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Sample records for metal-reducing structures bacterial

  1. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  2. Algal-bacterial interactions in metal contaminated floodplain sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, M.E.Y.; Greve, G.D.; Garcia-Meza, J.V.; Massieux, B.; Sprenger, W.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Rutgers, M.; Admiraal, W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate algal-bacterial interactions in a gradient of metal contaminated natural sediments. By means of multivariate techniques, we related the genetic structure (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) and the physiological structure (community-level physiological profiling, CLPP) of the bacterial communities to the species composition of the algal communities and to the abiotic environmental variables, including metal contamination. The results revealed that genetic and physiological structure of the bacterial communities correlated with the species composition of the algal community, but hardly to the level of metal pollution. This must be interpreted as an indication for a strong and species-specific linkage of algal and bacterial species in floodplain sediments. Metals were, however, not proven to affect either the algal or the bacterial communities of the Dutch river floodplains. - Algal and bacterial communities in floodplain sediments are interlinked, but are not affected by metal pollution

  3. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  4. Impact of heavy metal contamination on oxidative stress of Eisenia andrei and bacterial community structure in Tunisian mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughattas, Iteb; Hattab, Sabrine; Boussetta, Hamadi; Banni, Mohamed; Navarro, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this work were firstly to study the effect of heavy metal-polluted soils from Tunisian mine on earthworm biochemical biomarkers and on bacterial communities and therefore to analyze the interaction between earth worms and bacterial communities in these contaminated soils. For this purpose, we had introduced earthworm Eisenia andrei in six soils: one from mine spoils and five from agricultural soils, establishing a gradient of contamination. The response of worms to the presence of heavy metal was analyzed at the biochemical and transcriptional levels. In a second time, the impact of worm on bacterial community structure was investigated using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) fingerprinting. An impact of heavy metal-contaminated soils on the oxidative status of E. andrei was observed, but this effect was dependent of the level of heavy metal contamination. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the introduction of earthworms E. andrei has an impact on bacterial community; however, the major change was observed in the less contaminated site. Furthermore, a significant correlation between earthworm oxidative status biomarkers and bacterial community structure was observed, mainly in the mine spoils. Therefore, we contribute to a better understanding of the relationships between epigenic earthworms and bacterial communities in heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  5. Bioremoval of heavy metals by bacterial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Mahendra; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are among the most common pollutants found in the environment. Health problems due to the heavy metal pollution become a major concern throughout the world, and therefore, various treatment technologies such as reverse osmosis, ion exchange, solvent extraction, chemical precipitation, and adsorption are adopted to reduce or eliminate their concentration in the environment. Biosorption is a cost-effective and environmental friendly technique, and it can be used for detoxification of heavy metals in industrial effluents as an alternative treatment technology. Biosorption characteristics of various bacterial species are reviewed here with respect to the results reported so far. The role of physical, chemical, and biological modification of bacterial cells for heavy metal removal is presented. The paper evaluates the different kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic models used in bacterial sorption of heavy metals. Biomass characterization and sorption mechanisms as well as elution of metal ions and regeneration of biomass are also discussed.

  6. Effects of heavy metals and soil physicochemical properties on wetland soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang; Nie, Shuang; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Haipeng; Hua, Shanshan; Liu, Jiayu; Yuan, Yujie; Xiao, Haibing; Deng, Linjing; Xiang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metals (HMs) contamination is a serious environmental issue in wetland soil. Understanding the micro ecological characteristic of HMs polluted wetland soil has become a public concern. The goal of this study was to identify the effects of HMs and soil physicochemical properties on soil microorganisms and prioritize some parameters that contributed significantly to soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure. Bacterial community structure was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Relationships between soil environment and microorganisms were analyzed by correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). The result indicated relationship between SMB and HMs was weaker than SMB and physicochemical properties. The RDA showed all eight parameters explained 74.9% of the variation in the bacterial DGGE profiles. 43.4% (contain the variation shared by Cr, Cd, Pb and Cu) of the variation for bacteria was explained by the four kinds of HMs, demonstrating HMs contamination had a significant influence on the changes of bacterial community structure. Cr solely explained 19.4% (pstructure, and Cd explained 17.5% (pstructure changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transition metal ions mediated tyrosine based short peptide amphiphile nanostructures inhibit bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Khashti Ballabh; Singh, Ramesh; Mishra, Narendra Kumar; Kumar, Vikas; Vinayak, Vandana

    2018-05-17

    We report the design and synthesis of biocompatible small peptide based molecule for the controlled and targeted delivery of the encapsulated bioactive metal ions via transforming their internal nanostructures. Tyrosine based short peptide amphiphile (sPA) was synthesized which self-assembled into β-sheet like secondary structures. The self assembly of the designed sPA was modulated by using different bioactive transition metal ions which is confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. These bioactive metal ions conjugated sPA hybrid structures are further used to develop antibacterial materials. It is due to the excellent antibacterial activity of zinc ions that the growth of clinically relevant bacteria such as E. Coli was inhibited in the presence of zinc-sPA conjugate. The bacterial test demonstrated that owing to high biocompatibility with bacterial cell, the designed sPA worked as metal ions delivery agent and therefore it can show great potential in locally addressing bacterial infections. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Spatial and temporal changes in sulphate-reducing groundwater bacterial community structure in response to Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D A; Toze, S; Chang, B

    2008-01-01

    The population dynamics of bacterial able to be cultured under sulphate reducing condition was studied in conjunction with changes in aquifer geochemistry using multivariate statistics for two contrasting Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques at two different geographical locations (Perth, Western Australia and Adelaide, South Australia). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate spatial and temporal changes in the overall chemical signature of the aquifers using an array of chemical analytes which demonstrated a migrating geochemical plume. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) using DNA from sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures was used to detect spatial and temporal changes in population dynamics. Bacterial and geochemical evidence suggested that groundwater at greatest distance from the nutrient source was least affected by treated effluent recharge. The results suggested that bacterial populations that were able to be cultured in sulphate reducing media responded to the migrating chemical gradient and to the changes in aquifer geochemistry. Most noticeably, sulphate-reducing bacterial populations associated with the infiltration galleries were stable in community structure over time. Additionally, the biodiversity of these culturable bacteria was restored when aquifer geochemistry returned to ambient conditions during the recovery phase at the Adelaide Aquifer Storage and Recovery site. Copyright CSIRO 2008.

  9. Carbon, metals and grain size correlate with bacterial community composition in sediments of a high arsenic aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eLegg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities can exert significant influence on the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic (As. This has globally important implications since As toxicity in drinking water affects the health of millions of people worldwide, including in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta region of Bangladesh where geogenic groundwater arsenic concentrations can be more than 10 times the World Health Organization’s limit. Thus, the goal of this research was to investigate patterns in bacterial community composition across environmental gradients in an aquifer with elevated groundwater As concentrations in Araihazar, Bangladesh. We characterized the bacterial community by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes from aquifer sediment samples collected at three locations along a groundwater flowpath, at a range of depths between 1.5 and 15 m. We identified significant shifts in bacterial community composition along the groundwater flowpath in the aquifer. In addition, we found that bacterial community structure was significantly related to sediment grain size, and sediment carbon (C, manganese (Mn, and iron (Fe concentrations. Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were more abundant in silty sediments with higher concentrations of C, Fe, and Mn. By contrast, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were more abundant in sediments with higher concentrations of sand and Si, and lower concentrations of C and metals. Based on the phylogenetic affiliations of these taxa, these results may indicate a shift to more Fe-, Mn-, and humic substance- reducers in the high C and metal sediments. It is well-documented that C, Mn and Fe may influence the mobility of groundwater arsenic, and it is intriguing that these constituents may also structure the bacterial community.

  10. Bioinspired metal-cell wall-metal sandwich structure on an individual bacterial cell scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Mei; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei

    2012-08-25

    Pd nanoparticles were introduced to individual Bacillus cells and dispersedly anchored on both the inside and outside of the cell walls. The anchored nanoparticles served as "seeds" to drive the formation of double metallic layers forming a metal-cell wall-metal sandwich structure at the single-cell level.

  11. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  12. Structure of hydrocarbonoclastic nitrate-reducing bacterial communities in bioturbated coastal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-09-01

    The organisation of denitrifying microorganisms in oil-polluted bioturbated sediments was investigated in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to that observed in the environment. Molecular and culture-dependent approaches revealed that denitrifying Gammaproteobacteria were abundant in oil-polluted and bioturbated sediments suggesting that they may play a key role in hydrocarbon degradation in the environment. T-RFLP and gene libraries analyses targeting nirS gene showed that denitrifying microbial communities structure was slightly affected by either the addition of Hediste diversicolor or crude oil revealing the metabolic versatility of denitrifying microorganisms. From oil-polluted sediments, distinct denitrifying hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial consortia were obtained by enrichment cultures on high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (dibenzothiophene, fluoranthene, pyrene and chrysene) under nitrate-reducing conditions. Interestingly, molecular characterisation of the consortia showed that the denitrifying communities obtained from oiled microcosms with addition of H. diversicolor were different to that observed without H. diversicolor addition, especially with fluoranthene and chrysene revealing the bacterial diversity involved in the degradation of these PAHs. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Three common metal contaminants of urban runoff (Zn, Cu and Pb) accumulate in freshwater biofilm and modify embedded bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the absorption rates of zinc, copper and lead in freshwater biofilm and assessed whether biofilm bacterial populations are affected by exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals in flow chamber microcosms. Metals were rapidly accumulated by the biofilm and then retained for at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. Changes in bacterial populations were assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Significant differences in bacterial community structure occurred within only three days of exposure to metals and remained detectable at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. The rapid uptake of stormwater-associated metals and their retention in the biofilm highlight the potential role of biofilms in the transfer of metals to organisms at higher trophic levels. The sensitivity of stream biofilm bacterial populations to metal exposure supports their use as an indicator of stream ecological health. - The rapid accumulation of metals in biofilms and their impact on bacterial communities provide new insights into how these contaminants affect freshwater ecosystems.

  14. Bacterial Reduction Of Barium Sulphate By Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luptáková Alena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a worldwide problem leading to contamination of water sources. AMD are characterized by low pH and high content of heavy metals and sulphates. The barium salts application presents one of the methods for the sulphates removing from AMD. Barium chloride, barium hydroxide and barium sulphide are used for the sulphates precipitation in the form of barium sulphate. Because of high investment costs of barium salts, barium sulphide is recycled from barium sulphate precipitates. It can be recycled by thermic or bacterial reduction of barium sulphate. The aim of our study was to verify experimentally the possibility of the bacterial transformation of BaSO4 to BaS by sulphate-reducing bacteria. Applied BaSO4 came from experiments of sulphates removal from Smolnik AMD using BaCl2.

  15. The use of bacterial bioremediation of metals in aquatic environments in the twenty-first century: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alencar, Feliphe Lacerda Souza; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; do Amaral, Viviane Souza

    2017-07-01

    Metal pollution is a current environmental issue as a consequence of unregulated anthropic activiy. A wide range of bioremediation strategies have been successfully implemented to recover contaminated areas. Among them, bacterial bioremediation stands out as a promising tool to confront these types of concerns. This study aimed to compare and discuss worldwide scientific evolution of bacterial potential for metal bioremediation in aquatic ecosystems. The study consisted of a systematic review, elaborated through a conceptual hypothesis model, during the period from 2000 to 2016, using PubMed, MEDLINE, and SciELO databases as data resources. The countries with the largest number of reports included in this work were India and the USA. Industrial wastewater discharge was the main subject associated to metal contamination/pollution and where bacterial bioremediations have mostly been applied. Biosorption is the main bioremediation mechanism described. Bacterial adaptation to metal presence was discussed in all the selected studies, and chromium was the most researched bioremedied substrate. Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosas and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria were microorganisms with the greatest applicability for metal bioremediation. Most reports involved the study of genes and/or proteins related to metal metabolism and/or resistence, and Chromobacterium violaceum was the most studied. The present work shows the relevance of metal bacterial bioremediation through the high number of studies aimed at understanding the microbiological mechanisms involved. Moreover, the developed processes applied in removal and/or reducing the resulting environmental metal contaminant/pollutant load have become a current and increasingly biotechnological issue for recovering impacted areas.

  16. Predicting effects of structural stress in a genome-reduced model bacterial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Oriol; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2012-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen recently proposed as a genome-reduced model for bacterial systems biology. Here, we study the response of its metabolic network to different forms of structural stress, including removal of individual and pairs of reactions and knockout of genes and clusters of co-expressed genes. Our results reveal a network architecture as robust as that of other model bacteria regarding multiple failures, although less robust against individual reaction inactivation. Interestingly, metabolite motifs associated to reactions can predict the propagation of inactivation cascades and damage amplification effects arising in double knockouts. We also detect a significant correlation between gene essentiality and damages produced by single gene knockouts, and find that genes controlling high-damage reactions tend to be expressed independently of each other, a functional switch mechanism that, simultaneously, acts as a genetic firewall to protect metabolism. Prediction of failure propagation is crucial for metabolic engineering or disease treatment.

  17. Engineering bacterial biopolymers for the biosorption of heavy metals; new products and novel formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutnick, D.L.; Bach, H.

    2000-01-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution remains a major challenge in environmental biotechnology. One of the approaches considered for application involves biosorption either to biomass or to isolated biopolymers. Many bacterial polysaccharides have been shown to bind heavy metals with varying degrees of specificity and affinity. While various approaches have been adopted to generate polysaccharide variants altered in both structure and activity, metal biosorption has not been examined. Polymer engineering has included structural modification through the introduction of heterologous genes of the biosynthetic pathway into specific mutants, leading either to alterations in polysaccharide backbone or side chains, or to sugar modification. In addition, novel formulations can be designed which enlarge the family of available bacterial biopolymers for metal-binding and subsequent recovery. An example discussed here is the use of amphipathic bioemulsifiers such as emulsan, produced by the oil-degrading Acinetobacter lwoffii RAG-1, that forms stable, concentrated (70%), oil-in-water emulsions (emulsanosols). In this system metal ions bind primarily at the oil/water interface, enabling their recovery and concentration from relatively dilute solutions. In addition to the genetic modifications described above, a new approach to the generation of amphipathic bioemulsifying formulations is based on the interaction of native or recombinant esterase and its derivatives with emulsan and other water-soluble biopolymers. Cation-binding emulsions are generated from a variety of hydrophobic substrates. The features of these and other systems will be discussed, together with a brief consideratiton of possible applications. (orig.)

  18. Bacterial metal resistance genes and metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosa, Stéphanie; Wattiez, Ruddy; Prygiel, Emilie; Lesven, Ludovic; Billon, Gabriel; Gillan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria a metal may be defined as bioavailable if it crosses the cytoplasmic membrane to reach the cytoplasm. Once inside the cell, specific metal resistance systems may be triggered. In this research, specific metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediment microbial communities. Gene levels were measured by quantitative PCR and correlated to metals in sediments using five different protocols to estimate dissolved, particle-adsorbed and occluded metals. The best correlations were obtained with czcA (a Cd/Zn/Co efflux pump) and Cd/Zn adsorbed or occluded in particles. Only adsorbed Co was correlated to czcA levels. We concluded that the measurement of czcA gene levels by quantitative PCR is a promising tool which may complement the classical approaches used to estimate Cd/Zn/Co bioavailability in sediment compartments. - Highlights: • Metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediments. • Gene levels were correlated to metals using 5 different metal extraction protocols. • CzcA gene levels determined by quantitative PCR is a promising tool for Cd/Zn/Co. - Capsule Bacterial czcA is a potential biomarker of Cd, Zn and Co bioavailability in aquatic sediments as shown by quantitative PCR and sequential metal extraction

  19. Impact of metal stress on the production of secondary metabolites in Pteris vittata L. and associated rhizosphere bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hoang Nam; Michalet, Serge; Bodillis, Josselin; Nguyen, Tien Dat; Nguyen, Thi Kieu Oanh; Le, Thi Phuong Quynh; Haddad, Mohamed; Nazaret, Sylvie; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève

    2017-07-01

    Plants adapt to metal stress by modifying their metabolism including the production of secondary metabolites in plant tissues. Such changes may impact the diversity and functions of plant associated microbial communities. Our study aimed to evaluate the influence of metals on the secondary metabolism of plants and the indirect impact on rhizosphere bacterial communities. We then compared the secondary metabolites of the hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. collected from a contaminated mining site to a non-contaminated site in Vietnam and identified the discriminant metabolites. Our data showed a significant increase in chlorogenic acid derivatives and A-type procyanidin in plant roots at the contaminated site. We hypothesized that the intensive production of these compounds could be part of the antioxidant defense mechanism in response to metals. In parallel, the structure and diversity of bulk soil and rhizosphere communities was studied using high-throughput sequencing. The results showed strong differences in bacterial composition, characterized by the dominance of Proteobacteria and Nitrospira in the contaminated bulk soil, and the enrichment of some potential human pathogens, i.e., Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Cupriavidus in P. vittata's rhizosphere at the mining site. Overall, metal pollution modified the production of P. vittata secondary metabolites and altered the diversity and structure of bacterial communities. Further investigations are needed to understand whether the plant recruits specific bacteria to adapt to metal stress.

  20. Enhanced Toxic Metal Accumulation in Engineered Bacterial Cells Expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Phytochelatin Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Cuiné, Stéphan; Carrier, Patrick; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Luu, Doan-Trung; Peltier, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-binding cysteine-rich peptides, enzymatically synthesized in plants and yeasts from glutathione in response to heavy metal stress by PC synthase (EC 2.3.2.15). In an attempt to increase the ability of bacterial cells to accumulate heavy metals, the Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding PC synthase (AtPCS) was expressed in Escherichia coli. A marked accumulation of PCs was observed in vivo together with a decrease in the glutathione cellular content. When bacterial cells expressing AtPCS were placed in the presence of heavy metals such as cadmium or the metalloid arsenic, cellular metal contents were increased 20- and 50-fold, respectively. We discuss the possibility of using genes of the PC biosynthetic pathway to design bacterial strains or higher plants with increased abilities to accumulate toxic metals, and also arsenic, for use in bioremediation and/or phytoremediation processes. PMID:12514032

  1. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  2. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Metal(loid Nanostructures by Environmental Multi-Metal(loid Resistant Bacteria and Metal(loid-Reducing Flavoproteins

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    Maximiliano Figueroa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are suitable candidates to recover and decontaminate different environments from soluble metal ions, either via reduction or precipitation to generate insoluble, non-toxic derivatives. In general, microorganisms reduce toxic metal ions generating nanostructures (NS, which display great applicability in biotechnological processes. Since the molecular bases of bacterial reduction are still unknown, the search for new -environmentally safe and less expensive- methods to synthesize NS have made biological systems attractive candidates. Here, 47 microorganisms isolated from a number of environmental samples were analyzed for their tolerance or sensitivity to 19 metal(loids. Ten of them were highly tolerant to some of them and were assessed for their ability to reduce these toxicants in vitro. All isolates were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, fatty acids composition, biochemical tests and electron microscopy. Results showed that they belong to the Enterobacter, Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, and Exiguobacterium genera. Most strains displayed metal(loid-reducing activity using either NADH or NADPH as cofactor. While Acinetobacter schindleri showed the highest tellurite (TeO32- and tetrachloro aurate (AuCl4- reducing activity, Staphylococcus sciuri and Exiguobacterium acetylicum exhibited selenite (SeO32- and silver (Ag+ reducing activity, respectively. Based on these results, we used these bacteria to synthetize, in vivo and in vitro Te, Se, Au, and Ag-containing nanostructures. On the other hand, we also used purified E. cloacae glutathione reductase to synthesize in vitro Te-, Ag-, and Se-containing NS, whose morphology, size, composition, and chemical composition were evaluated. Finally, we assessed the putative anti-bacterial activity exhibited by the in vitro synthesized NS: Te-containing NS were more effective than Au-NS in inhibiting Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes growth. Aerobically synthesized TeNS using MF09 crude

  3. Significance of treated agrowaste residue and autochthonous inoculates (Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Bacillus cereus) on bacterial community structure and phytoextraction to remediate soils contaminated with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcón, Rosario; Medina, Almudena; Roldán, Antonio; Biró, Borbála; Vivas, Astrid

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we analyzed the impact of treatments such as Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste (SB), PO4(3-) fertilization and autochthonous inoculants [arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus cereus], on the bacterial community structure in a soils contaminated with heavy metals as well as, the effectiveness on plant growth (Trifolium repens). The inoculation with AM fungi in SB amended soil, increased plant growth similarly to PO4(3-) addition, and both treatments matched in P acquisition but bacterial biodiversity estimated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA sequences, was more stimulated by the presence of the AM fungus than by PO4(3-) fertilization. The SB amendment plus AM inoculation increased the microbial diversity by 233% and also changed (by 215%) the structure of the bacterial community. The microbial inoculants and amendment used favoured plant growth and the phytoextraction process and concomitantly modified bacterial community in the rhizosphere; thus they can be used for remediation. Therefore, the understanding of such microbial ecological aspects is important for phytoremediation and the recovery of contaminated soils.

  4. Extraction of metals from ores by bacterial leaching: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The principal organism effecting bacterial leaching of ferrous and sulfide ores is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, though other thiobacilli and other bacteria may be involved. The process depends on (a) direct solubilization of metal sulfides by bacterial oxidation; (b) dissolution of metal sulfides or oxides by ferric iron produced by bacterial pyrite oxidation. Mining spoil dumps and low grade ores can be leached for copper or uranium by cheap low-level technology. Dump leaching enables maximum recovery of valuable metal from any ore, but makes possible exploitation of very low grade Cu and U ores. Continuous extraction processes are possible where a continuously growing bacterial culture is fed with pyritic ores (or FeSO 4 or other sulfide) and continuous metal solubilization proceeds. Intimate contact between the bacteria and the ore to be leached (especially with uranium oxide ores) is not always necessary: leaching of UO 2 ores probably depends only on ferric iron reaction with the ore. Degradation of pyrite-containing rocks may also be developed as part of future recovery processes for petroleum from oil shales. Two-stage leaching systems present the best prospect for developing a higher-level technology for metal extraction. State 1: bacterial generation of Fe 3+ from pyrite or a Fe 2+ source; Stage 2: chemical leaching of ore by Fe 3+ in acid solution. Two-stage processes can be surface processes using crushed or milled ores or can be applied to underground solution mining, when an ore (e.g. uranium) can be leached by pumping Fe 3+ solutions through shattered underground deposits, metal recovered (e.g. solvent extraction) and Fe 3+ regenerated by bacterial oxidation at the surface. The use of controlled continuous microbial cultures to generate either bacteria or ferric iron is outlined

  5. Characterization of the Bacterial and Sulphate Reducing Community in the Alkaline and Constantly Cold Water of the Closed Kotalahti Mine

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    Malin Bomberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drainage from metal-sulphide rich rocks may cause considerable environmental stress in the form of elevated sulphate and heavy metal contamination of the environment. Mine draining effects from closed mines may be abated using indigenous and introduced microbial communities for sulphate reduction and metal precipitation at the mining site. Here we characterized the general and sulphate reducing bacterial (SRB community of Kotalahti Mine (Finland. The mine was flooded after closure and sulphate reduction and metal precipitation was induced by addition of pig manure sludge into the Vehkankuilu shaft. Water was sampled from Vehkankuilu and Ollinkuilu shafts from depths −10, −30, −70 and −100 m 15 years after the treatment. The water in the shafts differed from each other biologically and geochemically. The shafts are not directly connected except by some fracture zones, and the Ollinkuilu shaft is used as a reference for environmental monitoring. The detected bacterial communities from both shafts contained methylotrophic γ-Proteobacteria, hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic β-Proteobacteria and fermenting bacterial clades. The concentration of SRB was low, at most 4.0 × 103 dsrB genes·mL−1, and the SRB affiliated with Desulfobulbus and Thermoanaerobacteriales clades. Despite the obvious success of the mine as an in situ bioreactor for increasing water pH and removing sulphate and heavy metals by induced sulphate reduction under suboptimal temperature, only a small portion, less than 0.5%, of the bacterial population in the mine water was SRB.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of some reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxide phases with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lii, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    In the course of our research on reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxides, very interesting compounds with strong metal-metal bonds were discovered. Among these solid-state materials are found discrete cluster arrays and structures with extended metal-metal bonding. Further study in this system has revealed that many new structures exist in this new realm. The synthesis, structures, bonding, and properties of these new oxides, which are briefly summarized in tabular form, are presented in this thesis. 144 refs., 63 figs., 79 tabs

  7. Anaerobic biodegradation of nonylphenol in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions and associated bacterial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yuyin; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang, E-mail: xiesg@pku.edu.cn

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • NP biodegradation can occur under both nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. • Anaerobic condition affects sediment bacterial diversity during NP biodegradation. • NP-degrading bacterial community structure varies under different anaerobic conditions. - Abstract: Nonylphenol (NP) is a commonly detected pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and can be harmful to aquatic organisms. Anaerobic degradation is of great importance for the clean-up of NP in sediment. However, information on anaerobic NP biodegradation in the environment is still very limited. The present study investigated the shift in bacterial community structure associated with NP degradation in river sediment microcosms under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. Nearly 80% of NP (100 mg kg{sup −1}) could be removed under these two anaerobic conditions after 90 or 110 days’ incubation. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi became the dominant phylum groups with NP biodegradation. The proportion of Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Choloroflexi showed a marked increase in nitrate-reducing microcosm, while Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in sulfate-reducing microcosm. Moreover, sediment bacterial diversity changed with NP biodegradation, which was dependent on type of electron acceptor.

  8. Newer systems for bacterial resistances to toxic heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, S; Ji, G

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids contain specific genes for resistances to toxic heavy metal ions including Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+, Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sb3+, and Zn2+. Recent progress with plasmid copper-resistance systems in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas syringae show a system of four gene products, an inner membrane protein (PcoD), an outer membrane protein (PcoB), and two periplasmic Cu(2+)-binding proteins (PcoA and PcoC). Synthesis of this system is governed by two regulatory proteins (the membrane sensor PcoS and the soluble responder PcoR, probably a DNA-binding protein), homologous to other bacterial two-component regulatory systems. Chromosomally encoded Cu2+ P-type ATPases have recently been recognized in Enterococcus hirae and these are closely homologous to the bacterial cadmium efflux ATPase and the human copper-deficiency disease Menkes gene product. The Cd(2+)-efflux ATPase of gram-positive bacteria is a large P-type ATPase, homologous to the muscle Ca2+ ATPase and the Na+/K+ ATPases of animals. The arsenic-resistance system of gram-negative bacteria functions as an oxyanion efflux ATPase for arsenite and presumably antimonite. However, the structure of the arsenic ATPase is fundamentally different from that of P-type ATPases. The absence of the arsA gene (for the ATPase subunit) in gram-positive bacteria raises questions of energy-coupling for arsenite efflux. The ArsC protein product of the arsenic-resistance operons of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria is an intracellular enzyme that reduces arsenate [As(V)] to arsenite [As(III)], the substrate for the transport pump. Newly studied cation efflux systems for Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2+ (Czc) or Co2+ and Ni2+ resistance (Cnr) lack ATPase motifs in their predicted polypeptide sequences. Therefore, not all plasmid-resistance systems that function through toxic ion efflux are ATPases. The first well-defined bacterial metallothionein was found in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus

  9. Beneficial role of hydrophytes in removing Cr(VI) from wastewater in association with chromate-reducing bacterial strains Ochrobactrum intermedium and Brevibacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Muhammad; Hasnain, Shahida

    2005-01-01

    This study deals with the use of three chromium-resistant bacterial strains (Ochrobactrum intermedium CrT-1, Brevibacterium CrT-13, and CrM-1) in conjunction with Eichornia crassipes for the removal of toxic chromium from wastewater. Bacterial strains resulted in reduced uptake of chromate into inoculated plants as compared to noninoculated control plants. In the presence of different heavy metals, chromium uptake into the plants was 28.7 and 7.15% less at an initial K2CrO4 concentration of 100 and 500 microg ml(-1) in comparison to a metal free chromium solution. K2CrO4 uptake into the plant occurred at different pHs tested, but maximum uptake was observed at pH 5. Nevertheless, the bacterial strains caused some decrease in chromate uptake into the plants, but the combined effect of plants and bacterial strains conduce more removal of Cr(VI) from the solution.

  10. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  11. Bacterial adherence to tantalum versus commonly used orthopedic metallic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, Thomas A; Robie, Bruce; Muhr, Gert; Köller, Manfred

    2006-07-01

    Evaluation of bacterial adhesion to pure tantalum and tantalum-coated stainless steel versus commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and grit-blasted and polished stainless steel. Experimental in vitro cell culture study using Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively bacterial adherence to metallic implants. A bacterial adhesion assay was performed by culturing S. aureus (ATCC 6538) and S. epidermidis (clinical isolate) for one hour with tantalum, tantalum-coated stainless steel, titanium, titanium alloy, grit-blasted and polished stainless steel metallic implant discs. Adhered living and dead bacteria were stained using a 2-color fluorescence assay. Adherence was then quantitatively evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing. Qualitative adherence of the bacteria was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. The quantitative data were related to the implant surface roughness (Pa-value) as measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Bacterial adherence of S. aureus varied significantly (p = 0.0035) with the type of metallic implant. Pure tantalum presented with significantly (p titanium alloy, polished stainless steel, and tantalum-coated stainless steel. Furthermore, pure tantalum had a lower, though not significantly, adhesion than commercially pure titanium and grit-blasted stainless steel. Additionally, there was a significantly higher S. aureus adherence to titanium alloy than to commercially pure titanium (p = 0.014). S. epidermidis adherence was not significantly different among the tested materials. There was no statistically significant correlation between bacterial adherence and surface roughness of the tested implants. Pure tantalum presents with a lower or similar S. aureus and S. epidermidis adhesion when compared with commonly used materials in orthopedic implants. Because bacterial adhesion is an important predisposing factor in the development of

  12. Influence of biochar on heavy metals and microbial community during composting of river sediment with agricultural wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaoning; Liu, Yao; Li, Yuanping; Wu, Yanxin; Chen, Yanrong; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Jiachao; Li, Hui

    2017-11-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate influence of biochar addition on physico-chemical process, heavy metals transformation and bacterial community diversity during composting of sediment with agricultural wastes. Simultaneously, the relationships between those parameters including heavy metals and bacterial community compositions were evaluated by redundancy analysis (RDA). The results show that the extraction efficiency of DTPA extractable heavy metals decreased in both piles, and reduced more in pile with biochar addition about 0.1-2.96%. Biochar addition dramatically influenced the bacterial community structure during the composting process. Moreover, the bacterial community composition was significantly correlated with C/N ratio, water soluble carbon (WSC), and organic matter (OM) (Pheavy metals contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic Effects of Biochar on the Bacterial Community Structure in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Bian, Yongrong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Min; Ni, Ni; Yang, Xinglun; Gu, Chenggang; Jiang, Xin

    2017-08-16

    Amending soil with biochar is an effective soil remediation strategy for organic contaminants. This study investigated the dynamic effects of wheat straw biochar on the bacterial community structure during remediation by high-throughput sequencing. The wheat straw biochar amended into the soil significantly reduced the bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biochar amendment helped to maintain the bacterial diversity in the PAH-contaminated soil. The relationship between the immobilization of PAHs and the soil bacterial diversity fit a quadratic model. Before week 12 of the incubation, the incubation time was the main factor contributing to the changes in the soil bacterial community structure. However, biochar greatly affected the bacterial community structure after 12 weeks of amendment, and the effects were dependent upon the biochar type. Amendment with biochar mainly facilitated the growth of rare bacterial genera (relative abundance of 0.01-1%) in the studied soil. Therefore, the application of wheat straw biochar into PAH-contaminated soil can reduce the environmental risks of PAHs and benefit the soil microbial ecology.

  14. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kakkos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by administering neomycin sulphate and cefazoline. Hepatectomy was found to increase translocation, while administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics decreased it significantly. In addition, hepatectomy increased the aerobic cecal bacterial population, which normalised in the group receiving antibiotics. Among the histological parameters evaluated, villus height demonstrated a significant reduction after hepatectomy, while the number of villi per cm and the number of mitoses per crypt, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics presents a positive effect on bacterial and endotoxin translocation after extended hepatectomy, and this may be related to reduction of colonic bacterial load as an intraluminal effect of antibiotics.

  15. Low Concentrations of Vitamin C Reduce the Synthesis of Extracellular Polymers and Destabilize Bacterial Biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Pandit, Santosh

    2017-12-26

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by bacteria form a matrix supporting the complex three-dimensional architecture of biofilms. This EPS matrix is primarily composed of polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA. In addition to supporting the community structure, the EPS matrix protects bacterial biofilms from the environment. Specifically, it shields the bacterial cells inside the biofilm, by preventing antimicrobial agents from getting in contact with them, thereby reducing their killing effect. New strategies for disrupting the formation of the EPS matrix can therefore lead to a more efficient use of existing antimicrobials. Here we examined the mechanism of the known effect of vitamin C (sodium ascorbate) on enhancing the activity of various antibacterial agents. Our quantitative proteomics analysis shows that non-lethal concentrations of vitamin C inhibit bacterial quorum sensing and other regulatory mechanisms underpinning biofilm development. As a result, the EPS biosynthesis in reduced, and especially the polysaccharide component of the matrix is depleted. Once the EPS content is reduced beyond a critical point, bacterial cells get fully exposed to the medium. At this stage, the cells are more susceptible to killing, either by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress as reported here, or by other antimicrobials or treatments.

  16. Low Concentrations of Vitamin C Reduce the Synthesis of Extracellular Polymers and Destabilize Bacterial Biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Pandit, Santosh; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Mokkapati, V. R. S. S.; Sihlbom, Carina; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi; Gao, Xin; Westerlund, Fredrik; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by bacteria form a matrix supporting the complex three-dimensional architecture of biofilms. This EPS matrix is primarily composed of polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA. In addition to supporting the community structure, the EPS matrix protects bacterial biofilms from the environment. Specifically, it shields the bacterial cells inside the biofilm, by preventing antimicrobial agents from getting in contact with them, thereby reducing their killing effect. New strategies for disrupting the formation of the EPS matrix can therefore lead to a more efficient use of existing antimicrobials. Here we examined the mechanism of the known effect of vitamin C (sodium ascorbate) on enhancing the activity of various antibacterial agents. Our quantitative proteomics analysis shows that non-lethal concentrations of vitamin C inhibit bacterial quorum sensing and other regulatory mechanisms underpinning biofilm development. As a result, the EPS biosynthesis in reduced, and especially the polysaccharide component of the matrix is depleted. Once the EPS content is reduced beyond a critical point, bacterial cells get fully exposed to the medium. At this stage, the cells are more susceptible to killing, either by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress as reported here, or by other antimicrobials or treatments.

  17. Independent behavior of bacterial laccases to inducers and metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued Acer Customer

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... The medium for production was a high nitrogen medium containing ... effects of metal ions on either laccase production or laccase activity were not clear. ... this study was to isolate bacterial strains that produce ... The growth of cell culture was measured by using optical ... Conditions of laccase production.

  18. Biochemical parameters and bacterial species richness in soils contaminated by sludge-borne metals and remediated with inorganic soil amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mench, Michel; Renella, Giancarlo; Gelsomino, Antonio; Landi, Loretta; Nannipieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of two amendments for the in situ remediation of a Cd- and Ni-contaminated soil in the Louis Fargue long-term field experiment was assessed. In April 1995, one replicate plot (S1) was amended with 5% w/w of beringite (B), a coal fly ash (treatment S1 + B), and a second plot with 1% w/w zerovalent-Fe iron grit (SS) (treatment S1+SS), with the aim of increasing metal sorption and attenuating metal impacts. Long-term responses of daily respiration rates, microbial biomass, bacterial species richness and the activities of key soil enzymes (acid and alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, β-glucosidase, urease and protease activities) were studied in relation to soil metal extractability. Seven years after initial amendments, the labile fractions of Cd and Ni in both the S1 + B and S1 + SS soils were reduced to various extents depending on the metal and fractions considered. The soil microbial biomass and respiration rate were not affected by metal contamination and amendments in the S1 + B and S1 + SS soils, whereas the activity of different soil enzymes was restored. The SS treatment was more effective in reducing labile pools of Cd and Ni and led to a greater recovery of soil enzyme activities than the B treatment. Bacterial species richness in the S1 soil did not alter with either treatment. It was concluded that monitoring of the composition and activity of the soil microbial community is important in evaluating the effectiveness of soil remediation practices. - Amendments (coal fly ash, zerovalent-Fe iron grit), reduced labile fractions of Cd and Ni in contaminated soils and restored the activity of key soil hydrolases

  19. Bacterial assimilation reduction of iron in the treatment of non-metallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Malachovský

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural non-metallics, including granitoide and quartz sands, often contain iron which decreases the whiteness of these raw materials. Insoluble Fe3+ in these samples could be reduced to soluble Fe2+ by bacteria of Bacillus spp. and Saccharomyces spp. The leaching effect, observed by the measurement of Fe2+concentration in a solution, showed higher activities of a bacterial kind isolated from the Bajkal lake and also by using of yeast Saccharomyces sp. during bioleaching of quartz sands. However, allkinds of Bacillus spp. isolated from the Slovak deposit and from Bajkal lake were very active in the iron reduction during bioleaching of the feldspar raw material. This metal was efficiently removed from quartz sands as documented by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,317 % to 0,126 % and from feldpars raw materials by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,288 % to 0,115 % after bioleaching. The whiteness of these non-metallics was increased during a visual comparison of samples before and after bioleaching but samples contain selected magnetic particles. A removal of iron as well as a release of iron minerals from silicate matrix should increase the effect of the magnetic separation and should give a product which is suitable for industrial applications.

  20. Effect of reclaimed water effluent on bacterial community structure in the Typha angustifolia L. rhizosphere soil of urbanized riverside wetland, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingru; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Wei; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of reclaimed water on the ecology of bacterial communities in the Typha angustifolia L. rhizosphere soil, bacterial community structure was investigated using a combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results revealed significant spatial variation of bacterial communities along the river from upstream and downstream. For example, a higher relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi and a lower proportion of β-Proteobacteria and ε-Proteobacteria was detected at the downstream site compared to the upstream site. Additionally, with an increase of the reclaimed water interference intensity, the rhizosphere bacterial community showed a decrease in taxon richness, evenness and diversity. The relative abundance of bacteria closely related to the resistant of heavy-metal was markedly increased, while the bacteria related for carbon/nitrogen/phosphorus/sulfur cycling wasn't strikingly changed. Besides that, the pathogenic bacteria markedly increased in the downstream rhizosphere soil since reclaimed water supplement, while the possible plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria obviously reduced in the downstream sediment. Together these data suggest cause and effect between reclaimed water input into the wetland, shift in bacterial communities through habitat change, and alteration of capacity for biogeochemical cycling of contaminants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Environmental impact of mining activity in Bor area as indicated by the distribution of heavy metals and bacterial population dynamics in sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filimon M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of inorganic pollution is pronounced in water adjacent to Bor Copper Smelter Complex (RTB Bor, Serbia, with Cu, Zn, Pb, and As being the main determinants of aquatic pollution pattern. Communities of microorganisms present in the sediments are mainly affected by heavy metal pollution. Some groups of bacteria can be considered pollution bio-indicators, due to their sensibility and ability to bioaccumulate heavy metals, thus contributing to reducing pollution. This study investigates the relationships between trace element accumulation and heterogeneity in sediment bacteria community structure found in water streams adjacent to the Bor Copper Smelter Complex (RTB Bor, Serbia. Our results showed no contamination with copper, zinc, nickel, iron, and chromium, but did show a low to moderate contamination with lead and a moderate to high contamination with arsenic in aquatic sediments within the area of interest. Spatial heterogeneity in sediment-associated bacterial communities did not relate significantly to location of sampling sites, except for iron reducing bacteria. Iron reducing bacteria and nitrifying bacteria were the best distinguishing groups of bacteria. However, only iron reducing bacteria were significantly influenced by sampling locations. The iron reducing bacteria has correlated negatively with the degree of sediment contamination with lead, and therefore, we suggest that this group of bacteria could serve as potential bio-indicators of inorganic water contamination in Bor RTB area.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  3. Bacterial adhesion on conventional and self-ligating metallic brackets after surface treatment with plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupinambá, Rogerio Amaral; Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Nobrega, Celestino José Prudente; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Plasma-polymerized film deposition was created to modify metallic orthodontic brackets surface properties in order to inhibit bacterial adhesion. Methods: Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer films were deposited on conventional (n = 10) and self-ligating (n = 10) stainless steel orthodontic brackets using the Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) radio frequency technique. The samples were divided into two groups according to the kind of bracket and two subgroups after surface treatment. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to assess the presence of bacterial adhesion over samples surfaces (slot and wings region) and film layer integrity. Surface roughness was assessed by Confocal Interferometry (CI) and surface wettability, by goniometry. For bacterial adhesion analysis, samples were exposed for 72 hours to a Streptococcus mutans solution for biofilm formation. The values obtained for surface roughness were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test while biofilm adhesion were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and SNK test. Results: Significant statistical differences (p 0.05). Conclusion: Plasma-polymerized film deposition was only effective on reducing surface roughness and bacterial adhesion in conventional brackets. It was also noted that conventional brackets showed lower biofilm adhesion than self-ligating brackets despite the absence of film. PMID:28902253

  4. Bacterial adhesion on conventional and self-ligating metallic brackets after surface treatment with plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Amaral Tupinambá

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plasma-polymerized film deposition was created to modify metallic orthodontic brackets surface properties in order to inhibit bacterial adhesion. Methods: Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO polymer films were deposited on conventional (n = 10 and self-ligating (n = 10 stainless steel orthodontic brackets using the Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD radio frequency technique. The samples were divided into two groups according to the kind of bracket and two subgroups after surface treatment. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM analysis was performed to assess the presence of bacterial adhesion over samples surfaces (slot and wings region and film layer integrity. Surface roughness was assessed by Confocal Interferometry (CI and surface wettability, by goniometry. For bacterial adhesion analysis, samples were exposed for 72 hours to a Streptococcus mutans solution for biofilm formation. The values obtained for surface roughness were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test while biofilm adhesion were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and SNK test. Results: Significant statistical differences (p 0.05. Conclusion: Plasma-polymerized film deposition was only effective on reducing surface roughness and bacterial adhesion in conventional brackets. It was also noted that conventional brackets showed lower biofilm adhesion than self-ligating brackets despite the absence of film.

  5. Effects of Metals on Antibiotic Resistance and Conjugal Plasmid Transfer in Soil Bacterial Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Jianxiao

    Antibiotic resistance currently represents one of the biggest challenges for human health and in recent years the environmental dimension of antibiotic resistance has been increasingly recognized. The soil environment serves as an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants. In addi...... adaptation to metal stress did not significantly increase the permissiveness of the soil bacterial community towards conjugal plasmid transfer........ In addition to direct selection of antibiotic resistance by antibiotics, metals may co-select for antibiotic resistance via different mechanisms causing environmental selection of antibiotic resistance in metal contaminated soils. Horizontal gene transfer of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) like plasmids...... is generally considered one of the most important co-selection mechanisms as multiple resistance genes can be located on the same MGE. This PhD thesis focused on the impact of metals (Cu and Zn) on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities in soils exposed to different degrees...

  6. Towards revealing the structure of bacterial inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a widely observed phenomenon in human diseases, biopharmaceutical production, and biological research. Protein aggregates are generally classified as highly ordered, such as amyloid fibrils, or amorphous, such as bacterial inclusion bodies. Amyloid fibrils are elongated filaments with diameters of 6-12 nm, they are comprised of residue-specific cross-beta structure, and display characteristic properties, such as binding with amyloid-specific dyes. Amyloid fibrils are associated with dozens of human pathological conditions, including Alzheimer disease and prion diseases. Distinguished from amyloid fibrils, bacterial inclusion bodies display apparent amorphous morphology. Inclusion bodies are formed during high-level recombinant protein production, and formation of inclusion bodies is a major concern in biotechnology. Despite of the distinctive morphological difference, bacterial inclusion bodies have been found to have some amyloid-like properties, suggesting that they might contain structures similar to amyloid-like fibrils. Recent structural data further support this hypothesis, and this review summarizes the latest progress towards revealing the structural details of bacterial inclusion bodies.

  7. Fire modifies the phylogenetic structure of soil bacterial co-occurrence networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Valera, Eduardo; Goberna, Marta; Faust, Karoline; Raes, Jeroen; García, Carlos; Verdú, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Fire alters ecosystems by changing the composition and community structure of soil microbes. The phylogenetic structure of a community provides clues about its main assembling mechanisms. While environmental filtering tends to reduce the community phylogenetic diversity by selecting for functionally (and hence phylogenetically) similar species, processes like competitive exclusion by limiting similarity tend to increase it by preventing the coexistence of functionally (and phylogenetically) similar species. We used co-occurrence networks to detect co-presence (bacteria that co-occur) or exclusion (bacteria that do not co-occur) links indicative of the ecological interactions structuring the community. We propose that inspecting the phylogenetic structure of co-presence or exclusion links allows to detect the main processes simultaneously assembling the community. We monitored a soil bacterial community after an experimental fire and found that fire altered its composition, richness and phylogenetic diversity. Both co-presence and exclusion links were more phylogenetically related than expected by chance. We interpret such a phylogenetic clustering in co-presence links as a result of environmental filtering, while that in exclusion links reflects competitive exclusion by limiting similarity. This suggests that environmental filtering and limiting similarity operate simultaneously to assemble soil bacterial communities, widening the traditional view that only environmental filtering structures bacterial communities. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  9. Adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), and As(V) on bacterially produced metal sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-07-01

    The adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II) and As(V) onto bacterially produced metal sulfide (BPMS) material was investigated using a batch equilibrium method. It was found that the sulfide material had adsorptive properties comparable with those of other adsorbents with respect to the specific uptake of a range of metals and, the levels to which dissolved metal concentrations in solution can be reduced. The percentage of adsorption increased with increasing pH and adsorbent dose, but decreased with increasing initial dissolved metal concentration. The pH of the solution was the most important parameter controlling adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and As(V) by BPMS. The adsorption data were successfully modeled using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Desorption experiments showed that the reversibility of adsorption was low, suggesting high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. The mechanism of adsorption for the divalent metals was thought to be the formation of strong, inner-sphere complexes involving surface hydroxyl groups. However, the mechanism for the adsorption of As(V) by BPMS appears to be distinct from that of surface hydroxyl exchange. These results have important implications to the management of metal sulfide sludge produced by bacterial sulfate reduction.

  10. Susceptibility of metallic magnesium implants to bacterial biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Rohde, Manfred; Rais, Bushra; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Mueller, Peter P

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties as biodegradable medical implant materials for temporary applications during bone healing or as vascular stents. Whereas conventional implants are prone to colonization by treatment resistant microbial biofilms in which bacteria are embedded in a protective matrix, magnesium alloys have been reported to act antibacterial in vitro. To permit a basic assessment of antibacterial properties of implant materials in vivo an economic but robust animal model was established. Subcutaneous magnesium implants were inoculated with bacteria in a mouse model. Contrary to the expectations, bacterial activity was enhanced and prolonged in the presence of magnesium implants. Systemic antibiotic treatments were remarkably ineffective, which is a typical property of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation was further supported by electron microscopic analyses that revealed highly dense bacterial populations and evidence for the presence of extracellular matrix material. Bacterial agglomerates could be detected not only on the implant surface but also at a limited distance in the peri-implant tissue. Therefore, precautions may be necessary to minimize risks of metallic magnesium-containing implants in prospective clinical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1489-1499, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during

  12. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  13. Preventing bacterial growth on implanted device with an interfacial metallic film and penetrating X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jincui; Sun, An; Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Peipei; Su, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Device-related infections have been a big problem for a long time. This paper describes a new method to inhibit bacterial growth on implanted device with tissue-penetrating X-ray radiation, where a thin metallic film deposited on the device is used as a radio-sensitizing film for bacterial inhibition. At a given dose of X-ray, the bacterial viability decreases as the thickness of metal film (bismuth) increases. The bacterial viability decreases with X-ray dose increases. At X-ray dose of 2.5 Gy, 98% of bacteria on 10 nm thick bismuth film are killed; while it is only 25% of bacteria are killed on the bare petri dish. The same dose of X-ray kills 8% fibroblast cells that are within a short distance from bismuth film (4 mm). These results suggest that penetrating X-rays can kill bacteria on bismuth thin film deposited on surface of implant device efficiently.

  14. Rhizosphere bacterial diversity and heavy metal accumulation in Nymphaea pubescens in aid of phytoremediation potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAISA KABEER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to characterize the bacterial diversity of the rhizosphere system of Nymphaea pubescens and the sediment system where it grows naturally. Heavy metal content in the sediment and Nymphea plant from the selected wetland system were also studied. Results of the current study showed that the concentration of copper, zinc and lead in the sediment ranged from 43 to 182 mg/Kg, from 331 to 1382 mg/Kg and from 121 to 1253 mg/Kg, respectively. Cadmium concentration in sediment samples was found to be zero and the order of abundance of heavy metals in the sediment samples was Zn>Pb>Cu>Cd. The abundance patterns of heavy metals in leaf, petiole and root were Cd>Cu>Pb>Zn. Microbial load in rhizosphere of Nymphea pubescens ranged from 93×102 to 69×103 and that of sediment was 62×102 to 125×103. Bacterial load in rhizosphere was higher than that of growing sediment. Four bacterial genera were identified from the rhizosphere of Nymphaea pubescens which include Acinetobacter, Alcaligens, Listeria and Staphylococcus. Acinetobacter, Alcaligens and Listeria are the three bacterial genera isolated from sediment samples. Copper resistance studies of the 14 bacterial isolates from rhizosphere and 7 strains from sediment samples revealed that most of them showed low resistance (<100 μg/ml and very few isolates showed high resistance of 400-500 μg/ml.

  15. Structure of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroff, Martine; Karibian, Doris

    2003-11-14

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are the major components of the outer surface of Gram-negative bacteria They are often of interest in medicine for their immunomodulatory properties. In small amounts they can be beneficial, but in larger amounts they may cause endotoxic shock. Although they share a common architecture, their structural details exert a strong influence on their activity. These molecules comprise: a lipid moiety, called lipid A, which is considered to be the endotoxic component, a glycosidic part consisting of a core of approximately 10 monosaccharides and, in "smooth-type" lipopolysaccharides, a third region, named O-chain, consisting of repetitive subunits of one to eight monosaccharides responsible for much of the immunospecificity of the bacterial cell.

  16. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Fisher, Timothy S. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Kais, Sabre [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 46323 (United States); College of Science and Engineering, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); Alharbi, Fahhad H., E-mail: falharbi@qf.org.qa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar); College of Science and Engineering, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Using DFT, the maximum reduction of graphene workfunction is investigated. This is important for many applications. • The calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. • The transfer of electrons from the adatoms to graphene shifts up the Fermi level. So, graphene becomes metallic. • For those dopants that have been used experimentally, the calculations agree with the experimental data. • We found that 8% doping by Cs reduces the work function to 2.05 eV. - Abstract: In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  17. Reduced work function of graphene by metal adatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legesse, Merid; Mellouhi, Fedwa El; Bentria, El Tayeb; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Using DFT, the maximum reduction of graphene workfunction is investigated. This is important for many applications. • The calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. • The transfer of electrons from the adatoms to graphene shifts up the Fermi level. So, graphene becomes metallic. • For those dopants that have been used experimentally, the calculations agree with the experimental data. • We found that 8% doping by Cs reduces the work function to 2.05 eV. - Abstract: In this paper, the work function of graphene doped by different metal adatoms and at different concentrations is investigated. Density functional theory is used to maximize the reduction of the work function. In general, the work function drops significantly before reaching saturation. For example in the case of Cs doping, the work function saturates at 2.05 eV with a modest 8% doping. The adsorption of different concentrations on metal adatoms on graphene is also studied. Our calculations show that the adatoms prefer to relax at hollow sites. The transfer of electron from metallic dopants to the graphene for all the studied systems shifts the Fermi energy levels above the Dirac-point and the doped graphenes become metallic. The value of Fermi energy shifts depends on the type of metallic dopants and its concentrations. A detail analysis of the electronic structure in terms of band structure and density of states, absorption energy, and charge transfer for each adatom-graphene system is presented.

  18. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  19. Platelet concentrates: reducing the risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Korte D

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dirk de Korte,1 Jan H Marcelis2 1Department of Product and Process Development, Sanquin Blood Bank, Amsterdam, 2Department of Microbiology, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, the Netherlands Abstract: The introduction of a combination of interventions during collection of whole-blood or platelet concentrates has been successful in lowering the degree of bacterial contamination in the final product, the platelet concentrate, by 50%–75%. These interventions were improved donor questionnaires, best-practice skin disinfection, and diversion of first blood volume. These interventions have reduced the number of bacteria present in the platelet concentrates. In combination with screening for bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates with a culture method, the degree of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection has been reduced significantly. Due to the very low initial bacteria counts upon collection of the products, the need for improved sensitivity of early screenings tests or highly selective point-of-issue tests remains. The latter should be rapid and easy to perform. An alternative approach might be the implementation of pathogen-inactivation methods for cellular blood products to reduce the amount of pathogens. However, these methods are costly, and so far not proved to be cost-effective, especially in countries with an already-low incidence of transfusion-transmitted infections by viruses, parasites, or bacteria. Keywords: blood products, bacterial contamination, screening, point of issue, pathogen inactivation

  20. Bacterial adhesion on conventional and self-ligating metallic brackets after surface treatment with plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupinambá, Rogerio Amaral; Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Nobrega, Celestino José Prudente; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized film deposition was created to modify metallic orthodontic brackets surface properties in order to inhibit bacterial adhesion. Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer films were deposited on conventional (n = 10) and self-ligating (n = 10) stainless steel orthodontic brackets using the Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) radio frequency technique. The samples were divided into two groups according to the kind of bracket and two subgroups after surface treatment. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to assess the presence of bacterial adhesion over samples surfaces (slot and wings region) and film layer integrity. Surface roughness was assessed by Confocal Interferometry (CI) and surface wettability, by goniometry. For bacterial adhesion analysis, samples were exposed for 72 hours to a Streptococcus mutans solution for biofilm formation. The values obtained for surface roughness were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test while biofilm adhesion were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and SNK test. Significant statistical differences (pbrackets after surface treatment and between conventional and self-ligating brackets; no significant statistical differences were observed between self-ligating groups (p> 0.05). Plasma-polymerized film deposition was only effective on reducing surface roughness and bacterial adhesion in conventional brackets. It was also noted that conventional brackets showed lower biofilm adhesion than self-ligating brackets despite the absence of film.

  1. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    , a probabilistic dialect of Prolog. Results: We evaluate Hidden Markov Model structures for bacterial protein-coding gene potential, including a simple null model structure, three structures based on existing bacterial gene finders and two novel model structures. We test standard versions as well as ADPH length...

  2. Analysis of raw meat for heavy metals and bacterial contamination and comparison of antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the study was to analyze the commercially available meat for its heavy metal contents and bacterial contamination. The meat samples were collected from four commercial markets of Lahore, i.e., as Wafaqi Colony (Site I),Township (Site II), G-1 Market (Site III) and Zenith (Site IV), and analyzed for heavy metal [i.e., manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu)] contents and bacterial contaminants (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp. and Salmonella sp.) Atomic absorption spectrophotometery was employed for the detection of the heavy metals and plate count method was used for the detection of bacterial contaminants. The Ni concentration in the Site II sample only and Cd concentration in all meat samples were found above the standard value and the concentration of other metals (Cu, Cr, and Mn) was less than the standard concentrations. Bacterial (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp. and Staphylococcus sp.) contamination was found in all meat samples; however, the number was a little lower in the Site IV samples. Statistical analysis was done, by one-way ANOVA using SPSS, to compare heavy metal contamination in the meat samples. The results showed distribution of heavy metals in all meat samples there was significant difference of Ni concentration in the meat samples. The measure of antibiotic susceptibility showed that isolated species of bacteria were resistant to lincomycin, streptomycin, tertracyclin, ampicillin, amoxicillin and doxycyclin, but did not survive in the medium containing ofloxacin. (author)

  3. Clustered atom-replaced structure in single-crystal-like metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Mariko; Ishii, Hirotaka; Yokoe, Daisaku; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takeharu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    By means of metal organic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD), we replaced and localized two or more atoms in a single-crystalline structure having almost perfect orientation. Thus, we created a new functional structure, namely, clustered atom-replaced structure (CARS), having single-crystal-like metal oxide. We replaced metals in the oxide with Sm and Lu and localized them. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results, where the Sm signal increases with the Lu signal in the single-crystalline structure, confirm evidence of CARS. We also form other CARS with three additional metals, including Pr. The valence number of Pr might change from 3+ to approximately 4+, thereby reducing the Pr–Ba distance. We directly observed the structure by a high-angle annular dark-field image, which provided further evidence of CARS. The key to establishing CARS is an equilibrium chemical reaction and a combination of additional larger and smaller unit cells to matrix cells. We made a new functional metal oxide with CARS and expect to realize CARS in other metal oxide structures in the future by using the above-mentioned process.

  4. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelzel, Christina S., E-mail: Christina.Hoelzel@wzw.tum.de [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mueller, Christa [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany); Harms, Katrin S. [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mikolajewski, Sabine [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany); Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  5. Irrigation water quality in southern Mexico City based on bacterial and heavy metal analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Sandoval, J.; Perez-Vega, H.; Mazari-Hiriart, M.

    2006-01-01

    Xochimilco is located in southern Mexico City and represents the reminiscence of the pre-Columbian farming system, the 'chinampa' agriculture. 'Chinampas' are island plots surrounded by a canal network. At present the area is densely urbanized and populated, with various contaminant sources contributing to the water quality degradation. The canal system is recharged by a combination of treated-untreated wastewater, and precipitation during the rainy season. Over 40 agricultural species, including vegetables, cereals and flowers, are produced in the 'chinampas'. In order to characterize the quality of Xochimilcos' water used for irrigation, spatial and temporal contaminant indicators such as microorganisms and heavy metals were investigated. Bacterial indicators (fecal coliforms, fecal enterococcus) were analyzed by standard analytical procedures, and heavy metals (such as Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The more contaminated sites coincide with the heavily populated areas. Seasonal variation of contaminants was observed, with the higher bacterial counts and heavy metal concentrations reported during the rainy season

  6. Irrigation water quality in southern Mexico City based on bacterial and heavy metal analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, C.; Sandoval, J.; Pérez-Vega, H.; Mazari-Hiriart, M.

    2006-08-01

    Xochimilco is located in southern Mexico City and represents the reminiscence of the pre-Columbian farming system, the "chinampa" agriculture. "Chinampas" are island plots surrounded by a canal network. At present the area is densely urbanized and populated, with various contaminant sources contributing to the water quality degradation. The canal system is recharged by a combination of treated-untreated wastewater, and precipitation during the rainy season. Over 40 agricultural species, including vegetables, cereals and flowers, are produced in the "chinampas". In order to characterize the quality of Xochimilcos' water used for irrigation, spatial and temporal contaminant indicators such as microorganisms and heavy metals were investigated. Bacterial indicators (fecal coliforms, fecal enterococcus) were analyzed by standard analytical procedures, and heavy metals (such as Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The more contaminated sites coincide with the heavily populated areas. Seasonal variation of contaminants was observed, with the higher bacterial counts and heavy metal concentrations reported during the rainy season.

  7. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  8. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  9. Comparison of metals and tetracycline as selective agents for development of tetracycline resistant bacterial communities in agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Jianxiao; Rensing, Christopher; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2017-01-01

    Environmental selection of antibiotic resistance may be caused by either antibiotic residues or coselecting agents. Using a strictly controlled experimental design, we compared the ability of metals (Cu or Zn) and tetracycline to (co)select for tetracycline resistance in bacterial communities. Soil...... microcosms were established by amending agricultural soil with known levels of Cu, Zn, or tetracycline known to represent commonly used metals and antibiotics for pig farming. Soil bacterial growth dynamics and bacterial community-level tetracycline resistance were determined using the [(3)H......]leucine incorporation technique, whereas soil Cu, Zn, and tetracycline exposure were quantified by a panel of whole-cell bacterial bioreporters. Tetracycline resistance increased significantly in soils containing environmentally relevant levels of Cu (≥365 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (≥264 mg kg(-1)) but not in soil spiked...

  10. Microscopic Structure of Metal Whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Vamsi; Georgiev, Daniel G.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2018-05-01

    We present TEM images of the interior of metal whiskers (MWs) grown on electroplated Sn films. Along with earlier published information, our observations focus on a number of questions, such as, why MWs' diameters are in the micron range (significantly exceeding the typical nanosizes of nuclei in solids), why the diameters remain practically unchanged in the course of MW growth, what the nature of MW diameter stochasticity is, and what the origin of the well-known striation structure of MW side surfaces is. In an attempt to address such questions, we perform an in-depth study of MW structure at the nanoscale by detaching a MW from its original film, reducing its size to a thin slice by cutting its sides by a focused ion beam, and performing TEM on that structure. Also, we examine the root of the MW and Cu-Sn interface for the intermetallic compounds. Our TEM observations reveal a rich nontrivial morphology suggesting that MWs may consist of many side-by-side grown filaments. This structure appears to extend to the outside whisker surface and be the reason for the striation. In addition, we put forward a theory where nucleation of multiple thin metal needles results in micron-scale and larger MW diameters. This theory is developed in the average field approximation similar to the roughening transitions of metal surfaces. The theory also predicts MW nucleation barriers and other observed features.

  11. Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments and soils using green fluorescent protein-based bacterial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, V.H.-C.; Chien, M.-T.; Tseng, Y.-Y.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-01-01

    A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based bacterial biosensor Escherichia coli DH5α (pVLCD1) was developed based on the expression of gfp under the control of the cad promoter and the cadC gene of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258. DH5α (pVLCD1) mainly responded to Cd(II), Pb(II), and Sb(III), the lowest detectable concentrations being 0.1 nmol L -1 , 10 nmol L -1 , and 0.1 nmol L -1 , respectively, with 2 h exposure. The biosensor was field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of the heavy metals in contaminated sediments and soil samples. The results showed that the majority of heavy metals remained adsorbed to soil particles: Cd(II)/Pb(II) was only partially available to the biosensor in soil-water extracts. Our results demonstrate that the GFP-based bacterial biosensor is useful and applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals with high sensitivity in contaminated sediment and soil samples and suggests a potential for its inexpensive application in environmentally relevant sample tests. - Nonpathogenic GFP-based bacterial biosensor is applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals in environmental samples

  12. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-03-01

    Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM, a probabilistic dialect of Prolog. We evaluate Hidden Markov Model structures for bacterial protein-coding gene potential, including a simple null model structure, three structures based on existing bacterial gene finders and two novel model structures. We test standard versions as well as ADPH length modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our implementations of the two currently most used model structures are best performing in terms of statistical information criteria or prediction performances, suggesting that better-fitting models might be achievable. The source code of all PRISM models, data and additional scripts are freely available for download at: http://github.com/somork/codonhmm. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hideki, E-mail: hideki-h@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); JST, CREST, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Fujii, Tatsuo [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Nakanishi, Koji [Office of Society-Academia Collaboration for Innovation, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Yogi, Chihiro [SR Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Peterlik, Herwig [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nakanishi, Makoto [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takada, Jun [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); JST, CREST, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}·8SiO{sub 2}·P{sub 2}O{sub 5}·30H{sub 2}O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe–O–Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO{sub 6} octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials. - Highlights: • Structural transformation of a bacterial iron oxide microtubule was investigated. • Si–O–Fe was cleaved with increasing temperature to form α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/silicate composite. • Crystallization to 2Fh started at 500 °C to give α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} >700 °C. • FeO{sub 6} octahedra were highly distorted <500 °C. • Formation of face-sharing FeO{sub 6} was promoted >500 °C, releasing the local strain of FeO{sub 6}.

  14. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hölzel, Christina S.; Müller, Christa; Harms, Katrin S.; Mikolajewski, Sabine; Schäfer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08–5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1–32.0 mg chrome, 22.4–3387.6 mg copper, <2.0–26.7 mg lead, <0.01–0.11 mg mercury, 3.1–97.3 mg nickel and 93.0–8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against β-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against β-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  15. Diversity and morphological structure of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (Budapest, Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Dóra; Büki, Gabriella; Krett, Gergely; Makk, Judit; Márialigeti, Károly; Erőss, Anita; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The Buda Thermal Karst System is an active hypogenic karst area that offers possibility for the analysis of biogenic cave formation. The aim of the present study was to gain information about morphological structure and genetic diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (DHTS). Using scanning electron microscopy, metal accumulating and unusual reticulated filaments were detected in large numbers in the DHTS biofilm samples. The phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were represented by both bacterial strains and molecular clones but phyla Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, Chlorofexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae and Thermotogae only by molecular clones which showed the highest similarity to uncultured clone sequences originating from different environmental sources. The biofilm bacterial community proved to be somewhat more diverse than that of the water sample and the distribution of the dominant bacterial clones was different between biofilm and water samples. The majority of biofilm clones was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and Nitrospirae while the largest group of water clones was related to Betaproteobacteria. Considering the metabolic properties of known species related to the strains and molecular clones from DHTS, it can be assumed that these bacterial communities may participate in the local sulphur and iron cycles, and contribute to biogenic cave formation.

  16. Bacterial community structure in the Cerasus sachalinensis Kom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... The bacterial community structures of the Cerasus sachalinensis Kom. rhizosphere in wild and cultivated soil were studied and the community changes in different growth stages were analyzed by the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method. The results showed that the bacterial ...

  17. Bacterial community structure in response to environmental impacts in the intertidal sediments along the Yangtze Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xing-Pan; Lu, Da-Pei; Niu, Zuo-Shun; Feng, Jing-Nan; Chen, Yu-Ru; Tou, Fei-Yun; Liu, Min; Yang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the characteristics of bacterial communities in intertidal sediments along the Yangtze Estuary and their responses to environmental factors. The results showed that bacterial abundance was significantly correlated with salinity, SO 4 2- and total organic carbon, while bacterial diversity was significantly correlated with SO 4 2- and total nitrogen. At different taxonomic levels, both the dominant taxa and their abundances varied among the eight samples, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant phylum in general. Cluster analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure was influenced by river runoff and sewerage discharge. Moreover, SO 4 2- , salinity and total phosphorus were the vital environmental factors that influenced the bacterial community structure. Quantitative PCR and sequencing of sulphate-reducing bacteria indicated that the sulphate reduction process occurs frequently in intertidal sediments. These findings are important to understand the microbial ecology and biogeochemical cycles in estuarine environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  19. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Title Structural and functi...onal analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  20. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity

  1. On the determining role of network structure titania in silicone against bacterial colonization: Mechanism and disruption of biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based biomedical devices are prone to microbial adhesion, which is the primary cause of concern in the functioning of the artificial device. Silicone exhibiting long-term and effective antibacterial ability is highly desirable to prevent implant related infections. In this regard, nanophase titania was incorporated in silicone as an integral part of the silicone network structure through cross-link mechanism, with the objective to reduce bacterial adhesion to a minimum. The bacterial adhesion was studied using crystal violet assay, while the mechanism of inhibition of biofilm formation was studied via electron microscopy. The incorporation of nanophase titania in silicone dramatically reduced the viability of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and the capability to adhere on the surface of hybrid silicone by ∼ 93% in relation to stand alone silicone. The conclusion of dramatic reduction in the viability of S. aureus is corroborated by different experimental approaches including biofilm inhibition assay, zone of inhibition, and through a novel experiment that involved incubation of biofilm with titania nanoparticles. It is proposed that the mechanism of disruption of bacterial film in the presence of titania involves puncturing of the bacterial cell membrane. - Highlights: • Network structure titania in silicone imparts antimicrobial activity. • Ability to microbial adhesion is significantly reduced. • Antimicrobial mechanism involves rupture of biofilm

  2. Metal concentrations in stream biofilm and sediments and their potential to explain biofilm microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Dopheide, Andrew; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of metals associated with sediments have traditionally been analysed to assess the extent of heavy metal contamination in freshwater environments. Stream biofilms present an alternative medium for this assessment which may be more relevant to the risk incurred by stream ecosystems as they are intensively grazed by aquatic organisms at a higher trophic level. Therefore, we investigated zinc, copper and lead concentrations in biofilms and sediments of 23 stream sites variously impacted by urbanisation. Simultaneously, biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan community structure was analysed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm associated metals explained a greater proportion of the variations observed in bacterial and ciliate communities than did sediment associated-metals. This study suggests that the analysis of metal concentrations in biofilms provide a good assessment of detrimental effects of metal contaminants on aquatic biota. - Highlights: ► Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations in biofilm and sediments from 23 streams were assessed. ► Bacteria and ciliate protozoa were simultaneously used as biological indicators. ► Zn and Cu were generally enriched in biofilm compared to sediments. ► Metals in biofilm provide a useful assessment of freshwater ecosystem contamination. ► Results highlight the likely ecological importance of biofilm associated metals. - Metal concentrations in stream biofilms provide a good assessment of the effects of trace metal contaminants on freshwater ecosystems.

  3. Structural energetics of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    Structural energetics of the noble metals, namely Cu, Ag, and Au are investigated by employing a single-parameter pseudopotential. The calculations show that the lowest energy for all of these metals corresponds to FCC - their observed crystal structure. The one-electron contribution to the free energy is found to dominate the structural prediction for these metals. The present investigation strongly emphasizes that the effects due to band hybridization and core-core exchange play a significant role on the structural stability of the noble metals. (author)

  4. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  5. Irrigation water quality in southern Mexico City based on bacterial and heavy metal analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: corina@fisica.unam.mx; Sandoval, J. [Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo Postal 70-275, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Perez-Vega, H. [Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Ave. Universidad S/N. Zona de la Cultura, 86040 Villa Hermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Mazari-Hiriart, M. [Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo Postal 70-275, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2006-08-15

    Xochimilco is located in southern Mexico City and represents the reminiscence of the pre-Columbian farming system, the 'chinampa' agriculture. 'Chinampas' are island plots surrounded by a canal network. At present the area is densely urbanized and populated, with various contaminant sources contributing to the water quality degradation. The canal system is recharged by a combination of treated-untreated wastewater, and precipitation during the rainy season. Over 40 agricultural species, including vegetables, cereals and flowers, are produced in the 'chinampas'. In order to characterize the quality of Xochimilcos' water used for irrigation, spatial and temporal contaminant indicators such as microorganisms and heavy metals were investigated. Bacterial indicators (fecal coliforms, fecal enterococcus) were analyzed by standard analytical procedures, and heavy metals (such as Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The more contaminated sites coincide with the heavily populated areas. Seasonal variation of contaminants was observed, with the higher bacterial counts and heavy metal concentrations reported during the rainy season.

  6. Structural Design and Sizing of a Metallic Cryotank Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, David W.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the structural design and sizing details of a 33-foot (10 m) metallic cryotank concept used as the reference design to compare with the composite cryotank concepts developed by industry as part of NASA s Composite Cryotank Technology Development (CCTD) Project. The structural design methodology and analysis results for the metallic cryotank concept are reported in the paper. The paper describes the details of the metallic cryotank sizing assumptions for the baseline and reference tank designs. In particular, the paper discusses the details of the cryotank weld land design and analyses performed to obtain a reduced weight metallic cryotank design using current materials and manufacturing techniques. The paper also discusses advanced manufacturing techniques to spin-form the cryotank domes and compares the potential mass savings to current friction stir-welded technology.

  7. Effects of remediation on the bacterial community of an acid mine drainage impacted stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suchismita; Moitra, Moumita; Woolverton, Christopher J; Leff, Laura G

    2012-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) represents a global threat to water resources, and as such, remediation of AMD-impacted streams is a common practice. During this study, we examined bacterial community structure and environmental conditions in a low-order AMD-impacted stream before, during, and after remediation. Bacterial community structure was examined via polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Also, bacterial abundance and physicochemical data (including metal concentrations) were collected and relationships to bacterial community structure were determined using BIO-ENV analysis. Remediation of the study stream altered environmental conditions, including pH and concentrations of some metals, and consequently, the bacterial community changed. However, remediation did not necessarily restore the stream to conditions found in the unimpacted reference stream; for example, bacterial abundances and concentrations of some elements, such as sulfur, magnesium, and manganese, were different in the remediated stream than in the reference stream. BIO-ENV analysis revealed that changes in pH and iron concentration, associated with remediation, primarily explained temporal alterations in bacterial community structure. Although the sites sampled in the remediated stream were in relatively close proximity to each other, spatial variation in community composition suggests that differences in local environmental conditions may have large impacts on the microbial assemblage.

  8. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF BACTERIAL UREASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak YuV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This brief review concerns the basic principles of structural organization of multi-subunit bacterial ureases and formation of their quaternary structure. Urease is a nickel-containing enzyme (urea amidohydrolase, ЕС 3.5.1.5 that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea to get ammonia and carbamate which then decomposes with water to get ammonia and carbon dioxide. Urease is produced by bacteria, fungi, yeast and plants. On the basis of similarities in amino acid sequences, ureases assumed to have a similar structure and conservative catalytic mechanism. Within past two decades bacterial ureases have gained much attention in research field as a virulence factor in human and animal infections. The first crystal structure of urease has been determined for that from Klebsiella aerogenes. The native enzyme consists of three subunits, UreA (α-chain, UreB (β-chain and UreC (γ-chain, and contains four structural domains: two in α-chain (α-domain 1 and α-domain-2, one in β- and one in γ-chain. These three chains form a T-shaped heterotrimer αβγ. Three αβγ heterotrimers form quaternary complex (αβγ3. In case of Helicobacter pilori, the analogous trimers of corresponding dimeric subunits (αβ3 form tetrameric structure ((αβ34 in which four trimers are situated at the vertexes of the regular triangle pyramid. Active center is located in α-domain 1 and contains two atoms of nickel coordinated by residues His134, His136, carboxylated Lys217, His 246, His272 and Asp360, as well as residues involved in binding (His219 and catalysis (His320. Active site is capped by a flap that controls substrate ingress to and product egress from the dinickel center. Urease requires accessory proteins (UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE for the correct assembly of their Ni-containing metallocenters. The accessory proteins UreD, UreF, and UreG sequentially bind to the apoprotein (UreABC3 to finally form (UreABC-UreDFG3 activation complex. UreE metallochaperone delivers

  9. The Application of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria for the Heavy Metals Elimination from Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptáková

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems affecting mining companies around the world is the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD. AMD is characterised by its high acidity, high concentration of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd,… and high concentration of dissolved sulphates. The techniques traditionally used for the treatment of AMD have been based on chemical methods of neutralization and precipitation. A possible alternative to the chemical treatment of AMD is bioremediation using anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. The treatment of AMD by SRB is based on the ability of SRB to reduce sulphates to hydrogen sulphide, which binds readily with metals to form sparingly soluble precipitates. In this study we have attempted to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of the copper contaminated model solution and a real effluent AMD from the shaft Pech (the locality Smolnik using SRB. This method involves three stages: The H2S production by sulphate-reducing bacteria, the metals precipitation by the biologically produced H2S and the metal sulphides filtration. The studies confirm that copper was effectively recovered from the solution using bacterial produced H2S. An initial copper concentration 10 mg.l-1 was decreased to less than 0.05 mg.l-1 after 3 hours. The most adequate pH value for cooper precipitation was 2.5. Results of the copper precipitation from the areal effluent indicates that the optimal pH value for the copper precipitation is 3.5, but the created precipitates contain a mixture of copper and iron sulphides.

  10. Amorphous structure of iron oxide of bacterial origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Fujii, Tatsuo [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Asaoka, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshihiro [Department of Fine and Applied Arts, Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, Kurashiki, Okayama 712-8505 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasunori [Research Institute for Production Development, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-0805 (Japan); Nakanishi, Makoto [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Benino, Yasuhiko; Nanba, Tokuro [Graduate School of Environmental Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takada, Jun, E-mail: jtakada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); JST, CREST, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2012-12-14

    In nature, there are various iron oxides produced by the water-habitant bacterial group called 'iron-oxidizing bacteria'. These iron oxides have been studied mainly from biological and geochemical perspectives. Today, attempts are made to use such iron oxides as novel functional materials in several applications. However, their quantitative structural characteristics are still unclear. We studied the structure of iron oxide of microtubular form consisting of amorphous nanoparticles formed by an iron-oxidizing bacterium, Leptothrix ochracea, using a combination of high-energy X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo simulation. We found that its structure consists of a framework of corner- and edge-sharing distorted FeO{sub 6} octahedral units, while SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral units are isolated in the framework. The results reveal the atomic arrangement of iron oxide of bacterial origin, which is essential for investigating its potential as a functional material. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amorphous structure of bacterial iron oxide was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure was simulated by high-energy X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure was constructed of a framework of corner- and edge-sharing distorted FeO{sub 6} octahedral units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral units were distributed isolatedly in the framework of FeO{sub 6} octahedral units.

  11. Effectiveness Study of Drinking Water Treatment Using Clays/Andisol Adsorbent in Lariat Heavy Metal Cadmium (Cd) and Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto; Inayati; Firmansyah, Fathoni

    2018-04-01

    Water is a natural resource that is essential for all living creatures. In addition, water also caused of disease affecting humans. The existence of one of heavy metal pollutants cadmium (Cd) in the body of water is an environmental problem having a negative impact on the quality of water resources. Adsorption is one of the ways or methods that are often used for the treatment of wastewater. Clay and allophanic soil were used as Cd adsorbent by batch method. Ceramic filter was used to reduce Cd concentration in the ground water. This study aims to determine the effect of the composition of clay and Allophane, activation temperature and contact time on the adsorption capacity of Cd in the model solution. The optimum adsorption condition and the effectiveness of drinking water treatment in accordance with Regulation of the Minister of Health using clay/Andisol adsorbents in ensnare heavy metals Cd and bacterial pathogens. Identification and characterization of adsorbent is done by using NaF, Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), specific surface area and total acidity specific. The Cd metal concentrations were analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Adsorption isotherms determined by Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Modified water purification technology using ceramic filters are made with a mixture of clay and Andisol composition. The results showed samples of clay and Andisol containing minerals. The optimum condition of adsorption was achieved at 200 °C of activation temperature, 60 minutes of contact time and the 60:40 of clay:Andisol adsorbent composition. Freundlich isotherm represented Cd adsorption on the clay/Andisol adsorbent with a coefficient of determination (R2=0.99) and constant (k=1.59), higher than Langmuir (R2=0.89). The measurement results show the water purification technology using ceramic filters effectively reduce E. coli bacterial and Cd content in the water.

  12. MetalS(3), a database-mining tool for the identification of structurally similar metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a database search tool to identify metal sites having structural similarity to a query metal site structure within the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) contained in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such a local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. The database search tool, which we called MetalS(3) (Metal Sites Similarity Search), can be accessed through a Web interface at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals3/ . MetalS(3) uses a suitably adapted version of an algorithm that we previously developed to systematically compare the structure of the query metal site with each MFS in MetalPDB. For each MFS, the best superposition is kept. All these superpositions are then ranked according to the MetalS(3) scoring function and are presented to the user in tabular form. The user can interact with the output Web page to visualize the structural alignment or the sequence alignment derived from it. Options to filter the results are available. Test calculations show that the MetalS(3) output correlates well with expectations from protein homology considerations. Furthermore, we describe some usage scenarios that highlight the usefulness of MetalS(3) to obtain mechanistic and functional hints regardless of homology.

  13. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2014-05-01

    This review presents a broad overview of the research that enabled the structure determination of the bacterial reaction centers from Blastochloris viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, with a focus on the contributions from Duysens, Clayton, and Feher. Early experiments performed in the laboratory of Duysens and others demonstrated the utility of spectroscopic techniques and the presence of photosynthetic complexes in both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. The laboratories of Clayton and Feher led efforts to isolate and characterize the bacterial reaction centers. The availability of well-characterized preparations of pure and stable reaction centers allowed the crystallization and subsequent determination of the structures using X-ray diffraction. The three-dimensional structures of reaction centers revealed an overall arrangement of two symmetrical branches of cofactors surrounded by transmembrane helices from the L and M subunits, which also are related by the same twofold symmetry axis. The structure has served as a framework to address several issues concerning bacterial photosynthesis, including the directionality of electron transfer, the properties of the reaction center-cytochrome c 2 complex, and the coupling of proton and electron transfer. Together, these research efforts laid the foundation for ongoing efforts to address an outstanding question in oxygenic photosynthesis, namely the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  14. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood....... In the spiral phase of Ho, the structure in the c-axis distribution is much reduced, indicating that the Fermi surface is substantially modified by the magnetic ordering, as expected. The photon distribution from the equiatomic Ho-Er alloy is very similar to those from the constituent metals, although...

  15. Assessing the resistance and bioremediation ability of selected bacterial and protozoan species to heavy metals in metal-rich industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamika, Ilunga; Momba, Maggy N B

    2013-02-06

    Heavy-metals exert considerable stress on the environment worldwide. This study assessed the resistance to and bioremediation of heavy-metals by selected protozoan and bacterial species in highly polluted industrial-wastewater. Specific variables (i.e. chemical oxygen demand, pH, dissolved oxygen) and the growth/die-off-rates of test organisms were measured using standard methods. Heavy-metal removals were determined in biomass and supernatant by the Inductively Couple Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer. A parallel experiment was performed with dead microbial cells to assess the biosorption ability of test isolates. The results revealed that the industrial-wastewater samples were highly polluted with heavy-metal concentrations exceeding by far the maximum limits (in mg/l) of 0.05-Co, 0.2-Ni, 0.1-Mn, 0.1-V, 0.01-Pb, 0.01-Cu, 0.1-Zn and 0.005-Cd, prescribed by the UN-FAO. Industrial-wastewater had no major effects on Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus licheniformis and Peranema sp. (growth rates up to 1.81, 1.45 and 1.43 d-1, respectively) compared to other test isolates. This was also revealed with significant COD increases (p heavy metals (Co-71%, Ni-51%, Mn-45%, V-83%, Pb-96%, Ti-100% and Cu-49%) followed by Bacillus licheniformis (Al-23% and Zn-53%) and Peranema sp. (Cd-42%). None of the dead cells were able to remove more than 25% of the heavy metals. Bacterial isolates contained the genes copC, chrB, cnrA3 and nccA encoding the resistance to Cu, Cr, Co-Ni and Cd-Ni-Co, respectively. Protozoan isolates contained only the genes encoding Cu and Cr resistance (copC and chrB genes). Peranema sp. was the only protozoan isolate which had an additional resistant gene cnrA3 encoding Co-Ni resistance. Significant differences (p metal-removal and the presence of certain metal-resistant genes indicated that the selected microbial isolates used both passive (biosorptive) and active (bioaccumulation) mechanisms to remove heavy metals from industrial wastewater. This study

  16. Experimental Study of Structure/Behavior Relationship for a Metallized Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Eric; Reeves, Robert; Gash, Alexander; Glumac, Nick

    2017-06-01

    Metal powders are commonly added to explosive formulations to modify the blast behavior. Although detonation velocity is typically reduced compared to the neat explosive, the metal provides other benefits. Aluminum is a common additive to increase the overall energy output and high-density metals can be useful for enhancing momentum transfer to a target. Typically, metal powder is homogeneously distributed throughout the material; in this study, controlled distributions of metal powder in explosive formulations were investigated. The powder structures were printed using powder bed printing and the porous structures were filled with explosives to create bulk explosive composites. In all cases, the overall ratio between metal and explosive was maintained, but the powder distribution was varied. Samples utilizing uniform distributions to represent typical materials, discrete pockets of metal powder, and controlled, graded powder distributions were created. Detonation experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of metal powder design on the output pressure/time and the overall impulse. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Sonication reduces the attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 cells to bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models and cut plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michelle S F; Rahman, Sadequr; Dykes, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the removal of bacterial surface structures, particularly flagella, using sonication, and examined its effect on the attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 cells to plant cell walls. S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 cells were subjected to sonication at 20 kHz to remove surface structures without affecting cell viability. Effective removal of flagella was determined by staining flagella of sonicated cells with Ryu's stain and enumerating the flagella remaining by direct microscopic counting. The attachment of sonicated S. Typhimurium cells to bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models and cut plant material (potato, apple, lettuce) was then evaluated. Varying concentrations of pectin and/or xyloglucan were used to produce a range of bacterial cellulose-based plant cell wall models. As compared to the non-sonicated controls, sonicated S. Typhimurium cells attached in significantly lower numbers (between 0.5 and 1.0 log CFU/cm 2 ) to all surfaces except to the bacterial cellulose-only composite without pectin and xyloglucan. Since attachment of S. Typhimurium to the bacterial cellulose-only composite was not affected by sonication, this suggests that bacterial surface structures, particularly flagella, could have specific interactions with pectin and xyloglucan. This study indicates that sonication may have potential applications for reducing Salmonella attachment during the processing of fresh produce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of a bacterial toxin-activating acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas P; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-06-09

    Secreted pore-forming toxins of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) insert into host-cell membranes to subvert signal transduction and induce apoptosis and cell lysis. Unusually, these toxins are synthesized in an inactive form that requires posttranslational activation in the bacterial cytosol. We have previously shown that the activation mechanism is an acylation event directed by a specialized acyl-transferase that uses acyl carrier protein (ACP) to covalently link fatty acids, via an amide bond, to specific internal lysine residues of the protoxin. We now reveal the 2.15-Å resolution X-ray structure of the 172-aa ApxC, a toxin-activating acyl-transferase (TAAT) from pathogenic Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. This determination shows that bacterial TAATs are a structurally homologous family that, despite indiscernible sequence similarity, form a distinct branch of the Gcn5-like N-acetyl transferase (GNAT) superfamily of enzymes that typically use acyl-CoA to modify diverse bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic substrates. A combination of structural analysis, small angle X-ray scattering, mutagenesis, and cross-linking defined the solution state of TAATs, with intermonomer interactions mediated by an N-terminal α-helix. Superposition of ApxC with substrate-bound GNATs, and assay of toxin activation and binding of acyl-ACP and protoxin peptide substrates by mutated ApxC variants, indicates the enzyme active site to be a deep surface groove.

  19. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Bello-López, Juan M.; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Luna-Guido, Marco L.; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)) accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485) inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100%) > earthworms applied (92%) > organic material applied (77%) > untreated soil (57%) > surfactant applied (34%) after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes), Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil, but the

  20. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Delgado-Balbuena

    Full Text Available Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826 accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485 inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100% > earthworms applied (92% > organic material applied (77% > untreated soil (57% > surfactant applied (34% after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil

  1. Centralized Drinking Water Treatment Operations Shape Bacterial and Fungal Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Vikram, Amit; Casson, Leonard; Bibby, Kyle

    2017-07-05

    Drinking water microbial communities impact opportunistic pathogen colonization and corrosion of water distribution systems, and centralized drinking water treatment represents a potential control for microbial community structure in finished drinking water. In this article, we examine bacterial and fungal abundance and diversity, as well as the microbial community taxonomic structure following each unit operation in a conventional surface water treatment plant. Treatment operations drove the microbial composition more strongly than sampling time. Both bacterial and fungal abundance and diversity decreased following sedimentation and filtration; however, only bacterial abundance and diversity was significantly impacted by free chlorine disinfection. Similarly, each treatment step was found to shift bacterial and fungal community beta-diversity, with the exception of disinfection on the fungal community structure. We observed the enrichment of bacterial and fungal taxa commonly found in drinking water distribution systems through the treatment process, for example, Sphingomonas following filtration and Leptospirillium and Penicillium following disinfection. Study results suggest that centralized drinking water treatment processes shape the final drinking water microbial community via selection of community members and that the bacterial community is primarily driven by disinfection while the eukaryotic community is primarily controlled by physical treatment processes.

  2. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    ,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental and Space Sciences panel.

  3. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extraterrestrial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; Omaly, P.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of the ongoing exploration of Mars and the several unmanned and manned missions planned for the future, increased attention has been given to the use of the natural resources of the planet for rocket propellant production and energy generation. Since the atmosphere of Mars consists of approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), this gas is the resource of choice to be employed for these purposes. Unfortunately, CO2 is also a final product in most combustion reactions, requiring further processing to extract useful reactants such as carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), and hydrocarbons. An exception is the use Of CO2 as an oxidizer reacting directly with metal fuel. Since many metals burn vigorously with CO2, these may be used as an energy source and as propellants for an ascent/descent vehicle in sample-collection missions on Mars. In response to NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise to search for appropriate in-situ resource utilization techniques, this investigation will study the burning characteristics of promising metal/CO2 combinations. The use of reduced gravity is essential to eliminate the intrusive buoyant flows that plague the high-temperature metal reactions, to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples, and to study the influence of radiative heat transfer from solid oxides undisturbed by natural convection. In studies with large metal specimens, the burning process is invariably influenced by strong convective currents that accelerate the reaction and shorten the burning times. Although these currents are nearly absent from small burning particles, the high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, small length scales, and intermittent explosions make the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. This investigation has the ultimate goal of providing a careful probing of flame structure and dynamics by taking advantage of large, free

  4. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Microbiology, Maier, R.M., Pepper, I.L. and Gerba, C.P., eds., Academic Press, San Diego, 2000. Schlekat, C.E., Decho, A.W. and Chandler, G.T. Dietary assimilation of cadmium associated with bacterial exopolymer sediment coatings by the estuarine amphipod...H environments. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 55: 1249-1257; 1989. Ford, T.E., Maki, J.S. and Mitchell, R. The role of metal-binding bacterial exopolymers in corrosion processes. Corrosion/87, Paper no. 380, NACE publications, California; 1987. Geesey, G...

  5. Assessing the resistance and bioremediation ability of selected bacterial and protozoan species to heavy metals in metal-rich industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamika Ilunga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy-metals exert considerable stress on the environment worldwide. This study assessed the resistance to and bioremediation of heavy-metals by selected protozoan and bacterial species in highly polluted industrial-wastewater. Specific variables (i.e. chemical oxygen demand, pH, dissolved oxygen and the growth/die-off-rates of test organisms were measured using standard methods. Heavy-metal removals were determined in biomass and supernatant by the Inductively Couple Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer. A parallel experiment was performed with dead microbial cells to assess the biosorption ability of test isolates. Results The results revealed that the industrial-wastewater samples were highly polluted with heavy-metal concentrations exceeding by far the maximum limits (in mg/l of 0.05-Co, 0.2-Ni, 0.1-Mn, 0.1-V, 0.01-Pb, 0.01-Cu, 0.1-Zn and 0.005-Cd, prescribed by the UN-FAO. Industrial-wastewater had no major effects on Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus licheniformis and Peranema sp. (growth rates up to 1.81, 1.45 and 1.43 d-1, respectively compared to other test isolates. This was also revealed with significant COD increases (p Pseudomonas putida demonstrated the highest removal rates of heavy metals (Co-71%, Ni-51%, Mn-45%, V-83%, Pb-96%, Ti-100% and Cu-49% followed by Bacillus licheniformis (Al-23% and Zn-53% and Peranema sp. (Cd-42%. None of the dead cells were able to remove more than 25% of the heavy metals. Bacterial isolates contained the genes copC, chrB, cnrA3 and nccA encoding the resistance to Cu, Cr, Co-Ni and Cd-Ni-Co, respectively. Protozoan isolates contained only the genes encoding Cu and Cr resistance (copC and chrB genes. Peranema sp. was the only protozoan isolate which had an additional resistant gene cnrA3 encoding Co-Ni resistance. Conclusion Significant differences (p Peranema sp. as a potential candidate for the bioremediation of heavy-metals in wastewater treatment, in addition to Pseudomonas

  6. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Flavia L. D.; Aquilina, Luc; De Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  7. Significant relationship between soil bacterial community structure and incidence of bacterial wilt disease under continuous cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Siyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Chao; Xiao, Yunhua; Chen, Wu; Dai, Linjian; Liu, Xueduan; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-03-01

    Soil bacteria are very important in biogeochemical cycles and play significant role in soil-borne disease suppression. Although continuous cropping is responsible for soil-borne disease enrichment, its effect on tobacco plant health and how soil bacterial communities change are yet to be elucidated. In this study, soil bacterial communities across tobacco continuous cropping time-series fields were investigated through high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. The results showed that long-term continuous cropping could significantly alter soil microbial communities. Bacterial diversity indices and evenness indices decreased over the monoculture span and obvious variations for community structures across the three time-scale tobacco fields were detected. Compared with the first year, the abundances of Arthrobacter and Lysobacter showed a significant decrease. Besides, the abundance of the pathogen Ralstonia spp. accumulated over the monoculture span and was significantly correlated with tobacco bacterial wilt disease rate. Moreover, Pearson's correlation demonstrated that the abundance of Arthrobacter and Lysobacter, which are considered to be beneficial bacteria had significant negative correlation with tobacco bacterial wilt disease. Therefore, after long-term continuous cropping, tobacco bacterial wilt disease could be ascribed to the alteration of the composition as well as the structure of the soil microbial community.

  8. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production

    KAUST Repository

    Belila, Abdelaziz

    2016-02-18

    Microbial processes inevitably play a role in membrane-based desalination plants, mainly recognized as membrane biofouling. We assessed the bacterial community structure and diversity during different treatment steps in a full-scale seawater desalination plant producing 40,000 m3/d of drinking water. Water samples were taken over the full treatment train consisting of chlorination, spruce media and cartridge filters, de-chlorination, first and second pass reverse osmosis (RO) membranes and final chlorine dosage for drinking water distribution. The water samples were analyzed for water quality parameters (total bacterial cell number, total organic carbon, conductivity, pH, etc.) and microbial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The planktonic microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (48.6%) followed by Bacteroidetes (15%), Firmicutes (9.3%) and Cyanobacteria (4.9%). During the pretreatment step, the spruce media filter did not impact the bacterial community composition dominated by Proteobacteria. In contrast, the RO and final chlorination treatment steps reduced the Proteobacterial relative abundance in the produced water where Firmicutes constituted the most dominant bacterial group. Shannon and Chao1 diversity indices showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit some bacterial DNA was found in the water after RO filtration. About 0.25% of the total bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in all stages of the desalination plant: the seawater, the RO permeates and the chlorinated drinking water, suggesting that these bacterial strains can survive in different environments such as high/low salt concentration and with/without residual disinfectant. These bacterial strains were not caused by contamination during

  9. Effects of bacterially produced precipitates on the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria during the bio-treatment process of copper-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A large volume of bacterially produced precipitates are generated during the bio-treatment of heavy metal wastewater.The composition of the bacterially produced precipitates and its effects on sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in copper-containing waste stream were evaluated in this study.The elemental composition of the microbial precipitate was studied using electrodispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX),and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.12.Combining with the results of copper distribution in the SRB metabolism culture,which was analyzed by the sequential extraction procedure,copper in the precipitates was determined as covellite (CuS).The bacterially produced precipitates caused a decrease of the sulfate reduction rate,and the more precipitates were generated,the lower the sulfate reduction rate was.The particle sizes of bacterially generated covellite were ranging from 0.03 to 2 m by particles size distribution (PSD) analysis,which was smaller than that of the SRB cells.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the microbial covellite was deposited on the surface of the cell.The effects of the microbial precipitate on SRB metabolism were found to be weakened by increasing the precipitation time and adding microbial polymeric substances in later experiments.These results provided direct evidence that the SRB activity was inhibited by the bacterially produced covellite,which enveloped the bacterium and thus affected the metabolism of SRB on mass transfer.

  10. Foliar Application of the Fungicide Pyraclostrobin Reduced Bacterial Spot Disease of Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Ryong Kang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyraclostrobin is a broad-spectrum fungicide that inhibits mitochondrial respiration. However, it may also induce systemic resistance effective against bacterial and viral diseases. In this study, we evaluated whether pyraclostrobin enhanced resistance against the bacterial spot pathogen, Xanthomonas euvesicatora on pepper (Capsicum annuum. Although pyraclostrobin alone did not suppressed the in vitro growth of X. euvesicatoria, disease severity in pepper was significantly lower by 69% after treatments with pyraclostrobin alone. A combination of pyraclostrobin with streptomycin reduced disease by over 90% that of the control plants. The preventive control of the pyraclostrobin against bacterial spot was required application 1-3 days before pathogen inoculation. Our findings suggest that the fungicide pyraclostrobin can be used with a chemical pesticide to control bacterial leaf spot diseases in pepper.

  11. Promising Biological Indicator of Heavy Metal Pollution: Bioluminescent Bacterial Strains Isolated and Characterized from Marine Niches of Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Neha A; Shanware, Arti S

    2015-09-01

    In present study, several marine water samples collected from the North Goa Beaches, India for isolation of luminescent bacterial species. Isolates obtained labelled as DP1-5 and AB1-6. Molecular characterization including identification of a microbial culture using 16S rRNA gene based molecular technique and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that DP3 & AB1 isolates were Vibrio harveyi. All of the isolates demonstrated multiple metal resistances in terms of growth, with altered luminescence with variable metal concentration. Present investigations were an attempt towards exploring and reporting an updated diversity of bioluminescent bacterial species from various sites around the Goa, India which would be explored in future for constructing luminescence based biosensor for efficiently monitoring the level of hazardous metals in the environment.

  12. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  13. A structural role for the PHP domain in E. coli DNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Tiago; Guenther, Joel; Kelch, Brian; Anaya, Jordan; Prabhakar, Arjun; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John; Lamers, Meindert H

    2013-05-14

    In addition to the core catalytic machinery, bacterial replicative DNA polymerases contain a Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase (PHP) domain whose function is not entirely understood. The PHP domains of some bacterial replicases are active metal-dependent nucleases that may play a role in proofreading. In E. coli DNA polymerase III, however, the PHP domain has lost several metal-coordinating residues and is likely to be catalytically inactive. Genomic searches show that the loss of metal-coordinating residues in polymerase PHP domains is likely to have coevolved with the presence of a separate proofreading exonuclease that works with the polymerase. Although the E. coli Pol III PHP domain has lost metal-coordinating residues, the structure of the domain has been conserved to a remarkable degree when compared to that of metal-binding PHP domains. This is demonstrated by our ability to restore metal binding with only three point mutations, as confirmed by the metal-bound crystal structure of this mutant determined at 2.9 Å resolution. We also show that Pol III, a large multi-domain protein, unfolds cooperatively and that mutations in the degenerate metal-binding site of the PHP domain decrease the overall stability of Pol III and reduce its activity. While the presence of a PHP domain in replicative bacterial polymerases is strictly conserved, its ability to coordinate metals and to perform proofreading exonuclease activity is not, suggesting additional non-enzymatic roles for the domain. Our results show that the PHP domain is a major structural element in Pol III and its integrity modulates both the stability and activity of the polymerase.

  14. Metal working and dislocation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural observations are presented for different metals deformed from low to high strain by both traditional and new metal working processes. It is shown that deformation induced dislocation structures can be interpreted and analyzed within a common framework of grain subdivision on a finer...... and finer scale down to the nanometer dimension, which can be reached at ultrahigh strains. It is demonstrated that classical materials science and engineering principles apply from the largest to the smallest structural scale but also that new and unexpected structures and properties characterize metals...

  15. Structure of polyvalent metal halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1990-12-01

    A short review is given of recent progress in determining and understanding the structure of molten halide salts involving polyvalent metal ions. It covers the following three main topics: (i) melting mechanisms and types of liquid structure for pure polyvalent-metal chlorides; (ii) geometry and stability of local coordination for polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of their halides with alkali halides; and (iii) structure breaking and electron localization on addition of metal to the melt. (author). 28 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  16. Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Moreau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

  17. Targeted Structural Optimization with Additive Manufacturing of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Adam; Hull, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) of metals have now improved the state-of-the-art such that traditionally non-producible parts can be readily produced in a cost-effective way. Because of these advances in manufacturing technology, structural optimization techniques are well positioned to supplement and advance this new technology. The goal of this project is to develop a structural design, analysis, and optimization framework combined with AM to significantly light-weight the interior of metallic structures while maintaining the selected structural properties of the original solid. This is a new state-of-the-art capability to significantly reduce mass, while maintaining the structural integrity of the original design, something that can only be done with AM. In addition, this framework will couple the design, analysis, and fabrication process, meaning that what has been designed directly represents the produced part, thus closing the loop on the design cycle and removing human iteration between design and fabrication. This fundamental concept has applications from light-weighting launch vehicle components to in situ resource fabrication.

  18. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (ΔH) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides

  19. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  20. Metagenomics insights into Cr(VI effects on structural and functional diversity of bacterial community in chromite mine soils of Sukinda Valley, Odisha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Kumar Pradhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil contamination with heavy metal like chromium is a wide-spread environmental problem in mining and its periphery areas causing hazard to the plant, animal and human. Bacterial communities which resist the toxic effect of Cr(VI can only survive under this hostile condition. In the study assessment of structural diversity of bacterial communities from four different locations of chromite mines area of Sukinda, Odisha (India were carried out with 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of V3 regions using illuminaMiSeq and functional diversity analysis from in situ mining site with whole genome metagenomics using illuminaHiSeq. The taxonomic classification was carried out through QIIME program. The samples differed from each other, both in terms of level of contamination and soil characteristics. The variations in pH were small (6.67-7.32 between the mine soils from in situ and overburden sites in comparison to forest soil (5.08. The forest soil contains higher amount of available N and K as well as organic carbon as compared to both the mine soils. Heavy metals like Fe, Cr, Ni, and Cd have been detected in higher concentrations in in situ sites than both overburden and forest soil samples. Whereas concentration of other heavy metals like Co and Mn is high in overburden than in situ and forest soil. In spite of the differences between the samples, they shared many common operational taxonomic units (OTUs and it was possible to delineate the core microbiome of the soil samples. In general, Actinobacteria were the most dominant phyla with abundance of Deltaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria within the soils. Certain bacterial genera like Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Lactobacillus, Bacillus, Clostridium and Corynebacterium were found to be predominant in in situ mining sites, whereas genera like Nitrospira, DA101, JG37-AG-70 and Nitrospira and DA101 were found to be abundant in overburden and forest soil respectively. In in situ soil

  1. Use of configuration management to reduce development costs in metal parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsoom, T.; Ahmad, S.

    2005-01-01

    In development and manufacturing phases of metal parts, design efforts are converted in set of engineering data pack under the given guidelines of Configuration Management (CM). These engineering documents define Configuration Management of metal parts production in a local industry. The development phase is normally less structured and open to Engineering Change Proposals. In our local engineering organizations most of the work done is normally not well documented for future revisions and modernization. This leads to delays in development and increase in production costs of metal parts. This becomes more pronounced if any member of the design team disassociates and leaves the organization. The Configuration Management helps to reduce development costs by providing infrastructure for product identification, documentation, change control, interface control and technical reviews and product audits. Automated or Computer-Assisted CM activities can also be used to shorten response time and increase accuracy and reliability of the produced metal components. (author)

  2. Gauze Impregnated With Quaternary Ammonium Salt Reduces Bacterial Colonization of Surgical Drains After Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Amy L; Wolfe, Emily T; Shank, Nina; Chaffin, Abigail E; Jansen, David A

    2018-06-01

    Surgical site infection after breast reconstruction is associated with increased length of hospital stay, readmission rates, cost, morbidity, and mortality. Identifying methods to reduce surgical site infection without the use of antibiotics may be beneficial at reducing antimicrobial resistance, reserving the use of antibiotics for more severe cases. Quaternary ammonium salts have previously been shown to be a safe and effective antimicrobial agent in the setting of in vitro and in vivo animal experiments. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the antimicrobial properties of a quaternary ammonium salt, 3-trimethoxysilyl propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride (QAS-3PAC; Bio-spear), at reducing surgical drain site colonization and infection after breast reconstruction (deep inferior epigastric perforator flap reconstruction or tissue expander placement). Twenty patients were enrolled, with 14 surgical drains covered with nonimpregnated gauze and 17 surgical drains covered with QAS-3PAC impregnated gauze, for the purposes of investigating bacterial colonization. Antibiotic sensitivity analysis was also conducted when bacterial cultures were positive. The overall incidence of bacterial colonization of surgical drains was lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (17.6% vs 64.3%, respectively; P = 0.008). QAS-3PAC impregnated gauze reduced the incidence of bacterial colonization of surgical drains during the first (0.0% vs 33.3%) and second (33.3% vs 87.5%; P = 0.04) postoperative week. Furthermore, no enhanced antibiotic resistance was noted on drains treated with QAS-3PAC impregnated gauze. The results of this study suggest that QAS-3PAC impregnated gauze applied over surgical drains may be an effective method for reducing the incidence of bacterial colonization.

  3. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra; Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO 2 and ZrO 2 coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO 2 > ZrO 2 ) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO 2 , which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO 2 and ZrO 2 coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO 2 and a-ZrO 2 than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO 2 was lower than on the c-TiO 2

  4. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra, E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO{sub 2} > ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO{sub 2}, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO{sub 2} and a-ZrO{sub 2} than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO{sub 2} was lower than on the c-TiO{sub 2}.

  5. Electronic structure of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertheim, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of valence electrons in metal clusters, together with threshold ionization potential measurements, provide a coherent picture of the development of the electronic structure from the isolated atom to the large metallic cluster. An insulator-metal transition occurs at an intermediate cluster size, which serves to define the boundary between small and large clusters. Although the outer electrons may be delocalized over the entire cluster, a small cluster remains insulating until the density of states near the Fermi level exceeds 1/kT. In large clusters, with increasing cluster size, the band structure approaches that of the bulk metal. However, the bands remain significantly narrowed even in a 1000-atom cluster, giving an indication of the importance of long-range order. The core-electron binding-energy shifts of supported metal clusters depend on changes in the band structure in the initial state, as well as on various final-state effects, including changes in core hole screening and the coulomb energy of the final-state charge. For cluster supported on amorphous carbon, this macroscopic coulomb shift is often dominant, as evidenced by the parallel shifts of the core-electron binding energy and the Fermi edge. Auger data confirm that final-state effects dominate in cluster of Sn and some other metals. Surface atom core-level shifts provide a valuable guide to the contributions of initial-state changes in band structure to cluster core-electron binding energy shifts, especially for Au and Pt. The available data indicate that the shift observed in supported, metallic clusters arise largely from the charge left on the cluster by photoemission. As the metal-insulator transition is approached from above, metallic screening is suppressed and the shift is determined by the local environment. (orig.)

  6. The impact of natural transformation on adaptation in spatially structured bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Engelstädter, Jan

    2014-06-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that natural transformation and the formation of highly structured populations in bacteria are interconnected. In spite of growing evidence about this connection, little is known about the dynamics of natural transformation in spatially structured bacterial populations. In this work, we model the interdependency between the dynamics of the bacterial gene pool and those of environmental DNA in space to dissect the effect of transformation on adaptation. Our model reveals that even with only a single locus under consideration, transformation with a free DNA fragment pool results in complex adaptation dynamics that do not emerge in previous models focusing only on the gene shuffling effect of transformation at multiple loci. We demonstrate how spatial restriction on population growth and DNA diffusion in the environment affect the impact of transformation on adaptation. We found that in structured bacterial populations intermediate DNA diffusion rates predominantly cause transformation to impede adaptation by spreading deleterious alleles in the population. Overall, our model highlights distinctive evolutionary consequences of bacterial transformation in spatially restricted compared to planktonic bacterial populations.

  7. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-06-09

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids.

  8. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  9. Fabrication of subwavelength metallic structures by using a metal direct imprinting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, C W; Hsiung, H Y; Lu, Y T; Sung, C K; Wang, W H

    2007-01-01

    This work employs a metal direct imprinting process, which possesses the characteristics of simplicity, low-cost and high resolution, for the fabrication of subwavelength structures on a metallic thin film. Herein, the mould featuring periodic line structures is manufactured by using E-beam lithography and followed by a dry etching process; meanwhile, the thin film is fabricated by sputtering Al on a silicon substrate. AFM section analyses are employed to measure imprinting depths of the subwavelength metallic structures and it is found that the uniformity of the imprinting depths is affected by the designed patterns, the material property of thin film and mould deformation. The process temperature and the mould filling that influence the transferred quality are investigated. In addition, TEM is also utilized to examine defects in the subwavelength metallic structures. Finally, good quality subwavelength metallic structures are fabricated under a pressure of 300 MPa for 60 s at room temperature. In this study, we have demonstrated that subwavelength metallic structures with a minimum linewidth of less than 100 nm on the Al thin film are successfully constructed by the metal direct imprinting process

  10. Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chui, S T

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent development and interest in the photonics of metallic wire structures, the relatively simple concepts and physics often remain obscured or poorly explained to those who do not specialize in the field. Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures provides a clear and coherent guide to understanding these phenomena without excessive numerical calculations.   Including both background material and detailed derivations of the various different formulae applied, Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures describes how to extend basic circuit theory relating to voltages, currents, and resistances of metallic wire networks to include situations where the currents are no longer spatially uniform along the wire. This lays a foundation for a deeper understanding of the many new phenomena observed in meta-electromagnetic materials.   Examples of applications are included to support this new approach making Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures a comprehensive and ...

  11. Highly Heterogeneous Soil Bacterial Communities around Terra Nova Bay of Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoun Soo; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ji Hee; Lee, Joohan; Choi, Taejin; Ahn, Tae Seok; Kim, Ok-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Given the diminished role of biotic interactions in soils of continental Antarctica, abiotic factors are believed to play a dominant role in structuring of microbial communities. However, many ice-free regions remain unexplored, and it is unclear which environmental gradients are primarily responsible for the variations among bacterial communities. In this study, we investigated the soil bacterial community around Terra Nova Bay of Victoria Land by pyrosequencing and determined which environmental variables govern the bacterial community structure at the local scale. Six bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, were dominant, but their relative abundance varied greatly across locations. Bacterial community structures were affected little by spatial distance, but structured more strongly by site, which was in accordance with the soil physicochemical compositions. At both the phylum and species levels, bacterial community structure was explained primarily by pH and water content, while certain earth elements and trace metals also played important roles in shaping community variation. The higher heterogeneity of the bacterial community structure found at this site indicates how soil bacterial communities have adapted to different compositions of edaphic variables under extreme environmental conditions. Taken together, these findings greatly advance our understanding of the adaption of soil bacterial populations to this harsh environment. PMID:25799273

  12. Evaluation of free-stall mattress bedding treatments to reduce mastitis bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristula, M A; Dou, Z; Toth, J D; Smith, B I; Harvey, N; Sabo, M [University of Penn, Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Bacterial counts were compared in free-stall mattresses and teat ends exposed to 5 treatments in a factorial study design on 1 dairy farm. Mattresses in five 30-cow groups were subjected to 1 of 5 bedding treatments every other day: 0.5 kg of hydrated limestone, 120 mL of commercial acidic conditioner, 1 kg of coal fly ash, 1 kg of kiln-dried wood shavings, and control (no bedding). Counts of coliforms, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus spp. were lowest on mattresses bedded with lime. Mattresses bedded with the commercial acidic conditioner had the next lowest counts for coliforms, Klebsiella spp., and Streptococcus spp. Wood shavings and the no-bedding control had the highest counts for coliform and Klebsiella spp. Compared with wood shavings or control, fly ash reduced the counts of coliforms, whereas for the other 3 bacterial groups, the reduction was not always significant. Streptococcus spp. counts were greatest in the control group and did not differ among the shavings and fly ash groups. Teat swab results indicated that hydrated lime was the only bedding treatment that significantly decreased the counts of both coliforms and Klebsiella spp. There were no differences in Streptococcus spp. numbers on the teats between any of the bedding treatments. Bacterial populations grew steadily on mattresses and were generally higher at 36 to 48 h than at 12 to 24 h, whereas bacterial populations on teats grew rapidly by 12 h and then remained constant. Hydrated lime was the only treatment that significantly reduced bacterial counts on both mattresses and teat ends, but it caused some skin irritation.

  13. Air suctioning during colon biopsy forceps removal reduces bacterial air contamination in the endoscopy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, S R; Tutuian, R; Imhof, A; Wildi, S; Gubler, C; Fruehauf, H; Ruef, C; Schoepfer, A M; Fried, M

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of endoscopy suites is of concern; however studies evaluating bacterial aerosols are lacking. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of air suctioning during removal of biopsy forceps in reducing bacterial air contamination. This was a prospective single-blinded trial involving 50 patients who were undergoing elective nontherapeutic colonoscopy. During colonoscopy, endoscopists removed the biopsy forceps first without and then with suctioning following contact with the sigmoid mucosa. A total of 50 L of air was collected continuously for 30 seconds at 30-cm distance from the biopsy channel valve of the colonoscope, with time starting at forceps removal. Airborne bacteria were collected by an impactor air sampler (MAS-100). Standard Petri dishes with CNA blood agar were used to culture Gram-positive bacteria. Main outcome measure was the bacterial load in endoscopy room air. At the beginning and end of the daily colonoscopy program, the median (and interquartile [IQR] range) bioaerosol burden was 4 colony forming units (CFU)/m (3) (IQR 3 - 6) and 16 CFU/m (3) (IQR 13 - 18), respectively. Air suctioning during removal of the biopsy forceps reduced the bioaerosol burden from a median of 14 CFU/m (3) (IQR 11 - 29) to a median of 7 CFU/m (3) (IQR 4 - 16) ( P = 0.0001). Predominantly enterococci were identified on the agar plates. The bacterial aerosol burden during handling of biopsy forceps can be reduced by applying air suction while removing the forceps. This simple method may reduce transmission of infectious agents during gastrointestinal endoscopies. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  14. Metal-Microbial Interactions in Toronto Sunnyside Beach: Impact on Water Quality and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plach, J. M.; Elliott, A.; Warren, L. A.

    2009-05-01

    Assessing recreational water quality requires a fundamental understanding of metal-microbial interactions and the key biogeochemical processes occurring in urban public beaches. Metals play an important role in the distribution and virulence (e.g. resistance) of microorganisms in water systems. In turn, microorganisms have a significant influence on metal cycling, thus affecting metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Bacteria adhere to floc, small suspended mineral-bacterial aggregates, in aquatic systems resulting in high-density floc-associated bacterial biofilm communities. These nanoparticulate bacterial microhabitats are important environmental sinks for metals and potential reservoirs for antibiotic resistant and pathogenic bacteria. The objectives of this study are to identify and quantify (1) metal distributions among suspended floc, bed sediment and water-column aqueous compartments (2) important biogeochemical processes influencing metal cycling and (3) linkages between floc metals and the occurrence of floc associated antibiotic resistant bacteria and pathogens across a series of variably contaminated aquatic systems. Results of this project will provide new diagnostic indicators of pathogens in recreational water systems and aid in the development of public health policies to improve water quality and reduce water borne infectious disease. Here, results will be presented assessing the metal and microbial community dynamics in samples collected from Toronto's Sunnyside Beach (May 13 and August 20), an urban public beach on Lake Ontario. Water column, floc and bed sediments near and offshore were analyzed for physico-chemical characteristics and metal concentrations. Floc were imaged using DAPI and FISH to assess microbial community structure. Results to date, characterizing the linkages amongst bacteria, metal contaminant concentrations and sediment partitioning and system physico-chemical conditions will be discussed.

  15. Removal heavy metals and sulphate from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnierová Mária

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the process of bacterial sulphate reduction, which is used to removal of heavy metals and sulphate ions from waste waters.The life of animals and plants depends on the existence of microscopic organisms – microorganisms (MO, which play an important role in cycle changes of biogenic elements on the earth. The sulphur cycle in the nature is considered as one of the oldest and most significant biological systems (Fig. 1. The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB miss the assimilatory part of the cycle and produce sulphides. The microbial population of this dissimilatory part is called “sulfuretum”. The SRB can be found in anaerobic mud and sediments of freshwater, thermal or non-thermal sulphur springs, mining waters from sulphide deposits, oil deposits, sea and ocean beds, and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals. The SRB represent a group of chemoorganotrophic, strictly anaerobic and gramnegative bacteria, which exhibit a great morphological and physiological diversity. Despite of their considerable morphological variety, they have one property in common, which is the ability to utilise preferentially sulphates (occasionally sulphites, thiosulphates, tetrathionates as electron acceptors, which are reduced to sulphides, during anaerobic respiration. The electron donors in these processes are simple organic compounds as lactate, malate, etc.,(heterotrophically reduction or gaseous hydrogen (autotrophically reduction. SRB can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulphide, which reacts easily in aqueous solution with the cations of heavy metals, forming metal sulphides that have low solubility. The bacterial sulphate reduction can be used for the treatment of acid mine drainage waters, which is considered to be the major problem associated with mining activities.In order to remove heavy metals from waste waters, e.g., from galvanizing plants, mine waters (Smolnik, Šobov locality and metallurgic plants (works

  16. Baby Shampoo Versus Povidone-Iodine or Isopropyl Alcohol in Reducing Eyelid Skin Bacterial Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Giancarlo A; Nguyen, Christine V; Yonkers, Marc A; Tao, Jeremiah P

    Baby shampoo is used as an alternative surgical skin preparation, but the evidence supporting its use is scarce with no descriptions of efficacy in the periocular region. The authors compare the efficacy of baby shampoo, povidone-iodine (PI, Betadine) and isopropyl alcohol (IA) in reducing eyelid skin bacterial load. Prospective, randomized, comparative, and interventional trial. Bacterial load on adult, human eyelid skin was quantitated before and after cleansing with 1) dilute baby shampoo, 2) 10% PI, or 3) 70% IA. Paired skin swabs were collected from a 1 cm area of the upper eyelid of subjects before and after a standardized surgical scrub technique. Samples were cultured on 5% sheep blood agar for 24 hours. The number of colony forming units (CFU) was assessed and bacterial load per square centimeter of eyelid skin was quantified. Baseline and postcleansing samples were assessed from 42 eyelids of 42 subjects (n = 14 for each of baby shampoo, PI, and IA). Before cleansing, similar amounts of bacterial flora were grown from all specimens (median log CFU/cm = 2.04 before baby shampoo, 2.01 before PI, 2.11 before IA; p > 0.05). All 3 cleansing agents significantly reduced the bacterial load (p shampoo, 0.39 after PI, 0.59 after IA; p > 0.05). Change from baseline in bacterial load was statistically similar for all 3 agents (median reduction in log CFU/cm = 1.28 with baby shampoo, 1.57 with PI, 1.40 with IA; p > 0.05). These corresponded to bacterial load reductions of 96.3%, 96.6%, and 98.4% for baby shampoo, PI, and IA, respectively. Baby shampoo achieved comparable diminution in eyelid skin bacterial load to PI or IA. These data suggest baby shampoo may be an effective preoperative cleansing agent.

  17. Reduced material model for closed cell metal foam infiltrated with phase change material based on high resolution numerical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsenbrügge, Christoph; Marth, Wieland; Navarro y de Sosa, Iñaki; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Voigt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Closed cell metal foam sandwich structures were investigated. • High resolution numerical studies were conducted using CT scan data. • A reduced model for use in commercial FE software reduces needed degrees of freedom. • Thermal inertia is increased about 4 to 5 times in PCM filled structures. • The reduced material model was verified using experimental data. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of closed cell metal foam infiltrated with paraffin wax as latent heat storage for application in high precision tool machines was examined. Aluminium foam sandwiches with metallically bound cover layers were prepared in a powder metallurgical process and cross-sectional images of the structures were generated with X-ray computed tomography. Based on the image data a three dimensional highly detailed model was derived and prepared for simulation with the adaptive FE-library AMDiS. The pores were assumed to be filled with paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity and the transient thermal behaviour in the phase-change region were investigated. Based on the results from the highly detailed simulations a reduced model for use in commercial FE-software (ANSYS) was derived. It incorporates the properties of the matrix and the phase change material into a homogenized material. A sandwich-structure with and without paraffin was investigated experimentally under constant thermal load. The results were used to verify the reduced material model in ANSYS.

  18. Heavy metal speciation in solid-phase materials from a bacterial sulfate reducing bioreactor using sequential extraction procedure combined with acid volatile sulfide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-04-01

    Heavy metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity depends largely on the chemical form of metals and ultimately determines potential for environmental pollution. For this reason, determining the chemical form of heavy metals and metalloids, immobilized in sludges by biological mediated sulfate reduction, is important to evaluate their mobility and bioavailability. A modified Tessier sequential extraction procedure (SEP), complemented with acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneous extracted metals (SEM) measurements, were applied to determine the partitioning of five heavy metals (defined as Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu, and the metalloid As) in anoxic solid-phase material (ASM) from an anaerobic, sulfate reducing bioreactor into six operationally defined fractions. These fractions were water soluble, exchangeable, bound to carbonates (acid soluble), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (reducible), bound to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable) and residual. It was found that the distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Cu and As in ASM was strongly influenced by its association with the above solid fractions. The fraction corresponding to organic matter and sulfides appeared to be the most important scavenging phases of As, Fe, Ni, Zn and Cu in ASM (59.8-86.7%). This result was supported by AVS and SEM (Sigma Zn, Ni and Cu) measurements, which indicated that the heavy metals existed overwhelmingly as sulfides in the organic matter and sulfide fraction. A substantial amount of Fe and Ni at 16.4 and 20.1%, respectively, were also present in the carbonate fraction, while an appreciable portion of As (18.3%) and Zn (19.4%) was bound to Fe-Mn oxides. A significant amount of heavy metals was also associated with the residual fraction, ranging from 2.1% for Zn to 18.8% for As. Based on the average total extractable heavy metal (TEHM) values, the concentration of heavy metals in the ASM was in the order of Cu > Ni > Zn > Fe > As. If the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals are assumed to be

  19. Advanced Copper Composites Against Copper-Tolerant Xanthomonas perforans and Tomato Bacterial Spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer-Scherer, A; Liao, Y Y; Young, M; Ritchie, L; Vallad, G E; Santra, S; Freeman, J H; Clark, D; Jones, J B; Paret, M L

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a widespread and damaging bacterial disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). For disease management, growers rely on copper bactericides, which are often ineffective due to the presence of copper-tolerant Xanthomonas strains. This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of the new copper composites core-shell copper (CS-Cu), multivalent copper (MV-Cu), and fixed quaternary ammonium copper (FQ-Cu) as potential alternatives to commercially available micron-sized copper bactericides for controlling copper-tolerant Xanthomonas perforans. In vitro, metallic copper from CS-Cu and FQ-Cu at 100 μg/ml killed the copper-tolerant X. perforans strain within 1 h of exposure. In contrast, none of the micron-sized copper rates (100 to 1,000 μg/ml) from Kocide 3000 significantly reduced copper-tolerant X. perforans populations after 48 h of exposure compared with the water control (P copper-based treatments killed the copper-sensitive X. perforans strain within 1 h. Greenhouse studies demonstrated that all copper composites significantly reduced bacterial spot disease severity when compared with copper-mancozeb and water controls (P copper composites significantly reduced disease severity when compared with water controls, using 80% less metallic copper in comparison with copper-mancozeb in field studies (P copper composites have the potential to manage copper-tolerant X. perforans and tomato bacterial spot.

  20. MetalS2: a tool for the structural alignment of minimal functional sites in metal-binding proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Rosato, Antonio; Valasatava, Yana

    2013-11-25

    We developed a new software tool, MetalS(2), for the structural alignment of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs) in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. On our example data sets, MetalS(2) unveiled structural similarities that other programs for protein structure comparison do not consistently point out and overall identified a larger number of structurally similar MFSs. MetalS(2) supports the comparison of MFSs harboring different metals and/or with different nuclearity and is available both as a stand-alone program and a Web tool ( http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals2/).

  1. Development of protein based bioremediation and drugs for heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2001-09-18

    Structural studies were performed on several proteins of the bacterial detoxification system. These proteins are responsible for binding (MerP) and transport of heavy metals, including mercury, across membranes. The structural information obtained from NMR experiments provides insight into the selectivity and sequestration processes towards heavy metal toxins.

  2. Raising quality of maintenance and control of metallic structures in large-load technological machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygin, M. Yu; Kuryshkin, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    Active growth of coal extraction and underinvestment of coal mining in Russia lead to the fact that technical state of more than 86% of technological machines at opencast coal mines is unacceptable. One of the most significant problems is unacceptable state of supporting metallic structures of excavators and mine dump trucks. The analysis has shown that defects in these metallic structures had been accumulated for a long time. Their removal by the existing method of repair welding was not effective - the flaws reappeared in 2-6 months of technological machines’ service. The authors detected the prime causes that did not allow to make a good repair welding joint. A new technology of repair welding had been tested and endorsed, and this allowed to reduce the number of welded joints’ flaws by 85% without additional raising welders’ qualification. As a result the number of flaws in metallic structures of the equipment had been reduced by 35 % as early as in the first year of using the new technology.

  3. BACTERIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS IN WASTE OILY EMULSIONS FROM THE METAL-PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kaszycki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oil-containing wastewaters are regarded as main industrial pollutants of soil and water environments. They can occur as free-floating oil, unstable or stable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions, and in the case of extreme organic load, as water-in-oil (W/O emulsions. In this study two types of oily effluents, a typical O/W emulsion marked as E1 and a W/O emulsion E2, both discharged by local metal processing plants were examined to test their toxicity to microbial communities and the ability to serve as nutrient sources for bacterial growth. The organic contaminant load of the samples was evaluated on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD parameter values and was equal to 48 200 mg O2·dm-3 and >300 000 mg O2·dm-3 for E1 and E2, respectively.Both emulsions proved to be non toxic to bacterial communities and were shown to contain biodiverse autochthonous microflora consisting of several bacterial strains adapted to the presence of xenobiotics (the total of 1.36 · 106 CFU·cm-3 and 1.72 · 105 CFU·cm-3 was determined for E1 and E2, respectively. These indigenous bacteria as well as exogenously inoculated specialized allochthonous microorganisms were biostimulated so as to proliferate within the wastewater environment whose organic content served as the only source of carbon. The most favorable cultivation conditions were determined as fully aerobic growth at the temperature of 25 ºC. In 9 to 18 day-tests, autochthonous as well as bioaugmented allochthonous bacterial population dynamics were monitored. For both emulsions tested there was a dramatic increase (up to three orders of magnitude in bacterial frequency, as compared to the respective initial values. The resultant high biomass densities suggest that the effluents are susceptible to bioremediation. A preliminary xenobiotic biodegradation test confirmed that mixed auto- and allochthonous bacterial consortia obtained upon inoculation of the samples with microbiocenoses preselected for efficient

  4. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007–2014 of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8, near-neutral (pH 6.8 or alkaline (pH 8.4 Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (% of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%, Actinobacteria (19.7%, Chloroflexi (15.3% and Acidobacteria (12.6%; the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%, Planctomycetes (4.8%, Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%, Firmicutes (3.4%, Cyanobacteria (2.1%, Nitrospirae (1.8%, and candidate division TM7 (1

  5. Fertilization Shapes Bacterial Community Structure by Alteration of Soil pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuting; Shen, Hong; He, Xinhua; Thomas, Ben W; Lupwayi, Newton Z; Hao, Xiying; Thomas, Matthew C; Shi, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Application of chemical fertilizer or manure can affect soil microorganisms directly by supplying nutrients and indirectly by altering soil pH. However, it remains uncertain which effect mostly shapes microbial community structure. We determined soil bacterial diversity and community structure by 454 pyrosequencing the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes after 7-years (2007-2014) of applying chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) fertilizers, composted manure or their combination to acidic (pH 5.8), near-neutral (pH 6.8) or alkaline (pH 8.4) Eutric Regosol soil in a maize-vegetable rotation in southwest China. In alkaline soil, nutrient sources did not affect bacterial Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) richness or Shannon diversity index, despite higher available N, P, K, and soil organic carbon in fertilized than in unfertilized soil. In contrast, bacterial OTU richness and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower in acidic and near-neutral soils under NPK than under manure or their combination, which corresponded with changes in soil pH. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance showed that bacterial community structure was significantly affected across these three soils, but the PCoA ordination patterns indicated the effect was less distinct among nutrient sources in alkaline than in acidic and near-neural soils. Distance-based redundancy analysis showed that bacterial community structures were significantly altered by soil pH in acidic and near-neutral soils, but not by any soil chemical properties in alkaline soil. The relative abundance (%) of most bacterial phyla was higher in near-neutral than in acidic or alkaline soils. The most dominant phyla were Proteobacteria (24.6%), Actinobacteria (19.7%), Chloroflexi (15.3%) and Acidobacteria (12.6%); the medium dominant phyla were Bacterioidetes (5.3%), Planctomycetes (4.8%), Gemmatimonadetes (4.5%), Firmicutes (3.4%), Cyanobacteria (2.1%), Nitrospirae (1.8%), and candidate division TM7 (1

  6. Temporal evolution of bacterial communities associated with the in situ wetland-based remediation of a marine shore porphyry copper tailings deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaby, N; Dold, B; Rohrbach, E; Holliger, C; Rossi, P

    2015-11-15

    Mine tailings are a serious threat to the environment and public health. Remediation of these residues can be carried out effectively by the activation of specific microbial processes. This article presents detailed information about temporal changes in bacterial community composition during the remediation of a section of porphyry copper tailings deposited on the Bahía de Ite shoreline (Peru). An experimental remediation cell was flooded and transformed into a wetland in order to prevent oxidation processes, immobilizing metals. Initially, the top oxidation zone of the tailings deposit displayed a low pH (3.1) and high concentrations of metals, sulfate, and chloride, in a sandy grain size geological matrix. This habitat was dominated by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria, such as Leptospirillum spp., Acidithiobacillus spp., and Sulfobacillus spp., in a microbial community which structure resembled acid mine drainage environments. After wetland implementation, the cell was water-saturated, the acidity was consumed and metals dropped to a fraction of their initial respective concentrations. Bacterial communities analyzed by massive sequencing showed time-dependent changes both in composition and cell numbers. The final remediation stage was characterized by the highest bacterial diversity and evenness. Aside from classical sulfate reducers from the phyla δ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, community structure comprised taxa derived from very diverse habitats. The community was also characterized by an elevated proportion of rare phyla and unaffiliated sequences. Numerical ecology analysis confirmed that the temporal population evolution was driven by pH, redox, and K. Results of this study demonstrated the usefulness of a detailed follow-up of the remediation process, not only for the elucidation of the communities gradually switching from autotrophic, oxidizing to heterotrophic and reducing living conditions, but also for the long term management of the remediation

  7. Efficiency of temporary storage of geothermal waters in a lake system: Monitoring the changes of water quality and bacterial community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Kosáros, Tünde; Janurik, Endre; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2017-12-01

    Disposal of used geothermal waters in Hungary often means temporary storage in reservoir lakes to reduce temperature and improve water quality. In this study, the physical and chemical properties and changes in the bacterial community structure of a reservoir lake system in southeast region of Hungary were monitored and compared through 2 years, respectively. The values of biological oxygen demand, concentrations of ammonium ion, total inorganic nitrogen, total phosphorous, and total phenol decreased, whereas oxygen saturation, total organic nitrogen, pH, and conductivity increased during the storage period. Bacterial community structure of water and sediment samples was compared by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) following the amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. According to the DGGE patterns, greater seasonal than spatial differences of bacterial communities were revealed in both water and sediment of the lakes. Representatives of the genera Arthrospira and Anabaenopsis (cyanobacteria) were identified as permanent and dominant members of the bacterial communities.

  8. Moxifloxacin superior to cefuroxime in reducing bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis on hydrophobic intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbouzid, Fathalah; Kodjikian, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Renaud, François; Baillif, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    To compare the anti-adhesive effect of cefuroxime and moxifloxacin on the primary attachment phase of Staphylococcus epidermidis on hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs). Forty hydrophobic acrylic IOLs were used. Two groups of IOLs were soaked in a moxifloxacin (Mox-T1: 0.5 mg/0.1 ml) or a cefuroxime (Cef-T1: cefuroxime 1 mg/0.1 ml) solution before incubation in a S. epidermidis bacterial suspension. Two other groups were incubated in the bacterial suspension before antibiotics (Cef-T2 and Mox-T2) were added. The control group (Ctrl) consisted of IOLs incubated in the bacterial suspension. After incubation, IOLs were sonicated and vortexed. The resultant suspension was spread over a nutritive agar plate. Bacterial colonies were counted after 24 hr of incubation. Mean number of colony-forming units per IOL was Cef-T1: 184 × 10(3) (SE: 5.24; SD: 28.21), Cef-T2: 117 × 10(3) (SE: 5.74; SD: 30.37), Mox-T1: 1.27 × 10(3) (SE: 0.12; SD: 0.61), Mox-T2: 25 × 10(3) (SE:1.98; SD: 9.72) and Ctrl: 361 × 10(3) (SE: 26.9; SD: 107.6). The number of adhering bacteria did not vary whether cefuroxime was added before or after IOL incubation in the bacterial suspension (p = 0.132). Moxifloxacin was more effective in reducing the number of adhering bacteria when used before IOL incubation (p < 0.001). Overall for T1 and T2, moxifloxacin was more effective than cefuroxime in reducing bacterial adhesion on IOLs (p < 0.001). Moxifloxacin and cefuroxime significantly reduced S. epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic acrylic IOLs. The anti-adhesive effect was superior with moxifloxacin. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Construction of Zn-incorporated multilayer films to promote osteoblasts growth and reduce bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng, E-mail: liupeng79@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhang [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ding, Hongyan [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian, Jiangsu Province 223003 (China); Hu, Yan; Yang, Weihu [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cai, Kaiyong, E-mail: kaiyong_cai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-06-01

    To improve the biological performance of titanium substrates, a bioactive multilayered structure of chitosan/gelatin pair, containing zinc ions, was constructed via a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. The successful preparation of zinc ions incorporated multilayer films was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements, respectively. The biological behaviors of osteoblasts adhered to modified Ti substrates were investigated in vitro via cytoskeleton observation, cell viability measurement, and alkaline phosphatase activity assay. The cytocompatibility evaluation verified that the present system was capable of promoting the growth of osteoblasts. In addition, Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria were used to evaluate antibacterial property of modified Ti substrates. Bacterial adhesion and viability assay confirmed that Zn-loaded multilayer films were able to inhibit the adhesion and growth of bacteria. The approach presented here affords an alternative to reduce bacterial infection and promote osteoblast growth for titanium-based implants. - Highlights: • Polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing Zn ions were fabricated on Ti substrate. • Modified Ti substrate stimulated the biological responses of osteoblast. • Antibacterial property of Ti substrate was significantly improved. • The resulting material thus has potential application in orthopedic field.

  10. Crystal structure of actinide metals at high compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, L.; Soederlind, P.

    1995-08-01

    The crystal structures of some light actinide metals are studied theoretically as a function of applied pressure. The first principles electronic structure theory is formulated in the framework of density functional theory, with the gradient corrected local density approximation of the exchange-correlation functional. The light actinide metals are shown to be well described as itinerant (metallic) f-electron metals and generally, they display a crystal structure which have, in agreement with previous theoretical suggestions, increasing degree of symmetry and closed-packing upon compression. The theoretical calculations agree well with available experimental data. At very high compression, the theory predicts closed-packed structures such as the fcc or the hcp structures or the nearly closed-packed bcc structure for the light actinide metals. A simple canonical band picture is presented to explain in which particular closed-packed form these metals will crystallize at ultra-high pressure

  11. Aided phytostabilisation reduces metal toxicity, improves soil fertility and enhances microbial activity in Cu-rich mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touceda-González, M; Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, Á; Rodríguez-Garrido, B; Trasar-Cepeda, C; Mench, M; Puschenreiter, M; Quintela-Sabarís, C; Macías-García, F; Kidd, P S

    2017-01-15

    (Aided) phytostabilisation has been proposed as a suitable technique to decrease the environmental risks associated with metal(loid)-enriched mine tailings. Field scale evaluations are needed for demonstrating their effectiveness in the medium- to long-term. A field trial was implemented in spring 2011 in Cu-rich mine tailings in the NW of Spain. The tailings were amended with composted municipal solid wastes and planted with Salix spp., Populus nigra L. or Agrostis capillaris L. cv. Highland. Plant growth, nutritive status and metal accumulation, and soil physico- and bio-chemical properties, were monitored over three years (four years for plant growth). The total bacterial community, α- and β-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Streptomycetaceae were studied by DGGE of 16s rDNA fragments. Compost amendment improved soil properties such as pH, CEC and fertility, and decreased soil Cu availability, leading to the establishment of a healthy vegetation cover. Both compost-amendment and plant root activity stimulated soil enzyme activities and induced important shifts in the bacterial community structure over time. The woody plant, S. viminalis, and the grassy species, A. capillaris, showed the best results in terms of plant growth and biomass production. The beneficial effects of the phytostabilisation process were maintained at least three years after treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation, characterization, and aggregation of a structured bacterial matrix precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Liraz; Romero, Diego; Kayatekin, Can; Akabayov, Barak; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-06-14

    Biofilms are surface-associated groups of microbial cells that are embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is a network of biopolymers, mainly polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. ECM proteins serve a variety of structural roles and often form amyloid-like fibers. Despite the extensive study of the formation of amyloid fibers from their constituent subunits in humans, much less is known about the assembly of bacterial functional amyloid-like precursors into fibers. Using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopy, we show that our unique purification method of a Bacillus subtilis major matrix protein component results in stable oligomers that retain their native α-helical structure. The stability of these oligomers enabled us to control the external conditions that triggered their aggregation. In particular, we show that stretched fibers are formed on a hydrophobic surface, whereas plaque-like aggregates are formed in solution under acidic pH conditions. TasA is also shown to change conformation upon aggregation and gain some β-sheet structure. Our studies of the aggregation of a bacterial matrix protein from its subunits shed new light on assembly processes of the ECM within bacterial biofilms.

  13. Evolving Structural Diversity and Metallicity in Compressed Lithium Azide

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-10-10

    In pursuit of new stable nitrogen-rich phases and of a possible insulator-metal transition, the ground-state electronic structure of lithium azide, LiN3, is investigated from 1 atm to 300 GPa (∼2-fold compression) using evolutionary crystal structure exploration methods coupled with density functional theoretical calculations. Two new LiN3 phases, containing slightly reduced and well-separated N2 units, are found to be enthalpically competitive with the known lithium azide crystal structure at 1 atm. At pressures above 36 GPa nitrogen-rich assemblies begin to evolve. These incorporate NN bond formation beyond that in N2 or N3 -. N6 rings and infinite one-dimensional linear nitrogen chains (structural analogues to polyacetylene) appear. Above 200 GPa quasi-one- and two-dimensional extended puckered hexagonal and decagonal nitrogen layers emerge. The high-pressure phase featuring linear chains may be quenchable to P = 1 atm. With increasing pressure the progression in electrical conductivity is from insulator to metal. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  15. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  16. The disruptive effect of lysozyme on the bacterial cell wall explored by an in-silico structural outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Emiliano D; Otero, Lisandro H; Ruiz, Francisco; Klinke, Sebastián; Giordano, Walter

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, a structural unit of peptidoglycan polymer comprised of glycan strands consisting of a repeating disaccharide motif [N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuramylpentapeptide (NAM pentapeptide)], encases bacteria and provides structural integrity and protection. Lysozymes are enzymes that break down the bacterial cell wall and disrupt the bacterial life cycle by cleaving the linkage between the NAG and NAM carbohydrates. Lab exercises focused on the effects of lysozyme on the bacterial cell wall are frequently incorporated in biochemistry classes designed for undergraduate students in diverse fields as biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, medicine, and veterinary medicine. Such exercises typically do not include structural data. We describe here a sequence of computer tasks designed to illustrate and reinforce both physiological and structural concepts involved in lysozyme effects on the bacterial cell-wall structure. This lab class usually lasts 3.5 hours. First, the instructor presents introductory concepts of the bacterial cell wall and the effect of lysozyme on its structure. Then, students are taught to use computer modeling to visualize the three-dimensional structure of a lysozyme in complex with bacterial cell-wall fragments. Finally, the lysozyme inhibitory effect on a bacterial culture is optionally proposed as a simple microbiological assay. The computer lab exercises described here give students a realistic understanding of the disruptive effect of lysozymes on the bacterial cell wall, a crucial component in bacterial survival. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):83-90, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Antonyuk, Lyudmila P.; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Kulikov, Leonid A.; Perfiliev, Yurii D.; Polissiou, Moschos G.; Gardiner, Philip H.E.

    2006-01-01

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with 57 Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour

  18. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru; Tugarova, Anna V. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, Lyudmila P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Tarantilis, Petros A. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Kulikov, Leonid A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perfiliev, Yurii D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polissiou, Moschos G. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Gardiner, Philip H.E. [Division of Chemistry, School of Science and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-28

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour.

  19. Structured attachment of bacterial molecular motors for defined microflow induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerdemann Mike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial rotational motor complexes that propel flagellated bacteria possess unique properties like their size of a few nanometres and the ability of selfreproduction that have led to various exciting applications including biohybrid nano-machines. One mandatory prerequisite to utilize bacterial nano motors in fluid applications is the ability to transfer force and torque to the fluid, which usually can be achieved by attachment of the bacterial cell to adequate surfaces. Additionally, for optimal transfer of force or torque, precise control of the position down to the single cell level is of utmost importance. Based on a PIV (particle image velocimetry evaluation of the induced flow of single bacteria,we propose and demonstrate attachment of arbitrary patterns of motile bacterial cells in a fast light-based two-step process for the first time to our knowledge. First, these cells are pre-structured by holographic optical tweezers and then attached to a homogeneous, polystyrene-coated surface. In contrast to the few approaches that have been implemented up to now and which rely on pre-structured surfaces, our scheme allows for precise control on a single bacterium level, is versatile, interactive and has low requirements with respect to the surface preparation.

  20. Microbial community composition and functions are resilient to metal pollution along two forest soil gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbad, Hamed; Niklińska, Maria; Laskowski, Ryszard; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Wen, Chongqing; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the global importance of forests, it is virtually unknown how their soil microbial communities adapt at the phylogenetic and functional level to long-term metal pollution. Studying 12 sites located along two distinct gradients of metal pollution in Southern Poland revealed that functional potential and diversity (assessed using GeoChip 4.2) were highly similar across the gradients despite drastically diverging metal contamination levels. Metal pollution level did, however, significantly impact bacterial community structure (as shown by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes), but not bacterial taxon richness and community composition. Metal pollution caused changes in the relative abundance of specific bacterial taxa, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria. Also, a group of metal-resistance genes showed significant correlations with metal concentrations in soil. Our study showed that microbial communities are resilient to metal pollution; despite differences in community structure, no clear impact of metal pollution levels on overall functional diversity was observed. While screens of phylogenetic marker genes, such as 16S rRNA genes, provide only limited insight into resilience mechanisms, analysis of specific functional genes, e.g. involved in metal resistance, appears to be a more promising strategy. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Microbial impact on metallic corrosion processes: case of iron reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnault, Loic; Jullien, Michel; Libert, Marie; Mustin, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. French concept of deep disposal of nuclear waste is based on a multi-barrier system with a metal container and a clayey host rock as last natural barrier for radionuclides confinement and to avoid their migration in the environment. One of the most important criteria for the safety assessment concerns the life time of metal containers. In this deep environment (elevated pressure and temperature, low water content) many factors may induce an alteration and modification of metal containers properties through corrosion processes. Two types of reactions are currently studied First, the anaerobic aqueous corrosion (a) which is depending on the amount of water available and the second is clayey corrosion (b) by an oxidation of structural Iron(III) or clay's H + on Fe(0) of metal containers. - Fe 0 + 2H 2 O → Fe 2+ + 2OH - + H 2 (a) - Fe 0 + 2H + argile → Fe 2+ solution + H 2 (b) - Fe 0 + Fe 3+ argile → Fe 2+ solution + Fe 2+ argile (b) These processes will entail different reaction products: first, we observe formation of corrosion products like aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite, hematite like mineral. These new minerals inhibit aqueous corrosion by the formation of a passivation process. For the second process, we observe a transformation of smectites into iron-rich serpentine-type minerals. These phenomenons will be responsible for a potential loss of confinement properties such as release of radionuclides, swelling and capacity to cations exchange. Moreover, since the discovery of microorganisms in deep clayey environment or in bentonite used as swelling clay. A new corrosion parameter 'biological one inducing bio-corrosion process' must be taken into account and has to be investigated to improve geochemical prediction on the sustainability of containers in geological disposal. - Impact of microorganisms has to be focused in term of bio-corrosion and more precisely on an indirect corrosion through the

  2. Photoluminescence emission from Alq3 organic layer in metal–Alq3–metal plasmonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Liao, Chung-Chi [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Fan, Wan-Ting [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jin-Han; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Yi-Ping; Li, Jung-Yu; Chen, Shih-Pu [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), 195, Sec. 4, Chung-Hsin Road, Chutung 310, Taiwan (China); Ke, Wen-Cheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Tao-Yuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Nai-Chuan, E-mail: ncchen001@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-01

    The emission properties of an organic layer embedded in a metal–organic–metal (MOM) structure were investigated. A partially radiative odd-SPW as well as a non-radiative even-SPW modes are supported by hybridization of the SPW modes on the opposite organic/metal interface in the structure. Because of the competition by this radiative SPW, the population of excitons that recombine to form non-radiative SPW should be reduced. This may account for why the photoluminescence intensity of the MOM sample is higher than that of an organic–metal sample even though the MOM sample has an additional metal layer that should intuitively act as a filter.

  3. Abutment Coating With Diamond-Like Carbon Films to Reduce Implant-Abutment Bacterial Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mayra; Sangalli, Jorgiana; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2016-02-01

    The influence of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on bacterial leakage through the interface between abutments and dental implants of external hexagon (EH) and internal hexagon (IH) designs was evaluated. Film deposition was performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Sets of implants and abutments (n = 30 per group, sets of 180 implants) were divided according to connection design and treatment of the abutment base: 1) no treatment (control); 2) DLC film deposition; and 3) Ag-DLC film deposition. Under sterile conditions, 1 μL Enterococcus faecalis was inoculated inside the implants, and abutments were tightened. The sets were tested for immediate external contamination, suspended in test tubes containing sterile culture broth, and followed for 5 days. Turbidity of the broth indicated bacterial leakage. At the end of the period, the abutments were removed and the internal content of the implants was collected with paper points and plated in Petri dishes. After 24-hour incubation, they were assessed for bacterial viability and colony-forming unit counting. Bacterial leakage was analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests (α = 5%). The percentage of bacterial leakage was 16.09% for EH implants and 80.71% for IH implants (P DLC and Ag-DLC films do not significantly reduce the frequency of bacterial leakage and bacteria load inside the implants.

  4. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlind, Per; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Wills, J. M.; Boring, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    THE crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades1. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry-tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high-and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all of these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression.

  5. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlind, P.; Eriksson, O.; Johansson, B.; Wills, J.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry -tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high- and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression. (author)

  6. Ex situ formation of metal selenide quantum dots using bacterially derived selenide precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellowes, J W; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Charnock, J M; Coker, V S; Mosselmans, J F W; Weng, T-C; Pearce, C I

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent quantum dots were synthesized using bacterially derived selenide (Se II− ) as the precursor. Biogenic Se II− was produced by the reduction of Se IV by Veillonella atypica and compared directly against borohydride-reduced Se IV for the production of glutathione-stabilized CdSe and β-mercaptoethanol-stabilized ZnSe nanoparticles by aqueous synthesis. Biological Se II− formed smaller, narrower size distributed QDs under the same conditions. The growth kinetics of biologically sourced CdSe phases were slower. The proteins isolated from filter sterilized biogenic Se II− included a methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase previously characterized in the closely related Veillonella parvula. XAS analysis of the glutathione-capped CdSe at the S K-edge suggested that sulfur from the glutathione was structurally incorporated within the CdSe. A novel synchrotron based XAS technique was also developed to follow the nucleation of biological and inorganic selenide phases, and showed that biogenic Se II− is more stable and more resistant to beam-induced oxidative damage than its inorganic counterpart. The bacterial production of quantum dot precursors offers an alternative, ‘green’ synthesis technique that negates the requirement of expensive, toxic chemicals and suggests a possible link to the exploitation of selenium contaminated waste streams. (paper)

  7. Ex Situ Formation of Metal Selenide Quantum Dots Using Bacterially Derived Selenide Precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellowes, Jonathan W.; Pattrick, Richard; Lloyd, Jon; Charnock, John M.; Coker, Victoria S.; Mosselmans, JFW; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pearce, Carolyn I.

    2013-04-12

    Luminescent quantum dots were synthesized using bacterially derived selenide (SeII-) as the precursor. Biogenic SeII- was produced by the reduction of Se-IV by Veillonella atypica and compared directly against borohydride-reduced Se-IV for the production of glutathione-stabilized CdSe and beta-mercaptoethanol-stabilized ZnSe nanoparticles by aqueous synthesis. Biological SeII- formed smaller, narrower size distributed QDs under the same conditions. The growth kinetics of biologically sourced CdSe phases were slower. The proteins isolated from filter sterilized biogenic SeII- included a methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase previously characterized in the closely related Veillonella parvula. XAS analysis of the glutathione-capped CdSe at the S K-edge suggested that sulfur from the glutathione was structurally incorporated within the CdSe. A novel synchrotron based XAS technique was also developed to follow the nucleation of biological and inorganic selenide phases, and showed that biogenic SeII- is more stable and more resistant to beam-induced oxidative damage than its inorganic counterpart. The bacterial production of quantum dot precursors offers an alternative, 'green' synthesis technique that negates the requirement of expensive, toxic chemicals and suggests a possible link to the exploitation of selenium contaminated waste streams.

  8. Effect of metal oxide nanoparticles on microbial community structure and function in two different soil types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Frenk

    Full Text Available Increased availability of nanoparticle-based products will, inevitably, expose the environment to these materials. Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs may thus find their way into the soil environment via wastewater, dumpsters and other anthropogenic sources; metallic oxide nanoparticles comprise one group of ENPs that could potentially be hazardous for the environment. Because the soil bacterial community is a major service provider for the ecosystem and humankind, it is critical to study the effects of ENP exposure on soil bacteria. These effects were evaluated by measuring bacterial community activity, composition and size following exposure to copper oxide (CuO and magnetite (Fe3O4 nanosized (<50 nm particles. Two different soil types were examined: a sandy loam (Bet-Dagan and a sandy clay loam (Yatir, under two ENP concentrations (1%, 0.1%. Results indicate that the bacterial community in Bet-Dagan soil was more susceptible to change due to exposure to these ENPs, relative to Yatir soil. More specifically, CuO had a strong effect on bacterial hydrolytic activity, oxidative potential, community composition and size in Bet-Dagan soil. Few effects were noted in the Yatir soil, although 1% CuO exposure did cause a significant decreased oxidative potential and changes to community composition. Fe3O4 changed the hydrolytic activity and bacterial community composition in Bet-Dagan soil but did not affect the Yatir soil bacterial community. Furthermore, in Bet-Dagan soil, abundance of bacteria annotated to OTUs from the Bacilli class decreased after addition of 0.1% CuO but increased with 1% CuO, while in Yatir soil their abundance was reduced with 1% CuO. Other important soil bacterial groups, including Rhizobiales and Sphingobacteriaceae, were negatively affected by CuO addition to soil. These results indicate that both ENPs are potentially harmful to soil environments. Furthermore, it is suggested that the clay fraction and organic matter in

  9. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi, E-mail: shilpi@dbeb.iitd.ac.in

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture.

  10. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture

  11. Effects of farmhouse hotel and paper mill effluents on bacterial community structures in sediment and surface water of Nanxi River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The pyrosequencing technique was used to evaluate bacterial community structures in sediment and surface water samples taken from Nanxi River receiving effluents from a paper mill and a farmhouse hotel, respectively. For each sample, 4,610 effective bacterial sequences were selected and used to do the analysis of diversity and abundance, respectively. Bacterial phylotype richness in the sediment sample without effluent input was higher than the other samples, and the surface water sample with addition of effluent from the paper mill contained the least richness. Effluents from both the paper mill and farmhouse hotel have a potential to reduce the bacterial diversity and abundance in the sediment and surface water, especially it is more significant in the sediment. The effect of the paper mill effluent on the sediment and surface water bacterial communities was more serious than that of the farmhouse hotel effluent. Characterization of microbial community structures in the sediment and surface water from two tributaries of the downstream river indicated that various effluents from the paper mill and farmhouse hotel have the similar potential to decrease the natural variability in riverine microbial ecosystems.

  12. Bacteria killing nanotechnology Bio-Kil effectively reduces bacterial burden in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, P-R; Huang, H-C; Young, T-G; Su, C-Y; Liu, C-S; Yen, M-Y

    2014-04-01

    A contaminated hospital environment has been identified as an important reservoir of pathogens causing healthcare-associated infections. This study is to evaluate the efficacy of bacteria killing nanotechnology Bio-Kil on reducing bacterial counts in an intensive care unit (ICU). Two single-bed rooms (S-19 and S-20) in the ICU were selected from 7 April to 27 May 2011. Ten sets of new textiles (pillow cases, bed sheets, duvet cover, and patient clothing) used by patients in the two single-bed rooms were provided by the sponsors. In the room S-20, the 10 sets of new textiles were washed with Bio-Kil; the room walls, ceiling, and air-conditioning filters were treated with Bio-Kil; and the surfaces of instruments (respirator, telephone, and computer) were covered with Bio-Kil-embedded silicon pads. Room S-19 served as the control. We compared the bacterial count on textiles and environment surfaces as well as air samples between the two rooms. A total of 1,364 samples from 22 different sites in each room were collected. The mean bacterial count on textiles and environmental surfaces in room S-20 was significantly lower than that in room S-19 (10.4 vs 49.6 colony-forming units [CFU]/100 cm(2); P < 0.001). Room S-20 had lower bacterial counts in air samples than room S-19 (33.4-37.6 vs 21.6-25.7 CFU/hour/plate; P < 0.001). The density of microbial isolations was significantly greater among patients admitted to room S-19 than those to room S-20 (9.15 vs 5.88 isolates per 100 patient-days, P < 0.05). Bio-Kil can significantly reduce bacterial burden in the environment of the ICU.

  13. Reduced Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants by Bactericidal Peroxyacetic Acid Mixture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeum Kyu Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetic acid mixture Perosan, composed of peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid, was evaluated for eco-friendly management of tomato bacterial wilt by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum. Perosan drastically suppressed in vitro growth of R. pseudosolanacearum in liquid cultures in dose- and incubation time-dependent manners. Higher perosan doses (0.1 and 1% caused lowered pH and phytotoxicity to detached leaves of two tomato cultivars Cupirang and Benekia 220 in aqueous solution. Treatment with 0.01% of Perosan delayed wilting symptom significantly in the detached leaves of two cultivars inoculated with R. pseudosolanacearum (10⁷ cfu/ml. Soil drenching of 5% Perosan solution in pots caused severe tissue collapse of tomato seedlings at the four-week-old stage of two tomato cultivars. Treatment with 1% Perosan by soil-drenching significantly reduced bacterial wilt in the tomato seedlings of two cultivars. These findings suggest that Perosan treatment can be applied to suppress bacterial wilt during tomato production.

  14. Bacterial colonization of metallic surfaces exposed in marine environment. Use of bacterial lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezennec, Jean

    1986-01-01

    Addressing fouling and more particularly biofouling phenomena occurring notably on structures in marine environment, this research thesis first describes the fouling phenomenon (components, sequences of biofouling development, bio-film chemical composition). The author reports the study of the composition of the biological veil (microbiological methods, presentation of the different components), addresses the various types of lipids (bacterial markers and others). Then, after a presentation of the experimental equipment and methods (test cells, sample preparation, gas phase chromatography, hydrogenation and bromination, mass spectrometry), the author discusses the influence of different parameters such as the substrate type, speed, season, chlorination, and correlation with thermal transfer [fr

  15. Bacterial community structure and diversity responses to the direct revegetation of an artisanal zinc smelting slag after 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Youfa; Wu, Yonggui; Wang, Hu; Xing, Rongrong; Zheng, Zhilin; Qiu, Jing; Yang, Lian

    2018-05-01

    This comparative field study examined the responses of bacterial community structure and diversity to the revegetation of zinc (Zn) smelting waste slag with eight plant species after 5 years. The microbial community structure of waste slag with and without vegetation was evaluated using high-throughput sequencing. The physiochemical properties of Zn smelting slag after revegetation with eight plant rhizospheres for 5 years were improved compared to those of bulk slag. Revegetation significantly increased the microbial community diversity in plant rhizospheres, and at the phylum level, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were notably more abundant in rhizosphere slags than those in bulk waste slag. Additionally, revegetation increased the relative abundance of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria such as Flavobacterium, Streptomyces, and Arthrobacter as well as symbiotic N 2 fixers such as Bradyrhizobium. Three dominant native plant species (Arundo donax, Broussonetia papyrifera, and Robinia pseudoacacia) greatly increased the quality of the rhizosphere slags. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that the differences in bacterial community structure between the bulk and rhizosphere slags were explained by slag properties, i.e., pH, available copper (Cu) and lead (Pb), moisture, available nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), and organic matter (OM); however, available Zn and cadmium (Cd) contents were the slag parameters that best explained the differences between the rhizosphere communities of the eight plant species. The results suggested that revegetation plays an important role in enhancing bacterial community abundance and diversity in rhizosphere slags and that revegetation may also regulate microbiological properties and diversity mainly through changes in heavy metal bioavailability and physiochemical slag characteristics.

  16. Structural-chemical characteristics of implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozejkin, B.V.; Pavlov, P.V.; Pitirimova, E.A.; Frolov, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Corrosion and structural characteristics of metallic layers implanted by ions of chemically active impurities and noble gases are studied. Dependence of experimental results on parameters of initial materials and technological conditions of implantation is established. In studying corrosion characteristics of implanted metals a strong dependence of chemical passivation effect on technological conditions of ion-implantation and structure of initial material is stated. On the basis of developed mathematical model of chemical passivation effect it is shown that increase of corrosion characteristics of implanted metals is defined by superposition of surface and volumetric mechanisms

  17. Interactive effects of solar radiation and dissolved organic matter on bacterial activity and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María Teresa; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2007-09-01

    We studied the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solar radiation on the activity and community structure of bacteria from an alpine lake. Activity was assessed both at the community level as leucine incorporation rates and at the single-cell level by microautoradiography. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and signal amplification by catalysed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH) was used to track changes in the bacterial community composition. Bacteria-free filtrates of different DOM sources (lake, algae or soil) were incubated either in the dark or exposed to solar radiation. Afterwards, the natural bacterial assemblage was inoculated and the cultures incubated in the dark for 24-48 h. Bacterial activity was enhanced in the first 24 h in the soil and algal DOM amendments kept in the dark. After 48 h, the enhancement effect was greatly reduced. The initial bacterial community was dominated by Betaproteobacteria followed by Actinobacteria. The relative abundance (expressed as a percentage of DAPI-stained cells) of Betaproteobacteria increased first in dark incubated DOM amendments, but after 48 h no significant differences were detected among treatments. In contrast, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased in pre-irradiated DOM treatments. Although Betaproteobacteria dominated at the end of the experiment, the relative abundance of their R-BT subgroup differed among treatments. Changes in bacterial community activity were significantly correlated with those of the relative abundance and activity of Betaproteobacteria, whereas the contribution of Actinobacteria to the bulk activity was very modest. Our results indicate a negative effect of DOM photoalteration on the bulk bacterial activity. The magnitude of this effect was time-dependent and related to rapid changes in the bacterial assemblage composition.

  18. Charge Injection and Transport in Metal/Polymer Chains/Metal Sandwich Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai-Hong, Li; Dong-Mei, Li; Yuan, Li; Kun, Gao; De-Sheng, Liu; Shi-Jie, Xie

    2008-01-01

    Using the tight-binding Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model and a nonadiabatic dynamic evolution method, we study the dynamic processes of the charge injection and transport in a metal/two coupled conjugated polymer chains/metal structure. It is found that the charge interchain transport is determined by the strength of the electric field and the magnitude of the voltage bias applied on the metal electrode. The stronger electric field and the larger voltage bias are both in favour of the charge interchain transport. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  20. Genetic manipulation of structural color in bacterial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Villads Egede; Catón, Laura; Hamidjaja, Raditijo

    2018-01-01

    analysis, we obtained a detailed correlation of how genetic modifications alter structural color in bacterial colonies. Understanding of genotype and phenotype relations in this system opens the way to genetic engineering of on-demand living optical materials, for use as paints and living sensors.......Naturally occurring photonic structures are responsible for the bright and vivid coloration in a large variety of living organisms. Despite efforts to understand their biological functions, development, and complex optical response, little is known of the underlying genes involved...

  1. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  2. Higher-Order Structure in Bacterial VapBC Toxin-Antitoxin Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kirstine L; Brodersen, Ditlev E

    2017-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin systems are widespread in the bacterial kingdom, including in pathogenic species, where they allow rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions through selective inhibition of key cellular processes, such as DNA replication or protein translation. Under normal growth...... that allow auto-regulation of transcription by direct binding to promoter DNA. In this chapter, we review our current understanding of the structural characteristics of type II toxin-antitoxin complexes in bacterial cells, with a special emphasis on the staggering variety of higher-order architecture...... conditions, type II toxins are inhibited through tight protein-protein interaction with a cognate antitoxin protein. This toxin-antitoxin complex associates into a higher-order macromolecular structure, typically heterotetrameric or heterooctameric, exposing two DNA binding domains on the antitoxin...

  3. Orenia metallireducens sp. nov. Strain Z6, a Novel Metal-Reducing Member of the Phylum Firmicutes from the Deep Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Robert A.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Chang, Yun-juan; Locke, Randall A.; Weber, Joseph R.; Egan, Sheila M.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel halophilic and metal-reducing bacterium, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was isolated from briny groundwater extracted from a 2.02 km-deep borehole in the Illinois Basin, IL. This organism shared 96% 16S rRNA gene similarity with Orenia marismortui but demonstrated physiological properties previously unknown for this genus. In addition to exhibiting a fermentative metabolism typical of the genus Orenia, strain Z6 reduces various metal oxides [Fe(III), Mn(IV), Co(III), and Cr(VI)], using H2 as the electron donor. Strain Z6 actively reduced ferrihydrite over broad ranges of pH (6 to 9.6), salinity (0.4 to 3.5 M NaCl), and temperature (20 to 60°C). At pH 6.5, strain Z6 also reduced more crystalline iron oxides, such as lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH), and hematite (α-Fe2O3). Analysis of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) following Fe(III) reduction by strain Z6 revealed spectra from ferrous secondary mineral phases consistent with the precipitation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2] and siderite (FeCO3). The draft genome assembled for strain Z6 is 3.47 Mb in size and contains 3,269 protein-coding genes. Unlike the well-understood iron-reducing Shewanella and Geobacter species, this organism lacks the c-type cytochromes for typical Fe(III) reduction. Strain Z6 represents the first bacterial species in the genus Orenia (order Halanaerobiales) reported to reduce ferric iron minerals and other metal oxides. This microbe expands both the phylogenetic and physiological scopes of iron-reducing microorganisms known to inhabit the deep subsurface and suggests new mechanisms for microbial iron reduction. These distinctions from other Orenia spp. support the designation of strain Z6 as a new species, Orenia metallireducens sp. nov. IMPORTANCE A novel iron-reducing species, Orenia metallireducens sp. nov., strain Z6, was isolated from groundwater collected from a geological formation located 2.02 km below land surface in the Illinois Basin, USA

  4. Metallic glasses: structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassif, E.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a summary of the attempts made up to the present in order to discribe by structural models the atomic arrangement in metallic glasses, showing also why the structure factors and atomic distribution functions cannot be always experimentally determined with a reasonable accuracy. (M.W.O.) [pt

  5. A size-structured model of bacterial growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermeyer, S F; Pilyugin, S S

    2012-01-01

    We consider a size-structured bacterial population model in which the rate of cell growth is both size- and time-dependent and the average per capita reproduction rate is specified as a model parameter. It is shown that the model admits classical solutions. The population-level and distribution-level behaviours of these solutions are then determined in terms of the model parameters. The distribution-level behaviour is found to be different from that found in similar models of bacterial population dynamics. Rather than convergence to a stable size distribution, we find that size distributions repeat in cycles. This phenomenon is observed in similar models only under special assumptions on the functional form of the size-dependent growth rate factor. Our main results are illustrated with examples, and we also provide an introductory study of the bacterial growth in a chemostat within the framework of our model.

  6. Acidification of calf bedding reduces fly development and bacterial abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M S; Gerry, A C; McGarvey, J A; Armitage, T L; Mitloehner, F M

    2010-03-01

    Environmental stressors, such as high fly density, can affect calf well-being. Sodium bisulfate (SBS) is an acidifier that reduces the pH of flooring and bedding, creating a medium that neither bacteria nor immature flies (also known as larvae or maggots) can thrive in. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the application of SBS to a mixture of rice hull calf bedding and calf slurry (BED) to reduce house fly (Musca domestica L.) larval density and the abundance of bacteria. In experiment 1, dish pans containing 1L of BED and 3,000 house fly eggs were treated with SBS at concentrations of 0, 8.9, 17.7, and 26.5g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED (CON, LOW, MED, and HIGH, respectively), with each SBS concentration applied to 4 individual pans (16 pans total). Reapplication of the same SBS concentrations in each pan occurred 3 times/wk throughout the 23-d trial. Larval house fly survival was significantly reduced in all pans with SBS relative to CON pans, with lowest survival rates in the MED and HIGH pans (99% and 100% reduction, respectively). The mean pH for each treatment was inversely related to the SBS concentration. In experiment 2, pans containing 1L of BED and 3,000 house fly eggs were treated with either 0g of SBS (CON), 8.9g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED with reapplication of the acidifier 3 times/wk (SB3x), or 8.9g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED applied only once at 48h before the end of the 8 d-trial (SB48). Larval house fly survival and bacterial concentrations were reduced (90% larval reduction and 68% bacterial reduction) in the SB3x treatment relative to the CON. Mean pH was also reduced in SB3x pans relative to CON or SB48 pans. Overall, acidification of calf BED using the acidifier SBS resulted in a reduction of bacteria and house fly larval survival. This form of fly control might be expected to reduce adult fly production and, therefore, fly-related stress in calves.

  7. Responses of microbial tolerance to heavy metals along a century-old metal ore pollution gradient in a subarctic birch forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousk, Johannes; Rousk, Kathrin

    2018-05-07

    Heavy metals are some of the most persistent and potent anthropogenic environmental contaminants. Although heavy metals may compromise microbial communities and soil fertility, it is challenging to causally link microbial responses to heavy metals due to various confounding factors, including correlated soil physicochemistry or nutrient availability. A solution is to investigate whether tolerance to the pollutant has been induced, called Pollution Induced Community Tolerance (PICT). In this study, we investigated soil microbial responses to a century-old gradient of metal ore pollution in an otherwise pristine subarctic birch forest generated by a railway source of iron ore transportation. To do this, we determined microbial biomass, growth, and respiration rates, and bacterial tolerance to Zn and Cu in replicated distance transects (1 m-4 km) perpendicular to the railway. Microbial biomass, growth and respiration rates were stable across the pollution gradient. The microbial community structure could be distinguished between sampled distances, but most of the variation was explained by soil pH differences, and it did not align with distance from the railroad pollution source. Bacterial tolerance to Zn and Cu started from background levels at 4 km distance from the pollution source, and remained at background levels for Cu throughout the gradient. Yet, bacterial tolerance to Zn increased 10-fold 100 m from the railway source. Our results show that the microbial community structure, size and performance remained unaffected by the metal ore exposure, suggesting no impact on ecosystem functioning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding how cells allocate metals using metal sensors and metallochaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Stephen; Harvie, Duncan R; Robinson, Nigel J

    2005-10-01

    Each metalloprotein must somehow acquire the correct metal. We review the insights into metal specificity in cells provided by studies of ArsR-SmtB DNA binding, metal-responsive transcriptional repressors, and a bacterial copper chaperone. Cyanobacteria are the one bacterial group that have known enzymatic demand for cytoplasmic copper import. The copper chaperone and ATPases that supply cyanobacterial plastocyanin and cytochrome oxidase are reviewed, along with related ATPases for cobalt and zinc. These studies highlight the contributions of protein-protein interactions to metal speciation. Metal sensors and metallochaperones, along with metal transporters and metal-storage proteins, act in concert not only to supply the correct metals but also to withhold the wrong ones.

  9. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration

  10. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  11. 14 CFR 23.571 - Metallic pressurized cabin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metallic pressurized cabin structures. 23... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.571 Metallic pressurized cabin structures. For normal, utility, and acrobatic...

  12. Intrinsic factors of Peltigera lichens influence the structure of the associated soil bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Diego; Clavero-León, Claudia; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2016-11-01

    Definition of lichens has evolved from bi(tri)partite associations to multi-species symbioses, where bacteria would play essential roles. Besides, although soil bacterial communities are known to be affected by edaphic factors, when lichens grow upon them these could become less preponderant. We hypothesized that the structure of both the lichen microbiota and the microbiota in the soil underneath lichens is shaped by lichen intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this work, intrinsic factors corresponded to mycobiont and cyanobiont identities of Peltigera lichens, metabolite diversity and phenoloxidase activity and extrinsic factors involved the site of the forest where lichens grow. Likewise, the genetic and metabolic structure of the lichen and soil bacterial communities were analyzed by fingerprinting. Among the results, metabolite diversity was inversely related to the genetic structure of bacterial communities of lichens and soils, highlighting the far-reaching effect of these substances; while phenoloxidase activity was inversely related to the metabolic structure only of the lichen bacterial microbiota, presuming a more limited effect of the products of these enzymes. Soil bacterial microbiota was different depending on the site and, strikingly, according to the cyanobiont present in the lichen over them, which could indicate an influence of the photobiont metabolism on the availability of soil nutrients. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1991-12-01

    The proceedings contain 16 contributions to the following topics: 1. Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; 2. Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environment under Off-Normal Conditions; 3. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; and 4. Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium. (MM)

  14. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk; Jenkins, Huw T., E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Samuel C. [University of Oxford, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Byrne, Robert T. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Feodor-Lynen-Strasse 25, 81377 Munich (Germany); Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A., E-mail: fiona.whelan@york.ac.uk [The University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  15. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Fiona; Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer

  16. Structure of the Bacterial Community in Different Stages of Early Childhood Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes, Marcos; Armas, Rafael Dutra de; Triches, Thaisa Cezária; Cardoso, Mariane; Vieira, Ricardo de Souza

    2018-01-15

    To characterise in vivo the structure of bacterial communities in decayed and sound primary teeth. Samples of biofilms were collected from three groups of patients with complete and exclusively primary dentition (n = 45): G1: sound teeth (n = 15); G2: enamel lesion (n = 15); G3: dentin lesion (n = 15). DNA was extracted (CTAB 2%) from the biofilm, the partial 16S rRNA gene was amplified with Bacteria Universal Primers (BA338fGC - UN518r) and subjected to DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Multidimensional scaling and ANOSIM (analysis of similarity) were employed to determine the structure of the bacterial communities. The amplicon richness was determined by averaging amplicons, with the differences between treatments determined with ANOVA, while means were compared using Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Compared to sound teeth, a greater variety of bacterial communities was found in decayed teeth. Despite the differences between the bacterial communities of sound teeth and decayed teeth, the Venn diagram showed that the samples had 38 amplicons in common. Greater amplicon richness was observed in samples of decayed teeth (enamel: 20.5 ± 2.7; dentin: 20.1 ± 2.8) compared with the sound samples (12.0 ± 4.3) (p <0.05), indicating enhanced growth for specific groups of bacteria on decayed teeth. Although there is less bacterial diversity on sound than ECC-decayed teeth, the bacterial communities are very similar.

  17. Minerals with metal-organic framework structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskić, Igor; Pekov, Igor V; Krivovichev, Sergey V; Friščić, Tomislav

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an increasingly important family of advanced materials based on open, nanometer-scale metal-organic architectures, whose design and synthesis are based on the directed assembly of carefully designed subunits. We now demonstrate an unexpected link between mineralogy and MOF chemistry by discovering that the rare organic minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite exhibit structures found in well-established magnetic and proton-conducting metal oxalate MOFs. Structures of stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite, exhibiting almost nanometer-wide and guest-filled apertures and channels, respectively, change the perspective of MOFs as exclusively artificial materials and represent, so far, unique examples of open framework architectures in organic minerals.

  18. Analysis of bacterial and fungal community structure in replant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High quality DNA is the basis of analyzing bacterial and fungal community structure in replant strawberry rhizosphere soil with the method of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DNA of soil microorganisms was extracted from the rhizosphere soil of strawberries planted in different replanted years (0, two, ...

  19. Effect of heavy metals ondecolorization of reactive brilliant red by newly isolated microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosheen, S.; Arshad, M.

    2011-01-01

    This study involves aerobic decolorisation of reactive azo dye reactive brilliant red 2KBP by newly isolated microbial strains (two bacterial and one fungal strain) in presence of heavy metals including cobalt chloride, ferric chloride, zinc sulphate, copper sulphate and nickel chloride. Many heavy metals are necessary for microbial growth and are required in very small amounts however at higher levels they become toxic. So was the objective of present work to check the effect of concentration of heavy metals on the potential of microbial strains to decolorize azo dyes. All the heavy metals under consideration were added in range of 0.5 gl-1-2.5gl/sup -1/. All heavy metals showed inhibitory effect on decolorization capacity of bacterial as well as fungal strain .At optimum conditions bacterial strains named as B1 and B2 removed 84% and 78% while fungal strain decolorized 90.4% of dye. Cobalt and nickel showed greater inhibitors on% decolorization of dyes than Zinc and iron. Fungal strain showed greater negative effect. Heavy metals might affect enzyme activities and thus reducing removal of dye. (author)

  20. Effect of dietary monensin on the bacterial population structure of dairy cattle colonic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jeffery A; Hamilton, Scott W; DePeters, Edward J; Mitloehner, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    To determine the effect of monensin, a carboxylic polyether ionophore antibiotic, on the bacterial population structure of dairy cattle colonic contents, we fed six lactating Holstein cows a diet containing monensin (600 mg day(-1)) or an identical diet without monensin. Fresh waste samples were taken directly from the animals once a month for 3 months and assayed for their bacterial population structure via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In total 6,912 16S rRNA genes were examined, comprising 345 and 315 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the monensin fed and control animals, respectively. Coverage estimates of the OTUs identified were 87.6% for the monensin fed and 88.3% for the control colonic content derived library. Despite this high level of coverage, no significant difference was found between the libraries down to the genus level. Thus we concluded that although monensin is believed to increase milk production in dairy cattle by altering the bacterial population structure within the bovine gastrointestinal tract, we were unable to identify any significant difference in the bacterial population structure of the colonic contents of monensin fed vs. the control dairy cattle, down to the genus level.

  1. Bacterial contamination of fabric and metal-bead identity card lanyards: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pepper

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In healthcare, fabric or metal-bead lanyards are universally used for carrying identity cards. However there is little information on microbial contamination with potential pathogens that may readily re-contaminate disinfected hands. We examined 108 lanyards from hospital staff. Most grew skin flora but 7/108 (6% had potentially pathogenic bacteria: four grew methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, and four grew probable fecal flora: 3 Clostridium perfringens and 1 Clostridium bifermentans (one lanyard grew both S. aureus and C. bifermentans. Unused (control lanyards had little or no such contamination. The median duration of lanyard wear was 12 months (interquartile range 3–36 months. 17/108 (16% of the lanyards had reportedly undergone decontamination including wiping with alcohol, chlorhexidine or chlorine dioxide; and washing with soap and water or by washing machine. Metal-bead lanyards had significantly lower median bacterial counts than those from fabric lanyards (1 vs. 4 CFU/cm2; Mann–Whitney U = 300.5; P < 0.001. 12/32 (38% of the metal-bead lanyards grew no bacteria, compared with 2/76 (3% of fabric lanyards. We recommend that an effective decontamination regimen be instituted by those who use fabric lanyards, or that fabric lanyards be discarded altogether in preference for metal-bead lanyards or clip-on identity cards. Keywords: Lanyard, Contamination, Identity card, Metal, Fabric

  2. Antimicrobial properties of metal and metal-halide nanoparticles and their potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jason Robert

    Heavy metals, including silver and copper, have been known to possess antimicrobial properties against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Metal nanoparticles (aggregations of metal atoms 1-200 nm in size) have recently become the subject of intensive study for their increased antimicrobial properties. In the current studies, metal and metal-halide nanoparticles were evaluated for their antibacterial efficacy. Silver (Ag), silver bromide (AgBr), silver iodide (AgI), and copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles significantly reduced bacterial numbers of the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus within 24 hours and were more effective against P. aeruginosa. CuI nanoparticles were found to be highly effective, reducing both organisms by >4.43 log 10 within 15 minutes at 60 ppm Cu. CuI nanoparticles formulated with different stabilizers (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS; polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP) were further tested against representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans ), and a non-enveloped virus (poliovirus). Both nanoparticles caused significant reductions in most of the Gram-negative bacteria within five minutes (>5.09-log10). The Gram-positive bacterial species and C. albicans were more sensitive to the CuI-SDS than the CuI-PVP nanoparticles. In contrast, the acid-fast Mycobacterium smegmatis was more resistant to CuI-SDS than CuI-PVP nanoparticles. Poliovirus was more resistant than the other organisms tested except for Mycobacterium fortuitum, which displayed the greatest resistance to CuI nanoparticles. As an example of a real world antimicrobial application, polymer coatings embedded with various concentrations of CuI nanoparticles were tested for antibacterial efficacy against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Polyester-epoxy powder coatings were found to display superior uniformity, stability and antimicrobial properties against both organisms (>4.92 log 10 after six hours at

  3. Structural and quantum mechanical computations to elucidate the altered binding mechanism of metal and drug with pyrazinamidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nouman; Iftikhar, Saima; Amir, Anam; Hussain, Waqar

    2018-03-01

    Pyrazinamide is known to be the most effective treatment against tuberculosis disease and is known to have bacteriostatic action. By targeting the bacterial spores, this drug reduces the chances for the progression of the infection in organisms. In recent years, increased instances of the drug resistance of bacterial strains are reported. Pyrazinamidase, activator for pyrazinamide, leads to resistance against the drug due to mutagenicity across the world. The present study aimed at the quantum mechanistic analysis of mutations in pyrazinamidase to gain insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to analyse the effect of mutations at the metal coordination site using ORCA software program. Moreover, conformational changes in PZase binding cavity has also been analysed due to mutations of binding pocket residues using CASTp server. In order to elucidate the behaviour of the mutant pyrazinamidase, docking of PZA in the binding pocket of PZase was performed using AutoDock Vina. Analysis of results revealed that iron showed weak binding with the metal coordination site of the mutant proteins due to alteration in electron transfer mechanism. The binding cavity of the mutant PZase has undergone major conformational changes as the volume of pocket increased due to bulky R-chains of mutated amino acids. These conformational changes lead to weak binding of the drug at binding cavity of PZase and reduce the drug activation mechanism leading to increased drug resistance in the bacterial strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing changes in soil bacterial community structure in response to short-term warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Jinbo [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; School of Marine Sciences, Ningbo University, Ningbo China; Sun, Huaibo [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; Peng, Fei [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou China; Zhang, Huayong [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China; Xue, Xian [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou China; Gibbons, Sean M. [Argonne National Laboratory Biosciences Division, Argonne IL USA; Graduate Program in Biophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Gilbert, Jack A. [Argonne National Laboratory Biosciences Division, Argonne IL USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Chu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing China

    2014-02-18

    High altitude alpine meadows are experiencing considerably greater than average increases in soil surface temperature, potentially as a result of ongoing climate change. The effects of warming on plant productivity and soil edaphic variables have been established previously, but the influence of warming on soil microbial community structure has not been well characterized. Here, the impact of 15 months of soil warming (both + 1 and + 2 degrees C) on bacterial community structure was examined in a field experiment on a Tibetan plateau alpine meadow using bar-coded pyrosequencing. Warming significantly changed (P < 0.05) the structure of the soil bacterial community, but the alpha diversity was not dramatically affected. Changes in the abundance of the Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria were found to contribute the most to differences between ambient (AT) and artificially warmed conditions. A variance partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that warming directly explained 7.15% variation in bacterial community structure, while warming-induced changes in soil edaphic and plant phenotypic properties indirectly accounted for 28.3% and 20.6% of the community variance, respectively. Interestingly, certain taxa showed an inconsistent response to the two warming treatments, for example Deltaproteobacteria showed a decreased relative abundance at + 1 degrees C, but a return to AT control relative abundance at + 2 degrees C. This suggests complex microbial dynamics that could result from conditional dependencies between bacterial taxa.

  5. Acute toxicity of heavy metals to acetate-utilizing mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria: EC100 and EC50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, V P; Chen, B Y; Chaudhary, N; Tabak, H H; Haines, J R; Govind, R

    2001-12-01

    Acid mine drainage from abandoned mines and acid mine pit lakes is an important environmental concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Because sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of acid mine drainage, knowledge of acute metal toxicity levels for SRB is essential for the proper functioning of the treatment system for acid mine drainage. Quantification of heavy metal toxicity to mixed cultures of SRB is complicated by the confounding effects of metal hydroxide and sulfide precipitation, biosorption, and complexation with the constituents of the reaction matrix. The objective of this paper was to demonstrate that measurements of dissolved metal concentrations could be used to determine the toxicity parameters for mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The effective concentration, 100% (EC100), the lowest initial dissolved metal concentrations at which no sulfate reduction is observed, and the effective concentration, 50% (EC50), the initial dissolved metal concentrations resulting in a 50% decrease in sulfate reduction, for copper and zinc were determined in the present study by means of nondestructive, rapid physical and chemical analytical techniques. The reaction medium used in the experiments was designed specifically (in terms of pH and chemical composition) to provide the nutrients necessary for the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB and to preclude chemical precipitation of the metals under investigation. The toxicity-mitigating effects of biosorption of dissolved metals were also quantified. Anaerobic Hungate tubes were set up (at least in triplicate) and monitored for sulfate-reduction activity. The onset of SRB activity was detected by the blackening of the reaction mixture because of formation of insoluble ferrous sulfide. The EC100 values were found to be 12 mg/L for copper and 20 mg/L for zinc. The dissolved metal concentration measurements were effective as the indicators of the effect of the

  6. Bacterial phylogeny structures soil resistomes across habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Gibson, Molly K.; Lauber, Christian L.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Dantas, Gautam

    2014-05-01

    Ancient and diverse antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have previously been identified from soil, including genes identical to those in human pathogens. Despite the apparent overlap between soil and clinical resistomes, factors influencing ARG composition in soil and their movement between genomes and habitats remain largely unknown. General metagenome functions often correlate with the underlying structure of bacterial communities. However, ARGs are proposed to be highly mobile, prompting speculation that resistomes may not correlate with phylogenetic signatures or ecological divisions. To investigate these relationships, we performed functional metagenomic selections for resistance to 18 antibiotics from 18 agricultural and grassland soils. The 2,895 ARGs we discovered were mostly new, and represent all major resistance mechanisms. We demonstrate that distinct soil types harbour distinct resistomes, and that the addition of nitrogen fertilizer strongly influenced soil ARG content. Resistome composition also correlated with microbial phylogenetic and taxonomic structure, both across and within soil types. Consistent with this strong correlation, mobility elements (genes responsible for horizontal gene transfer between bacteria such as transposases and integrases) syntenic with ARGs were rare in soil by comparison with sequenced pathogens, suggesting that ARGs may not transfer between soil bacteria as readily as is observed between human pathogens. Together, our results indicate that bacterial community composition is the primary determinant of soil ARG content, challenging previous hypotheses that horizontal gene transfer effectively decouples resistomes from phylogeny.

  7. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result

  8. The changes of spectroscopic characteristics of sulfurreducing bacteria Desulfuromonas acetoxidans under the influence of different metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Olexandr I.; Getman, Vasyl B.; Kushkevych, Ivan V.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2011-10-01

    Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, which is regarded to the oldest microorganisms that exist in the Earth, are uncoloured gram-negative obligatory anaerobic bacteria that have an ability to reduce S0 to H2S. This process supports bacteria with sufficient amount of energy which they need for growth. At the same time high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide are very toxic towards all living organisms. Different metal ions that exist in surrounding environment in small concentrations are essential for microorganisms because they support normal functionality of them. But in high concentrations they have a detrimental influence on cell structure and it functions. Srains of D. acetoxidans bacteria that have high toxic metals resistance can neutralize the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, which is the final product of dissimilative sulfurreduction, and these metals as the result of their particular binding and forming the insoluble precipitations. Light scattering changes and metals accumulation ability of D. acetoxidans bacterial cells under the influence of CuSO4, PbNO3, ZnSO4 and CdSO4 have been investigated. The changes of light scattering characteristics of bacterial D. acetoxidans cells on the base of their size distribution and relative content under the influence of investigated metal salts have been observed by the new method of measurement.

  9. [Changes of bacterial community structure on reusing domestic sewage of Daoxianghujing Hotel to landscape water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-nan; Wang, Xiao-dan; Zhai, Zhen-hua; Ma, Wen-lin; Li, Rong-qi; Wang, Xue-lian; Li, Yan-hong

    2010-05-01

    A 16S rDNA library was used to evaluate the bacterial diversity and identify dominant groups of bacteria in different treatment pools in the domestic sewage system of the Beijing Daoxianghujing Hotel. The results revealed that there were many types of bacteria in the hotel domestic sewage, and the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index was 3.12. In addition, epsilon Proteobacteria was found to be the dominant group with the ratio of 32%. In addition, both the CFB phylum, Fusobacteria, gamma Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were also reached to 9%-15%. After treated with the reclaimed water station, the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index was reduced to 2. 41 and beta Proteobacteria became the dominant group and occupied 73% of the total clones. However, following artificial wetland training, the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index in the sample increased to 3.38, Actinobacteria arrived to 33% and became the most dominant group; Cyanobacteria reached to 26%, and was the second dominant group. But, the control sample comprised 38% Cyanobacteria, and mainly involved in Cyanobium, Synechoccus and Microcystis, with ratios of 47.1%, 17.6% and 8.8%, respectively. Some bacteria of Microcystis aenruginosa were also detected, which probably resulted in the light bloom finally. Therefore, the bacterial diversity and community structures changed in response to treatment of the hotel domestic sewage; there was no cyanobacteria bloom explosion in the treated water. This study will aid in investigation the changes of microbial ecology in different types of water and providing the useful information for enhancing the cyanobacteria blooms control from ecological angle.

  10. Ultrafine nano-network structured bacterial cellulose as reductant and bridging ligands to fabricate ultrathin K-birnessite type MnO2 nanosheets for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; He, Mingqian; He, Ping; Li, Caixia; Liu, Huanhuan; Zhang, Xingquan; Ma, Yongjun

    2018-03-01

    In this work, nanostructured ultrathin K-birnessite type MnO2 nanosheets are successfully prepared by a rapid and environmently friendly hydrothermal method, which involves only a facile redox reaction between KMnO4 and nano-network structured bacterial cellulose with abundant hydroxyl groups. The results show that the unique three-dimensional interwoven structured bacterial cellulose acts as not only reductant but also bridging ligands for assembling nanoscaled building units to control the desired morphology of prepared MnO2. Furthermore, electrochemical performances of prepared MnO2 are investigated as electrode materials for supercapacitors by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectrum in 1.0 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. The resulting ultrathin K-birnessite type MnO2 nanosheets based electrode exhibits higher capacitance (328.2 F g-1 at 0.2 A g-1), excellent rate capability (328.2 F g-1 and 200.4 F g-1 at 0.2 A g-1 and 2.0 A g-1, respectively) and satisfactory cyclic stability (91.6% of initial capacitance even after 2000 cycles at 3.0 A g-1). This work suggests that bacterial cellulose as reductant is a promising candidate in the development of nanostructures of metal oxides.

  11. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  12. New insights into the spatial variability of biofilm communities and potentially negative bacterial groups in hydraulic concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Meng, Fangang

    2017-10-15

    The composition and distribution characteristics of bacterial communities in biofilms attached to hydraulic concrete structure (HCS) surfaces were investigated for the first time in four reservoirs in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River Basin using 16S rRNA Miseq sequencing. High microbial diversity was found in HCS biofilms, and notable differences were observed in different types of HCS. Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi were the predominant phyla, with respective relative abundances of 35.3%, 25.4% and 13.0%. The three most abundant genera were Leptolyngbya, Anaerolineaceae and Polynucleobacter. The phyla Beta-proteobacteria and Firmicutes and genus Lyngbya were predominant in CGP, whereas the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi and genera Leptolyngbya, Anaerolinea and Polynucleobacter survived better in land walls and bank slopes. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia nitrogen and temperature were characterized as the main factors driving the bacterial community composition. The most abundant groups of metabolic functions were also identified as ammonia oxidizers, sulphate reducers, and dehalogenators. Additionally, functional groups related to biocorrosion were found to account for the largest proportion (14.0% of total sequences) in gate piers, followed by those in land walls (11.5%) and bank slopes (10.2%). Concrete gate piers were at the greatest risk of biocorrosion with the most abundant negative bacterial groups, especially for sulphate reducers. Thus, it should be paid high attention to the biocorrosion prevention of concrete gate piers. Overall, this study contributed to the optimization of microbial control and the improvement of the safety management for water conservation structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of a mouthrinse based on hydroxyapatite to reduce initial bacterial colonisation in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, A; Holder, C; Basche, S; Tahan, N; Hannig, C; Hannig, M

    2017-08-01

    The present in situ - investigation aimed to specify the impact of pure hydroxyapatite microclusters on initial bioadhesion and bacterial colonization at the tooth surface. Pellicle formation was carried out in situ on bovine enamel slabs (9 subjects). After 1min of pellicle formation rinses with 8ml of hydroxyapatite (HA) microclusters (5%) in bidestilled water or chlorhexidine 0.2% were performed. As negative control no rinse was adopted. In situ biofilm formation was promoted by the intraoral slab exposure for 8h overnight. Afterwards initial bacterial adhesion was quantified by DAPI staining and bacterial viability was determined in vivo/in vitro by live/dead-staining (BacLight). SEM analysis evaluated the efficacy of the mouthrinse to accumulate hydroxyapatite microclusters at the specimens' surface and spit-out samples of the testsolution were investigated by TEM. Compared to the control (2.36×10 6 ±2.01×10 6 bacteria/cm 2 ), significantly reduced amounts of adherent bacteria were detected on specimens rinsed with chlorhexidine 0.2% (8.73×10 4 ±1.37×10 5 bacteria/cm 2 ) and likewise after rinses with the hydroxyapatite testsolution (2.08×10 5 ±2.85×10 5 bacteria/cm 2 , phydroxyapatite microclusters at the tooth surface. Adhesive interactions of HA-particles with oral bacteria were shown by TEM. Hydroxyapatite microclusters reduced initial bacterial adhesion to enamel in situ considerably and could therefore sensibly supplement current approaches in dental prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, T. R.; Chui, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures

  15. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liu, Xinming [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stingo, Francesco C. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  16. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F.; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  17. The potential for Probiotic Bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury metals in skimmed milk media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyana, Zaraswati; Priosambodo, D.; Haedar, N.; Erviani, A. E.; Djabura, A. K.; Sukma, R.

    2018-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the heavy metals that is harmful to humans. The accumulation of mercury in the body is generally derived from food. Several types of bacteria from intestine of milkfish are known to reduce mercury concentration. People can take advantage of this bacterial ability by eating it through probiotic foods. This research conducted to figure out the potential for probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine in reducing mercury. Isolation from probiotic bacteria from milkfish intestine conducted with grown the isolates in MRSA medium with addition of 1% CaCO3. Twelve isolate were obtained from milkfish intestine. Mercury resistance tested was performed by measuring cell density using a spectrophotometer at concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 ppm respectively in skim milk media. Probiotic tests (gastric acid, bile salts and antimicrobial activity) for MRSB media was also conducted. Results showed that seven isolate were resistant to mercury in all concentrations and potential as probiotics. All resistant isolate then tested for skim milk media with addition of 5, 10, 20 ppm mercury acetate respectively. Result showed that only one isolated was able to reduce the concentration of mercury (Hg) in all variations on concentration and potential as mercury reducer probiotic bacteria.

  18. Inorganic phosphorus fertilizer ameliorates maize growth by reducing metal uptake, improving soil enzyme activity and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wencheng; Wu, Jiahui; Liu, Xiaowen; Chen, Xianbin; Wu, Yingxin; Yu, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Recently, several studies have showed that both organic and inorganic fertilizers are effective in immobilizing heavy metals at low cost, in comparison to other remediation strategies for heavy metal-contaminated farmlands. A pot trial was conducted in this study to examine the effects of inorganic P fertilizer and organic fertilizer, in single application or in combination, on growth of maize, heavy metal availabilities, enzyme activities, and microbial community structure in metal-contaminated soils from an electronic waste recycling region. Results showed that biomass of maize shoot and root from the inorganic P fertilizer treatments were respectively 17.8 and 10.0 folds higher than the un-amended treatments (CK), while the biomass in the organic fertilizer treatments was only comparable to the CK. In addition, there were decreases of 85.0% in Cd, 74.3% in Pb, 66.3% in Cu, and 91.9% in Zn concentrations in the roots of maize grown in inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. Consistently, urease and catalase activities in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil were 3.3 and 2.0 times higher than the CK, whereas no enhancement was observed in the organic fertilizer amended soil. Moreover, microbial community structure was improved by the application of inorganic P fertilizer, but not by organic fertilizer; the beneficial microbial groups such as Kaistobacter and Koribacter were most frequently detected in the inorganic P fertilizer amended soil. The negligible effect from the organic fertilizer might be ascribed to the decreased pH value in soils. The results suggest that the application of inorganic P fertilizer (or in combination with organic fertilizer) might be a promising strategy for the remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils in electronic waste recycling region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Elemente de structură bacteriană și mecanismele transmiterii rezistenței la antibiotice / Elements of bacterial structure and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru O. Doma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this bibliographic essay is to refresh the knowledge of veterinarians in the field of therapy and bacterial resistance. Are summarized, in a didactic manner: the bacteria classification, the overall structure of the cell wall, the general characterization of antibiotics, the fundamental modes of action of antibiotics, the main interactions and side phenomena antibiotics and toxic products. Installing and effects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is presented in detail, being given the basic concepts about resistance mechanisms as: the drug inactivation or misappropriation of the pathway, enzyme target altering or structure, low accumulation of antibiotic resistance in bacterial cells. They are also presented: the natural antibiotic resistance (epigenetic, the gained antibiotic resistance, the genetic adaptation (by mutation and selection and the genetic acquisition. By means of resistance means all the mechanisms by which bacteria can reduce or total inactivate the antimicrobial activity. In this regard are presented: phases of the resistance installation and antibiotics’ modification / inactivation, not being omitted also the trends in the evolution of resistance to antibiotics and environmental impacts analysis, the results of the imprudent using of the anti-infectives (like veterinary antibiotics in soil and water, the antibiotic resistance in the genetic modified crops or the long-term effects on ecosystems and them consequences.

  20. Gut bacterial community structure of two Australian tropical fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narit Thaochan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The community structure of the alimentary tract bacteria of two Australian fruit fly species, Bactrocera cacuminata (Hering and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt, was studied using a molecular cloning method based on the 16S rRNA gene. Differences in the bacterial community structure were shown between the crops and midguts of the two species and sexes of each species. Proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial phylum in the flies, especially bacteria in the order Gammaproteobacteria which was prominent in all clones. The total bacterial community consisted of Proteobacteria (more than 75% of clones, except in the crop of B. cacuminata where more than 50% of clones belonged to Firmicutes. Firmicutes gave the number of the secondary community structure in the fly’s gut. Four orders, Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found in both fruit fly species, while the order Epsilonproteobacteria and the phylum Bacteroidetes were found only in B. tryoni. Two phyla, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were rare and less frequent in the flies. There was a greater diversity of bacteria in the crop of the two fruit fly species than in the midgut. The midgut of B. tryoni females and the midgut of B. cacuminata males had the lowest bacterial diversity.

  1. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  2. Role of Sulfhydryl Sites on Bacterial Cell Walls in the Biosorption, Mobility and Bioavailability of Mercury and Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Mishra, Bhoopesh [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fein, Jeremy [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this exploratory study is to provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the impact of bacterial sulfhydryl groups on the bacterial uptake, speciation, methylation and bioavailability of Hg and redox changes of uranium. The relative concentration and reactivity of different functional groups present on bacterial surfaces will be determined, enabling quantitative predictions of the role of biosorption of Hg under the physicochemical conditions found at contaminated DOE sites.The hypotheses we propose to test in this investigation are as follows- 1) Sulfhydryl groups on bacterial cell surfaces modify Hg speciation and solubility, and play an important role, specifically in the sub-micromolar concentration ranges of metals in the natural and contaminated systems. 2) Sulfhydryl binding of Hg on bacterial surfaces significantly influences Hg transport into the cell and the methylation rates by the bacteria. 3) Sulfhydryls on cell membranes can interact with hexavalent uranium and convert to insoluble tetravalent species. 4) Bacterial sulfhydryl surface groups are inducible by the presence of metals during cell growth. Our studies focused on the first hypothesis, and we examined the nature of sulfhydryl sites on three representative bacterial species: Bacillus subtilis, a common gram-positive aerobic soil species; Shewanella oneidensis, a facultative gram-negative surface water species; and Geobacter sulfurreducens, an anaerobic iron-reducing gram-negative species that is capable of Hg methylation; and at a range of Hg concentration (and Hg:bacterial concentration ratio) in which these sites become important. A summary of our findings is as follows- Hg adsorbs more extensively to bacteria than other metals. Hg adsorption also varies strongly with pH and chloride concentration, with maximum adsorption occurring under circumneutral pH conditions for both Cl-bearing and Cl-free systems. Under these conditions, all bacterial species tested exhibit

  3. Host species and developmental stage, but not host social structure, affects bacterial community structure in socially polymorphic bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFrederick, Quinn S; Wcislo, William T; Hout, Michael C; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2014-05-01

    Social transmission and host developmental stage are thought to profoundly affect the structure of bacterial communities associated with honey bees and bumble bees, but these ideas have not been explored in other bee species. The halictid bees Megalopta centralis and M. genalis exhibit intrapopulation social polymorphism, which we exploit to test whether bacterial communities differ by host social structure, developmental stage, or host species. We collected social and solitary Megalopta nests and sampled bees and nest contents from all stages of host development. To survey these bacterial communities, we used 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing. We found no effect of social structure, but found differences by host species and developmental stage. Wolbachia prevalence differed between the two host species. Bacterial communities associated with different developmental stages appeared to be driven by environmentally acquired bacteria. A Lactobacillus kunkeei clade bacterium that is consistently associated with other bee species was dominant in pollen provisions and larval samples, but less abundant in mature larvae and pupae. Foraging adults appeared to often reacquire L. kunkeei clade bacteria, likely while foraging at flowers. Environmental transmission appears to be more important than social transmission for Megalopta bees at the cusp between social and solitary behavior. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of bacterial community structure and dynamics during the thermophilic composting of different types of solid wastes: anaerobic digestion residue, pig manure and chicken manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Caihong; Li, Mingxiao; Jia, Xuan; Wei, Zimin; Zhao, Yue; Xi, Beidou; Zhu, Chaowei; Liu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of composting substrate types on the bacterial community structure and dynamics during composting processes. To this end, pig manure (PM), chicken manure (CM), a mixture of PM and CM (PM + CM), and a mixture of PM, CM and anaerobic digestion residue (ADR) (PM + CM + ADR) were selected for thermophilic composting. The bacterial community structure and dynamics during the composting process were detected and analysed by polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) coupled with a statistic analysis. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that compared to single-material composting (PM, CM), co-composting (PM + CM, PM + CM + ADR) could promote the degradation of organic matter and strengthen the ability of conserving nitrogen. A DGGE profile and statistical analysis demonstrated that co-composting, especially PM + CM + ADR, could improve the bacterial community structure and functional diversity, even in the thermophilic stage. Therefore, co-composting could weaken the screening effect of high temperature on bacterial communities. Dominant sequencing analyses indicated a dramatic shift in the dominant bacterial communities from single-material composting to co-composting. Notably, compared with PM, PM + CM increased the quantity of xylan-degrading bacteria and reduced the quantity of human pathogens. PMID:24963997

  5. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future

  6. Screening of metal-resistant coal mine bacteria for biofabrication of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additionally, IR study provided information about the bacterial proteins involved in either reduction of Ag(I) into silver nanoparticle or capping of reduced silver nanocrystal or both.Thus, majority of the bacteria found in the coal mines have the resistance against the antimicrobial metal ion, and the potential to reduce the ion ...

  7. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic characterisation of heavy metal-induced metabolic changes in the plant-associated soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Tugarova, A. V.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Gardiner, P. H. E.

    2002-06-01

    Structural and compositional features of whole cells of the plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 under standard and heavy metal-stressed conditions are analysed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and compared with the FT-Raman spectroscopic data obtained previously [J. Mol. Struct. 563-564 (2001) 199]. The structural spectroscopic information is considered together with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) analytical data on the content of the heavy metal cations (Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+) in the bacterial cells. As a bacterial response to heavy metal stress, all the three metals, being taken up by bacterial cells from the culture medium (0.2 mM) in significant amounts (ca. 0.12, 0.48 and 4.2 mg per gram of dry biomass for Co, Cu and Zn, respectively), are shown to induce essential metabolic changes in the bacterium revealed in the spectra, including the accumulation of polyester compounds in bacterial cells and their enhanced hydration affecting certain IR vibrational modes of functional groups involved.

  8. Food-safe modification of stainless steel food processing surfaces to reduce bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Tarek Samir; Asker, Dalal; Hatton, Benjamin D

    2018-06-11

    Biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces of food processing plants, leading to foodborne illness outbreaks, is enabled by the attachment and confinement within microscale cavities of surface roughness (grooves, scratches). We report Foodsafe Oil-based Slippery Coatings (FOSCs) for food processing surfaces that suppress bacterial adherence and biofilm formation by trapping residual oil lubricant within these surface cavities to block microbial growth. SS surfaces were chemically functionalized with alkylphosphonic acid to preferentially wet a layer of food grade oil. FOSCs reduced the effective surface roughness, the adhesion of organic food residue, and bacteria. FOSCs significantly reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on standard roughness SS-316 by 5 log CFU cm-2, and by 3 log CFU cm-2 for mirror-finished SS. FOSCs also enhanced surface cleanability, which we measured by bacterial counts after conventional detergent cleaning. Importantly, both SS grades maintained their anti-biofilm activity after erosion of the oil layer by surface wear with glass beads, which suggests there is a residual volume of oil that remains to block surface cavity defects. These results indicate the potential of such low-cost, scalable approaches to enhance the cleanability of SS food processing surfaces and improve food safety by reducing biofilm growth.

  9. Metal transformation as a strategy for bacterial detoxification of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, Ashraf M M; Al Abboud, Mohamed A; Khatib, Sayeed I

    2018-01-01

    Microorganisms can modify the chemical and physical characters of metals leading to an alteration in their speciation, mobility, and toxicity. Aqueous heavy metals solutions (Hg, Cd, Pb, Ag, Cu, and Zn) were treated with the volatile metabolic products (VMPs) of Escherichia coli Z3 for 24 h using aerobic bioreactor. The effect of the metals treated with VMPs in comparison to the untreated metals on the growth of E. coli S1 and Staphylococcus aureus S2 (local isolates) was examined. Moreover, the toxic properties of the treated and untreated metals were monitored using minimum inhibitory concentration assay. A marked reduction of the treated metals toxicity was recorded in comparison to the untreated metals. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed the formation of metal particles in the treated metal solutions. In addition to heavy metals at variable ratios, these particles consisted of carbon, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen elements. The inhibition of metal toxicity was attributed to the existence of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide in the VMPs of E. coli Z3 culture that might responsible for the transformation of soluble metal ions into metal complexes. This study clarified the capability of E. coli Z3 for indirect detoxification of heavy metals via the immobilization of metal ions into biologically unavailable species. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Competition and habitat filtering jointly explain phylogenetic structure of soil bacterial communities across elevational gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Goberna, Marta; Liu, Yuguo; Cui, Ming; Yang, Haishui; Sun, Qixiang; Insam, Heribert; Zhou, Jinxing

    2018-04-24

    The importance of assembly processes in shaping biological communities is poorly understood, especially for microbes. Here we report on the forces that structure soil bacterial communities along a 2000 m elevational gradient. We characterized the relative importance of habitat filtering and competition on phylogenetic structure and turnover in bacterial communities. Bacterial communities exhibited a phylogenetically clustered pattern and were more clustered with increasing elevation. Biotic factors (i.e. relative abundance of dominant bacterial lineages) appeared to be most important to the degree of clustering, evidencing the role of the competitive ability of entire clades in shaping the communities. Phylogenetic turnover showed the greatest correlation to elevation. After controlling for elevation, biotic factors showed greater correlation to phylogenetic turnover than all the habitat variables (i.e. climate, soil and vegetation). Structural equation modelling also identified that elevation and soil organic matter exerted indirect effects on phylogenetic diversity and turnover by determining the dominance of microbial competitors. Our results suggest that competition among bacterial taxa induced by soil carbon contributes to the phylogenetic pattern across elevational gradient in the Tibetan Plateau. This highlights the importance of considering not only abiotic filtering but also biotic interactions in soil bacterial communities across stressful elevational gradients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Bio-Kil, a nano-based disinfectant, reduces environmental bacterial burden and multidrug-resistant organisms in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Sen Lee

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Application of Bio-Kil reduced the environmental bacterial burden and MDROs in ICUs. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this nanotechnology-based disinfectant in reducing HAIs.

  12. Metallacyclopentadienes: structural features and coordination in transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgushin, Fedor M; Yanovsky, Aleksandr I; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    2004-01-01

    Results of structural studies of polynuclear transition metal complexes containing the metallacyclopentadiene fragment are overviewed. The structural features of the complexes in relation to the nature of the substituents in the organic moiety of the metallacycles, the nature of the transition metals and their ligand environment are analysed. The main structural characteristics corresponding to different modes of coordination of metallacyclopentadienes to one or two additional metal centres are revealed.

  13. Correlation models between environmental factors and bacterial resistance to antimony and copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunji Shi

    Full Text Available Antimony (Sb and copper (Cu are toxic heavy metals that are associated with a wide variety of minerals. Sb(III-oxidizing bacteria that convert the toxic Sb(III to the less toxic Sb(V are potentially useful for environmental Sb bioremediation. A total of 125 culturable Sb(III/Cu(II-resistant bacteria from 11 different types of mining soils were isolated. Four strains identified as Arthrobacter, Acinetobacter and Janibacter exhibited notably high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs for Sb(III (>10 mM,making them the most highly Sb(III-resistant bacteria to date. Thirty-six strains were able to oxidize Sb(III, including Pseudomonas-, Comamonas-, Acinetobacter-, Sphingopyxis-, Paracoccus- Aminobacter-, Arthrobacter-, Bacillus-, Janibacter- and Variovorax-like isolates. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA revealed that the soil concentrations of Sb and Cu were the most obvious environmental factors affecting the culturable bacterial population structures. Stepwise linear regression was used to create two predictive models for the correlation between soil characteristics and the bacterial Sb(III or Cu(II resistance. The concentrations of Sb and Cu in the soil was the significant factors affecting the bacterial Sb(III resistance, whereas the concentrations of S and P in the soil greatly affected the bacterial Cu(II resistance. The two stepwise linear regression models that we derived are as follows: MIC(Sb(III=606.605+0.14533 x C(Sb+0.4128 x C(Cu and MIC((Cu(II=58.3844+0.02119 x C(S+0.00199 x CP [where the MIC(Sb(III and MIC(Cu(II represent the average bacterial MIC for the metal of each soil (μM, and the C(Sb, C(Cu, C(S and C(P represent concentrations for Sb, Cu, S and P (mg/kg in soil, respectively, p<0.01]. The stepwise linear regression models we developed suggest that metals as well as other soil physicochemical parameters can contribute to bacterial resistance to metals.

  14. Robust simulation of buckled structures using reduced order modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, R.; Perez, R.A.; Spottswood, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight metallic structures are a mainstay in aerospace engineering. For these structures, stability, rather than strength, is often the critical limit state in design. For example, buckling of panels and stiffeners may occur during emergency high-g maneuvers, while in supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, it may be induced by thermal stresses. The longstanding solution to such challenges was to increase the sizing of the structural members, which is counter to the ever present need to minimize weight for reasons of efficiency and performance. In this work we present some recent results in the area of reduced order modeling of post- buckled thin beams. A thorough parametric study of the response of a beam to changing harmonic loading parameters, which is useful in exposing complex phenomena and exercising numerical models, is presented. Two error metrics that use but require no time stepping of a (computationally expensive) truth model are also introduced. The error metrics are applied to several interesting forcing parameter cases identified from the parametric study and are shown to yield useful information about the quality of a candidate reduced order model. Parametric studies, especially when considering forcing and structural geometry parameters, coupled environments, and uncertainties would be computationally intractable with finite element models. The goal is to make rapid simulation of complex nonlinear dynamic behavior possible for distributed systems via fast and accurate reduced order models. This ability is crucial in allowing designers to rigorously probe the robustness of their designs to account for variations in loading, structural imperfections, and other uncertainties. (paper)

  15. Robust simulation of buckled structures using reduced order modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, R.; Perez, R. A.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight metallic structures are a mainstay in aerospace engineering. For these structures, stability, rather than strength, is often the critical limit state in design. For example, buckling of panels and stiffeners may occur during emergency high-g maneuvers, while in supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, it may be induced by thermal stresses. The longstanding solution to such challenges was to increase the sizing of the structural members, which is counter to the ever present need to minimize weight for reasons of efficiency and performance. In this work we present some recent results in the area of reduced order modeling of post- buckled thin beams. A thorough parametric study of the response of a beam to changing harmonic loading parameters, which is useful in exposing complex phenomena and exercising numerical models, is presented. Two error metrics that use but require no time stepping of a (computationally expensive) truth model are also introduced. The error metrics are applied to several interesting forcing parameter cases identified from the parametric study and are shown to yield useful information about the quality of a candidate reduced order model. Parametric studies, especially when considering forcing and structural geometry parameters, coupled environments, and uncertainties would be computationally intractable with finite element models. The goal is to make rapid simulation of complex nonlinear dynamic behavior possible for distributed systems via fast and accurate reduced order models. This ability is crucial in allowing designers to rigorously probe the robustness of their designs to account for variations in loading, structural imperfections, and other uncertainties.

  16. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H U [ed.

    1991-12-15

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Specialists Meeting on Properties of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment was held during June 18 to June 20, 1991, at the Nuclear Research Centre (Kernforschungszentrum) in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Specialists Meeting was divided into five technical sessions which addressed topics as follows: Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environments under Off-Normal Conditions;Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium; and Conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. On the structure of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedel, J.

    1958-01-01

    The properties of the last series of Mendeleef's table are compared with those of the elements of the preceding series. This comparison suggests an electronic structure of the 'transition metal' type, with narrow bands, at the beginning of this series (up to certain phases at least of plutonium); then of the rare earth metal type, with independent non-saturated internal layers, further on in the series. The 5 f orbits seem to play an important part in these two types of structure, from uranium on. A more detailed study of the very heavy elements (americium and beyond) and alloys would allow these conclusions to be confirmed. Certain general points, concerning the nature of homopolar connections and paramagnetism in the transition metals, are developed in an additional section. (author) [fr

  18. FTIR spectroscopy structural analysis of the interaction between Lactobacillus kefir S-layers and metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, E.; Mobili, P.; Tymczyszyn, E.; Fausto, R.; Gómez-Zavaglia, A.

    2011-02-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to structurally characterize the interaction of S-layer proteins extracted from two strains of Lactobacillus kefir (the aggregating CIDCA 8348 and the non-aggregating JCM 5818) with metal ions (Cd +2, Zn +2, Pb +2 and Ni +2). The infrared spectra indicate that the metal/protein interaction occurs mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of Asp and Glut residues, with some contribution of the NH groups belonging to the peptide backbone. The frequency separation between the νCOO - anti-symmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations in the spectra of the S-layers in presence of the metal ions was found to be ca. 190 cm -1 for S-layer CIDCA 8348 and ca. 170 cm -1 for JCM 5818, denoting an unidentate coordination in both cases. Changes in the secondary structures of the S-layers induced by the interaction with the metal ions were also noticed: a general trend to increase the amount of β-sheet structures and to reduce the amount of α-helices was observed. These changes allow the proteins to adjust their structure to the presence of the metal ions at minimum energy expense, and accordingly, these adjustments were found to be more important for the bigger ions.

  19. Bacterial community dynamic associated with autochthonous bioaugmentation for enhanced Cu phytoremediation of salt-marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Oliveira, Tânia; Reis, Izabela; Gomes, Carlos R; Mucha, Ana P

    2017-12-01

    Autochthonous bioaugmentation for metal phytoremediation is still little explored, particularly its application to estuarine salt marshes, but results obtained so far are promising. Nevertheless, understanding the behaviour of the microbial communities in the process of bioaugmentation and their role in improving metal phytoremediation is very important to fully validate the application of this biological technology. This study aimed to characterize the bacterial community dynamic associated with the application of autochthonous bioaugmentation in an experimentation which showed that Phragmites australis rhizosphere microorganisms could increase this salt marsh plant potential to phytoremediate Cu contaminated sediments. Bacterial communities present in the autochthonous microbial consortium resistant to Cu added to the medium and in the sediment at the beginning and at the end of the experiment were characterized by ARISA. Complementarily, the consortium and the sediment used for its production were characterized by next generation sequencing using the pyrosequencing platform 454. The microbial consortium resistant to Cu obtained from non-vegetated sediment was dominated by the genus Lactococcus (46%), Raoultella (25%), Bacillus (12%) and Acinetobacter (11%), whereas the one obtained form rhizosediment was dominated by the genus Gluconacetobacter (77%), Bacillus (17%) and Dyella (3%). Results clearly showed that, after two months of experiment, Cu caused a shift in the bacterial community structure of sediments, an effect that was observed either with or without addition of the metal resistant microbial consortium. Therefore, bioaugmentation application improved the process of phytoremediation (metal translocation by the plant was increased) without inducing long term changes in the bacterial community structure of the sediments. So, phytoremediation combined with autochthonous bioaugmentation can be a suitable technology for the recovery of estuarine areas

  20. Metal concentration and structural changes in Corallina elongata (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) from hydrothermal vents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Ruben P.; Neto, Ana I.; Rodrigues, Armindo S.

    2010-01-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal activity is widely present at Azores archipelago. Organisms in such environments present great potential as sentinels of the effects derived from chronically exposure to increased temperature, metal concentrations and reduced pH. This study aimed to evaluate metal concentration in Corallina elongata collected at locations exposed and not exposed to shallow-water hydrothermal activity and evaluate changes in its calcareous structure. Elemental concentration was determined and morphometric analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy. Thicker cell walls and a bleached appearance were observed on C. elongata specimens from the hydrothermally active location, as well as increased concentrations of elements associated to volcanic activity. This study reports on metal accumulation and morphometric changes in the calcareous structure of C. elongata from a hydrothermally active location, adding new data for further research on such habitats and communities, providing an insight on how coralline algae might be affected by ocean acidification.

  1. Characterisation of the bacterial community structures in the intestine of Lampetra morii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Xie, Wenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2016-07-01

    The metagenomic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing method were used to investigate the bacterial community in the intestines of Lampetra morii. The bacterial community structure in L. morii intestine was relatively simple. Eight different operational taxonomic units were observed. Chitinophagaceae_unclassified (26.5 %) and Aeromonas spp. (69.6 %) were detected as dominant members at the genus level. The non-dominant genera were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (1.4 %), Candidatus Bacilloplasma (2.5 %), Enterobacteria spp. (1.5 %), Shewanella spp. (0.04 %), Vibrio spp. (0.09 %), and Yersinia spp. (1.8 %). The Shannon-Wiener (H) and Simpson (1-D) indexes were 0.782339 and 0.5546, respectively. The rarefaction curve representing the bacterial community richness and Shannon-Wiener curve representing the bacterial community diversity reached asymptote, which indicated that the sequence depth were sufficient to represent the majority of species richness and bacterial community diversity. The number of Aeromonas in lamprey intestine was two times higher after stimulation by lipopolysaccharide than PBS. This study provides data for understanding the bacterial community harboured in lamprey intestines and exploring potential key intestinal symbiotic bacteria essential for the L. morii immune response.

  2. Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated

  3. Effects of combined drought and heavy metal stresses on xylem structure and hydraulic conductivity in red maple (Acer rubrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Nayana Dilini Gardiyehewa; Cholewa, Ewa; Ryser, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The effects of heavy metal stress, drought stress, and their combination on xylem structure in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings were investigated in an outdoor pot experiment. As metal-contaminated substrate, a mixture of 1.5% slag with sand was used, with Ni, Cu, Co, and Cr as the main contaminants. Plants grown on contaminated substrate had increased leaf metal concentrations. The two stresses reduced plant growth in an additive manner. The effects of metal and drought stresses on xylem characteristics were similar to each other, with a reduced proportion of xylem tissue, reduced conduit density in stems, and reduced conduit size in the roots. This resulted, in both stems and roots, in reductions in hydraulic conductance, xylem-specific conductivity, and leaf-specific conductivity. The similarity of the responses to the two stresses suggests that the plants' response to metals was actually a drought response, probably due to the reduced water uptake capacity of the metal-exposed roots. The only plant responses specific to metal stress were decreasing trends of stomatal density and chlorophyll content. In conclusion, the exposure to metals aggravates water stress in an additive manner, making the plants more vulnerable to drought.

  4. Bacterial community structure and variation in a full-scale seawater desalination plant for drinking water production

    KAUST Repository

    Belila, Abdelaziz; El Chakhtoura, Joline; Otaibi, N.; Muyzer, G.; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Saikaly, Pascal; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    showed that bacterial species richness and diversity decreased during the seawater desalination process. The two-stage RO filtration strongly reduced the water conductivity (>99%), TOC concentration (98.5%) and total bacterial cell number (>99%), albeit

  5. Effect of streptomycin treatment on bacterial community structure in the apple phyllosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Yashiro

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of many years of streptomycin use in apple orchards on the proportion of phyllosphere bacteria resistant to streptomycin and bacterial community structure. Leaf samples were collected during early July through early September from four orchards that had been sprayed with streptomycin during spring of most years for at least 10 years and four orchards that had not been sprayed. The percentage of cultured phyllosphere bacteria resistant to streptomycin at non-sprayed orchards (mean of 65% was greater than at sprayed orchards (mean of 50% (P = 0.0271. For each orchard, a 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed from leaf samples. Proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities at all orchards, accounting for 71 of 104 OTUs (determined at 97% sequence similarity and 93% of all sequences. The genera Massilia, Methylobacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas were shared across all sites. Shannon and Simpson's diversity indices and Pielou's evenness index were similar among orchards regardless of streptomycin use. Analysis of Similarity (ANOSIM indicated that long-term streptomycin treatment did not account for the observed variability in community structure among orchards (R = -0.104, P = 0.655. Other variables, including time of summer, temperature and time at sampling, and relative distance of the orchards from each other, also had no significant effect on bacterial community structure. We conclude that factors other than streptomycin exposure drive both the proportion of streptomycin-resistant bacteria and phylogenetic makeup of bacterial communities in the apple phyllosphere in middle to late summer.

  6. Dirac cones in isogonal hexagonal metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2018-03-01

    A honeycomb hexagonal metallic lattice is equivalent to a triangular atomic one and cannot create Dirac cones in its electromagnetic wave spectrum. We study in this work the low-frequency electromagnetic band structures in isogonal hexagonal metallic lattices that are directly related to the honeycomb one and show that such structures can create Dirac cones. The band formation can be described by a tight-binding model that allows investigating, in terms of correlations between local resonance modes, the condition for the Dirac cones and the consequence of the third structure tile sustaining an extra resonance mode in the unit cell that induces band shifts and thus nonlinear deformation of the Dirac cones following the wave vectors departing from the Dirac points. We show further that, under structure deformation, the deformations of the Dirac cones result from two different correlation mechanisms, both reinforced by the lattice's metallic nature, which directly affects the resonance mode correlations. The isogonal structures provide new degrees of freedom for tuning the Dirac cones, allowing adjustment of the cone shape by modulating the structure tiles at the local scale without modifying the lattice periodicity and symmetry.

  7. Optical fibre sensing in metals by embedment in 3D printed metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, R. R. J.; Havermann, D.; Schneller, O.; Mathew, J.; Polyzos, D.; MacPherson, W. N.; Hand, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing of structural components in metals has potential to revolutionise the manufacturing industry. Embedded sensing in such structures opens a route towards SMART metals, providing added functionality, intelligence and enhanced performance in many components. Such embedded sensors would be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures by utilizing regenerated fibre Bragg gratings and in-fibre Fabry-Perot cavities.

  8. Metal nanoparticle direct inkjet printing for low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Nam, Koo Hyun; Chung, Jaewon; Hotz, Nico; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials is a key technology toward ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. We demonstrate low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication by direct inkjet printing of metal nanoparticles (NPs) as a versatile, direct 3D metal structuring approach representing an alternative to conventional vacuum deposition and photolithographic methods. Metal NP ink was inkjet-printed to exploit the large melting temperature drop of the nanomaterial and the ease of the NP ink formulation. Parametric studies on the basic conditions for stable 3D inkjet printing of NP ink were carried out. Furthermore, diverse 3D metal microstructures, including micro metal pillar arrays, helices, zigzag and micro bridges were demonstrated and electrical characterization was performed. Since the process requires low temperature, it carries substantial potential for fabrication of electronics on a plastic substrate

  9. Bacterial genomic adaptation and response to metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Houdt, R.

    2009-01-01

    The beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (formerly Ralstonia metallidurans) has been intensively studied since 1976 in SCK-CEN and VITO, for its adaptation capacity to survive in harsh (mostly industrial) environments, to overcome acute environmental stresses, for its resistance to a variety of heavy metals and for applications in environmental biotechnology. Recently, CH34 has become a model bacterium to study the effect of spaceflight conditions in several space flight experiments conducted by SCK-CEN (e.g. MESSAGE, BASE). Furthermore, Cupriavidus and Ralstonia species are isolated from the floor, air and surfaces of spacecraft assembly rooms; were found prior-to-flight on surfaces of space robots such as the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and even in-flight in ISS cooling water and Shuttle drinking water, vindicating its role as model bacterium in space research. In addition, Ralstonia species are also the causative agent of nosocomial infections and are among the unusual species recovered from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The genomic organization of Cuprivavidus metallidurans CH34 was studied in-depth to identify the genetic and regulatory structures involved in the resistance to heavy metals

  10. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  11. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0824-z. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer activity of new Schiff base and its copper complex derived from sulfamethoxazole. I RAMA∗ and R SELVAMEENA. PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Seethalakshmi Ramaswami College,. Tiruchirappalli 620 002 ...

  12. The Disruptive Effect of Lysozyme on the Bacterial Cell Wall Explored by an "In-Silico" Structural Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Emiliano D.; Otero, Lisandro H.; Ruiz, Francisco; Klinke, Sebastián; Giordano, Walter

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, a structural unit of peptidoglycan polymer comprised of glycan strands consisting of a repeating disaccharide motif [N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuramylpentapeptide (NAM pentapeptide)], encases bacteria and provides structural integrity and protection. Lysozymes are enzymes that break down the bacterial cell wall…

  13. Metal concentration and structural changes in Corallina elongata (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) from hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Ruben P; Neto, Ana I; Rodrigues, Armindo S

    2010-04-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal activity is widely present at Azores archipelago. Organisms in such environments present great potential as sentinels of the effects derived from chronically exposure to increased temperature, metal concentrations and reduced pH. This study aimed to evaluate metal concentration in Corallina elongata collected at locations exposed and not exposed to shallow-water hydrothermal activity and evaluate changes in its calcareous structure. Elemental concentration was determined and morphometric analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy. Thicker cell walls and a bleached appearance were observed on C. elongata specimens from the hydrothermally active location, as well as increased concentrations of elements associated to volcanic activity. This study reports on metal accumulation and morphometric changes in the calcareous structure of C. elongata from a hydrothermally active location, adding new data for further research on such habitats and communities, providing an insight on how coralline algae might be affected by ocean acidification. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Process, structure, property and applications of metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Geetha Priyadarshini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic glasses (MGs are gaining immense technological significance due to their unique structure-property relationship with renewed interest in diverse field of applications including biomedical implants, commercial products, machinery parts, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. Various processing routes have been adopted to fabricate MGs with short-range ordering which is believed to be the genesis of unique structure. Understanding the structure of these unique materials is a long-standing unsolved mystery. Unlike crystalline counterpart, the outstanding properties of metallic glasses owing to the absence of grain boundaries is reported to exhibit high hardness, excellent strength, high elastic strain, and anti-corrosion properties. The combination of these remarkable properties would significantly contribute to improvement of performance and reliability of these materials when incorporated as bio-implants. The nucleation and growth of metallic glasses is driven by thermodynamics and kinetics in non-equilibrium conditions. This comprehensive review article discusses the various attributes of metallic glasses with an aim to understand the fundamentals of relationship process-structure-property existing in such unique class of material.

  15. Bacterial community changes in an industrial algae production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Scott P; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Knight, Rob; Reardon, Kenneth F; Chisholm, Stephen T

    2018-04-01

    While microalgae are a promising feedstock for production of fuels and other chemicals, a challenge for the algal bioproducts industry is obtaining consistent, robust algae growth. Algal cultures include complex bacterial communities and can be difficult to manage because specific bacteria can promote or reduce algae growth. To overcome bacterial contamination, algae growers may use closed photobioreactors designed to reduce the number of contaminant organisms. Even with closed systems, bacteria are known to enter and cohabitate, but little is known about these communities. Therefore, the richness, structure, and composition of bacterial communities were characterized in closed photobioreactor cultivations of Nannochloropsis salina in F/2 medium at different scales, across nine months spanning late summer-early spring, and during a sequence of serially inoculated cultivations. Using 16S rRNA sequence data from 275 samples, bacterial communities in small, medium, and large cultures were shown to be significantly different. Larger systems contained richer bacterial communities compared to smaller systems. Relationships between bacterial communities and algae growth were complex. On one hand, blooms of a specific bacterial type were observed in three abnormal, poorly performing replicate cultivations, while on the other, notable changes in the bacterial community structures were observed in a series of serial large-scale batch cultivations that had similar growth rates. Bacteria common to the majority of samples were identified, including a single OTU within the class Saprospirae that was found in all samples. This study contributes important information for crop protection in algae systems, and demonstrates the complex ecosystems that need to be understood for consistent, successful industrial algae cultivation. This is the first study to profile bacterial communities during the scale-up process of industrial algae systems.

  16. Bacterial exopolysaccharides as a modern biotechnological tool for modification of fungal laccase properties and metal ion binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Jaszek, Magdalena; Starosielec, Magdalena; Sulej, Justyna; Matuszewska, Anna; Janczarek, Monika; Bancerz, Renata; Wydrych, Jerzy; Wiater, Adrian; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2018-03-26

    Four bacterial EPSs extracted from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Rt24.2, Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, and Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA76 were determined towards their metal ion adsorption properties and possible modification of Cerrena unicolor laccase properties. The highest magnesium and iron ion-sorption capacity (~ 42 and ~ 14.5%, respectively) was observed for EPS isolated from B. japonicum USDA110. An evident influence of EPSs on the stability of laccase compared to the control values (without EPSs) was shown after 30-day incubation at 25 °C. The residual activity of laccases was obtained in the presence of Rh76EPS and Rh1021EPS, i.e., 49.5 and 41.5% of the initial catalytic activity, respectively. This result was confirmed by native PAGE electrophoresis. The EPS effect on laccase stability at different pH (from 3.8 to 7.0) was also estimated. The most significant changes at the optimum pH value (pH 5.8) was observed in samples of laccase stabilized by Rh76EPS and Rh1021EPS. Cyclic voltamperometry was used for analysis of electrochemical parameters of laccase stabilized by bacterial EPS and immobilized on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with aryl residues. Laccases with Rh76EPS and Rh1021EPS had an evident shift of the value of the redox potential compared to the control without EPS addition. In conclusion, the results obtained in this work present a new potential use of bacterial EPSs as a metal-binding component and a modulator of laccase properties especially stability of enzyme activity, which can be a very effective tool in biotechnology and industrial applications.

  17. Some reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum. A family of compounds with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torardi, C.C.; McCarley, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Several new, reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum are reported, each containing molybdenum in an average oxidation state 2 sealed in Mo tubes held at 1100 0 C for ca. 7 days. Refinement of the substructure of the new compound Ba 0 62 Mo 4 O 6 was based on an orthorhombic cells, with a = 9.509(2), b = 9.825(2), c = 2.853(1) A, Z = 2 in space group Pbam; weak supercell reflections indicate the true structure has c = 8(2.853) A. The chief structural feature is closely related to that of NaMo 4 O 6 which consists of infinite chains of Mo 6 octahedral clusters fused on opposite edges, bridged on the outer edges by O atoms and crosslinked by Mo-O-Mo bonding to create four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions are located. The structure of Ba 1 13 Mo 8 O 16 is triclinic, a = 7.311(1), b = 7.453(1), c = 5.726(1) A, α = 101.49(2), β = 99.60(2), γ = 89.31(2) 0 , Z = 1, space group P1. It is a low-symmetry, metal-metal bonded variant of the hollandite structure, in which two different infinite chains, built up from Mo 4 O 8 2- and Mo 4 O 8 0 26- cluster units, respectively, are interlinked via Mo-O-Mo bridge bonding to create again four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions reside. Other compounds prepared and characterized by analyses and x-ray powder diffraction data are Pb/sub x/Mo 4 O 6 (x approx. 0.6), LiZn 2 Mo 3 O 8 , , CaMo 5 O 8 , K 2 Mo 12 O 19 , and Na 2 Mo 12 O 19

  18. Combined use of polymer composites and metals in engineering structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoa, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites have found many applications in the construction of light weight structures such as those in aircrafts, automobiles, sports equipment etc. This is because these materials possess high stiffness, high strength and low densities. In applications of polymer matrix composites in the light weight structures, the polymer composites are however, not used by themselves alone in most cases. Usually the polymer composites are used in conjunction with some metal components. The metal components are used either to provide means for joining the composite components or the composites are used to repair the cracked metal structures. The synergistic effect of both metals and composites can provide excellent performance with good economy. This paper presents a few applications where polymer composites are used in conjunction with metals in engineering structures. (author)

  19. The "Suicide Guard Rail": a minimal structural intervention in hospitals reduces suicide jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Andreas; Stulz, Niklaus; Martin, Andrea; Eigenmann, Franz; Hepp, Urs; Hüsler, Jürg; Beer, Jürg H

    2012-08-04

    Jumping from heights is a readily available and lethal method of suicide. This study examined the effectiveness of a minimal structural intervention in preventing suicide jumps at a Swiss general teaching hospital. Following a series of suicide jumps out of the hospital's windows, a metal guard rail was installed at each window of the high-rise building. In the 114 months prior to the installation of the metal guard rail, 10 suicides by jumping out of the hospital's windows occurred among 119,269 inpatients. This figure was significantly reduced to 2 fatal incidents among 104,435 inpatients treated during the 78 months immediately following the installation of the rails at the hospital's windows (χ2 = 4.34, df = 1, p = .037). Even a minimal structural intervention might prevent suicide jumps in a general hospital. Further work is needed to examine the effectiveness of minimal structural interventions in preventing suicide jumps.

  20. Elucidation of Operon Structures across Closely Related Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components. PMID:24959722

  1. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  2. Harnessing cell-to-cell variations to probe bacterial structure and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A.

    Advances in microscopy and biotechnology have given us novel insights into cellular biology and physics. While bacteria were long considered to be relatively unstructured, the development of fluorescence microscopy techniques, and spatially and temporally resolved high-throughput quantitative studies, have uncovered that the bacterial cell is highly organized, and its structure rigorously maintained. In this thesis I will describe our gateTool software, designed to harness cell-to-cell variations to probe bacterial structure, and discuss two exciting aspects of structure that we have employed gateTool to investigate: (i) chromosome organization and the cellular mechanisms for controlling DNA dynamics, and (ii) the study of cell wall synthesis, and how the genes in the synthesis pathway impact cellular shape. In the first project, we develop a spatial and temporal mapping of cell-cycle-dependent chromosomal organization, and use this quantitative map to discover that chromosomal loci segregate from midcell with universal dynamics. In the second project, I describe preliminary time- lapse and snapshot imaging analysis suggesting phentoypical coherence across peptidoglycan synthesis pathways.

  3. Risk Assessment and effect of Penicillin-G on bacterial diversity in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Zhao, Xiaofei; Peng, Sen; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Xinhua

    2018-02-01

    Penicillin-G was detected in drinking water by LC-MS/MS and the bacterial diversity was investigated by PCR and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that bacteria community structure in drinking water has undergone major changes when added different concentrations of penicillin-G. The diversity index of each sample was calculated. The results showed that the total number and abundance of bacterial community species in drinking water samples decreased significantly after the addition of penicillin-G. However, the number and abundance of community structure did not change with the concentration. Penicillin-G inhibits the activity of bacterial community in drinking water and can reduce the bacterial diversity in drinking water.

  4. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  5. Impact of Oil on Bacterial Community Structure in Bioturbated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria. In the oiled-microcosms, the addition of H. diversicolor reduced the phylotype-richness, sequences associated to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Plantomycetes were not detected. These observations highlight the influence of the bioturbation on the bacterial community structure without affecting the biodegradation capacities. PMID:23762350

  6. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Stauffert

    Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria. In the oiled-microcosms, the addition of H. diversicolor reduced the phylotype-richness, sequences associated to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Plantomycetes were not detected. These observations highlight the influence of the bioturbation on the bacterial community structure without affecting the biodegradation capacities.

  7. Bacterial mediated alleviation of heavy metal stress and decreased accumulation of metals in plant tissues: Mechanisms and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution of agricultural soils is one of main concerns causing some of the different ecological and environmental problems. Excess accumulation of these metals in soil has changed microbial community (e.g., structure, function, and diversity), deteriorated soil, decreased the growth and yield of plant, and entered into the food chain. Plants' tolerance to heavy metal stress needs to be improved in order to allow growth of crops with minimum or no accumulation of heavy metals in edible parts of plant that satisfy safe food demands for the world's rapidly increasing population. It is well known that PGPRs (plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria) enhance crop productivity and plant resistance to heavy metal stress. Many recent reports describe the application of heavy metal resistant-PGPRs to enhance agricultural yields without accumulation of metal in plant tissues. This review provides information about the mechanisms possessed by heavy metal resistant-PGPRs that ameliorate heavy metal stress to plants and decrease the accumulation of these metals in plant, and finally gives some perspectives for research on these bacteria in agriculture in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  9. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves

  10. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ren-Hao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Huang, Xian-Rong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wang, Mu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves.

  11. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chettiar, Uday K. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Liu, Zhengtong (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Thoreson, Mark D. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Drachev, Vladimir P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nyga, Piotr (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  12. Characterization of bacterial community structure in a hydrocarbon-contaminated tropical African soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Lateef B; Ilori, Mathew O; Amund, Olukayode O; LiiMien, Yee; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2018-04-01

    The bacterial community structure in a hydrocarbon-contaminated Mechanical Engineering Workshop (MWO) soil was deciphered using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Four hundred and thirty-seven clones cutting across 13 bacterial phyla were recovered from the soil. The representative bacterial phyla identified from MWO soil are Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Ignavibacteriae, Spirochaetes, Chlamydiae, Candidatus Saccharibacteria and Parcubacteria. Proteobacteria is preponderant in the contaminated soil (51.2%) with all classes except Epsilonproteobacteria duly represented. Rarefaction analysis indicates 42%, 52% and 77% of the clone library is covered at the species, genus and family/class delineations with Shannon diversity (H') and Chao1 richness indices of 5.59 and 1126, respectively. A sizeable number of bacterial phylotypes in the clone library shared high similarities with strains previously described to be involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Novel uncultured genera were identified that have not been previously reported from tropical African soil to be associated with natural attenuation of hydrocarbon pollutants. This study establishes the involvement of a wide array of physiologically diverse bacterial groups in natural attenuation of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil.

  13. Engineering MerR for Sequestration and MerA for Reduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, Anne O.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to alter a metalloregulatory protein (MerR) so that it would bind other toxic metals or radionuclides with similar affinity so that the engineered protein itself and/or bacteria expressing it could be deployed in the environment to specifically sequester such metals and (2) to alter the mercuric reductase, MerA, to reduce radionuclides and render them less mobile. Both projects had a basic science component. In the first case, such information about MerR illuminates how proteins discriminate very similar metals/elements. In the second case, information about MerA reveals the criteria for transmission of reducing equivalents from NADPH to redox-active metals. The work involved genetic engineering of all or parts of both proteins and examination of their resultant properties both in vivo and in vitro, the latter with biochemical and biophysical tools including equilibrium and non-equilibrium dialysis, XAFS, NMR, x-ray crystallography, and titration calorimetry. We defined the basis for metal specificity in MerR, devised a bacterial strain that sequesters Hg while growing, characterized gold reduction by MerA and the role of the metallochaperone domain of MerA, and determined the 3-D structure of MerB, the organomercurial lyase.

  14. Crystal Structures of the SpoIID Lytic Transglycosylases Essential for Bacterial Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocadello, Salvatore; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla S; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Sabini, Elisabetta; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life known on Earth and represent a serious problem for (i) bioterrorism attack, (ii) horizontal transmission of microbial pathogens in the community, and (iii) persistence in patients and in a nosocomial environment. Stage II sporulation protein D (SpoIID) is a lytic transglycosylase (LT) essential for sporulation. The LT superfamily is a potential drug target because it is active in essential bacterial processes involving the peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria. However, the absence of structural information for the sporulation-specific LT enzymes has hindered mechanistic understanding of SpoIID. Here, we report the first crystal structures with and without ligands of the SpoIID family from two community relevant spore-forming pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium difficile. The structures allow us to visualize the overall architecture, characterize the substrate recognition model, identify critical residues, and provide the structural basis for catalysis by this new family of enzymes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on structurization properties of bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory E. Brill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose — to investigate the effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the process of dehydration selforganization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Material and Methods — The method of wedge dehydration has been used to study the structure formation of bacterial LPS. Image-phases analysis included their qualitative characteristics, as well as the calculation of quantitative indicators, followed by statistical analysis. Results — Low-intensity ultra high frequency (UHF radiation (1 GHz, 0.1 μW/cm2, 10 min has led to the changes in the suspension system of the LPS-saline reflected in the kinetics of structure formation. Conclusion — 1 GHz corresponds to the natural frequency of oscillation of water clusters and, presumably, the effect of UHF on structure of LPS mediates through the changes in water-salt environment. Under these conditions, properties of water molecules of hydration and possibly the properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the molecule of LPS, which can affect the ability of toxin molecules to form aggregates change. Therefore the LPS structure modification may result in the change of its toxic properties.

  16. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  17. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  18. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  19. Reduction of metal oxides in metal carbide fusion superheated with plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedai, L

    1981-01-01

    A significant part of metals is capable of binding a high quantity of carbon in the form of carbide. The carbide fusion produced as a result of smelting and superheating, metal carbides with the use of plasma might be a medium to be utilized for the reduction of different metal oxides, whilst also the original carbide structure of the metal carbides will be reduced to metallic structure. The experiments conducted by making use of plasma equipment, of 20, 55 and 100 kW performances are described. On the basis of the results of the experiments performed, the following statements are to be made. The oxide reductions taking place in the metal carbide fusion might also be carried out in open-hearth furnaces, because reducing atmosphere is not necessitated during this procedure. The quantity of energy required is basically defined by the energy needed for smelting and superheating the metal carbide. The method for producing the metal described may be mainly applied for the allied production of high-purity steels as well as for that of ferro-alloys.

  20. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  1. Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 transitorily reduces tomato bacterial wilt incidence caused by Ralstonia solanacearum under in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Marie; Crozilhac, Patrice; Deberdt, Péninna; Plouznikoff, Katia; Declerck, Stéphane

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the world's most important soil-borne plant diseases. In Martinique, French West Indies, a highly virulent new pathogenic variant of this bacterium (phylotype IIB/4NPB) severely impacts tomato production. Here we report on the effect of R. solanacearum CFBP 6783, classified in phytotype IIB/4NPB, on tomato plantlets grown under strict in vitro culture conditions in the presence or absence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833. A mycelium donor plant (i.e. Crotalaria spectabilis) was used for rapid, uniform mycorrhization of tomato plantlets that were subsequently infected by the bacterium. Bacterial wilt was significantly delayed and the incidence of the disease consequently reduced in the mycorrhizal tomato plantlets. Conversely, R. solanacearum did not affect root colonization by the AMF within the 16 days of the experiment. These results suggested that the mycorrhizal fungus was able to reduce bacterial wilt symptoms, probably by eliciting defence mechanisms in the plant.

  2. A review of current strategies to reduce intraoperative bacterial contamination of surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a mean topic in cardiac surgery, leading to a prolonged hospitalization, and substantially increased morbidity and mortality. One source of pathogens is the endogenous flora of the patient?s skin, which can contaminate the surgical site. A number of preoperative skin care strategies are performed to reduce bacterial contamination like preoperative antiseptic showering, hair removal, antisepsis of the skin, adhesive barrier drapes, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Fu...

  3. Factors influencing production of lipase under metal supplementation by bacterial strain, Bacillus subtilis BDG-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhevahi, B; Gurusamy, R

    2014-11-01

    Lipases are biocatalyst having wide applications in industries due to their versatile properties. In the present study, a lipolytic bacterial strain, Bacillus subtilis BDG-8 was isolated from an oil based industrial soil. The effect of selenium and nickel as a media supplement on enhancement of lipase production, was studied individually with the isolated strain by varying the concentration of selected metal. 60 μg l(-1) selenium enhanced lipase production to an enzyme activity measuring 7.8 U ml(-1) while 40 μgI(-1) nickel gave the maximum enzyme activity equivalent to 7.5 U ml(-1). However, nickel and selenium together at a range of concentration with an equal w/v ratio, at 60 μg l(-1) each, showed the maximum lipase activity of 8.5 U ml(-1). The effect of pH and temperature on lipase production showed maximum enzyme activity in the presence of each of the metals at pH 7 and 35°C among the other tested ranges. After optimisation of the parameters such as metal concentration, pH and temperature lipase production by Bacillus subtilis BDG-8 had increased several folds. This preliminary investigation may consequently lead as to various industrial applications such as treatment of wastewater contaminated with metal or oil with simultaneous lipase production.

  4. Deformed metals - structure, recrystallisation and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how new discoveries and advanced experimental techniques in the last 25 years have led to paradigm shifts in the analysis of deformation and annealing structures of metals and in the way the strength of deformed samples is related to structural parameters. This is described in three...

  5. Development of the Method of Bacterial Leaching of Metals out of Low-Grade Ores, Rocks, and Industrial Wastes Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tsertsvadze, L A; Petriashvili, Sh G; Chutkerashvili, D G; Kirkesali, E I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2001-01-01

    The results of preliminary investigations aimed at the development of an economical and easy to apply technique of bacterial leaching of rare and valuable metals out of low-grade ores, complex composition ores, rocks, and industrial wastes in Georgia are discussed. The main groups of microbiological community of the peat suspension used in the experiments of bacterial leaching are investigated and the activity of particular microorganisms in the leaching of probes with different mineral compositions is assessed. The element composition of the primary and processed samples was investigated by the epithermal neutron activation analysis method and the enrichment/subtraction level is estimated for various elements. The efficiency of the developed technique to purify wastes, extract some scrace metals, and enrich ores or rocks in some elements, e.g. Au, U, Th, Cs, Sr, Rb, Sc, Zr, Hf, Ta, Gd, Er, Lu, Ce, etc., is demonstrated.

  6. Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d > 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems

  7. Heavy metal biosorption by bacterial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecchio, A; Finoli, C; Di Simine, D; Andreoni, [No Value

    Microbial biomass provides available ligand groups on which metal ions bind by different mechanisms. Biosorption of these elements from aqueous solutions represents a remediation technology suitable for the treatment of metal-contaminated effluents. The purpose of the present investigation was the

  8. Alternative substrates of bacterial sulphate reduction suitable for the biological-chemical treatment of acid mine drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Luptakova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of AMD pollution on biological systems are mostly severe and the problem may persist from many decadesto thousands of years. Consequently AMD prior to being released into the environment must be treated to meet government standardsfor the amount of metal and non-metal ions contained in the water. One of the best available technologies for the removal of metals fromAMD is precipitation as metal sulphides. SRB applications for AMD treatment involve a few principal stages. The first stageis the cultivation of SRB i.e. the bacterial sulphate reduction. At the laboratory conditions the sodium lactate is the energetic substratefor the growth of bacteria. Its price is not economic for the application in the practice and is needed investigate the alternativesubstitutes. The aim of this work was the cultivation of SRB using the selected energetic substrates such as: calcium lactate, ethanol,saccharose, glucose and whey. Experimental studies confirm that in the regard to the amount of reduced sulphates the calcium lactateand ethanol are the best alternative substrates for the bacterial sulphate-reduction.

  9. Structural coloration of metallic surfaces with micro/nano-structures induced by elliptical vibration texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Pan, Yayue; Guo, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Creating orderly periodic micro/nano-structures on metallic surfaces, or structural coloration, for control of surface apparent color and optical reflectivity has been an exciting research topic over the years. The direct applications of structural coloration include color marking, display devices, and invisibility cloak. This paper presents an efficient method to colorize metallic surfaces with periodic micro/nano-gratings using elliptical vibration texturing. When the tool vibration is coupled with a constant cutting velocity, controlled periodic ripples can be generated due to the overlapping tool trajectory. These periodic ripples with a wavelength near visible spectrum can act as micro-gratings to introduce iridescent colors. The proposed technique also provides a flexible method for color marking of metallic surfaces with arbitrary patterns and images by precise control of the spacing distance and orientation of induced micro/nano-ripples. Theoretical analysis and experimental results are given to demonstrate structural coloration of metals by a direct mechanical machining technique.

  10. Structural analysis of a set of proteins resulting from a bacterial genomics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, J; Sauder, J M; Adams, J M; Antonysamy, S; Bain, K; Bergseid, M G; Buchanan, S G; Buchanan, M D; Batiyenko, Y; Christopher, J A; Emtage, S; Eroshkina, A; Feil, I; Furlong, E B; Gajiwala, K S; Gao, X; He, D; Hendle, J; Huber, A; Hoda, K; Kearins, P; Kissinger, C; Laubert, B; Lewis, H A; Lin, J; Loomis, K; Lorimer, D; Louie, G; Maletic, M; Marsh, C D; Miller, I; Molinari, J; Muller-Dieckmann, H J; Newman, J M; Noland, B W; Pagarigan, B; Park, F; Peat, T S; Post, K W; Radojicic, S; Ramos, A; Romero, R; Rutter, M E; Sanderson, W E; Schwinn, K D; Tresser, J; Winhoven, J; Wright, T A; Wu, L; Xu, J; Harris, T J R

    2005-09-01

    The targets of the Structural GenomiX (SGX) bacterial genomics project were proteins conserved in multiple prokaryotic organisms with no obvious sequence homolog in the Protein Data Bank of known structures. The outcome of this work was 80 structures, covering 60 unique sequences and 49 different genes. Experimental phase determination from proteins incorporating Se-Met was carried out for 45 structures with most of the remainder solved by molecular replacement using members of the experimentally phased set as search models. An automated tool was developed to deposit these structures in the Protein Data Bank, along with the associated X-ray diffraction data (including refined experimental phases) and experimentally confirmed sequences. BLAST comparisons of the SGX structures with structures that had appeared in the Protein Data Bank over the intervening 3.5 years since the SGX target list had been compiled identified homologs for 49 of the 60 unique sequences represented by the SGX structures. This result indicates that, for bacterial structures that are relatively easy to express, purify, and crystallize, the structural coverage of gene space is proceeding rapidly. More distant sequence-structure relationships between the SGX and PDB structures were investigated using PDB-BLAST and Combinatorial Extension (CE). Only one structure, SufD, has a truly unique topology compared to all folds in the PDB. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. On the structure of heavy metals; Sur la structure des metaux lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Faculte des Sciences de l' Universite de Paris, 75 (France)

    1958-07-01

    The properties of the last series of Mendeleef's table are compared with those of the elements of the preceding series. This comparison suggests an electronic structure of the 'transition metal' type, with narrow bands, at the beginning of this series (up to certain phases at least of plutonium); then of the rare earth metal type, with independent non-saturated internal layers, further on in the series. The 5 f orbits seem to play an important part in these two types of structure, from uranium on. A more detailed study of the very heavy elements (americium and beyond) and alloys would allow these conclusions to be confirmed. Certain general points, concerning the nature of homopolar connections and paramagnetism in the transition metals, are developed in an additional section. (author) [French] Les proprietes des elements de la derniere serie du tableau de Mendeleef sont comparees a celles des elements des series precedentes. Cette comparaison suggere une structure electronique du type 'metal de transition', a bandes etroites, au debut de cette serie (jusqu'a certaines phases au moins du plutonium); puis du type d'un metal des terres rares, a couches internes non saturees independantes, au-dela dans la serie. Les orbitales 5 f semblent jouer un r e important, dans ces deux types de structures, a partir de l'uranium. Une etude plus poussee des elements tres lourds (americium et au-dela) et des alliages permettrait de confirmer ces conclusions. Certains points generaux, concernant la nature des liaisons homopolaires et le paramagnetisme dans les metaux de transition, sont developpes en annexe. (auteur)

  12. Localized corrosion of carbon steels due to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Development of a specific sensor; Corrosion localisee des aciers au carbone induite par des bacteries sulfato-reductrices. Developpement d'un capteur specifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfort Moros, N.

    2001-11-01

    This work concerns the microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steels in saline anaerobic media (3% of NaCl) containing sulfato-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio gabonensis, DSM 10636). In these media, extreme localised corrosion occurs by pitting under the bio-film covering the metallic substrate. A sensor with concentric electrodes was designed to initiate the phenomenon of bio-corrosion, recreating the favourable conditions for growth of a corrosion pit, and then measuring the corrosion current maintained by bacterial activity. The pit initiation was achieved through either of two methods. The electrochemical conditioning involved driving the potential difference between inner and outer electrodes to values corresponding to a galvanic corrosion that can be maintained by the bacterial metabolism. The mechanical process involved removal of a portion of the bio-film by scratching, yielding galvanic potential differences equivalent to that found by the conditioning technique. This protocol was found to be applicable to a bio-corrosion study on industrial site for the monitoring of the metallic structures deterioration (patent EN 00/06114, May 2000). Thereafter, a fundamental application uses the bio-corrosion sensor for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), Electrochemical Noise Analysis (ENA) and current density cartography by the means of micro-electrodes. Thus, the EIS technique reveals the importance of the FeS corrosion products for initiation of bio-corrosion start on carbon steel. In addition, depending on the method used to create a pit, the ENA gives rise to supplementary processes (gaseous release) disturbing the bio-corrosion detection. The beginning of a bio-corrosion process on a clean surface surrounded with bio-film was confirmed by the current density cartography. These different results establish the sensor with concentric electrodes as an indispensable tool for bio-corrosion studies, both in the laboratory and on industrial sites

  13. Grazing of leaf-associated Cercomonads (Protists: Rhizaria: Cercozoa) structures bacterial community composition and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flues, Sebastian; Bass, David; Bonkowski, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Preferential food selection in protists is well documented, but we still lack basic understanding on how protist predation modifies the taxonomic and functional composition of bacterial communities. We conducted feeding trials using leaf-associated cercomonad Cercozoa by incubating them on a standardized, diverse bacterial community washed from plant leaves. We used a shotgun metagenomics approach to investigate the taxonomic and functional changes of the bacterial community after five days protist predation on bacteria. Predation-induced shifts in bacterial community composition could be linked to phenotypic protist traits. Protist reproduction rate, morphological plasticity and cell speed were most important in determining bacterial community composition. Analyses of co-occurrence patterns showed less complex correlations between bacterial taxa in the protist-grazed treatments with a higher proportion of positive correlations than in non-grazed controls, suggesting that predation reduced the influence of strong competitors. Protist predation influenced 14 metabolic core functions including membrane transport from which type VI secretion systems were in particular upregulated. In view of the functional importance of bacterial communities in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of plants, a more detailed understanding of predator-prey interactions, changes in microbial composition and function, and subsequent repercussions on plant performance are clearly required. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments

  15. Bacterial Exopolysaccharide mediated heavy metal removal: A Review on biosynthesis, mechanism and remediation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Gupta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination has been recognized as a major public health risk, particularly in developing countries and their toxicological manifestations are well known. Conventional remediation strategies are either expensive or they generate toxic by-products, which adversely affect the environment. Therefore, necessity for an environmentally safe strategy motivates interest towards biological techniques. One of such most profoundly driven approach in recent times is biosorption through microbial biomass and their products. Extracellular polymeric substances are such complex blend of high molecular weight microbial (prokaryotic and eukaryotic biopolymers. They are mainly composed of proteins, polysaccharides, uronic acids, humic substances, lipids etc. One of its essential constituent is the exopolysaccharide (EPS released out of self defense against harsh conditions of starvation, pH and temperature, hence it displays exemplary physiological, rheological and physio-chemical properties. Its net anionic makeup allows the biopolymer to effectively sequester positively charged heavy metal ions. The polysaccharide has been expounded deeply in this article with reference to its biosynthesis and emphasizes heavy metal sorption abilities of polymer in terms of mechanism of action and remediation. It reports current investigation and strategic advancements in dealing bacterial cells and their EPS in diverse forms – mixed culture EPS, single cell EPS, live, dead or immobilized EPS. A significant scrutiny is also involved highlighting the existing challenges that still lie in the path of commercialization. The article enlightens the potential of EPS to bring about bio-detoxification of heavy metal contaminated terrestrial and aquatic systems in highly sustainable, economic and eco-friendly manner.

  16. Bacterial Exopolysaccharide mediated heavy metal removal: A Review on biosynthesis, mechanism and remediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Diwan, Batul

    2017-03-01

    Heavy metal contamination has been recognized as a major public health risk, particularly in developing countries and their toxicological manifestations are well known. Conventional remediation strategies are either expensive or they generate toxic by-products, which adversely affect the environment. Therefore, necessity for an environmentally safe strategy motivates interest towards biological techniques. One of such most profoundly driven approach in recent times is biosorption through microbial biomass and their products. Extracellular polymeric substances are such complex blend of high molecular weight microbial (prokaryotic and eukaryotic) biopolymers. They are mainly composed of proteins, polysaccharides, uronic acids, humic substances, lipids etc. One of its essential constituent is the exopolysaccharide (EPS) released out of self defense against harsh conditions of starvation, pH and temperature, hence it displays exemplary physiological, rheological and physio-chemical properties. Its net anionic makeup allows the biopolymer to effectively sequester positively charged heavy metal ions. The polysaccharide has been expounded deeply in this article with reference to its biosynthesis and emphasizes heavy metal sorption abilities of polymer in terms of mechanism of action and remediation. It reports current investigation and strategic advancements in dealing bacterial cells and their EPS in diverse forms - mixed culture EPS, single cell EPS, live, dead or immobilized EPS. A significant scrutiny is also involved highlighting the existing challenges that still lie in the path of commercialization. The article enlightens the potential of EPS to bring about bio-detoxification of heavy metal contaminated terrestrial and aquatic systems in highly sustainable, economic and eco-friendly manner.

  17. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  18. Temporal and Spatial Impact of Human Cadaver Decomposition on Soil Bacterial and Arthropod Community Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baneshwar; Minick, Kevan J.; Strickland, Michael S.; Wickings, Kyle G.; Crippen, Tawni L.; Tarone, Aaron M.; Benbow, M. Eric; Sufrin, Ness; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.; Pechal, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-01

    As vertebrate carrion decomposes, there is a release of nutrient-rich fluids into the underlying soil, which can impact associated biological community structure and function. How these changes alter soil biogeochemical cycles is relatively unknown and may prove useful in the identification of carrion decomposition islands that have long lasting, focal ecological effects. This study investigated the spatial (0, 1, and 5 m) and temporal (3–732 days) dynamics of human cadaver decomposition on soil bacterial and arthropod community structure and microbial function. We observed strong evidence of a predictable response to cadaver decomposition that varies over space for soil bacterial and arthropod community structure, carbon (C) mineralization and microbial substrate utilization patterns. In the presence of a cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples), the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was greater, while the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia was lower when compared to samples at 1 and 5 m. Micro-arthropods were more abundant (15 to 17-fold) in soils collected at 0 m compared to either 1 or 5 m, but overall, micro-arthropod community composition was unrelated to either bacterial community composition or function. Bacterial community structure and microbial function also exhibited temporal relationships, whereas arthropod community structure did not. Cumulative precipitation was more effective in predicting temporal variations in bacterial abundance and microbial activity than accumulated degree days. In the presence of the cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples), the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased significantly with cumulative precipitation. Furthermore, soil bacterial communities and C mineralization were sensitive to the introduction of human cadavers as they diverged from baseline levels and did not recover completely in approximately 2 years. These data are valuable for understanding ecosystem

  19. Temporal and Spatial Impact of Human Cadaver Decomposition on Soil Bacterial and Arthropod Community Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baneshwar Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As vertebrate carrion decomposes, there is a release of nutrient-rich fluids into the underlying soil, which can impact associated biological community structure and function. How these changes alter soil biogeochemical cycles is relatively unknown and may prove useful in the identification of carrion decomposition islands that have long lasting, focal ecological effects. This study investigated the spatial (0, 1, and 5 m and temporal (3–732 days dynamics of human cadaver decomposition on soil bacterial and arthropod community structure and microbial function. We observed strong evidence of a predictable response to cadaver decomposition that varies over space for soil bacterial and arthropod community structure, carbon (C mineralization and microbial substrate utilization patterns. In the presence of a cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes was greater, while the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia was lower when compared to samples at 1 and 5 m. Micro-arthropods were more abundant (15 to 17-fold in soils collected at 0 m compared to either 1 or 5 m, but overall, micro-arthropod community composition was unrelated to either bacterial community composition or function. Bacterial community structure and microbial function also exhibited temporal relationships, whereas arthropod community structure did not. Cumulative precipitation was more effective in predicting temporal variations in bacterial abundance and microbial activity than accumulated degree days. In the presence of the cadaver (i.e., 0 m samples, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased significantly with cumulative precipitation. Furthermore, soil bacterial communities and C mineralization were sensitive to the introduction of human cadavers as they diverged from baseline levels and did not recover completely in approximately 2 years. These data are valuable for understanding

  20. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  1. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R.; Grossoehme, Nickolas E.; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Giedroc, David P.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2009-01-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni 2+ ions but that it is able to bind Zn 2+ with K d < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn 2+ is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors

  2. The “Suicide Guard Rail”: a minimal structural intervention in hospitals reduces suicide jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohl Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jumping from heights is a readily available and lethal method of suicide. This study examined the effectiveness of a minimal structural intervention in preventing suicide jumps at a Swiss general teaching hospital. Following a series of suicide jumps out of the hospital’s windows, a metal guard rail was installed at each window of the high-rise building. Results In the 114 months prior to the installation of the metal guard rail, 10 suicides by jumping out of the hospital’s windows occurred among 119,269 inpatients. This figure was significantly reduced to 2 fatal incidents among 104,435 inpatients treated during the 78 months immediately following the installation of the rails at the hospital’s windows (χ2 = 4.34, df = 1, p = .037. Conclusions Even a minimal structural intervention might prevent suicide jumps in a general hospital. Further work is needed to examine the effectiveness of minimal structural interventions in preventing suicide jumps.

  3. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  4. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealson, Kenneth [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  5. Bacterial community composition in the water column of a lake formed by a former uranium open pit mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Frida; Andersson, Anders F; Holmström, Sara J M

    2012-11-01

    Mining of pyrite minerals is a major environmental issue involving both biological and geochemical processes. Here we present a study of an artificial lake of a former uranium open pit mine with the aim to connect the chemistry and bacterial community composition (454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes) in the stratified water column. A shift in the water chemistry from oxic conditions in the epilimnion to anoxic, alkaline, and metal and sulfide-rich conditions in the hypolimnion was corresponded by a strong shift in the bacterial community, with few shared operational taxonomic units (OTU) between the water layers. The epilimnetic bacterial community of the lake (~20 years old) showed similarities to other temperate freshwater lakes, while the hypolimnetic bacterial community showed similarity to extreme chemical environments. The epilimnetic bacterial community had dominance of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The hypolimnion displayed a higher bacterial diversity and was dominated by the phototrophic green sulphur bacterium of the genus Chlorobium (ca. 40 % of the total community). Deltaproteobacteria were only represented in the hypolimnion and the most abundant OTUs were affiliated with ferric iron and sulfate reducers of the genus Geobacter and Desulfobulbus, respectively. The chemistry is clearly controlling, especially the hypolimnetic, bacterial community but the community composition also indicates that the bacteria are involved in metal cycling in the lake.

  6. Inorganic Nitrogen Application Affects Both Taxonomical and Predicted Functional Structure of Wheat Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa N. Kavamura

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of fertilizer regime on bulk soil microbial communities have been well studied, but this is not the case for the rhizosphere microbiome. The aim of this work was to assess the impact of fertilization regime on wheat rhizosphere microbiome assembly and 16S rRNA gene-predicted functions with soil from the long term Broadbalk experiment at Rothamsted Research. Soil from four N fertilization regimes (organic N, zero N, medium inorganic N and high inorganic N was sown with seeds of Triticum aestivum cv. Cadenza. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed with the Illumina platform on bulk soil and rhizosphere samples of 4-week-old and flowering plants (10 weeks. Phylogenetic and 16S rRNA gene-predicted functional analyses were performed. Fertilization regime affected the structure and composition of wheat rhizosphere bacterial communities. Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes were significantly depleted in treatments receiving inorganic N, whereas the addition of high levels of inorganic N enriched members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, especially after 10 weeks. Bacterial richness and diversity decreased with inorganic nitrogen inputs and was highest after organic treatment (FYM. In general, high levels of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers negatively affect bacterial richness and diversity, leading to a less stable bacterial community structure over time, whereas, more stable bacterial communities are provided by organic amendments. 16S rRNA gene-predicted functional structure was more affected by growth stage than by fertilizer treatment, although, some functions related to energy metabolism and metabolism of terpenoids and polyketides were enriched in samples not receiving any inorganic N, whereas inorganic N addition enriched predicted functions related to metabolism of other amino acids and carbohydrates. Understanding the impact of different fertilizers on the structure and dynamics of the rhizosphere microbiome is an important step

  7. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  8. Crystal structure of the Haemophilus influenzae Hap adhesin reveals an intercellular oligomerization mechanism for bacterial aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoyu; Spahich, Nicole; Kenjale, Roma; Waksman, Gabriel; St Geme, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex microbial communities that are common in nature and are being recognized increasingly as an important determinant of bacterial virulence. However, the structural determinants of bacterial aggregation and eventual biofilm formation have been poorly defined. In Gram-negative bacteria, a major subgroup of extracellular proteins called self-associating autotransporters (SAATs) can mediate cell–cell adhesion and facilitate biofilm formation. In this study, we used the Haemophilus influenzae Hap autotransporter as a prototype SAAT to understand how bacteria associate with each other. The crystal structure of the H. influenzae HapS passenger domain (harbouring the SAAT domain) was determined to 2.2 Å by X-ray crystallography, revealing an unprecedented intercellular oligomerization mechanism for cell–cell interaction. The C-terminal SAAT domain folds into a triangular-prism-like structure that can mediate Hap–Hap dimerization and higher degrees of multimerization through its F1–F2 edge and F2 face. The intercellular multimerization can give rise to massive buried surfaces that are required for overcoming the repulsive force between cells, leading to bacterial cell–cell interaction and formation of complex microcolonies. PMID:21841773

  9. Experimental warming effects on the bacterial community structure and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Han, S.; Adams, J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the responses of soil bacterial community to future temperature increase by conducting open-field warming experiment. We conducted an open-field experimental warming system using infra-red heater in 2011 and regulated the temperature of warmed plots by 3oC higher than that of control plots constantly. The seeds of Pinus densiflora, Abies holophylla, Abies koreana, Betula costata, Quercus variabilis, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, and Zelkova serrata were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. We collected soil samples from the rhizosphere of 7 tree species. DNA was extracted and PCR-amplified for the bacterial 16S gene targeting V1-V3 region. The paired-end sequencing was performed at Beijing Genome Institute (BGI, Hong Kong, China) using 2× 100 bp Hiseq2000 (Illumina). This study aimed to answer the following prediction/hypothesis: 1) Experimental warming will change the structure of soil bacterial community, 2) There will be distinct 'indicator group' which response to warming treatment relatively more sensitive than other groups. 3) Warming treatment will enhance the microbial activity in terms of soil respiration. 4) The rhizoplane bacterial communities for each of 7 tree species will show different response pattern to warming treatment. Since the sequence data does not arrive before the submission deadline, therefore, we would like to present the results and discussions on December 2014, AGU Fall Meeting.

  10. Structure of bacterial communities in soil following cover crop and organic fertilizer incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Adria L; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Incorporation of organic material into soils is an important element of organic farming practices that can affect the composition of the soil bacterial communities that carry out nutrient cycling and other functions crucial to crop health and growth. We conducted a field experiment to determine the effects of cover crops and fertilizers on bacterial community structure in agricultural soils under long-term organic management. Illumina sequencing of 16S rDNA revealed diverse communities comprising 45 bacterial phyla in corn rhizosphere and bulk field soil. Community structure was most affected by location and by the rhizosphere effect, followed by sampling time and amendment treatment. These effects were associated with soil physicochemical properties, including pH, moisture, organic matter, and nutrient levels. Treatment differences were apparent in bulk and rhizosphere soils at the time of peak corn growth in the season following cover crop and fertilizer application. Cover crop and fertilizer treatments tended to lower alpha diversity in early season samples. However, winter rye, oilseed radish, and buckwheat cover crop treatments increased alpha diversity in some later season samples compared to a no-amendment control. Fertilizer treatments and some cover crops decreased relative abundance of members of the ammonia-oxidizing family Nitrosomonadaceae. Pelleted poultry manure and Sustane® (a commercial fertilizer) decreased the relative abundance of Rhizobiales. Our data point to a need for future research exploring how (1) cover crops influence bacterial community structure and functions, (2) these effects differ with biomass composition and quantity, and (3) existing soil conditions and microbial community composition influence how soil microbial populations respond to agricultural management practices.

  11. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  12. Effects of field-grown genetically modified Zoysia grass on bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Eok; Yang, Sang-Hwan; Bae, Tae-Woong; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Lim, Pyung-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Yeon

    2011-04-01

    Herbicide-tolerant Zoysia grass has been previously developed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We investigated the effects of genetically modified (GM) Zoysia grass and the associated herbicide application on bacterial community structure by using culture-independent approaches. To assess the possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of transgenic DNA to soil microorganisms, total soil DNAs were amplified by PCR with two primer sets for the bar and hpt genes, which were introduced into the GM Zoysia grass by a callus-type transformation. The transgenic genes were not detected from the total genomic DNAs extracted from 1.5 g of each rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM Zoysia grasses. The structures and diversities of the bacterial communities in rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM Zoysia grasses were investigated by constructing 16S rDNA clone libraries. Classifier, provided in the RDP II, assigned 100 clones in the 16S rRNA gene sequences library into 11 bacterial phyla. The most abundant phyla in both clone libraries were Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. The bacterial diversity of the GM clone library was lower than that of the non- GM library. The former contained four phyla, whereas the latter had seven phyla. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to confirm these results. Phylogenetic analyses of the two clone libraries revealed considerable difference from each other. The significance of difference between clone libraries was examined with LIBSHUFF statistics. LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two clone libraries differed significantly (P〈0.025), suggesting alterations in the composition of the microbial community associated with GM Zoysia grass.

  13. Efficacy of sanitized ice in reducing bacterial load on fish fillet and in the water collected from the melted ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Lizanel; Lee, Jaesung; Lopes, John A; Pascall, Melvin A

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of sanitized ice for the reduction of bacteria in the water collected from the ice that melted during storage of whole and filleted Tilapia fish. Also, bacterial reductions on the fish fillets were investigated. The sanitized ice was prepared by freezing solutions of PRO-SAN (an organic acid formulation) and neutral electrolyzed water (NEW). For the whole fish study, the survival of the natural microflora was determined from the water of the melted ice prepared with PRO-SAN and tap water. These water samples were collected during an 8 h storage period. For the fish fillet study, samples were inoculated with Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas putida then stored on crushed sanitized ice. The efficacies of these were tested by enumerating each bacterial species on the fish fillet and in the water samples at 12 and 24 h intervals for 72 h, respectively. Results showed that each bacterial population was reduced during the test. However, a bacterial reduction of fillet samples. A maximum of approximately 2 log CFU and > 3 log CFU reductions were obtained in the waters sampled after the storage of whole fish and the fillets, respectively. These reductions were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the water from sanitized ice when compared with the water from the unsanitized melted ice. These results showed that the organic acid formulation and NEW considerably reduced the bacterial numbers in the melted ice and thus reduced the potential for cross-contamination.

  14. Full-scale agricultural biogas plant metal content and process parameters in relation to bacterial and archaeal microbial communities over 2.5 year span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repinc, Sabina Kolbl; Šket, Robert; Zavec, Domen; Mikuš, Katarina Vogel; Fermoso, Fernando G; Stres, Blaž

    2018-05-01

    A start-up of 4 MW agricultural biogas plant in Vučja vas, Slovenia, was monitored from 2011 to 2014. The start-up was carried out in 3 weeks with the intake of biomass from three operating full-scale 1-2 MW donor agricultural biogas plants. The samples were taken from donor digesters and from two serial digesters during the start-up over the course of 2.5 years. Bacterial and Archaeal microbial communities progressively diverged from the composition of donor digesters during the start-up phase. The rate of change of Bacterial community decreased exponentially over the first 2.5 years as dynamics within the first 70 days was comparable to that of the next 1.5 years, whereas approximately constant rate was observed for Archaea. Despite rearrangements, the microbial communities remained functionally stable and produced biogas throughout the whole 2.5 years of observation. All systems parameters measured were ordered according to their Kernel density (Gaussian function) ranging from the most dispersed (substrate categories used as cosubstrates, quantities of each cosubstrate, substate dry and volatile matter, process parameters) towards progressively least dispersed (trace metal and ion profiles, aromatic-polyphenolic compounds, biogas plant functional output (energy)). No deficiency was detected in trace metal content as the distribution of metals and elements fluctuated within the suggested limits for biogas over 2.5 year observation. In contrast to the recorded process variables, Bacterial and Archaeal microbial communities exhibited directed changes oriented in time. Variation partitioning showed that a large fraction of variability in the Bacterial and Archaeal microbial communities (55% and 61%, respectively) remained unexplained despite numerous measured variables (n = 44) and stable biogas production. Our results show that the observed reorganization of microbial communities was not directly associated with impact on the full-scale biogas reactor

  15. The crystal structures of EAP domains from Staphylococcus aureus reveal an unexpected homology to bacterial superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Brian V; Hamaoka, Brent Y; Perman, Benjamin; Zemla, Adam; Leahy, Daniel J

    2005-04-29

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 A resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an alpha-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed beta-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the beta-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  16. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi, E-mail: suzuki@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture. 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  17. Enhanced Tolerance to Cadmium in Bacterial-Fungal Co-Cultures as a Strategy for Metal Biorecovery from e-Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geremia Losa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a microbe-based approach to be used for the biorecovery of valuable metals from e-waste. E-waste is a heterogeneous matrix at the microbial scale. Therefore, this study aims at taking advantage of bacterial-fungal (BF interactions in order to mobilize and immobilize a selected metal present in e-waste. We used cadmium (Cd and a selection of Cd-tolerant microorganisms from our culture collection or isolated from a naturally cadmium-contaminated soil. Several experiments were designed in order to use the synergistic bioremediation capabilities of BF couples to mobilize and immobilize Cd from a culture medium. Initial results showed that the selected synergistic BF couples are more tolerant to Cd concentrations than the organisms alone. However, setting the conditions leading to effective immobilization of this toxic metal still need further work. Using microbial consortia rather than single species represents an innovative alternative to traditional bioremediation approaches for the development of new biotechnological approaches in urban mining.

  18. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar

    2014-10-03

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  19. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared Heath; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R.; Barlow, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  20. Do high levels of diffuse and chronic metal pollution in sediments of Rhine and Meuse floodplains affect structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozema, Jelte; Notten, Martje J.M.; Aerts, Rien; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Hobbelen, Peter H.F.; Hamers, Timo H.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper (re)considers the question if chronic and diffuse heavy metal pollution (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) affects the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems of Biesbosch National Park, the floodplain area of rivers Meuse and Rhine. To reach this aim, we integrated the results of three projects on: 1. the origin, transfer and effects of heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain; 2. the impact of bioavailability on effects of heavy metals on the structure and functioning of detritivorous communities; 3. the risk assessment of heavy metals for an herbivorous and a carnivorous small mammal food chain. Metal pollution levels of the Biesbosch floodplain soils are high. The bioavailability of metals in the soils is low, causing low metal levels in plant leaves. Despite this, metal concentrations in soil dwelling detritivores and in land snails at polluted locations are elevated in comparison to animals from 'non-polluted' reference sites. However, no adverse effects on ecosystem structure (species richness, density, biomass) and functioning (litter decomposition, leaf consumption, reproduction) have been found. Sediment metal pollution may pose a risk to the carnivorous small mammal food chain, in which earthworms with elevated metal concentrations are eaten by the common shrew. Additional measurements near an active metal smelter, however, show reduced leaf consumption rates and reduced reproduction by terrestrial snails, reflecting elevated metal bioavailability at this site. Since future management may also comprise reintroduction of tidal action in the Biesbosch area, changes in metal bioavailability, and as a consequence future ecosystem effects, cannot be excluded

  1. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiemin [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang [101 Institute, Ministry of Civil Affairs, Beijing 100070 (China); Xing, Jianmin, E-mail: jmxing@ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities.

  2. Reducing the leachability of nitrate, phosphorus and heavy metals from soil using waste material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridullah

    Full Text Available Abstract Contaminants like nitrate (NO3, phosphorus (P and heavy metals in water are often associated with agricultural activities. Various soil and water remediation techniques have been employed to reduce the risk associated with these contaminants. A study was conducted to examine the extent of leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Pb and Cr, NO3 and P. For this purpose sandy and silt loam soils were amended with different waste materials, namely wood ash, solid waste ash, vegetable waste, charcoal, and sawdust. The soils were saturated with wastewater. Irrespective of the waste applied, the pH and EC of the amended soils were found to be greater than the control. Charcoal, sawdust and wood ash significantly decreased heavy metals, nitrate and phosphorus concentrations in the leachate. Treatments were more efficient for reducing Ni than other heavy metals concentrations. Waste amendments differed for heavy metals during the process of leaching. Heavy metals in the soil were progressively depleted due to the successive leaching stages. This research suggests that waste material may act as an adsorbent for the above contaminants and can reduce their leachability in soils.

  3. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-01-01

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T g . The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure

  4. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shuai, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Stolpe, Moritz, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Evenson, Zach [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), 51170 Köln (Germany); Bednarcik, Jozef [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kruzic, Jamie J. [Material Science, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  5. Taxonomic profiling of bacterial community structure from coastal sediment of Alang-Sosiya shipbreaking yard near Bhavnagar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vilas; Munot, Hitendra; Shah, Varun; Shouche, Yogesh S; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-12-30

    The Alang-Sosiya shipbreaking yard (ASSBY) is considered the largest of its kind in the world, and a major source of anthropogenic pollutants. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of shipbreaking activities on the bacterial community structure with a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. In the culture-dependent approach, 200 bacterial cultures were isolated and analyzed by molecular fingerprinting and 16S ribosomal RNA (r-RNA) gene sequencing, as well as being studied for degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the culture-independent approach, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were related to eight major phyla, of which Betaproteobacteria (especially Acidovorax) was predominantly found in the polluted sediments of ASSBY and Gammaproteobacteria in the pristine sediment sample. The statistical approaches showed a significant difference in the bacterial community structure between the pristine and polluted sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the effect of shipbreaking activity on the bacterial community structure of the coastal sediment at ASSBY. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Coupled cryoconite ecosystem structure-function relationships are revealed by comparing bacterial communities in alpine and Arctic glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Mur, Luis A. J.; Girdwood, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Cryoconite holes are known as foci of microbial diversity and activity on polar glacier surfaces, but are virtually unexplored microbial habitats in alpine regions. In addition, whether cryoconite community structure reflects ecosystem functionality is poorly understood. Terminal restriction...... revealed Proteobacteria were particularly abundant, with Cyanobacteria likely acting as ecosystem engineers in both alpine and Arctic cryoconite communities. However, despite these generalities, significant differences in bacterial community structures, compositions and metabolomes are found between alpine...... fragment length polymorphism and Fourier transform infrared metabolite fingerprinting of cryoconite from glaciers in Austria, Greenland and Svalbard demonstrated cryoconite bacterial communities are closely correlated with cognate metabolite fingerprints. The influence of bacterial-associated fatty acids...

  7. Iron/argillite interactions in radioactive waste disposal context: Oxidising transient and bacterial activities influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, Camille; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Maillet, Anais

    2014-01-01

    The design of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility developed by Andra (2005) in France involves emplacing metallic materials (containers, overpacks, liner) into a geological argillaceous formation. During the operational phase, ventilation of handling drifts will keep oxidising conditions at the front of disposal tunnels. Therefore, an oxidising transient may take place in parts of these tunnels in the post-closure phase possibly over several years. During this transient period, the environment of the disposal cell will evolve towards reducing and saturated conditions close to the equilibrium state of the original underground argillaceous formation. Moreover, high temperature conditions above 50 deg. C may be encountered in this environment over a few hundred years. Uniform corrosion represents the main type of degradation of metallic materials for the long term. The oxidising transient will be characterised by high corrosion rates (e.g. localised corrosion) due to the presence of oxygen whereas during the following anoxic stage, the main alteration factor will originate from the pore water associated with lower corrosion rates. In any case, metallic materials corrosion will lead to the release of aqueous iron, which may induce alteration of the favourable confining properties of the clayey materials. In this context, reactive pathways related to the metal corrosion under oxidising conditions and then followed by reducing conditions remain to be further understood (evolution of pH, redox and influence of temperature). Furthermore, some other significant issues remain open, in particular the dissolution/precipitation processes, the argillite perturbation extent and the effects of these transformations on the confining properties of materials. The presence of micro-organisms in deep argillaceous environment and the introduction of new bacterial species in the repository during the operational phase raise the question of their survival under real

  8. Perspective on Structural Evolution and Relations with Thermophysical Properties of Metallic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between the structural evolution and properties of metallic liquids is a long-standing hot issue in condensed-matter physics and materials science. Here, recent progress is reviewed in several fundamental aspects of metallic liquids, including the methods to study their atomic structures, liquid-liquid transition, physical properties, fragility, and their correlations with local structures, together with potential applications of liquid metals at room temperature. Involved with more experimentally and theoretically advanced techniques, these studies provide more in-depth understanding of the structure-property relationship of metallic liquids and promote the design of new metallic materials with superior properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Melting and liquid structure of polyvalent metal halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1992-08-01

    A short review is given of recent progress in determining and understanding liquid structure types and melting mechanisms for halides of polyvalent metals. The nature of the preferred local coordination for the polyvalent metal ion in the melt can usually be ascertained from data on liquid mixtures with halogen-donating alkali halides. The stability of these local coordination states and the connectivity that arises between them in the approach to the pure melt determines the character of its short-range and possible medium-range order. A broad classification of structural and melting behaviours can be given on the basis of measured melting parameters and transport coefficients for many compounds, in combination with the available diffraction data on the liquid structure of several compounds. Correlations have been shown to exist with a simple indicator of the nature of the chemical bond and also with appropriate parameters of ionic models, wherever the latter are usefully applicable for semiquantitative calculations of liquid structure. Consequences on the mechanisms for valence electron localization in solutions of metallic elements into strongly structured molten salts are also briefly discussed. (author). 46 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides

  11. Liquid structure and melting of trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.; Pastore, G.; Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.

    1991-03-01

    Many divalent and trivalent metal ions in stoichiometric liquid mixtures of their halides with alkali halides are fourfold or sixfold coordinated by halogens into relatively long-lived ''complexes''. The stability of these local coordination states and the connectivity that arises between them in the approach to the pure polyvalent metal halide melt determines the character of its short-range and possible intermediate-range order. The available evidence on local coordination in some 140 mixtures has been successfully classified by a structure sorting method based on Pettifor's chemical scale of the elements. Within the general phenomenological frame provided by structure sorting, main attention is given in this work to the liquid structure and melting mechanisms of trivalent metal chlorides. The liquid structure of YCl 3 is first discussed on the basis of neutron diffraction measurements and of calculations within a simple ionic model, and the melting mechanisms of YCl 3 and AlCl 3 , which are structurally isomorphous in the crystalline state, are contrasted. By appeal to macroscopic melting parameters and transport coefficients and to liquid structure data on SbCl 3 , it is proposed that the melting mechanisms of these salts may be classified into three main types in correlation with the character of the chemical bond. (author). 31 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Unique hyper-thermal composting process in Kagoshima City forms distinct bacterial community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yukihiro; Tabata, Hanae; Itahara, Asuka; Shimizu, Natsuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Sakai, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    A unique compost, Satsuma soil, is produced from three types of wastewater sludge using hyper-thermal processes at temperatures much higher than that of general thermophilic processes in Kagoshima City, Japan. We analyzed the bacterial community structures of this hyper-thermal compost sample and other sludges and composts by a high-throughput barcoded pyrosequencing method targeting the 16S rRNA gene. In total, 621,076 reads were derived from 17 samples and filtered. Artificial sequences were deleted and the reads were clustered based on the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% similarity. Phylum-level analysis of the hyper-thermal compost revealed drastic changes of the sludge structures (each relative abundance) from Firmicutes (average 47.8%), Proteobacteria (average 22.3%), and Bacteroidetes (average 10.1%) to two main phyla including Firmicutes (73.6%) and Actinobacteria (25.0%) with less Proteobacteria (∼0.3%) and Bacteroidetes (∼0.1%). Furthermore, we determined the predominant species (each relative abundance) of the hyper-thermal compost including Firmicutes related to Staphylococcus cohnii (13.8%), Jeotgalicoccus coquinae (8.01%), and Staphylococcus lentus (5.96%), and Actinobacteria related to Corynebacterium stationis (6.41%), and found that these species were not predominant in wastewater sludge. In contrast, we did not observe any common structures among eight other composts produced, using the hyper-thermal composts as the inoculums, under thermophilic conditions from different materials. Principle coordinate analysis of the hyper-thermal compost indicated a large difference in bacterial community structures from material sludge and other composts. These results suggested that a distinct bacterial community structure was formed by hyper-thermal composting. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal distribution of bacterial community structure in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and the adjacent East China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Huang Huiqin; Bao Shixiang; Xiao Tian; Zhang Wuchang; Wu Ying; Zhou Feng

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial community structure and the effects of environmental factors on the microbial community distribution were investigated in the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia area and its adjacent area in the East China Sea (ECS) in June, August and October, 2006. Profiles of bacterial communities were generated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes followed by DNA sequence analysis. The dominant bacterial groups were affiliated to Gammaproteobacteria, Cytophaga–Flavobacteria–Bacteroides (CFB), Deltaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes, which were mostly from the marine seawater ecosystem. Effects of environmental factors on the bacterial community distribution were analyzed by the ordination technique of canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The environmental factors significantly influencing bacterial community structure were different in the three months; dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and temperature in June and nitrite in August. No environmental variables displayed significant influence on the bacterial community at the 5% level in October. The seasonal environmental heterogeneity in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent ECS, such as seasonal hydrodynamic conditions and riverine input of nutrients, might be the reason for the difference in the key environmental factors determining the bacterial community in the three months. (letter)

  14. Bacterial Community Structure in a Mollisol Under Long-Term Natural Restoration, Cropping, and Bare Fallow History Estimated by PCR-DGGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Hua; JIN Jian; LIU Jun-Jie; CHEN Xue-Li; LIU Ju-Dong; LIU Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbial biomass and community structures are commonly used as indicators for soil quality and fertility.A investigation was performed to study the effects of long-term natural restoration,cropping,and bare fallow managements on the soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in depths of 0-10,20-30,and 40-50 cm in a black soil (Mollisol).Microbial biomass was estimated from chloroform fumigation-extraction,and bacterial community structures were determined by analysis of 16S rDNA using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCRDGGE).Experimental results showed that microbial biomass significantly declined with soil depth in the managements of restoration and cropping,but not in the bare fallow.DGGE profiles indicated that the band number in top 0-10 cm soils was less than that in depth of 20-30 or 40-50 cm.These suggested that the microbial population was high but the bacterial community structure was simple in the topsoil.Cluster and principle component analysis based on DGGE banding patterns showed that the bacterial community structure was affected by soil depth more primarily than by managements,and the succession of bacterial community as increase of soil depth has a similar tendency in the three managements.Fourteen predominating DGGE bands were excised and sequenced,in which 6 bands were identified as the taxa of Verrucomicrobia,2 bands as Actinobacteria,2 bands as α-Proteobacteria,and the other 4 bands as δ-Proteobacteria,Acidobacteria,Nitrospira,and unclassified bacteria.In addition,the sequences of 11 DGGE bands were closely related to uncultured bacteria.Thus,the bacterial community structure in black soil was stable,and the predominating bacterial groups were uncultured.

  15. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal–metal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konsolakis, Michalis, E-mail: mkonsol@science.tuc.gr [School of Production Engineering and Management, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); Ioakeimidis, Zisis [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, Bakola and Sialvera, GR-50100 Kozani (Greece)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • The surface chemistry of Cu-based catalysts is adjusted by metal-support or metal–metal interactions. • Three series of catalysts, i.e., Cu/REOs, Cu/Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ} and Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2} were prepared. • The local structure of Cu sites is remarkably affected by support or active phase modification. • Useful insights toward the fundamental understanding of Cu-catalyzed reactions are provided. - Abstract: Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal–metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ}) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2}). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal–metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  16. Characterization of bacterial diversity associated with deep sea ferromanganese nodules from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Chao; Liu, Yan-Xia; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Deep sea ferromanganese (FeMn) nodules contain metallic mineral resources and have great economic potential. In this study, a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent (16S rRNA genes clone library and pyrosequencing) methods was used to investigate the bacterial diversity in FeMn nodules from Jiaolong Seamount, the South China Sea. Eleven bacterial strains including some moderate thermophiles were isolated. The majority of strains belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria; one isolate belonged to the phylum Firmicutes. A total of 259 near full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in a clone library and 67,079 valid reads obtained using pyrosequencing indicated that members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated, with the most abundant bacterial genera being Pseudomonas and Alteromonas. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of many organisms whose closest relatives are known manganese oxidizers, iron reducers, hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria and methylotrophs. This is the first reported investigation of bacterial diversity associated with deep sea FeMn nodules from the South China Sea.

  17. A model for the electric conduction in metal/poly-TiO2/metal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Babaei, Faramarz; Alaei-Sheini, Navid-

    2017-12-01

    Intensely studied memristive devices have M‧/MO/M″ structures, wherein MO is a nanometer-sized metal oxide crystallite sandwiched between the M‧ and M″ metal electrodes. The most widely used oxide for this purpose is TiO2 and the electrodes are of noble metals such as platinum, silver, and gold. The memristive features of the device is believed to originate from the motion of the ionized oxygen vacancies within the oxide crystal. The operation of the device is further complicated by the motion of the mobile cations originating from the metal electrodes. The complexity of the device performance increases further when the noble metal electrodes form Schottky barriers at their junctions with TiO2, as the conduction takes place through these energy barriers. In a recent publication, the authors have shown that, owing to the ohmicity of the Ti/TiO2 junctions, electronic observations on the devices with Ti/TiO2/Ti structure can be easier to model. The presented model clarified that in a Ti/poly-TiO2/Ti structure, the ionic motion and the electronic conduction take place on the TiO2 grain surfaces and grain boundaries rather than the grain interiors. Here, we show that the suggested model has important implications for chemical sensor design and fabrication.

  18. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangho Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE and low density polyethylene (LDPE and polypropylene (PP resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  19. Reducing Salt in Raw Pork Sausages Increases Spoilage and Correlates with Reduced Bacterial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougy, Lysiane; Desmonts, Marie-Hélène; Coeuret, Gwendoline; Fassel, Christine; Hamon, Erwann; Hézard, Bernard; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raw sausages are perishable foodstuffs; reducing their salt content raises questions about a possible increased spoilage of these products. In this study, we evaluated the influence of salt reduction (from 2.0% to 1.5% [wt/wt]), in combination with two types of packaging (modified atmosphere [50% mix of CO2-N2] and vacuum packaging), on the onset of spoilage and on the diversity of spoilage-associated bacteria. After 21 days of storage at 8°C, spoilage was easily observed, characterized by noticeable graying of the products and the production of gas and off-odors defined as rancid, sulfurous, or sour. At least one of these types of spoilage occurred in each sample, and the global spoilage intensity was more pronounced in samples stored under modified atmosphere than under vacuum packaging and in samples with the lower salt content. Metagenetic 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that vacuum-packaged samples contained a higher total bacterial richness (n = 69 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) than samples under the other packaging condition (n = 46 OTUs). The core community was composed of 6 OTUs (Lactobacillus sakei, Lactococcus piscium, Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Serratia proteamaculans, and Brochothrix thermosphacta), whereas 13 OTUs taxonomically assigned to the Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae families comprised a less-abundant subpopulation. This subdominant community was significantly more abundant when 2.0% salt and vacuum packaging were used, and this correlated with a lower degree of spoilage. Our results demonstrate that salt reduction, particularly when it is combined with CO2-enriched packaging, promotes faster spoilage of raw sausages by lowering the overall bacterial diversity (both richness and evenness). IMPORTANCE Our study takes place in the context of raw meat product manufacturing and is linked to a requirement for salt reduction. Health guidelines are calling for a reduction in

  20. Reducing Salt in Raw Pork Sausages Increases Spoilage and Correlates with Reduced Bacterial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougy, Lysiane; Desmonts, Marie-Hélène; Coeuret, Gwendoline; Fassel, Christine; Hamon, Erwann; Hézard, Bernard; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Chaillou, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Raw sausages are perishable foodstuffs; reducing their salt content raises questions about a possible increased spoilage of these products. In this study, we evaluated the influence of salt reduction (from 2.0% to 1.5% [wt/wt]), in combination with two types of packaging (modified atmosphere [50% mix of CO2-N2] and vacuum packaging), on the onset of spoilage and on the diversity of spoilage-associated bacteria. After 21 days of storage at 8°C, spoilage was easily observed, characterized by noticeable graying of the products and the production of gas and off-odors defined as rancid, sulfurous, or sour. At least one of these types of spoilage occurred in each sample, and the global spoilage intensity was more pronounced in samples stored under modified atmosphere than under vacuum packaging and in samples with the lower salt content. Metagenetic 16S rRNA pyrosequencing revealed that vacuum-packaged samples contained a higher total bacterial richness (n = 69 operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) than samples under the other packaging condition (n = 46 OTUs). The core community was composed of 6 OTUs (Lactobacillus sakei, Lactococcus piscium, Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Serratia proteamaculans, and Brochothrix thermosphacta), whereas 13 OTUs taxonomically assigned to the Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae families comprised a less-abundant subpopulation. This subdominant community was significantly more abundant when 2.0% salt and vacuum packaging were used, and this correlated with a lower degree of spoilage. Our results demonstrate that salt reduction, particularly when it is combined with CO2-enriched packaging, promotes faster spoilage of raw sausages by lowering the overall bacterial diversity (both richness and evenness). Our study takes place in the context of raw meat product manufacturing and is linked to a requirement for salt reduction. Health guidelines are calling for a reduction in dietary salt intake

  1. Structural and magnetic properties of Fe{sub x}Ni{sub 100−x} alloys synthesized using Al as a reducing metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srakaew, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Jantaratana, P., E-mail: fscipsj@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Nipakul, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sirisathitkul, C. [Molecular Technology Research Unit, School of Science, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161 (Thailand)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Reduction by aluminum is a simple and safe route to synthesize iron-nickel alloys. • Alloy compositions with up to 90 at.% Fe can be obtained with minimal oxidation. • Morphology and magnetic properties are varied with the alloy composition. - Abstract: Iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloys comprising nine different compositions were rapidly synthesized from the redox reaction using aluminum foils as the reducing metal. Compared with conventional chemical syntheses, this simple approach is relatively safe and allows control over the alloy morphology and magnetic behavior as a function of the alloy composition with minimal oxidation. For alloys having low (10%–30%) Fe content the single face-centered cubic (FCC) FeNi{sub 3} phase was formed with nanorods aligned in the (1 1 1) crystalline direction on the cluster surface. This highly anisotropic morphology gradually disappeared as the Fe content was raised to 40%–70% with the alloy structure possessing a mixture of FCC FeNi{sub 3} and body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe{sub 7}Ni{sub 3}. The FCC phase was entirely replaced by the BCC structure upon further increase the Fe content to 80%–90%. The substitution of Ni by Fe in the crystals and the dominance of the BCC phase over the FCC structure gave rise to enhanced magnetization. By contrast, the coercive field decreased as a function of increasing Fe because of the reduction in shape anisotropy and the rise of saturation magnetization.

  2. Structure of deformed metals. Struktura deformirovannykh metallov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernshtein, M L

    1977-01-01

    A teaching aid for students at metallurgical and machine-building institutions of higher learning. It can also be used by engineering-technical personnel and scientists. A presentation is made of physical concepts on the mechanism of plastic deformation and its effect on fine structure, structure and properties of metals and alloys. An examination is made of the processes of recovery, polygonization and recrystallization during the heating of cold-deformed metals. The influence of thermal deformation is described to account for the interaction between admixture atoms and dislocations, phase and structural transformations. An examination is made of the phenomenon of superplasticity. Special attention is given to the process of hot deformation. An analysis is made of phenomena at the basis of hardening steel as a result of thermo-mechanical processing, including controlled rolling.

  3. A composite structure based on reduced graphene oxide and metal oxide nanomaterials for chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galstyan, Vardan; Comini, Elisabetta; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Ponzoni, Andrea; Sberveglieri, Veronica; Poli, Nicola; Faglia, Guido; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid nanostructure based on reduced graphene oxide and ZnO has been obtained for the detection of volatile organic compounds. The sensing properties of the hybrid structure have been studied for different concentrations of ethanol and acetone. The response of the hybrid material is significantly higher compared to pristine ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the nanohybrid is a promising structure for the monitoring of environmental pollutants and for the application of breath tests in assessment of exposure to volatile organic compounds.

  4. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO 2 , AsO 4 , Bi, Cd, Co, CrO 4 , Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO 3 , TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  5. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  6. Reducing bacterial contamination in an Orthopedic Theatre ventilated by natural ventilation, in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephanie; Palmer, Rish; Phillipo, Edward; Chipungu, Geoffrey

    2016-05-31

    All surgical procedures have the potential for infection and some of the main sources are contamination from airborne particles, theatre personnel and the theatre environment.  There is strong evidence that the use of ultra-clean air flow systems in orthopedic operating theatres reduces the incidence of deep sepsis after surgery. In the developing world however, this is often an unrealistic solution. The aim of this study was to establish baseline levels of contamination in a working orthopedic theatre, at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. To feedback results to the theatre team, promote infection prevention discussion and work with the team to implement workable and realistic goals to improve the intra-operative environment. Samples were collected from theatre equipment available at the time of surgery, from theatre water and theatre air using passive air sampling techniques. Samples were immediately transferred to the Central Microbiology Laboratory for culture on basic culture media. Bacterial contamination of theatre equipment, intra-operative theatre air and water was detected. Results were discussed with the theatre and infection prevention team who were receptive to feedback with regards to infection prevention strategies and keen to develop simple measures which could be put in place to change practice. In this setting, we suggest that implementing workable and realistic goals such as, establishing baseline rates of bacterial contamination and introduction of strict protocols for asepsis and theatre etiquette, may reduce bacterial contamination rates and subsequent intra-operative infection in the absence of expensive engineering solutions.

  7. The atomic structure of transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical reactions are used to probe the atomic (geometrical) structure of isolated clusters of transition metal atoms. The number of adsorbate molecules that saturate a cluster, and/or the binding energy of molecules to cluster surfaces, are determined as a function of cluster size. Systematics in these properties often make it possible to propose geometrical structures consistent with the experimental observations. We will describe how studies of the reactions of cobalt and nickel clusters with ammonia, water, and nitrogen provide important and otherwise unavailable structural information. Specifically, small (less than 20 atoms) clusters of cobalt and nickel atoms adopt entirely different structures, the former having packing characteristic of the bulk and the latter having pentagonal symmetry. These observations provide important input for model potentials that attempt to describe the local properties of transition metals. In particular, they point out the importance of a proper treatment of d-orbital binding in these systems, since cobalt and nickel differ so little in their d-orbital occupancy

  8. A composite structure based on reduced graphene oxide and metal oxide nanomaterials for chemical sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Galstyan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid nanostructure based on reduced graphene oxide and ZnO has been obtained for the detection of volatile organic compounds. The sensing properties of the hybrid structure have been studied for different concentrations of ethanol and acetone. The response of the hybrid material is significantly higher compared to pristine ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the nanohybrid is a promising structure for the monitoring of environmental pollutants and for the application of breath tests in assessment of exposure to volatile organic compounds.

  9. Metal Oxide Nano structures: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L. H.; Patil, D. S.; Yang, J.; Xiao, J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nano structured materials have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties, which make these materials potentially suitable for applications in electronics, optics, photonics, and sensors. Some metal oxides show a wide variety of morphologies such as nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes, nano rings, and nano belts. Synthesis and investigation of these metal-oxide nano structures are beneficial not only for understanding the fundamental phenomena in low dimensional systems, but also for developing new-generation nano devices with high performance.

  10. Hydrodebridement of wounds: effectiveness in reducing wound bacterial contamination and potential for air bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Frank L; Stickings, Daryl S; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; Armstrong, David G; Boulton, Andrew Jm

    2009-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of air contamination with bacteria after surgical hydrodebridement and to determine the effectiveness of hydro surgery on bacterial reduction of a simulated infected wound. Four porcine samples were scored then infected with a broth culture containing a variety of organisms and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The infected samples were then debrided with the hydro surgery tool (Versajet, Smith and Nephew, Largo, Florida, USA). Samples were taken for microbiology, histology and scanning electron microscopy pre-infection, post infection and post debridement. Air bacterial contamination was evaluated before, during and after debridement by using active and passive methods; for active sampling the SAS-Super 90 air sampler was used, for passive sampling settle plates were located at set distances around the clinic room. There was no statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination of the porcine samples post hydrodebridement. Analysis of the passive sampling showed a significant (p air whilst using hydro surgery equipment compared with a basal count of 582 CFUs/m3. During removal of the wound dressing, a significant increase was observed relative to basal counts (p air samples was still significantly raised 1 hour post-therapy. The results suggest a significant increase in bacterial air contamination both by active sampling and passive sampling. We believe that action might be taken to mitigate fallout in the settings in which this technique is used.

  11. Abundance, composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer and denitrifier communities in metal polluted rice paddies from South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available While microbial nitrogen transformations in soils had been known to be affected by heavy metal pollution, changes in abundance and community structure of the mediating microbial populations had been not yet well characterized in polluted rice soils. Here, by using the prevailing molecular fingerprinting and enzyme activity assays and comparisons to adjacent non-polluted soils, we examined changes in the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing and denitrifying communities of rice paddies in two sites with different metal accumulation situation under long-term pollution from metal mining and smelter activities. Potential nitrifying activity was significantly reduced in polluted paddies in both sites while potential denitrifying activity reduced only in the soils with high Cu accumulation up to 1300 mg kg-1. Copy numbers of amoA (AOA and AOB genes were lower in both polluted paddies, following the trend with the enzyme assays, whereas that of nirK was not significantly affected. Analysis of the DGGE profiles revealed a shift in the community structure of AOA, and to a lesser extent, differences in the community structure of AOB and denitrifier between soils from the two sites with different pollution intensity and metal composition. All of the retrieved AOB sequences belonged to the genus Nitrosospira, among which species Cluster 4 appeared more sensitive to metal pollution. In contrast, nirK genes were widely distributed among different bacterial genera that were represented differentially between the polluted and unpolluted paddies. This could suggest either a possible non-specific target of the primers conventionally used in soil study or complex interactions between soil properties and metal contents on the observed community and activity changes, and thus on the N transformation in the polluted rice soils.

  12. Exogenous indirect photoinactivation of bacterial pathogens and indicators in water with natural and synthetic photosensitizers in simulated sunlight with reduced UVB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraccini, P A; Wenk, J; Boehm, A B

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the UVB-independent and exogenous indirect photoinactivation of eight human health-relevant bacterial species in the presence of photosensitizers. Eight bacterial species were exposed to simulated sunlight with greatly reduced UVB light intensity in the presence of three synthetic photosensitizers and two natural photosensitizers. Inactivation curves were fit with shoulder log-linear or first-order kinetic models, from which the presence of a shoulder and magnitude of inactivation rate constants were compared. Eighty-four percent reduction in the UVB light intensity roughly matched a 72-95% reduction in the overall bacterial photoinactivation rate constants in sensitizer-free water. With the UVB light mostly reduced, the exogenous indirect mechanism contribution was evident for most bacteria and photosensitizers tested, although most prominently with the Gram-positive bacteria. Results confirm the importance of UVB light in bacterial photoinactivation and, with the reduction of the UVB light intensity, that the Gram-positive bacteria are more vulnerable to the exogenous indirect mechanism than Gram-negative bacteria. UVB is the most important range of the sunlight spectrum for bacterial photoinactivation. In aquatic environments where photosensitizers are present and there is high UVB light attenuation, UVA and visible wavelengths can contribute to exogenous indirect photoinactivation. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Asit; Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Patra, Ashok K.; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L"−"1 metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L"−"1), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  14. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Asit [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Biswas, Bhabananda [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Patra, Ashok K. [Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@newcastle.edu.au [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L{sup −1} metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L{sup −1}), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  15. Evaluation of two iterative techniques for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, F Edward; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate two methods for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography (CT)--the metal deletion technique (MDT) and the selective algebraic reconstruction technique (SART)--and compare these methods with filtered back projection (FBP) and linear interpolation (LI). The institutional review board approved this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study; informed patient consent was waived. Simulated projection data were calculated for a phantom that contained water, soft tissue, bone, and iron. Clinical projection data were obtained retrospectively from 11 consecutively identified CT scans with metal streak artifacts, with a total of 178 sections containing metal. Each scan was reconstructed using FBP, LI, SART, and MDT. The simulated scans were evaluated quantitatively by calculating the average error in Hounsfield units for each pixel compared with the original phantom. Two radiologists who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms used qualitatively evaluated the clinical scans, ranking the overall severity of artifacts for each algorithm. P values for comparisons of the image quality ranks were calculated from the binomial distribution. The simulations showed that MDT reduces artifacts due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and motion and does not introduce new streaks between metal and bone. MDT had the lowest average error (76% less than FBP, 42% less than LI, 17% less than SART). Blinded comparison of the clinical scans revealed that MDT had the best image quality 100% of the time (95% confidence interval: 72%, 100%). LI had the second best image quality, and SART and FBP had the worst image quality. On images from two CT scans, as compared with images generated by the scanner, MDT revealed information of potential clinical importance. For a wide range of scans, MDT yields reduced metal streak artifacts and better-quality images than does FBP, LI, or SART. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101782/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  16. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the 'MD source' as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an ''all stainless steel'' ECRIS.

  17. Structural study of Zr-based metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, E.; Ichitsubo, T.; Saida, J.; Kohara, S.; Ohsumi, H.

    2007-01-01

    Structures of Zr 70 Ni 20 Al 10 , Zr 70 Cu 20 Al 10 , Zr 70 Cu 30 and Zr 70 Ni 30 amorphous alloys were analyzed by high-energy X-ray diffraction. The relatively stable Zr 2 Cu amorphous alloy shows a local atom arrangement different from the Zr 2 Cu crystalline phase. By contrast, the less stable Zr 70 Ni 30 amorphous alloy has a structure similar to Zr 2 Ni. In the Zr 70 Cu 20 Al 10 metallic glass, Zr-Al nearest neighbor pairs are introduced in the amorphous structure. In the Zr 70 Ni 20 Al 10 metallic glass, the strong correlation between Zr-Ni pairs is drastically modified by the formation of Zr-Al pairs. The presence of Zr-Al pairs in the ternary alloys suppresses the crystallization and stabilizes the glassy state

  18. Hospital effluents are one of several sources of metal, antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial markers disseminated in Sub-Saharan urban rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Laffite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Data concerning the occurrence of emerging biological contaminants such as antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB in aquatic environments in Sub-Saharan African countries is limited. On the other hand, antibiotic resistance remains a worldwide problem which may pose serious potential risks to human and animal health. Consequently, there is a growing number of reports concerning the prevalence and dissemination of these contaminants into various environmental compartments. Sediments provide the opportunity to reconstruct the pollution history and evaluate impacts so this study investigates the abundance and distribution of toxic metals, FIB, and ARGs released from hospital effluent wastewaters and their presence in river sediments receiving systems. ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, blaSHV, and aadA, total bacterial load, and selected bacterial species FIB (E. coli, Enterococcus (ENT and Pseudomonas species (Psd were quantified by targeting species specific genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR in total DNA extracted from the sediments recovered from 4 hospital outlet pipes (HOP and their river receiving systems in the City of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The results highlight the great concentration of toxic metals in HOP, reaching the values (in mg kg-1 of 47.9 (Cr, 213.6 (Cu, 1434.4 (Zn, 2.6 (Cd, 281.5 (Pb, and 13.6 (Hg. The results also highlight the highest (P˂0.05 values of 16S rRNA, FIB, and ARGs copy numbers in all sampling sites including upstream (control site, discharge point, and downstream of receiving rivers, indicating that the hospital effluent water is not an exclusive source of the biological contaminants entering the urban rivers. Significant correlation were observed between (i all analyzed ARGs and total bacterial load (16S rRNA 0.51 to 0.72 (p<0.001, n=65; (ii ARGs (except blaTEM and FIB and Psd 0.57 < r < 0.82 (p<0.001, n=65; and (iii ARGs (except blaTEM and toxic metals (Cd, Cr, Cu

  19. Physical masking process for integrating micro metallic structures on polymer substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    plasmon devices need micro metallic structures on a polymer substrate with an uniform metal layer thickness in the nanometer range. A well known fabrication process to achieve such metallic surface pattern on polymer substrate is photolithography which involves an expensive mask and toxic chemicals......Integration of micro metallic structures in polymer devices is a broad multi-disciplinary research field, consisting of various combinations of mechanical, chemical and physical fabrication methods. Each of the methods has its specific advantages and disadvantages. Some applications like surface....... The current study shows a novel approach for fabricating thin micro metallic structures on polymer substrates using a simple physical mask and a PVD equipment. The new process involves fewer process steps, it is cost effective and suitable for high volume industrial production. Current study suggests...

  20. Mechanisms of bacterial metals removal from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torma, A.E.; Pryfogle, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Great Lakes area sediments are contaminated with varying amounts of heavy metals and polychlorinated organic matter. With respect to the bioremediation of metallic contents of these sediments, it was shown that a number of microorganisms exist which can effectively solubilize heavy metals. The basic reaction mechanisms of bioleaching processes were discussed and the effects of semiconductor character of the sulfide substrate explained. A special emphasis was made to comment on INEL's bioremediation capability. 37 refs

  1. A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His M200 changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Bio-Kil, a nano-based disinfectant, reduces environmental bacterial burden and multidrug-resistant organisms in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Sen; Hsieh, Tai-Chin; Shiau, Justine C; Ou, Tsong-Yih; Chen, Fu-Lun; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Yen, Muh-Yong; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2017-10-01

    This prospective before-after study was intended to investigate the effect of Bio-Kil on reducing environmental bacterial burden and healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) at the Municipal Wan-Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan in 2014. Four rooms in the medical and surgical ICUs were investigated and designated as study rooms (n = 2) or control rooms (n = 2). Routine disinfection was performed during the pre-intervention period in both room types. Bio-Kil was applied to the fomites and surroundings of the study rooms during the intervention period. Total bacterial burden and proportion of colonization of fomites and surroundings by multidrug-resistance organisms (MDROs) were determined before and after the intervention. The demographic characteristics, underlying conditions, and clinical outcomes of patients were analyzed. After application of Bio-Kil, the bacterial burden declined in both groups, although the reduction was greater in the study rooms as compared with the control rooms (p = 0.001). During the pre-intervention period, 16 patients were admitted to control rooms and 18 patients to study rooms. After the intervention, 22 patients were admitted to control rooms and 21 patients to study rooms. The number of cases of new-onset sepsis declined in the intervention group (from 33% to 23.8%), but increased in the control group (from 25% to 40.9%); however, there was no significant difference in incidence of new-onset sepsis between the study and control rooms after intervention. Application of Bio-Kil reduced the environmental bacterial burden and MDROs in ICUs. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this nanotechnology-based disinfectant in reducing HAIs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  4. Reliability Analysis-Based Numerical Calculation of Metal Structure of Bridge Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study introduced a finite element model of DQ75t-28m bridge crane metal structure and made finite element static analysis to obtain the stress response of the dangerous point of metal structure in the most extreme condition. The simulated samples of the random variable and the stress of the dangerous point were successfully obtained through the orthogonal design. Then, we utilized BP neural network nonlinear mapping function trains to get the explicit expression of stress in response to the random variable. Combined with random perturbation theory and first-order second-moment (FOSM method, the study analyzed the reliability and its sensitivity of metal structure. In conclusion, we established a novel method for accurately quantitative analysis and design of bridge crane metal structure.

  5. Effectiveness of oxytetracycline in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish (Labeo rohita, Hamilton under laboratory culture condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ariful Haque

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effectiveness of most widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish under artificial culture condition in the laboratory. Methods: The experiment was conducted in the Faculty Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in 8 aquaria where fish in 5 aquaria were used for replication of the treatment (experimental group and fish in remaining 3 aquaria were considered as a control (Control group. OTC was fed to the fish in the experimental aquarium at the rate of 2 g/kg through diet twice daily whereas fish reared under control condition was given feed without antibiotic for 20 d and bacterial content in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish were estimated at every alternative day after onset of the experiment. Results: Rearing the fish with OTC treated feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial load in the aquarium water, gills, intestine and skin of the fish whereas the content remain unchanged or little increased in the control group. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were within the suitable range in the experimental aquarium but not in control aquaria throughout the experimental period. Conclusions: These results suggest that OTC could be a potential antibiotic to reduce the bacterial load in fish and can be used commercially for maintaining the fish health in aquarium conditions.

  6. Nano and Microscale Topographies for the Prevention of Bacterial Surface Fouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary V. Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface fouling is problematic for a wide range of applications and industries, including, but not limited to medical devices (implants, replacement joints, stents, pacemakers, municipal infrastructure (pipes, wastewater treatment, food production (food processing surfaces, processing equipment, and transportation (ship hulls, aircraft fuel tanks. One method to combat bacterial biofouling is to modify the topographical structure of the surface in question, thereby limiting the ability of individual cells to attach to the surface, colonize, and form biofilms. Multiple research groups have demonstrated that micro and nanoscale topographies significantly reduce bacterial biofouling, for both individual cells and bacterial biofilms. Antifouling strategies that utilize engineered topographical surface features with well-defined dimensions and shapes have demonstrated a greater degree of controllable inhibition over initial cell attachment, in comparison to undefined, texturized, or porous surfaces. This review article will explore the various approaches and techniques used by researches, including work from our own group, and the underlying physical properties of these highly structured, engineered micro/nanoscale topographies that significantly impact bacterial surface attachment.

  7. Analysis of Bacterial Community Composition of Corroded Steel Immersed in Sanya and Xiamen Seawaters in China via Method of Illumina MiSeq Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal corrosion is of worldwide concern because it is the cause of major economic losses, and because it creates significant safety issues. The mechanism of the corrosion process, as influenced by bacteria, has been studied extensively. However, the bacterial communities that create the biofilms that form on metals are complicated, and have not been well studied. This is why we sought to analyze the composition of bacterial communities living on steel structures, together with the influence of ecological factors on these communities. The corrosion samples were collected from rust layers on steel plates that were immersed in seawater for two different periods at Sanya and Xiamen, China. We analyzed the bacterial communities on the samples by targeted 16S rRNA gene (V3–V4 region sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria fell into 13 phylotypes (similarity level = 97%. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, accounting for 88.84% of the total. Deltaproteobacteria, Clostridia and Gammaproteobacteria were the dominant classes, and accounted for 70.90% of the total. Desulfovibrio spp., Desulfobacter spp. and Desulfotomaculum spp. were the dominant genera and accounted for 45.87% of the total. These genera are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are known to corrode steel. Bacterial diversity on the 6 months immersion samples was much higher than that of the samples that had been immersed for 8 years (P < 0.001, Student’s t-test. The average complexity of the biofilms from the 8-years immersion samples from Sanya was greater than those from Xiamen, but not significantly so (P > 0.05, Student’s t-test. Overall, the data showed that the rust layers on the steel plates carried many bacterial species. The bacterial community composition was influenced by the immersion time. The results of our study will be of benefit to the further studies of bacterial corrosion mechanisms and

  8. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance Effect in Semiconductor/Metal Hybrid Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2013-06-27

    In this dissertation, the extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) effect in semiconductor/metal hybrid structures is studied to improve the performance in sensing applications. Using two-dimensional finite element simulations, the geometric dependence of the output sensitivity, which is a more relevant parameter for EMR sensors than the magnetoresistance (MR), is studied. The results show that the optimal geometry in this case is different from the geometry reported before, where the MR ratio was optimized. A device consisting of a semiconductor bar with length/width ratio of 5~10 and having only 2 contacts is found to exhibit the highest sensitivity. A newly developed three-dimensional finite element model is employed to investigate parameters that have been neglected with the two dimensional simulations utilized so far, i.e., thickness of metal shunt and arbitrary semiconductor/metal interface. The simulations show the influence of those parameters on the sensitivity is up to 10 %. The model also enables exploring the EMR effect in planar magnetic fields. In case of a bar device, the sensitivity to planar fields is about 15 % to 20 % of the one to perpendicular fields. 5 A “top-contacted” structure is proposed to reduce the complexity of fabrication, where neither patterning of the semiconductor nor precise alignment is required. A comparison of the new structure with a conventionally fabricated device shows that a similar magnetic field resolution of 24 nT/√Hz is obtained. A new 3-contact device is developed improving the poor low-field sensitivity observed in conventional EMR devices, resulting from its parabolic magnetoresistance response. The 3-contact device provides a considerable boost of the low field response by combining the Hall effect with the EMR effect, resulting in an increase of the output sensitivity by 5 times at 0.01 T compared to a 2-contact device. The results of this dissertation provide new insights into the optimization of EMR devices

  9. Effectiveness of stress release geometries on reducing residual stress in electroforming metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang; Du, Liqun; Zhao, Wenjun; Zhu, Heqing; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Weitai

    2018-04-01

    Micro electroforming, as a mature micromachining technology, is widely used to fabricate metal microdevices in micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). However, large residual stress in the local positions of the micro electroforming layer often leads to non-uniform residual stress distributions, dimension accuracy defects and reliability issues during fabrication of the metal microdevice. To solve this problem, a novel design method of presetting stress release geometries in the topological structure of the metal microstructure is proposed in this paper. First, the effect of stress release geometries (circular shape, annular groove shape and rivet shape) on the residual stress in the metal microstructure was investigated by finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Two evaluation parameters, stress concentration factor K T and stress non-uniformity factor δ were calculated. The simulation results show that presetting stress release geometries can effectively reduce and homogenize the residual stress in the metal microstructures were measured metal microstructure. By combined use with stress release geometries of annular groove shape and rivet shape, the stress concentration factor K T and the stress non-uniformity factor δ both decreased at a maximum of 49% and 53%, respectively. Meanwhile, the average residual stress σ avg decreased at a maximum of 20% from  -292.4 MPa to  -232.6 MPa. Then, micro electroforming experiments were carried out corresponding to the simulation models. The residual stresses in the metal microstructures were measured by micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) method. The results of the experiment proved that the stress non-uniformity factor δ and the average residual stress σ avg also decreased at a maximum with the combination use of annular groove shape and rivet shape stress release geometries, which is in agreement with the results of FEM analysis. The stress non-uniformity factor δ has a maximum decrease of 49% and the

  10. Related Structure Characters and Stability of Structural Defects in a Metallic Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Shidong; Pan, Shaopeng

    2018-03-22

    Structural defects were investigated by a recently proposed structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in a modeled Zr 50 Cu 50 metallic glass through molecular dynamics simulations. More QNAs around an atom usually means that more defects are located near the atom. Structural analysis reveals that the spatial distribution of the numbers of QNAs displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, QNA is closely correlated with cluster connections, especially four-atom cluster connections. Atoms with larger coordination numbers usually have less QNAs. When two atoms have the same coordination number, the atom with larger five-fold symmetry has less QNAs. The number of QNAs around an atom changes rather frequently and the change of QNAs might be correlated with the fast relaxation metallic glasses.

  11. Related Structure Characters and Stability of Structural Defects in a Metallic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Shidong; Pan, Shaopeng

    2018-01-01

    Structural defects were investigated by a recently proposed structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in a modeled Zr50Cu50 metallic glass through molecular dynamics simulations. More QNAs around an atom usually means that more defects are located near the atom. Structural analysis reveals that the spatial distribution of the numbers of QNAs displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, QNA is closely correlated with cluster connections, especially four-atom cluster connections. Atoms with larger coordination numbers usually have less QNAs. When two atoms have the same coordination number, the atom with larger five-fold symmetry has less QNAs. The number of QNAs around an atom changes rather frequently and the change of QNAs might be correlated with the fast relaxation metallic glasses. PMID:29565298

  12. Biofabrication of morphology improved cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells and ionic liquid: For toxicity against brain cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Siyuan; Ding, Yiming; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Nijia; Yu, Shuqing

    2018-01-01

    The present work determines the anticancer activity of bio-mediated synthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using the ionic liquid and bacterial cells (Shewanella oneidensis). Bacterial cells have been exposed to be important resources that hold huge potential as ecofriendly, cost-effective, evading toxic of dangerous chemicals and the alternative of conventional physiochemical synthesis. The Shewanella oneidensis is an important kind of metal reducing bacterium, known as its special anaerobic respiratory and sulfate reducing capacity. The crystalline nature, phase purity and surface morphology of biosynthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy. The use of imidazolium based ionic liquids as soft templating agent for controlling self-assembly and crystal growth direction of metal sulfide nanoparticles has also advanced as an important method. The microscopic techniques showed that the nanoparticles are designed on the nano form and have an excellent spherical morphology, due to the self-assembled mechanism of ionic liquid assistance. The antitumor efficiency of the cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was investigated against brain cancer cell lines using rat glioma cell lines. The effectively improved nano-crystalline and morphological structure of CdS nanoparticles in the presence of IL exhibit excellent cytotoxicity and dispersion ability on the cell shape is completely spread out showing a nice toxic environment against cancer cells. The cytotoxicity effect of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was discussed with a diagrammatic representation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effect of metal doping on structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dong [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Lee, Kwang-Ryeol, E-mail: krlee@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-05-31

    First-principles calculation was performed to investigate the effect of metal doping on the structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system, and the 3d transition metals (TM) were particularly selected as representative case. Results showed that the total energy in TM–C systems caused by distorting the bond angles was reduced distinctly for comparison with that in C–C system. Further electronic structure revealed that as the 3d electrons of doped TM increased, the bond characteristic of highest occupied molecular orbital changed from bonding (Sc, Ti) to nonbonding (V, Cr, Mn, Fe) and finally to antibonding (Co, Ni, Cu) between the TM and C atoms. Meanwhile, the TM–C bond presented a mixture of the covalent and ionic characters. The decrease of strength and directionality of TM–C bonds resulted in the total energy change upon bond angle distortion, which demonstrated that the bond characteristics played an important role in reducing residual stress of TM-doped amorphous carbon systems. - Highlights: • The bond characteristics as 3d electrons changed from bonding, nonbonding to antibonding. • The TM–C bond was a mixture of covalent and ionic characters. • Reduced strength and directionality of TM–C bond led to small distortion energy change. • The weak TM–C bond accounted for the reduced compressive stress caused by TM.

  14. Metal-organic frameworks: structure, properties, methods of synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butova, V V; Soldatov, M A; Guda, A A; Lomachenko, K A; Lamberti, C

    2016-01-01

    This review deals with key methods of synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The modular structure affords a wide variety of MOFs with different active metal sites and organic linkers. These compounds represent a new stage of development of porous materials in which the pore size and the active site structure can be modified within wide limits. The set of experimental methods considered in this review is sufficient for studying the short-range and long-range order of the MOF crystal structure, determining the morphology of samples and elucidating the processes that occur at the active metal site in the course of chemical reactions. The interest in metal-organic frameworks results, first of all, from their numerous possible applications, ranging from gas separation and storage to chemical reactions within the pores. The bibliography includes 362 references

  15. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  16. An analysis of harmful factors to storage stability of the reduced metallic spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Z. S.; Yoo, K. S.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, J. C.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze harmful factors for the reduced uranium metal, which was mainly composed of uranium, several basic properties such as microstructure, immiscibility, thermal, fission product effects were surveyed. And the oxidation properties of metal uranium and uranium alloys were also studied to select alloying elements for producing a stable uranium metal

  17. Configuration of biological wastewater treatment line and influent composition as the main factors driving bacterial community structure of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaranowska, Paulina; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    The structure of microbial consortia in wastewater treatment facilities is a resultant of environmental conditions created by the operational parameters of the purification process. In the research, activated sludge from nine Polish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) was investigated at a molecular level to determine the impact of the complexity of biological treatment line and the influent composition on the species structure and the diversity of bacterial consortia. The community fingerprints and technological data were subjected to the canonical correspondence and correlation analyses. The number of separated biological processes realized in the treatment line and the presence of industrial wastewater in the influent were the key factors determining the species structure of total and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biomass. The N2O-reducers community composition depended significantly on the design of the facility; the highest species richness of denitrifiers was noted in the WWTPs with separated denitrification tanks. The contribution of industrial streams to the inflow affected the diversity of total and denitrifying bacterial consortia and diminished the diversity of ammonia oxidizers. The obtained data are valuable for engineers since they revealed the main factors, including the design of wastewater treatment plant, influencing the microbial groups critical for the stability of purification processes.

  18. Structural investigations of some metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sietsma, J.

    1987-03-01

    Metallic glasses were prepared by the melt spinning technique from iron and nickel alloys (Fe-Ni-P; Fe-B; Ni-Nb; Ni-B). Structure investigations were made by means of neutron diffraction experiments. Distribution functions and range orders were determined. (Auth.)

  19. Effect of multiple metal resistant bacteria from contaminated lake sediments on metal accumulation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kefeng; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring bacteria play an important role in bioremediation of heavy metal pollutants in soil and wastewater. This study identified high levels of resistance to zinc, cesium, lead, arsenate and mercury in eight copper resistant Pseudomonas strains previously isolated from Torch Lake sediment. These strains showed variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. Furthermore, these metal resistant strains were capable of bioaccumulation of multiple metals and solubilization of copper. Bacterial strains TLC 3-3.5-1 and TLC 6-6.5-1 showed high bioaccumulation ability of Zn (up to 15.9 mg/g dry cell) and Pb (80.7 mg/g dry cell), respectively. All the strains produced plant growth promoting indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), iron chelating siderophore and solubilized mineral phosphate and metals. The effect of bacterial inoculation on plant growth and copper uptake by maize (Zea mays) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) was investigated using one of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. TLC 6-6.5-4) with higher IAA production and phosphate and metal soubilization, which resulted in a significant increase in copper accumulation in maize and sunflower, and an increase in the total biomass of maize. The multiple metal-resistant bacterial isolates characterized in our study have potential applications for remediation of metal contaminated soils in combination with plants and metal contaminated water.

  20. Effect of multiple metal resistant bacteria from contaminated lake sediments on metal accumulation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kefeng [Department of Biological Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Ramakrishna, Wusirika, E-mail: wusirika@mtu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Naturally occurring bacteria play an important role in bioremediation of heavy metal pollutants in soil and wastewater. This study identified high levels of resistance to zinc, cesium, lead, arsenate and mercury in eight copper resistant Pseudomonas strains previously isolated from Torch Lake sediment. These strains showed variable susceptibility to different antibiotics. Furthermore, these metal resistant strains were capable of bioaccumulation of multiple metals and solubilization of copper. Bacterial strains TLC 3-3.5-1 and TLC 6-6.5-1 showed high bioaccumulation ability of Zn (up to 15.9 mg/g dry cell) and Pb (80.7 mg/g dry cell), respectively. All the strains produced plant growth promoting indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), iron chelating siderophore and solubilized mineral phosphate and metals. The effect of bacterial inoculation on plant growth and copper uptake by maize (Zea mays) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) was investigated using one of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. TLC 6-6.5-4) with higher IAA production and phosphate and metal soubilization, which resulted in a significant increase in copper accumulation in maize and sunflower, and an increase in the total biomass of maize. The multiple metal-resistant bacterial isolates characterized in our study have potential applications for remediation of metal contaminated soils in combination with plants and metal contaminated water.

  1. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Swagat K; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared H; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R; Barlow, Stephen

    2014-11-17

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the X-ray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central CC σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these CC bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2 ]2 , rather similar (-1.97 to -2.15 V vs. FeCp2 (+/0) in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Soil factors involved in the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, B B; Montes-Borrego, M; Aranda, S; Soriano, M A; Gómez, J A; Navas-Cortés, J A

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency in olive production systems to reduce tillage or keep a vegetative cover to reduce soil erosion and degradation. However, there is scarce information on the effects of different soil management systems (SMS) in soil bacterial community composition of olive groves. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of soil type and different SMS implemented to control weeds in the structure and diversity of bacterial communities of 58 soils in the two geographic areas that best represent the organic olive production systems in Spain. Bacterial community composition assessed by frequency and intensity of occurrence of terminal restriction profiles (TRFs) derived from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of amplified 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid were strongly correlated with soil type/field site (Eutric/Calcaric) that differed mainly in soil particle size distribution and soil pH, followed by a strong effect of SMS, in that order. Canonical discriminant (CD) analysis of TRFs properly classified all of the olive orchard soils as belonging to their respective soil type or SMS. Furthermore, only a small set of TRFs were enough to clearly and significantly differentiate soil samples according to soil type or SMS. Those specific TRFs could be used as bioindicators to assess the effect of changes in SMS aimed to enhance soil quality in olive production systems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Extremophiles in Mineral Sulphide Heaps: Some Bacterial Responses to Variable Temperature, Acidity and Solution Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Watling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In heap bioleaching, acidophilic extremophiles contribute to enhanced metal extraction from mineral sulphides through the oxidation of Fe(II and/or reduced inorganic sulphur compounds (RISC, such as elemental sulphur or mineral sulphides, or the degradation of organic compounds derived from the ore, biota or reagents used during mineral processing. The impacts of variable solution acidity and composition, as well as temperature on the three microbiological functions have been examined for up to four bacterial species found in mineral sulphide heaps. The results indicate that bacteria adapt to sufficiently high metal concentrations (Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, As to allow them to function in mineral sulphide heaps and, by engaging alternative metabolic pathways, to extend the solution pH range over which growth is sustained. Fluctuating temperatures during start up in sulphide heaps pose the greatest threat to efficient bacterial colonisation. The large masses of ores in bioleaching heaps mean that high temperatures arising from sulphide oxidation are hard to control initially, when the sulphide content of the ore is greatest. During that period, mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria are markedly reduced in both numbers and activity.

  4. High pressure metallization of Mott Insulators: Magnetic, structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, M.P.; Hearne, G.; Sterer, E.; Taylor, R.D.; Jeanloz, R.

    1993-01-01

    High pressure studies of the insulator-metal transition in the (TM)I 2 (TM = V, Fe, Co and Ni) compounds are described. Those divalent transition-metal iodides are structurally isomorphous and classified as Mott Insulators. Resistivity, X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy were employed to investigate the electronic, structural, and magnetic properties as a function of pressure both on the highly correlated and on the metallic regimes

  5. Investigation on three new metal carboxydiphosphonates: Syntheses, structures, magnetic and luminescent properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Sifu; Pan Xiaobo; Lv Xiaoxia [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Zhao Xuebo, E-mail: zhaoxb@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A new multifunctionalized phosphoric acid, (2-(diphosphonomethylamino)nicotinic acid, Py(COOH)(NHCH--(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}){sub 2}), H{sub 5}L{sup 1}), has been employed as ligand for the construction of new metal phosphonates. By reacting it with different metal chlorides under hydrothermal condition, three new transition metal phosphonates, namely, [Co{sub 2}(HL{sup 1})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}][H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} (1), Zn(H{sub 3}L{sup 1}) (2) and [Cd(H{sub 3}L{sup 1})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][H{sub 2}O] (3) were successfully obtained. The single-crystal structure measurements indicated that the coordination mode of ligand H{sub 5}L{sup 1} is metal-dependant and results in different structures. For compound 1, it features 2D layered structure. Whereas compounds 2 and 3 have 1D chain structures. Under the excitation of 250 nm light, both compounds 2 and 3 show intraligand and ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) emission bands at about 415 and 420 nm, respectively. Magnetic study shows that compound 1 displays antiferromagnetic behavior. - Graphical abstract: Three new metal phosphonates were synthesized from a multifunctionalized phosphonate ligand and different metal chlorides. Their structures, thermal stabilities, luminescent and magnetic properties were characterized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new metal phosphonates were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 1 exhibits 2D layered structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 2 and 3 have 1D infinite chain structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 1 displays antiferromagnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 2 and 3 show intraligand and ligand to metal charge transfer emission bands.

  6. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  7. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  8. Role of reducing agent in extraction of arsenic and heavy metals from soils by use of EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Jeon, Eun-Ki; Baek, Kitae

    2016-06-01

    Although many metal-contaminated sites contain both anionic arsenic and cationic heavy metals, the current remediation technologies are not effective for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic elements from the contaminated sites due to their different characteristics. In this study, the role of reducing agent in simultaneous extraction of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn from contaminated soils was investigated using EDTA. The addition of reducing agents, which includes sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4), greatly enhanced the EDTA extraction of both As and heavy metals from the contaminated soils due to the increased mobility of the metals under the reduced conditions. The extent of the enhancement of the EDTA extraction was greatly affected by the reducing conditions. Strong reducing conditions (0.1 M of dithionite) were required for the extraction of metals strongly bound to the soil, while weak reducing conditions (0.01 M of dithionite or 0.1 M of oxalate/ascorbic acid) were sufficient for extraction of metals that were relatively weakly bound to the soil. An almost 90% extraction efficiency of total metals (As, Cu, Zn, and Pb) was obtained from the contaminated soils using the combination of dithionite and EDTA. Our results clearly showed that the combination of dithionite and EDTA can effectively extract As and heavy metals simultaneously from soils under a wide range of pH conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrologic linkages drive spatial structuring of bacterial assemblages and functioning in alpine floodplains

    OpenAIRE

    Freimann, Remo; Bürgmann, Helmut; Findlay, Stuart E.G.; Robinson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community assembly and microbial functions are affected by a number of different but coupled drivers such as local habitat characteristics, dispersal rates, and species interactions. In groundwater systems, hydrological flow can introduce spatial structure and directional dependencies among these drivers. We examined the importance of hydrology in structuring bacterial communities and their function within two alpine floodplains during different hydrological states. Piezometers were...

  10. Reduced Set of Virulence Genes Allows High Accuracy Prediction of Bacterial Pathogenicity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraola, Gregorio; Vazquez, Gustavo; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advances in understanding bacterial pathogenesis, there is still a lack of integrative information about what makes a bacterium a human pathogen. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has dramatically increased the amount of completed bacterial genomes, for both known human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains; this information is now available to investigate genetic features that determine pathogenic phenotypes in bacteria. In this work we determined presence/absence patterns of different virulence-related genes among more than finished bacterial genomes from both human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains, belonging to different taxonomic groups (i.e: Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, etc.). An accuracy of 95% using a cross-fold validation scheme with in-fold feature selection is obtained when classifying human pathogens and non-pathogens. A reduced subset of highly informative genes () is presented and applied to an external validation set. The statistical model was implemented in the BacFier v1.0 software (freely available at ), that displays not only the prediction (pathogen/non-pathogen) and an associated probability for pathogenicity, but also the presence/absence vector for the analyzed genes, so it is possible to decipher the subset of virulence genes responsible for the classification on the analyzed genome. Furthermore, we discuss the biological relevance for bacterial pathogenesis of the core set of genes, corresponding to eight functional categories, all with evident and documented association with the phenotypes of interest. Also, we analyze which functional categories of virulence genes were more distinctive for pathogenicity in each taxonomic group, which seems to be a completely new kind of information and could lead to important evolutionary conclusions. PMID:22916122

  11. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  12. Metal–insulator–metal light absorber: a continuous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M

    2013-01-01

    A type of light absorber made of continuous layers of metal and dielectric films is studied. The metal films can have thicknesses close to their skin depths in the wavelength range concerned, which allows for both light transmission and reflection. Resonances induced by multiple reflections in the structure, when combined with the inherent lossy nature of metals, result in strong absorption spectral features. An eigen-mode analysis is carried out for the plasmonic multilayer nanostructures which provides a generic understanding of the absorption features. Experimentally, the calculation is verified by a reflection measurement with a representative structure. Such an absorber is simple to fabricate. The highly efficient absorption characteristics can be potentially deployed for optical filter designs, sensors, accurate photothermal temperature control in a micro-environment and even for backscattering reduction of small particles, etc. (paper)

  13. Diazotrophic Bacterial Community of Degraded Pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tiago Correia Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pasture degradation can cause changes in diazotrophic bacterial communities. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the culturable and total diazotrophic bacterial community, associated with regions of the rhizosphere and roots of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. pastures in different stages of degradation. Samples of roots and rhizospheric soil were collected from slightly, partially, and highly degraded pastures. McCrady’s table was used to obtain the Most Probable Number (MPN of bacteria per gram of sample, in order to determine population density and calculate the Shannon-Weaver diversity index. The diversity of total diazotrophic bacterial community was determined by the technique of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the nifH gene, while the diversity of the culturable diazotrophic bacteria was determined by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (BOX-PCR technique. The increase in the degradation stage of the B. decumbens Stapf. pasture did not reduce the population density of the cultivated diazotrophic bacterial community, suggesting that the degradation at any degree of severity was highly harmful to the bacteria. The structure of the total diazotrophic bacterial community associated with B. decumbens Stapf. was altered by the pasture degradation stage, suggesting a high adaptive capacity of the bacteria to altered environments.

  14. Eddy current technologies for thick metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Endo, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    One of approach of an eddy current testing (ECT) for thick metal structures is introduced. The detection limit of ECT is capable of enlarging thick more than 10 mm, which is ordinarily about 5 mm, by the design of probe. On the basis of results of numerical analysis, the defect detection in thick and shape is evaluated by the distribution of experimental ECT signals. The problems of ECT for thick metal structures and measures, approach to probe design, the specifications of probe, evaluation of experimental results and defect detection are described. By ECT fast simulator, good slit sharp is simulated in the case of 10 and 20 mm of EDM slit length and 5, 10 and 15 mm of slit height. (S.Y.)

  15. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dittrich

    Full Text Available Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP. To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs; ii storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood. This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  16. Structural Variation in the Bacterial Community Associated with Airborne Particulate Matter in Beijing, China, during Hazy and Nonhazy Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Zhang, Tao; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Li; Wang, Hao; Fang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yu, Li-Yan

    2018-05-01

    The structural variation of the bacterial community associated with particulate matter (PM) was assessed in an urban area of Beijing during hazy and nonhazy days. Sampling for different PM fractions (PM 2.5 [airborne bacterial community in these samples was analyzed using the Illumina MiSeq platform with bacterium-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 1,707,072 reads belonging to 6,009 operational taxonomic units were observed. The airborne bacterial community composition was significantly affected by PM fractions ( R = 0.157, P airborne bacterial community composition. Only six genera increased across PM 10 samples ( Dokdonella , Caenimonas , Geminicoccus , and Sphingopyxis ) and PM 2.5 samples ( Cellulomonas and Rhizobacter ), while a large number of taxa significantly increased in total suspended particulate samples, such as Paracoccus , Kocuria , and Sphingomonas Network analysis indicated that Paracoccus , Rubellimicrobium , Kocuria , and Arthrobacter were the key genera in the airborne PM samples. Overall, the findings presented here suggest that diverse airborne bacterial communities are associated with PM and provide further understanding of bacterial community structure in the atmosphere during hazy and nonhazy days. IMPORTANCE The results presented here represent an analysis of the airborne bacterial community associated with particulate matter (PM) and advance our understanding of the structural variation of these communities. We observed a shift in bacterial community composition with PM fractions but no significant difference with haze levels. This may be because the bacterial differences are obscured by high bacterial diversity in the atmosphere. However, we also observed that a few genera (such as Methylobacillus , Tumebacillus , and Desulfurispora ) increased significantly on heavy-haze days. In addition, Paracoccus , Rubellimicrobium , Kocuria , and Arthrobacter were the key genera in the airborne PM samples. Accurate and real

  17. Structural applications of metal foams considering material and geometrical uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mohammadreza

    Metal foam is a relatively new and potentially revolutionary material that allows for components to be replaced with elements capable of large energy dissipation, or components to be stiffened with elements which will generate significant supplementary energy dissipation when buckling occurs. Metal foams provide a means to explore reconfiguring steel structures to mitigate cross-section buckling in many cases and dramatically increase energy dissipation in all cases. The microstructure of metal foams consists of solid and void phases. These voids have random shape and size. Therefore, randomness ,which is introduced into metal foams during the manufacturing processes, creating more uncertainty in the behavior of metal foams compared to solid steel. Therefore, studying uncertainty in the performance metrics of structures which have metal foams is more crucial than for conventional structures. Therefore, in this study, structural application of metal foams considering material and geometrical uncertainty is presented. This study applies the Sobol' decomposition of a function of many random variables to different problem in structural mechanics. First, the Sobol' decomposition itself is reviewed and extended to cover the case in which the input random variables have Gaussian distribution. Then two examples are given for a polynomial function of 3 random variables and the collapse load of a two story frame. In the structural example, the Sobol' decomposition is used to decompose the variance of the response, the collapse load, into contributions from the individual input variables. This decomposition reveals the relative importance of the individual member yield stresses in determining the collapse load of the frame. In applying the Sobol' decomposition to this structural problem the following issues are addressed: calculation of the components of the Sobol' decomposition by Monte Carlo simulation; the effect of input distribution on the Sobol' decomposition

  18. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, L; Stiebing, K E; Dobrescu, S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut für Kernphysik der Universität Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the "MD source" as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an "all stainless steel" ECRIS.

  19. Local structure and structural signature underlying properties in metallic glasses and supercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun

    Metallic glasses (MGs), discovered five decades ago as a newcomer in the family of glasses, are of current interest because of their unique structures and properties. There are also many fundamental materials science issues that remain unresolved for metallic glasses, as well as their predecessor above glass transition temperature, the supercooled liquids. In particular, it is a major challenge to characterize the local structure and unveil the structure-property relationship for these amorphous materials. This thesis presents a systematic study of the local structure of metallic glasses as well as supercooled liquids via classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Three typical MG models are chosen as representative candidate, Cu64 Zr36, Pd82Si18 and Mg65Cu 25Y10 systems, while the former is dominant with full icosahedra short-range order and the prism-type short-range order dominate for latter two. Furthermore, we move to unravel the underlying structural signature among several properties in metallic glasses. Firstly, the temperature dependence of specific heat and liquid fragility between Cu-Zr and Mg-Cu-Y (also Pd-Si) in supercooled liquids are quite distinct: gradual versus fast evolution of specific heat and viscosity/relaxation time with undercooling. Their local structural ordering are found to relate with the temperature dependence of specific heat and relaxation time. Then elastic heterogeneity has been studied to correlate with local structure in Cu-Zr MGs. Specifically, this part covers how the degree of elastic deformation correlates with the internal structure at the atomic level, how to quantitatively evaluate the local solidity/liquidity in MGs and how the network of interpenetrating connection of icosahedra determine the corresponding shear modulus. Finally, we have illustrated the structure signature of quasi-localized low-frequency vibrational normal modes, which resides the intriguing vibrational properties in MGs. Specifically, the

  20. A simple method to assess bacterial attachment to surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    The crystal violet microplate adhension assay was modified to evaluate bacterial adhesion to metal and non-metal surfaces. Both viable cell count and the absorbance of the crystal violet stained cells attached to aluminium increased over the period...

  1. Atomic-level structures and physical properties of magnetic CoSiB metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Guangcun; Liang Zhang, Ji; Li, Jiong; Zhang, Shuo; Jiang, Zheng; Huang, Yuying; Shek, Chan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Two CoSiB metallic glasses of low Co contents, which consist of different clusters, have recently been developed by addition of solute atoms. In this work, the atomic structure and the magnetic properties of the two CoBSi metallic glasses were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) computational techniques. Besides, the origin of these magnetic behaviors was discussed in view of the EXAFS results and atomic structures of the metallic glasses. - Graphical abstract: The atomic structure and the origins of the magnetic properties of two ternary CoBSi metallic glasses were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) techniques. - Highlights: • The atomic structure and the origins of the magnetic properties of two ternary CoBSi metallic glasses were revealed. • The atomic structures were elucidated by state-of-the-art extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) combining with ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) techniques. • The experimental spectra were in good agreement with the predictions of ab initio full multiple scattering theory using the FEFF8.4 code. • The origin of these magnetic behaviors was discussed in view of the EXAFS results and atomic structures of the metallic glasses. • These two metallic glasses consist of different clusters, and hence different magnetic properties, which are dominated by short-range orders (SROs)

  2. Structural study of Zr-based metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: e.matsubara@materials.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ichitsubo, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Saida, J. [Center of Interdisciplinary Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kohara, S. [JASRI, SPring-8, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohsumi, H. [JASRI, SPring-8, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-05-31

    Structures of Zr{sub 70}Ni{sub 20}Al{sub 10}, Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 20}Al{sub 10}, Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} and Zr{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} amorphous alloys were analyzed by high-energy X-ray diffraction. The relatively stable Zr{sub 2}Cu amorphous alloy shows a local atom arrangement different from the Zr{sub 2}Cu crystalline phase. By contrast, the less stable Zr{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} amorphous alloy has a structure similar to Zr{sub 2}Ni. In the Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 20}Al{sub 10} metallic glass, Zr-Al nearest neighbor pairs are introduced in the amorphous structure. In the Zr{sub 70}Ni{sub 20}Al{sub 10} metallic glass, the strong correlation between Zr-Ni pairs is drastically modified by the formation of Zr-Al pairs. The presence of Zr-Al pairs in the ternary alloys suppresses the crystallization and stabilizes the glassy state.

  3. Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikriye Alev Akçay

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal particles reduced to nano size by nanotechnological methods are confronted in many different fields such as biomedical and physicochemical, pharmaceutical, electric-electronic, automotive and food industries. Nanoparticles can be produced using chemical, physical and biological methods, of which chemical processes are in common use. However, physical and chemical methods are not environmentally friendly and economical because they require the use of high temperature, high pressure and toxic chemicals. For this reason, interest in the production of metal nanoparticles by biological methods, also called green technology, an environmentally friendly and sustainable approach, has increased in recent years. With some plant extracts and intracellular and extracellular secretions of microorganisms, some reduction reactions take place and metal nanoparticles are produced. Bacteria have been actively involved in nanotechnology in recent years due to their diversity in nature, their ease of isolation, and ease of nanoparticle synthesis. In this article, production and application of metal nanoparticles by using bacterial methods have been reviewed.

  4. Conceptual assessment and thermal hydraulic analysis of MVDS system for the dry storage of reduced metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S.; Shin, H. S.; Joo, J. S.; Su, K. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual assessment and thermal hydraulic analysis of MVDS storage system have been carried out for application of reduced metal fuel. The storage concept was established considering the optimum weight, storage volume and thermal efficiency. The capacity of MVDS system for loading the reduced metal fuel has four times as compared with existing PWR fuel storage system. In the results of thermal analysis, the maximum temperature of metal fuel was estimated to be 110 .deg. C which is lower than the allowable value under normal operation condition. Therefore, it is shown that the MVDS system can feasibly accomodate the reduced metal fuel in aspect of thermal safety

  5. The treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy with clindamycin to reduce the risk of infection-related preterm birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Larsson, Per G.

    2017-01-01

    and Gynecology advised against the use of clindamycin for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy to reduce the risk of spontaneous preterm birth based on lack of evidence of efficacy. We believe that the evidence for the use of clindamycin for this indication is robust and that this recommendation...... was reached erroneously on the basis of flawed inclusion criteria: the inclusion of an unpublished study with poorly diagnosed bacterial vaginosis and the exclusion of an important pivotal study on the use of clindamycin in early pregnancy for the prevention of preterm birth. Had these errors been corrected...

  6. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  7. Sensing the Structural Differences in Cellulose from Apple and Bacterial Cell Wall Materials by Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Cybulska, Justyna; Zdunek, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used for assessment of structural differences of celluloses of various origins. Investigated celluloses were: bacterial celluloses cultured in presence of pectin and/or xyloglucan, as well as commercial celluloses and cellulose extracted from apple parenchyma. FT-IR spectra were used to estimate of the Iβ content, whereas Raman spectra were used to evaluate the degree of crystallinity of the cellulose. The crystallinity index (XCRAMAN%) varied from −25% for apple cellulose to 53% for microcrystalline commercial cellulose. Considering bacterial cellulose, addition of xyloglucan has an impact on the percentage content of cellulose Iβ. However, addition of only xyloglucan or only pectins to pure bacterial cellulose both resulted in a slight decrease of crystallinity. However, culturing bacterial cellulose in the presence of mixtures of xyloglucan and pectins results in an increase of crystallinity. The results confirmed that the higher degree of crystallinity, the broader the peak around 913 cm−1. Among all bacterial celluloses the bacterial cellulose cultured in presence of xyloglucan and pectin (BCPX) has the most similar structure to those observed in natural primary cell walls. PMID:22163913

  8. Structurally triggered metal-insulator transition in rare-earth nickelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Alain; Bieder, Jordan; Íñiguez, Jorge; Ghosez, Philippe

    2017-11-22

    Rare-earth nickelates form an intriguing series of correlated perovskite oxides. Apart from LaNiO 3 , they exhibit on cooling a sharp metal-insulator electronic phase transition, a concurrent structural phase transition, and a magnetic phase transition toward an unusual antiferromagnetic spin order. Appealing for various applications, full exploitation of these compounds is still hampered by the lack of global understanding of the interplay between their electronic, structural, and magnetic properties. Here we show from first-principles calculations that the metal-insulator transition of nickelates arises from the softening of an oxygen-breathing distortion, structurally triggered by oxygen-octahedra rotation motions. The origin of such a rare triggered mechanism is traced back in their electronic and magnetic properties, providing a united picture. We further develop a Landau model accounting for the metal-insulator transition evolution in terms of the rare-earth cations and rationalizing how to tune this transition by acting on oxygen rotation motions.

  9. Structural Characterisation of FabG from Yersinia pestis, a Key Component of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanson, Jeffrey D; Forwood, Jade K

    2015-01-01

    Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (FabG) are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that catalyse the reduction of acyl carrier protein (ACP) linked thioesters within the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. The products of these enzymes, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, are essential components of the bacterial cell envelope. The FASII reductase enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) has been the focus of numerous drug discovery efforts, some of which have led to clinical trials, yet few studies have focused on FabG. Like FabI, FabG appears to be essential for survival in many bacteria, similarly indicating the potential of this enzyme as a drug target. FabG enzymes are members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, and like other SDRs, exhibit highly conserved secondary and tertiary structures, and contain a number of conserved sequence motifs. Here we describe the crystal structures of FabG from Yersinia pestis (YpFabG), the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, and three human pandemics. Y. pestis remains endemic in many parts of North America, South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, and a threat to human health. YpFabG shares a high degree of structural similarity with bacterial homologues, and the ketoreductase domain of the mammalian fatty acid synthase from both Homo sapiens and Sus scrofa. Structural characterisation of YpFabG, and comparison with other bacterial FabGs and the mammalian fatty acid synthase, provides a strong platform for virtual screening of potential inhibitors, rational drug design, and the development of new antimicrobial agents to combat Y. pestis infections.

  10. Structural Characterisation of FabG from Yersinia pestis, a Key Component of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Nanson

    Full Text Available Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (FabG are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that catalyse the reduction of acyl carrier protein (ACP linked thioesters within the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII pathway. The products of these enzymes, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, are essential components of the bacterial cell envelope. The FASII reductase enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI has been the focus of numerous drug discovery efforts, some of which have led to clinical trials, yet few studies have focused on FabG. Like FabI, FabG appears to be essential for survival in many bacteria, similarly indicating the potential of this enzyme as a drug target. FabG enzymes are members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family, and like other SDRs, exhibit highly conserved secondary and tertiary structures, and contain a number of conserved sequence motifs. Here we describe the crystal structures of FabG from Yersinia pestis (YpFabG, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, and three human pandemics. Y. pestis remains endemic in many parts of North America, South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, and a threat to human health. YpFabG shares a high degree of structural similarity with bacterial homologues, and the ketoreductase domain of the mammalian fatty acid synthase from both Homo sapiens and Sus scrofa. Structural characterisation of YpFabG, and comparison with other bacterial FabGs and the mammalian fatty acid synthase, provides a strong platform for virtual screening of potential inhibitors, rational drug design, and the development of new antimicrobial agents to combat Y. pestis infections.

  11. Impact of repeated single-metal and multi-metal pollution events on soil quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burges, Aritz; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Most frequently, soil metal pollution results from the occurrence of repeated single-metal and, above all, multi-metal pollution events, with concomitant adverse consequences for soil quality. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the impact of repeated single-metal and multi-metal (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) pollution events on soil quality, as reflected by the values of a variety of soil microbial parameters with potential as bioindicators of soil functioning. Specifically, parameters of microbial activity (potentially mineralizable nitrogen, β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase activity) and biomass (fungal and bacterial gene abundance by RT-qPCR) were determined, in the artificially metal-polluted soil samples, at regular intervals over a period of 26 weeks. Similarly, we studied the evolution over time of CaCl2-extractable metal fractions, in order to estimate metal bioavailability in soil. Different metals showed different values of bioavailability and relative bioavailability ([metal]bio/[metal]tot) in soil throughout the experiment, under both repeated single-metal and multi-metal pollution events. Both repeated Zn-pollution and multi-metal pollution events led to a significant reduction in the values of acid phosphatase activity, and bacterial and fungal gene abundance, reflecting the negative impact of these repeated events on soil microbial activity and biomass, and, hence, soil quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Probing Induced Structural Changes in Biomimetic Bacterial Cell Membrane Interactions with Divalent Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Allison M [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Jubb, Aaron M [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes, formed primarily by the self-assembly of complex mixtures of phospholipids, provide a structured scaffold for compartmentalization and structural processes in living cells. The specific physical properties of phospholipid species present in a given membrane play a key role in mediating these processes. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a zwitterionic lipid present in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cell membranes, is exceptional. In addition to undergoing the standard lipid polymorphic transition between the gel and liquid-crystalline phase, it can also assume an unusual polymorphic state, the inverse hexagonal phase (HII). Divalent cations are among the factors that drive the formation of the HII phase, wherein the lipid molecules form stacked tubular structures by burying the hydrophilic head groups and exposing the hydrophobic tails to the bulk solvent. Most biological membranes contain a lipid species capable of forming the HII state suggesting that such lipid polymorphic structural states play an important role in structural biological processes such as membrane fusion. In this study, the interactions between Mg2+ and biomimetic bacterial cell membranes composed of PE and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were probed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The lipid phase transitions were examined at varying ratios of PE to PG and upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of Mg2+. An understanding of these basic interactions enhances our understanding of membrane dynamics and how membrane-mediated structural changes may occur in vivo.

  13. Brood size modifications affect plumage bacterial assemblages of European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Françoise S; Moureau, Benoit; Jourdie, Violaine; Heeb, Philipp

    2005-02-01

    During reproduction, birds face trade-offs between time and energy devoted to parental effort and traits associated with self-maintenance. We manipulated brood sizes to investigate the effects of such trade-offs on feather bacterial densities and the structure of bacterial assemblages on feathers in adult European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, and in vitro feather degradation. As predicted by a trade-off between parental effort and self-maintenance, we found that birds with enlarged broods had more free-living bacteria on their feathers than birds with reduced broods. Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between brood manipulation and original brood size on free-living bacterial densities suggesting that the trade-off is mediated by the adults' initial reproductive investment. In contrast, brood size manipulations had no significant effect on densities of attached bacteria. Using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), we demonstrated that brood manipulations significantly modified the structure (band pattern) of feather-degrading bacterial assemblages, but had no significant effect on their richness (number of bands) or the in vitro feather degradation. In vitro feather degradation varied in relation to the premanipulation brood size and positively with the richness of the feather degrading bacterial community. Besides brood manipulation effect, we found that ecological factors and individual traits, such as the age, the nest location or the capture date, shaped bacterial assemblages and feather degradation capacities.

  14. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...

  15. Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Krishnan, Kannan; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of inorganic mercury (Hg) on bacterial community and diversity in different soils. Three soils-neutral, alkaline and acidic-were spiked with six different concentrations of Hg ranging from 0 to 200 mg kg -1 and aged for 90 days. At the end of the ageing period, 18 samples from three different soils were investigated for bacterial community structure and soil physicochemical properties. Illumina MiSeq-based 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing revealed the alteration in the bacterial community between un-spiked control soils and Hg-spiked soils. Among the bacterial groups, Actinobacteria (22.65%) were the most abundant phyla in all samples followed by Proteobacteria (21.95%), Bacteroidetes (4.15%), Firmicutes (2.9%) and Acidobacteria (2.04%). However, the largest group showing increased abundance with higher Hg doses was the unclassified group (45.86%), followed by Proteobacteria. Mercury had a considerable negative impact on key soil functional bacteria such as ammonium oxidizers and nitrifiers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that among the measured soil properties, Hg had a major influence on bacterial community structure. Furthermore, nonlinear regression analysis confirmed that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial alpha diversity in lower organic carbon containing neutral and alkaline soils, whereas in acidic soil with higher organic carbon there was no significant correlation. EC 20 values obtained by a nonlinear regression analysis indicated that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial diversity in concentrations lower than several guideline values.

  16. Beneficial of Coriander Leaves (Coriandrum sativum L.) to Reduce Heavy Metals Contamination in Rod Shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarti, S.; Pertiwi, C. N.; Hanani, A. Z.; Mujamil, S. I.; Putra, K. A.; Herlambang, K. C.

    2018-01-01

    Contamination of heavy metals in certain levels of food can disrupt human health. Heavy metals have toxic properties, cannot be overhauled or destroyed by living organisms, can accumulate in the body of organisms including humans, either directly or indirectly. Heavy metal Hg, Cd, Cr is a very toxic metals (can result in death or health problems that are not recovered in a short time), while heavy metal Co, Pb, Cu toxicity is moderate (can lead to both recoverable and non-recoverable health problems in a relatively long time). Hence the heavy metal contaminating the food must be eliminated or reduced to a safe level. One effort was use coriander leaves to reduce the contamination of heavy metals in fish/shellfish. The objective of the research was to prove the extract of coriander leaves can reduce heavy metal contamination of Pb, Hg and Cu in rod shellfish (lorjuk). The treatment of this research was long soaking in coriander leaves extract that were 0, 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The results showed that the longer time of soaking can decrease Pb level from 4.4 ± 0.424 ppb to 1.7 ± 0.5 ppb, Hg level from 4.11± 0.07 to 1.12± 0.6 ppb, and Cu level from 433.7 ± 0.1 ppb to 117 ± 0.78 ppb. Protein content not significant decrease in rod shellfish (lorjuk) after 90 minutes soaking time, that was from 28.56 ± 0.403% to 26,625 ± 0.19%.

  17. Acute exposure to crystalline silica reduces macrophage activation in response to bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Lee Beamer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AM and crystalline silica (SiO2 using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes is largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g. 4 hours. Interestingly, these responses were dependent upon interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins.

  18. Catalytic properties of graphene–metal nanoparticle hybrid prepared using an aromatic amino acid as the reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Bimalendu; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    An easy and single step process of making reduced graphene oxide nanosheet from graphene oxide (GO) in water medium has been demonstrated by using a naturally occurring non-proteinaceous amino acid (2,4-dihydroxy phenyl alanine, Dopa) as a new reducing agent and stabilizing agent. This amino acid has also been used to reduce the noble metal salt (AuCl 3 /AgNO 3 ) to produce the corresponding noble metal nanoparticles (MNP) without using any external reducing and stabilizing agents. So, this amino acid has been used to reduce simultaneously GO to RGO and noble metal salts to produce corresponding MNP to form RGO–MNP nanohybrid system in a single step in water medium and also in absence of any external toxic reducing and stabilizing agents. Different techniques UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and others have been used to characterize the reduction of GO to RGO, metal salts to produce corresponding MNPs and the formation of RGO–MNP nanohybrid systems. Moreover, this metal nanoparticle containing RGO–MNP nanohybrid system acts as a potential catalyst for the reduction of aromatic nitro to aromatic amino group. - Graphical abstract: This study demonstrates an easy, single step and eco-friendly method to make RGO and Au/AgNP simultaneously from respective precursors to form a RGO–Au/AgNP nanohybrid system using an aromatic amino acid (2,4-dihydroxy phenyl alanine, Dopa) as a new reducing agent as well as stabilizing agent in water medium. Highlights: ► Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheet using an amino acid. ► The amino acid (Dopa) can reduce noble metal salt (Au 3+ /Ag + ) to metal nanoparticle (MNP). ► Single step and eco-friendly synthesis of RGO-MNP nanohybrid using Dopa. ► Characterization of RGO, MNP and RGO–MNP nanohybrid. ► RGO-MNP nanohybrid acts as a catalyst for the reduction of aromatic nitro

  19. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations...... of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  20. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized th...

  1. [Effect of ground mulch managements on soil bacterial community structure and diversity in the non-irrigated apple orchard in Weibei Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuexing; Wen, Xiaoxia; Sun, Yulin; Zhang, Junli; Lin, Xiaoli; Liao, Yuncheng

    2015-07-04

    We studied the changes in soil bacterial communities induced by ground mulch managements at different apple growth periods. We adopted the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with PCR-amplified 16S rRNA fragments to determine soil bacterial community structure and diversity. Soil bacterial community structure with different ground mulch managements were significantly different. Both the mulch management strategies and apple growth periods affected the predominant groups and their abundance in soil bacterial communities. Grass mulch and cornstalk mulch treatments had higher bacterial diversity and richness than the control at young fruit period and fruit expanding period, whereas film mulch treatment had no significant difference compared with the control. During mature period, bacterial diversity in the control reached its maximum, which may be ascribed to the rapid growth and reproduction of the r-selection bacteria. The clustering and detrended correspondence analysis revealed that differences in soil bacterial communities were closely correlated to apple growth periods and ground mulch managements. Soil samples from the grass mulch and cornstalk mulch treatments clustered together while those mulched with plastic film treatment were similar to the control. The most abundant phylum in soil bacterial community was Proteobacteria followed by Bacteroidetes. Some other phyla were also detected, such as Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. Mulching with plant (Grass/Cornstalk) had great effects on soil bacterial community structure and enhanced the diversity while film mulch management had no significant effects.

  2. Magnetic activity at infrared frequencies in structured metallic photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.; Pendry, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We derive the effective permeability and permittivity of a nanostructured metallic photonic crystal by analysing the complex reflection and transmission coefficients for slabs of various thicknesses. These quantities were calculated using the transfer matrix method. Our results indicate that these structures could be used to realize a negative effective permeability, at least up to infrared frequencies. The origin of the negative permeability is a resonance due to the internal inductance and capacitance of the structure. We also present an analytic model for the effective permeability of the crystal. The model reveals the importance of the inertial inductance due to the finite mass of the electrons in the metal. We find that this contribution to the inductance has implications for the design of metallic magnetic structures in the optical region of the spectrum. We show that the magnetic activity in the structure is accompanied by the concentration of the incident field energy into very small volumes within the structure. This property will allow us to considerably enhance non-linear effects with minute quantities of material. (author)

  3. Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn; Hamilton, Nathan; West, Robert G.; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-01-01

    We used photoactive substrates consisting of about 1 nm coating of a metal oxide on glass substrates to investigate the impact of the structures of colloidal quantum dots on their photophysical and photochemical properties. We showed during irradiation these substrates can interact uniquely with such quantum dots, inducing distinct forms of photo-induced processes when they have different cores, shells, or ligands. In particular, our results showed that for certain types of core-shell quantum dot structures an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide can reduce suppression of quantum efficiency of the quantum dots happening when they undergo extensive photo-oxidation. This suggests the possibility of shrinking the sizes of quantum dots without significant enhancement of their non-radiative decay rates. We show that such quantum dots are not influenced significantly by Coulomb blockade or photoionization, while those without a shell can undergo a large amount of photo-induced fluorescence enhancement via such blockade when they are in touch with the metal oxide.

  4. Microbial Metabolite Production for Accelerated Metal and Radionuclide Bioremediation (Microbial Metabolite Production Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TURICK, CHARLES

    2004-01-01

    Biogeochemical activity is an ongoing and dynamic process due to bacterial activity in the subsurface. Bacteria contribute significantly to biotransformation of metals and radionuclides. As basic science reveals more information about specific mechanisms of bacterial-metal reduction, an even greater contribution of bacteria to biogeochemical activities is realized. An understanding and application of the mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction offers tremendous potential for development into bioremedial processes and technologies. Most bacteria are capable of biogeochemical transformation as a result of meeting nutrient requirements. These assimilatory mechanisms for metals transformation include production of small molecules that serve as electron shuttles for metal reduction. This contribution to biogeochemistry is small however due to only trace requirements for minerals by bacteria. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) reduce oxidized metals and insoluble mineral oxides as a means for biological energy production during growth. These types of bacteria offer considerable potential for bioremediation of environments contaminated with toxic metals and radionuclides because of the relatively large amount of metal biotransformation they require for growth. One of the mechanisms employed by some DMRB for electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides is melanin production. The electrochemical properties of melanin provide this polymeric, humic-type compound with electron shuttling properties. Melanin, specifically, pyomelanin, increases the rate and degree of metal reduction in DMRB as a function of pyomelanin concentration. Due to its electron shuttling behavior, only low femtogram quantities per cell are required to significantly increase metal reduction capacity of DMRB. Melanin production is not limited to DMRB. In fact melanin is one of the most common pigments produced by biological systems. Numerous soil microorganisms produce melanin, contributing

  5. THE APPLICATION OF WAVELET-MULTIFRACTAL ANALYSIS IN PROBLEMS OF METAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VOLCHUK V. N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. In order to obtain acceptable results of the evaluation of the metal structure developed methodology should include the use of both classical and modern methods of its evaluation and the properties of the produced goods. Thus, to establish the relationship between mechanical properties and structural elements of metal to use multifractal theory. The proposed method is the most appropriate to quantify the majority of real structures, which are integral approximation figures Euclid introduces some uncertainty, and therefore not always acceptable in practical problems of modern materials science. According to the proposed method, each of heterogeneous objects, which are the structures most metals can be characterized by variety of statistical Renyi dimensions. The range of dimensions multifractals interpreted as some of the physical laws, which have a separate statistical properties that make it possible to their financial performance. Application of statistical dimensions of the structural elements for the assessment of qualitative characteristics of metal contributes to their formalization as a function of the fractal dimension. This in turn makes it possible to identify and anticipate the physical and mechanical properties of the metal without producing special mechanical tests. Purpose  obtain information about the possible application of wavelet-multifractal analysis to assess the microstructure of the metal. Conclusion. Using the methods of wavelet multifractal analysis, a statistical evaluation of the structural elements of steel St3ps. An analysis of the characteristics of uniformity, consistency and regularity of the structural elements has shown that most of the change observed in the samples subjected to accelerated cooling water in the temperature range of the intermediate (bainitic conversion 550 – 4500С, less - in samples cooled in the temperature range 650 pearlite transformation  6000С and the smallest

  6. Bacterial Community Structure and Biochemical Changes Associated With Composting of Lignocellulosic Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Huzairi Mohd Zainudin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial community structure and biochemical changes during the composting of lignocellulosic oil palm empty bunch (EFB and palm oil mill effluent (POME anaerobic sludge were studied by examining the succession of the bacterial community and its association with changes in lignocellulosic components by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and the 16S rRNA gene clone library. During composting, a major reduction in cellulose after 10 days from 50% to 19% and the carbon content from 44% to 27% towards the end of the 40-day composting period were observed. The C/N ratio also decreased. A drastic change in the bacterial community structure and diversity throughout the composting process was clearly observed using PCR-DGGE banding patterns. The bacterial community drastically shifted between the thermophilic and maturing stages. 16s rRNA clones belonging to the genera Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Desemzia, and Planococcus were the dominant groups throughout composting. The species closely related to Solibacillus silvestris were found to be major contributors to changes in the lignocellulosic component. Clones identified as Thermobacillus xylanilyticus, Brachybacterium faecium, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, Cellulomonas sp., and Thermobifida fusca, which are known to be lignocellulosic-degrading bacteria, were also detected and are believed to support the lignocellulose degradation.

  7. Streptomyces lunalinharesii 235 prevents the formation of a sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pacheco da Rosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Streptomyces lunalinharesii strain 235 produces an antimicrobial substance that is active against sulfate reducing bacteria, the major bacterial group responsible for biofilm formation and biocorrosion in petroleum reservoirs. The use of this antimicrobial substance for sulfate reducing bacteria control is therefore a promising alternative to chemical biocides. In this study the antimicrobial substance did not interfere with the biofilm stability, but the sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation was six-fold smaller in carbon steel coupons treated with the antimicrobial substance when compared to the untreated control. A reduction in the most probable number counts of planktonic cells of sulfate reducing bacteria was observed after treatments with the sub-minimal inhibitory concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance. Additionally, when the treated coupons were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, the biofilm formation was found to be substantially reduced when the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance was used. The coupons used for the biofilm formation had a small weight loss after antimicrobial substance treatment, but corrosion damage was not observed by scanning electron microscopy. The absence of the dsrA gene fragment in the scraped cell suspension after treatment with the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance suggests that Desulfovibrio alaskensis was not able to adhere to the coupons. This is the first report on an antimicrobial substance produced by Streptomyces active against sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation. The application of antimicrobial substance as a potential biocide for sulfate reducing bacteria growth control could be of great interest to the petroleum industry.

  8. Transient structural distortion of metal-free Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase triggers aberrant oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Smith, Melanie H; Schulz, Eike

    2009-01-01

    remained enigmatic, however, as is the case in other protein-misfolding diseases. Here, we target the critical conformational change that defines the earliest step toward aggregation. Using nuclear spin relaxation dispersion experiments, we identified a short-lived (0.4 ms) and weakly populated (0.......7%) conformation of metal-depleted SOD1 that triggers aberrant oligomerization. This excited state emanates from the folded ground state and is suppressed by metal binding, but is present in both the disulfide-oxidized and disulfide-reduced forms of the protein. Our results pinpoint a perturbed region......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease linked to the misfolding of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). ALS-related defects in SOD1 result in a gain of toxic function that coincides with aberrant oligomerization. The structural events triggering oligomerization have...

  9. Analysis and exploitation of bacterial population from natural uranium-rich soils: selection of a model specie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondani, L.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that soils play a key role in controlling the mobility of toxic metals and this property is greatly influenced by indigenous bacterial communities. This study has been conducted on radioactive and controls soils, collected in natural uraniferous areas (Limousin). A physico-chemical and mineralogical analysis of soils samples was carried out.The structure of bacterial communities was estimated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The community structure is remarkably more stable in the uranium-rich soils than in the control ones, indicating that uranium exerts a high selection from the soils was constructed and screened for uranium resistance in order to study bacteria-uranium interactions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a phylo-genetically diverse set of uranium-resistant species ware able to chelate uranium at the cell surface. (author) [fr

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of alkali metal arsinoamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Gamer, Michael T; Roesky, Peter W

    2017-12-20

    The aminoarsane Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph was prepared from Mes 2 AsCl and aniline in good yields. Deprotonation of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with suitable alkali metal bases resulted in the corresponding alkali metal derivatives. Thus, reaction of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with nBuLi, NaN(SiMe 3 ) 2 , or KH gave the metal complexes [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Li(OEt 2 ) 2 }], [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Na(OEt 2 )}] 2 , and [(Mes 2 AsNPh){K(THF)}] 2 . These are the first metal complexes ligated by an arsinoamide. All solid-state structures were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The lithium compounds form a monomer in the solid-state, whereas the sodium and the potassium derivatives are dimers. In the dimeric compounds intra- and intermolecular π-interaction of the aromatic rings with the metal atoms is observed.

  11. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  12. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  13. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-05-22

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  14. Electronic structure and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha V.; Roy, Debesh R.

    2018-05-01

    A density functional scrutiny on the structure, electronic and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins MTPP (M=Fe, Co, Ni) is performed. The structural stability of the molecules is evaluated based on the electronic parameters like HOMO-LUMO gap (HLG), chemical hardness (η) and binding energy of the central metal atom to the molecular frame etc. The computed UltraViolet-Visible (UV-Vis) optical absorption spectra for all the compounds are also compared. The molecular structures reported are the lowest energy configurations. The entire calculations are carried out with a widely reliable functional, viz. B3LYP with a popular basis set which includes a scaler relativistic effect, viz. LANL2DZ.

  15. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  16. Current-voltage characteristics of the semiconductor nanowires under the metal-semiconductor-metal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Xitian; Gao, Hong; Wang, Mingjiao

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to calculate the I-V characteristics of semiconductor nanowires under the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure. The carrier concentration as an important parameter is introduced into the expression of the current. The subband structure of the nanowire has been considered for associating it with the position of the Fermi level and circumventing the uncertainties of the contact areas in the contacts. The tunneling and thermionic emission currents in the two Schottky barriers at the two metal-semiconductor contacts are discussed. We find that the two barriers have different influences on the I-V characteristics of the MSM structure, one of which under the forward bias plays the role of threshold voltage if its barrier height is large and the applied voltage is small, and the other under the reverse bias controls the shapes of I-V curves. Our calculations show that the shapes of the I-V curves for the MSM structure are mainly determined by the barrier heights of the contacts and the carrier concentration. The nearly identical I-V characteristics can be obtained by using different values of the barrier heights and carrier concentration, which means that the contact type conversion can be ascribed not only to the changes of the barrier heights but also that of the carrier concentration. We also discuss the mechanisms of the ohmic-Schottky conversions and clarify the ambiguity in the literature. The possibility about the variation of the carrier concentration under the applied fields has been confirmed by experimental results.

  17. Crystal-Structure Contribution to the Solid Solubility in Transition Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1998-01-01

    The solution energies of 4d metals in other 4d metals as well as the bcc-hcp structural energy differences in random 4d alloys are calculated by density functional theory. It is shown that the crystal structure of the host plays a crucial role in the solid solubility. A local virtual bond...

  18. Bacterial community structure of a full-scale biofilter treating pig house exhaust air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Anja; Pedersen, Kristina Hadulla; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2011-01-01

    Biological air filters represent a promising tool for treating emissions of ammonia and odor from pig facilities. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing were used to investigate the bacterial community structure and diversity in a full-scale biofilter ...... consisting of two consecutive compartments (front and back filter). The analysis revealed a highly specialized bacterial community of limited diversity, dominated by a few groups of Betaproteobacteria (especially Comamonas) and diverse Bacteroidetes. Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria......, and betaproteobacterial ammoniaoxidizers (Nitrosomonas eutropha/Nitrosococcus mobilis-lineage) were also quantitatively important. Only a few quantitative differences existed between the two filter compartments at the group level, with a lower relative abundance of Actinobacteria and a higher relative abundance...

  19. Revealing structure and assembly cues for Arabidopsis root-inhabiting bacterial microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Davide; Rott, Matthias; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Ahmadinejad, Nahal; Assenza, Federica; Rauf, Philipp; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Schmelzer, Elmon; Peplies, Joerg; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Amann, Rudolf; Eickhorst, Thilo; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2012-08-02

    The plant root defines the interface between a multicellular eukaryote and soil, one of the richest microbial ecosystems on Earth. Notably, soil bacteria are able to multiply inside roots as benign endophytes and modulate plant growth and development, with implications ranging from enhanced crop productivity to phytoremediation. Endophytic colonization represents an apparent paradox of plant innate immunity because plant cells can detect an array of microbe-associated molecular patterns (also known as MAMPs) to initiate immune responses to terminate microbial multiplication. Several studies attempted to describe the structure of bacterial root endophytes; however, different sampling protocols and low-resolution profiling methods make it difficult to infer general principles. Here we describe methodology to characterize and compare soil- and root-inhabiting bacterial communities, which reveals not only a function for metabolically active plant cells but also for inert cell-wall features in the selection of soil bacteria for host colonization. We show that the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana, grown in different natural soils under controlled environmental conditions, are preferentially colonized by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and each bacterial phylum is represented by a dominating class or family. Soil type defines the composition of root-inhabiting bacterial communities and host genotype determines their ribotype profiles to a limited extent. The identification of soil-type-specific members within the root-inhabiting assemblies supports our conclusion that these represent soil-derived root endophytes. Surprisingly, plant cell-wall features of other tested plant species seem to provide a sufficient cue for the assembly of approximately 40% of the Arabidopsis bacterial root-inhabi