of Classical Cepheid variables to watch for changes in the light curves. Starting with a sample of stars which had previously been monitored spectroscopically using the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m telescope, we collected photometric data in the H-alpha/H-beta system detailed in Joner & Hintz (2015). We will present a preliminary analysis of this data and the abilities of the new deck to monitor these type of objects.

  2. Structure and Bonding in Binuclear Metal Carbonyls. Classical Paradigms vs. Insights from Modern Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 195-213 ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : binuclear metal carbonyls * DAFH analysis * 18-electron rule Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2015

  3. Insensitivity of The Distance Ladder Hubble Constant Determination to Cepheid Calibration Modeling Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, B.; Knox, L.

    2018-03-01

    Recent determination of the Hubble constant via Cepheid-calibrated supernovae by Riess et al. (2016) (R16) find ˜3σ tension with inferences based on cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization measurements from Planck. This tension could be an indication of inadequacies in the concordance ΛCDM model. Here we investigate the possibility that the discrepancy could instead be due to systematic bias or uncertainty in the Cepheid calibration step of the distance ladder measurement by R16. We consider variations in total-to-selective extinction of Cepheid flux as a function of line-of-sight, hidden structure in the period-luminosity relationship, and potentially different intrinsic colour distributions of Cepheids as a function of host galaxy. Considering all potential sources of error, our final determination of H0 = 73.3 ± 1.7 km/s/Mpc (not including systematic errors from the treatment of geometric distances or Type Ia Supernovae) shows remarkable robustness and agreement with R16. We conclude systematics from the modelling of Cepheid photometry, including Cepheid selection criteria, cannot explain the observed tension between Cepheid-variable and CMB-based inferences of the Hubble constant. Considering a `model-independent' approach to relating Cepheids in galaxies with known distances to Cepheids in galaxies hosting a Type Ia supernova and finding agreement with the R16 result, we conclude no generalization of the model relating anchor and host Cepheid magnitude measurements can introduce significant bias in the H0 inference.

  4. Extremely metal-poor stars in classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies : Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafelmeyer, M.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Starkenburg, E.; Venn, K. A.; Abel, T.; Francois, P.; Kaufer, A.; North, P.; Primas, F.; Szeifert, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a dedicated search for extremely metal-poor stars in the Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSphs. Five stars were selected from two earlier VLT/Giraffe and HET/HRS surveys and subsequently followed up at high spectroscopic resolution with VLT/UVES. All of them turned out to

  5. Extremely metal-poor stars in classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafelmeyer, M.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Starkenburg, E.; Venn, K. A.; Abel, T.; Francois, P.; Kaufer, A.; North, P.; Primas, F.; Szeifert, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a dedicated search for extremely metal-poor stars in the Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSphs. Five stars were selected from two earlier VLT/Giraffe and HET/HRS surveys and subsequently followed up at high spectroscopic resolution with VLT/UVES. All of them turned out to

  6. Cepheid distances from infrared long-baseline interferometry. I. VINCI/VLTI observations of seven Galactic Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervella, P.; Nardetto, N.; Bersier, D.; Mourard, D.; Coudé du Foresto, V.

    2004-03-01

    We report the angular diameter measurements of seven classical Cepheids, X Sgr, η Aql, W Sgr, ζ Gem, β Dor, Y Oph and ℓ Car that we have obtained with the VINCI instrument, installed at ESO's VLT Interferometer (VLTI). We also present reprocessed archive data obtained with the FLUOR/IOTA instrument on ζ Gem, in order to improve the phase coverage of our observations. We obtain average limb darkened angular diameter values of /line{θLD}[X Sgr] = 1.471 ± 0.033 mas, /line{θLD[η Aql] = 1.839 ± 0.028 mas, /line{θLD}[W Sgr] = 1.312 ± 0.029 mas, /line{θLD}[β Dor] = 1.891 ± 0.024 mas, /line{θLD}[ζ Gem] =1.747 ± 0.061 mas, /line{θLD}[Y Oph] = 1.437 ± 0.040 mas, and /line{θLD}[ℓ Car] = 2.988 ± 0.012 mas. For four of these stars, η Aql, W Sgr, β Dor, and ℓ Car, we detect the pulsational variation of their angular diameter. This enables us to compute directly their distances, using a modified version of the Baade-Wesselink method: d[η Aql] = 276+55-38 pc, d[W Sgr] = 379+216-130 pc, d[β Dor] = 345+175-80 pc, d[ℓ Car] = 603+24-19 pc. The stated error bars are statistical in nature. Applying a hybrid method, that makes use of the Gieren et al. (\\cite{gieren98}) Period-Radius relation to estimate the linear diameters, we obtain the following distances (statistical and systematic error bars are mentioned): d[X Sgr] = 324 ± 7 ± 17 pc, d[η Aql] = 264 ± 4 ± 14 pc, d[W Sgr] = 386 ± 9 ± 21 pc, d[β Dor] = 326 ± 4 ± 19 pc, d[ζ Gem] = 360 ± 13 ± 22 pc, d[Y Oph] = 648 ± 17 ± 47 pc, d[ℓ Car] = 542 ± 2 ± 49 pc. Tables 3 to 10 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  7. Concerning the incidence of duplicity among cepheid variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madore, B.F.; Fernie, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A 'phase-shift' technique for detecting photometric companions to cepheids is applied to 202 variables. The inferred incidence of duplicity is 35 plus or minus 5%. An earlier 'color-color loop' method suggested 20%-27% duplicity. However, when positive results are required of both methods for a given star, the incidence falls to 15%. This lack of detailed agreement, as well as an apparent correlation of duplicity with period, suggests neither method is infallible

  8. Spectroscopic properties of a two-dimensional time-dependent Cepheid model. II. Determination of stellar parameters and abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, V.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Lemasle, B.; Marconi, M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Standard spectroscopic analyses of variable stars are based on hydrostatic 1D model atmospheres. This quasi-static approach has not been theoretically validated. Aim. We aim at investigating the validity of the quasi-static approximation for Cepheid variables. We focus on the spectroscopic determination of the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, microturbulent velocity ξt, and a generic metal abundance log A, here taken as iron. Methods: We calculated a grid of 1D hydrostatic plane-parallel models covering the ranges in effective temperature and gravity that are encountered during the evolution of a 2D time-dependent envelope model of a Cepheid computed with the radiation-hydrodynamics code CO5BOLD. We performed 1D spectral syntheses for artificial iron lines in local thermodynamic equilibrium by varying the microturbulent velocity and abundance. We fit the resulting equivalent widths to corresponding values obtained from our dynamical model for 150 instances in time, covering six pulsational cycles. In addition, we considered 99 instances during the initial non-pulsating stage of the temporal evolution of the 2D model. In the most general case, we treated Teff, log g, ξt, and log A as free parameters, and in two more limited cases, we fixed Teff and log g by independent constraints. We argue analytically that our approach of fitting equivalent widths is closely related to current standard procedures focusing on line-by-line abundances. Results: For the four-parametric case, the stellar parameters are typically underestimated and exhibit a bias in the iron abundance of ≈-0.2 dex. To avoid biases of this type, it is favorable to restrict the spectroscopic analysis to photometric phases ϕph ≈ 0.3…0.65 using additional information to fix the effective temperature and surface gravity. Conclusions: Hydrostatic 1D model atmospheres can provide unbiased estimates of stellar parameters and abundances of Cepheid variables for particular

  9. RESOLVED COMPANIONS OF CEPHEIDS: TESTING THE CANDIDATES WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS 4, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave., Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Bond, Howard E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Schaefer, Gail H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, California 91023 (United States); Mason, Brian D., E-mail: nevans@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org [US Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M{sub ⊙}). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au.

  10. Recent progress in the theoretical modelling of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Marcella

    2017-09-01

    Cepheids and RR Lyrae are among the most important primary distance indicators to calibrate the extragalactic distance ladder and excellent stellar population tracers, for Population I and Population II, respectively. In this paper I first mention some recent theoretical studies of Cepheids and RR Lyrae obtained with different theoretical tools. Then I focus the attention on new results based on nonlinear convective pulsation models in the context of some international projects, including VMC@VISTA and the Gaia collaboration. The open problems for both Cepheids and RR Lyrae are briefly discussed together with some challenging future application.

  11. Investigating light curve modulation via kernel smoothing. I. Application to 53 fundamental mode and first-overtone Cepheids in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süveges, Maria; Anderson, Richard I.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Recent studies have revealed a hitherto unknown complexity of Cepheid pulsations by discovering irregular modulated variability using photometry, radial velocities, and interferometry. Aim. We aim to perform a statistically rigorous search and characterization of such phenomena in continuous time, applying it to 53 classical Cepheids from the OGLE-III catalog. Methods: We have used local kernel regression to search for both period and amplitude modulations simultaneously in continuous time and to investigate their detectability. We determined confidence intervals using parametric and non-parametric bootstrap sampling to estimate significance, and investigated multi-periodicity using a modified pre-whitening approach that relies on time-dependent light curve parameters. Results: We find a wide variety of period and amplitude modulations and confirm that first overtone pulsators are less stable than fundamental mode Cepheids. Significant temporal variations in period are more frequently detected than those in amplitude. We find a range of modulation intensities, suggesting that both amplitude and period modulations are ubiquitous among Cepheids. Over the 12-year baseline offered by OGLE-III, we find that period changes are often nonlinear, sometimes cyclic, suggesting physical origins beyond secular evolution. Our method detects modulations (period and amplitude) more efficiently than conventional methods that are reliant on certain features in the Fourier spectrum, and pre-whitens time series more accurately than using constant light curve parameters, removing spurious secondary peaks effectively. Conclusions: Period and amplitude modulations appear to be ubiquitous among Cepheids. Current detectability is limited by observational cadence and photometric precision: detection of amplitude modulation below 3 mmag requires space-based facilities. Recent and ongoing space missions (K2, BRITE, MOST, CoRoT) as well as upcoming ones (TESS, PLATO) will

  12. Obtaining accurate radial velocities for Cepheid companions using the STIS echelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proffitt C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the high dispersion echelle observations of the hot binary companions of six Cepheids with known radial-velocity orbits that we have obtained with the STIS FUV E140H mode on board the Hubble Space Telescope, with the goal of determining the masses of these Cepheids. We discuss the stability and repeatability of the STIS echelle wavelength scale and other issues that may limit the final accuracy of our mass determinations.

  13. Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient. III. First results for the outer disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrievsky, S. M.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Luck, R. E.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Beletsky, Yu. V.

    2002-09-01

    As a continuation of our previous work, which concerned the radial abundance distribution in the galactic disc over the distances 4-10 kpc this paper presents the first results on the metallicity in the outer disc (RG > 10 kpc). Based on high-resolution spectra obtained for 19 distant Cepheids we sampled galactocentric distances from 10 to 12 kpc. Combined with the results of our previous work on the inner and middle parts of the galactic disc, the present data enable one to study the structure of the radial abundance distribution over a large baseline. In particular, we find indications of a discontinuity in the radial abundance distribution for iron as well as a number of the other elements. The discontinuity is seen at a galactocentric distance RG = 10 kpc. This finding supports the results reported earlier by Twarog et al. (\\cite{twaet97}). Based on spectra collected at ESO - La Silla, Chile. Table A1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/392/491

  14. THE CoRoT DISCOVERY OF A UNIQUE TRIPLE-MODE CEPHEID IN THE GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poretti, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Baglin, A. [LESIA, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Weiss, W. W., E-mail: ennio.poretti@brera.inaf.it [Institute of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-11-10

    The exploitation of the CoRoT treasure of stars observed in the exoplanetary field allowed the detection of a unusual triple-mode Cepheid in the Milky Way, CoRoT 0223989566. The two modes with the largest amplitudes and a period ratio of 0.80 are identified with the first (P {sub 1} = 1.29 days) and second (P {sub 2} = 1.03 days) radial overtones. The third period, which has the smallest amplitude but is able to produce combination terms with the other two, is the longest one (P {sub 3} = 1.89 days). The ratio of 0.68 between the first-overtone period and the third period is the unusual feature. Its identification with the fundamental radial or a nonradial mode is discussed with respect to similar cases in the Magellanic Clouds. In both cases, the period triplet and the respective ratios make the star unique in our Galaxy. The distance derived from the period-luminosity relation and the galactic coordinates put CoRoT 0223989566 in the metal-rich environment of the ''outer arm'' of the Milky Way.

  15. Thermodynamics of Small Alkali Metal Halide Cluster Ions: Comparison of Classical Molecular Simulations with Experiment and Quantum Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, L.; Uhlík, F.; Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Chialvo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 3 (2015), s. 488-500 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : monte-carlo simulations * molecular-dynamic simulations * classical drude oscillators Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.883, year: 2015

  16. High-resolution spectroscopy for Cepheids distance determination. IV. Time series of Hα line profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardetto, N.; Groh, J. H.; Kraus, S.; Millour, F.; Gillet, D.

    2008-10-01

    Context: In recent years, infrared interferometry has revealed the presence of faint dusty circumstellar envelopes (CSE) around Cepheids. However the size, shape, chemical nature, and the interaction of the CSE with the star itself are still under investigation. The presence of a CSE might have an effect on the angular diameter estimates used in the interferometric Baade-Wesselink and surface-brightness methods of determining the distance of Cepheids. Aims: By studying Hα profiles as a function of the period, we investigate the permanent mass loss and the CSE around Cepheids. Our high spectral- and time-resolution data, combined with a very good S/N, will be useful in constraining future hydrodynamical models of Cepheids atmosphere and their close environment. Methods: We present HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planetary Search project developed by the European Southern Observatory.) high-resolution spectroscopy (R = 120 000) of eight galactic Cepheids: R Tra, S Cru, Y Sgr, β Dor, zeta Gem, RZ Vel, ell Car, and RS Pup, providing a good period sampling (P = 3.39 d to P = 41.52 d). The Hα line profiles are described for all stars using a 2D (wavelength versus pulsation phase) representation. For each star, an average spectral line profile is derived, together with its first moment (γ-velocity) and its asymmetry (γ-asymmetry). Results: Short-period Cepheids show Hα line profiles following the pulsating envelope of the star, while long-period Cepheids show very complex line profiles and, in particular, large asymmetries. We find a new relationship between the period of Cepheids and their γ-velocities and -asymmetries. These results may be related to the dynamical structure of the atmosphere and to a permanent mass loss of Cepheids. In particular, we confirm for ell Car a dominant absorption component whose velocity is constant and nearly of zero km s-1 in the stellar rest frame. This component is attributed to the presence of circumstellar envelope

  17. Toward a renewed Galactic Cepheid distance scale from Gaia and optical interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervella, Pierre; Mérand, Antoine; Gallenne, Alexandre; Trahin, Boris; Nardetto, Nicolas; Anderson, Richard I.; Breitfelder, Joanne; Szabados, Laszlo; Bond, Howard E.; Borgniet, Simon; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz

    2017-09-01

    Through an innovative combination of multiple observing techniques and modeling, we are assembling a comprehensive understanding of the pulsation and close environment of Cepheids. We developed the SPIPS modeling tool that combines all observables (radial velocimetry, photometry, angular diameters from interferometry) to derive the relevant physical parameters of the star (effective temperature, infrared excess, reddening, …) and the ratio of the distance and the projection factor d/p. We present the application of SPIPS to the long-period Cepheid RS Pup, for which we derive p = 1.25±0.06. The addition of this massive Cepheid consolidates the existing sample of p-factor measurements towards long-period pulsators. This allows us to conclude that p is constant or mildly variable around p = 1.29±0.04 (±3%) as a function of the pulsation period. The forthcoming Gaia DR2 will provide a considerable improvement in quantity and accuracy of the trigonometric parallaxes of Cepheids. From this sample, the SPIPS modeling tool will enable a robust calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  18. Toward a renewed Galactic Cepheid distance scale from Gaia and optical interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kervella Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an innovative combination of multiple observing techniques and modeling, we are assembling a comprehensive understanding of the pulsation and close environment of Cepheids. We developed the SPIPS modeling tool that combines all observables (radial velocimetry, photometry, angular diameters from interferometry to derive the relevant physical parameters of the star (effective temperature, infrared excess, reddening, … and the ratio of the distance and the projection factor d/p. We present the application of SPIPS to the long-period Cepheid RS Pup, for which we derive p = 1.25±0.06. The addition of this massive Cepheid consolidates the existing sample of p-factor measurements towards long-period pulsators. This allows us to conclude that p is constant or mildly variable around p = 1.29±0.04 (±3% as a function of the pulsation period. The forthcoming Gaia DR2 will provide a considerable improvement in quantity and accuracy of the trigonometric parallaxes of Cepheids. From this sample, the SPIPS modeling tool will enable a robust calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  19. Recent Insights in the Dynamical Structure of Cepheids' Atmosphere and Prospect Concerning Hydrodynamical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardetto, N.

    The link between the dynamical structure of Cepheid atmosphere and the distance scale calibration in the universe is now clearly established through a period-projection factor relation (Pp). However, to support future observations, we currently need fully consistent hydrodynamical models, including pulsating and evolutionary theories, convective energy transport, adaptive numerical meshes, and a refined calculation of the radiative transfer within the pulsating atmosphere and the expected circumstellar envelope (hereafter CSE). Confronting such models with observations (spectral line profiles, spatial- and spectral- visibility curves), will permit to resolve and/or strengthen subtle questions concerning (1) the limb-darkening, (2) the dynamical structure of Cepheids' atmosphere, (3) the expected interaction between the atmosphere and the CSE, and (4) it will bring new insights in determining the fundamental parameters of Cepheids. All these physical quantities are supposed furthermore to be linked to the pulsation period of Cepheids. From these studies, it will be possible to paint a glowing picture of all Cepheids within the instability strip, allowing an unprecedent calibration of the period-luminosity relation, leading to new insights in the fields of extragalactic distance scales and cosmology.

  20. Classical antiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors)

  1. Thermodynamics of Small Alkali Metal Halide Cluster Ions: Comparison of Classical Molecular Simulations with Experiment and Quantum Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcek, Lukas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Uhlik, Filip [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Moucka, Filip [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Nezbeda, Ivo [Purkinje Univ. (Czech Republic); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic); Chialvo, Ariel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-16

    We evaluate the ability of selected classical molecular models to describe the thermodynamic and structural aspects of gas-phase hydration of alkali halide ions and the formation of small water clusters. To understand the effect of many-body interactions (polarization) and charge penetration effects on the accuracy of a force field, we perform Monte Carlo simulations with three rigid water models using different functional forms to account for these effects: (i) point charge non-polarizable SPC/E, (ii) Drude point charge polarizable SWM4- DP, and (iii) Drude Gaussian charge polarizable BK3. Model predictions are compared with experimental Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of ion hydration, and with microscopic structural properties obtained from quantum DFT calculations. We find that all three models provide comparable predictions for pure water clusters and cation hydration, but differ significantly in their description of anion hydration. None of the investigated classical force fields can consistently and quantitatively reproduce the experimental gas phase hydration thermodynamics. The outcome of this study highlights the relation between the functional form that describes the effective intermolecular interactions and the accuracy of the resulting ion hydration properties.

  2. Luminosities and infrared excess in Type II and anomalous Cepheids in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Jurkovic, M. I.

    2017-07-01

    Type II and anomalous Cepheids (ACs) are useful distance indicators when there are too few classical Cepheids or when RR Lyrae stars are too faint. Type II and ACs follow a period-luminosity relation as well, but they are less well-studied classes of objects. In this paper we study the sample of 335 Type II and ACs in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds detected in OGLE-III data. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are constructed from photometric data available in the literature and fitted with a dust radiative transfer model, thereby leading to a determination of luminosity and effective temperature. In addition, a subsample of targets is investigated for possible binarity by looking for the light-time travel effect (LITE). Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams (HRD) are constructed and compared to evolutionary tracks and theoretical instability strips (ISs). In agreement with previous suggestions, the BL Her subclass can be explained by the evolution of 0.5-0.6 M⊙ stars evolving off the zero-age horizontal branch and the ACs can be explained by the evolution of 1.1-2.3 M⊙ stars. The evolution of the W Vir subclass is not clear. These objects are at higher luminosities than ACs and evolutionary tracks of 2.5-4 M⊙ stars cross this region in the HRD, but the periods of the W Vir are longer than those of the short period classical Cepheids at these luminosities, which indicates the former have lower masses. A low-mass star experiencing a thermal pulse when the envelope mass is small can make a blue loop into the IS region of the W Vir stars. But the timescale is extremely short, so this is also no explanation for the W Vir as a class. A relation to binarity might be at the origin of the W Vir stars, which has already been explicitly suggested for the peculiar W Vir stars. For 60% of the RV Tau and 10% of the W Vir objects an infrared excess is detected from the SED fitting. A recent result is confirmed that stars exist with luminosities below that predicted from

  3. On the α-element gradients of the Galactic thin disk using Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovali, K.; Lemasle, B.; da Silva, R.; Bono, G.; Fabrizio, M.; Bergemann, M.; Buonanno, R.; Ferraro, I.; François, P.; Iannicola, G.; Inno, L.; Laney, C. D.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Matsunaga, N.; Nonino, M.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Thévenin, F.

    2015-08-01

    We present new homogeneous measurements of Na, Al, and three α-elements (Mg, Si, Ca) for 75 Galactic Cepheids. The abundances are based on high spectral resolution (R~ 38 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ~ 50-300) spectra collected with UVES at ESO VLT. The current measurements were complemented with Cepheid abundances provided by our group (75) or available in the literature, for a total of 439 Galactic Cepheids. Special attention was given to providing a homogeneous abundance scale for these five elements plus iron. In addition, accurate Galactocentric distances (RG) based on near-infrared photometry are also available for all the Cepheids in the sample. They cover a large section of the Galactic thin disk (4.1 ≤RG≤ 18.4 kpc). We found that these five elements display well-defined linear radial gradients and modest standard deviations over the entire range of RG. Moreover, the [element/Fe] abundance ratios are constant across the entire thin disk; only the Ca radial distribution shows marginal evidence of a positive slope. These results indicate that the chemical enrichment history of iron and of the quoted five elements has been quite similar across the four quadrants of the Galactic thin disk. The [element/Fe] ratios are also constant over the entire period range. This empirical evidence indicates that the chemical enrichment of Galactic Cepheids has also been very homogenous within the range in age that they cover (~10-300 Myr). Once again, [Ca/Fe] vs. log P shows a (negative) gradient, since it is underabundant among the youngest Cepheids. Finally, we also find that Cepheid abundances agree quite well with similar abundances for thin and thick disk dwarf stars, and they follow the typical Mg-Al and Na-O correlations. Based on spectra collected with the UVES spectrograph available at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), Cerro Paranal, Chile (ESO Proposals: 081.D-0928(A), PI: S. Pedicelli; 082.D-0901(A), PI: S. Pedicelli; 089.D-0767(C), PI: K

  4. Filling the gap between the quantum and classical worlds of nanoscale magnetism: giant molecular aggregates based on paramagnetic 3d metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatriantafyllopoulou, Constantina; Moushi, Eleni E; Christou, George; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2016-03-21

    In this review, aspects of the syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of giant 3d and 3d/4f paramagnetic metal clusters in moderate oxidation states are discussed. The term "giant clusters" is used herein to denote metal clusters with nuclearity of 30 or greater. Many synthetic strategies towards such species have been developed and are discussed in this paper. Attempts are made to categorize some of the most successful methods to giant clusters, but it will be pointed out that the characteristics of the crystal structures of such compounds including nuclearity, shape, architecture, etc. are unpredictable depending on the specific structural features of the included organic ligands, reaction conditions and other factors. The majority of the described compounds in this review are of special interest not only for their fascinating nanosized structures but also because they sometimes display interesting magnetic phenomena, such as ferromagnetic exchange interactions, large ground state spin values, single-molecule magnetism behaviour or impressively large magnetocaloric effects. In addition, they often possess the properties of both the quantum and the classical world, and thus their systematic study offers the potential for the discovery of new physical phenomena, as well as a better understanding of the existing ones. The research field of giant clusters is under continuous evolution and their intriguing structural characteristics and magnetism properties that attract the interest of synthetic Inorganic Chemists promise a brilliant future for this class of compounds.

  5. Azotobacter vinelandii metal storage protein: "classical" inorganic chemistry involved in Mo/W uptake and release processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemberg, Jörg; Schneider, Klaus; Fenske, Dirk; Müller, Achim

    2008-03-03

    The release of Mo (as molybdate) from the Mo storage protein (MoSto), which is unique among all existing metalloproteins, is strongly influenced by temperature and pH value; other factors (incubation time, protein concentration, degree of purity) have minor, though significant effects. A detailed pH titration at 12 degrees C revealed that three different steps can be distinguished for the Mo-release process. A proportion of approximately 15% at pH 6.8-7.0, an additional 25% at pH 7.2-7.5 and ca. 50% (up to 90% in total) at pH 7.6-7.8. This triphasic process supports the assumption of the presence of different types of molybdenum-oxide-based clusters that exhibit different pH lability. The complete release of Mo was achieved by increasing the temperature to 30 degrees C and the pH value to >7.5. The Mo-release process does not require ATP; on the contrary, ATP prevents, or at least reduces the degree of metal release, depending on the concentration of the nucleotide. From this point of view, the intracellular ATP concentration is suggested to play-in addition to the pH value-an indirect but crucial role in controlling the extent of Mo release in the cell. The binding of molybdenum to the apoprotein (reconstitution process) was confirmed to be directly dependent on the presence of a nucleotide (preferably ATP) and MgCl2. Maximal reincorporation of Mo required 1 mM ATP, which could partly be replaced by GTP. When the storage protein was purified in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 (1 mM each), the final preparation contained 80 Mo atoms per protein molecule. Maximal metal loading (110-115 atoms/MoSto molecule) was only achieved, if Mo was first completely released from the native protein and subsequently (re-) bound under optimal reconstitution conditions: 1 h incubation at pH 6.5 and 12 degrees C in the presence of ATP, MgCl2 and excess molybdate. A corresponding tungsten-containing storage protein ("WSto") could not only be synthesized in vivo by growing cells, but

  6. Classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Benacquista, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to classical mechanics at a level intermediate between the typical undergraduate and advanced graduate level. This text describes the background and tools for use in the fields of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, particle physics, and relativity. Students who have had basic undergraduate classical mechanics or who have a good understanding of the mathematical methods of physics will benefit from this book.

  7. Properties of Anomalous and Type II Cepheids in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkovic Monika I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC give us the possibility to study individual variable star types in a new way. Literature data provide us with photometric information about objects from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Here we would like to show the results of our study of 335 Anomalous and Type II Cepheids in the SMC and LMC detected by OGLE. Using the code More of DUSTY (MoD, a modified version of the DUSTY radiative transfer code, and the assumption that our objects are at a known distance, luminosity and effective temperature were determined. From these data the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of these objects was compared with the theoretical models. The radius and masses of the examined stars was estimated, too. In the end, we have given the period-luminosity relations for the Anomalous and Type II Cepheids.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVIc light curves of 57 Cepheids (Berdnikov+,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Zhujko, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    In 2008-2013, we obtained 11333 CCD BV Ic frames for 57 Cepheids from the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We performed our observations with the 76-cm telescope of the South AfricanAstronomicalObservatory (SAAO, South Africa) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Astronomical Observatory of the Universidad Catolica del Norte (OCA, Chile) using the SBIG ST-10XME CCD camera. The tables of observations, the plots of light curves, and the current light elements are presented. Comparison of our light curves with those constructed from photoelectric observations shows that the differences between their mean magnitudes exceed 0.05mag in 20% of the cases. This suggests the necessity of performing CCD observations for all Cepheids. (2 data files).

  9. The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud - Constraints from Cepheids in Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Gianpaolo; Bressan, Alessandro; Chiosi, Cesare; Mateo, Mario; Wood, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We have used recent observational data for the Cepheids in the rich, young LMC clusters NGC 1866 and NGC 2031 to constrain the cluster distances with the mass-equivalency (ME) method. The basis of this approach is to fix the cluster distances by requiring the Cepheid evolutionary and pulsational masses to be equal. Using evolutionary models incorporating a mild amount of core and envelope overshooting along with recent pulsational models, we derive distance moduli of 18.51 +/- 0.21 and 18.32 +/- 0.20 for NGC 1866 and NGC 2031, respectively. The quoted errors are dominated by the uncertainties in the heavy element abundances of the clusters (assumed to be 0.3 dex for both clusters), with a smaller contribution due to the apparently intrinsic spread in the masses of the Cepheids in each cluster. For the ME method, we find that Delta(m-M)(0)/Delta sub Z(1) = 0.69, where Z(1) = log (Z/0.016). This result implies that the cluster distances can be determined to better than +/- 5 percent if the cluster abundances can be measured to better than about +/- 0.15 dex.

  10. Classical tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.

    1984-01-01

    A review of tachyons, with particular attention to their classical theory, is presented. The extension of Special Relativity to tachyons in two dimensional is first presented, an elegant model-theory which allows a better understanding also of ordinary physics. Then, the results are extended to the four-dimensional case (particular on tachyon mechanics) that can be derived without assuming the existence of Super-luminal reference-frames. Localizability and the unexpected apparent shape of tachyonic objects are discussed, and it is shown (on the basis of tachyon kinematics) how to solve the common causal paradoxes. In connection with General Relativity, particularly the problem of the apparent superluminal expansions in astrophysics is reviewed. The problem (still open) of the extension of relativitic theories to tachyons in four dimensions is tackled, and the electromagnetic theory of tachyons, a topic that can be relevant also for the experimental side, is reviewed. (Author) [pt

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy for Cepheids distance determination. III. A relation between γ-velocities and γ-asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardetto, N.; Stoekl, A.; Bersier, D.; Barnes, T. G.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Galactic Cepheids in the vicinity of the Sun have a residual line-of-sight velocity, or γ-velocity, which shows a systematic blueshift of about 2 km s-1 compared to an axisymmetric rotation model of the Milky Way. This term is either related to the space motion of the star and, consequently, to the kinematic structure of our Galaxy, or it is the result of the dynamical structure of the Cepheids' atmosphere. Aims: We aim to show that these residual γ-velocities are an intrinsic property of Cepheids. Methods: We observed eight galactic Cepheids with the HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planetary Search project developed by the European Southern Observatory.) spectroscope, focusing specifically on 17 spectral lines. For each spectral line of each star, we computed the γ-velocity (resp. γ-asymmetry) as an average value of the interpolated radial velocity (resp. line asymmetry) curve. Results: For each Cepheid in our sample, a linear relation is found between the γ-velocities of the various spectral lines and their corresponding γ-asymmetries, showing that residual γ-velocities stem from the intrinsic properties of Cepheids. We also provide a physical reference to the stellar γ-velocity: it should be zero when the γ-asymmetry is zero. Following this definition, we provide very precise and physically calibrated estimates of the γ-velocities for all stars of our sample [ in km s-1] : -11.3 ± 0.3 [R TrA], -3.5 ± 0.4 [S Cru], -1.5 ± 0.2 [Y Sgr], 9.8 ± 0.1 [ β Dor] , 7.1 ± 0.1 [ zeta Gem] , 24.6 ± 0.4 [RZ Vel], 4.4 ± 0.1 [ ell Car] , 25.7 ± 0.2 [RS Pup]. Finally, we investigated several physical explanations for these γ-asymmetries like velocity gradients or the relative motion of the line-forming region compared to the corresponding mass elements. However, none of these hypotheses seems to be entirely satisfactory to explain the observations. Conclusions: To understand this very subtle γ-asymmetry effect, further numerical studies are

  12. Use of Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying of bi-metallic powder mixtures as alternative to classic powder metallurgy route for producing intermetallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents cold gas dynamic spraying (or Cold Spray as a novel surface treatment technology capable not only of surface modifications but also being used as bulk creating technology. This is demonstrated on numerous samples where bi-metallic powder feedstock is deposited into bulk, self-standing pieces of material that does not need the support of substrate. Mixtures from the group of Fe, Al, Ti, Ni, Cu were used for the initial bi-metallic mixtures. The deposited samples were then subjected to annealing at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1100°C in protective atmosphere and resulting morphologies and microstructures were analysed. Generally materials with high proportion of intermetallic phase content were obtained. These are discussed as potential scaffolds for metal or polymer matrix composites or as hi temperature resistive supports for catalysts with filter functions.

  13. New Parallaxes of Galactic Cepheids from Spatially Scanning the Hubble Space Telescope: Implications for the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Adam G.; Casertano, Stefano; Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas; Anderson, Jay; MacKenty, John W.; Bowers, J. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Jones, David O.; Tucker, Brad E.

    2018-03-01

    We present new measurements of the parallax of seven long-period (≥10 days) Milky Way (MW) Cepheid variables (SS CMa, XY Car, VY Car, VX Per, WZ Sgr, X Pup, and S Vul) using one-dimensional astrometric measurements from spatial scanning of Wide-Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The observations were obtained at ∼6 month intervals over 4 years. The distances are 1.7–3.6 kpc, with a mean precision of 45 μas (signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ≈ 10) and a best precision of 29 μas (S/N = 14). The accuracy of the parallaxes is demonstrated through independent analyses of >100 reference stars. This raises to 10 the number of long-period Cepheids with significant parallax measurements, 8 obtained from this program. We also present high-precision mean F555W, F814W, and F160W magnitudes of these Cepheids, allowing a direct, zeropoint-independent comparison to >1800 extragalactic Cepheids in the hosts of 19 SNe Ia. This sample addresses two outstanding systematic uncertainties affecting prior comparisons of MW and extragalactic Cepheids used to calibrate the Hubble constant (H 0): their dissimilarity of periods and photometric systems. Comparing the new parallaxes to their predicted values derived from reversing the distance ladder gives a ratio (or independent scale for H 0) of 1.037 ± 0.036, consistent with no change and inconsistent at the 3.5σ level with a ratio of 0.91 needed to match the value predicted by Planck cosmic microwave background data in concert with ΛCDM. Using these data instead to augment the Riess et al. measurement of H 0 improves the precision to 2.3%, yielding 73.48 ± 1.66 km s‑1 Mpc‑1, and the tension with Planck + ΛCDM increases to 3.7σ. The future combination of Gaia parallaxes and HST spatial scanning photometry of 50 MW Cepheids can support a <1% calibration of H 0.

  14. Pulsating star products from the Palomar Transient Factory: Ultra-long period Cepheids in M31 and RR Lyrae in Kepler field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngeow Chow-Choong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and its successor, the intermediate PTF (iPTF, are wide-field synoptic sky surveys aimed to detect transients. Even though the main science goal for PTF/iPTF is to detect various types of transients, the synoptic nature of the surveys can also be used for the study of variable stars. In this proceedings contribution, I will first give a brief introduction to PTF/iPTF, followed by the two pulsating stars studies using the PTF/iPTF data: the Ultra-Long Period Cepheids (ULPC in M31 and the RR Lyrae in the Kepler field. For the formal study, we searched the M31’s ULPC using PTF imaging data, and follow up the candidates with other telescopes. Our finding revealed that there are only two ULPC in M31. I will give a brief implication of our finding in distance scale studies. For the latter study, I will present our work on the derivation of metallicity-light curve relation in native PTF/iPTF R-band using the RRab stars in the Kepler field.

  15. Pulsational constraints to the metallicity gradient in the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, F.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Pont, F.

    2001-06-01

    BVI data of Galactic Cepheids observed in the solar neighborhood and in the outer disk are analyzed on the basis of nonlinear, non-local and time-dependent convective pulsating models computed for different assumptions on the chemical composition. We show that the theoretical color-color, period-luminosity, and period-luminosity-color relations, as predicted by the models with varying metal content, provide the way to simultaneously estimate the true distance modulus mu_0 and the metal content Z of each individual variable. On this basis, we estimate that the metallicity distribution of Cepheids with Galactocentric distances d from ~ 6 to ~ 19 kpc can be represented by a linear gradient of -0.05 +/- 0.01 dex kpc-1, which is close to previous empirical determinations based on Cepheids, Planetary Nebulae and HII regions. However, our results are not excluding a different scenario, such as a two-zone model with a discontinuity in metallicity near d=10 kpc (see Twarog et al. 1997).

  16. J. Genet. classic 101

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. 101. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. 102. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. 103. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. 104. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No. 2, August 2006. Page 5. J. Genet. classic.

  17. J. Genet. classic 37

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 37. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 38. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 39. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 84, No. 1, April 2005. 40. Page 5. J. Genet. classic. Journal of ...

  18. J. Genet. classic 125

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 2, August 2004. 125. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 2, August 2004. 126. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 2, August 2004. 127. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 2, August 2004. 128. Page 5. J. Genet. classic.

  19. J. Genet. classic 9

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 1, April 2009. 9. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. 10. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 1, April 2009. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 1, April 2009. 11. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. 12. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 1, April 2009. Page 5. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics ...

  20. Performance evaluation of Cepheid Xpert Norovirus kit with a user-modified protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rachel Shi-Lei; Yeo, Fion; Chia, Wai Theng; Lee, Chun Kiat; Leong, Mun Han; Ng, Christopher Wai-Siong; Poon, Kok Siong; Yan, Gabriel Zherong; Chiu, Lily-Lily; Yan, Benedict Junrong; Jureen, Roland; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Lee, Hong Kai

    2018-03-01

    The Cepheid Xpert® Norovirus kit automates sample processing, nucleic acid extraction, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) to detect norovirus genogroups I (GI) and II (GII). Eighty-five stool samples collected between February 2015 and May 2017 were used to compare the performance of a user-modified Xpert assay against a clinically validated laboratory-developed test (LDT). Of the 85 samples, 54 were previously archived in -80°C freezer. The remaining 31 were fresh samples tested concurrently with the LDT. The results of all samples tested using the Xpert kit and LDT were found to be concordant, including 12 GI- and 42 GII-positive samples, 1 GI and GII coinfection, and 30 negative samples. Comparison of the assays showed perfect concordance with a kappa coefficient score of 1.00 (95%CI from 1.00 to 1.00). Of the 30 negative stool samples tested, three samples were positive for rotavirus detected using an immunochromatographic assay, with no cross-reactivity shown in both LDT and Xpert assays. In-run sample processing control of the Xpert assay for all negative samples tested showed no/minor inhibition. Compared to the LDT, the Xpert assay produced similar or better Ct values for detection. It also showed better mitigation of PCR inhibition in stool sample testing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Type II Cepheids: evidence for Na-O anticorrelation for BL Her type stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, V.; Yegorova, I.; Andrievsky, S.; Korotin, S.; Saviane, I.; Lemasle, B.; Chekhonadskikh, F.; Belik, S.

    2018-03-01

    The chemical composition of 28 Population II Cepheids and one RR Lyrae variable has been studied using high-resolution spectra. The chemical composition of W Vir variable stars (with periods longer than 8 days) is typical for the halo and thick disc stars. However, the chemical composition of BL Her variables (with periods of 0.8-4 days) is drastically different while it does not differ essentially from that of the stars belonging to globular clusters. In particular, the sodium overabundance ([Na/Fe]≈0.4) is reported for most of these stars, and the Na-O anti-correlation is also possible. The evolutionary tracks for BL Her variables (with a progenitor mass value of 0.8 solar masses) indicate that mostly helium-overabundant stars (Y=0.30-0.35) can fall into the instability strip region. We suppose that it is the helium overabundance that accounts not just for the existence of BL Her variable stars, but also for the observed abnormalities in the chemical composition of this small group of pulsating variables.

  2. J. Genet. classic 235

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 235. Page 2. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 236. Page 3. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 237. Page 4. J. Genet. classic. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 83, No. 3, December 2004. 238. Page 5 ...

  3. Comparative Evaluation of the Diagnostic Performance of the Prototype Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen van Vuren, Petrus; Grobbelaar, Antoinette; Storm, Nadia; Conteh, Ousman; Konneh, Kelfala; Kamara, Abdul; Sanne, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa has highlighted an urgent need for point-of-care (POC) assays for the diagnosis of this devastating disease in resource-limited African countries. The diagnostic performance characteristics of a prototype Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola POC used to detect Ebola virus (EBOV) in stored serum and plasma samples collected from suspected EVD cases in Sierra Leone in 2014 and 2015 was evaluated. The GeneXpert Ebola POC is a self-contained single-cartridge automated system that targets the glycoprotein (GP) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes of EBOV and yields results within 90 min. Results from 281 patient samples were compared to the results of a TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the polymerase gene and performed on two real-time PCR machines. Agreement between the three platforms was 100% at cycle threshold (CT) values of ≤34.99, but discordant results were noted between CT values of 35 and 45.The diagnostic sensitivity of the three platforms was 100% in 91 patient samples that were confirmed to be infectious by virus isolation. All three molecular platforms detected viral EBOV RNA in additional samples that did not contain viable EBOV. The analytical sensitivity of the GeneXpert Ebola POC for the detection of NP was higher, and comparable to that of polymerase gene detection, than that for the detection of GP when using a titrated laboratory stock of EBOV. There was no detectable cross-reactivity with other hemorrhagic fever viruses or arboviruses. The GeneXpert Ebola POC offers an easy to operate and sensitive diagnostic tool that can be used for the rapid screening of suspected EVD cases in treatment or in holding centers during EVD outbreaks. PMID:26637383

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Trigonometric Parallax of Polaris B, Companion of the Nearest Cepheid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.; Nelan, Edmund P.; Remage Evans, Nancy; Schaefer, Gail H.; Harmer, Dianne

    2018-01-01

    Polaris, the nearest and brightest Cepheid, is a potential anchor point for the Leavitt period–luminosity relation. However, its distance is a matter of contention, with recent advocacy for a parallax of ∼10 mas, in contrast with the Hipparcos measurement of 7.54 ± 0.11 mas. We report an independent trigonometric parallax determination, using the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Polaris itself is too bright for FGS, so we measured its eighth-magnitude companion Polaris B, relative to a network of background reference stars. We converted the FGS relative parallax to absolute, using estimated distances to the reference stars from ground-based photometry and spectral classification. Our result, 6.26 ± 0.24 mas, is even smaller than that found by Hipparcos. We note other objects for which Hipparcos appears to have overestimated parallaxes, including the well-established case of the Pleiades. We consider possible sources of systematic error in the FGS parallax, but find no evidence they are significant. If our “long” distance is correct, the high luminosity of Polaris indicates that it is pulsating in the second overtone of its fundamental mode. Our results raise several puzzles, including a long pulsation period for Polaris compared to second-overtone pulsators in the Magellanic Clouds, and a conflict between the isochrone age of Polaris B (∼2.1 Gyr) and the much younger age of Polaris A. We discuss possibilities that B is not a physical companion of A, in spite of the strong evidence that it is, or that one of the stars is a merger remnant. These issues may be resolved when Gaia provides parallaxes for both stars. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  6. Drama : Classical Versus Modern

    OpenAIRE

    Nuran, Ade Aini

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at explaining classical drama and modern drama in general. It is also purposed to compare the differences between classical drama and modern drama. One of the most significant contrasts between classical drama and modern is the difference in the protagonists. Classical tragedy, for instance, involves royalty, the elite. The idea was that for a character to have a great and far-reaching influence over society he/she had to be in a position of great power and authority. In...

  7. The Classics, Con Brio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1978-01-01

    Sponsored by a consortium of 30 American universities, Rome's Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies offers a year of study to American undergraduate classics majors. Instructors are also American and normally stay only a year; teaching assistants are always ex-students of the center. Extensive field trips are an important part of the…

  8. Fermions from classical statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe fermions in terms of a classical statistical ensemble. The states τ of this ensemble are characterized by a sequence of values one or zero or a corresponding set of two-level observables. Every classical probability distribution can be associated to a quantum state for fermions. If the time evolution of the classical probabilities p τ amounts to a rotation of the wave function q τ (t)=±√(p τ (t)), we infer the unitary time evolution of a quantum system of fermions according to a Schroedinger equation. We establish how such classical statistical ensembles can be mapped to Grassmann functional integrals. Quantum field theories for fermions arise for a suitable time evolution of classical probabilities for generalized Ising models.

  9. Mathematical physics classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Knauf, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    As a limit theory of quantum mechanics, classical dynamics comprises a large variety of phenomena, from computable (integrable) to chaotic (mixing) behavior. This book presents the KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theory and asymptotic completeness in classical scattering. Including a wealth of fascinating examples in physics, it offers not only an excellent selection of basic topics, but also an introduction to a number of current areas of research in the field of classical mechanics. Thanks to the didactic structure and concise appendices, the presentation is self-contained and requires only knowledge of the basic courses in mathematics. The book addresses the needs of graduate and senior undergraduate students in mathematics and physics, and of researchers interested in approaching classical mechanics from a modern point of view.

  10. Classical pulsating variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, G.

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the three types of classical pulsating variables (δ-Cephei stars, W-Virginis stars and RR-Lyrae stars) is studied. Problems of the light-curve analysis such as (1) the frequency distribution of periods for the three types of classical pulsating variables, (2) spurions periods, (3) changes of periods and multiple periodicity as well as (4) the Blazhko-effect and other changes of the light-curve form are discussed

  11. Nation and Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    The last book Anthony D. Smith wrote before he died, and which will be published in Spring 2017, has the title Nation and Classical Music. Smith had for a long time been intrigued by the intimate relationship between the nation and classical music. At the most manifest level it involves...... them into their compositions thus challenging the romantic musical style searching for an authentic national musical expression. Against the backdrop of the extensive research carried out by Anthony Smith into the relationship between the nation and classical music, the present paper seeks to add...... cultural centers. In doing this, the paper seeks to unfold how composers channeled musical inspiration embedded in cultural environments that cut across national boundaries into national musical traditions thus catering to specific national audiences. The paper is written as a tribute to a great mentor...

  12. Twisted classical Poincare algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukierski, J.; Ruegg, H.; Tolstoy, V.N.; Nowicki, A.

    1993-11-01

    We consider the twisting of Hopf structure for classical enveloping algebra U(g), where g is the inhomogeneous rotations algebra, with explicite formulae given for D=4 Poincare algebra (g=P 4 ). The comultiplications of twisted U F (P 4 ) are obtained by conjugating primitive classical coproducts by F element of U(c)xU(c), where c denotes any Abelian subalgebra of P 4 , and the universal R-matrices for U F (P 4 ) are triangular. As an example we show that the quantum deformation of Poincare algebra recently proposed by Chaichian and Demiczev is a twisted classical Poincare algebra. The interpretation of twisted Poincare algebra as describing relativistic symmetries with clustered 2-particle states is proposed. (orig.)

  13. Classical mechanics with Maxima

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, Todd Keene

    2016-01-01

    This book guides undergraduate students in the use of Maxima—a computer algebra system—in solving problems in classical mechanics. It functions well as a supplement to a typical classical mechanics textbook. When it comes to problems that are too difficult to solve by hand, computer algebra systems that can perform symbolic mathematical manipulations are a valuable tool. Maxima is particularly attractive in that it is open-source, multiple-platform software that students can download and install free of charge. Lessons learned and capabilities developed using Maxima are easily transferred to other, proprietary software.

  14. Classic Problems of Probability

    CERN Document Server

    Gorroochurn, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    "A great book, one that I will certainly add to my personal library."—Paul J. Nahin, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, University of New Hampshire Classic Problems of Probability presents a lively account of the most intriguing aspects of statistics. The book features a large collection of more than thirty classic probability problems which have been carefully selected for their interesting history, the way they have shaped the field, and their counterintuitive nature. From Cardano's 1564 Games of Chance to Jacob Bernoulli's 1713 Golden Theorem to Parrondo's 1996 Perplexin

  15. Learning Classical Music Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Learning Classical Music Club

    2010-01-01

    There is a new CERN Club called “Learning Classical Music at CERN”. We are aiming to give classical music lessons for different instruments (see link) for students from 5 to 100 years old. We are now ready to start our activities in the CERN barracks. We are now in the enrollment phase and hope to start lessons very soon ! Club info can be found in the list of CERN Club: http://user.web.cern.ch/user/Communication/SocialLifeActivities/Clubs/Clubs.html Salvatore Buontempo Club President

  16. Elementary classical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Langford, W J; Maxwell, E A; Plumpton, C

    1967-01-01

    Elementary Classical Hydrodynamics deals with the fundamental principles of elementary classical hydrodynamics, with emphasis on the mechanics of inviscid fluids. Topics covered by this book include direct use of the equations of hydrodynamics, potential flows, two-dimensional fluid motion, waves in liquids, and compressible flows. Some general theorems such as Bernoulli's equation are also considered. This book is comprised of six chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the fundamental principles of fluid hydrodynamics, with emphasis on ways of studying the motion of a fluid. Basic c

  17. CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system: the period-radius and the period-luminosity relation of classical Cepheids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Bono, G.; Lub, J.; Pedicelli, S.; Pel, J. W.

    We present a new derivation of the CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system. We solved the complete Baade-Wesselink equation by calibrating the surface brightness function with a recent grid of atmosphere models. The new approach was adopted to estimate the mean radii of a

  18. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  19. Classicism and Romanticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes one teacher's methods for introducing to secondary English students the concepts of Classicism and Romanticism in relation to pictures of gardens, architecture, music, and literary works. Outlines how the unit leads to a writing assignment based on collected responses over time. (HB)

  20. Classical electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Newly corrected, this highly acclaimed text is suitable for advanced physics courses. The author presents a very accessible macroscopic view of classical electromagnetics that emphasizes integrating electromagnetic theory with physical optics. The survey follows the historical development of physics, culminating in the use of four-vector relativity to fully integrate electricity with magnetism.

  1. Classical galactosaemia revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Annet M.

    2006-01-01

    Classical galactosaemia (McKusick 230400) is an: autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism, caused by a deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712). Most patients present in the neonatal period, after ingestion of galactose, with jaundice,

  2. Classical Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Judith W.

    2009-01-01

    The article identifies some key findings in pedagogical research over recent decades, placing them within a framework of logical curriculum development and current practice in quality assurance and enhancement. Throughout, the ideas and comments are related to the practice of teaching classics in university. (Contains 1 figure and 3 notes.)

  3. Causality in Classical Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Classical physics encompasses the study of phys- ical phenomena which range from local (a point) to nonlocal (a region) in space and/or time. We discuss the concept of spatial and temporal non- locality. However, one of the likely implications pertaining to nonlocality is non-causality. We study causality in the context of ...

  4. Classical Diophantine equations

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The author had initiated a revision and translation of "Classical Diophantine Equations" prior to his death. Given the rapid advances in transcendence theory and diophantine approximation over recent years, one might fear that the present work, originally published in Russian in 1982, is mostly superseded. That is not so. A certain amount of updating had been prepared by the author himself before his untimely death. Some further revision was prepared by close colleagues. The first seven chapters provide a detailed, virtually exhaustive, discussion of the theory of lower bounds for linear forms in the logarithms of algebraic numbers and its applications to obtaining upper bounds for solutions to the eponymous classical diophantine equations. The detail may seem stark--- the author fears that the reader may react much as does the tourist on first seeing the centre Pompidou; notwithstanding that, Sprind zuk maintainsa pleasant and chatty approach, full of wise and interesting remarks. His emphases well warrant, ...

  5. Classical and statistical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rizk, Hanna A

    2016-01-01

    This is a text book of thermodynamics for the student who seeks thorough training in science or engineering. Systematic and thorough treatment of the fundamental principles rather than presenting the large mass of facts has been stressed. The book includes some of the historical and humanistic background of thermodynamics, but without affecting the continuity of the analytical treatment. For a clearer and more profound understanding of thermodynamics this book is highly recommended. In this respect, the author believes that a sound grounding in classical thermodynamics is an essential prerequisite for the understanding of statistical thermodynamics. Such a book comprising the two wide branches of thermodynamics is in fact unprecedented. Being a written work dealing systematically with the two main branches of thermodynamics, namely classical thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics, together with some important indexes under only one cover, this treatise is so eminently useful.

  6. Injuries in classical ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate what injuries are most likely to occur due to classical ballet practice. The research used national and international bibliography. The bibliography analysis indicated that technical and esthetical demands lead to a practice of non-anatomical movements, causing the ballet dancer to suffer from a number of associated lesions. Most of the injuries are caused by technical mistakes and wrong training. Troubles in children are usually due to trying to force external rotation at hip level and to undue use of point ballet slippers. The commonest lesions are in feet and ankles, followed by knees and hips. The rarest ones are in the upper limbs. These injuries are caused by exercise excess, by repetitions always in the same side and by wrong and early use of point slippers. The study reached the conclusion that incorrect application of classical ballet technique predisposes the dancers to characteristic injuries.

  7. Invitation to classical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Duren, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book gives a rigorous treatment of selected topics in classical analysis, with many applications and examples. The exposition is at the undergraduate level, building on basic principles of advanced calculus without appeal to more sophisticated techniques of complex analysis and Lebesgue integration. Among the topics covered are Fourier series and integrals, approximation theory, Stirling's formula, the gamma function, Bernoulli numbers and polynomials, the Riemann zeta function, Tauberian theorems, elliptic integrals, ramifications of the Cantor set, and a theoretical discussion of differ

  8. Revisiting a Classic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ibram

    2008-01-01

    As a 26-year-old English teacher in 1958, Chinua Achebe had no idea that the book he was writing would become a literary classic, not only in Africa but also throughout the world. He could only try to articulate the feelings he had for his countrymen and women. Achebe had a burning desire to tell the true story of Africa and African humanity. The…

  9. Concepts of classical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, John

    1958-01-01

    An intermediate course in optics, this volume explores both experimental and theoretical concepts, offering practical knowledge of geometrical optics that will enhance students' comprehension of any relevant applied science. Its exposition of the concepts of classical optics is presented with a minimum of mathematical detail but presumes some knowledge of calculus, vectors, and complex numbers.Subjects include light as wave motion; superposition of wave motions; electromagnetic waves; interaction of light and matter; velocities and scattering of light; polarized light and dielectric boundarie

  10. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  11. Generalized classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, M.; Rodrigues, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The geometrical study of Classical Mechanics shows that the Hamiltonian (respectively, Lagrangian) formalism may be characterized by intrinsical structures canonically defined on the cotangent (respectively, tangent) bundle of a differentiable manifold. A generalized formalism for higher order Lagrangians is developed. Then the Hamiltonian form of the theory is developed. Finally, the Poisson brackets are defined and the conditions under which a mapping is a canonical transformation are studied. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for this type of mechanics is established. (Auth.)

  12. What was classical genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, C Kenneth

    2004-12-01

    I present an account of classical genetics to challenge theory-biased approaches in the philosophy of science. Philosophers typically assume that scientific knowledge is ultimately structured by explanatory reasoning and that research programs in well-established sciences are organized around efforts to fill out a central theory and extend its explanatory range. In the case of classical genetics, philosophers assume that the knowledge was structured by T. H. Morgan's theory of transmission and that research throughout the later 1920s, 30s, and 40s was organized around efforts to further validate, develop, and extend this theory, I show that classical genetics was structured by an integration of explanatory reasoning (associated with the transmission theory) and investigative strategies (such as the 'genetic approach'). The investigative strategies, which have been overlooked in historical and philosophical accounts, were as important as the so-called laws of Mendelian genetics. By the later 1920s, geneticists of the Morgan school were no longer organizing research around the goal of explaining inheritance patterns; rather, they were using genetics to investigate a range of biological phenomena that extended well beyond the explanatory domain of transmission theories. Theory-biased approaches in history and philosophy of science fail to reveal the overall structure of scientific knowledge and obscure the way it functions.

  13. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  14. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multisite Evaluation of Cepheid Xpert Carba-R Assay for Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Organisms in Rectal Swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tato, M; Ruiz-Garbajosa, P; Traczewski, M; Dodgson, A; McEwan, A; Humphries, R; Hindler, J; Veltman, J; Wang, H; Cantón, R

    2016-07-01

    Rapid identification of patients who are colonized with carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPO) is included in multiple national guidelines for containment of these organisms. In a multisite study, we evaluated the performance of the Cepheid Xpert Carba-R assay, a qualitative diagnostic test that was designed for the rapid detection and differentiation of the blaKPC, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaOXA-48, and blaIMP-1 genes from rectal swab specimens. A double rectal swab set was collected from 383 patients admitted at four institutions (2 in the United States, 1 in the United Kingdom, 1 in Spain). One swab was used for reference culture (MacConkey broth containing 1 mg/liter of meropenem and subcultured to a MacConkey agar plate with a 10-μg meropenem disk) and for sequencing of DNA obtained from carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates for carbapenemase identification. The other swab was used for the Xpert Carba-R assay. In addition to the clinical rectal swabs, 250 contrived specimens (108 well-characterized CPO and 142 negative controls spiked onto negative rectal swabs) were tested. Overall, 149/633 (23.5%) samples were positive by the Xpert Carba-R assay. In 6 samples, multiple targets were detected (4 VIM/OXA-48, 1 IMP-1/NDM, and 1 NDM/KPC). The Xpert Carba-R assay detected 155 targets (26 IMP-1, 30 VIM, 27 NDM, 33 KPC, 39 OXA-48) within a time range of 32 to 48 min. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Xpert Carba-R assay compared to those of the reference culture and sequencing results were 96.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.2% to 98.9%), 98.6% (95% CI, 97.1% to 99.4%), 95.3%, and 99.0%, respectively. The Cepheid Xpert Carba-R assay is an accurate and rapid test to identify rectal colonization with CPO, which can guide infection control programs to limit the spread of these organisms. Copyright © 2016 Tato et al.

  16. On Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chusseau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the laws of motion, aside from the law of energy conservation. Only a single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath submitted to a z and t-invariant force is considered. Most of the end results are known but the method appears to be novel. The mathematics being elementary, the present paper should facilitate the understanding of the ideal gas law and of classical thermodynamics even though not-usually-taught concepts are being introduced.

  17. Renormalization in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbo, Guido

    2010-01-01

    We discuss simple examples in which renormalization is required in classical field theory. The presentation is accessible to undergraduate students with a knowledge of the basic notions of classical electromagnetism. (letters and comments)

  18. Classical altitude training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann-Bette, B

    2008-08-01

    For more than 40 years, the effects of classical altitude training on sea-level performance have been the subject of many scientific investigations in individual endurance sports. To our knowledge, no studies have been performed in team sports like football. Two well-controlled studies showed that living and training at an altitude of >or=1800-2700 m for 3-4 weeks is superior to equivalent training at sea level in well-trained athletes. Most of the controlled studies with elite athletes did not reveal such an effect. However, the results of some uncontrolled studies indicate that sea-level performance might be enhanced after altitude training also in elite athletes. Whether hypoxia provides an additional stimulus for muscular adaptation, when training is performed with equal intensity compared with sea-level training is not known. There is some evidence for an augmentation of total hemoglobin mass after classical altitude training with duration >or=3 weeks at an altitude >or=2000 m due to altitude acclimatization. Considerable individual variation is observed in the erythropoietic response to hypoxia and in the hypoxia-induced reduction of aerobic performance capacity during training at altitude, both of which are thought to contribute to inter-individual variation in the improvement of sea-level performance after altitude training.

  19. Classical mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Jinzenji, Masao

    2018-01-01

    This book furnishes a brief introduction to classical mirror symmetry, a term that denotes the process of computing Gromov–Witten invariants of a Calabi–Yau threefold by using the Picard–Fuchs differential equation of period integrals of its mirror Calabi–Yau threefold. The book concentrates on the best-known example, the quintic hypersurface in 4-dimensional projective space, and its mirror manifold. First, there is a brief review of the process of discovery of mirror symmetry and the striking result proposed in the celebrated paper by Candelas and his collaborators. Next, some elementary results of complex manifolds and Chern classes needed for study of mirror symmetry are explained. Then the topological sigma models, the A-model and the B-model, are introduced. The classical mirror symmetry hypothesis is explained as the equivalence between the correlation function of the A-model of a quintic hyper-surface and that of the B-model of its mirror manifold. On the B-model side, the process of construct...

  20. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  1. Classical and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook is devoted to classical and quantum cosmology, with particular emphasis on modern approaches to quantum gravity and string theory and on their observational imprint. It covers major challenges in theoretical physics such as the big bang and the cosmological constant problem. An extensive review of standard cosmology, the cosmic microwave background, inflation and dark energy sets the scene for the phenomenological application of all the main quantum-gravity and string-theory models of cosmology. Born of the author's teaching experience and commitment to bridging the gap between cosmologists and theoreticians working beyond the established laws of particle physics and general relativity, this is a unique text where quantum-gravity approaches and string theory are treated on an equal footing. As well as introducing cosmology to undergraduate and graduate students with its pedagogical presentation and the help of 45 solved exercises, this book, which includes an ambitious bibliography...

  2. Classical mechanics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Strauch, D

    2008-01-01

    This upper-level undergraduate and beginning graduate textbook primarily covers the theory and application of Newtonian and Lagrangian, but also of Hamiltonian mechanics. In addition, included are elements of continuum mechanics and the accompanying classical field theory, wherein four-vector notation is introduced without explicit reference to special relativity. The author's writing style attempts to ease students through the primary and secondary results, thus building a solid foundation for understanding applications. So the text is thus structured around developments of the main ideas, explicit proofs, and numerous clarifications, comments and applications. Numerous examples illustrate the material and often present alternative approaches to the final results. Frequent references are made linking mechanics to other fields of physics. These lecture notes have been used frequently by students to prepare for written and/or oral examinations. Summaries and problems conclude chapters and appendices supply nee...

  3. Classical competing risks

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, Martin J

    2001-01-01

    If something can fail, it can often fail in one of several ways and sometimes in more than one way at a time. There is always some cause of failure, and almost always, more than one possible cause. In one sense, then, survival analysis is a lost cause. The methods of Competing Risks have often been neglected in the survival analysis literature. Written by a leading statistician, Classical Competing Risks thoroughly examines the probability framework and statistical analysis of data of Competing Risks. The author explores both the theory of the subject and the practicalities of fitting the models to data. In a coherent, self-contained, and sequential account, the treatment moves from the bare bones of the Competing Risks setup and the associated likelihood functions through survival analysis using hazard functions. It examines discrete failure times and the difficulties of identifiability, and concludes with an introduction to the counting-process approach and the associated martingale theory.With a dearth of ...

  4. Classic clover cline clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Matthew S; Levsen, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    Adaptive clines are striking examples of natural selection in action, yet few have been studied in depth. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Kooyers & Olsen (2012) introduce modern analyses and thinking towards studies of a classical example of the rapid and repeated evolution of latitudinal and altitudinal clines in cyanogenesis in white clover, Trifolium repens L. Recognizing that adaptive clines represent trade-offs in the selective benefits of traits at different ends of a geographical transect, these researchers focus on whether evidence for selection can be found at regional (coarse) and local (fine) scales. After adjusting for population genetic patterns generated by demographic processes, Kooyers and Olsen provide evidence that the cyanogenesis cline is adaptive across a transect from Louisiana to Wisconsin, USA. Within local populations, divergent selection on coupling dominant and recessive alleles that underlie cyanogenesis is predicted to drive populations to gametic phase disequilibrium (LD), a pattern that has been found in several other studies reviewed by Kooyers and Olsen. The absence of LD within any sampled populations in this study leads the authors to suggest that selective patterns within these clines may be more complex than previously proposed, perhaps even following theoretical predictions of a geographic mosaic. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  6. Classical Fourier analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Grafakos, Loukas

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this text is to present the theoretical foundation of the field of Fourier analysis on Euclidean spaces. It covers classical topics such as interpolation, Fourier series, the Fourier transform, maximal functions, singular integrals, and Littlewood–Paley theory. The primary readership is intended to be graduate students in mathematics with the prerequisite including satisfactory completion of courses in real and complex variables. The coverage of topics and exposition style are designed to leave no gaps in understanding and stimulate further study. This third edition includes new Sections 3.5, 4.4, 4.5 as well as a new chapter on “Weighted Inequalities,” which has been moved from GTM 250, 2nd Edition. Appendices I and B.9 are also new to this edition.  Countless corrections and improvements have been made to the material from the second edition. Additions and improvements include: more examples and applications, new and more relevant hints for the existing exercises, new exercises, and...

  7. UV-Completion by Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Kehagias, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach to UV-completion of a class of non-renormalizable theories, according to which the high-energy scattering amplitudes get unitarized by production of extended classical objects (classicalons), playing a role analogous to black holes, in the case of non-gravitational theories. The key property of classicalization is the existence of a classicalizer field that couples to energy-momentum sources. Such localized sources are excited in high-energy scattering processes and lead to the formation of classicalons. Two kinds of natural classicalizers are Nambu-Goldstone bosons (or, equivalently, longitudinal polarizations of massive gauge fields) and scalars coupled to energy-momentum type sources. Classicalization has interesting phenomenological applications for the UV-completion of the Standard Model both with or without the Higgs. In the Higgless Standard Model the high-energy scattering amplitudes of longitudinal $W$-bosons self-unitarize via classicalization, without the help of any new...

  8. Dynamics of unitarization by classicalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, Gia; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-01-01

    We study dynamics of the classicalization phenomenon suggested in G. Dvali et al. , according to which a class of non-renormalizable theories self-unitarizes at very high-energies via creation of classical configurations (classicalons). We study this phenomenon in an explicit model of derivatively-self-coupled scalar that serves as a prototype for a Nambu-Goldstone-Stueckelberg field. We prepare the initial state in form of a collapsing wave-packet of a small occupation number but of very high energy, and observe that the classical configuration indeed develops. Our results confirm the previous estimates, showing that because of self-sourcing the wave-packet forms a classicalon configuration with radius that increases with center of mass energy. Thus, classicalization takes place before the waves get any chance of probing short-distances. The self-sourcing by energy is the crucial point, which makes classicalization phenomenon different from the ordinary dispersion of the wave-packets in other interacting theories. Thanks to this, unlike solitons or other non-perturbative objects, the production of classicalons is not only unsuppressed, but in fact dominates the high-energy scattering. In order to make the difference between classicalizing and non-classicalizing theories clear, we use a language in which the scattering cross section in a generic theory can be universally understood as a geometric cross section set by a classical radius down to which waves can propagate freely, before being scattered. We then show, that in non-classicalizing examples this radius shrinks with increasing energy and becomes microscopic, whereas in classicalizing theories expands and becomes macroscopic. We study analogous scattering in a Galileon system and discover that classicalization also takes place there, although somewhat differently. We thus observe, that classicalization is source-sensitive and that Goldstones pass the first test.

  9. Classical Sets and Non-Classical Sets: An Overview -38 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathematicians, logicians, and computer scientists are trying to model uncertain, imprecise or vague concepts. Here we present two models of vague concepts and draw a comparison between such imprecise sets and the stan- dard classical sets. In Section 1, we define classical sets, which model precise concepts.

  10. Classical Sets and Non-Classical Sets: An Overview -38 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classical Sets and Non-Classical Sets: Sumita Basu is assistant professor of mathematics at Lady Braboume. College, Kolkata. Her research interests include artificial intelligence, automata theory, and mathematical logic. Keywords. Fuzzy sets, crisp sets, rough sets, law of excluded middle,. DeMorgan's laws. An Overview.

  11. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  12. A Classic Beauty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    M51, whose name comes from being the 51st entry in Charles Messier's catalog, is considered to be one of the classic examples of a spiral galaxy. At a distance of about 30 million light-years from Earth, it is also one of the brightest spirals in the night sky. A composite image of M51, also known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, shows the majesty of its structure in a dramatic new way through several of NASA's orbiting observatories. X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory reveals point-like sources (purple) that are black holes and neutron stars in binary star systems. Chandra also detects a diffuse glow of hot gas that permeates the space between the stars. Optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (green) and infrared emission from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red) both highlight long lanes in the spiral arms that consist of stars and gas laced with dust. A view of M51 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer telescope shows hot, young stars that produce lots of ultraviolet energy (blue). The textbook spiral structure is thought be the result of an interaction M51 is experiencing with its close galactic neighbor, NGC 5195, which is seen just above. Some simulations suggest M51's sharp spiral shape was partially caused when NGC 5195 passed through its main disk about 500 million years ago. This gravitational tug of war may also have triggered an increased level of star formation in M51. The companion galaxy's pull would be inducing extra starbirth by compressing gas, jump-starting the process by which stars form.

  13. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  14. Classic African American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Jonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assert that there are classic African American children's books and to identify a sampling of them. The author presents multiple definitions of the term classic based on the responses of children's literature experts and relevant scholarship. Next, the manner in which data were collected and analyzed in regard to…

  15. 'Leonard pairs' in classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhedanov, Alexei; Korovnichenko, Alyona

    2002-01-01

    Leonard pairs (LP) are matrices with the property of mutual tri-diagonality. We introduce and study a classical analogue of LP. We show that corresponding classical 'Leonard' dynamical variables satisfy non-linear relations of the AW-type with respect to Poisson brackets. (author)

  16. Classic romance in electronic arrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizin M.M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available this article analyses the transformation of the performing arts of classical romance in the terms of electronic sound and performance via electronic sounds arrangements. The author focuses on the problem of synthesis of electronic sound arrangements and classical romance, offering to acquire the skills of the creative process in constantly changing conditions of live performances.

  17. Doing classical theology in context

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    This article is about doing classical theology in context. The weight ... Classical texts always share in those liberative moments. The question then is in what sense do they present a challenge to the contemporary reader. The second ... tradition established by Marx (1843); the invention by Haydn of a new musical style after ...

  18. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  19. Classical Dynamics of Triatomic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, Christopher Alan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1968-09-05

    The classical equations of motion of some bent triatomic harmonic molecular models are integrated numerically to investigate the assumptions underlying contemporary theories of unimolecular reaction rates. The classical equations of motion of two anharmonic bent triatomic molecular models are integrated numerically. Also, a Sato surface, free of spurious wells, is proposed for the reaction H + DBr.

  20. The Diversity of Classical Archaeology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is the first volume in the series Studies in Classical Archaeology, founded and edited by professors of classical archaeology, Achim Lichtenberger and Rubina Raja. This volume sets out the agenda for this series. It achieves this by familiarizing readers with a wide range of themes and ...

  1. Classicalization of Gravitons and Goldstones

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Kehagias, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We establish a close parallel between classicalization of gravitons and derivatively-coupled Nambu-Goldstone-type scalars. We show, that black hole formation in high energy scattering process represents classicalization with the classicalization radius given by Schwarzschild radius of center of mass energy, and with the precursor of black hole entropy being given by number of soft quanta composing this classical configuration. Such an entropy-equivalent is defined for scalar classicalons also and is responsible for exponential suppression of their decay into small number of final particles. This parallel works in both ways. For optimists that are willing to hypothesize that gravity may indeed self-unitarize at high energies via black hole formation, it illustrates that the Goldstones may not be much different in this respect, and they classicalize essentially by similar dynamics as gravitons. In the other direction, it may serve as an useful de-mystifier of via-black-hole-unitarization process and of the role...

  2. Classical dynamics a modern perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarshan, Ennackal Chandy George

    2016-01-01

    Classical dynamics is traditionally treated as an early stage in the development of physics, a stage that has long been superseded by more ambitious theories. Here, in this book, classical dynamics is treated as a subject on its own as well as a research frontier. Incorporating insights gained over the past several decades, the essential principles of classical dynamics are presented, while demonstrating that a number of key results originally considered only in the context of quantum theory and particle physics, have their foundations in classical dynamics.Graduate students in physics and practicing physicists will welcome the present approach to classical dynamics that encompasses systems of particles, free and interacting fields, and coupled systems. Lie groups and Lie algebras are incorporated at a basic level and are used in describing space-time symmetry groups. There is an extensive discussion on constrained systems, Dirac brackets and their geometrical interpretation. The Lie-algebraic description of ...

  3. Olefination of carbonyl compounds: modern and classical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotchenko, V N; Nenajdenko, Valentine G; Balenkova, Elizabeth S [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shastin, Aleksey V [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-31

    The published data on the methods for alkene synthesis by olefination of carbonyl compounds are generalised and systematised. The main attention is given to the use of transition metals and organoelement compounds. The review covers the data on both classical and newly developed methods that are little known to chemists at large.

  4. Olefination of carbonyl compounds: modern and classical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotchenko, V. N.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Balenkova, Elizabeth S.; Shastin, Aleksey V.

    2004-10-01

    The published data on the methods for alkene synthesis by olefination of carbonyl compounds are generalised and systematised. The main attention is given to the use of transition metals and organoelement compounds. The review covers the data on both classical and newly developed methods that are little known to chemists at large.

  5. Loire Classics: Reviving Classicism in some Loire Poets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Verbaal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term 'Loire poets' has come to refer to a rather undefinable group of poets that in the second half of the eleventh century distinguishes itself through its refined poetics. They are often characterized as medieval humanists thanks to their renewed interest in the classics. Sometimes their movement is labelled a 'classicist' one. But what does this 'classicism' mean? Is it even permitted to speak of medieval 'classicisms'? This contribution approaches the question of whether we can apply this modern label to pre-modern phenomena. Moreover, it explores the changes in attitude towards the classics that sets the Loire poets off from their predecessors and contemporaries. The article focuses on poems by Hildebert of Lavardin, Baudri of Bourgueil, Marbod of Rennes, and Geoffrey of Reims. They are compared with some contemporary poets, such as Reginald of Canterbury and Sigebert of Gembloux.

  6. Experimental assessment of unvalidated assumptions in classical plasticity theory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Burghardt, Jeffrey A. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Bauer, Stephen J.; Bronowski, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates the validity of several key assumptions in classical plasticity theory regarding material response to changes in the loading direction. Three metals, two rock types, and one ceramic were subjected to non-standard loading directions, and the resulting strain response increments were displayed in Gudehus diagrams to illustrate the approximation error of classical plasticity theories. A rigorous mathematical framework for fitting classical theories to the data, thus quantifying the error, is provided. Further data analysis techniques are presented that allow testing for the effect of changes in loading direction without having to use a new sample and for inferring the yield normal and flow directions without having to measure the yield surface. Though the data are inconclusive, there is indication that classical, incrementally linear, plasticity theory may be inadequate over a certain range of loading directions. This range of loading directions also coincides with loading directions that are known to produce a physically inadmissible instability for any nonassociative plasticity model.

  7. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3 He in the samples. (orig.)

  8. Mathematical methods of classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    This short primer, geared towards students with a strong interest in mathematically rigorous approaches, introduces the essentials of classical physics, briefly points out its place in the history of physics and its relation to modern physics, and explains what benefits can be gained from a mathematical perspective. As a starting point, Newtonian mechanics is introduced and its limitations are discussed. This leads to and motivates the study of different formulations of classical mechanics, such as Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, which are the subjects of later chapters. In the second part, a chapter on classical field theories introduces more advanced material. Numerous exercises are collected in the appendix.

  9. The Wigner representation of classical mechanics, quantization and classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2001-08-01

    Starting from the Liouvillian formulation of classical physics it is possible by means of a Fourier transform to introduce the Wigner representation and to derive an operator structure to classical mechanisms. The importance of this new representation lies on the fact that it turns out to be suitable route to establish a general method of quantization directly from the equations of motion without alluding to the existence of Hamiltonian and Lagrangian functions. Following this approach we quantize only the motion of a Browian particle with non-linear friction in the Markovian approximation - the thermal bath may be quantum or classical -, thus when the bath is classically described we obtain a master equation which reduces to Caldeira-Legget equation for the linear friction case, and when the reservoir is quantum we get an equation reducing to the one found by Caldeira et al. By neglecting the environmental influence we show that the system can be approximately described by equations of motion in terms of wave function, such as the Schrodinger-Langevin equation and equations of the Caldirola-Kanai type. Finally to make the present study self-consistent we evaluate the classical limit of these dynamical equations employing a new classical limiting method h/2π → 0. (author)

  10. Classical physics and classical logic in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechtold, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Philosophie

    2007-07-01

    Are the measurement outcomes in microphysics ''classical''? If yes, in which sense? In this talk, I come back to Niels Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics and his claim that every measurement outcomes have to be described by means of classical physics. Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker's transcendental version of this claim and its recent justification provided by Brigitte Falkenburg are also discussed. I then support the idea that a measurement outcome in microphysics cannot be considered as ''classical'' because its occurrence would be governed by the deterministic laws of classical physics (indeed, in the general case, it can only be predicted in a probabilistic manner by quantum mechanics). It can be considered as ''classical'', I argue, only by reference to classical logic. It is true, when no measurement is performed, the structure of propositions expressing all the possible events conforms to a kind of quantum logic (e.g. partial Boolean algebra or orthomodular lattice). However, if considering a performed measurement, the propositions expressing its possible outcomes (i.e. ''possible'' according to the predictions of quantum mechanics) are characterized as follows: at the end of the measurement (i) each of these propositions is either true or false (principle of bivalence), and (ii) only one of these propositions is true (principle of mutual exclusiveness). (orig.)

  11. New perspectives on classical electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Cote, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The fallacies associated with the gauge concept in electromagnetism are illustrated. A clearer and more valid formulation of the basics of classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing existing physical constraints as well as the physical reality of the vector potential.

  12. Classical Mechanics and Symplectic Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Nikolaj; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2005-01-01

    Content: Classical mechanics: Calculus of variations, Lagrange’s equations, Symmetries and Noether’s theorem, Hamilton’s equations, cannonical transformations, integrable systems, pertubation theory. Symplectic integration: Numerical integrators, symplectic integrators, main theorem on symplectic...

  13. Quantum money with classical verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it

  14. Classical theory of radiating strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  15. Dynamical systems in classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V V

    1995-01-01

    This book shows that the phenomenon of integrability is related not only to Hamiltonian systems, but also to a wider variety of systems having invariant measures that often arise in nonholonomic mechanics. Each paper presents unique ideas and original approaches to various mathematical problems related to integrability, stability, and chaos in classical dynamics. Topics include… the inverse Lyapunov theorem on stability of equilibria geometrical aspects of Hamiltonian mechanics from a hydrodynamic perspective current unsolved problems in the dynamical systems approach to classical mechanics

  16. Classical and quantum dynamics from classical paths to path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Graduate students who wish to become familiar with advanced computational strategies in classical and quantum dynamics will find in this book both the fundamentals of a standard course and a detailed treatment of the time-dependent oscillator, Chern-Simons mechanics, the Maslov anomaly and the Berry phase, to name just a few topics. Well-chosen and detailed examples illustrate perturbation theory, canonical transformations and the action principle, and demonstrate the usage of path integrals. The fifth edition has been revised and enlarged to include chapters on quantum electrodynamics, in particular, Schwinger’s proper time method and the treatment of classical and quantum mechanics with Lie brackets and pseudocanonical transformations. It is shown that operator quantum electrodynamics can be equivalently described with c-numbers, as demonstrated by calculating the propagation function for an electron in a prescribed classical electromagnetic field.

  17. Classical approach in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincare section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormalization group symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well. (author)

  18. Hermeneutic reading of classic texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla A-L; Lindström, Unni Å

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to broaden the understandinfg of the hermeneutic reading of classic texts. The aim is to show how the choice of a specific scientific tradition in conjunction with a methodological approach creates the foundation that clarifies the actual realization of the reading. This hermeneutic reading of classic texts is inspired by Gadamer's notion that it is the researcher's own research tradition and a clearly formulated theoretical fundamental order that shape the researcher's attitude towards texts and create the starting point that guides all reading, uncovering and interpretation. The researcher's ethical position originates in a will to openness towards what is different in the text and which constantly sets the researcher's preunderstanding and research tradition in movement. It is the researcher's attitude towards the text that allows the text to address, touch and arouse wonder. Through a flexible, lingering and repeated reading of classic texts, what is different emerges with a timeless value. The reading of classic texts is an act that may rediscover and create understanding for essential dimensions and of human beings' reality on a deeper level. The hermeneutic reading of classic texts thus brings to light constantly new possibilities of uncovering for a new envisioning and interpretation for a new understanding of the essential concepts and phenomena within caring science. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. NUCLEAR MIXING METERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Keegan J.; Iliadis, Christian; Downen, Lori; Champagne, Art; José, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae are caused by mass transfer episodes from a main-sequence star onto a white dwarf via Roche lobe overflow. This material possesses angular momentum and forms an accretion disk around the white dwarf. Ultimately, a fraction of this material spirals in and piles up on the white dwarf surface under electron-degenerate conditions. The subsequently occurring thermonuclear runaway reaches hundreds of megakelvin and explosively ejects matter into the interstellar medium. The exact peak temperature strongly depends on the underlying white dwarf mass, the accreted mass and metallicity, and the initial white dwarf luminosity. Observations of elemental abundance enrichments in these classical nova events imply that the ejected matter consists not only of processed solar material from the main-sequence partner but also of material from the outer layers of the underlying white dwarf. This indicates that white dwarf and accreted matter mix prior to the thermonuclear runaway. The processes by which this mixing occurs require further investigation to be understood. In this work, we analyze elemental abundances ejected from hydrodynamic nova models in search of elemental abundance ratios that are useful indicators of the total amount of mixing. We identify the abundance ratios ΣCNO/H, Ne/H, Mg/H, Al/H, and Si/H as useful mixing meters in ONe novae. The impact of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on the mixing meters is investigated using Monte Carlo post-processing network calculations with temperature-density evolutions of all mass zones computed by the hydrodynamic models. We find that the current uncertainties in the 30 P(p, γ) 31 S rate influence the Si/H abundance ratio, but overall the mixing meters found here are robust against nuclear physics uncertainties. A comparison of our results with observations of ONe novae provides strong constraints for classical nova models

  20. Plasticity and creep of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Rusinko, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Here is a systematic presentation of the postulates, theorems and principles of mathematical theories of plasticity and creep in metals, and their applications. Special attention is paid to analysis of the advantages and shortcomings of the classical theories.

  1. Classical field theory with fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Hindmarsh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Classical field theory simulations have been essential for our understanding of non-equilibrium phenomena in particle physics. In this talk we discuss the possible extension of the bosonic classical field theory simulations to include fermions. In principle we use the inhomogeneous mean field approximation as introduced by Aarts and Smit. But in practice we turn from their deterministic technique to a stochastic approach. We represent the fermion field as an ensemble of pairs of spinor fields, dubbed male and female. These c-number fields solve the classical Dirac equation. Our improved algorithm enables the extension of the originally 1+1 dimensional analyses and is suitable for large-scale inhomogeneous settings, like defect networks.

  2. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  3. Classical planning and causal implicatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Benotti, Luciana

    In this paper we motivate and describe a dialogue manager (called Frolog) which uses classical planning to infer causal implicatures. A causal implicature is a type of Gricean relation implicature, a highly context dependent form of inference. As we shall see, causal implicatures are important...... to generate clarification requests"; as a result we can model task-oriented dialogue as an interactive process locally structured by negotiation of the underlying task. We give several examples of Frolog-human dialog, discuss the limitations imposed by the classical planning paradigm, and indicate...

  4. Classical higher-order processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Classical Processes (CP) is a calculus where the proof theory of classical linear logic types processes à la Π-calculus, building on a Curry-Howard correspondence between session types and linear propositions. We contribute to this research line by extending CP with process mobility, inspired...... by the Higher-Order Π-calculus. The key to our calculus is that sequents are asymmetric: one side types sessions as in CP and the other types process variables, which can be instantiated with process values. The controlled interaction between the two sides ensures that process variables can be used at will...

  5. Principal bundles the classical case

    CERN Document Server

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This introductory graduate level text provides a relatively quick path to a special topic in classical differential geometry: principal bundles.  While the topic of principal bundles in differential geometry has become classic, even standard, material in the modern graduate mathematics curriculum, the unique approach taken in this text presents the material in a way that is intuitive for both students of mathematics and of physics. The goal of this book is to present important, modern geometric ideas in a form readily accessible to students and researchers in both the physics and mathematics communities, providing each with an understanding and appreciation of the language and ideas of the other.

  6. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    just downstream from the glomerular ultrafiltration apparatus? Again, the system represents a far-from-insignificant aspect of our physiology; 20 to. 25% of the output of the heart passes through this one pair of organs. About 20% of the plasma volume squeezes out of the blood in the process, in absolute terms around 60ml ...

  7. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, Rutherford's atomic model was not perfect and raised many questions. The needed improvement was worked out by Niels Bohr in two years after Rutherford proposed his theory. Bohr, after getting his PhD from the University of Copenhagen in 1911, joined Rutherford at Manchester in. March 1912, stayed there till ...

  8. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    by others and by himself. d) While the phase for which he is well known is part of this paper, it is clearly not an isolated discovery but part of a much larger programme. One also cannot help noticing the mature, measured, clear, and careful style, old fashioned though it may seem to today's readers. We also reproduce.

  9. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    when they shed their skins and finally change into butterflies, moths, beetles, bees, and flies. All these little creatures were placed on the plants, flowers, and fruit which they ate for nourishment;. I have also included here species of West Indian spiders, ants, snakes, lizards, rare toads, and frogs, all of which I myself sketched ...

  10. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nium bombarded with a tiny neutron can yield fragments of much lower atomic number. Sitting on a tree trunk, Meitner estimated the energy release in this breakup process, which they later named 'fission'. After the vacation, Frisch returned to his home institute in Copenhagen and discussed with Bohr, who immedi-.

  11. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    important female steroid hormone. It was the time when a good number of prominent organic chemists were engaged in the chemistry of steroids. Because of their biological importance, there was tremendous competitive activity to develop convenient stereospe- cific routes for their synthesis. This paper and his other papers ...

  12. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and how the related ideas of relativity affect our formulation of field theories, form the ... problem. While relativity is a strong tool provided by physicists for dealing with the cosmological problem, its early orgins are actually to be found in cosmology. .... dynamical relations of physics is provided by tensor analysis, for the lan-.

  13. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... It tried to envisage individual trajectories and anticipated the role of reagent translation and vibration on the rate of a chemical ... has been fully translated and the official version published in the same journal recently (2013). We are grateful to the journal for ...... tainties of the procedure. Instead we take into ...

  14. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Winter Meeting and receives a monetary award, the Oersted Medal, an Award Certifi- cate, and travel expenses to the ... special lectures on the theory of relativity, especially in its four dimensional form, as developed by ... on this theory were heard by Linus Pauling, who learned as much from them as I did myself. In 1927, in ...

  15. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sriranga

    A B Kempe, an English kinematician, provided in this paper a constructive proof that a linkage can be methodically created to trace a general algebraic curve. ... Statement about ownership and other particulars of. Resonance – journal of science education. 1. Place of Publication : Bangalore. 2. Periodicity of Publication :.

  16. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    self confidence of a C V Raman, might they have been the first rather than the second to publish the lifetime of spontaneous fission? On the other hand, we must keep in mind that Raman knew that the phenomenon he was looking for was predicted by theory, while the lifetime measured in this work was far shorter than.

  17. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    family of curves, a feat which marked the entry of the prodigy Norbert Wiener onto the mathematical scene. The curves are continuous but nowhere differentiable – a phenom- enon regarded as a mathematical curiosity by most physicists but not Jean Perrin, whose intuitive insights were later proved rigorously. Many more ...

  18. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    139th Meeting at Shereton Park Hotel, Wilmington Room, AAAS Section on Environmental Sciences, New. Approaches to Global Weather: GARP (The Global Atmospheric Research ... Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Lest I appear frivolous in even posing the title question, let alone suggesting that it ...

  19. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    What is worth learning from this paper is the rather confused situation at that time, with many ideas floating around, proposed by famous astronomers like Kapetyn, Jeans, Lindblad and Shapley. Oort is meticulous in citing his sources, but he also quickly disposes of untenable ideas, though in rather mild language.

  20. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Astronomical Quarterly chose to reprint the unpublished report written by Lyman Spitzer as early as. 1947, on the benefits to astronomy from space telescopes. Artificial earth satellites launched by rockets were just being talked about then; the first success came in 1957 with the launch of 'Sputnik' by the then. USSR.

  1. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The paper deals with his and his co-worker K M Sivanandaiah's (who later joined the chemistry faculty of Bangalore. University and made some very useful contributions to peptide chemistry) efforts to develop a convenient stereospecific synthesis of oestrone (written also as estrone), an important female steroid hormone.

  2. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    were a dart game, I would be thrown out – for throwing darts at a wall first and only subsequently painting ... to check the performance of the evolutionary process. In particular, it can provide a test for ..... Biochem. Physiol. 83A 255–259. Vallee R B 1998 Molecular motors and the cytoskeleton (San Diego: Academic Press).

  3. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swimming Against the Current of Racism. It was a strange state of pain and agony in which I found myself. “Who is this man,. Jones?” I said to myself, “to sit in judgement upon me and my abilities”3. But the thing had been done, and both the Principal and the Director of Public Instruction had unhesitatingly put the seal of ...

  4. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Following LondonГs arguments, one may express the energy of such systems for each spatial conf guration of the atoms in terms of the energy function of the diatomic molecules that can be formed by pairwise combination of the reacting atoms. When two molecules of hi react, e. g., according to. 2hi i2 h2 at every stage of ...

  5. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    From tim e im m em orial m en studied the heavens w ith their unaided eyes. F inally, about three centuries ago, the telescope w as invented. W ith the grow th and developm ent of these giant eyes, the exploration of space has. The article reproduced here was written by Edwin Hubble for P opular A stronom y. (Vol.54, p.183 ...

  6. CLASSICS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Though bacterial sexuality was discovered in 1946 by Lederberg and Tatum, the evidence was entirely based on genetics. The experiment essentially involved the isolation of prototrophic recombinants by mixing two cultures of auxotrophs. Though the involvement of cell-cell contact was confirmed by the U-tube experiment ...

  7. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  8. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong [Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University,Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-30

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  9. Supersymmetric classical mechanics: free case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Paraiba Univ., Cajazeiras, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza]. E-mail: rafael@cfp.ufpb.br; Almeida, W. Pires de [Paraiba Univ., Cajazeiras, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza; Fonseca Neto, I. [Paraiba Univ., Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2001-06-01

    We present a review work on Supersymmetric Classical Mechanics in the context of a Lagrangian formalism, with N = 1-supersymmetry. We show that the N = 1 supersymmetry does not allow the introduction of a potencial energy term depending on a single commuting supercoordinate, {phi}(t;{theta}). (author)

  10. Solved problems in classical electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Jerrold

    2018-01-01

    This original Dover publication is the companion to a new edition of the author's Classical Electromagnetism: Second Edition. The latter volume will feature only basic answers; this book will contain some problems from the reissue as well as many other new ones. All feature complete, worked-out solutions and form a valuable source of problem-solving material for students.

  11. Alternate formulations of classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beil, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The Lorentz--Dirac, Wheeler--Feynman, and Synge formulations of classical electrodynamics are compared with regard to their equations of motion for charged particles and their treatment of radiation. It is found that the less familiar Synge theory offers a viable alternate to the other two, since it is theoretically consistent and predicts results not at variance with experiment

  12. On teaching Classics in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    very idea of a university is one that has its roots in ancient Greece. The Academy of. Plato, the Lyceum of Aristotle and the Museum at Alexandria are precursors of today's institutions of learning. Classics has close links with subjects such as history, philosophy, theology, English and law. The writing of history as we ...

  13. Neo-classical impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, T.E.

    The neo-classical theory for impurity transport in a toroidal plasma is outlined, and the results discussed. A general account is given of the impurity behaviour and its dependence on collisionality. The underlying physics is described with special attention to the role of the poloidal rotation

  14. Classical Music as Enforced Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In classical music composition, whatever thematic or harmonic conflicts may be engineered along the way, everything always turns out for the best. Similar utopian thinking underlies performance: performers see their job as faithfully carrying out their master's (the composer's) wishes. The more perfectly they represent them, the happier the…

  15. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...

  16. Classical mechanics and symplectic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    The author analyzes some classical or more recent mechanics notions (force, impulse, momentum, energy, mass, action and reaction, electric charge, spin, magnetic moment, etc..) which give physical examples of various mathematical structures: symplectic and pre-symplectic varieties, groups and Lie algebra cohomology, homotopy, homology, etc.. [fr

  17. CLASSIC APPROACH TO BUSINESS COACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Żukowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present business coaching in a classical way. An overview of coaching definitions will be provided. Attention will be drawn to coaching components and varieties. Moreover, a brief description of coach competences and tools supporting their work will be offered. Joanna Żukowska

  18. Classical Syllogisms in Logic Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik; Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of introducing classical syllogisms in university courses in elementary logic and human reasoning. Using a program written in Prolog+CG, some empirical studies have been carried out involving three groups of students in Denmark; one group of philosophy student...

  19. Quantum proofs for classical theorems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drucker, A.; de Wolf, R.

    2011-01-01

    Alongside the development of quantum algorithms and quantum complexity theory in recent years, quantum techniques have also proved instrumental in obtaining results in diverse classical (non-quantum) areas, such as coding theory, communication complexity, and polynomial approximations. In this paper

  20. Teaching Classical Mechanics Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf. Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming." Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics…

  1. Classical diffusion, Anderson localization, and spectral statistics in billiard chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, T.; Doron, E.; Smilansky, U.

    1993-03-01

    We study spectral properties of quasi one-dimensional extended systems that show deterministic diffusion on the classical level and Anderson localization in the quantal description. Using semiclassical arguments, we relate to universal aspects of the spectral fluctuations to features of the set of classical periodic orbits, expressed in terms of probability to perform periodic motion, that are likewise universal. This allows to derive an analytical expression for the spectral form factor which reflects the diffusive nature of the corresponding classical dynamics. It defines a novel spectral universality class which covers the transition between GOE statistics in the limit of a small ratio of the system size to the localization length, corresponding to the metallic regime of disordered systems, to Poissonian level fluctuations in the opposite limit. Our semiclassical predictions are illustrated and confirmed by a numerical investigation of aperiodic chains of chaotic billiards. (authors)

  2. Hilbert space theory of classical electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Classical electrodynamics is reformulated in terms of wave functions in the classical phase space of electrodynamics, following the Koopman–von Neumann–Sudarshan prescription for classical mechanics on Hilbert spaces sans the superselection rule which prohibits interference effects in classical mechanics.

  3. Classical planning and causal implicatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Benotti, Luciana

    for understanding the structure of task-oriented dialogues. Such dialogues locate conversational acts in contexts containing both pending tasks and the acts which bring them about. The ability to infer causal implicatures lets us interleave decisions about "how to sequence actions" with decisions about "when......In this paper we motivate and describe a dialogue manager (called Frolog) which uses classical planning to infer causal implicatures. A causal implicature is a type of Gricean relation implicature, a highly context dependent form of inference. As we shall see, causal implicatures are important...... to generate clarification requests"; as a result we can model task-oriented dialogue as an interactive process locally structured by negotiation of the underlying task. We give several examples of Frolog-human dialog, discuss the limitations imposed by the classical planning paradigm, and indicate...

  4. [Diet treatment of classical galactosemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Erika; Balogh, Lídia; Reismann, Péter

    2017-11-01

    Classical galactosemia is an inherited disorder of the carbohydrate metabolism, most often caused by the deficient activity of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase. Classical galactosemia presents in the neonatal period with life threatening illness after galactose is introduced in the diet. Symptoms and signs include poor feeding, vomiting, and diarrhea, weight loss, jaundice, hypotension, cataracts, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatocellular insufficiency, and encephalopathy. Since 1975 the testing for galactosemia is part of the neonatal screening program in Hungary. Affected newborns are recognized in the first days of their life, and special diet is introduced immediately. The therapy of galactosemia is the lactose-free and galactose-poor diet for life. As a result of the nationwide newborn screening and the lifelong medical therapy, early treatment with galactosemia can achieve a normal life without serious complications. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(47): 1864-1867.

  5. Classical and multilinear harmonic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Muscalu, Camil

    2013-01-01

    This two-volume text in harmonic analysis introduces a wealth of analytical results and techniques. It is largely self-contained and useful to graduates and researchers in pure and applied analysis. Numerous exercises and problems make the text suitable for self-study and the classroom alike. The first volume starts with classical one-dimensional topics: Fourier series; harmonic functions; Hilbert transform. Then the higher-dimensional Calderón-Zygmund and Littlewood-Paley theories are developed. Probabilistic methods and their applications are discussed, as are applications of harmonic analysis to partial differential equations. The volume concludes with an introduction to the Weyl calculus. The second volume goes beyond the classical to the highly contemporary and focuses on multilinear aspects of harmonic analysis: the bilinear Hilbert transform; Coifman-Meyer theory; Carleson's resolution of the Lusin conjecture; Calderón's commutators and the Cauchy integral on Lipschitz curves. The material in this vo...

  6. Suppressing Quantum Fluctuations in Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Vikman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We study vacuum quantum fluctuations of simple Nambu-Goldstone bosons - derivatively coupled single scalar-field theories possessing shift-symmetry in field space. We argue that quantum fluctuations of the interacting field can be drastically suppressed with respect to the free-field case. Moreover, the power-spectrum of these fluctuations can soften to become red for sufficiently small scales. In quasiclassical approximation, we demonstrate that this suppression can only occur for those theories that admit such classical static backgrounds around which small perturbations propagate faster than light. Thus a quasiclassical softening of quantum fluctuations is only possible for theories which classicalize instead of having a usual Lorentz invariant and local Wilsonian UV- completion. We illustrate our analysis by estimating the quantum fluctuations for the DBI-like theories.

  7. Classical theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Ribenboim, Paulo

    2001-01-01

    Gauss created the theory of binary quadratic forms in "Disquisitiones Arithmeticae" and Kummer invented ideals and the theory of cyclotomic fields in his attempt to prove Fermat's Last Theorem These were the starting points for the theory of algebraic numbers, developed in the classical papers of Dedekind, Dirichlet, Eisenstein, Hermite and many others This theory, enriched with more recent contributions, is of basic importance in the study of diophantine equations and arithmetic algebraic geometry, including methods in cryptography This book has a clear and thorough exposition of the classical theory of algebraic numbers, and contains a large number of exercises as well as worked out numerical examples The Introduction is a recapitulation of results about principal ideal domains, unique factorization domains and commutative fields Part One is devoted to residue classes and quadratic residues In Part Two one finds the study of algebraic integers, ideals, units, class numbers, the theory of decomposition, iner...

  8. CPT invariance in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aaron D.; Tsankov, Tsvetelin D.

    2017-11-01

    The transformation properties of classical electrodynamic variables under charge conjugation C, parity reversal P, and time inversion T are considered both for standard and atypical assumptions for the nature of charge. We have shown that four distinct behaviours of charge under space and time inversion are consistent with the invariance of Maxwell’s equations under CPT and P. No prior knowledge of CPT invariance is assumed and the material is accessible to undergraduate students.

  9. Primary classical hemangiopericytomas of thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicakcioglu, Pinar; Aydin, Ertan; Celik, Ali; Demirag, Funda; Karaoglanoglu, Nurettin

    2012-07-01

    Hemangiopericytoma, an uncommon hypervascular tumor, occurs anywhere in the body with capillary vessels originating from the pericyte. These tumors most frequently occur in the musculature of the lower extremities and retroperitoneum, but are rarely seen in the thoracic cavity. The objective of this study is to present primary classical hemangiopericytomas of the thorax together with a literature review. The postoperative pathologic records of 17,165 operations that were performed between January 1990 and December 2010 in the clinic were retrospectively searched, and the files of 6 cases with the diagnosis of primary classical hemangiopericytoma were analyzed for clinical characteristics of patients, surgical procedures, histopathologic features, treatments after surgery, and morbidity and mortality results. There were 4 female and 2 male patients with an average age of 30.3 years (range, 15 to 60 years). Three patients had thoracic wall lesions, 2 patients had intrathoracic extrapulmonary lesions, and 1 patient had mediastinal lesion. Four left and two right posterolateral thoracotomies were performed. Chest wall resection was performed in 3 patients, intrathoracic extrapulmonary mass excision in 2 patients, and mediastinal mass excision and left lower lobectomy in 1 patient. Postoperative histopathologic diagnoses were primary classical hemangiopericytomas in 4 patients and primary classical malignant hemangiopericytomas in 2 patients. Four patients underwent reoperation for recurrence. In the follow-up period, 2 patients are still alive at 30 months and 14 years postoperatively; 3 patients died at 7, 8, and 16 years postoperatively. One patient was lost to follow-up. All 3 mortalities were related to the recurrence or distant metastasis of the tumor. Although hemangiopericytomas are benign or malignant tumors, they generally display malignant behaviors. The risk of recurrence and distant metastasis occurs even many years after resection, suggesting that the

  10. THE BUREAUCRATIC PHENOMENON: CLASSICAL CONCEPTS

    OpenAIRE

    Дама Ибрагима

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this article - to analyze Hegel and Karl Marx’s classic bureaucracy theories and also Max Weber’s concept of rational bureaucracy and its development in the works of Herbert Simon, Robert Merton, Peter Blau and Michel Crozier. It shows that the above listed researchers only undertook a change of terminology within the same theoretical tradition. The article describes different approaches to the bureaucratic system of administrative schools of the late 1950s and early 1980s. Major concl...

  11. Classical music and the teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eramo, Stefano; Di Biase, Mary Jo; De Carolis, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Teeth and their pathologies are frequent themes in classical music. The teeth have inspired popular songwriters such as Thomas Crecquillon, Carl Loewe, Amilcare Ponchielli & Christian Sinding; as well as composers whose works are still played all over the world, such as Robert Schumann and Jacques Offenbach. This paper examines several selections in which the inspiring theme is the teeth and the pain they can cause, from the suffering of toothache, to the happier occasion of a baby's first tooth.

  12. Classical solutions of quasielliptic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belonosov, V S

    1999-01-01

    Fundamental solutions of quasielliptic equations are constructed; this allows the author to develop a relevant theory of volume potentials, establish estimates for the Holder norms of solutions of equations with constant coefficients, and extend them after that to equations with variable coefficients. As a result, sharp Schauder-type interior estimates are obtained, of which the well-known classical results for elliptic and parabolic equations are special cases

  13. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis. PMID:25672294

  14. Semi-classical signal analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2012-09-30

    This study introduces a new signal analysis method, based on a semi-classical approach. The main idea in this method is to interpret a pulse-shaped signal as a potential of a Schrödinger operator and then to use the discrete spectrum of this operator for the analysis of the signal. We present some numerical examples and the first results obtained with this method on the analysis of arterial blood pressure waveforms. © 2012 Springer-Verlag London Limited.

  15. Classical optics and curved spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailyn, M.; Ragusa, S.

    1976-01-01

    In the eikonal approximation of classical optics, the unit polarization 3-vector of light satisfies an equation that depends only on the index, n, of refraction. It is known that if the original 3-space line element is d sigma 2 , then this polarization direction propagates parallely in the fictitious space n 2 d sigma 2 . Since the equation depends only on n, it is possible to invent a fictitious curved 4-space in which the light performs a null geodesic, and the polarization 3-vector behaves as the 'shadow' of a parallely propagated 4-vector. The inverse, namely, the reduction of Maxwell's equation, on a curve 'dielectric free) space, to a classical space with dielectric constant n=(-g 00 ) -1 / 2 is well known, but in the latter the dielectric constant epsilon and permeability μ must also equal (-g 00 ) -1 / 2 . The rotation of polarization as light bends around the sun by utilizing the reduction to the classical space, is calculated. This (non-) rotation may then be interpreted as parallel transport in the 3-space n 2 d sigma 2 [pt

  16. Normal and superconducting metals at microwave frequencies-classic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dheer, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    A brief review of experimental and theoretical work on the behaviour of normal and superconducting materials at microwave frequencies before the publication of Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity is given. The work discussed is mostly that of Pippard and his coworkers. It is shown that these investigations lead not only to a better understanding of the electrodynamics of normal and superconducting state but also of the nature of the superconducting state itself. (author)

  17. Intuitionism vs. classicism a mathematical attack on classical logic

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkamp, Nick

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, the Dutch mathematician L.E.J. Brouwer launched a powerful attack on the prevailing mathematical methods and theories. He developed a new kind of constructive mathematics, called intuitionism, which seems to allow for a rigorous refutation of widely accepted mathematical assumptions including fundamental principles of classical logic. Following an intense mathematical debate esp. in the 1920s, Brouwer's revolutionary criticism became a central philosophical concern in the 1970s, when Michael Dummett tried to substantiate it with meaning-theoretic considerations.

  18. Classical and quantum dynamics from classical paths to path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who want to become familiar with advanced computational strategies in classical and quantum dynamics will find here both the fundamentals of a standard course and a detailed treatment of the time-dependent oscillator, Chern-Simons mechanics, the Maslov anomaly and the Berry phase, to name a few. Well-chosen and detailed examples illustrate the perturbation theory, canonical transformations, the action principle and demonstrate the usage of path integrals. This new edition has been revised and enlarged with chapters on quantum electrodynamics, high energy physics, Green’s functions and strong interaction.

  19. Classical limit for quantum mechanical energy eigenfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, D.; Sengupta, S.

    2004-01-01

    The classical limit problem is discussed for the quantum mechanical energy eigenfunctions using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, free from the problem at the classical turning points. A proper perspective of the whole issue is sought to appreciate the significance of the discussion. It is observed that for bound states in arbitrary potential, appropriate limiting condition is definable in terms of a dimensionless classical limit parameter leading smoothly to all observable classical results. Most important results are the emergence of classical phase space, keeping the observable distribution functions non-zero only within the so-called classical region at the limit point and resolution of some well-known paradoxes. (author)

  20. Classical and non-classical effective medium theories: New perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukerman, Igor, E-mail: igor@uakron.edu

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • Advanced non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization theories of metamaterials, valid in electrostatics and electrodynamics. • Classical theories (Clausius–Mossotti, Lorenz–Lorentz, Maxwell Garnett) fit well into the proposed framework. • Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. • A challenging problem for future research is to determine what effective tensors are attainable for given constituents of a metamaterial. - Abstract: Future research in electrodynamics of periodic electromagnetic composites (metamaterials) can be expected to produce sophisticated homogenization theories valid for any composition and size of the lattice cell. The paper outlines a promising path in that direction, leading to non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization models, and highlights aspects of homogenization that are often overlooked: the finite size of the sample and the role of interface boundaries. Classical theories (e.g. Clausius–Mossotti, Maxwell Garnett), while originally derived from a very different set of ideas, fit well into the proposed framework. Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making an order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. One future challenge is to determine what effective parameters can or cannot be obtained for a given set of constituents of a metamaterial lattice cell, thereby delineating the possible from the impossible in metamaterial design.

  1. Lie group analysis : Classical Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Ibragimov, Nail H.

    2004-01-01

    Classical works in Lie group analysis, e.g. important papers of S.Lie and A.V.Bäcklund are written in old German and somewhat old fashioned mathematical language. The present volume comprises translation into English of fundamental papers of S. Lie, A.V.Bäcklund and L.V. Ovsyannikov. I have selected here some of my favorite papers containing profound results significant for modern group analysis. The first paper imparts not only Lie's interesting view on the development of the general th...

  2. Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Marshall W; Zaldivar-Diez, Josefa; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2017-03-15

    The discovery of haloperidol catalyzed a breakthrough in our understanding of the biochemical basis of schizophrenia, improved the treatment of psychosis, and facilitated deinstitutionalization. In doing so, it solidified the role for chemical neuroscience as a means to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of complex neuropsychiatric disorders. In this Review, we will cover aspects of haloperidol's synthesis, manufacturing, metabolism, pharmacology, approved and off-label indications, and adverse effects. We will also convey the fascinating history of this classic molecule and the influence that it has had on the evolution of neuropsychopharmacology and neuroscience.

  3. Ultrasonic waves in classical gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Grygoriev, U. V.

    2017-12-01

    The velocity and absorption coefficient for the plane sound waves in a classical gas are obtained by solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation, which describes the reaction of the single-particle distribution function to a periodic external field. Within the linear response theory, the nonperturbative dispersion equation valid for all sound frequencies is derived and solved numerically. The results are in agreement with the approximate analytical solutions found for both the frequent- and rare-collision regimes. These results are also in qualitative agreement with the experimental data for ultrasonic waves in dilute gases.

  4. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailagic, A.

    1981-08-01

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  5. Modular forms a classical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Henri

    2017-01-01

    The theory of modular forms is a fundamental tool used in many areas of mathematics and physics. It is also a very concrete and "fun" subject in itself and abounds with an amazing number of surprising identities. This comprehensive textbook, which includes numerous exercises, aims to give a complete picture of the classical aspects of the subject, with an emphasis on explicit formulas. After a number of motivating examples such as elliptic functions and theta functions, the modular group, its subgroups, and general aspects of holomorphic and nonholomorphic modular forms are explained, with an emphasis on explicit examples. The heart of the book is the classical theory developed by Hecke and continued up to the Atkin-Lehner-Li theory of newforms and including the theory of Eisenstein series, Rankin-Selberg theory, and a more general theory of theta series including the Weil representation. The final chapter explores in some detail more general types of modular forms such as half-integral weight, Hilbert, Jacob...

  6. Physiological characteristics of classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, P G; Astrand, P O

    1984-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic energy yield during professional training sessions ("classes") of classical ballet as well as during rehearsed and performed ballets has been studied by means of oxygen uptake, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration determinations on professional ballet dancers from the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm. The measured oxygen uptake during six different normal classes at the theatre averaged about 35-45% of the maximal oxygen uptake, and the blood lactate concentration averaged 3 mM (N = 6). During 10 different solo parts of choreographed dance (median length = 1.8 min) representative for moderately to very strenuous dance, an average oxygen uptake (measured during the last minute) of 80% of maximum and blood lactate concentration of 10 mM was measured (N = 10). In addition, heart rate registrations from soloists in different ballets during performance and final rehearsals frequently indicated a high oxygen uptake relative to maximum and an average blood lactate concentration of 11 mM (N = 5). Maximal oxygen uptake, determined in 1971 (N = 11) and 1983 (N = 13) in two different groups of dancers, amounted to on the average 51 and 56 ml X min-1 X kg-1 for the females and males, respectively. In conclusion, classical ballet is a predominantly intermittent type of exercise. In choreographed dance each exercise period usually lasts only a few minutes, but can be very demanding energetically, while during the dancers' basic training sessions, the energy yield is low.

  7. Friedreich Ataxia in Classical Galactosaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Siobhán; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; Sweeney, Bronagh; Lynch, Bryan; Hanrahan, Donncha; Knerr, Ina; Lynch, Sally Ann; Crushell, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders such as ataxia are a recognized complication of classical galactosaemia, even in diet-compliant patients. Here, we report the coexistence of classical galactosaemia and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) in nine children from seven Irish Traveller families. These two autosomal recessive disorders, the loci for which are located on either side of the centromere of chromosome 9, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium in this subgroup. Both conditions are known to occur with increased frequency amongst the Irish Traveller population.Each member of our cohort had been diagnosed with galactosaemia in the neonatal period, and all are homozygous for the common Q188R mutation in the GALT gene. Eight of the nine patients later presented with progressive ataxia, between the ages of 5-13 years. Another child presented in cardiac failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy at 7 years of age. He was not ataxic at presentation and, one year from diagnosis, his neurological examination remains normal. The diagnosis of FRDA was confirmed by detecting the common pathogenic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene (FXN) in each patient.Neurological symptoms are easily attributed to an underlying diagnosis of galactosaemia. It is important to consider a diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia in a child from the Irish Traveller population with galactosaemia who presents with ataxia or cardiomyopathy.

  8. Drama of the English classicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejević Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the numerous dramatic forms that have emerged during the English Classicism, there are few who could be considered the successors of the rich theatrical tradition. The dramatic genres that were created by mixing many traditional comic elements with the modern influences would be short-lived or become part of the commercial milieu of contemporary theater. On the other hand, the tragedy has lost its lofty character and the primacy over the comedy that has not been restored until today. However, few tragedies that have managed to avoid the rules and spirit of the Classicism have hinted the element of modern tragedy: the main roles are finally given to the ordinary citizens with their everyday problems. Although this shift was made due to the strengthening of the middle class and was a part of the actual intellectual climate, it has created the conditions for the birth of the modern tragedy that will begin to conquer the stage with Henrik Ibsen. .

  9. Teaching classical mechanics using smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf.4 Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming."5 Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics teachers could add that smartphones are "perfect for teaching science." The software iMecaProf displays in real time the measured data on a screen. The visual representation is built upon the formalism of classical mechanics. iMecaProf receives data 100 times a second from iPhone sensors through a Wi-Fi connection using the application Sensor Data.6 Data are the three components of the acceleration vector in the smartphone frame and smartphone's orientation through three angles (yaw, pitch, and roll). For circular motion (uniform or not), iMecaProf uses independent measurements of the rotation angle θ, the angular speed dθ/dt, and the angular acceleration d2θ/dt2.

  10. Mental Toughness in the Classical Martial Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Minnix, Douglas Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Mental Toughness in the Classical Martial Arts Douglas Wayne Minnix ABSTRACT The construct of mental toughness is in a state of evolution and refinement. The current study proposed to investigate; (1) the importance of mental toughness attributes from a Classical Martial Arts context, (2) the trainability of the mental toughness attributes from a Classical Martial Arts context, (3) and the extent to which classical martial artists perceive that attributes converge under broader...

  11. Markkinointiviestintäsuunnitelma : Classic Coffee Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Eerola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli laatia markkinointiviestintäsuunnitelma kalenterivuodelle 2016 vuosikellon muodossa, toimintansa jo vakiinnuttaneelle Classic Coffee Oy:lle. Classic Coffee Oy on vuonna 2011 perustettu, Tampereella toimiva kahvila-alan yritys joka tarjoaa lounaskahvilatoiminnan lisäksi laadukkaita konditoria-palveluita, yritys- ja kokoustarjoiluja sekä tilavuokrausta. Classic Coffee Oy:llä on yksi kahvila, Classic Coffee Tampella. Kahvila sijaitsee Tampellassa, Tampereen keskustan vä...

  12. About the modern house - and the classical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    In text and illustrations describes the classical house and the classical city, represented by Andrea Palladio (1508-80), and the modern house, the modern city and building task, represented by Le Corbusier (1857-1965).......In text and illustrations describes the classical house and the classical city, represented by Andrea Palladio (1508-80), and the modern house, the modern city and building task, represented by Le Corbusier (1857-1965)....

  13. Classical and non-classical effective medium theories: New perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukerman, Igor

    2017-05-01

    Future research in electrodynamics of periodic electromagnetic composites (metamaterials) can be expected to produce sophisticated homogenization theories valid for any composition and size of the lattice cell. The paper outlines a promising path in that direction, leading to non-asymptotic and nonlocal homogenization models, and highlights aspects of homogenization that are often overlooked: the finite size of the sample and the role of interface boundaries. Classical theories (e.g. Clausius-Mossotti, Maxwell Garnett), while originally derived from a very different set of ideas, fit well into the proposed framework. Nonlocal effects can be included in the model, making an order-of-magnitude accuracy improvements possible. One future challenge is to determine what effective parameters can or cannot be obtained for a given set of constituents of a metamaterial lattice cell, thereby delineating the possible from the impossible in metamaterial design.

  14. Hilbert space theory of classical electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wigner function can be implemented by classical optics. This may be useful in interpreting quantum information processing in terms of classical optics. Keywords. Hilbert space; Koopman–von Neumann theory; classical electrodynamics. PACS No. 03.50.De. 1. Introduction. Much recent work has unexpectedly revealed that ...

  15. Diminuendo: Classical Music and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    How is the tradition of Western classical music faring on university campuses? Before answering this question, it is necessary to understand what has transpired with classical music in the wider culture, as the relationship between the two is so strong. In this article, the author discusses how classical music has taken a big cultural hit in…

  16. The classical origins of Pavlov's conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert E

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a brief description of the scientific discovery of classical conditioning both in the United States and in Russia. The incorporation of classical conditioning as a scientific method in the United States is described. Particular attention is given to how and why the terminologies used to identify the components of classical conditioning were modified over the years. I then trace the curious evolution of the terminology associated with Pavlov's form of conditioning, from its introduction to the United States as "the Pawlow salivary reflex method" to its present appellation as classical conditioning. Finally I conclude by developing a theory as to when and why the term classical conditioning was adopted.

  17. Quantum classical correspondence in nonrelativistic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.; Weatherford, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    A form of classical electrodynamic field exists which gives exact agreement with the operator field of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for the Lamb shift of a harmonically bound point electron. Here it is pointed out that this form of classical theory, with its physically acceptable interpretation, is the result of an unconventional resolution of a mathematically ambiguous term in classical field theory. Finally, a quantum classical correspondence principle is shown to exist in the sense that the classical field and expectation value of the QED operator field are identical, if retardation is neglected in the latter

  18. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment

  19. Classic ballet dancers postural patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseani Paulini Neves Simas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate classic ballet practice and its influence on postural patterns and (a identify the most frequent postural changes; (b determine the postural pattern; (c verify the existence of association of practice time and postural changes. The investigation was carried out in two stages: one, description in which 106 dancers participated; the other, causal comparative in which 50 dancers participated; and (a questionnaire; (b a checkerboard; (c postural chart; (d measure tape; (e camera and (f pedoscope were used as instrument. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used for analysis. The results revealed the most frequent postural changes such as hyperlordosis, unleveled shoulders and pronated ankles. Ballet seems to have negative implications in the postural development , affecting especially the vertebral spine, trunk and feet. The practice time was not a parameter to indicate the increase in postural changes. In conclusion, ballet may be associated with postural changes and determining a characteristic postural pattern.

  20. Hydrogen: Beyond the Classic Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scivetti, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    The classical nucleus approximation is the most frequently used approach for the resolution of problems in condensed matter physics.However, there are systems in nature where it is necessary to introduce the nuclear degrees of freedom to obtain a correct description of the properties.Examples of this, are the systems with containing hydrogen.In this work, we have studied the resolution of the quantum nuclear problem for the particular case of the water molecule.The Hartree approximation has been used, i.e. we have considered that the nuclei are distinguishable particles.In addition, we have proposed a model to solve the tunneling process, which involves the resolution of the nuclear problem for configurations of the system away from its equilibrium position

  1. Hydrogen Beyond the Classic Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Scivetti, I

    2003-01-01

    The classical nucleus approximation is the most frequently used approach for the resolution of problems in condensed matter physics.However, there are systems in nature where it is necessary to introduce the nuclear degrees of freedom to obtain a correct description of the properties.Examples of this, are the systems with containing hydrogen.In this work, we have studied the resolution of the quantum nuclear problem for the particular case of the water molecule.The Hartree approximation has been used, i.e. we have considered that the nuclei are distinguishable particles.In addition, we have proposed a model to solve the tunneling process, which involves the resolution of the nuclear problem for configurations of the system away from its equilibrium position

  2. Classical and quantum thermal physics

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, R

    2016-01-01

    Covering essential areas of thermal physics, this book includes kinetic theory, classical thermodynamics, and quantum thermodynamics. The text begins by explaining fundamental concepts of the kinetic theory of gases, viscosity, conductivity, diffusion, and the laws of thermodynamics and their applications. It then goes on to discuss applications of thermodynamics to problems of physics and engineering. These applications are explained with the help of P-V and P-S-H diagrams where necessary and are followed by a large number of solved examples and unsolved exercises. The book includes a dedicated chapter on the applications of thermodynamics to chemical reactions. Each application is explained by taking the example of an appropriate chemical reaction, where all technical terms are explained and complete mathematical derivations are worked out in steps starting from the first principle.

  3. Classical Cosmology Through Animation Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, Milan; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2010-05-01

    Computer animations are a powerful tool for explanation and communication of ideas, especially to a younger generation. Our team completed a three part sequence of short, computer animated stories about the insight and discoveries that lead to the understanding of the overall structure of the universe. Our principal characters are Immanuel Kant, Henrietta Leavitt, and Edwin Hubble. We utilized animations to model and visualize the physical concepts behind each discovery and to recreate the characters, locations, and flavor of the time. The animations vary in length from 6 to 11 minutes. The instructors or presenters may wish to utilize them separately or together. The animations may be used for learning classical cosmology in a visual way in GE astronomy courses, in pre-college science classes, or in public science education setting.

  4. From classical to quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baulieu, Laurent; Sénéor, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Field Theory has become the universal language of most modern theoretical physics. This introductory textbook shows how this beautiful theory offers the correct mathematical framework to describe and understand the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. The book begins with a brief reminder of basic classical field theories, electrodynamics and general relativity, as well as their symmetry properties, and proceeds with the principles of quantisation following Feynman's path integral approach. Special care is used at every step to illustrate the correct mathematical formulation of the underlying assumptions. Gauge theories and the problems encountered in their quantisation are discussed in detail. The last chapters contain a full description of the Standard Model of particle physics and the attempts to go beyond it, such as grand unified theories and supersymmetry. Written for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in physics and mathematics, the book could also serve as a re...

  5. A course in classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bettini, Alessandro

    This first volume covers the mechanics of point particles, gravitation, extended systems (starting from the two-body system), the basic concepts of relativistic mechanics and the mechanics of rigid bodies and fluids. The four-volume textbook, which covers electromagnetism, mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, and waves and light, is designed to reflect the typical syllabus during the first two years of a calculus-based university physics program. Throughout all four volumes, particular attention is paid to in-depth clarification of conceptual aspects, and to this end the historical roots of the principal concepts are traced. Writings by the founders of classical mechanics, G. Galilei and I. Newton, are reproduced, encouraging students to consult them. Emphasis is also consistently placed on the experimental basis of the concepts, highlighting the experimental nature of physics. Whenever feasible at the elementary level, concepts relevant to more advanced courses in modern physics are included. Each chapter b...

  6. Theoretical physics 1 classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to classical mechanics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. The book starts with a thorough introduction to the mathematical tools needed, to make this textbook self-contained for learning. The second part of the book introduces the mechanics of the free mass point and details conservation principles. The third part expands the previous to mechanics of many particle systems. Finally the mechanics of the rigid body is illustrated with rotational forces, inertia and gyroscope movement. Ideally suited to undergraduate students in their first year, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets. About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful German editions, the eight volumes of this series...

  7. A Classical Model of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A classical model of gravitation is proposed with time as an independent coordinate. The dynamics of the model is determined by a proposed Lagrangian. Applying the canonical equations of motion to its associated Hamiltonian gives conservation equa- tions of energy, total angular momentum and the z component of the angular momen- tum. These lead to a Keplerian orbit in three dimensions, which gives the observed values of perihelion precession and bending of light by a massive object. An expression for gravitational redshift is derived by accepting the local validity of special relativity at all points in space. Exact expressions for the GEM relations, as well as their associated Lorentz-type force, are derived. An expression for Mach’s Principle is also derived.

  8. Classical electromagnetism in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    This graduate-level physics textbook provides a comprehensive treatment of the basic principles and phenomena of classical electromagnetism. While many electromagnetism texts use the subject to teach mathematical methods of physics, here the emphasis is on the physical ideas themselves. Anupam Garg distinguishes between electromagnetism in vacuum and that in material media, stressing that the core physical questions are different for each. In vacuum, the focus is on the fundamental content of electromagnetic laws, symmetries, conservation laws, and the implications for phenomena such as radiation and light. In material media, the focus is on understanding the response of the media to imposed fields, the attendant constitutive relations, and the phenomena encountered in different types of media such as dielectrics, ferromagnets, and conductors. The text includes applications to many topical subjects, such as magnetic levitation, plasmas, laser beams, and synchrotrons.

  9. Quantum and classical gauge symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Terashima, Hiroaki

    2001-01-01

    The use of the mass term of the gauge field as a gauge fixing term, which was discussed by Zwanziger, Parrinello and Jona-Lasinio in a large mass limit, is related to the non-linear gauge by Dirac and Nambu. We have recently shown that this use of the mass term as a gauge fixing term is in fact identical to the conventional local Faddeev-Popov formula without taking a large mass limit, if one takes into account the variation of the gauge field along the entire gauge orbit. This suggests that the classical massive vector theory, for example, could be re-interpreted as a gauge invariant theory with a gauge fixing term added in suitably quantized theory. As for massive gauge particles, the Higgs mechanics, where the mass term is gauge invariant, has a more intrinsic meaning. We comment on several implications of this observation. (author)

  10. Classically Stable Nonsingular Cosmological Bounces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the fundamental questions of theoretical cosmology is whether the Universe can undergo a nonsingular bounce, i.e., smoothly transit from a period of contraction to a period of expansion through violation of the null energy condition (NEC) at energies well below the Planck scale and at finite values of the scale factor such that the entire evolution remains classical. A common claim has been that a nonsingular bounce either leads to ghost or gradient instabilities or a cosmological singularity. In this Letter, we consider a well-motivated class of theories based on the cubic Galileon action and present a procedure for explicitly constructing examples of a nonsingular cosmological bounce without encountering any pathologies and maintaining a subluminal sound speed for comoving curvature modes throughout the NEC violating phase. We also discuss the relation between our procedure and earlier work.

  11. Classical databases and knowledge organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers classical bibliographic databases based on the Boolean retrieval model (such as MEDLINE and PsycInfo). This model is challenged by modern search engines and information retrieval (IR) researchers, who often consider Boolean retrieval a less efficient approach. The paper...... examines this claim and argues for the continued value of Boolean systems, which suggests two further considerations: (1) the important role of human expertise in searching (expert searchers and “information literate” users) and (2) the role of library and information science and knowledge organization (KO...... implications for the maintenance of information science and KO as research fields, as well as for the information profession as a profession in its own right....

  12. Introducing Newton and classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, William

    2002-01-01

    The rainbow, the moon, a spinning top, a comet, the ebb and flood of the oceans ...a falling apple. There is only one universe and it fell to Isaac Newton to discover its secrets. Newton was arguably the greatest scientific genius of all time, and yet he remains a mysterious figure. Written and illustrated by William Rankin, "Introducting Newton and Classical Physics" explains the extraordinary ideas of a man who sifted through the accumulated knowledge of centuries, tossed out mistaken beliefs, and single-handedly made enormous advances in mathematics, mechanics and optics. By the age of 25, entirely self-taught, he had sketched out a system of the world. Einstein's theories are unthinkable without Newton's founding system. He was also a secret heretic, a mystic and an alchemist, the man of whom Edmund Halley said "Nearer to the gods may no man approach!". This is an ideal companion volume to "Introducing Einstein".

  13. Citation classics in pediatric orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Ranjit A; Dhawale, Arjun A; Zavaglia, Bogard C; Slobogean, Bronwyn L; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles with at least 100 citations published in all orthopaedic journals and to examine their characteristics. All journals dedicated to orthopaedics and its subspecialties were selected from the Journal Citation Report 2001 under the subject category "orthopedics." Articles cited 100 times or more were identified using the database of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, 1900 to present). The articles were ranked in a comprehensive list. Two authors independently reviewed the full text of each article and applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the list of articles. The 2 lists were then compared. All disagreements were resolved by consensus with input from the senior author. The final list of pediatric orthopaedic articles was then compiled. There were a total of 49 journals under the search category "orthopedics." Five journals were excluded as they were non-English journals. The remaining 44 journals were screened for articles with at least 100 citations. A total of 135 clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles cited at least 100 times were included. The most cited article was cited 692 times. The mean number of citations per article was 159 (95% confidence interval, 145-173). All the articles were published between 1949 and 2001, with 1980 and 1989 producing the most citation classics (34). The majority (90) originated from the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12) and Canada (11). Scoliosis/kyphosis was the most common topic with 26 papers. The second most common subject was hip disorders (24). Therapeutic studies were the most common study type (71). Ninety-seven papers were assigned a 4 for level of evidence. The list of citation classics in pediatric orthopaedic articles is useful for several reasons. It identifies important contributions to the field of pediatric orthopaedics and their originators; it facilitates the understanding and discourse

  14. Saudi experience with classic homocystinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Essa, M.; Ozand, P.T.; Rashed, M.

    1998-01-01

    Classic homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency. The clinical, radiological and neurophysiological findings of classic homcystinuria diagnosed at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH and RC) are presented in this report. Twenty-four patients (15 females and 9 males) were referred to KFSH and RC for work-up of mental retardation, seizures, thrombo-embolic episodes and dislocation of the ocular lenses. The common clinical findings included ectopia lentis (20 patients), skeletal system involvement (18 patients), vascular system involvement (9patients), and mental retardation (all patients to varying degrees). Unusual findings consisted of a patient who developed severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, a patient with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, probably due to vasculopathy, and other having severe bronchiectasis, which may have been due to fibrillin disruption, and required the resection of a lobe of lung. The parents of 21 patients were first-degree relatives, and 19 patients had one or more family members affected by the same disease. All patients had markedly elevated plasma levels of methionine. Cystathionine synthase activity in the fibroblast was measured in 25% of the patients and was deficient. Only four patients responded to pyridoxine and their methionine level decreased to almost normal range. The aim of this study was to increase the awareness of this disease in the scientific and medical community, in particular in the general pediatrician working in Saudi Arabia who first encounters the clinical manifestations of disease. Early detection through tandem mass spectrometry of blood spot screening and treatment are important and may prevent the major complications of this disease. (author)

  15. Classical foundations of quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garola, C.

    1991-01-01

    The author constructs a language L for a classical first-order predicate calculus with monadic predicates only, extended by means of a family of statistical quantifiers. Then, a formal semantic model M is put forward for L which is compatible with a physical interpretation and embodies a truth theory which provides the statistical quantifiers with properties that fit their interpretation; in this framework, the truth mode of physical laws is suitably characterized and a probability-frequency correlation principle is established. By making use of L and M, a set of basic physical laws is stated that hold both in classical physics (CP) and in quantum physics (QP), which allow the selection of suitable subsets of primitive predicates of L and the introduction on these subsets of binary relations. Two languages L E x and L E S are constructed that can be mapped into L; the mapping induces on them mathematical structures, some kind of truth function, an interpretation. The formulas of L E S can be endowed with two different interpretations as statements about the frequency of some physical property in some class (state) of physical objects; consequently, a two-valued truth function and a multivalued fuzzy-truth function are defined on L E S . In all cases the algebras of propositions of these 'logics' are complete ortho-complemented lattices isomorphic to (E E , prec). These results hold both in CP and in QP; further physical assumptions endow the lattice (E E , prec), hence L E x and L E s , with further properties, such as distributivity in CP and weak modularity and covering law in QP. In the latter case, L E x and L E s , together with their interpretations, can be considered different models of the same basic mathematical structure, and can be identified with standard (elementary) quantum logics

  16. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, A.M., E-mail: kowalski@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC) (Argentina); Plastino, A., E-mail: plastino@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Argentina' s National Research Council (CONICET) (Argentina); SThAR, EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-09-16

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  17. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, A.M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  18. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  19. THE BUREAUCRATIC PHENOMENON: CLASSICAL CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дама Ибрагима

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article - to analyze Hegel and Karl Marx’s classic bureaucracy theories and also Max Weber’s concept of rational bureaucracy and its development in the works of Herbert Simon, Robert Merton, Peter Blau and Michel Crozier. It shows that the above listed researchers only undertook a change of terminology within the same theoretical tradition. The article describes different approaches to the bureaucratic system of administrative schools of the late 1950s and early 1980s. Major conclusions in the article include the following: administering the state apparatus consists in the organization of government on the basis of regulated rights, mandatory procedures that are invoked to ensure balance in the interest of man and society; bad effectiveness of government, infringement of the rights and freedoms of the individual is the result of dysfunction in the state apparatus; the struggle against it can be carried out with the help of administrative, economical and legal methods.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-45

  20. Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Bodard, Gabriel; Romanello, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    This volume, edited by the organizers of the “Digital Classicist” seminars series, presents research in classical studies, digital classics and digital humanities, bringing together scholarship that addresses the impact of the study of classical antiquity through computational methods on audiences such as scientists, heritage professionals, students and the general public. Within this context, chapters tackle particular aspects, from epigraphy, papyrology and manuscripts, via Greek language, ...

  1. The relation between classical and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Peter.

    1984-01-01

    The thesis examines the relationship between classical and quantum mechanics from philosophical, mathematical and physical standpoints. Arguments are presented in favour of 'conjectural realism' in scientific theories, distinguished by explicit contextual structure and empirical testability. The formulations of classical and quantum mechanics, based on a general theory of mechanics is investigated, as well as the mathematical treatments of these subjects. Finally the thesis questions the validity of 'classical limits' and 'quantisations' in intertheoretic reduction. (UK)

  2. Classical Mechanics as Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    All measurable predictions of classical mechanics can be reproduced from a quantum-like interpretation of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The key observation leading to classical physics is the fact that a wave function that satisfies a linear equation is real and positive, rather than complex. This has profound implications on the role of the Bohmian classical-like interpretation of linear quantum mechanics, as well as on the possibilities to find a consistent interpretation of arbitrary nonlinear generalizations of quantum mechanics

  3. On the Classical Limit of Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Allori, Valia; Zanghì, Nino

    2001-01-01

    Contrary to the widespread belief, the problem of the emergence of classical mechanics from quantum mechanics is still open. In spite of many results on the $\\h \\to 0$ asymptotics, it is not yet clear how to explain within standard quantum mechanics the classical motion of macroscopic bodies. In this paper we shall analyze special cases of classical behavior in the framework of a precise formulation of quantum mechanics, Bohmian mechanics, which contains in its own structure the possibility o...

  4. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  5. Limitations on cloning in classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  6. Classical Trajectories from Coherent Quantum Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, Alan

    2013-03-01

    In the conventional Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, classical behavior arises from microscopic coherent quantum systems only in the presence of decoherence on the macroscopic scale. On the contrary, we derive classical Hamiltonian trajectories for a confined quantum wave directly from coherent phase evolution on the microscopic scale, without decoherence or wavefunction collapse (see also). This suggests that the basis for classical macroscopic physics, including relativity, lies in the microscopic behavior of coherently oscillating quantum fields. An outline of such a theory will be presented, which resolves longstanding paradoxes involving wave-particle duality, quantum entanglement, and the quantum-to-classical transition.

  7. Primary Mediastinal Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is rare. Nodular sclerosis CHL (NS-CHL) is the most common subtype involving the anterior mediastinum and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. Primary thymic CHL is exceedingly rare. The disease typically affects young women and is asymptomatic in 30% to 50% of patients. Common symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, dyspnea and cough, but vary depending on the location and size of the tumor. B-symptoms develop in 30% of cases. By imaging, primary mediastinal CHL presents as mediastinal widening/mediastinal mass that does not invade adjacent organs but may compress vital structures as bulky disease. Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. Primary mediastinal NS-CHL consists of nodules of polymorphous inflammatory cells surrounded by broad fibrous bands extending from a thickened lymph node capsule. The cellular nodules contain variable numbers of large Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells, required for diagnosis. Primary thymic CHL may exhibit prominent cystic changes. The histopathologic recognition of NS-CHL can be challenging in cases with prominent fibrosis, scant cellularity, artifactual cell distortion, or an exuberant granulomatous reaction. The differential diagnosis includes primary mediastinal non-HLs, mediastinal germ cell tumors, thymoma, and metastatic carcinoma or melanoma to the mediastinum. Distinction from primary mediastinal non-HLs is crucial for adequate therapeutic decisions. Approximately 95% of patients with primary mediastinal CHL will be alive and free of disease at 10 years after treatment with short courses of combined chemoradiotherapy. In this review, we discuss the history, classification, epidemiology, clinicoradiologic features, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis, and treatment of primary mediastinal CHL.

  8. Classical An-W-geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing the extrinsic geometry of two dimensional surfaces chirally embedded in C P n (the C P n W-surface), we give exact treatments in various aspects of the classical W-geometry in the conformal gauge: First, the basis of tangent and normal vectors are defined at regular points of the surface, such that their infinitesimal displacements are given by connections which coincide with the vector potentials of the (conformal) A n -Toda Lax pair. Since the latter is known to be intrinsically related with the W symmetries, this gives the geometrical meaning of the A n W-Algebra. Second, W-surfaces are put in one-to-one correspondence with solutions of the conformally-reduced WZNW model, which is such that the Toda fields give the Cartan part in the Gauss decomposition of its solutions. Third, the additional variables of the Toda hierarchy are used as coordinates of C P n . This allows us to show that W-transformations may be extended as particular diffeomorphisms of this target-space. Higher-dimensional generalizations of the WZNW equations are derived and related with the Zakharov-Shabat equations of the Toda hierarchy. Fourth, singular points are studied from a global viewpoint, using our earlier observation that W-surfaces may be regarded as instantons. The global indices of the W-geometry, which are written in terms of the Toda fields, are shown to be the instanton numbers for associated mappings of W-surfaces into the Grassmannians. The relation with the singularities of W-surface is derived by combining the Toda equations with the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. (orig.)

  9. Classical and Quantum Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Peter

    1996-03-01

    The idea that noise can assist the formation of order might sound paradoxical but does indeed occur in nonlinear systems with the phenomenon of Stochastic Resonance (SR)(F. Moss et al., Stochastic Resonance: Tutorial and Update), Int. J. Bif. and Chaos 4, 1383 (1994); K. Wiesenfeld and F. Moss, Nature 373, 33 (1995); P. Jung, Phys. Rep. 234 C, 175 (1993). This term is given to the effect where the detection of weak periodic signals is enhanced in presence of noise activated crossings of barriers or threshold levels. After introducing the audience into the common characterization of SR by use of the power spectrum of the output signal and/or the probability density of correponding residence times, I shall report new features for nonlinear SR where strong driving can give rise to anomalous amplification of higher harmonics, hole-burning in power spectra, or SR-induced, almost complete deletion of higher harmonics(R. Bartussek, P. Jung, P. Hänggi, Phys. Rev. E49), 3930 (1994); V. Shneidman, P. Jung, P. Hänggi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2682 (1994). These novel effects have recently been confirmed experimentally in a magnetic flux driven sensitive detection device (superconducting quantum-interference device)(R. Rouse, S. Han, J.E. Lukens, Appl. Phys. Lett. 66), 108 (1995). This device constitutes a macroscopic quantum system where with decreasing temperature quantum tunneling transitions begin to modify and blur the classical SR-responce. Recent progress in the quest of SR phenomena in the deep quantum regime(M. Grifoni and P. Hänggi, submitted to PRL) is reviewed together with experimental proposals where Quantum-SR induced manipulation of individual atoms, or whole molecular groups, can be observed.

  10. Quantum experiments without classical counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicic, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present a generalized and exhaustive method of finding the directions of the quantization axes of the measured eigenstates within experiments which have no classical counterparts. The method relies on a constructive and exhaustive definition of sets of such directions (which we call Kochen-Specker vectors) in a Hilbert space of any dimension as well as of all the remaining vectors of the space. Kochen-Specker vectors are elements of any set of orthonormal states, i.e., vectors in n-dim Hilbert space, Hn, n > 2 to which it is impossible to assign 1s and 0s in such a way that no two mutually orthogonal vectors from the set are both assigned 1 and that not all mutually orthogonal vectors are assigned 0. Our constructive definition of such Kochen-Specker vectors is based on algorithms that generate MMP diagrams corresponding to blocks of orthogonal vectors in Rn, on algorithms that single out those diagrams on which algebraic to 0-1 states cannot be defined, and on algorithms that solve nonlinear equations describing the orthogonalities of the vectors by means of statistically polynomially complex interval analysis and self-teaching programs. The algorithms are limited neither by the number of dimensions nor by the number of vectors. To demonstrate the power of the algorithms, all 4-dim KS vector systems containing up to 24 vectors were generated and described, all 3-dim vector systems containing up to 30 vectors were scanned, and several general properties of KS vectors were found. (author)

  11. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  12. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H 2 C 2 → HC 2 H, HNC → HCN, and H 2 CO → H 2 + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I → Na + + I - is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features

  13. Hilbert space theory of classical electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Furthermore, following Bondar et al, {\\it Phys. Rev.} A 88, 052108 (2013), it is pointed out that quantum processes that preserve the positivity or nonpositivity of theWigner function can be implemented by classical optics. This may be useful in interpreting quantum information processing in terms of classical optics.

  14. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  15. COLLEGE CLASSICAL ENROLLMENTS, 1965-66.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIEBERMAN, SAMUEL

    THE MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION (MLA) STATISTICAL SURVEY AVAILABLE IN MARCH 1966 CORROBORATED PREVIOUS, LESS EXTENSIVE, STUDIES SPONSORED BY "THE CLASSICAL WORLD," AND SHOWED THAT ENROLLMENTS IN LATIN AND GREEK HAVE GROWN SLOWLY BUT RESPECTABLY, AND THAT ALTHOUGH A NUMBER OF COLLEGES DO NOT OFFER CLASSICAL LANGUAGES, MANY DO NOT PROVIDE…

  16. The Dirac equation in classical statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ord, G.N.

    2002-01-01

    The Dirac equation, usually obtained by 'quantizing' a classical stochastic model is here obtained directly within classical statistical mechanics. The special underlying space-time geometry of the random walk replaces the missing analytic continuation, making the model 'self-quantizing'. This provides a new context for the Dirac equation, distinct from its usual context in relativistic quantum mechanics

  17. The Zoology of the classical islamic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provencal, Philippe; Aarab, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article brings a survey of research on the science of zoology in the Classical Arabic/Islamic Culture as revealed in texts on this subject written in Classical Arabic from the second half of the 8th century to the 15th century A.D. In the light of recent research and by use of examples from...

  18. Expert Western Classical Music Improvisers' Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Philippe; Burnard, Pamela; Dubé, Francis; Stévance, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in musical improvisation is exemplified by the body of literatures evidencing the positive impacts of improvisation learning on the musical apprentice's aptitudes and the increasing presence of improvisation in Western classical concert halls and competitions. However, high-level Western classical music improvisers' thinking…

  19. Tarnished Gold: Classical Music in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A few articles have appeared recently regarding the subject of the health of classical music (or more broadly, the fine arts) in America. These include "Classical Music's New Golden Age," by Heather Mac Donald, in the "City Journal" and "The Decline of the Audience," by Terry Teachout, in "Commentary." These articles appeared around the time of…

  20. Why/How Does Classics Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Classics is in the news--or on the screen: "Gladiator" a few years ago, "Troy" very recently, "Alexander" as I write. How significant is this current Hollywood fascination with the ancient Greeks and Romans? Or should we take far more seriously the decline of the teaching of the Classical languages in schools, a…

  1. Linguistic Investigations into Ellipsis in Classical Sanskrit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Brendan S.

    Ellipsis is a common phenomenon of Classical Sanskrit prose. No inventory of the forms of ellipsis in Classical Sanskrit has been made. This paper presents an inventory, based both on a systematic investigation of one text and on examples based on sundry reading.

  2. Copies of classical logic in intuitionistic logic

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Classical logic (the logic of non-constructive mathematics) is stronger than intuitionistic logic (the logic of constructive mathematics). Despite this, there are copies of classical logic in intuitionistic logic. All copies usually found in the literature are the same. This raises the question: is the copy unique? We answer negatively by presenting three different copies.

  3. Classical Conditioning: Eliciting the Right Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    Classical conditioning is responsible for students' positive and negative feelings, whether directed toward subject matter, peers, teachers, or education in general. This article explains how educators can use classical conditioning principles (such as reinforcement, extinction, and paired stimuli) to create an anxiety-free learning environment.…

  4. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The particle may hop from classically allowed site to nearest-neighbour classically allowed site in the potential, behaving as if it were a quantum particle in an energy gap and undergoing repeated tunnelling processes or; the particle may behave as a quantum particle in a conduction band and drift at a constant average ...

  5. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a quantum particle in a conduction band and drift at a constant average velocity through the potential as if it were undergoing resonant tunnelling. The classical conduction bands for this potential are determined numerically with high precision. Keywords. PT symmetry; complex trajectories; complex classical mechanics; ...

  6. Classical Swine Fever Virus-Rluc Replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Belsham, Graham J.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the etiologic agent of the severe porcine disease, classical swine fever. Unraveling the molecular determinants of efficient replication is crucial for gaining proper knowledge of the pathogenic traits of this virus. Monitoring the replication competence within...

  7. Quantum Statistical Operator and Classically Chaotic Hamiltonian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantum Statistical Operator and Classically Chaotic Hamiltonian System. ... Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... In a Hamiltonian system von Neumann Statistical Operator is used to tease out the quantum consequence of (classical) chaos engendered by the nonlinear coupling of system to its ...

  8. Semiclassical Quantization of Classical Field Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattaneo, A.; Mnev, P.; Reshetikhin, N.; Calaque, D.; Strobi, Th.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract These lectures are an introduction to formal semiclassical quantization of classical field theory. First we develop the Hamiltonian formalism for classical field theories on space time with boundary. It does not have to be a cylinder as in the usual Hamiltonian framework. Then we outline

  9. Reply to the 'Comment on "Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regime"'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2017-08-09

    We respond to the erroneous criticisms about our modeling of proton transport in barium stannate [G. Geneste et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 19104]. In this previous work, we described, on the basis of density-functional calculations, proton transport in the classical and semi-classical regimes, and provided arguments in favor of an adiabatic picture for proton transfer at low temperature. We re-explain here our article (with more detail and precision), the content of which has been distorted in the Comment, and reiterate our arguments in this reply. We refute all criticisms. They are completely wrong in the context of our article. Even though a few of them are based on considerations probably true in some metals, they make no sense here since they do not correspond to the content of our work. It has not been understood in the Comment that two competitive configurations, associated with radically different transfer mechanisms, have been studied in our work. It has also not been understood in the Comment that the adiabatic regime described for transfer occurs in the protonic ground state, in a very-low barrier configuration with the protonic ground state energy larger than the barrier. Serious confusion has been made in the Comment with the case of H in metals like Nb or Ta, leading to the introduction of the notion of (protonic) "excited-state proton transfer", relevant for H in some metals, but (i) that does not correspond to the (ground state) adiabatic transfers here described, and (ii) that does not correspond to what is commonly described as the "adiabatic limit for proton transfer" in the scientific literature. We emphasize, accordingly, the large differences between proton transfer in the present oxide and hydrogen jumps in metals like Nb or Ta, and the similarities between proton transfer in the present oxide and in acid-base solutions. We finally describe a scenario for proton transfer in the present oxide regardless of the temperature regime.

  10. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  11. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  12. Citation Classics from Industrial Marketing Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Adam; Di Benedetto, C. Anthony

    2017-01-01

    review, qualitative methodology, or quantitative methodology). In addition, these citation classics can be classified by topic (firm performance, goods-dominant and service-dominant logics, Internet and high-technology markets, product innovation, relationships and business networks, supply chains......This article proposes a categorization of what constitutes a citation classic. General observations reveal, with regard to the top 30 citation classics from Industrial Marketing Management, the number of authors per article, country of origin of the lead author, and type of article (literature......, system sellers and systems integrator, third-party logistics providers, and value). Finally, each of the 30 citation classics is introduced, and the classics' theoretical implications to business-to-business marketing management and fields related to (e.g., supply chain management, strategic management...

  13. Quantum Communication Attacks on Classical Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    , one can show that the protocol remains secure even under such an attack. However, there are also cases where the honest players are quantum as well, even if the protocol uses classical communication. For instance, this is the case when classical multiparty computation is used as a “subroutine......” in quantum multiparty computation. Furthermore, in the future, players in a protocol may employ quantum computing simply to improve efficiency of their local computation, even if the communication is supposed to be classical. In such cases, it no longer seems clear that a quantum adversary must be limited......In the literature on cryptographic protocols, it has been studied several times what happens if a classical protocol is attacked by a quantum adversary. Usually, this is taken to mean that the adversary runs a quantum algorithm, but communicates classically with the honest players. In several cases...

  14. Classical-driving-assisted entanglement dynamics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying-Jie, E-mail: yingjiezhang@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Han, Wei [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Xia, Yun-Jie, E-mail: yjxia@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a scheme of controlling entanglement dynamics of a quantum system by applying the external classical driving field for two atoms separately located in a single-mode photon cavity. It is shown that, with a judicious choice of the classical-driving strength and the atom–photon detuning, the effective atom–photon interaction Hamiltonian can be switched from Jaynes–Cummings model to anti-Jaynes–Cummings model. By tuning the controllable atom–photon interaction induced by the classical field, we illustrate that the evolution trajectory of the Bell-like entanglement states can be manipulated from entanglement-sudden-death to no-entanglement-sudden-death, from no-entanglement-invariant to entanglement-invariant. Furthermore, the robustness of the initial Bell-like entanglement can be improved by the classical driving field in the leaky cavities. This classical-driving-assisted architecture can be easily extensible to multi-atom quantum system for scalability.

  15. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  16. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  17. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  18. Emergence of quantum mechanics from classical statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C

    2009-01-01

    The conceptual setting of quantum mechanics is subject to an ongoing debate from its beginnings until now. The consequences of the apparent differences between quantum statistics and classical statistics range from the philosophical interpretations to practical issues as quantum computing. In this note we demonstrate how quantum mechanics can emerge from classical statistical systems. We discuss conditions and circumstances for this to happen. Quantum systems describe isolated subsystems of classical statistical systems with infinitely many states. While infinitely many classical observables 'measure' properties of the subsystem and its environment, the state of the subsystem can be characterized by the expectation values of only a few probabilistic observables. They define a density matrix, and all the usual laws of quantum mechanics follow. No concepts beyond classical statistics are needed for quantum physics - the differences are only apparent and result from the particularities of those classical statistical systems which admit a quantum mechanical description. In particular, we show how the non-commuting properties of quantum operators are associated to the use of conditional probabilities within the classical system, and how a unitary time evolution reflects the isolation of the subsystem.

  19. Randomness in Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovich, Igor V.

    2011-03-01

    The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics assumes the existence of the classical deterministic Newtonian world. We argue that in fact the Newton determinism in classical world does not hold and in the classical mechanics there is fundamental and irreducible randomness. The classical Newtonian trajectory does not have a direct physical meaning since arbitrary real numbers are not observable. There are classical uncertainty relations: Δ q>0 and Δ p>0, i.e. the uncertainty (errors of observation) in the determination of coordinate and momentum is always positive (non zero). A "functional" formulation of classical mechanics was suggested. The fundamental equation of the microscopic dynamics in the functional approach is not the Newton equation but the Liouville equation for the distribution function of the single particle. Solutions of the Liouville equation have the property of delocalization which accounts for irreversibility. The Newton equation in this approach appears as an approximate equation describing the dynamics of the average values of the position and momenta for not too long time intervals. Corrections to the Newton trajectories are computed. An interpretation of quantum mechanics is attempted in which both classical and quantum mechanics contain fundamental randomness. Instead of an ensemble of events one introduces an ensemble of observers.

  20. Classical Ising chain in transverse field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccoli, A.; Taiti, A.; Vaia, R.; Verrucchi, P.

    2007-01-01

    The spin 12 Ising chain in transverse field is considered the prototypical system for quantum phase transitions. However, very little is apparently known in literature about its classical counterpart, not to be confused with the standard classical Ising model: while the latter is constructed from classical discrete variables, the model we consider is a chain of classical vectors of modulus 1, interacting via an Ising-like Hamiltonian. When an uniform field is applied perpendicular to the exchange interaction, both the quantum model and its classical counterpart get to be characterized by a critical field separating a ferromagnetically ordered state of minimal energy from a paramagnetic one. The properties of the classical model, and especially the behaviour of the correlation length, are investigated at low temperature around the critical field and compared with those of the quantum model, in order to single out the role played by quantum and classical fluctuations at finite temperature; the possibility to experimentally observe peculiar quantum critical effects in Ising spin chains is discussed

  1. Rapid and accurate detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples by Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF assay--a clinical validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rachow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A crucial impediment to global tuberculosis control is the lack of an accurate, rapid diagnostic test for detection of patients with active TB. A new, rapid diagnostic method, (Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF Assay, is an automated sample preparation and real-time PCR instrument, which was shown to have good potential as an alternative to current reference standard sputum microscopy and culture. METHODS: We performed a clinical validation study on diagnostic accuracy of the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay in a TB and HIV endemic setting. Sputum samples from 292 consecutively enrolled adults from Mbeya, Tanzania, with suspected TB were subject to analysis by the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay. The diagnostic performance of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay was compared to standard sputum smear microscopy and culture. Confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a positive culture was used as a reference standard for TB diagnosis. RESULTS: Xpert MTB/RIF Assay achieved 88.4% (95%CI = 78.4% to 94.9% sensitivity among patients with a positive culture and 99% (95%CI = 94.7% to 100.0% specificity in patients who had no TB. HIV status did not affect test performance in 172 HIV-infected patients (58.9% of all participants. Seven additional cases (9.1% of 77 were detected by Xpert MTB/RIF Assay among the group of patients with clinical TB who were culture negative. Within 45 sputum samples which grew non-tuberculous mycobacteria the assay's specificity was 97.8% (95%CI = 88.2% to 99.9%. CONCLUSIONS: The Xpert MTB/RIF Assay is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for diagnosing TB which has potential to complement the current reference standard of TB diagnostics and increase its overall sensitivity. Its usefulness in detecting sputum smear and culture negative patients needs further study. Further evaluation in high burden TB and HIV areas under programmatic health care settings to ascertain applicability, cost-effectiveness, robustness and local acceptance are required.

  2. On the quantization of classically chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, N.F. de.

    1988-01-01

    Some propeties of a quantization in terms of observables of a classically chaotic system, which exhibits a strange are studied. It is shown in particular that convenient expected values of some observables have the correct classical limit and that in these cases the limits ℎ → O and t → ∞ (t=time) rigorously comute. This model was alternatively quantized by R.Graham in terms of Wigner function. The Graham's analysis is completed a few points, in particular, we find out a remarkable analogy with general results about the semi-classical limit of Wigner function. Finally the expected values obtained by both methods of quantization were compared. (author) [pt

  3. Classical dynamics of particles and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, Jerry B

    1965-01-01

    Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems presents a modern and reasonably complete account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies for physics students at the advanced undergraduate level. The book aims to present a modern treatment of classical mechanical systems in such a way that the transition to the quantum theory of physics can be made with the least possible difficulty; to acquaint the student with new mathematical techniques and provide sufficient practice in solving problems; and to impart to the student some degree of sophistication in handl

  4. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benet, L; Flores, J; Hernandez-Saldana, H; Izrailev, F M; Leyvraz, F; Seligman, T H

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics

  5. Classical Music, liveness and digital technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Performances of classical composition music have seen a decline in their audiences for some years. Does the classical concert ritual scare people off? This notion has spurred off a development of design concepts directed at rethinking concert rituals in order to create new audience experiences...... of interrelated design experiments are presented which all share the ambition of integration digital technologies in life performances of classical music. A particular focus is put on the ongoing development of a design concept where interactive audio and visual experiences in an underground metro station shall...

  6. Classical realizability in the CPS target language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by considerations about Krivine's classical realizability, we introduce a term calculus for an intuitionistic logic with record types, which we call the CPS target language. We give a reformulation of the constructions of classical realizability in this language, using the categorical...... techniques of realizability triposes and toposes. We argue that the presentation of classical realizability in the CPS target language simplifies calculations in realizability toposes, in particular it admits a nice presentation of conjunction as intersection type which is inspired by Girard's ludics....

  7. Classical thermodynamics of non-electrolyte solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Van Ness, H C

    1964-01-01

    Classical Thermodynamics of Non-Electrolyte Solutions covers the historical development of classical thermodynamics that concerns the properties of vapor and liquid solutions of non-electrolytes. Classical thermodynamics is a network of equations, developed through the formal logic of mathematics from a very few fundamental postulates and leading to a great variety of useful deductions. This book is composed of seven chapters and begins with discussions on the fundamentals of thermodynamics and the thermodynamic properties of fluids. The succeeding chapter presents the equations of state for

  8. Beethoven : The Arbiter of Classical Style

    OpenAIRE

    デュカウスキー, トム

    2002-01-01

    The Classical style of music met its absolute apex in the music of Ludwig van Beethoven. To illustrate this, I shall divide this paper into four parts. First, I shall explain the underlying structure and tonal qualities of Classical music, making many references to Charles Rosen's book on the subject, which is considered to be the best and most thorough study of classical music to date. In part two, I shall make an in-depth analysis of an early work by Beethoven, String Quartet #6,opus 18 in ...

  9. Bohmian measures and their classical limit

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-09-01

    We consider a class of phase space measures, which naturally arise in the Bohmian interpretation of quantum mechanics. We study the classical limit of these so-called Bohmian measures, in dependence on the scale of oscillations and concentrations of the sequence of wave functions under consideration. The obtained results are consequently compared to those derived via semi-classical Wigner measures. To this end, we shall also give a connection to the theory of Young measures and prove several new results on Wigner measures themselves. Our analysis gives new insight on oscillation and concentration effects in the semi-classical regime. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  11. Can classical noise enhance quantum transmission?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, Mark M

    2009-01-01

    A modified quantum teleportation protocol broadens the scope of the classical forbidden-interval theorems for stochastic resonance. The fidelity measures performance of quantum communication. The sender encodes the two classical bits for quantum teleportation as weak bipolar subthreshold signals and sends them over a noisy classical channel. Two forbidden-interval theorems provide a necessary and sufficient condition for the occurrence of the nonmonotone stochastic resonance effect in the fidelity of quantum teleportation. The condition is that the noise mean must fall outside a forbidden interval related to the detection threshold and signal value. An optimal amount of classical noise benefits quantum communication when the sender transmits weak signals, the receiver detects with a high threshold and the noise mean lies outside the forbidden interval. Theorems and simulations demonstrate that both finite-variance and infinite-variance noise benefit the fidelity of quantum teleportation.

  12. From quantumness to classicality: A Bohmian journey

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Ángel S.

    2014-01-01

    WG2 workshop "Quantum and Classical Complexity: From Atoms to Biosystems", Homburg, Germany, 5-7 May 2014. Dedicated to Hermann Hartmann on the Occasion of his 100th Birthday. http://www.theochem.uni-frankfurt.de/COST/FRANKFURT2014/

  13. Stabilization of classic and quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the mechanism of quantum whirligig can be successfully used for stabilization of classical systems. In particular, the conditions for stabilization of charged particles and radiation fluxes in plasma are found.

  14. The complexity of arterial classical monocyte recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Maik; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of classical monocytes is imperative for the progression of atherosclerosis. Hence, therapeutic interference with mechanisms of lesional monocyte recruitment, the primary mechanism controlling macrophage accumulation, may allow for targeting atheroprogression and its clinical

  15. Classic Phenylketonuria: Diagnosis Through Heterozygote Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert F.; Elsas, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the identification of the asymptomatic carrier of classic phenylketonuria (PKU) 59 male and female normal control Ss were differentiated from 18 males and females heterozgous for PKU. (DB)

  16. Progress in classical and quantum variational principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, C G; Karl, G; Novikov, V A

    2004-01-01

    We review the development and practical uses of a generalized Maupertuis least action principle in classical mechanics in which the action is varied under the constraint of fixed mean energy for the trial trajectory. The original Maupertuis (Euler-Lagrange) principle constrains the energy at every point along the trajectory. The generalized Maupertuis principle is equivalent to Hamilton's principle. Reciprocal principles are also derived for both the generalized Maupertuis and the Hamilton principles. The reciprocal Maupertuis principle is the classical limit of Schroedinger's variational principle of wave mechanics and is also very useful to solve practical problems in both classical and semiclassical mechanics, in complete analogy with the quantum Rayleigh-Ritz method. Classical, semiclassical and quantum variational calculations are carried out for a number of systems, and the results are compared. Pedagogical as well as research problems are used as examples, which include nonconservative as well as relativistic systems. '... the most beautiful and important discovery of Mechanics.' Lagrange to Maupertuis (November 1756)

  17. Quantum machine learning: a classical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliberto, Carlo; Herbster, Mark; Ialongo, Alessandro Davide; Pontil, Massimiliano; Rocchetto, Andrea; Severini, Simone; Wossnig, Leonard

    2018-01-01

    Recently, increased computational power and data availability, as well as algorithmic advances, have led machine learning (ML) techniques to impressive results in regression, classification, data generation and reinforcement learning tasks. Despite these successes, the proximity to the physical limits of chip fabrication alongside the increasing size of datasets is motivating a growing number of researchers to explore the possibility of harnessing the power of quantum computation to speed up classical ML algorithms. Here we review the literature in quantum ML and discuss perspectives for a mixed readership of classical ML and quantum computation experts. Particular emphasis will be placed on clarifying the limitations of quantum algorithms, how they compare with their best classical counterparts and why quantum resources are expected to provide advantages for learning problems. Learning in the presence of noise and certain computationally hard problems in ML are identified as promising directions for the field. Practical questions, such as how to upload classical data into quantum form, will also be addressed.

  18. The classical limit of W-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, J.M.; Ramos, E.

    1992-01-01

    We define and compute explicitly the classical limit of the realizations of W n appearing as hamiltonian structures of generalized KdV hierarchies. The classical limit is obtained by taking the commutative limit of the ring of pseudodifferential operators. These algebras - denoted w n - have free field realizations in which the generators are given by the elementary symmetric polynomials in the free fields. We compute the algebras explicitly and we show that they are all reductions of a new algebra w KP , which is proposed as the universal classical W-algebra for the w n series. As a deformation of this algebra we also obtain w 1+∞ , the classical limit of W 1+∞ . (orig.)

  19. Classical algebra its nature, origins, and uses

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Roger L

    2008-01-01

    This insightful book combines the history, pedagogy, and popularization of algebra to present a unified discussion of the subject. Classical Algebra provides a complete and contemporary perspective on classical polynomial algebra through the exploration of how it was developed and how it exists today. With a focus on prominent areas such as the numerical solutions of equations, the systematic study of equations, and Galois theory, this book facilitates a thorough understanding of algebra and illustrates how the concepts of modern algebra originally developed from classical algebraic precursors. This book successfully ties together the disconnect between classical and modern algebraand provides readers with answers to many fascinating questions that typically go unexamined, including: What is algebra about? How did it arise? What uses does it have? How did it develop? What problems and issues have occurred in its history? How were these problems and issues resolved? The author answers these questions and more,...

  20. Quantum machine learning: a classical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliberto, Carlo; Herbster, Mark; Ialongo, Alessandro Davide; Pontil, Massimiliano; Rocchetto, Andrea; Severini, Simone; Wossnig, Leonard

    2018-01-01

    Recently, increased computational power and data availability, as well as algorithmic advances, have led machine learning (ML) techniques to impressive results in regression, classification, data generation and reinforcement learning tasks. Despite these successes, the proximity to the physical limits of chip fabrication alongside the increasing size of datasets is motivating a growing number of researchers to explore the possibility of harnessing the power of quantum computation to speed up classical ML algorithms. Here we review the literature in quantum ML and discuss perspectives for a mixed readership of classical ML and quantum computation experts. Particular emphasis will be placed on clarifying the limitations of quantum algorithms, how they compare with their best classical counterparts and why quantum resources are expected to provide advantages for learning problems. Learning in the presence of noise and certain computationally hard problems in ML are identified as promising directions for the field. Practical questions, such as how to upload classical data into quantum form, will also be addressed.

  1. Semi-classical quantization of chaotic billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilansky, U.

    1992-02-01

    The semi-classical quantization of chaotic billiards will be developed using scattering theory approach. This will be used to introduce and explain the inherent difficulties in the semi-classical quantization of chaos, and to show some of the modern tools which were developed recently to overcome these difficulties. To this end, we shall first obtain a semi-classical secular equation which is based on a finite number of classical periodic orbits. We shall use it to derive some spectral properties, and in particular to investigate the relationship between spectral statistics of quantum chaotic systems and the predictions of random-matrix theory. We shall finally discuss an important family of chaotic billiard, whose statistics does not follow any of the canonical ensembles, (GOE,GUE,...) but rather, corresponds to a new universality class. (author)

  2. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  3. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  4. Classical Music Clustering Based on Acoustic Features

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xindi; Haque, Syed Arefinul

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we cluster 330 classical music pieces collected from MusicNet database based on their musical note sequence. We use shingling and chord trajectory matrices to create signature for each music piece and performed spectral clustering to find the clusters. Based on different resolution, the output clusters distinctively indicate composition from different classical music era and different composing style of the musicians.

  5. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Farhan

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits ...

  6. Expert Western Classical Music Improvisers' Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Despres, JP; Burnard, Pamela Anne; Dube, F; Stevance, S

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in musical improvisation is exemplified by the body of literatures evidencing the positive impacts of improvisation learning on the musical apprentice’s aptitudes and the increasing presence of improvisation in Western classical concert halls and competitions. However, high-level Western classical music improvisers’ thinking processes are not yet thoroughly documented. As a result of this gap, our research addresses the following question: What strategies are implement...

  7. Classical geometry Euclidean, transformational, inversive, and projective

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, I E; Liu, A C F; Tokarsky, G W

    2014-01-01

    Features the classical themes of geometry with plentiful applications in mathematics, education, engineering, and science Accessible and reader-friendly, Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective introduces readers to a valuable discipline that is crucial to understanding bothspatial relationships and logical reasoning. Focusing on the development of geometric intuitionwhile avoiding the axiomatic method, a problem solving approach is encouraged throughout. The book is strategically divided into three sections: Part One focuses on Euclidean geometry, which p

  8. On classical orthogonal polynomials and differential operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranian, L

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the four families of classical orthogonal polynomials (Jacobi, Bessel, Hermite and Laguerre) each satisfy an equation FP n (x) = λ n P n (x), n ≥ 0, for an appropriate second-order differential operator F. In this paper it is shown that any linear differential operator U which has the Jacobi, Bessel, Hermite or Laguerre polynomials as eigenfunctions has to be a polynomial with constant coefficients in the classical second-order operator F

  9. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  10. Bohmian mechanics and the emergence of classicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzkin, A

    2009-01-01

    Bohmian mechanics is endowed with an ontological package that supposedly allows to solve the main interpretational problems of quantum mechanics. We are concerned in this work by the emergence of classicality from the quantum mechanical substrate. We will argue that although being superficially attractive, the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation does not shed new light on the quantum-to-classical transition. This is due to nature of the dynamical law of Bohmian mechanics by which the particles follow the streamlines of the probability flow. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories can be highly non-classical even when the wavefunction propagates along classical trajectories, as happens in semiclassical systems. In order to account for classical dynamics, Bohmian mechanics needs non-spreading and non-interfering wave packets: this is achieved for practical purposes by having recourse to decoherence and dense measurements. However one then faces the usual fundamental problems associated with the meaning of reduced density matrices. Moreover the specific assets of the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation - in particular the existence of point-like particles pursuing well-defined trajectories - would play no role in accounting for the emergence of classical dynamics.

  11. Metal working and dislocation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural observations are presented for different metals deformed from low to high strain by both traditional and new metal working processes. It is shown that deformation induced dislocation structures can be interpreted and analyzed within a common framework of grain subdivision on a finer...... and finer scale down to the nanometer dimension, which can be reached at ultrahigh strains. It is demonstrated that classical materials science and engineering principles apply from the largest to the smallest structural scale but also that new and unexpected structures and properties characterize metals...

  12. Subsurface excitations in a metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate internal hot carrier excitations in a Au thin film bombarded by hyperthermal and low energy alkali and noble gas ions. Excitations within the thin film of a metal-oxide-semiconductor device are measured revealing that ions whose velocities fall below the classical threshold given...... by the free-electron model of a metal still excite hot carriers. Excellent agreement between these results and a nonadiabatic model that accounts for the time-varying ion-surface interaction indicates that the measured excitations are due to semilocalized electrons near the metal surface....

  13. Entanglement-assisted classical communication can simulate classical communication without causal order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akibue, Seiseki; Owari, Masaki; Kato, Go; Murao, Mio

    2017-12-01

    Phenomena induced by the existence of entanglement, such as nonlocal correlations, exhibit characteristic properties of quantum mechanics distinguishing from classical theories. When entanglement is accompanied by classical communication, it enhances the power of quantum operations jointly performed by two spatially separated parties. Such a power has been analyzed by the gap between the performances of joint quantum operations implementable by local operations at each party connected by classical communication with and without the assistance of entanglement. In this work, we present a formulation for joint quantum operations connected by classical communication beyond special relativistic causal order but without entanglement and still within quantum mechanics. Using the formulation, we show that entanglement-assisting classical communication necessary for implementing a class of joint quantum operations called separable operations can be interpreted to simulate "classical communication" that does not respect causal order. Our results reveal a counterintuitive aspect of entanglement related to space-time.

  14. [Detection of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin (MRSA) by molecular biology (Cepheid GeneXpert IL, GeneOhm BD, Roche LightCycler, Hyplex Evigene I2A) versus screening by culture: Economic and practical strategy for the laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudat, P; Demondion, E; Jouannet, C; Charron, J; Chillou, C; Salaun, V; Mankikian, B

    2012-06-01

    Patients admitted in cardiac surgery and cardiac ICU at the Clinic Saint-Gatien (Tours) are screened for MRSA at the entrance by nasal swab and culture on blood agar and selective chromogenic medium made by addition of cefoxitin: BBL CHROMagar MRSA-II BD (result obtained at Day +1). We wanted to assess the molecular biology techniques available to obtain a result at day 0 for the majority of patients and to define an economic and practical strategy for the laboratory. We studied four molecular biology techniques: Cepheid GeneXpert (Cepheid) GeneOhm (BD), LightCycler (Roche) and Hyplex (I2A). Upon reception, nasal swabs were treated by culture, considered as reference, and one of the techniques of molecular biology, according to the manufacturer's notice. We conducted four studies between April 2008 and February 2009 to obtain a significant sample for each of them. By screening we mean a method that allows us to exclude MRSA carriage for patients waiting for surgery, and not to change patient management: for example, lack of isolation measures specific to entrance, no modification of antibiotic prophylaxis during surgery and no isolation measures in the immediate postoperative period. The criteria we considered for this evaluation were: (1) technician time: time to perform one or a series of sample(s) n=10 or more (about 2h for all techniques except GeneXpert 75min), level of skilled competences (no specific training for GeneXpert); (2) results: turnaround time (all molecular biology techniques), ease of reading and results interpretations (no specialized training required for GeneXpert), failure or not (12% of failure of internal controls for GeneOhm); (3) economic: cost for one or a series of sample(s) (n=10 or more), if we considered X as the reference culture cost (10 X Hyplex and LightCycler, 20 X and 40 X for GeneXpert GeneOhm); (4) NPV: 100% for GeneXpert and LightCycler. At same sensitivity, no technique, including culture, can solve alone our problem, which

  15. Emergence of classical theories from quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hájícek, P

    2012-01-01

    Three problems stand in the way of deriving classical theories from quantum mechanics: those of realist interpretation, of classical properties and of quantum measurement. Recently, we have identified some tacit assumptions that lie at the roots of these problems. Thus, a realist interpretation is hindered by the assumption that the only properties of quantum systems are values of observables. If one simply postulates the properties to be objective that are uniquely defined by preparation then all difficulties disappear. As for classical properties, the wrong assumption is that there are arbitrarily sharp classical trajectories. It turns out that fuzzy classical trajectories can be obtained from quantum mechanics by taking the limit of high entropy. Finally, standard quantum mechanics implies that any registration on a quantum system is disturbed by all quantum systems of the same kind existing somewhere in the universe. If one works out systematically how quantum mechanics must be corrected so that there is no such disturbance, one finds a new interpretation of von Neumann's 'first kind of dynamics', and so a new way to a solution of the quantum measurement problem. The present paper gives a very short review of this work.

  16. Population structure of the Classic period Maya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Andrew K

    2007-03-01

    This study examines the population structure of Classic period (A.D. 250-900) Maya populations through analysis of odontometric variation of 827 skeletons from 12 archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. The hypothesis that isolation by distance characterized Classic period Maya population structure is tested using Relethford and Blangero's (Hum Biol 62 (1990) 5-25) approach to R matrix analysis for quantitative traits. These results provide important biological data for understanding ancient Maya population history, particularly the effects of the competing Tikal and Calakmul hegemonies on patterns of lowland Maya site interaction. An overall F(ST) of 0.018 is found for the Maya area, indicating little among-group variation for the Classic Maya sites tested. Principal coordinates plots derived from the R matrix analysis show little regional patterning in the data, though the geographic outliers of Kaminaljuyu and a pooled Pacific Coast sample did not cluster with the lowland Maya sites. Mantel tests comparing the biological distance matrix to a geographic distance matrix found no association between genetic and geographic distance. In the Relethford-Blangero analysis, most sites possess negative or near-zero residuals, indicating minimal extraregional gene flow. The exceptions were Barton Ramie, Kaminaljuyu, and Seibal. A scaled R matrix analysis clarifies that genetic drift is a consideration for understanding Classic Maya population structure. All results indicate that isolation by distance does not describe Classic period Maya population structure. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Lagrangian formulation of classical BMT-theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupasov-Maksimov, Andrey; Deriglazov, Alexei; Guzman, Walberto

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The most popular classical theory of electron has been formulated by Bargmann, Michel and Telegdi (BMT) in 1959. The BMT equations give classical relativistic description of a charged particle with spin and anomalous magnetic momentum moving in homogeneous electro-magnetic field. This allows to study spin dynamics of polarized beams in uniform fields. In particular, first experimental measurements of muon anomalous magnetic momentum were done using changing of helicity predicted by BMT equations. Surprisingly enough, a systematic formulation and the analysis of the BMT theory are absent in literature. In the present work we particularly fill this gap by deducing Lagrangian formulation (variational problem) for BMT equations. Various equivalent forms of Lagrangian will be discussed in details. An advantage of the obtained classical model is that the Lagrangian action describes a relativistic spinning particle without Grassmann variables, for both free and interacting cases. This implies also the possibility of canonical quantization. In the interacting case, an arbitrary electromagnetic background may be considered, which generalizes the BMT theory formulated to the case of homogeneous fields. The classical model has two local symmetries, which gives an interesting example of constrained classical dynamics. It is surprising, that the case of vanishing anomalous part of the magnetic momentum is naturally highlighted in our construction. (author)

  18. Classical generalization of the Drude formula for the optical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N. V.

    2001-10-15

    A simple classical generalization of the Drude formula is derived based on the impulse response approach and Poisson statistics. The new feature is a parameter c, which is a measure of persistence of velocity. With negative values of c, it is possible to mimic the infrared properties of poor metals that display a minimum in the optical conductivity at zero frequency. The electron current in these cases reverses direction before decaying to zero. Specific examples considered are Hg and its amalgams, liquid Te, and the quasicrystal Al{sub 63.5}Cu{sub 24.5}Fe{sub 12}. Discussion is offered on the connection with interband transitions, on the distinction between the electron lifetime and the transport relaxation time, and on other generalizations of the Drude formula.

  19. Classical diffusion: theory and simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, H.; Hu, P.N.

    1977-01-01

    The nonstandard mathematical and numerical problems which arise in classical diffusion theory upon reinsertion of the time derivative of the magnetic field (curl E not equal to 0) are discussed. The extension of classical diffusion theory to curl E not equal to 0 requires solution of a global boundary value problem before the surface averaged flux can be obtained. It also introduces coupling between plamsa diffusion and magnetic flux diffusion (the shin effect). The most effective method for treating Grad--Hogan classical diffusion was to introduce independent and dependent variables so as to eliminate the convection velocity (it can be computed afterwards). This procedure reduced the nonstandard, two dimensional problem to one with computation time only slightly more than for a one-dimensional diffusion problem. 23 references, 1 figure

  20. Classical bound for Mach-Zehnder superresolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afek, I; Ambar, O; Silberberg, Y

    2010-03-26

    The employment of path-entangled multiphoton states enables measurement of phase with enhanced precision. It is common practice to demonstrate the unique properties of such quantum states by measuring superresolving oscillations in the coincidence rate of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Similar oscillations, however, have also been demonstrated in various configurations using classical light only; making it unclear what, if any, are the classical limits of this phenomenon. Here we derive a classical bound for the visibility of superresolving oscillations in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This provides an easy to apply, fundamental test of nonclassicality. We apply this test to experimental multiphoton coincidence measurements obtained using photon number resolving detectors. Mach-Zehnder superresolution is found to be a highly distinctive quantum effect.

  1. The chronicle of the classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassalo, J.M.F.

    1984-01-01

    In this Chronicle of the classical electrodynamics it is shown how this important branch of classical physics was developed since the mathematical formulation of the electromagnetism empiric laws carried by Maxwell, mainly the laws of Coulomb, Oersted, Ampere, Biot-Savart, Faraday, Henry and Lenz, up to the settlement of the radiation theory, scientific background for the technological development of the wireless telegraphy. Through this chronicle, it is also seen how Maxwell got one of the main results of the past century classical physics - the electromagnetic theory of light -, and how the experimental production of an electromagnetic wave by Hertz, unchained a collection of theoretical papers which explained many experimental results such as dispersion of light, thermical radiation, X-rays and its scattering through the matter. At last, it is still seen that the study of electrodynamics of moving bodies led to the relativity theory, presented by Einstein's famous paper about such subject. (Author) [pt

  2. Globalising the classical foundations of IPE thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Helleiner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current efforts to teach and research the historical foundations of IPE thought in classical political economy in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries centre largely on European and American thinkers. If a more extensive 'global conversation' is to be fostered in the field today, the perspectives of thinkers in other regions need to be recognised, and brought into the mainstream of its intellectual history. As a first step towards 'globalising' the classical foundations of IPE thought, this article demonstrates some ways in which thinkers located beyond Europe and the United States engaged with and contributed to debates associated with the three well-known classical traditions on which current IPE scholarship often draws: economic liberalism, economic nationalism and Marxism. It also reveals the extensive nature of 'global conversations' about IPE issues in this earlier era.

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome with a distinct symptom mainly excruciating facial pain that tends to come and go unpredictably in sudden shock-like attacks. Medical management remains the primary treatment for classical trigeminal neuralgia. When medical therapy failed, surgery with microvascular decompression can be performed. Radiosurgery can be offered for classical trigeminal neuralgia patients who are not surgical candidate or surgery refusal and they should not in acute pain condition. Radiosurgery is widely used because of good therapeutic result and low complication rate. Weakness of this technique is a latency period, which is time required for pain relief. It usually ranges from 1 to 2 months. This review enlightens the important role of radiosurgery in the treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia.

  4. Quantum and classical optics–emerging links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J H; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Qasimi, Asma Al; Ali, Hazrat; Alonso, M A; Gutiérrez-Cuevas, R; Little, Bethany J; Howell, John C; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A N

    2016-01-01

    Quantum optics and classical optics are linked in ways that are becoming apparent as a result of numerous recent detailed examinations of the relationships that elementary notions of optics have with each other. These elementary notions include interference, polarization, coherence, complementarity and entanglement. All of them are present in both quantum and classical optics. They have historic origins, and at least partly for this reason not all of them have quantitative definitions that are universally accepted. This makes further investigation into their engagement in optics very desirable. We pay particular attention to effects that arise from the mere co-existence of separately identifiable and readily available vector spaces. Exploitation of these vector-space relationships are shown to have unfamiliar theoretical implications and new options for observation. It is our goal to bring emerging quantum–classical links into wider view and to indicate directions in which forthcoming and future work will promote discussion and lead to unified understanding. (invited comment)

  5. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendon, Raymond Cori [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  6. Classical and quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, Farhan

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electro-magnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electro-magnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences

  7. Violation of quantum inequalities with classical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, J. Acacio de; Sant'Anna, Adonai S.

    1997-01-01

    We use as experimental configuration two classical sources α 1 (θ 1 ) with θ 1 phase, and α 2 (θ 2 ) with θ 2 phase, and a third one u(θ) with unknown phase, to be studied. The configuration has two homodyne detections (D 1 , D 2 ) and (D 3 , D 4 ). We compute the correlation functions which violate the inequalities. We calculate the classical intensities for the four detectors used in configuration. These intensities are conditioned in the θ variable. For obtaining the unconditional intensities we assume an uniform distribution for θ, and integrate the expressions for all the possible θ values

  8. Classical solutions of Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitter, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews classical, static solutions of the Yang Mills field equations in the presence of charge and current sources. The full Yang Mills equations are given. Abelian solutions are considered, but the paper really concentrates on nonabelian solutions describing spherically symmetric situations. A situation is called spherically symmetric if any deviation from the symmetry can be gauged away. The discussed solutions can be considered as the simplest non-abelian generalization of the well known Coulomb-Biot-Savart solution in classical electrodynamics

  9. The classic. Review article: Traffic accidents. 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherne, H

    2013-09-01

    This Classic Article is a translation of the original work by Prof. Harald Tscherne, Der Straßenunfall [Traffic Accidents]. An accompanying biographical sketch of Prof. Tscherne is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-3011-x . An online version of the original German article is available as supplemental material. The Classic Article is reproduced with permission from Brüder Hollinek & Co. GesmbH, Purkersdorf, Austria. The original article was published in Wien Med Wochenschr. 1966;116:105-108. (Translated by Dr. Roman Pfeifer.).

  10. Classical Fields Derived from Quantum Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Fred Gordon

    The Clifford algebra C(,4) is shown to be a suitable formalism for classical and quantum physics, and enables classical electromagnetic and gravitational field equations to be derived from the quantum conservation laws for electric charge and energy-momentum. The resulting linear theory of gravitation is shown to make predictions in agreement with the results of the classic weak field tests of gravitation theories. The C(,4) formalism is a physically intuitive, unifying, and mathematically powerful formalism. It can be developed as a geometric algebra in which its elements and operations have direct geometrical interpretations. The Dirac algebra of 4 x 4 matrices is a matrix representation of C(,4). C(,4) also contains the Pauli algebra, the generators of the Lorentz group, tensors, and differential forms. Because of these features C(,4) is both unifying, effectively merging tensor formulations of classical physics with the Dirac and Pauli algebras of quantum physics, and mathematically powerful, as its simple rules allow a wide variety of mathematical operations and structures to be defined. The unified treatment of classical and quantum physics permits a straightforward discussion of the classical limit of quantum field equations and conservation laws. Electromagnetic and gravitational field equations are derived from the local conservation laws for electric charge and energy-momentum by using the Poincare lemma from differential forms theory. The electromagnetic field equations thereby obtained are the usual Maxwell equations. The gravitational field equations obtained have an analogous mathematical form to the Maxwell equations and describe a linear gravitational field. The resulting theory provides a relativistic treatment of the motion of particles in a central gravitational field. The theory makes predictions in agreement with the predictions of general relativity for the classic weak field tests so can be considered a valid theory in problems in which the

  11. Beam structures classical and advanced theories

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, Erasmo; Petrolo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Beam theories are exploited worldwide to analyze civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures. Many beam approaches have been proposed during the last centuries by eminent scientists such as Euler, Bernoulli, Navier, Timoshenko, Vlasov, etc.  Most of these models are problem dependent: they provide reliable results for a given problem, for instance a given section and cannot be applied to a different one. Beam Structures: Classical and Advanced Theories proposes a new original unified approach to beam theory that includes practically all classical and advanced models for be

  12. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadi, Z.; Menas, F.; Bérard, A.; Mohrbach, H.

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way

  13. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhadi, Z. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Laboratoire de physique théorique, Faculté des sciences exactes, Université de Bejaia, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); Menas, F. [Laboratoire de physique et chimie quantique, Faculté des sciences, Université Mouloud Mammeri, BP 17, 15000 Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Ecole Nationale Préparatoire aux Etudes d’ingéniorat, Laboratoire de physique, RN 5 Rouiba, Alger (Algeria); Bérard, A. [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France); Mohrbach, H., E-mail: herve.mohrbach@univ-lorraine.fr [Equipe BioPhysStat, Laboratoire LCP-A2MC, ICPMB, IF CNRS No 2843, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  14. Mathematical optics classical, quantum, and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Going beyond standard introductory texts, Mathematical Optics: Classical, Quantum, and Computational Methods brings together many new mathematical techniques from optical science and engineering research. Profusely illustrated, the book makes the material accessible to students and newcomers to the field. Divided into six parts, the text presents state-of-the-art mathematical methods and applications in classical optics, quantum optics, and image processing. Part I describes the use of phase space concepts to characterize optical beams and the application of dynamic programming in optical wave

  15. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, C; Langlois, J

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems. (review)

  16. On the Classical and Quantum Momentum Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, Chiara

    In this thesis we study the classical and quantum momentum maps and the theory of reduction. We focus on the notion of momentum map in Poisson geometry and we discuss the classification of the momentum map in this framework. Furthermore, we describe the so-called Poisson Reduction, a technique...... that allows us to reduce the dimension of a manifold in presence of symmetries implemented by Poisson actions. Using techniques of deformation quantization and quantum groups, we introduce the quantum momentum map as a deformation of the classical momentum map, constructed in such a way that it factorizes...

  17. Random electrodynamics: the theory of classical electrodynamics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of classical electrodynamics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation is outlined here under the title random electrodynamics. The work represents a reanalysis of the bounds of validity of classical electron theory which should sharpen the understanding of the connections and distinctions between classical and quantum theories. The new theory of random electrodynamics is a classical electron theory involving Newton's equations for particle motion due to the Lorentz force, and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields with point particles as sources. However, the theory departs from the classical electron theory of Lorentz in that it adopts a new boundary condition on Maxwell's equations. It is assumed that the homogeneous boundary condition involves random classical electromagnetic radiation with a Lorentz-invariant spectrum, classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation. The implications of random electrodynamics for atomic structure, atomic spectra, and particle-interference effects are discussed on an order-of-magnitude or heuristic level. Some detailed mathematical connections and some merely heuristic connections are noted between random electrodynamics and quantum theory. (U.S.)

  18. On incompleteness of classical field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sardanashvily, G.

    2009-01-01

    Classical field theory is adequately formulated as Lagrangian theory on fibre bundles and graded manifolds. One however observes that non-trivial higher stage Noether identities and gauge symmetries of a generic reducible degenerate Lagrangian field theory fail to be defined. Therefore, such a field theory can not be quantized.

  19. Classical diagnostic radiological features of Von Recklinghausen's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and appropriately guiding management decisions. The patient presented is a 29- year old female who had presented with right orbital and periorbital masses, lisch nodules, multiple scalp and body nodules, cranial bony defect and complex kyphoscoliosis. She had three of the seven classical diagnostic features of NF-1 ...

  20. Simple classical approach to spin resonance phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A

    1977-01-01

    A simple classical method of describing spin resonance in terms of the average power absorbed by a spin system is discussed. The method has several advantages over more conventional treatments, and a number of important spin resonance phenomena, not normally considered at the introductory level...

  1. Quantum machine learning: a classical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliberto, Carlo; Herbster, Mark; Ialongo, Alessandro Davide; Pontil, Massimiliano; Severini, Simone; Wossnig, Leonard

    2018-01-01

    Recently, increased computational power and data availability, as well as algorithmic advances, have led machine learning (ML) techniques to impressive results in regression, classification, data generation and reinforcement learning tasks. Despite these successes, the proximity to the physical limits of chip fabrication alongside the increasing size of datasets is motivating a growing number of researchers to explore the possibility of harnessing the power of quantum computation to speed up classical ML algorithms. Here we review the literature in quantum ML and discuss perspectives for a mixed readership of classical ML and quantum computation experts. Particular emphasis will be placed on clarifying the limitations of quantum algorithms, how they compare with their best classical counterparts and why quantum resources are expected to provide advantages for learning problems. Learning in the presence of noise and certain computationally hard problems in ML are identified as promising directions for the field. Practical questions, such as how to upload classical data into quantum form, will also be addressed. PMID:29434508

  2. Multiple-Access Quantum-Classical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mohsen

    2011-10-01

    A multi-user network that supports both classical and quantum communication is proposed. By relying on optical code-division multiple access techniques, this system offers simultaneous key exchange between multiple pairs of network users. A lower bound on the secure key generation rate will be derived for decoy-state quantum key distribution protocols.

  3. Classical or equilibrium thermodynamics: basic conceptual aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Calvo Tiritan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Classical or Equilibrium Thermodynamics is one of the most consolidated fields of Physics. It is synthesized by a well-known and self coherent knowledge structure. The essence of the Classical Thermodynamics theoretical structure consists of a set of natural laws that rule the macroscopic physical systems behavior. These laws were formulated based on observations generalizations and are mostly independent of any hypotheses concerning the microscopic nature of the matter. In general, the approaches established for the Classical Thermodynamics follow one of the following alternatives: the historical approach that describes chronologically the evolution of ideas, concepts and facts, and the postulational approach in which postulates are formulated but are not demonstrated a priori but can be confirmed a posteriori. In this work, a brief review of the pre-classical historical approach conceptual evolution is elaborated, from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. As for this, the following themes are dealt with in an evolutionary and phenomenological way: heat nature, thermometry, calorimetry, Carnot’s heat engine, heat mechanical equivalent and the first and second laws. The Zeroth law that was formulated afterwards is included in the discussion.

  4. Immune reactions in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, S; Potters, M; Emmens, R; Visser, L; van den Berg, A.

    The immune reaction in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) can be separated into an inflammatory response in the involved tissues and a generalized immune response in the patient. The local immune reaction in HL is by far the most prominent among all tumors, with the exception of so called T-cell-rich

  5. Embedding classical fields in quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, S.

    1978-01-01

    We describe a procedure for quantizing a classical field theory which is the field-theoretica analog of Sudarshan's method for embedding a classical-mechanical system in a quantum-mechanical system. The essence of the difference between our quantization procedure and Fock-space quantization lies in the choice of vacuum states. The key to our choice of vacuum is the procedure we outline for constructing Lagrangians which have gradient terms linear in the field varialbes from classical Lagrangians which have gradient terms which are quadratic in field variables. We apply this procedure to model electrodynamic field theories, Yang-Mills theories, and a vierbein model of gravity. In the case of electrodynamics models we find a formalism with a close similarity to the coherent-soft-photon-state formalism of QED. In addition, photons propagate to t = + infinity via retarded propagators. We also show how to construct a quantum field for action-at-a-distance electrodynamics. In the Yang-Mills case we show that a previously suggested model for quark confinement necessarily has gluons with principle-value propagation which allows the model to be unitary despite the presence of higher-order-derivative field equations. In the vierbein-gravity model we show that our quantization procedure allows us to treat the classical and quantum parts of the metric field in a unified manner. We find a new perturbation scheme for quantum gravity as a result

  6. Classical and quantum effects in electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komar, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers on classical and quantum effects in electrodynamics. It covers the following topics: The physics of superhigh energy neutrinos; Quantum, particle in nonstationary; Correlated coherent states; The non degenerate gauge and generalized canonical formalism; and Ultimate capabilities of soft x-ray optics

  7. On dual representation in classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlovets, Dmitrii V

    2010-01-01

    A discussion is given of the use of the dual representation in solving multipole radiation and electromagnetic wave diffraction problems in classical electrodynamics. In the method discussed, actual electric field sources are replaced by 'magnetic' ones. It is shown that despite the absence of Dirac magnetic monopoles, such formalism allows for a physical interpretation of some frequently used methods. (methodological notes)

  8. On the regularization procedure in classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaremko, Yu

    2003-01-01

    We consider the self-action problem in classical electrodynamics. A strict geometrical sense of commonly used renormalization of mass is made. A regularization procedure is proposed which relies on energy-momentum and angular momentum balance equations. We correct the expression for angular momentum tensor obtained by us in a previous paper (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 831)

  9. Functional integral approach to classical statistical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.V.

    1980-04-01

    A functional integral method is developed for the statistical solution of nonlinear stochastic differential equations which arise in classical dynamics. The functional integral approach provides a very natural and elegant derivation of the statistical dynamical equations that have been derived using the operator formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose

  10. Classical stochastic approach to cosmology revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The classical stochastic model of cosmology recently developed by us is reconsidered. In that approach the parameter defined by the equation of state = wρ was taken to be fluctuating with mean zero and we compared the theoretical probability distribution function (PDF) for the Hubble parameter with observational ...

  11. Classical stochastic approach to cosmology revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The classical stochastic model of cosmology recently developed by us is reconsidered. In that approach the parameter w defined by the equation of state p wρ was taken to be fluctuat- ing with mean zero and we compared the theoretical probability distribution function (PDF) for the. Hubble parameter with ...

  12. Classical solutions of the p-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, D.T.

    1988-11-01

    An appropriate subsidiary condition is introduced in the classical actions of the p-branes (p arbitrary). A general class of exact solutions of the resulting nonlinear equations of motion are obtained which yield a broad class of characteristics for the original covariant equations of the p-branes. (author). 11 refs

  13. Summary of classical general relativity workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the classical general relativity workshop, ten lectures were presented on various topics. The topics included aspects of black-hole physics, gravitational collapse and the formation of black holes, specific stellar models like a superdense star, method of extracting solutions by exploiting Noether symmetry, brane world and.

  14. Data Structures in Classical and Quantum Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Fillinger (Max)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis survey summarizes several results about quantum computing related to (mostly static) data structures. First, we describe classical data structures for the set membership and the predecessor search problems: Perfect Hash tables for set membership by Fredman, Koml\\'{o}s and

  15. The Oxford Treasury of Classic Poems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michael, Ed.; Stuart-Clark, Christopher, Ed.

    This book contains over 90 classic poems for children. The collection of poems includes nonsense verse by Lear and Carroll, story poems by Tennyson and Keats, and humorous poems by Belloc and Betjeman. The collection also includes poems by modern poets, such as Charles Causley, Ted Hughes, John Agard, Roger McGough, and Stevie Smith. The…

  16. Transpupillary Thermotherapy for Classic Subfoveal Choroidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To report a case of successful treatment of a classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularization with a transpupillary thermotherapy protocol. Case Report: A 67-year old pensioner presented with a sixmonth history of reduced vision in both eyes. He had been previously diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma.

  17. Aspects of Negation in Classical Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J.

    1972-01-01

    Traditional grammars are criticized as having obscured or omitted many significant features of negation patterns in classical Greek. The author demonstrates that negation in Greek extensively involves semantic and syntactic factors. Certain of the factors are thoroughly embedded in the traditional approach to grammar, while others are derived from…

  18. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 6. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics. Martha Goodway. General Article Volume 11 Issue 6 June 2006 pp 63-66. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Classical "Topoi" and the Academic Commonplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, Laurence E.

    An investigation of the various ways the term "topos" is used in classical rhetoric reveals the limited range of invention strategies offered by academic discourse pedagogy. Donald Bartholmae's work on basic writing addresses the relationship of the commonplace to topical invention within academic discourse. Investigation of the history…

  20. Free Fermions and the Classical Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunden, Fabio Deelan; Mezzadri, Francesco; O'Connell, Neil

    2018-04-01

    There is a close connection between the ground state of non-interacting fermions in a box with classical (absorbing, reflecting, and periodic) boundary conditions and the eigenvalue statistics of the classical compact groups. The associated determinantal point processes can be extended in two natural directions: (i) we consider the full family of admissible quantum boundary conditions (i.e., self-adjoint extensions) for the Laplacian on a bounded interval, and the corresponding projection correlation kernels; (ii) we construct the grand canonical extensions at finite temperature of the projection kernels, interpolating from Poisson to random matrix eigenvalue statistics. The scaling limits in the bulk and at the edges are studied in a unified framework, and the question of universality is addressed. Whether the finite temperature determinantal processes correspond to the eigenvalue statistics of some matrix models is, a priori, not obvious. We complete the picture by constructing a finite temperature extension of the Haar measure on the classical compact groups. The eigenvalue statistics of the resulting grand canonical matrix models (of random size) corresponds exactly to the grand canonical measure of free fermions with classical boundary conditions.

  1. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A remarkable contribution of Professor Cyril Stanley Smith was the translation of metallurgical classics into English from several languages - both ancient and modem ... He had not prepared for the role of technical translator. His wife,. Alice Kimball Smith, in oral history interviews made for Harvard. University related how his ...

  2. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy of a quantum particle cannot be determined exactly unless there is an infinite amount of time to perform the measurement. This paper considers the possibility that , the uncertainty in the energy, may be complex. To understand the effect of a particle having a complex energy, the behaviour of a classical ...

  3. Nanotribology investigations with classical molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of nanotribological problems investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, within the context of the applicability of continuum mechanics contact theories at the atomic scale. Along these lines, three different themes can be recognized herein:

  4. On normal modes in classical Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Normal modes of Hamittonian systems that are even and of classical type are characterized as the critical points of a normalized kinetic energy functional on level sets of the potential energy functional. With the aid of this constrained variational formulation the existence of at least one family

  5. Equilibration and thermalization of classical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, F.; Neuhaus, T.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Novotny, M. A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; De Raedt, H.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical evidence is presented that the canonical distribution for a subsystem of a closed classical system of a ring of coupled harmonic oscillators (integrable system) or magnetic moments (nonintegrable system) follows directly from the solution of the time-reversible Newtonian equation of motion

  6. Stimulus Configuration, Classical Conditioning, and Hippocampal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmajuk, Nestor A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of the hippocampus in classical conditioning is described in terms of a multilayer network portraying stimulus configuration. A model of hippocampal function is presented, and computer simulations are used to study neural activity in the various brain areas mapped according to the model. (SLD)

  7. Attitudes of Children Established by Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabei, Fred; And Others

    This study examined the attitudes of children established by classical conditioning. Subjects were 4th graders (26 males and 31 females). Each child was randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. A posttest-only design was used with positive and negative word associations presented to the experimental group, and neutral word…

  8. Priority in the Classical Conditioning of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George; Lamal, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contrary to widely held belief, Watons and Rayner's (1920) experiment with Little Albert is not first reported case of classical conditioning of a child. Their work was preceded by that of Bogen and of Krasnogorskii. Mateer's work either preceded or coincided with Watons and Rayner's. This article clarifies chronology of these early studies of…

  9. The Role of Contingency in Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Mauricio R.; Bitterman, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    Early experiments suggesting that classical conditioning depends on the contingency between conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) are reconsidered along with later evidence that shows conditioning of the CS and its context in random training. CS-US contingency is neither necessary nor sufficient for conditioning. (SLD)

  10. SUPPORTING INFORMATION Classical dynamics simulations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classical dynamics simulations of interstellar glycine formation via CH2=NH + CO + H2O reaction. YOGESHWARAN KRISHNAN, ALLEN VINCENT, and MANIKANDAN. PARANJOTHY∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, Jodhpur, Rajasthan,. India. E-mail: pmanikandan@iitj.ac.in.

  11. Quantum scattering from classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.M.; Poppitz, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    We show that scattering amplitudes between initial wave packet states and certain coherent final states can be computed in a systematic weak coupling expansion about classical solutions satisfying initial-value conditions. The initial-value conditions are such as to make the solution of the classical field equations amenable to numerical methods. We propose a practical procedure for computing classical solutions which contribute to high energy two-particle scattering amplitudes. We consider in this regard the implications of a recent numerical simulation in classical SU(2) Yang-Mills theory for multiparticle scattering in quantum gauge theories and speculate on its generalization to electroweak theory. We also generalize our results to the case of complex trajectories and discuss the prospects for finding a solution to the resulting complex boundary value problem, which would allow the application of our method to any wave packet to coherent state transition. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these results to the issues of baryon number violation and multiparticle scattering at high energies. ((orig.))

  12. Classical Etymologies of Select Gynaecological and Ophthalmic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In early times, many terms were traced to the treatises of early Greek and Roman physicians such as Hippocrates, Galen and Celsus, who were famous doctors in antiquity. This paper attempts to identify, through the philological and semantic methods, the Classical stories and linguistic history that surround the etymology of ...

  13. Maxwell and the classical wave particle dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J T

    2008-05-28

    Maxwell's equations are one of the greatest theoretical achievements in physics of all times. They have survived three successive theoretical revolutions, associated with the advent of relativity, quantum mechanics and modern quantum field theory. In particular, they provide the theoretical framework for the understanding of the classical wave particle dualism.

  14. A slow component of classic Stroop interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phaf, R. Hans; Horsman, Hark H.; van der Moolen, Bas; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Schmand, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The interference in colour naming may extend beyond critical Stroop trials. This "slow'' effect was first discovered in emotional Stroop tasks, but is extended here to classical Stroop. In two experiments, meaningless coloured letter strings followed a colour word or neutral word. Student

  15. The Strange World of Classical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David

    2010-01-01

    We have heard many times that the commonsense world of classical physics was shattered by Einstein's revelation of the laws of relativity. This is certainly true; the shift from our everyday notions of time and space to those revealed by relativity is one of the greatest stretches the mind can make. What is seldom appreciated is that the laws of…

  16. CLASSICS Invention of the Integrated Circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    CLASSICS. Jack Kilby demonstrated the working of the world's first integrated circuit in September 1958. He was awarded ... bility was established. In the early 1950's, Robert Henry of this group, working under ..... to the Air Force a small working computer complete with a few hundred bits of semiconductor memory, and. 1.

  17. On the zeros of the classical polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calogero, F.

    1977-01-01

    Some theorems and conjectures concerning the zeros of the classical polynomials (of Hermite, Laguerre and Jacobi) are announced. The theorems, whose proof is not reported, have been obtained from the relationship between the motion of the zeros of special solutions of simple linear partial differential equations (in x and t), and one-dimensional many-body problems. (author)

  18. A 'missing' family of classical orthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    We study a family of 'classical' orthogonal polynomials which satisfy (apart from a three-term recurrence relation) an eigenvalue problem with a differential operator of Dunkl type. These polynomials can be obtained from the little q-Jacobi polynomials in the limit q = -1. We also show that these polynomials provide a nontrivial realization of the Askey-Wilson algebra for q = -1.

  19. The Coming of a Classical World

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 9. The Coming of a Classical World. Anu Venugopalan. General Article Volume 9 Issue 9 ... Author Affiliations. Anu Venugopalan1. School of Basic and Applied Sciences GGS Indraprastha University Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110 006, India.

  20. Treatment of classical Kaposi's sarcoma with gemcitabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brambilla, L; Labianca, R; Ferrucci, SM; Taglioni, M; Boneschi, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Background: Several drugs are active in aggressive classical Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS); chemotherapeutic agents with fewer side-effects, more rapid response and able to overcome resistance to previous treatment are advisable when treating patients in a second line. Gemcitabine, an analogue of

  1. Classic Readers Theatre for Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Kroll, Jennifer L.

    This book presents 16 original scripts that have been adapted from classic works of literature for use for readers theatre with young adults and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Adaptations of the following works are included: "Little Women" (Louisa May Alcott); episodes from "Don Quixote" (Miguel de Cervantes; "The Necklace" (Guy de…

  2. Minimal classical communication and measurement complexity for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to Charlie via two classical bits. Now, the Bob–Charlie system evolves into a state given by Ux(α|00〉 + β|11〉)23, where Ux is a unitary operator. Hence, the unknown single qubit information is locked between Bob and Charlie in such a way that neither of them can obtain the unknown qubit completely, by local operations on.

  3. Functional integral approach to classical statistical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.V.

    1980-04-01

    A functional integral method is developed for the statistical solution of nonlinear stochastic differential equations which arise in classical dynamics. The functional integral approach provides a very natural and elegant derivation of the statistical dynamical equations that have been derived using the operator formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose.

  4. Classical BV theories on manifolds with boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cattaneo, A.S.; Mnev, P.; Reshetikhin, N.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we extend the classical BV framework to gauge theories on spacetime manifolds with boundary. In particular, we connect the BV construction in the bulk with the BFV construction on the boundary and we develop its extension to strata of higher codimension in the case of manifolds with

  5. Generalized classical mechanics and field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, M.; Rodrigues, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to build up a large panel of the present situation of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms involving higher order derivatives. The achievements of differential geometry in formulating a more modern and powerful treatment of these theories are developed. An extensive review of the development of these theories in classical language is also given. (Auth.)

  6. Mechanical and Thermal Analysis of Classical Functionally Graded Coated Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toudehdehghan Abdolreza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The governing equation of a classical rectangular coated beam made of two layers subjected to thermal and uniformly distributed mechanical loads are derived by using the principle of virtual displacements and based on Euler-Bernoulli deformation beam theory (EBT. The aim of this paper was to analyze the static behavior of clamped-clamped thin coated beam under thermo-mechanical load using MATLAB. Two models were considered for composite coated. The first model was consisting of ceramic layer as a coated and substrate which was metal (HC model. The second model was consisting of Functionally Graded Material (FGM as a coated layer and metal substrate (FGC model. From the result it was apparent that the superiority of the FGC composite against conventional coated composite has been demonstrated. From the analysis, the stress level throughout the thickness at the interface of the coated beam for the FGC was reduced. Yet, the deflection in return was observed to increase. Therefore, this could cater to various new engineering applications where warrant the utilization of material that has properties that are well-beyond the capabilities of the conventional or yesteryears materials.

  7. CLASSICAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND UAV – SELECTED ASCPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mikrut

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The UAV technology seems to be highly future-oriented due to its low costs as compared to traditional aerial images taken from classical photogrammetry aircrafts. The AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow - Department of Geoinformation, Photogrammetry and Environmental Remote Sensing focuses mainly on geometry and radiometry of recorded images. Various scientific research centres all over the world have been conducting the relevant research for years. The paper presents selected aspects of processing digital images made with the UAV technology. It provides on a practical example a comparison between a digital image taken from an airborne (classical height, and the one made from an UAV level. In his research the author of the paper is trying to find an answer to the question: to what extent does the UAV technology diverge today from classical photogrammetry, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both methods? The flight plan was made over the Tokarnia Village Museum (more than 0.5 km2 for two separate flights: the first was made by an UAV - System FT-03A built by FlyTech Solution Ltd. The second was made with the use of a classical photogrammetric Cesna aircraft furnished with an airborne photogrammetric camera (Ultra Cam Eagle. Both sets of photographs were taken with pixel size of about 3 cm, in order to have reliable data allowing for both systems to be compared. The project has made aerotriangulation independently for the two flights. The DTM was generated automatically, and the last step was the generation of an orthophoto. The geometry of images was checked under the process of aerotriangulation. To compare the accuracy of these two flights, control and check points were used. RMSE were calculated. The radiometry was checked by a visual method and using the author's own algorithm for feature extraction (to define edges with subpixel accuracy. After initial pre-processing of data, the images were put together, and

  8. Classical Photogrammetry and Uav - Selected Ascpects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikrut, S.

    2016-06-01

    The UAV technology seems to be highly future-oriented due to its low costs as compared to traditional aerial images taken from classical photogrammetry aircrafts. The AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow - Department of Geoinformation, Photogrammetry and Environmental Remote Sensing focuses mainly on geometry and radiometry of recorded images. Various scientific research centres all over the world have been conducting the relevant research for years. The paper presents selected aspects of processing digital images made with the UAV technology. It provides on a practical example a comparison between a digital image taken from an airborne (classical) height, and the one made from an UAV level. In his research the author of the paper is trying to find an answer to the question: to what extent does the UAV technology diverge today from classical photogrammetry, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both methods? The flight plan was made over the Tokarnia Village Museum (more than 0.5 km2) for two separate flights: the first was made by an UAV - System FT-03A built by FlyTech Solution Ltd. The second was made with the use of a classical photogrammetric Cesna aircraft furnished with an airborne photogrammetric camera (Ultra Cam Eagle). Both sets of photographs were taken with pixel size of about 3 cm, in order to have reliable data allowing for both systems to be compared. The project has made aerotriangulation independently for the two flights. The DTM was generated automatically, and the last step was the generation of an orthophoto. The geometry of images was checked under the process of aerotriangulation. To compare the accuracy of these two flights, control and check points were used. RMSE were calculated. The radiometry was checked by a visual method and using the author's own algorithm for feature extraction (to define edges with subpixel accuracy). After initial pre-processing of data, the images were put together, and shown side by side

  9. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, U.

    1983-12-01

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  10. A Study of Classics-Reading Curriculum, Classics-Reading Promotion, and Classics-Reading Effect Modeling Exploration in Elementary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Chuen-An; Chen, Kuang-Ming; Chang, Li-Chuan; Lin, Deng-Shun

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to test reliabilities and validities of classics-reading curriculum (CRC) scale, classics-reading promotion (CRP) scale, and classics-reading effect (CRE) scale and to examine the relationships between CRC, CRP, and CRE in elementary schools through applying CORPS framework. The pilot sample and formal sample contain 141 and 500 participants from elementary school faculties and classics-reading volunteers in the north, central, south, and east regions of Taiwan....

  11. Classic and Quantum Capacitances in Bernal Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene Field Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our focus in this study is on characterizing the capacitance voltage (C-V behavior of Bernal stacking bilayer graphene (BG and trilayer graphene (TG as the channel of FET devices. The analytical models of quantum capacitance (QC of BG and TG are presented. Although QC is smaller than the classic capacitance in conventional devices, its contribution to the total metal oxide semiconductor capacitor in graphene-based FET devices becomes significant in the nanoscale. Our calculation shows that QC increases with gate voltage in both BG and TG and decreases with temperature with some fluctuations. However, in bilayer graphene the fluctuation is higher due to its tunable band structure with external electric fields. In similar temperature and size, QC in metal oxide BG is higher than metal oxide TG configuration. Moreover, in both BG and TG, total capacitance is more affected by classic capacitance as the distance between gate electrode and channel increases. However, QC is more dominant when the channel becomes thinner into the nanoscale, and therefore we mostly deal with quantum capacitance in top gate in contrast with bottom gate that the classic capacitance is dominant.

  12. Gravitation in the 'quasi-classical' theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, J.W.G.; Zangari, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 'quasi-classical' picture of particles as extendend periodic disturbances in a classical nonlinear field, previously shown to imply all the equations of Maxwell electrodynamics with very little formal input, is here applied to the other known long-range force, gravitation. It is shown that the picture's absolute interpretation of inertial mass and four-potential as measures of the local spacing between equal-phase hypersurfaces, together with the empirically established proportionality of gravitational 'charge' to inertial mass, leads naturally to the gravitational red-shift formula, and it thus provides a physical basis for the spacetime curvature that is the central idea of Einstein's general theory of relativity. 16 refs., 1 fig

  13. Green’s functions in classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rother, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the Green’s function formalism in a basic way and demonstrates its usefulness for applications to several well-known problems in classical physics which are usually solved not by this formalism but other approaches. The book bridges the gap between applications of the Green’s function formalism in quantum physics and classical physics. This book is written as an introduction for graduate students and researchers who want to become more familiar with the Green’s function formalism. In 1828 George Green has published an essay that was unfortunately sunken into oblivion shortly after its publication. It was rediscovered only after several years by the later Lord Kelvin. But since this time, using Green’s functions for solving partial differential equations in physics has become an important mathematical tool. While the conceptual and epistemological importance of these functions were essentially discovered and discussed in modern physics - especially in quantum field theory and quantum...

  14. Hearing loss among classical-orchestra musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esko Toppila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intended to evaluate classical musicians′ risk of hearing loss. We studied 63 musicians from four Helsinki classical orchestras. We measured their hearing loss with an audiometer, found their prior amount of exposure to sound and some individual susceptibility factors with a questionnaire, measured their present sound exposure with dosimeters, and tested their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, then compared their hearing loss to ISO 1999-1990′s predictions. The musicians′ hearing loss distribution corresponded to that of the general population, but highly exposed musicians had greater hearing loss at frequencies over 3 kHz than less-exposed ones. Their individual susceptibly factors were low. Music deteriorates hearing, but by less than what ISO 1999-1990 predicted. The low number of individual susceptibility factors explained the difference, but only reduced hearing loss and not the prevalence of tinnitus.

  15. VOTERS DECIDE. CLASSICAL MODELS OF ELECTORAL BEHAVIOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is a extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decide becomes a central concern. In this paper we intend to locate the determinants of the vote decision in the electoral behavior classical theoretical models developed over time. After doing synthesis of classical schools of thought on electoral behavior we conclude that it has been made a journey through the mind, soul and cheek, as follows: the mind as reason in theory developed by Downs, soul as preferably for an actor in Campbell's theory, etc. and cheek as an expression of the impossibility of detachment from social groups to which we belong in Lazarsfeld's theory.

  16. Classical collisions of protons with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, D.; Hughes, P.E.; Percival, I.C.; Barnes, K.S.; Valentine, N.A.; Wilson, Mc.B.

    1977-01-01

    The program solves the equations of motion for the interaction of 3 charged particles, obtaining final states in terms of initial states, and energy transfers, angles of ejection, and final cartesian co-ordinates of relative motion. Using a Monte Carlo method on many orbits total ionization and charge transfer cross sections, integral energy transfer cross sections and moments of energy transfers are estimated. Facilities are provided for obtaining angular distributions, momentum transfer cross sections and for comparison with various approximate classical theories. The equations of motion are solved using stepwise fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration with automatic steplength change. Selection of initial conditions is determined by the user, usually as a statistical distribution determined by a pseudorandom number subroutine. Classical representation theory and transformation methods are extensively used. (Auth.)

  17. Model predictive control classical, robust and stochastic

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaritakis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a textbook that brings together classical predictive control with treatment of up-to-date robust and stochastic techniques. Model Predictive Control describes the development of tractable algorithms for uncertain, stochastic, constrained systems. The starting point is classical predictive control and the appropriate formulation of performance objectives and constraints to provide guarantees of closed-loop stability and performance. Moving on to robust predictive control, the text explains how similar guarantees may be obtained for cases in which the model describing the system dynamics is subject to additive disturbances and parametric uncertainties. Open- and closed-loop optimization are considered and the state of the art in computationally tractable methods based on uncertainty tubes presented for systems with additive model uncertainty. Finally, the tube framework is also applied to model predictive control problems involving hard or probabilistic constraints for the cases of multiplic...

  18. Categories of definiteness in Classical Armenian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Müth

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of the definite article in semantic and pragmatic categories in the Greek and Classical Armenian New Testament translation is compared. Greek and Classical Armenian agree in their use of the definite article only in NPs determined by contrastive attributes. In all other categories the systems of both languages differ. Generally, Armenian avoids the definite article with proper nouns and nouns with unique reference, while definite articles with proper names in Greek are common (with the exception of sacred or especially “respected” persons such as prophets. If the definite article is present in Greek, it is often motivated by pragmatic factors (e.g. re-topicalization, etc.. There is no clear evidence in Armenian for the use of the definite article as a marker of generic reference, nor for the use in NPs determined by superlative, comparative or ordinal attributes.

  19. Classical trajectory in non-relativistic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    With the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics as a guide, the classical trajectory is incorporated into quantum scattering theory. The Feynman path integral formalism is used as a starting point, and classical transformation theory is applied to the phase of the wave function so derived. This approach is then used to derive an expression for the scattering amplitude for potential scattering. It is found that the amplitude can be expressed in an impact parameter representation similar to the Glauber formalism. Connections are then made to the Glauber approximation and to semiclassical approximations derived from the Feynman path integral formalism. In extending this analysis to projectile-nucleus scattering, an approximation scheme is given with the first term being the same as in Glauber's multiple scattering theory. Higher-order approximations, thus, are found to give corrections to the fixed scatterer form of the impulse approximation inherent in the Glauber theory

  20. Global aspects of classical integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cushman, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a uniquely complete description of the geometry of the energy momentum mapping of five classical integrable systems: the 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the geodesic flow on the 3-sphere, the Euler top, the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. It presents for the first time in book form a general theory of symmetry reduction which allows one to reduce the symmetries in the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. Also the monodromy obstruction to the existence of global action angle coordinates is calculated for the spherical pendulum and the Lagrange top. The book addresses professional mathematicians and graduate students and can be used as a textbook on advanced classical mechanics or global analysis.

  1. Quantum-classical path integral. I. Classical memory and weak quantum nonlocality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Roberto; Makri, Nancy

    2012-12-14

    We consider rigorous path integral descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system coupled to a polyatomic environment, assuming that the latter is well approximated by classical trajectories. Earlier work has derived semiclassical or purely classical expressions for the influence functional from the environment, which should be sufficiently accurate for many situations, but the evaluation of quantum-(semi)classical path integral (QCPI) expressions has not been practical for large-scale simulation because the interaction with the environment introduces couplings nonlocal in time. In this work, we analyze the nature of the effects on a system from its environment in light of the observation [N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2994 (1998)] that true nonlocality in the path integral is a strictly quantum mechanical phenomenon. If the environment is classical, the path integral becomes local and can be evaluated in a stepwise fashion along classical trajectories of the free solvent. This simple "classical path" limit of QCPI captures fully the decoherence of the system via a classical mechanism. Small corrections to the classical path QCPI approximation may be obtained via an inexpensive random hop QCPI model, which accounts for some "back reaction" effects. Exploiting the finite length of nonlocality, we argue that further inclusion of quantum decoherence is possible via an iterative evaluation of the path integral. Finally, we show that the sum of the quantum amplitude factors with respect to the system paths leads to a smooth integrand as a function of trajectory initial conditions, allowing the use of Monte Carlo methods for the multidimensional phase space integral.

  2. Classical diffusion: theory and simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, H.; Hu, P.N.

    1978-03-01

    A survey is given of the development of classical diffusion theory which arose from the observation of Grad and Hogan that the Pfirsch-Schluter and Neoclassical theories are very special and frequently inapplicable because they require that plasma mass flow be treated as transport rather than as a state variable of the plasma. The subsequent theory, efficient numerical algorithms, and results of various operating codes are described

  3. Classical and new ideas of a university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jens Erik

    2011-01-01

    The chapter examines what has happened to ideas of the university in the light of current reforms and the implementation of performance management. Taking a retrospective view of the most central ideas of a university, focus will be on why even a modernized and corporatized university apparently...... cannot survive without reference to ideas and idealistic justifications, including a number of classical ideas, as well as on which new ideas may be delineated on the basis of the old....

  4. Alternative perturbation approaches in classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Raya, Alfredo; Fernandez, Francisco M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss two alternative methods, based on the Lindstedt-Poincare technique, for the removal of secular terms from the equations of perturbation theory. We calculate the period of an anharmonic oscillator by means of both approaches and show that one of them is more accurate for all values of the coupling constant. We believe that present discussion and comparison may be a suitable exercise for teaching perturbation theory in advanced undergraduate courses on classical mechanics

  5. Quantum systems that follow classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredi, G; Feix, M R

    1993-01-01

    For a special class of potentials, the dynamical evolution of any quantum wavepacket is entirely determined by the laws of classical mechanics. Here, the properties of this class are investigated both from the viewpoint of the Ehrenfest theorem (which provides the evolution of the average position and momentum), and the Wigner representation (which expresses quantum mechanics in a phase space formalism). Finally, these results are extended to the case of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. (author)

  6. The Classical Music Culture of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Ramanan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper sketches briefly the cultural and political context against which one may study the classical South Indian concert called the Kutcheri. It goes on to trace the development of the modern concert and then concentrates on the devotional poetry of Tyagaraja who is the foremost composer in the tradition. The paper demonstrates the centrality of Bhakti (devotion as an emotion and its role in creating a link between the composer, the singer, the song and the audience.

  7. Complexity and nonseparability of classical Liouvillian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2011-03-01

    We propose a simple complexity indicator of classical Liouvillian dynamics, namely the separability entropy, which determines the logarithm of an effective number of terms in a Schmidt decomposition of phase space density with respect to an arbitrary fixed product basis. We show that linear growth of separability entropy provides a stricter criterion of complexity than Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, namely it requires that the dynamics be exponentially unstable, nonlinear, and non-Markovian.

  8. A Neuronal Model of Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Moore (1985), Gelperin, HopfieIG, aria Tank (1985), Blazis, Desmond, Moore, and Lerthier (1986), Tesauro (1986), dnd Donegan and Wagner (1987). Proposals...sometimes called Hopfield networks (Hopfield, 1982; Cohen and Grossberg, 1983; Hopfield, 1984; Hopfield and Tank, 1985, 1986; Tesauro , 1986). These latter... Tesauro , G. (1986). S itple neural models of classical conditioning. F1ulogical Cybernetic., 55, 187-200. Thompson, R. F. (1976). The scarch for the

  9. Classical limit of relativistic dynamical fields

    OpenAIRE

    Hruška, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we summarise existing results concerning the absence of "gravitational aberration" in Einstein's general theory of relativity, i.e., the fact that the gravitational "force" points towards the instantaneous position of objects with mass, although the field propagates at the speed of light. The electromagne- tic interaction behaves similarly. Thanks to that, the classical limit with infinite speed of propagation of electricity and gravitation is a good approximation of relativisti...

  10. Classical Novae. The thermonuclear runaway model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truran, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The identification of classical nova explosions with thermonuclear runaway events is examined. It is shown that the detailed characteristics of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle hydrogen-burning reactions serve to impose severe restrictions on the energetics of the critical stages of these runaways and thereby afford a physical basis for distinguishing 'fast' and 'slow' novae. Subsequent to runaway, hydrogen burning by means of these same CNO cycles dictates the evolution of nova systems through outburst. (U.K.)

  11. Classical and quantum probabilities as truth values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Andreas; Isham, Chris J.

    2012-03-01

    We show how probabilities can be treated as truth values in suitable sheaf topoi. The scheme developed in this paper is very general and applies both in classical and quantum physics. On the quantum side, the results naturally tie in with the topos approach to quantum theory that has been developed in the last 14 years by the authors and others . Earlier results on the representation of arbitrary quantum states are complemented with a purely logical perspective.

  12. Hybrid quantum-classical master equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2014-01-01

    We discuss hybrid master equations of composite systems, which are hybrids of classical and quantum subsystems. A fairly general form of hybrid master equations is suggested. Its consistency is derived from the consistency of Lindblad quantum master equations. We emphasize that quantum measurement is a natural example of exact hybrid systems. We derive a heuristic hybrid master equation of time-continuous position measurement (monitoring). (paper)

  13. Etiology of diverticular disease with classic illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. W.; Bumpers, H. L.; Hoover, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    Diverticulosis is a common colonic disorder and often is found incidentally on colonic endoscopy and contrast enema radiographs. Theories relating to the etiology of the pathologic processes are commonly quoted, although the actual anatomic features are rarely seen during colonoscopic examinations. Here we show classic illustrations that support the widely held theories regarding the etiologies of diverticular diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8691502

  14. Socialcultural background of formation of classical metaphysics

    OpenAIRE

    I. Z. Derzhko

    2014-01-01

    The classical model of philosophy has shaped ideas about its nature and aims that were laid in ancient metaphysics, but have been substantially amended by civilizational change. Socialcultural background of philosophy became trends that began to emerge in late medieval culture has particularly flourished there during modern times. Sphere of existence is important for the development of any spiritual phenomenon. For metaphysics it is the idea of humanity, acting as a kind of cultural protest a...

  15. Testing for Classicality of a Physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Dietmar; Länger, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    Often quantum logics are algebraically modelled by orthomodular posets. The physical system described by such a quantum logic is classical if and only if the corresponding orthomodular poset is a Boolean algebra. We provide an easy testing procedure for this case. Moreover, we characterize orthomodular posets which are lattices and consider orthomodular posets which admit a full set of states and hence represent so-called spaces of numerical events. This way further test procedures are obtained.

  16. Citation classics in pediatrics: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapola, Viswas; Tiwari, Soumya; Deepthi, Bobbity; Kanwal, Sandeep Kumar

    2018-03-06

    Citation analysis provides insights into the history and developmental trajectory of scientific fields. Our objective was to perform an analysis of citation classics in the journals of pediatric specialty and to examine their characteristics. Initially, all the journals listed under the category of pediatrics (n = 120) were identified using Journal Citation Reports. Web of science database was then searched (1950-2016) to select the top-100 cited articles in the above identified pediatric journals. The top-100 cited article were categorized according the study design, sub-specialty, country, institutional affiliation, and language. The top-100 articles were published in 18 different journals, with Pediatrics having the highest numbers (n = 40), followed by The Journal of Pediatrics (n = 17). The majority (n = 62) of classics were published after 1990. The most cited article had citation count of 3516 and the least cited had a citation count of 593. The USA (n = 71) was the most commonly represented country, and 60 institutions contributed to 100 articles. Fifteen authors contributed to more than one classic as first or second author. Observational study (n = 55) was the commonest study design across all decades, followed by reviews (n = 12), scale development studies (n = 11), and guidelines (n = 11). Among the pediatric sub-specialties, growth and development articles were highly cited (n = 24), followed by pediatric psychiatry and behavior (n = 21), endocrinology (n = 15), and neonatology (n = 12). The top-100 cited articles in pediatrics identify the impactful authors, journals, institutes, and countries. Observational study design was predominant-implying that inclusion among citation classics is not related to soundness of study design.

  17. Special relativity and classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman are back. This time, they introduce readers to Einstein's special relativity and Maxwell's classical field theory. Using their typical brand of real math, enlightening drawings, and humor, Susskind and Friedman walk us through the complexities of waves, forces, and particles by exploring special relativity and electromagnetism. It's a must-read for both devotees of the series and any armchair physicist who wants to improve their knowledge of physics' deepest truths.

  18. Acoustical study of classical Peking Opera singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Johan; Gu, Lide; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic characteristics of classical opera singing differ considerably between the Western and the Chinese cultures. Singers in the classical Peking opera tradition specialize on one out of a limited number of standard roles. Audio and electroglottograph signals were recorded for four performers of the Old Man role and three performers of the Colorful Face role. Recordings were made of the singers' speech and when they sang recitatives and songs from their roles. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and spectrum characteristics were analyzed. Histograms showing the distribution of fundamental frequency showed marked peaks for the songs, suggesting a scale tone structure. Some of the intervals between these peaks were similar to those used in Western music. Vibrato rate was about 3.5Hz, that is, considerably slower than in Western classical singing. Spectra of vibrato-free tones contained unbroken series of harmonic partials sometimes reaching up to 17 000Hz. Long-term-average spectrum (LTAS) curves showed no trace of a singer's formant cluster. However, the Colorful Face role singers' LTAS showed a marked peak near 3300Hz, somewhat similar to that found in Western pop music singers. The mean LTAS spectrum slope between 700 and 6000Hz decreased by about 0.2dB/octave per dB of equivalent sound level. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic cost for classical counterdiabatic driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravetti, Alessandro; Tapias, Diego

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the recent growing interest about the thermodynamic cost of shortcuts to adiabaticity, we consider the cost of driving a classical system by the so-called counterdiabatic driving (CD). To do so, we proceed in three steps: first we review a general definition recently put forward in the literature for the thermodynamic cost of driving a Hamiltonian system; then we provide a new complementary definition of cost, which is of particular relevance for cases where the average excess work vanishes; finally, we apply our general framework to the case of CD. Interestingly, we find that in such a case our results are the exact classical counterparts of those reported by Funo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 100602 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.100602]. In particular we show that a universal trade-off between speed and cost for CD also exists in the classical case. To illustrate our points we consider the example of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator subject to different strategies of adiabatic control.

  20. Information transport in classical statistical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2018-02-01

    For "static memory materials" the bulk properties depend on boundary conditions. Such materials can be realized by classical statistical systems which admit no unique equilibrium state. We describe the propagation of information from the boundary to the bulk by classical wave functions. The dependence of wave functions on the location of hypersurfaces in the bulk is governed by a linear evolution equation that can be viewed as a generalized Schrödinger equation. Classical wave functions obey the superposition principle, with local probabilities realized as bilinears of wave functions. For static memory materials the evolution within a subsector is unitary, as characteristic for the time evolution in quantum mechanics. The space-dependence in static memory materials can be used as an analogue representation of the time evolution in quantum mechanics - such materials are "quantum simulators". For example, an asymmetric Ising model on a Euclidean two-dimensional lattice represents the time evolution of free relativistic fermions in two-dimensional Minkowski space.

  1. Information transport in classical statistical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wetterich

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For “static memory materials” the bulk properties depend on boundary conditions. Such materials can be realized by classical statistical systems which admit no unique equilibrium state. We describe the propagation of information from the boundary to the bulk by classical wave functions. The dependence of wave functions on the location of hypersurfaces in the bulk is governed by a linear evolution equation that can be viewed as a generalized Schrödinger equation. Classical wave functions obey the superposition principle, with local probabilities realized as bilinears of wave functions. For static memory materials the evolution within a subsector is unitary, as characteristic for the time evolution in quantum mechanics. The space-dependence in static memory materials can be used as an analogue representation of the time evolution in quantum mechanics – such materials are “quantum simulators”. For example, an asymmetric Ising model on a Euclidean two-dimensional lattice represents the time evolution of free relativistic fermions in two-dimensional Minkowski space.

  2. Defining Astrology in Ancient and Classical History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Astrology in the ancient and classical worlds can be partly defined by its role, and partly by the way in which scholars spoke about it. The problem is complicated by the fact that the word is Greek - it has no Babylonian or Egyptian cognates - and even in Greece it was interchangeable with its cousin, 'astronomy'. Yet if we are to understand the role of the sky, stars and planets in culture, debates about the nature of ancient astrology, by both classical and modern scholars, must be taken into account. This talk will consider modern scholars' typologies of ancient astrology, together with ancient debates from Cicero in the 1st century BC, to Plotinus (204/5-270 AD) and Isidore of Seville (c. 560 - 4 April 636). It will consider the implications for our understanding of astronomy's role in culture, and conclude that in the classical period astrology may be best understood through its diversity and allegiance to competing philosophies, and that its functions were therefore similarly varied.

  3. Diminished aversive classical conditioning in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunborg, Geir Scott; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Mentzoni, Rune Aune; Myrseth, Helga; Molde, Helge; Lorvik, Ingjerd Meen; Bu, Eli Torild Hellandsjø; Pallesen, Ståle

    2012-09-01

    Impaired ability to form associations between negative events in gambling and aversive somatic reactions may be a predisposing factor for pathological gambling. The current study investigated whether a group of pathological gamblers and a control group differed in aversive classical conditioning. A differential aversive classical conditioning paradigm, which consisted of three phases. In the habituation phase, one 850-Hz tone stimulus and one 1500-Hz tone stimulus were presented three times each in random order. In the acquisition phase, the two tones were presented 10 times each in random order, and one was always followed by a 100-dB burst of white noise. In the extinction phase the two tones were presented three times each without the white noise. University laboratory testing facilities and out-patient treatment facilities. Twenty pathological gamblers and 20 control participants. Duration of seven cardiac interbeat-intervals (IBIs) following tone offset, gambling severity, tobacco and alcohol use, anxiety and depression. No group differences were found in the habituation and acquisition phases. However, a significant group × stimuli × trials × IBIs interaction effect was found in the extinction phase (P classical conditioning, but that the control group did. Pathological gamblers have a diminished capacity to form associations between aversive events and stimuli that predict aversive events. Aversion learning is likely to be an ineffective treatment for pathological gamblers. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Ultra-High Energy Probes of Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2012-01-01

    Classicalizing theories are characterized by a rapid growth of the scattering cross section. This growth converts these sort of theories in interesting probes for ultra-high energy experiments even at relatively low luminosity, such as cosmic rays or Plasma Wakefield accelerators. The microscopic reason behind this growth is the production of N-particle states, classicalons, that represent self-sustained lumps of soft Bosons. For spin-2 theories this is the quantum portrait of what in the classical limit are known as black holes. We emphasize the importance of this quantum picture which liberates us from the artifacts of the classical geometric limit and allows to scan a much wider landscape of experimentally-interesting quantum theories. We identify a phenomenologically-viable class of spin-2 theories for which the growth of classicalon production cross section can be as efficient as to compete with QCD cross section already at 100 TeV energy, signaling production of quantum black holes with graviton occupat...

  5. Beyond the borders of classical optical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, H.; Khoury, G.; Fonseca, E.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text: The limits of optical measurements are the subject to many recent works. It has been shown how by using non-classical photonic states, spatial resolution can exceed the diffraction limit [1]. The same states also improve interference measurements beyond the shot noise and up to the quantum Heisenberg limit [2]. On the other hand, a few methods have been suggested that improve the optical resolution by exploiting classical optical nonlinearities [3]. First, we will present a scheme that exploits the non-local quantum correlations of a second order entangled state produced by optical parametric down-conversion [4]. The scheme results with a non-classical state that can be used in quantum limited interferometry. It is also simply extendable to states of any photon number. Another method will be presented, where nonlinear measurements are induced by projecting the state of light onto the Fock space [5]. This process simulated optical nonlinearities up to the 7th order. We used those measurements to characterize the output of a standard polarization interferometer. Improved resolution was demonstrated, but a detailed analysis reveals the differences to the previous nonclassical approach

  6. Quantum and classical ripples in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hašík, Juraj; Tosatti, Erio; MartoÅák, Roman

    2018-04-01

    Thermal ripples of graphene are well understood at room temperature, but their quantum counterparts at low temperatures are in need of a realistic quantitative description. Here we present atomistic path-integral Monte Carlo simulations of freestanding graphene, which show upon cooling a striking classical-quantum evolution of height and angular fluctuations. The crossover takes place at ever-decreasing temperatures for ever-increasing wavelengths so that a completely quantum regime is never attained. Zero-temperature quantum graphene is flatter and smoother than classical graphene at large scales yet rougher at short scales. The angular fluctuation distribution of the normals can be quantitatively described by coexistence of two Gaussians, one classical strongly T -dependent and one quantum about 2° wide, of zero-point character. The quantum evolution of ripple-induced height and angular spread should be observable in electron diffraction in graphene and other two-dimensional materials, such as MoS2, bilayer graphene, boron nitride, etc.

  7. Metal lagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The metal lagging described is characterized by the fact that it is formed of closed sacks composed of an elastic metal mass, compressed in an outer envelope made of a fine mesh metal fabric. The metal mass is composed of stainless steel wool stuffed into the envelope. This lagging is particularly intended for the thermal protection of the end slab of LMFBR type reactors [fr

  8. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert; Evans, Christopher J.; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Carraro, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T eff indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  9. Quantitative spectroscopy of blue supergiants in metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert [Institute for Astro and Particle Physics, A-6020 Innsbruck University (Austria); Evans, Christopher J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Carraro, Giovanni, E-mail: mwhosek@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: Norbert.Przybilla@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: chris.evans@stfc.ac.uk, E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, La Silla Paranal Observatory (Chile)

    2014-04-20

    We present a quantitative analysis of the low-resolution (∼4.5 Å) spectra of 12 late-B and early-A blue supergiants (BSGs) in the metal-poor dwarf galaxy NGC 3109. A modified method of analysis is presented which does not require use of the Balmer jump as an independent T {sub eff} indicator, as used in previous studies. We determine stellar effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, reddening, and luminosities, and combine our sample with the early-B-type BSGs analyzed by Evans et al. to derive the distance to NGC 3109 using the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FGLR). Using primarily Fe-group elements, we find an average metallicity of [ Z-bar ] = –0.67 ± 0.13, and no evidence of a metallicity gradient in the galaxy. Our metallicities are higher than those found by Evans et al. based on the oxygen abundances of early-B supergiants ([ Z-bar ] = –0.93 ± 0.07), suggesting a low α/Fe ratio for the galaxy. We adjust the position of NGC 3109 on the BSG-determined galaxy mass-metallicity relation accordingly and compare it to metallicity studies of H II regions in star-forming galaxies. We derive an FGLR distance modulus of 25.55 ± 0.09 (1.27 Mpc) that compares well with Cepheid and tip of the red giant branch distances. The FGLR itself is consistent with those found in other galaxies, demonstrating the reliability of this method as a measure of extragalactic distances.

  10. A Walk Through an American Classic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Gage

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The music of Walt Disney’s classic films was written by a number of hand-picked composers who, working with Disney, ingeniously crafted the music to fit animation and bring musical inspiration to the homes of viewers leaving America and the world with a beloved legacy. Though Walt Disney was a cartoonist and not a musician, music was given a distinct, almost central, role in the creation of his cartoons. Special techniques such as Mickey-mousing or the click track were developed by composers and used to synchronize this music and animation. These processes really began with Disney and have formed the basis for all music synchronized to cartoon animation. From the very beginning with Mickey Mouse, to The Silly Symphonies, to the beloved classic Disney movies music has been an ever-present and developing center. Walt Disney, though not a composer himself, hired a number of key composers from which we have many cherished melodies. Unlike most other cartoons Disney’s were focused on using music of the classical style rather than the popular style. The music from a number of classical composers was used or drawn upon as a model. Disney had a special purpose for the music in his animated films. Most of his films contained a story other than the music, but his movie Fantasia really seeks to find the purpose music itself has with visual interpretation. College students have done research on these ideas of simply listening to music or listening while seeing an image. All of Disney’s animated films would not be the classics they are without the music that holds them together. Disney music has become recognized as its own individual art form. It has inspired America to dream and to think more deeply than realized. Walt Disney’s indirect effect on music history may be considered a stretch, but there is no doubt that the music developed through Disney Bros. has left an inspiration on the hearts of Americans.

  11. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  12. Gauge-fields and integrated quantum-classical theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    Physical situations in which quantum systems communicate continuously to their classically described environment are not covered by contemporary quantum theory, which requires a temporary separation of quantum degrees of freedom from classical ones. A generalization would be needed to cover these situations. An incomplete proposal is advanced for combining the quantum and classical degrees of freedom into a unified objective description. It is based on the use of certain quantum-classical structures of light that arise from gauge invariance to coordinate the quantum and classical degrees of freedom. Also discussed is the question of where experimenters should look to find phenomena pertaining to the quantum-classical connection. 17 refs.

  13. Magnetic correlations in a classic Mott system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, W.; Broholm, C.; Aeppli, G.; Carter, S.A.; Dai, D.; Frost, C.D.

    1997-07-01

    The metal-insulator transition in V 2 O 3 causes a fundamental change in its magnetism. While the antiferromagnetic insulator (AFI) is a Heisenberg localized spin system, the antiferromagnetism in the strongly correlated metal is determined by a Fermi surface instability. Paramagnetic fluctuations in the metal and insulator represent similar spatial spin correlations, but are unrelated to the long range order in the AFI. The phase transition to the AFI induces an abrupt switching of magnetic correlations to a different magnetic wave vector. The AFI transition, therefore, is not a conventional spin order-disorder transition. Instead it is accounted for by an ordering in the occupation of the two degenerate d-orbitals at the Fermi level

  14. Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. D.; Aplin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact, but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant, because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for Monet, Constable, and Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies. But to what extent does weather inspire composers? The authors of this presentation, who are atmospheric scientists by day but amateur classical musicians by night, have been contemplating this question. We have built a systematic musical database, which has allowed us to catalogue and analyze the frequencies with which weather is depicted in a sample of classical orchestral music. The depictions vary from explicit mimicry using traditional and specialized orchestral instruments, through to subtle suggestions. We have found that composers are generally influenced by their own environment in the type of weather they choose to represent. As befits the national stereotype, British composers seem disproportionately keen to depict the UK's variable weather patterns and stormy coastline. Reference: Aplin KL and Williams PD (2011) Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music. Weather, 66(11), pp 300-306. doi:10.1002/wea.765

  15. RAACFDb: Rheumatoid arthritis ayurvedic classical formulations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Thoufic Ali, A M; Agrawal, Aakash; Sajitha Lulu, S; Mohana Priya, A; Vino, S

    2017-02-02

    In the past years, the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone remarkable changes in all therapeutic modes. The present newfangled care in clinical research is to determine and to pick a new track for better treatment options for RA. Recent ethnopharmacological investigations revealed that traditional herbal remedies are the most preferred modality of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, several ayurvedic modes of treatments and formulations for RA are not much studied and documented from Indian traditional system of medicine. Therefore, this directed us to develop an integrated database, RAACFDb (acronym: Rheumatoid Arthritis Ayurvedic Classical Formulations Database) by consolidating data from the repository of Vedic Samhita - The Ayurveda to retrieve the available formulations information easily. Literature data was gathered using several search engines and from ayurvedic practitioners for loading information in the database. In order to represent the collected information about classical ayurvedic formulations, an integrated database is constructed and implemented on a MySQL and PHP back-end. The database is supported by describing all the ayurvedic classical formulations for the treatment rheumatoid arthritis. It includes composition, usage, plant parts used, active ingredients present in the composition and their structures. The prime objective is to locate ayurvedic formulations proven to be quite successful and highly effective among the patients with reduced side effects. The database (freely available at www.beta.vit.ac.in/raacfdb/index.html) hopefully enables easy access for clinical researchers and students to discover novel leads with reduced side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Classical limit for semirelativistic Hartree systems

    KAUST Repository

    Aki, Gonca L.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the three-dimensional semirelativistic Hartree model for fast quantum mechanical particles moving in a self-consistent field. Under appropriate assumptions on the initial density matrix as a (fully) mixed quantum state we prove by using Wigner transformation techniques that its classical limit yields the well known relativistic Vlasov-Poisson system. The result holds for the case of attractive and repulsive mean-field interactions, with an additional size constraint in the attractive case. © 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Representation Theory in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    2006-10-01

    We review the basic notions of group theory, in particular Lie groups and Lie algebras, and of representations of the latter. Then we examine briefly their occurrence in classical physics for the description of invariance properties of physical systems and the concomitant conservation laws resulting from Noether's theorem. In the last section, finally, we give an overview of the applications of group representation theory in quantum physics, with special emphasis on the proper mathematical description of symmetry properties, both in quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory.

  18. Classic Peripheral Signs of Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yooyoung Chong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female patient with visual disturbances was referred for further evaluation of a heart murmur. Fundoscopy revealed a Roth spot in both eyes. A physical examination showed peripheral signs of infective endocarditis, including Osler nodes, Janeway lesions, and splinter hemorrhages. Our preoperative diagnosis was subacute bacterial endocarditis with severe aortic regurgitation. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and was treated with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks postoperatively. The patient made a remarkable recovery and was discharged without complications. We report this case of subacute endocarditis with all 4 classic peripheral signs in a patient who presented with visual disturbance.

  19. Classical Antiferromagnetism in Kinetically Frustrated Electronic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Bravo, B.; Trumper, A. E.; Gazza, C. J.; Manuel, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    We study, by means of the density matrix renormalization group, the infinite U Hubbard model—with one hole doped away from half filling—in triangular and square lattices with frustrated hoppings, which invalidate Nagaoka's theorem. We find that these kinetically frustrated models have antiferromagnetic ground states with classical local magnetization in the thermodynamic limit. We identify the mechanism of this kinetic antiferromagnetism with the release of the kinetic energy frustration, as the hole moves in the established antiferromagnetic background. This release can occur in two different ways: by a nontrivial spin Berry phase acquired by the hole, or by the effective vanishing of the hopping amplitude along the frustrating loops.

  20. Classical system underlying a diffracting quantum billiard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manan

    2018-02-01

    For a point scatterer placed slightly off the centre of a circular enclosure, rays are found which vividly exhibit the effect of diffraction. The Schrödinger equation was mapped in the complex plane by employing a fractional linear transformation which brings the point scatterer to the centre. But the mass of the particle becomes a function of space coordinates, bearing anisotropy. For the transformed problem, the corresponding classical Hamiltonian is written and solved with Snell's laws on the boundary. The solutions of the Hamilton's equations thus found constitute, in fact, the ray-manifold underlying the diffraction at the level of the wave description.