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Sample records for metal-reducing conditions uranium

  1. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  2. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  3. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  4. Why can rossing uranium mine keep mining even in low price conditions of uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2004-01-01

    Rossing uranium mine is the only operating uranium mine in the world where the uranium occurs in intrusive alaskite. In the past 10 years, uranium market regressed in the world, uranium production weakened, expenditures of capital for uranium exploration were insufficient. Uranium spot market price rapidly decreased from $111.8/kg U in late 1970's to $22.1/kg U in mid-1990's. Why can Rossing uranium mine mined with traditional underground and open pit operation can keep running even in low price conditions of uranium market? Augumenting research on the deposit, mineral and technology, decreasing production cost and improving selling strategy can not only maintain Rossing's uranium production at present, but also ensure sustainable development in the coming 15 years. Exploration of low-costed uranium deposits is very important. However, obvious economic benefits can be obtained, as Rossing uranium mine does, by augumenting geological-economical research on the known uranium deposits of hard-rock type and by using new techniques to improve the conventional techniques in the uranium mine development. (authors)

  5. Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Brodie, Eoin; Wang, Zheming; Zheng, Zuoping; Herman, Don; Hazen, Terry C.; Firestone, Mary K.; Sutton, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing for nuclear weapons and fuel have left thousands of sites with toxic levels of this actinide in soil and ground water. An emerging strategy for remediating such environments involves using organic carbon to promote microbially-mediated reduction and precipitation of insoluble U(IV) minerals. Although previous U bioreduction studies have shown promising results, they were of short duration (up to a few months). Our longer-term (20 months) laboratory study using historically contaminated sediment has alarmingly shown that microbial reduction of U was transient even under reducing (methanogenic) conditions. Uranium was reductively immobilized during the first 100 days, but later (150 to 600 days) reoxidized and mobilized, although a microbial community capable of reducing U(VI) remained through the end of the experiment. The formation of Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complexes (caused by the elevated carbonate concentration from microbial respiration and presence of calcium) drove the U(IV)/U(VI) reduction potential to much more reducing conditions. Fe(III) and Mn(IV) were found to be likely terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for U reoxidation. Thus, U remediation by organic carbon based reductive precipitation is not sustainable in calcareous, neutral to alkaline soils and ground waters

  6. Uranium mineralization characteristics and metallogenic conditions in Simen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yunjie

    2012-01-01

    Jinbiansi deposit is located in the southwest of Qinshanbu, east of Longshou mountain. It has a series of uranium occurrences, which has a good metallogenic setting. The text systemic analyses the magmatic condition, structure condition, hydrothermal condition, subsequent transformation condition, especially the alkali metasomatism, which has a osculant connection with alkali metasomatism in the area. It has certain practical significant for the next uranium deposit prospecting. (author)

  7. Uranium-mill-tailings conditioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; O'Brien, P.D.; Thode, E.F.; Wangen, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Conditioning of uranium mill tailings involves the physico-chemical alteration of tailings to remove or immobilize mobile radionuclides and toxic trace elements before disposal in a repository. The principal immobilization approach under investigation is sntering tailings at high temperatures (1100 to 1200 0 C) to radically alter the structure of tailings. This thermal stabilization at 1200 0 C reduced radon emanation power for tailings sands by factors of 20 to 200 and for tailings fines by factors of 300 to 1100. Substantial reductions in the leachability of most contaminants have been found for thermally conditioned tailings. A conceptual thermal stabilization process has been developed wherein obsolete coal-fired rotary cement kilns perform the sintering. An economic analysis of this conceptual process has shown that thermal stabilization can be competitive at certain tailings sites with other remedial actions requiring the excavation, transportation, and burial of tailings in a repository. An analysis of the long-term radiological hazard posed by untreated tailings and by tailings conditioned by radionuclide removal has illustrated the necessity of extracting both 226 Ra and 230 Th to achieve long-term hazard reductions. Sulfuric acid extraction of residual mineral values and important radionuclides from tailings has been investigated. Concentrated H 2 SO 4 can extract up to 80% of the 226 Ra, 70% of the Ba, and 90% of the 230 Th from tailings in a single stag extraction. An economic analysis of a sulfuric acid leach process was made to determine whether the value of minerals recovered from tailings would offset the leaching cost. For one relatively mineral-rich tailings pile, the U and V values would more than pay for the leaching step and would contribute about 60% of the costs of moving and burying the tailings at a new site

  8. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Webb, Sam; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa; Chinni, Satyavani; Veeramani, Harish; Junier, Pilar; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Suvorova Buffat, Elena; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron ...

  9. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp J.O

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium processing site at Old Rifle CO. This resulted in metal reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron re...

  10. Formation conditions for regenerated uranium blacks in uranium-molybdenum deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsova, K.V.; Sychev, I.V.; Modnikov, I.S.; Zhil'tsova, I.G.

    1980-01-01

    Formation conditions of regenerated uranium blacks in the zone of incomplete oxidation and cementation of uranium-molybdenum deposit have been studied. Mixed and regenerated blacks were differed from residual ones by the method of determining excess quantity of lead isotope (Pb 206 ) in ores. Determined were the most favourable conditions for formation of regenerated uranium blacks: sheets of brittle and permeable volcanic rocks characterized by heterogeneous structure of a section, by considerable development of gentle interlayer strippings and zones of hydrothermal alteration; predominance of reduction conditions in a media over oxidation ones under limited oxygen access and other oxidating agents; the composition of hypogenic ores characterized by optimum correlations of uranium minerals, sulfides and carbonates affecting violations of pH in oxidating solutions in the range of 5-6; the initial composition of ground water resulting from climatic conditions of the region and the composition of ore-bearing strata and others. Conditions unfavourable for the formation of regenerated uranium blacks are shown

  11. Reduction of uranium in disposal conditions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllykylae, E.

    2008-02-01

    This literature study is a summary of publications, in which the reduction of uranium by iron has been investigated in anaerobic groundwater conditions or in aqueous solution in general. The basics of the reduction phenomena and the oxidation states, complexes and solubilities of uranium and iron in groundwaters are discussed as an introduction to the subject, as well as, the Finnish disposal concept of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel itself mainly (∼96 %) consists of a sparingly soluble uranium(IV) dioxide, UO 2 (s), which is stable phase in the anticipated reducing disposal conditions. If spent fuel gets in contact with groundwater, oxidizing conditions might be induced by the radiolysis of water, or by the intrusion of oxidizing glacial melting water. Under these conditions, the oxidation and dissolution of uranium dioxide to more soluble U(VI) species could occur. This could lead to the mobilization of uranium and other components of spent fuel matrix including fission products and transuranium elements. The reduction of uranium back to oxidation state U(IV) can be considered as a favourable immobilization mechanism in a long-term, leading to precipitation due to the low solubility of U(IV) species. The cast iron insert of the disposal canister and its anaerobic corrosion products are the most important reductants under disposal conditions, but dissolved ferrous iron may also function as reductant. Other iron sources in the buffer or near-field rock, are also considered as possible reductants. The reduction of uranium is a very challenging phenomenon to investigate. The experimental studies need e.g. well-controlled anoxic conditions and measurements of oxidation states. Reduction and other simultaneous phenomena are difficult to distinghuish. The groundwater conditions (pH, Eh and ions) influence on the prevailing complexes of U and Fe and on forming corrosion products of iron and, thus they determine also the redox chemistry. The partial reduction of

  12. Sensitivity analysis of uranium solubility under strongly oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions in the repository on the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions, a mathematical model has been developed to determine the solubility, by utilizing a set of nonlinear algebraic equations to describe the chemical equilibria in the groundwater environment. The model takes into account the predominant precipitation-dissolution reactions, hydrolysis reactions and complexation reactions that may occur under strongly oxidizing conditions. The model also includes the solubility-limiting solids induced by the presence of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, calcium, and sodium in the groundwater. The thermodynamic equilibrium constants used in the solubility calculations are essentially taken from the NEA Thermochemical Data Base of Uranium, with some modification and some uranium minerals added, such as soddyite, rutherfordite, uranophane, uranyl orthophosphate, and becquerelite. By applying this model, the sensitivities of uranium solubility to variations in the concentrations of various groundwater component species are systematically investigated. The results show that the total analytical concentrations of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, and calcium in deep groundwater play the most important role in determining the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions

  13. Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, A.K.; Embury, J.D.; Kelly, A.; Thissell, W.R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Hixson, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppM carbon) and from material containing 280 ppM C. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level, stress state, and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

  14. Environmental condition and impact of inactive uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, J.M. Jr.; Eadie, G.E.; O'Connell, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was required to provide a report to Congress identifying the location, and potential health, safety and environmental hazards of uranium mine wastes together with recommendations, if any, for a program to eliminate the hazards. The approach taken to prepare this report was to develop model active and inactive mines and locate them in a typical mining area to estimate their environmental impact. The inactive mines were separated from the list and sorted into surface and underground categories. A literature search was conducted to obtain and consolidate available information concerning the environmental aspects of uranium mining and short-term field surveys and studies were conducted to augment this information base. Radioactivity emission rates were measured or estimated for each mining category and were entered into computer codes to assess population exposures and subsequent health risks. The general environmental condition of inactive uranium mines was determined by walk-through surveys in several mining areas

  15. Conditioning of uranium-containing technological radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.; Tavcar, G.; Stepisnik, M.; Pucelj, B.

    2006-01-01

    Conditioning of mostly liquid uranium containing technological radioactive waste emerging from the past research activities at the Jozef Stefan Institute is described. The waste was first thoroughly characterised, then the radionuclides present solidified by appropriate chemical treatment, and the final product separated and prepared for storage in compliance with the legislation. The activities were carried out within the recently renewed Hot Cells Facility of the Jozef Stefan Institute and the overall process resulted in substantial volume reduction of the waste initially present. (author)

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the the uranium industry in Australia that took place during the quarter ended 30 June 1980 are reviewed. These include uranium mine production and uranium exploration. Prices for uranium oxide and uranium hexafluoride as at the end of June 1980 and figures for U 3 O 8 production and export from 1978 to March 1980 are listed

  17. Conditions applying to Australian uranium exports - safeguards obligations under NPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotsey, W.B.

    1975-08-01

    The Australian Government's expressed desire to inhibit the spread of nuclear weapons and its wish to prevent Australia's uranium exports being used for manufacture of nuclear explosives are underwritten by Australia's formal international obligations. Australia is not free to export its material without paying due regard to supra-national requirements. This paper defines two safeguards regimes, one applying to countries such as Australia which are party to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the other to those which are not parties. The application of safeguards and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are briefly explained. Australia's obligations under the NPT and those stemming from specific undertakings to the IAEA are stated. The latter require Australia to ensure that Non-Nuclear Weapons States not party to the NPT give assurances that Australian uranium will not be used for the manufacture of nuclear explosives and that they will permit verification by the IAEA. These obligations give rise to a set of minimum conditions applying to exports of Australian uranium which vary according to the NPT status of the importing countries. (author)

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  3. Present condition of uranium exploration and the prospecting direction in southwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Shijun; Zhang Chengjiang; Xu Zhengqi; Chen Youliang

    2012-01-01

    Southwest China is one of the important areas where uranium is distributed. After exploration and research of 50 years, the metallogenic conditions for uranium deposits in Southwest China have been studied more deeply. It is found that uranium ore in Southwest China has more complete types, less deposits and more mineral occurrences, and the amount of uranium resources is disproportionate to the area of Southwest China. Researches of years show that Southwest China is characterized by thick crust. thick sedimentary cover, weak crust-mantle interaction, weak deep flu id activity in shallow strata, strong dynamic formation in shallow strata and obvious deep geologic process on block mar- gins. In this paper, the control of deep geologic process and evolution in uranium metallogenesis in Southwest China is studied by employing new theories and thoughts on the fundamental concept that deep geologic process and evolution has important control on super-large scale deposits. The study focuses on the crust-mantle structure and evolution with uranium metallogenesis, structural and magmatic activity and deep fluid activity with uranium metallogenesis, and ore-con- trolling role of penetrating faults on block edges and inside the blocks. To offer theoretic basis for large-scale uranium deposit prospecting in Southwest China, the key research on uranium deposit in Southwest China in future should be on the deep geologic evolution and uranium metallogenesis in Western Qinling Region, the uranium metallogenesis of iron oxide copper gold deposits on Kangdian axis, the uranium metallogenesis in Yunnan-Guizhou contiguous area, the hydrothermal uranium metallogenesis in Eastern Tibet and Western Sichuan, and the connection between sandstone type uranium deposit and magmatic activity. Meanwhile, the above regions are also the key ones for uranium deposit prospecting in Southwest China in a rather long period in future. (authors)

  4. Accumulation of uranium by filamentous green algae under natural environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleissa, K.A.; Shabana, El-Said K.; Al-Masoud, F.L.S.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of algae to concentrate uranium under natural environmental conditions is measured by a-spectrometry. Spirogyra, a filamentous green fresh-water alga, has concentrated uranium from a surface concrete ponds with elevated uranium levels (140-1140 ppb). The concentration factors (CFs) ranged from 8.9-67 with an average value of 22. Cladophora spp, a filamentous green marine alga has concentrated uranium from the marine water with a concentration factor ranged from 220-280. The average concentration factor was 250. The factors affecting the sorption process are discussed in detail. (author)

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Production of uranium oxide in Australia for 1983 was 3786 t(3211 t U). Uranium exports for 1983 were 3273 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. value of $41.02/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1982-83 fiscal year was $36.5 million, 35% less than in 1981-82. In November 1983, the Government decided that uranium mining would be allowed only at the existing Ranger and Nabarlek mines and at the proposed Olympic Dam mine. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U as at December 1983, totalled 474 000 t U. Australia's total now represents 30% of the Western world's low-cost RAR. In addition Australia has 235 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category 1, which represents 31% of the Western world's resources in this category

  7. Research on the characterization and conditioning of uranium mill tailings. III. Summary of uranium mill tailings conditioning research and implications regarding remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; Thode, E.F.; Williams, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the findings of research on uranium mill tailings conditioning technology development performed for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). Hazards and risks posed by tailings piles are discussed in relation to the goal of conditioning the tailings to reduce these hazards. The results of our efforts regarding characterization of tailings, removal of radionuclides, mineral recovery, thermal stabilization, and engineering/economic analysis of conditioning are presented. The implications of these results for remedial action plans are discussed and conclusions regarding the applicability of these technologies are also presented

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, E.

    1986-01-01

    After the increase in oil prices in 1973, several European countries increased their power programs. As a result some uranium mining companies from the FRG, Spain and France invested in exploration of radioactive minerals in Colombia hoping to find uranium resources needed to fuel European reactors. In the article a historic review of foreign investment in uranium in Colombia is made; some recommendations about joint-venture contracts used to regulate the work of the foreign companies are included. The four companies involved in exploration left the country in the early eighties, due to the difficulties in finding a large deposit and the difficult world situation of nuclear power

  9. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.H.; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K d model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data

  10. Metallogenetic condition and mineralization characteristics of uranium deposit No.114

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Lin; Ma Fei; Yang Wanjin

    1988-01-01

    Deposit No 114 is one of the typical carbonate-type uranium deposits, that are widely distributed in South China. In this paper formational environment of host rock, wall-rock alteration, sulfur, oxygen, carbon isotopes, mineralization temperatures, ore compsitions were studied. Based on the U-Pb isotopic research three mineralization stages in deposit No 114 were established, namely 104 Ma, 61 Ma and 11 Ma. It is suggested, that the deposit No 114 is a polygenetic deposit formed primarily by supergene leaching and hydrothermal reworked. The uranium deposit has multi-sources, the main uranium source of which is from the granite body situated nearby. According to metallogenetic characteristics the authors suggest the favourable geological exploration guides for this kind of ore deposits

  11. Uranium plasma emission at gas-core reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.D.; Jalufka, N.W.; Hohl, F.; Lee, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of uranium plasma emission produced by two methods are reported. For the first method a ruby laser was focused on the surface of a pure 238 U sample to create a plasma plume with a peak plasma density of about 10 20 cm -3 and a temperature of about 38,600 0 K. The absolute intensity of the emitted radiation, covering the range from 300 to 7000 A was measured. For the second method, the uranium plasma was produced in a 20 kilovolt, 25 kilojoule plasma-focus device. The 2.5 MeV neutrons from the D-D reaction in the plasma focus are moderated by polyethylene and induce fissions in the 235 U. Spectra of both uranium plasmas were obtained over the range from 30 to 9000 A. Because of the low fission yield the energy input due to fissions is very small compared to the total energy in the plasma

  12. The solubility of uranium in cementitious near-field chemical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Brownsword, M.; Cross, J.E.; Hobley, J.; Moreton, A.D.; Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Thomason, H.P.

    1993-05-01

    Tetravalent and hexavalent uranium solubilities have been measured in cement-equilibriated water for pH values from 4 to 13. Tetravalent uranium solubilities at pH 12 have been measured by three experimental techniques: oversaturation, undersaturation and by the use of an electrochemical cell which controlled the redox conditions. The experimentally obtained data have been simulated using the thermodynamic equilibrium program HARPHRQ in conjunction with three different sets of thermodynamic data for uranium. In each case, differences were found between the predicted and measured uranium behaviour. For hexavalent uranium at high pH values the model suggested the formation of anionic hydrolysis products which led to the prediction of uranium solubilities significantly higher than those observed. Refinement of the thermodynamic data used in the model enabled the derivation of maximum values for the formation constants of these species under cementitious conditions. Similarly, the experimental data have been used to refine a model of tetravalent uranium solubility under cementitious near-field conditions. (author)

  13. The geological characteristics and forming conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiangang; Tong Hangshou; Feng Mingyue; Li Yuexiang; Xu Zhan

    1993-03-01

    The forming conditions and concentration mechanism of rich ore, criteria of ore prospecting and selection of uranium-rich ore target area are introduced in the article that is based on the studying of geological characteristics and conditions of granite type uranium-rich ore deposits of No 201 and 361 and on the comparisons of rich and poor ore deposits in geological conditions. Some new view points are also presented as the separate deposition of uranium minerals and gangue minerals is the main mechanism to form rich ore, for rich ore formation the ore enrichment by superimposition is not a universal regularity and most uranium-rich ore deposits are formed within one mineralization stage or mainly in one mineralization stage

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  15. Uranium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenthe, Ingmar; Drożdżyński, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

    Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

  16. Environmental conditioning on uranium surface distribution in the tropical region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Heitor Evangelista da; Licinio, Marcus V.S.; Miranda, Marcio R.

    2001-01-01

    Based on a high resolution aerogammaspectrometer survey over the State of Rio de Janeiro, it is presented an associative study of equivalent uranium concentration and environmental parameters. The aspects considered in this study included geological domains like Sandys, Gnaisses, Granites, Xists; soils domains like Organic and Alluvial ones, Litolic, Glei, Podzolic, Red-yellow, Latossolo, Planossolo, Red bruizem, Cambissolo, Hidromorphic Podzol, Yellow latossolo; geomorphology (Coast Plains and River Accumulation Land, Coast Tabulators, Pomba-Muriae Rivers Spread Depression, Northern Mantiqueira, main Hills and Coastal Rock Massifs, Steep slopes and Reverses of Serra do Mar Mountain Range ,Serra dos Orgaos Mountain Range and Bocaina Tablelands), Paraiba do Sul Crests Alignment, Medium Paraiba do Sul Depression); influence of mean annual rain intensity and hydrographical categories were also evaluated. Geoprocessing of each environmental data base at the same cartographical base of uranium surface distribution was the basic methodology employed. (author)

  17. Environmental conditions of two abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, M.

    Two abandoned uranium mill tailings sites near Uranium City, Saskatchewan, have been studied in an attempt to follow the natural rehabilitation processes. The Gunnar site is a largely terrestrial environment while the Lorado mill tailings were discharged mainly into Nero Lake. This report describes the ecological conditions of both sites, potential long-term environmental degradation, and possible measures to assist the recovery of both areas

  18. Enhancing Uranium Uptake by Amidoxime Adsorbent in Seawater: An investigation for optimum alkaline conditioning parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Tsouris, Constantinos; Zhang, C.; Kim, J.; Brown, S.; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, C.; Mayes, R. T.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana R.; Gill, Gary A.; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-20

    A high-surface-area polyethylene-fiber adsorbent (AF160-2) has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid. The grafted nitriles were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) by varying different reaction parameters such as KOH concentration (0.2, 0.44, and 0.6 M), duration (1, 2, and 3 h), and temperature (60, 70, and 80 ºC). Adsorbent screening was then performed with simulated seawater solutions containing sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, at concentrations found in seawater, and uranium nitrate at a uranium concentration of ~ 7-8 ppm and pH 8. FTIR and solid state NMR indicated that a fraction of amidoxime groups was hydrolyzed to carboxylate during KOH conditioning. The uranium adsorption capacity in the simulated seawater screening solution gradually increased with conditioning time and temperature for all KOH concentrations. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase in concentration of KOH for all the conditioning times and temperatures. AF160-2 adsorbent samples were also tested with natural seawater using flow-through experiments to determine uranium adsorption capacity with varying KOH conditioning time and temperature. Based on uranium loading capacity values of several AF160-2 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning time from 3 to 1 h at 60, 70, and 80 ºC resulted in increase of the uranium loading capacity in seawater, which did not follow the trend found in laboratory screening with stimulated solutions. Longer KOH conditioning times lead to significantly higher uptake of divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, which is a result of amidoxime conversion into less selective carboxylate. Scanning electron microscopy showed that long conditioning times may also lead to adsorbent degradation

  19. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W.P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  20. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Richard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Janke, Christopher James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Das, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liao, W. -P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Byers, Maggie Flicker [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Schneider, Eric [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  1. Conditions of uranium-bearing calcite formation in ore-enclosing sediments of the Semizbaj deposit (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Maksimova, I.G.; Dojnikova, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation into uranium-bearing calcite, forming the cement of gravelly-sandy rocks of the Semizbaj uranium deposit. Core sampling in prospecting boreholes were used to establish geological conditions, place and time of uranium-bearing calcite formation. Calcite was investigated by optical, electron-microscope and radiographic methods. It is shown that uranium in calcite doesn't form its own mineral phase and exists in scattered state. Uranium in calcite-bearing minerals is present in isomorphic form. Uranium content in calcite was equal to 0.009-0.15 %. It is proposed that mineralization, formed in sedimentary rocks by processes of ground-stratum oxidation, is the source of uranium, enriching calcite. refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  3. Study on tertiary in-situ leachable uranium mineralization conditions in South Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenqiang; Li Guokuan; Zhao Zonghua; Zhang Jingxun

    2001-01-01

    Tertiary in-situ leachable mineralization in Songliao Basin was analyzed in theory in the past. Since 1998, regional investigation at 1:200000 scale has been done with about 120 holes drilled. Based on drill holes recording, section compiling and sample analysis, the authors investigate into the Tertiary in-situ leachable conditions including rock character, sedimentary facies, rock chemistry, organic substances, uranium content, sandstone porosity, sandstone bodies, interlayer oxidation, and hydro-dynamic value. The study would play important role in prospecting for in-situ leachable uranium in South Songliao basin

  4. In vivo measurement of uranium in the human chest under high background conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, P.J.; Feather, J.I.

    1981-08-01

    The use of a low-background counting room was considered essential for in vivo gamma counting of uranium in the human chest. When such measurements were, however, carried out under relatively high background conditions, this necessitated a new method of analysis. It was found that a linear relationship between LnN and E exists for each individual where N is the count rate per keV and E the energy in keV, for gamma energies between 90 keV and 300 keV. The displacements from this straight line at the energy values of 90 and 186 keV then represent the contribution of the uranium present. These displacements were calibrated for natural uranium. It was possible to detect contamination levels of lower than half MPLB [af

  5. Contribution of analytical techniques coupled to the knowledge of the uranium speciation in natural conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.

    2009-06-01

    To understand the transport mechanisms and the radionuclides behaviour in the bio-geosphere is necessary to evaluate healthy and environmental risks of nuclear industry. These mechanisms are monitored by radioelements speciation, namely the distribution between their different physico-chemical forms in the environment. From this perspective, this PhD thesis deals with uranium speciation in a natural background. A detailed summary of uranium biogeochemistry has been written, which enables to restrict the PhD issue to uranium complexation with oxalic acid, a hydrophilic organic acid with good binding properties, ubiquitous in soil waters. Analytical conditions have been established by means of speciation diagrams. The speciation diagrams building by means of literature stability constants has allowed to define the analytical conditions of complex formation. The chosen analytical technique is the hyphenation of a separative technique (liquid chromatography LC or capillary electrophoresis CE) with mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The studied complexes presence in the synthetic samples has been confirmed with UV/visible spectrophotometry. LC-ICPMS analyses have proved the lability of the uranyl-organic acid complexes, namely their tendency to dissociate during analysis, which prevents from studying uranium speciation. CE-ICPMS study of labile complexes from a metal-ligand system has been made possible by employing affinity capillary electrophoresis, which enables to determine stability constants and electrophoretic mobilities. This PhD thesis has allowed to compare the different mathematical treatments of binding isotherm and to take into account ionic strength and real ligand concentration. Affinity CE has been applied successfully to lanthanum-oxalate (model system) and uranium-oxalate systems. The obtained results have been applied to a real system (situated in Le Bouchet). This shows the contribution of the developed method to the modelling of uranium speciation. (author)

  6. Uranium tetrafluoride reduction closed bomb. Part I: Reduction process general conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anca Abati, R.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1961-01-01

    General conditions about the metallo thermic reduction in small bombs (250 and 800 gr. of uranium) has been investigated. Factors such as kind and granulometry of the magnesium used, magnesium excess and preheating temperature, which affect yields and metal quality have been considered. magnesium excess increased yields in a 15% in the small bomb, about the preheating temperature, there is a range between which yields and metal quality does not change. All tests have been made with graphite linings. (Author) 18 refs

  7. Optimization of experimental conditions in uranium trace determination using laser time-resolved fluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baly, L.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    At the present paper a new sample excitation geometry is presented for the uranium trace determination in aqueous solutions by the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence. This new design introduces the laser radiation through the top side of the cell allowing the use of cells with two quartz sides, less expensive than commonly used at this experimental set. Optimization of the excitation conditions, temporal discrimination and spectral selection are presented

  8. Formation conditions and prospecting criteria for sandstone uranium deposit of interlayer oxidation type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shijie

    1994-01-01

    This paper comprehensively analyses the geotectonic setting and favourable conditions, such as structure of the basin, sedimentary facies and paleogeography, geomorphology and climate, hydrodynamics and hydrogeochemistry, the development of interlayered oxidation etc, necessary for the formation of sandstone uranium deposit of interlayered oxidation type. The following prospecting criteria is proposed, namely: abundant uranium source, arid climate, stable big basin, flat-lying sandstone bed, big alluvial fan, little change in sedimentary facies, intercalation of sandstone and mudstone beds, shallow burying of sandstone bed, well-aquiferous sandstone bed, high permeability of sandstone bed, development of interlayered oxidation, and high content of reductant in sandstone. In addition, the 6 in 1 hydrogenic genetic model is proposed

  9. Analysis of uranium metallogenic conditions and prospective prognosis on the south-central part of the Xikang-Yunnan Axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Baochi; Qian Farong; Cai Yuqi; Zhang Daishi

    1996-08-01

    Three types of uranium mineralizations (i.e., sandstone type, sodium metasomatite type and Proterozoic epimetamorphic rock type) are distinguished in the south-central part of the Xikang-Yunnan Axis, and their major characteristics are expounded. It is proposed that the Early Proterozoic crust has three elevation stages: primitive old land formation stage, subsidence stage and base mental reconsolidation stage, and that the Middle Proterozoic Kunyang Group is different from typical carbonate-siliceous-politic sedimentary formation which contains many regional uranium-rich horizons. The primitive uranium contents of some rocks in the region have been studied for the first time, and proposed a new knowledge that some relative rocks be recognized as the uranium source rocks of the region. It is pointed out that there are two kinds of hydrothermal alterations, namely, alkaline alteration and acidic alteration, and some areas with development of alkaline alteration have promising uranium-metallogenic potential. As for the U-metallogenic prospect of the region, three conclusions are summarized: (1) This region does not have favourable geologic conditions for the Australian-Canadian type Proterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposit; (2) The Proterozoic unconformity different from that of Australian-Canadian type does not have permission U-metallogenic potential either; (3) The alkaline (sodium) metasomatite type uranium mineralization in the region has some prospecting potential. Therefore on the basis of above-mentioned conclusions five relatively promising uranium-metallogenic prospects are selected. (4 refs.)

  10. Conditions and potential evaluation of the uranium mineralization in volcanic basins at the west section of the Yanliao mineral belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang; Zhao Shiqin; Luo Yi; Zhou Dean; Xiao Xiangping

    1993-03-01

    The West section of the Yanliao Mineral Belt is an important prospective uranium mineralization area in volcanic basins at North China. It has undergone three evolutionary periods and developed into six large volcanic collapse faulted basins with tri-layer structure. This leads to three times of pre-enrichment and multiple mineralization of uranium. Finally, the accumulation of uranium and superimposed reworked actions of uranium mineralization resulted in the formation of uranium deposits. After analyzing conditions of uranium mineralization, a model for uranium mineralization of mixed hydrothermal solution of multiple sources in penetrating volcanic collapse faulted basins and seven exploring criteria are suggested. On this basis the evaluation of prospect in this area is positive, and the main exploring strategy has been decided. Furthermore, five prospective areas of mineralization and three most favorable mineralization zones are selected. For exploring large size or super-large size uranium deposits in the area, the key is to strengthen the study and boring of deep layers. Thus, the mineralization in the deep layers or basement may be found. The prediction of deep blind deposits in known ore districts has been proved effectively

  11. Preliminary evaluation of uranium mill tailings conditioning as an alternative remedial action technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; Thode, E.F.; Wangen, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Conditioning of uranium mill tailings is being investigated as an alternative remedial action for inactive tailings piles to be stabilized by the US Department of Energy. Tailings from high priority sites have been characterized for elemental composition, mineralogy, aqueous leachable contaminants, and radon emanation power to provide a baseline to determine the environmental hazard control produced by conditioning. Thermal stabilization of tailings at high temperatures and removal of contaminants by sulfuric acid leaching are being investigated for technical merit as well as economic and engineering feasibility

  12. Subsurface Conditions Controlling Uranium Incorporation in Iron Oxides: A Redox Stable Sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, Scott [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Toxic metals and radionuclides throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex pose a serious threat to ecosystems and to human health. Of particular concern is the redox-sensitive radionuclide uranium, which is classified as a priority pollutant in soils and groundwaters at most DOE sites owing to its large inventory, its health risks, and its mobility with respect to primary waste sources. The goal of this research was to contribute to the long-term mission of the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Program by determining reactions of uranium with iron (hydr)oxides that lead to long-term stabilization of this pervasive contaminant. The research objectives of this project were thus to (1) identify the (bio)geochemical conditions, including those of the solid-phase, promoting uranium incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides, (2) determine the magnitude of uranium incorporation under a variety of relevant subsurface conditions in order to quantify the importance of this pathway when in competition with reduction or adsorption; (3) identify the mechanism(s) of U(VI/V) incorporation in Fe (hydr)oxides; and (4) determine the stability of these phases under different biogeochemical (inclusive of redox) conditions. Our research demonstrates that redox transformations are capable of achieving U incorporation into goethite at ambient temperatures, and that this transformation occurs within days at U and Fe(II) concentrations that are common in subsurface geochemical environments with natural ferrihydrites—inclusive of those with natural impurities. Increasing Fe(II) or U concentration, or initial pH, made U(VI) reduction to U(IV) a more competitive sequestration pathway in this system, presumably by increasing the relative rate of U reduction. Uranium concentrations commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments are often on the order of 1-10 μM, and groundwater Fe(II) concentrations can reach exceed 1 mM in reduced zones of the subsurface. The redox-driven U(V) incorporation

  13. Application of spaceborne SAR data to uranium metallogenetic environment, condition and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xianfang; Huang Shutao; Dong Wenming; Pan Wei; Fang Maolong; Xuan Yanxiu

    2001-01-01

    JERS-1 SAR data processing and data fusion with TM, airborne radioactive and magnetic survey data have been elaborated and image effects have been described in the paper. By means of the analysis of the processed images, the stratigraphy, structures (including faults and folds) and ore-controlling factors in the study area have successfully been interpreted; the underground water mobile characteristics have been discussed; and the metallogenetic environment and condition have been summarized. Based on above research results, the prospecting criteria have been provided and favorable sections have been suggested. The practice has indicated that the application of spaceborne SAR data to uranium reconnaissance and exploration has potential prospects

  14. Potential behavior of depleted uranium penetrators under shipping and bulk storage accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1985-03-01

    An investigation of the potential hazard from airborne releases of depleted uranium (DU) from the Army's M829 munitions was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The study included: (1) assessing the characteristics of DU oxide from an April 1983 burn test, (2) postulating conditions of specific accident situations, and (3) reviewing laboratory and theoretical studies of oxidation and airborne transport of DU from accidents. Results of the experimental measurements of the DU oxides were combined with atmospheric transport models and lung and kidney exposure data to help establish reasonable exclusion boundaries to protect personnel and the public at an accident site. 121 references, 44 figures, 30 tables.

  15. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Junier, Pilar; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Chinni, Satya; Veeramani, Harish; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Webb, Samuel M.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-11-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO 2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron release. Despite initial augmentation with Shewanella oneidensis, bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated columns. The immobilization of uranium (˜1 mmol U per kg sediment) enabled analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Tetravalent uranium associated with these sediments did not have spectroscopic signatures representative of U-U shells or crystalline UO 2. Analysis by microfocused XAS revealed concentrated micrometer regions of solid U(IV) that had spectroscopic signatures consistent with bulk analyses and a poor proximal correlation (μm scale resolution) between U and Fe. A plausible explanation, supported by biogeochemical conditions and spectral interpretations, is uranium association with phosphoryl moieties found in biomass; hence implicating direct enzymatic uranium reduction. After the immobilization phase, two months of in situ exposure to oxic influent did not result in substantial uranium remobilization. Ex situ flow-through experiments demonstrated more rapid uranium mobilization than observed in column oxidation studies and indicated that sediment-associated U(IV) is more mobile than biogenic UO 2. This work suggests that in situ uranium bioimmobilization studies and subsurface modeling parameters should be expanded to account for non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass.

  16. Behavior of uranium during the formation of granitic magma by anatexis (I). Influence of redox conditions and the presence of chloride on the solubility of uranium in the hydrothermal solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoru Nakashima; Toshimichi Iiyama, J.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of uranium is examined experimentally in the course of partial fusion of natural or synthetic granitic rocks. Uranium is definitely soluble in the associated hydrothermal solutions containing chloride under oxidizing conditions, but it is not soluble in the same fluids under reducing conditions [fr

  17. Biogeochemical changes induced in uranium mining waste pile samples by uranyl nitrate treatments under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, A; Merroun, M; Geipel, G; Reuther, H; Selenska-Pobell, S

    2009-06-01

    Response of the subsurface soil bacterial community of a uranium mining waste pile to treatments with uranyl nitrate over different periods of time was studied under anaerobic conditions. The fate of the added U(VI) without supplementation with electron donors was investigated as well. By using 16S rRNA gene retrieval, we demonstrated that incubation with uranyl nitrate for 4 weeks resulted in a strong reduction in and even disappearance of some of the most predominant bacterial groups of the original sample. Instead, a strong proliferation of denitrifying and uranium-resistant populations of Rahnella spp. from Gammaproteobacteria and of Firmicutes occurred. After longer incubations for 14 weeks with uranyl nitrate, bacterial diversity increased and populations intrinsic to the untreated samples such as Bacteroidetes and Deltaproteobacteria propagated and replaced the above-mentioned uranium-resistant groups. This indicated that U(VI) was immobilized. Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis revealed an increased Fe(III) reduction by increasing the incubation time from four to 14 weeks. This result signified that Fe(III) was used as an electron acceptor by the bacterial community established at the later stages of the treatment. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that no detectable amounts of U(VI) were reduced to U(IV) in the time frames of the performed experiments. The reason for this observation is possibly due to the low level of electron donors in the studied oligotrophic environment. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that most of the added U(VI) was bound by organic or inorganic phosphate phases both of biotic origin.

  18. Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B.; Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including 222 Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess

  19. Discussion on hydrogeological conditions of metallogenesis of the sandstone type uranium deposit in Burqin basin, Xinjiang autonomous region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qirong

    2000-01-01

    Based on a brief introduction to the occurrence and distribution of groundwater, the characteristics of the tectonic-hydrogeological layers of the basin are discussed. Then, the author expounds the groundwater hydrodynamic conditions including recharge, runoff and drainage, and hydrogeochemical characteristics. In the end, the hydrogeological conditions favorable for uranium metallogenesis are summarized

  20. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO 2 +2 , thorium dihydroxide Th(OH) 2 +2 , and thorium hydroxide Th(OH) +3 , tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO 2 (CO) 33 -4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH) 4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  1. Uranium Sequestration During Biostimulated Reduction and In Response to the Return of Oxic Conditions In Shallow Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Johnson, Kelly J.; Akstin, Katherine; Singer, David M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Fuhrmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    A proposed approach for groundwater remediation of uranium contamination is to generate reducing conditions by stimulating the growth of microbial populations through injection of electron donor compounds into the subsurface. Sufficiently reducing conditions will result in reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium, U(VI), and precipitation of the less soluble +4 oxidation state uranium, U(IV). This process is termed biostimulated reduction. A key issue in the remediation of uranium (U) contamination in aquifers by biostimulated reduction is the long term stability of the sequestered uranium. Three flow-through column experiments using aquifer sediment were used to evaluate the remobilization of bioreduced U sequestered under conditions in which biostimulation extended well into sulfate reduction to enhance precipitation of reduced sulfur phases such as iron sulfides. One column received added ferrous iron, Fe(II), increasing production of iron sulfides, to test their effect on remobilization of the sequestered uranium, either by serving as a redox buffer by competing for dissolved oxygen, or by armoring the reduced uranium. During biostimulation of the ambient microbial population with acetate, dissolved uranium was lowered by a factor of 2.5 or more with continued removal for over 110 days of biostimulation, well after the onset of sulfate reduction at ~30 days. Sequestered uranium was essentially all U(IV) resulting from the formation of nano-particulate uraninite that coated sediment grains to a thickness of a few 10’s of microns, sometimes in association with S and Fe. A multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport model simulation of column effluents during biostimulation was generally able to describe the acetate oxidation, iron, sulfate, and uranium reduction for all three columns using parameters derived from simulations of field scale biostimulation experiments. Columns were eluted with artificial groundwater at equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to

  2. New developments in the techniques of uranium exploration in Egypt. Case histories for exploration under arid conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, E.M.; Meshref, W.M.; Ammar, A.A.; El-Ghawaby, M.A.; El-Kassas, I.A.; El-Rakaiby, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Exploration for radioactive mineralizations and mineral accumulations in Egypt during the last five years involved the application of new techniques and their adaptation to the prevailing semi-arid to arid environment. The mobilization of uranium and thorium, and their daughter products in the oxidation zone, is greatly influenced by this particular environment. Exploration techniques employed include the use of airborne, space-borne, ground and sub-surface methodologies. Case histories for uranium exploration have been formulated through practical experience, which can be applied in the arid regions in different parts of the world where conditions are comparable to those of Egypt. (author)

  3. Uranium, thorium and trace elements in geologic occurrences as analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Brookins, D.G.; Cohen, L.H.; Flexser, S.; Abashian, M.; Murphy, M.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Contact zones between intrusive rocks and tuff, basalt, salt and granitic rock were investigated as possible analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions. Results of detailed studies of contacts between quartz monzonite of Laramide age, intrusive into Precambrian gneiss, and a Tertiary monzonite-tuff contact zone indicate that uranium, thorium and other trace elements have not migrated significantly from the more radioactive instrusives into the country rock. Similar observations resulted from preliminary investigations of a rhyodacite dike cutting basalt of the Columbia River plateau and a kimberlitic dike cutting bedded salt of the Salina basin. This lack of radionuclide migration occurred in hydrologic and thermal conditions comparable to, or more severe than those expected in nuclear waste repository environments and over time periods of the order of concern for waste repositories. Attention is now directed to investigation of active hydrothermal systems in candidate repository rock types, and in this regard a preliminary set of samples has been obtained from a core hole intersecting basalt underlying the Newberry caldera, Oregon, where temperatures presently range from 100 to 265 0 C. Results of mineralogical and geochemical investigations of this core should indicate the alteration mineralogy and behavior of radioelements in conditions analogous to those in the near field of a repository in basalt

  4. Legislatory background of uranium recovery on Greenland with special regard for safety and environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, A.

    1983-08-01

    The actual laws on mineral resources in Greenland, on radioactive substance handling and protection and their consequences for uranium recovery at Kvanefjeld are considered. The uranium processing pilot plant at Risoe was on Danish territory and therefore subject to the Danish legislation for nuclear installations. (EG)

  5. The conditions for uranium concentration in the phosphates of Tchivoula, Congo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giresse, P.; N'Landou, J. de Dieu; Wiber, M.

    1986-01-01

    The processes of deposition of marine phosphates in the Maastrichtian seas of the Congo do not appear capable alone of having produced the significant concentrations of uranium found. Diagenetic phenomena resulted in a mobilisation and a secondary concentration of uranium in the interior of recrystallized apatites. This secondary uranium may have been derived from the residual organic matrix in the deposit. Towards the top of the beds, hydrolysis of the apatites and authigenesis of crandallite, barrandite and ferruginous variscite led to uranium concentrations which are characteristic of alteration in a tropical climate. In contrast, wavellite, the final product of supergene alteration does not retain uranium. In the case of the Tchivoula deposits, the overlying Paleocene beds may have been the source of the uraniferous solutions' downslope movement which favored concentration in the underlying sediments. (orig.)

  6. Analysis on uranium mineralization-formation condition and prospecting potential in Xidamingshan metallogenic belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhixing; Qi Fucheng; He Zhongbo; Zhang Zilong

    2012-01-01

    There are many different opinions about the source of uranium and metallogenic mechanism in Xidamingshan metallogenic belt. therefore it blocked uranium resources potential evaluation and ore exploration. Through absorb in- formation and investigate Daxin deposit and systematic analysis on samples. It is believed that uranium source mainly came from Cambrian System, a little came from the deep. The Devonian System is favorable room for saving ores in addition to be pre-concentrated room for uranium. Also, there are new cognition about uranium metallogenic mechanism, establish ore-forming series of Xidamingshan metallogenic belt, It is proposed that uranium mineralization have experienced 4 stages; It is cleared that hydrothermal fluid superposition transform type uranium deposit is main genetic type, ancient karst accumulate type is secondary genetic type, the later is formed by leaching the former and then precipitate, enrichment in ancient karst congeries, which is formed nearby faults and with the movement of Xishan structural movement. It is proven that metallogenic potential of Xidamingshan metallogenic belt is good. Tectonic rock controlled by subsidiary fracture nearby regional main fault, which connected with the Cambrian System and the Devonian System, and the deep of the deposit is guideline of mineral prospecting next stage. (authors)

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic bases to resolve issues regarding conditioning of uranium metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.; Ballinger, R.G.; Simpson, K.A.

    1994-12-01

    Numerous uranium - bearing fuels are corroding in fuel storage pools in several countries. At facilities where reprocessing is no longer available, dry storage is being evaluated to preclude aqueous corrosion that is ongoing. It is essential that thermodynamic and kinetic factors are accounted for in transitions of corroding uranium-bearing fuels to dry storage. This paper addresses a process that has been proposed to move Hanford N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to dry storage

  8. Ground water conditions and the relation to uranium deposits in the Gas Hills area, Fremont and Natrona Counties, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, L.Y.

    1978-03-01

    As ground water apparently leaches, transports, and deposits uranium in the Gas Hills area, central Wyoming, it is important to understand its distribution, movement, and relation to geology and ore bodies. Water table maps were prepared of the Wind River Basin; the most detailed work was in the Gas Hills area. The water table in the Gas Hills area slopes downward to the northwest, ranges in depth from near the ground surface to more than 200 feet, and has seasonal fluctuation of about five feet. Perched water tables and artesian conditions occur locally. The oxidized-unoxidized rock contact is probably roughly parallel to the water table, and averages about 25 feet above it; although locally the two surfaces are considerably farther apart and the oxidized-unoxidized contact may be below the water table. In many places the gradient of the water table changes near the contact between rocks of different permeability. It is conformable with the structure at some anticlines and its gradient changes abruptly near some faults. Most above-normal concentrations of uranium occur at local water table depressions or at water table terraces where the gradient of the water table flattens. At these places, the uraniferous ground water is slowed and is in contact with the reducing agents in the rocks for a relatively long time. This may allow reduction of soluble transported uranium (U +6 ) to insoluble U +4 ) so that uranium is precipitated

  9. Chemical aspects of uranium behavior in soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2011-08-01

    Uranium has varying degrees of oxidation (+4 and +6) and is responsive to changes in the redox potential of the environment. It is deposited at the reduction barrier with the participation of biota and at the sorption barrier under oxidative conditions. Iron (hydr)oxides are the strongest sorbents of uranium. Uranium, being an element of medium biological absorption, can accumulate (relative to thorium) in the humus horizons of some soils. The high content of uranium in uncontaminated soils is most frequently inherited from the parent rocks in the regions of positive U anomalies: in the soils developed on oil shales and in the marginal zone of bogs at the reduction barrier. The development of nuclear and coal-fired power engineering resulted in the environmental contamination with uranium. The immobilization of anthropogenic uranium at artificial geochemical barriers is based on two preconditions: the stimulation of on-site metal-reducing bacteria or the introduction of strong mineral reducers, e.g., Fe at low degrees of oxidation.

  10. INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.D. Oliver; J.C. Dinsmoor; S.J. Goldstein; I. Reyes; R. De La Garza

    2005-07-11

    Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown ({approx}15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge

  11. Analysis on geological conditions and orientation of uranium exploration in Diebu orefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zilong; Qi Fucheng; Fu Jin; He Zhongbo; Wang Wenquan; Su Xiangli; Li Zhixing

    2011-01-01

    The uranium-rich formation of siliceous-limestone-mudstone was controlled by EW-striking depressions between platforms in Diebu. The spatial distribution of uranium orebodies are controlled by the horizontal and vertical extension of siliceous-limestone lenses. Analysis on the superposition of key ore-forming factors, including uranium-rich formation, siliceous-limestone lenses, structure-hydrothermal alteration, radioactive anomaly and geochemical anomaly combination, etc. indicate that the northwest depression and Zhanwa-Diaodeka depression of Baiyi anticline are the main orientation of deep and peripheral exploration in known deposits, and the new favorable ore-forming regions are Makeku and Sangjisi in the east part of north side of and Jiangzha-Baiyi region in the south side of Taiyangding anticline. (authors)

  12. Metallogenic condition and regularity of inter layered oxidation zone-type sandstone uranium deposit in southwestern part of Turpan-Hami basin, Northwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Weidong; Chen Zhaobo; Chen Zuyi; Yin Jinshuang

    2001-01-01

    Regional geological surveying and drilling evaluation in recent years show that there are very large potential resources of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the southwestern part of Turpan-Hami basin. According to the characteristics of tectonic evolution and sedimentary cover of the basin, the evolution stages and types of the basin are divided, and the favorable development stages for the ore-bearing formation and the formation of uranium deposits in the evolution process are identified. The metallogenic conditions of uranium deposits are deeply discussed from four aspects: basic tectonics, paleoclimate evolution, hydrogeology and uranium source of the region. All these have laid an important foundation for accurate prediction and evaluation of uranium resources in this region. The research indicates that the uranium metallogeny is a process of long-term, multi-stage and pulsation. The authors try to ascertain the role of organic matter in concentrating uranium. The organic matter is of humic type in sandstone host-rock in the studied area, whose original mother material mainly belongs to terrestrial high plant. The maturity of the organic matter is very low, being in low-grade stage of thermal evolution. Correlation analysis and separation experiments show that uranium concentration is closely related with the organic matter, and the organic matter in uranium ore is mainly in the form of humic acid adsorption and humate. For this reason the total organic carbon content is often increased in the geochemical redox zone in epigenetic sandstone-type uranium deposits. It is suggested that the north of China is of great potential for sandstone-type uranium resources

  13. Fate of Uranium in Wetlands: Impact of Drought Followed by Re-flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, E.; Huang, S.; Koster van Groos, P. G.; Scheckel, K.; Peacock, A. D.; Kaplan, D. I.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Uranium contamination in groundwater can be mitigated in anoxic zones by iron-reducing bacteria that reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) and by uranium immobilization through complexation and sorption. Wetlands often link ground and surface-waters, making them strategic systems for potentially limiting migration of uranium contamination. Little is known about how drought periods that result in the drying of wetland soils, and consequent redox changes, affect uranium fate and transport in wetlands. In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium in wetland soils, and how dry periods affect the uranium stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl-acetate for 5 months before imposing a 9-day drying period followed by a 13-day rewetting period. Concentrations of uranium in mesocosm effluent increased after rewetting, but the cumulative amount of uranium released in the 13 days following the drying constituted less than 1% of the uranium immobilized in the soil during the 5 months prior to the drought. This low level of remobilization suggests that the uranium immobilized in these soils was not primarily bioreduced U(IV), which could have been oxidized to soluble U(VI) during the drought and released in the effluent during the subsequent flood. XANES analyses confirm that most of the uranium immobilized in the mesocosms was U(VI) sorbed to iron oxides. Compared to mesocosms that did not experience drying or rewetting, mesocosms that were sacrificed immediately after drying and after 13 days of rewetting had less uranium in soil near roots and more uranium on root surfaces. Metal-reducing bacteria only dominated the bacterial community after 13 days of rewetting and not immediately after drying, indicating that these bacteria are not responsible for this redistribution of uranium after the drying and rewetting. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland may

  14. Measurement conditions of natural soil thermoluminescence and their application in a granite type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yue; Yang Yaxin; Liu Qingcheng

    2009-01-01

    A measuring method of natural soil thermoluminescence is used for prospecting of uranium deposits. The better effects are obtained by using the method, but the parameters selected have significant effects on the intensity of soil thermoluminescent. So, the measuring parameters are selected according to the different soil samples. Based on the measuring 1 000 soil samples of granite type uranium deposit,the optimum heating up program of natural soil thermoluminescence is obtained, that is, preheating, lasting heating, constant temperature and the halting heating. The parameters selected are as follows: the heating rate being 15 degree C/s, the temperatures of the first and second constant temperature being 135 degree C and 400 degree C respectively. Using the selected parameters for measuring soil samples from a known mining area in Guangdong province, the result indicates that the abnormities of thermoluminescence have corresponding relations with the underground orebodies. (authors)

  15. Geophysical and geochemical exploration research on basic metallogenic conditions of unconformity-related uranium deposits in the south part of Kangdian earth's axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shucheng; Bai Yunsheng; Wu Huishan; Wu Yue; Chang Guilan

    2001-01-01

    In order to find out the unconformity-related large and super large uranium-rich deposits and to explore the prospecting model for the unconformity-related uranium deposits, the geophysical and geochemical exploration on the basic metallogenic conditions of the unconformity-related uranium deposits in the south part of the Kangdian earth's axis has been carried out after the investigation and research into large amounts of information in combination with the analysis and contrasts of the aeromagnetic, aero-radiometric and gravity data. On the basis of synthesizing the airborne survey information, land-based geophysical and geochemical exploration, the physical nature of many types of rocks and the multi-element analytical and determining results of the U, Th, Au, Cu in the soil samples, the geophysical prospecting models on the unconformity-related uranium deposits in this area has been put forward, and two uranium metallogenic prospect areas and one uranium metallogenic prospect belt have been divided. These results have laid a good foundation for finding out the unconformity-related uranium deposits in this area

  16. Preparation, characterization, uranium (VI) biosorption models, and conditions optimization by response surface methodology (RSM) for amidoxime-functionalized marine fungus materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xuechun; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Min; He, Dianxiong; Liao, Sen; Hou, Dan; Yan, Xueming; Long, Wei; Wu, Yaxin; Tan, Ni [Univ. of South China, Hengyang (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Amidoxime-functionalized marine fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51 (ZGDA) was synthesized and studied to adsorb uranium (VI) from the aqueous solution. Different instrumental techniques such as FTIR, SEM, and TGA were employed for the characterization of the manufactured materials, and theirs ability of removal uranium (VI) was optimized using RSM. The experimental results showed the maximum adsorption capacity for the synthesized materials was 230.78 mg g{sup -1} at the following optimization conditions: S-L ratio 150 mg L{sup -1}, pH 5.13, uranium (VI) initial concentration 40 mg L{sup -1}, and equilibrium time 122.40 min. More than 85% of the absorbed uranium (VI) could be desorbed by 0.5 or 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HCl, and the modified mycelium could be reused at least five times. The thermodynamic experimental data of adsorption uranium (VI) could fit better with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms models, and the pseudo-second-order model was better to interpret the kinetics process. The modified fungus materials exhibited the better sorption capacity for uranium (VI) in comparison with raw biomass should be attributed to the strong chelation of amidoxime to uranium (VI) ions.

  17. Australian uranium today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: Australia's resources; Northern Territory uranium in perspective; the government's decision [on August 25, 1977, that there should be further development of uranium under strictly controlled conditions]; Government legislation; outlook [for the Australian uranium mining industry]. (U.K.)

  18. Uranium: the recalcitrant commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowson, P.C.F.

    1989-01-01

    During the past year dollar prices of virtually every mineral commodity have risen considerably on the back of strong demand, falling stocks and rising capacity utilization. Uranium has experienced the same economic influences, but measures of conditions in uranium spot markets display drift and even further decline. Does this mean that uranium is not really a commodity after all, or have special factors been at work? Some of the economic features of the uranium market are re-examined in this context. (author)

  19. Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent; Sani, Rajesh

    2006-09-28

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: 1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant # DE-FG03-01ER63270, and 2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant # DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly on the

  20. Uranium(VI) retention by Ca-bentonite under (hyper)alkaline conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Thimo; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The sorption behavior of U(VI) on Ca-bentonite was studied in saline, (hyper)alkaline solution via batch experiments. At pH 8.5-9.5 sorption is low in the presence of CO{sub 2} due to the formation of weakly sorbing uranyl carbonate species, which have been observed to dominate speciation up to pH 10 by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In the pH region 10-12, U(VI) retention is almost complete. The retention can either be attributed to strongly sorbing uranyl hydroxo complexes or to a partial precipitation of uranium due to an altered solubility of U(VI) induced by ions leached out of the bentonite.

  1. Energies and media nr 32. Conditions for the nuclear sector. Uranium and its enrichment for EDF. The role of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (international conference, agreement between Rosatom and the IAEA, energy policy and projects in India, Turkey, Vietnam, France, Finland, UK, Sweden, USA, Germany), this publication discusses the uranium enrichment issue for EDF and the role of Russia. It refers to a report by the French High committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN) and to a hearing by the French Parliament. Different aspects are discussed: the national and international legal contexts and their relationship, the EDF reactor supply (enriched uranium of MOX, fixed elements in enrichment contracts, supply security), enrichment processes and installations (in France, natural uranium enrichment, use of reprocessed or recycle uranium, use of depleted uranium as a by-product of enrichment), how EDF and AREVA are working with Russia (enrichment of recycled uranium, use of depleted uranium)

  2. Accumulation of uranium by aquatic plants in field conditions: Prospects for phytoremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favas, Paulo J.C.; Pratas, João; Varun, Mayank; D'Souza, Rohan; Paul, Manoj S.

    2014-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine Uranium concentrations in water and aquatic plants in the uraniferous region of Beiras, Central Portugal. Samples were collected from running water (n = 200) at places where aquatic species were observed. Plant samples were collected from 28 species of submerged, free-floating and rooted emergent plants including 2 bryophytes and 1 pteridophyte. Uranium concentrations in surface waters ranged from 0.23 to 1217 μg L −1 . The aquatic plant species studied, including several previously untested species, exhibited the ability to accumulate U in concentrations many times that of the ambient water. In general submerged plants exhibited higher U content followed by rooted emergent and free floating species. The highest U concentrations were observed in the bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica (up to 4979 mg kg −1 ) followed by Callitriche stagnalis (1963 mg kg −1 ), Callitriche hamulata (379 mg kg −1 ), Ranunculus peltatus subsp. saniculifolius (243 mg kg −1 ), Callitriche lusitanica (218 mg kg −1 ), and Ranunculus trichophyllus (65.8 mg kg −1 ). In two out of three rooted emergent species U seemed to be preferentially partitioned in rhizome/roots with highest rhizome U content recorded in Typha latifolia (380 mg kg −1 ). Among the free-floating species, the highest U content (42.5 mg kg −1 ) was seen in Lemna minor. The bryophyte F. antipyretica and Callitrichaceae members seem to be promising candidates for the development of phytofiltration methodologies based on U accumulation, abundance and biomass production. - Highlights: • Exploration of U contamination extent in uraniferous province of Central Portugal • A group of previously untested species with the ability to accumulate U was assessed • U accumulation patterns in the species indicate their potential in bioindication and phytoremediation of U-contaminated water

  3. Accumulation of uranium by aquatic plants in field conditions: Prospects for phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favas, Paulo J.C., E-mail: pjcf@utad.pt [School of Life Sciences and the Environment, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); IMAR-CMA Marine and Environmental Research Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3001-401 Coimbra (Portugal); Pratas, João [Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3001-401 Coimbra (Portugal); IMAR-CMA Marine and Environmental Research Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3001-401 Coimbra (Portugal); Varun, Mayank; D' Souza, Rohan; Paul, Manoj S. [Department of Botany, St. John' s College, Agra 282 002 (India)

    2014-02-01

    A study was undertaken to determine Uranium concentrations in water and aquatic plants in the uraniferous region of Beiras, Central Portugal. Samples were collected from running water (n = 200) at places where aquatic species were observed. Plant samples were collected from 28 species of submerged, free-floating and rooted emergent plants including 2 bryophytes and 1 pteridophyte. Uranium concentrations in surface waters ranged from 0.23 to 1217 μg L{sup −1}. The aquatic plant species studied, including several previously untested species, exhibited the ability to accumulate U in concentrations many times that of the ambient water. In general submerged plants exhibited higher U content followed by rooted emergent and free floating species. The highest U concentrations were observed in the bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica (up to 4979 mg kg{sup −1}) followed by Callitriche stagnalis (1963 mg kg{sup −1}), Callitriche hamulata (379 mg kg{sup −1}), Ranunculus peltatus subsp. saniculifolius (243 mg kg{sup −1}), Callitriche lusitanica (218 mg kg{sup −1}), and Ranunculus trichophyllus (65.8 mg kg{sup −1}). In two out of three rooted emergent species U seemed to be preferentially partitioned in rhizome/roots with highest rhizome U content recorded in Typha latifolia (380 mg kg{sup −1}). Among the free-floating species, the highest U content (42.5 mg kg{sup −1}) was seen in Lemna minor. The bryophyte F. antipyretica and Callitrichaceae members seem to be promising candidates for the development of phytofiltration methodologies based on U accumulation, abundance and biomass production. - Highlights: • Exploration of U contamination extent in uraniferous province of Central Portugal • A group of previously untested species with the ability to accumulate U was assessed • U accumulation patterns in the species indicate their potential in bioindication and phytoremediation of U-contaminated water.

  4. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  5. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  6. Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1982-03-01

    Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa

  7. Mechanisms of Chromium and Uranium Toxicity in Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2 Grown under Anaerobic Nitrate-Reducing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Ge, Xiaoxuan; Zane, Grant M; Wetmore, Kelly M; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Younkin, Adam D; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-01-01

    Chromium and uranium are highly toxic metals that contaminate many natural environments. We investigated their mechanisms of toxicity under anaerobic conditions using nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2, which was originally isolated from a chromium-contaminated aquifer. A random barcode transposon site sequencing library of RCH2 was grown in the presence of the chromate oxyanion (Cr[VI][Formula: see text]) or uranyl oxycation (U[VI][Formula: see text]). Strains lacking genes required for a functional nitrate reductase had decreased fitness as both metals interacted with heme-containing enzymes required for the later steps in the denitrification pathway after nitrate is reduced to nitrite. Cr[VI]-resistance also required genes in the homologous recombination and nucleotide excision DNA repair pathways, showing that DNA is a target of Cr[VI] even under anaerobic conditions. The reduced thiol pool was also identified as a target of Cr[VI] toxicity and psest_2088 , a gene of previously unknown function, was shown to have a role in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. U[VI] resistance mechanisms involved exopolysaccharide synthesis and the universal stress protein UspA. As the first genome-wide fitness analysis of Cr[VI] and U[VI] toxicity under anaerobic conditions, this study provides new insight into the impact of Cr[VI] and U[VI] on an environmental isolate from a chromium contaminated site, as well as into the role of a ubiquitous protein, Psest_2088.

  8. Mechanisms of Chromium and Uranium Toxicity in Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2 Grown under Anaerobic Nitrate-Reducing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Thorgersen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium and uranium are highly toxic metals that contaminate many natural environments. We investigated their mechanisms of toxicity under anaerobic conditions using nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2, which was originally isolated from a chromium-contaminated aquifer. A random barcode transposon site sequencing library of RCH2 was grown in the presence of the chromate oxyanion (Cr[VI]O42− or uranyl oxycation (U[VI]O22+. Strains lacking genes required for a functional nitrate reductase had decreased fitness as both metals interacted with heme-containing enzymes required for the later steps in the denitrification pathway after nitrate is reduced to nitrite. Cr[VI]-resistance also required genes in the homologous recombination and nucleotide excision DNA repair pathways, showing that DNA is a target of Cr[VI] even under anaerobic conditions. The reduced thiol pool was also identified as a target of Cr[VI] toxicity and psest_2088, a gene of previously unknown function, was shown to have a role in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. U[VI] resistance mechanisms involved exopolysaccharide synthesis and the universal stress protein UspA. As the first genome-wide fitness analysis of Cr[VI] and U[VI] toxicity under anaerobic conditions, this study provides new insight into the impact of Cr[VI] and U[VI] on an environmental isolate from a chromium contaminated site, as well as into the role of a ubiquitous protein, Psest_2088.

  9. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H.B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of temperature, laser energy, and detection rate on the evaporation of UO 2 was investigated. • Laser energy can significantly affect the evaporation behavior of UO 2 . • Proper experimental conditions allows for an accurate investigation of UO 2 with APT. - Abstract: Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO 2 . Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO 2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate

  10. Analysis on tectonomagmatic evolution and metallogenic geological conditions of rich-large uranium deposits in Nanling uranium-polymetal metallogenic belt, South Jiangxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guihua

    2001-01-01

    Nanling is a complicated tectonomagmatic belt. It is also an important uranium-polymetallic metallogenic belt. On the basis of the research achievements of previous researchers, through the detailed stratigraphic, lithologic, litho-paleo-geographic, geochronologic and geochemical studies and the processing of gravimetric and magnetic data, as well as the information extraction of remote sensing data, the authors come to the following conclusions: (1) The Sannan-Xunwu fault is a long-lived (from the Early Sinian to recent time) EW-trending fault; (2) The earth crust in Nanling experienced three time opening-closing with different scales; (3) The Anyuan-Xunwu area is a large thermo-upwelling extensional structure; (4) The above area is considered to be favourable for the formation of rich-large uranium deposit

  11. Radiological conditions in areas of Kuwait with residues of depleted uranium. Report by an international group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is one of the by-products of uranium enrichment and, like any other uranium compound, has both chemical and radiological toxicity; it is mildly radioactive, having about 60% of the activity of natural uranium. DU has had a wide range of peaceful applications, such as the provision of radiation shielding for medical sources or as counterweights in aeroplanes. DU is also used for heavy tank armour and, owing to its high density and high melting point and its property of becoming 'sharper' as it penetrates armour plating, in anti-tank munitions and missiles. The 1991 Gulf War was the first conflict in which DU munitions were used extensively. In view of the concerns raised about the possible link between human exposure to ionizing radiation from DU and harmful biological effects, the Government of Kuwait, in February 2001, requested the IAEA to conduct surveys at and assessments of a number of specified locations. The aim of this work was to inform the Government of Kuwait and the public of the possible radiological conditions arising owing to DU residues at these sites. The IAEA accepted the request for a radiological assessment under its unique statutory functions within the United Nations system, namely: (1) to establish standards of safety for protection against radiation exposure; and (2) to provide for the application of these standards. In 1996 the IAEA, in cosponsorship with other relevant organizations in the United Nations system, established the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. These standards are fully applicable to exposure to all forms of ionizing radiation, including exposure to any uranium radionuclides in general and, in particular, to DU. In the past, a number of evaluations of the environmental and health impact of DU munitions have been performed by national and international organizations. This report constitutes the first comprehensive

  12. Research on metallogenic conditions of intersection-type uranium ore-deposits in Zhongdong area, Northern Guangdong province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengqi; Wu Lieqin; Zhang Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    The methods following as field geological investigation, trace element geo- chemistry and isotope geochemistry were used in this project. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics of Xiaoshui uranium ore deposits in Zhongdong area, Xiazhuang ore-field, Guangdong province, it could be concluded that: (1) The Provenance of Cretaceous mantle is a enriched mantle; (2) Silicified zone-type and intersection-type uranium ore are distinctness in the metallogenic period and mineralization process, and main metallogenic period of Xiaoshui uranium ore-deposit is 73.5 Ma; (3) The sources of uranium mineralization substance derived from enriched mantle; and (4)The intersection-type high grade uranium deposits were controlled by substances derived from mantle (contain with U, CO 2 , F, et al), tracks of intersection of NWW-across with NNE-trending faults and lithology of diabase. (authors)

  13. Preliminary results from uranium/americium affinity studies under experimental conditions for cesium removal from NPP ''Kozloduy'' simulated wastes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforova, A.; Kinova, L.; Peneva, C.; Taskaeva, I.; Petrova, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use the approach described by Westinghouse Savannah River Company using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) to remove elevated concentrations of radioactive cesium to facilitate handling waste samples from NPP K ozloduy . Preliminary series of tests were carried out to determine the exact conditions for sufficient cesium removal from five simulated waste solutions with concentrations of compounds, whose complexing power complicates any subsequent processing. Simulated wastes solutions contain high concentrations of nitrates, borates, H 2 C 2 O 4 , ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and Citric acid, according to the composition of the real waste from the NPP. On this basis a laboratory treatment protocol was created. This experiment is a preparation for the analysis of real waste samples. In this sense the results are preliminary. Unwanted removal of non-cesium radioactive species from simulated waste solutions was studied with gamma spectrometry with the aim to find a compromise between on the one hand the AMP effectiveness and on the other hand unwanted affinity to AMP of Uranium and Americium. Success for the treatment protocol is defined by proving minimal uptake of U and Am, while at the same time demonstrating good removal effectiveness through the use of AMP. Uptake of U and Am were determined as influenced by oxidizing agents at nitric acid concentrations, proposed by Savannah River National laboratory. It was found that AMP does not significantly remove U and Am when concentration of oxidizing agents is more than 0.1M for simulated waste solutions and for contact times inherent in laboratory treatment protocol. Uranium and Americium affinity under experimental conditions for cesium removal were evaluated from gamma spectrometric data. Results are given for the model experiment and an approach for the real waste analysis is chosen. Under our experimental conditions simulated wastes solutions showed minimal affinity to AMP when U and Am are most probably in

  14. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  15. Uranium demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The estimated world resources of uranium as well as the estimated consumption of uranium over the next 25 years are briefly discussed. Attention is given to the prospecting of uranium in South Africa and elsewhere in the world

  16. A comparative study for the conditions concentration and extraction of uranium from ores in sedimentary rocks from Egypt and Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium has been recently discovered in a sedimentary rock in Meshraq locality (north of Iraq). This rock composed mainly of gypsum with different proportions of dolomite and sand, thus it could be termed: dolomite sandy gypseous. On the other hand, the Oligocene deposits of Qatrani area (located at the northern part of the western desert, Egypt) in which gypsum and dolomite are the main constituents, contains various forms of uranium mineralizations. Thus, the could be technologically compared with the uraniferous samples of Iraq. This thesis concerned with the study of uranium concentration and extraction from the two ore materials. Uranium leaching study has been carried out by using many leaching variants, i. e.; sulfuric acid, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate. Also, a detailed study for the possibility of producing sulfuric acid from gypsum by the reaction with ammonium carbonate has been performed. During uranium recovery from the acidic leach liquors, the 'Uranous phosphate' method has been studied, and during uranium recovery from the alkaline leach liquors (Ammonium Carbonate), the process of uranium precipitation with steam has been studied

  17. The health condition of uranium mine workers of the Shantobe settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenova, F.K.; Bajdurin, S.A.; Zhuravlev, M.Ya.; Bajkenov, M.B.; Abrakhmanova, R.Kh.; Esenbaeva, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    The condition of health was estimated by results of profound medical inspection of 797 inhabitants of Shantobe settlement, including by 392 working miners. The most wide-spread diseases among workers were a hyperplasia of a thyroid glands, an arterial hypertension, and chronic bronchitis

  18. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Génin, X.; Bayle, J. P.; Dugne, O.; Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  19. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  20. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  1. Uranium biosorption under dynamic conditions. Preliminary tests with Sargassum filipendula in real radioactive wastewater containing Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ca and Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Silva, J.I.; Melo Ferreira de, A.C.; Costa da, A.C.A

    2009-01-01

    The biosorption of uranium by the seaweed Sargassum filipendula was investigated under dynamic conditions at various bed heights. Our results indicate that a bed height of 40.0 cm (111.9 g biomass) was the most efficient for long-term operation of the continuous system. Our results also indicate that the effluent solutions produced are in accordance with Brazilian legislation for safe discharge of uranium in aqueous streams. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in bed height from 5.0 to 40.0 cm due to changes in the transfer zone. In treatment of a real effluent contaminated with uranium, stable heavy metals and essential metals, 64% of the uranium was biosorbed, as well as the stable heavy metals chromium, lead and barium. The essential metals calcium, magnesium, iron and manganese were not biosorbed by the seaweed, in fact, their concentrations in the solution increased due to ion-exchange mechanisms with the constituent polysaccharides of the biomass. Another important result was the 85-87% reduction of mass obtained after drying and calcination of the biomass. This is a relevant indication that long-term storage of biomass loaded with radionuclides and heavy metals is possible after concentration of the contaminants. In the present work, the reduction in total mass of the loaded biomass was considerable, thus facilitating storage of the contaminated seaweed. (author)

  2. Studies on hydrogeological conditions for mineralization of some sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Li Sen; Xiao Feng; Qi Daneng; Yin Jinshuang

    1996-11-01

    Based on the analysis for regional geology, structural and hydrogeological conditions of Erennaoer Depression, Erlian Basin, the hydrogeological hydraulic zoning was carried out for groundwater in the study area, structural-palaeo-hydrogeological stages and the feature of deep-seated groundwater were studied, and, two important U-mineralization periods were determined. The conditions of recharge, runoff and discharge of groundwater in ore bearing aquifers and the hydraulic mechanism were revealed by isotope hydrology and single-well tracing technique. By study of hydrogeochemistry, it is indicated that both Subeng and Nuheting U-deposit are located at the parts where groundwater characteristics intensely variate, and the ore indicators are determined. Oil and gas transportation and the relationships between groundwater and U-metallogenetic process were discussed by using of organic geochemistry method. It shows that the bleeding of oil and gas is very important for the forming of U-deposits. It is suggested that the interlayered oxidation zone type sandstone U-deposit which is suitable for in-situ leaching could be existed in the Tenggeer formation, Bayanhua group of Lower Cretaceous, accordingly, two prospecting areas are delimited. (4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  3. Analysis of the murine renal transcriptoma in conditions of acute and chronic exposure to uranium; Analyse du transcriptome renal murin dans des conditions d'exposition aigue et chronique a l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulan, M

    2004-06-01

    The principal objective of this work was to evaluate the molecular alterations induced by uranium. For this, were used classical approaches of toxicology and implementation of a global analysis technique: S.A.G.E. (serial analysis of gene expression). After acute contamination, was brought to the shore an alteration of the renal function and a catalogue of different transcripts representative of molecular events consecutive to uranium incorporation was defined. More than 14 000 transcripts have been identified, among which 224 genes that present a variation in gene expression. These last ones have been classified in different categories of cell processes as inflammation, oxidative stress, cell transporters, signal transduction, apoptosis, metabolism and catabolism. The same study was made for a chronic exposure. This study shows that the chronic uranium ingestion changes numerous cell processes as these ones previously noticed. The whole of these data has allowed to validate the use of the genomic approach S.A.G.E. in the field of toxicology, by establishing a profile of gene expression of events relative to an uranium intoxication. The analysis of molecular consequences should allow to find early markers of an uranium contamination, means more efficient of this actinide elimination and new therapies targets. (N.C.)

  4. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  5. Development of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores for conditions of OJSC Priargunsky Mining and Chemical plant (PPGKhO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Litvinenko, V.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of low-grade commercial uranium ores by heap leaching has been carried out at the enterprise since 1996. During the initial stage of development, the ore piles were formed of the raw ore having the run-of-mine coarseness with uranium content around 0.08%. Under such conditions, recovery of the metal to the solution is 60-65% in case of a pile treatment lasting 2 years. To intensify the process and to provide a stable concentration of uranium in the productive solutions transferred to sorption, the enterprise developed and implemented a method of percolation leaching of low-grade ores with re-circulation of productive solutions through the re-treated ore bulk (RF patent No. 2226564). The main peculiarity of such leaching is simultaneous moistening of the ore by productive solutions and by barren solutions that are sharpened with sulphuric acid; that gives the possibility to wet far bigger areas of piles under constant volume of productive solutions outputting to the sorption treatment. Such scheme enables to treat successively first the piles at the “re-treatment” (where the metal is mainly extracted), and then the piles at the “active leaching” stage (where the metal is mainly inside the ore bulk). The technical and economic indexes of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores were significantly increased in 2006, when the X-ray-radiometric treatment plant was commissioned. The technological scheme of ore treatment at the processing plant includes mould and grating of the raw material with delivery of undersized products enriched with uranium: -5 mm are transferred to the pulp process; fractions (-200+40) mm to the X-ray-radiometric separation; the material of size (-40+5) mm, washed-out from clayey and fine particles, are sent to the uranium heap leaching in piles. Delivery of the ore material having size (-40+5) mm to treatment by the acid leaching method excluded colmatage and creation of zones impermeable for water, and in combination

  6. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species

  7. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2015, Watts et al.

  8. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares Rieumont, S.; Martinez Luzardo, J.; Torres Hernandez, J.; Lima Cazorla, D. de la Rosa.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  9. The evaluation of in-situ leaching hydrological-geologic condition in a sandstone-type uranium deposits of a low-grade and thick ledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yan

    2014-01-01

    The ore aquifer of a sandstone-type uranium deposits is thick, the grade, and uranium amount per square meter is low. To demonstrate the economic rationality of the in-situ leaching deposit, the Pumping test on the spot, recovery of water levels test, Pumping test and Injection test, Injection test in a Drilling hole, the pumping and injection balance test are carried out. And the hydro geological parameters of mineral aquifer are acquired. The parameters includes coefficient of transmissibility, Coefficient of permeability, Specific discharge of a well and Water injection. Radius of influence etc. The relation between discharge of drilling and Drawdown is researched. The capability of pumping and injection by a drilling hole is determined. The Hydraulic between the aquifer with mineral and the upper and lower aquifer is researched. The reasonable Mining drawdown is testified, the hydrogeological conditions of in-Situ leaching of the mining deposit is found out, this provides necessary parameters and basis for this kind of Situ-leach uranium mining wells, the designing of Spacing of wells, and the economic evaluation of In-situ leaching technology. (author)

  10. Crystal chemistry of iron in low-temperature chlorites, implications for geo-thermometry and the determination of redox paleo-conditions in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigault, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    In contexts of uranium deposits, redox conditions constitute the main factor controlling the uranium deposition. Often observed in these deposits, chlorites are the unique clay mineral which can be able to record in their structure the redox conditions through their Fe 3+ /SFe ratio. However, the common presence of several populations of chlorites makes difficult to understand the message carried out by these minerals. Thanks to μ-XANES spectroscopy, we are now able to measure on thin sections the Fe 3+ /SFe ratio in chlorites with an accuracy of 5 %. Measurements show that it can reach 60 % in di-tri-octahedral chlorites and 5 % to more than 40 % for tri-octahedral chlorites. In hydrothermal contexts where chlorites crystallize through a dissolution-recrystallization process, their Fe 3+ /SFe ratio decreases with the increase of the global Fe content. Diagenetic chlorites observed resulting from the polymorphic transformation of berthierine have a different behavior because there is no link between their total iron content and their Fe 3+ /SFe ratio: their chemistry is directly inherited from the one of the precursor mineral because this transformation does not allow a reorganization of cations in the structure. This transformation explains that thermodynamic models cannot work for these phases. For the use of chlorites as makers of redox paleo-conditions in contexts of uranium deposits where diagenetic and hydrothermal chlorites can be present, it is decisive to determine their origin, for example analyzing their polytype: Ib (b=90 degrees) for chlorites crystallized from solid-state transformation and IIb for chlorites crystallized through dissolution-recrystallization process. (author)

  11. Australia's uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampson, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: structure of the uranium industry in Australia (export policies; development of mining programme; table of export contracts approved by Australian government, 1972; government policy towards the industry 1972-75 and since 1975); reserves (table of Australia's major uranium deposits; estimated world resources of uranium, excluding USSR, Eastern Europe and China; comparison of exploration expenditures and discovery of uranium in Australia and the USA); enrichment; resource potential; future demand (table of nuclear power reactors above 30 MW in operation or under construction, mid-1979; projection of Australian uranium production to 1990); government and union action. (U.K.)

  12. Canada's uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    The history of uranium mining, exploration, and trade in Canada is outlined. Past complex variations in market conditions are analyzed and future prospects for production and demand are forecast. Canadian and world resources of uranium are compared. Export policies and their rationales are explained. The Canadian nuclear fuel industry is described and fuel performance in-reactor is shown to be excellent. (E.C.B.)

  13. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  14. A preliminary analysis and assessment of hydrogeological conditions for in-situ leach mining of sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fazheng; Zhao Jinfeng; Chang Baocheng; Gao Junyi

    2006-01-01

    A systematic analysis and assessment on hydrogeologic condition, the lithology and hydrogeologic structure of ore-hosting aquitfers, hydrodynamic condition, hydrochemical characteristics at a sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin is made in this paper. It has been concluded, that hydrogeologic condition in the study area is favorable, meeting the requirements for in-situ leach mining of the deposit. Aimed at the low artesian pressure head and low water output and based on the results of pumping-injection tests which led to the significant increase of water output, a technical scheme of pressured water injection has been proposed to artificially raise the artesian pressure head and increase the output of groundwater to satisfy the requirements of in-situ leach mining. (authors)

  15. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  16. Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study ($20,575 extension)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent Peyton; Rajesh Sani

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: (1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant DE-FG03-01ER63270, and (2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 (micro)M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly

  17. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Uranium industry seminar: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The eleventh annual Uranium Industry Seminar, sponsored by the Grand Junction Area Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE), was held in Grand Junction, Colorado, on October 21 and 22, 1981. There were 491 registered attendees as compared to 700 attending the previous year. The attendees were largely from uranium and other energy resource companies, electric utility firms, energy consultants and service companies, and governmental agencies. In addition, there were representatives present from Indian tribes, universities, the media, DOE laboratories, and foreign countries and organizations. Papers presented at the seminar dealt with uranium policies, exploration, resources, supply, enrichment, and market conditions. There also were papers on the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program and international activities. Thirteen papers included in this report have been abstracted and indexed

  19. Uranium industry seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The tenth annual Uranium Industry Seminar, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Grand Junction Office, was held in Grand Junction, Colorado, on October 22 and 23, 1980. There were 700 registered attendees as compared to 833 attending the previous year. The attendees were drawn largely from uranium and other energy resource companies, electric utility firms, energy consultants and service companies, and governmental agencies. In addition, there were representatives present from Indian tribes, universities, the media, DOE laboratories, and foreign countries and organizations. There were 14 papers presented at the seminar by speakers from the Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, and Bendix Field Engineering Corporation which is the on-site prime contractor for DOE's Grand Junction Office. The topics the papers dealt with were uranium policies, exploration, respources, supply, enrichment, and market conditions. There also were papers describing the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program and international activities. All 14 papers in this Proceedings have been abstracted and indexed

  20. Uranium determination in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdeiro, N.H.; Bianco de Salas, G.H.; Correia, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The method used for the spectrometric uranium determination with 2-(2-thiolase)-5-diethylaminophenol was modified for its application in the zirconium samples analysis with an uranium content of the 0.1% order. The samples, previously dissolved in nitric acid, were submitted to a separative stage of liquid-liquid extraction, with a trioctylphosphine (TOPO) oxide diluted in cyclohexane. A sodium fluoride aqueous solution was necessary to be aggregated in the spectrometric determination so as to complex the zirconium vestiges, which could be present, originated by the Zr/U high relation of the initial sample. Under the established working conditions, different spectrometric assays, dyes absorption spectra and its uranium complex, complex stability, PH influence determination of the dyes-uranium relation, calculation of the complex's apparent formation constant and its molar absorption, were performed. (Author)

  1. Uranium control in phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.; Arnold, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    In wet-process phosphoric acid plants, both previous and recent test results show that uranium dissolution from phosphate rock is significantly higher when the rock is acidulated under oxidizing conditions than under reducing conditions. Excess sulfate and excess fluoride further enhance the distribution of uranium to the cake. Apparently the U(IV) present in the crystal lattice of the apatite plus that formed by reduction of U(IV) by FE(II) during acidulation is trapped or carried into the crystal lattice of the calcium sulfate crystals as they form and grow. The amount of uranium that distributes to hemihydrate filter cake is up to seven times higher than the amount that distributes to the dihydrate cake. About 60% of the uranium in hemihydrate cakes can be readily leached after hydration of the cake, but the residual uranium (20 to 30%) is very difficult to remove economically. Much additional research is needed to develop methods for minimizing uranium losses to calcium filter cakes

  2. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  3. Uranium Bio-accumulation and Cycling as revealed by Uranium Isotopes in Naturally Reduced Sediments from the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Pierre; Noël, Vincent; Jemison, Noah; Weaver, Karrie; Bargar, John; Maher, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Uranium (U) groundwater contamination following oxidized U(VI) releases from weathering of mine tailings is a major concern at numerous sites across the Upper Colorado River Basin (CRB), USA. Uranium(IV)-bearing solids accumulated within naturally reduced zones (NRZs) characterized by elevated organic carbon and iron sulfide compounds. Subsequent re-oxidation of U(IV)solid to U(VI)aqueous then controls the release to groundwater and surface water, resulting in plume persistence and raising public health concerns. Thus, understanding the extent of uranium oxidation and reduction within NRZs is critical for assessing the persistence of the groundwater contamination. In this study, we measured solid-phase uranium isotope fractionation (δ238/235U) of sedimentary core samples from four study sites (Shiprock, NM, Grand Junction, Rifle and Naturita, CO) using a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). We observe a strong correlation between U accumulation and the extent of isotopic fractionation, with Δ238U up to +1.8 ‰ between uranium-enriched and low concentration zones. The enrichment in the heavy isotopes within the NRZs appears to be especially important in the vadose zone, which is subject to variations in water table depth. According to previous studies, this isotopic signature is consistent with biotic reduction processes associated with metal-reducing bacteria. Positive correlations between the amount of iron sulfides and the accumulation of reduced uranium underline the importance of sulfate-reducing conditions for U(IV) retention. Furthermore, the positive fractionation associated with U reduction observed across all sites despite some variations in magnitude due to site characteristics, shows a regional trend across the Colorado River Basin. The maximum extent of 238U enrichment observed in the NRZ proximal to the water table further suggests that the redox cycling of uranium, with net release of U(VI) to the groundwater by

  4. Uranium prospecting and uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, K.E.

    1975-01-01

    Following of short historical survey, estimations of the uranium resources of the western world made in the middle of 1975 are presented and interpreted. The most common methods of prospecting and exploration of the mines and of production and processing of the uranium eres are described. A short survey of the situation of supply and demand is supplemented by a description of the activities of the two German companies in the field of uranium supply. (UA/AK) [de

  5. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  6. Analytical method of uranium (IV) and uranium (VI) in uranium ores and uranium-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhuqin; Zheng Yongfeng; Li Qingzhen; Zhong Miaolan; Gu Dingxiang

    1995-11-01

    The best conditions for keeping the original valences of uranium during the dissolution and separation procedure of geological samples (especially those micro uranium-bearing rock) were studied. With the exist of high concentration protectants, the sample was decomposed with concentration HF at 40 +- 5 degree C. The U(VI) was dissolved completely and formed stable complex UO 2 F 2 , the U(IV) was precipitated rapidly and carried by carrier. Quantitative separation was carried out immediately with suction. The decomposition of sample and separation of solid/liquid phases was completed within two minutes. After separation, the U(IV) and U(VI) were determined quantitatively with laser fluorescence or voltametry respectively according to the uranium content. The limit of detection for this method is 0.7 μg/g, RSD is 10.5%, the determinate range of uranium is 2 x 10 -6 ∼10 -1 g/g. The uranium contents and their valence state ratio were measured for more than one hundred samples of sand stone and granite, the accuracy and precision of these results are satisfactory for uranium geological research. (12 tabs.; 11 refs.)

  7. Australia's uranium policy - produce for export only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Australia's uranium policy is that the mining and export of uranium only be permitted from the Nabarlek, Ranger and Olympic Dam Mines subject to strict safeguard conditions. In addition, the government has decided against the development of further stages of the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia, resulting in all uranium production being for export only

  8. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to understand the microbial and geochemical mechanisms controlling the reduction and immobilization of U(VI) during biostimulation in subsurface sediments of the Field Research Center (FRC) which are cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate. The focus will be on activity of microbial populations (metal- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) and iron minerals which are likely to make strong contributions to the fate of uranium during in situ bioremediation. The project will: (1) quantify the relationships between active members of the microbial communities, iron mineralogy, and nitrogen transformations in the field and in laboratory incubations under a variety of biostimulation conditions, (2) purify and physiologically characterize new model metal-reducing bacteria isolated from moderately acidophilic FRC subsurface sediments, and (3) elucidate the biotic and abiotic mechanisms by which FRC aluminosilicate clay minerals are reduced and dissolved under environmental conditions resembling those during biostimulation. Active microbial communities will be assessed using quantitative molecular techniques along with geochemical measurements to determine the different terminal-electron-accepting pathways. Iron minerals will be characterized using a suite of physical, spectroscopic, and wet chemical methods. Monitoring the activity and composition of the denitrifier community in parallel with denitrification intermediates during nitrate removal will provide a better understanding of the indirect effects of nitrate reduction on uranium speciation. Through quantification of the activity of specific microbial populations and an in-depth characterization of Fe minerals likely to catalyze U sorption/precipitation, we will provide important inputs for reaction-based biogeochemical models which will provide the basis for development of in situ U bioremediation strategies. In collaboration with Jack Istok and Lee Krumholz, we have begun to study the

  9. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  10. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  11. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  12. Experimental studies of the mechanisms and the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of the uranium reduction by sedimentary organic materials from ligneous origin under diagenetic or hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports experimental studies of fixation and reduction of the uranyl cation by sedimentary organic materials from ligneous origin in order to understand the mechanisms and quantitative aspects of these processes in diagenetic or hydrothermal conditions. Two fixation mechanisms have been identified. Reduction appears to be governed by the oxidation of hydroxyl functions and the dehydrogenation of aliphatic hydro-carbonated entities. A kinetic study of this reduction process is reported, as well as a simulation of these processes by simple organic compounds (alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons). The assessment of thermodynamic parameters of the reduction process is discussed, and the obtained thermodynamic data show that almost the totality of uranium present in natural waters precipitates under the form of uraninite in presence of lignite. The extension of the obtained results to all sedimentary organic materials is finally discussed [fr

  13. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  14. Evaluation of uranium removal by Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle from low level nuclear waste under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Bhainsa, K C

    2016-02-01

    The present study evaluated uranium (U) removal ability and tolerance to low level nuclear waste (LLNW) of an aquatic weed Hydrilla verticillata. Plants were screened for growth in 10%-50% waste treatments up to 3 d. Treatments of 20% and 50% waste imposed increasing toxicity with duration assessed in terms of change in fresh weight and in the levels of photosynthetic pigments and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. U concentration, however, did not show a progressive increase and was about 42 μg g(-1) dw from 20% to 50% waste at 3 d. This suggested that a saturation stage was reached with respect to U removal due to increasing toxicity. However, in another experiment with 10% waste and 10% waste+10 ppm U treatments, plants showed an increase in U concentration with the maximum level approaching 426 μg g(-1) dw at 3 d without showing any toxicity as compared to that at 20% and 50% waste treatments. Hence, plants possessed significant potential to take up U and toxicity of LLNW limited their U removal ability. This implies that the use of Hydrilla plants for U removal from LLNW is feasible at low concentrations and would require repeated harvesting at short intervals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxidants for uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Ring, B.

    2007-01-01

    Most uranium ores are leached with sulfuric acid under oxidising conditions. This paper reviews the oxidants that have been traditionally used in uranium leaching and discusses their merits in the context of overall flow sheet considerations. Options for alternative oxidants are also discussed. In acid leaching, ferric ion in solution oxidises insoluble uranium(IV) to soluble uranium (VI). Though ferric ion may be added directly, usually an oxidant is added to the circuit to convert ferrous ion to ferric ion in the liquor so that leaching can continue. The most common oxidants are pyrolusite and sodium chlorate. Pyrolusite is relatively cheap but introduces manganese ions into the liquor and consumes twice as much acid as sodium chlorate. Sodium chlorate is a slow reacting oxidant at low temperatures and acidities, and introduces chloride into the leach liquor. Caro's acid, is a non-polluting reagent that was used successfully at the Nabarlek uranium mine, and provided very good control of oxidising conditions. Other oxidants that are now being considered to overcome the disadvantages of pyrolusite and sodium chlorate are oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and SO 2 /O 2 . Some performance data for these oxidants are presented

  16. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  17. The significance of zircon characteristic and its uranium concentration in evaluation of uranium metallogenetic prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yaosong; Zhu Jiechen; Xia Yuliang

    1992-02-01

    Zircon characteristic and its relation to uranium metallogenetic process have been studied on the basis of physics properties and chemical compositions. It is indicated that the colour of zircon crystal is related to uranium concentration; on the basis of method of zircon population type of Pupin J.P., the sectional plan of zircon population type has been designed, from which result that zircon population type of uranium-producing rock body is distributed mainly in second section, secondly in fourth section; U in zircon presents synchronous increase trend with Th, Hf and Ta; the uranium concentration in zircon from uranium-producing geologic body increases obviously and its rate of increase is more than that of the uranium concentration in rock; the period, in which uranium concentration in zircon is increased, is often related to better uranium-producing condition in that period of this area. 1785 data of the average uranium concentration in zircon have been counted and clear regularity has been obtained, namely the average uranium concentrations in zircon in rich uranium-producing area, rock, geologic body and metallogenetic zone are all higher than that in poor or no uranium-producing area, rock, geologic body and metallogenetic zone. This shows that the average uranium concentration in zircon within the region in fact reflects the primary uranium-bearing background in region and restricts directly follow-up possibility of uranium mineralization. On the basis of this, the uranium source conditions of known uranium metallogenetic zones and prospective provinces have been discussed, and the average uranium concentrations in zircon from magmatic rocks for 81 districts have been contrasted and graded, and some districts in which exploration will be worth doing further are put forward

  18. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  19. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  20. Mineralogical controls on uranium immobilization at Tono Uranium Deposit, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, M. A.; McKibben, M. A.; Arthur, R. C.; Ota, K.; Iwatsuki, T.

    2002-12-01

    The Tono uranium deposit, located in central Japan, is thought to have formed when oxidizing groundwater leached uranium from the underlying Toki Granite and transported it to the overlying host sedimentary formations where it precipitated under reducing conditions. Fission-track dating shows that this uranium mineralization took place ~10 million years ago and has remained immobilized despite episodes of sedimentation, uplift, subsidence, major faulting, and erosion. In order to understand the mineralogical controls on uranium immobilization, this study is gathering data on the mode of precipitation and adsorption of uranium within the various host lithologies. Optical petrography done on samples has shown a predominance of volcaniclastic deposits, containing glass shards within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. Tephra that were formerly glass lack axiolitic devitrification textures and are altered to similar fine-grained mineralogy as in the matrix. X-ray diffraction data indicates that the majority of this fine-grained mineralogy is chlorite and the Mg, Ca smectite, saponite. Electron dispersive spectroscopy and back scattered electron data will create a map of the uranium concentrations and show any mineralogical affinities. Scanning and transmission electron microscope data will resolve the nature, crystallinity, and host sites of the uranium mineralization and help resolve the paragenesis in these tuffaceous rocks. This paper will address data gathered on samples across the host sedimentary formations and with depth to establish what mineralogical controls, if any, have influenced uranium precipitation and immobilization.

  1. International uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, T.L.; Jacoby, H.D.

    1980-12-01

    Discussed in this report are 1) how one might think about uranium demand, resources and supply, 2) how producers and consumers see the market and are likely to behave, including specifics about export and import commitments, and 3) how these actors are brought together in the international market. The general conclusion is that much of current anxiety about future uranium supply results primarily from a brief but difficult period in the mid- to late-1970's; and that current conditions and trends are favorable (at least to consumers) that there is now little basis for concern. Inventories contractual positions and producer commitments--when compared with realistic (or even unrealistic) demand estimates--imply a buyer's market for at least the next decade. The result will be considerable increases in market flexibility and resilience to shock, and real prices that are low relative to those of the past few years. There is a need to reconsider assumptions about desired directions of technological development, for many current programs were planned in an era of pessimism about uranium supply and process. Similar questions must be raided about nonproliferation policies that depend on some level of control of fuel supplies by the industrial nations. With a soft and more diversified uranium market, leverage that may have existed in the past is rapidly being eroded. Finally, as world prices turn soft, there may be significant problems created for U.S. uranium producers, who have relatively high costs in relation to several large-scale foreign suppliers

  2. Uranium extraction in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from the phosphoric liquor produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). The proposed process consists of two extraction cycles. In the first one, uranium is reduced to its tetravalent state and then extracted by dioctylpyrophosphoric acid, diluted in Kerosene. Re-extraction is carried out with concentrated phosphoric acid containing an oxidising agent to convert uranium to its hexavalent state. This extract (from the first cycle) is submitted to the second cycle where uranium is extracted with DEPA-TOPO (di-2-hexylphosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) in Kerosene. The extract is then washed and uranium is backextracted and precipitated as commercial concentrate. The organic phase is recovered. Results from discontinuous tests were satisfactory, enabling to establish operational conditions for the performance of a continuous test in a micro-pilot plant. (Author) [pt

  3. Remediation of contaminated subsurface materials by a metal-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorby, Y.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II) that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated

  4. The migration of uranium through sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.; Lawless, T.A.; Sims, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three column experiments are described in which the migration of uranium through Clashach Sandstone was studied. A priori predictions of uranium migration in the experiments were made using an equilibrium chemical transport model. The experimental results showed that, even under oxidising conditions, the migration of uranium is strongly retarded owing to the affinity of uranium for mineral surfaces. For the relatively simple chemical system investigated, the chemical transport model was successful in predicting the migration of uranium and its distribution along the column. (author)

  5. The uranium International trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez U, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the understanding of how the present dynamic of uranium International trade is developed, the variables which fall into, the factors that are affecting and conditioning it, in order to clarify which are going to be the outlook in the future of this important resource in front of the present ecological situation and the energetic panorama of XXI Century. For this purpose, as starting point, the uranium is considered as a strategic material which importance take root in its energetic potential as alternate energy source, and for this reason in Chapter I, the general problem of raw materials, its classification and present situation in the global market is presented. In Chapter II, by means of a historical review, is explain what uranium is, how it was discovered, and how since the end of the past Century and during the last three decades of present, uranium pass of practically unknown element, to the position of a strategic raw material, which by degrees, generate an International market, owing to its utilization as a basic resource in the generation of energy. Chapter III, introduce us in the roll played by uranium, since its warlike applications until its utilization in nuclear reactors for the generation of electricity. Also is explain the reason for this change in the perception at global level. Finally, in Chapter IV we enter upon specifically in the present conditions of the International market of this mineral throughout the trends of supply and demand, the main producers, users, price dynamics, and the correlation among these economical variables and other factors of political, social and ecological nature. All of these with the purpose to found out, if there exist, a meaning of the puzzle that seems to be the uranium International trade

  6. Standard specification for uranium metal enriched to more than 15 % and less Than 20 % 235U

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium metal that has either been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of highly enriched uranium with other uranium, to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 20 % (and greater than 15 %) and that is intended for research reactor fuel fabrication. The scope of this specification includes specifications for enriched uranium metal derived from commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium, or highly enriched uranium. Commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium and highly enriched uranium are defined in Section 3. The objectives of this specification are to define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for commercial grade enriched uranium metal. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched uranium metal which is to be used in the production of research reactor fuel. In addition to this specification, the parties concerned may agree to other appropriate conditions. ...

  7. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume contains: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications for Division 1 -- general requirements; specifications for Division 2 -- sitework; specifications for Divisions 5 -- metals; subcontract drawings, (general, Union Carbide processing site, North Continent processing site, and Burro Canyon disposal site)

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This volume contains: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications for Division 1 -- general requirements; specifications for Division 2 -- sitework; specifications for Divisions 5 -- metals; subcontract drawings, (general, Union Carbide processing site, North Continent processing site, and Burro Canyon disposal site).

  10. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  11. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  12. FINAL REPORT - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions:An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study and Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Peyton; James Amonette; Haluk Beyenal; Gill Geesey; Zbigniew Lewandowski; Rajesh Sani

    2005-10-07

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. In situ coupons with a variety of mineral phases were placed in monitoring wells at the NABIR FRC. These coupons showed that the mineral phase composition significantly affected the resulting attached phase microbial community. Our comparative use of both batch and open flow reactors (more representative of field conditions) indicates that hydrodynamics and continual influx of substrate and contaminants can also yield significantly different results than those obtained with closed serum bottles. To this end, the following overall experimental hypothesis tested was the following: On a mineral surface under anaerobic conditions, accumulations of secondary inorganic precipitates are controlled by a) the bacteria associated with the mineral surface, b) the electron acceptors available for anaerobic bacterial respiration, and c) local hydrodynamics and pH buffers govern micro- and meso-scale interaction of U in the presence of electron donors and acceptors, and nutrients.

  13. Characterization of magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles by metal-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yumi; Jang, Heedong; Suh, Yongjae; Roh, Yul

    2011-08-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles exhibit clear technological potential for biomedical applications. The objectives of this study were to synthesize magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles through the use of metal-reducing bacteria and characterize the mineralogical and surface chemical properties of these nanoparticles as well as to test their potential applications in biomedical technology with regards to their protein immobilization capacity. The microbially formed magnetite nanoparticles had a size of around 10 nm with a spherical shape and were coated with organics containing an abundance of reactive carboxyl groups without any chemical process for functionalizing them. These microbial processes may lead to a simple preparation of functional magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles which have benefits for biomedical applications.

  14. Preliminary discussion on paleo-hydrodynamic conditions of metallogenesis of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Hefeng-Burqin basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qirong

    2000-01-01

    Based on a brief analysis of the tectonic-sedimentary evolutionary history of Hefeng-Burqin Basin, the hydrogeological development history of the basin is divided into several cycles and stages. Then, the hydrogeologic evolutionary history of Neogene and Paleogene aquifers is reconstructed. Finally, it is concluded that Paleogene Ulungurhe Group (E 2-3w ) is the prospecting target for having favourable paleo-infiltration hydrodynamic conditions

  15. Immobilization of uranium in the presence of Fe0(s): Model development and simulation of contrasting experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Salvage, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A geochemical model is developed for the immobilization of U in the presence of metallic Fe. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) serves as a reducing agent inducing the reductive-precipitation of U, and ZVI corrosion products can serve as absorbing agents for U. The numerical model developed allows the complex interactions of U in solution in differing concentrations to be examined, under variable pH and redox conditions, with or without carbonate, in the presence of ZVI of different size and surface area. It incorporates Fe corrosion, Fe(II) and Fe(III) corrosion product formation, reductive-precipitation of U from the soluble U(VI) valence to the poorly soluble U(IV) valence, adsorption/de-sorption of U onto the Fe oxide corrosion products, and aqueous speciation. The processes of Fe corrosion and reductive precipitation of U are simulated as non-equilibrium, an improvement over other geochemical models. The reductive-precipitation process may use either ZVI or Fe(II) as the reducing agent. The model is calibrated using 3 separate sets of experimental data from published literature that cover a wide range of redox conditions. Sensitivity of the model predictions to variations in input parameters is examined. The simulation results show that the different published experimental results can be explained by different solution chemistries in the studies, specifically O 2 and CO 2 availability and pH, and the amount and surface area of the metallic Fe. With this numerical model the behavior of U in ZVI containing systems over a range of conditions realistic for groundwater can be investigated. By synthesizing observations across several experimental studies, it will lead to a broader understanding of the processes controlling U immobilization under varied geochemical conditions

  16. “Stereoscopic” 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework: Design, synthesis and selective sorption towards uranium at high acidic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Li, Bo; Bai, Chiyao; Li, Yang; Wang, Lei; Wen, Rui; Zhang, Meicheng; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian, E-mail: sjli000616@scu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Phosphorus element was first introduced into covalent organic frameworks (COFs). • Monomer in C{sub 3}-like spatial configuration was first used to construct COF materials. • A new 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based sorbent (MPCOF) was synthesized. • Separation of U (VI) by MPCOF at high acidic media (up to 1M HNO{sub 3}) was achieved. • Selectivity for U (VI) separation from multi-ion solution can reach unreported 92%. - Abstract: So far, only five primary elements (C, H, O, N and B) and two types of spatial configuration (C{sub 2}–C{sub 4}, C{sub 6} and T{sub d}) are reported to build the monomers for synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which have partially limited the route selection for accessing COFs with new topological structure and novel properties. Here, we reported the design and synthesis of a new “stereoscopic” 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework (MPCOF) by using hexachorocyclotriphosphazene (a P-containing monomer in a C{sub 3}-like spatial configuration) and p-phenylenediamine (a linker). The as-synthesized MPCOF shows high crystallinity, relatively high heat and acid stability and distinctive super-microporous structure with narrow pore-size distributions ranging from 1.0–2.1 nm. The results of batch sorption experiments with a multi-ion solution containing 12 co-existing cations show that in the pH range of 1–2.5, MPCOF exhibits excellent separation efficiency for uranium with adsorption capacity more than 71 mg/g and selectivity up to record-breaking 92%, and furthermore, an unreported sorption capacity (>50 mg/g) and selectivity (>60%) were obtained under strong acidic condition (1 M HNO{sub 3}). Studies on sorption mechanism indicate that the uranium separation by MPCOF in acidic solution is realized mainly through both intra-particle diffusion and size-sieving effect.

  17. Uranium Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO 2 2+ ) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range ∼ 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases

  18. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  19. Modeling and analysis of thermal-hydraulic response of uranium-aluminum reactor fuel plates under transient heatup conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the analysis performed to predict the thermal behavior of fuel miniplates under rapid transient heatup conditions. The possibility of explosive boiling was considered, and it was concluded that the heating rates are not large enough for explosive boiling to occur. However, transient boiling effects were pronounced. Because of the complexity of transient pool boiling and the unavailability of experimental data for the situations studied, an approximation was made that predicted the data very well within the uncertainties present. If pool boiling from the miniplates had been assumed to be steady during the heating pulse, the experimental data would have been greatly overestimated. This fact demonstrates the importance of considering the transient nature of heat transfer in the analysis of reactivity excursion accidents. An additional contribution of the present work is that it provided data on highly subcooled steady nulceate boiling from the cooling portion of the thermocouple traces.

  20. Uranium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutonnet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fabrication processes and main characteristics of the yellow coke are described. Choice of acidic or alkaline process, chemical reactions reagents, installation and efficiency are examined. Investment, cost and production are given. Extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid is briefly described [fr

  1. Uranium tetrafluoride reduction closed bomb. Part I: Reduction process general conditions; Reduccion del tetrafluoruro de uranio en bomba cerrada. Part I. estudio de las variables generales del proceso de reduccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anca Abati, R.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1961-07-01

    General conditions about the metallo thermic reduction in small bombs (250 and 800 gr. of uranium) has been investigated. Factors such as kind and granulometry of the magnesium used, magnesium excess and preheating temperature, which affect yields and metal quality have been considered. magnesium excess increased yields in a 15% in the small bomb, about the preheating temperature, there is a range between which yields and metal quality does not change. All tests have been made with graphite linings. (Author) 18 refs.

  2. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  3. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  5. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  6. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  7. PREPARATION OF URANIUM MONOSULFIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.

    1964-01-28

    A process is given for preparing uranium monosulfide from uranium tetrafluoride dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride. A hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide gas mixture passed through the solution precipitates uranium monosulfide. (AEC)

  8. Recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, D.H.; Walker, R.W.; Hurwitz, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from an uranium bearing liquid which comprises contacting the liquid with a crosslinkedvinyl benzyl chloride polymer, thereafter eluting from the resin the uranium in salt form

  9. Present status of uranium resource development in foreign countries, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The book of the same title as this one was published in 1983. Since then, the situation requiring the correction of the contents, such as the correction of uranium resource policy in various countries accompanying the change of uranium market condition and the change of uranium policy in Australia due to the political situation, has occurred, consequently, the revision has been made adding these new information. The confirmed resources of uranium and the resources of uranium to be added by estimation in the free world are tabulated. About each country, the organization and policy, the policy of exporting uranium and the present status of the export, the quantity of uranium resources, the production of uranium, the state of exploration and development and so on are reported. Japan has taken part in the development of uranium resources in Australia, Canada, Gabon, Zambia, Morocco, Guinea, Mali and so on. (Kako, I.)

  10. Model of the coercion uranium hexafluoride on a human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    A method for calculating certain quantities characterizing the effect of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) on the human body under industrial conditions in uranium enrichment plants is described. It is assumed that the effect is determined by uranium and fluorine inhaled together with the products of hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride. The proposed complex model consists of three models, the first of which describes the contamination of the industrial environment and the second and third describe inhalation and percutaneous intake. A relation is obtained between uranium and fluorine intake and the uranium hexafluoride concentration in air at the moment the compound is discharged [ru

  11. A study on chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Kim, T.J.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, G.Y.; Lee, S.J.; Hur, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) was conducted to derive an easy and simple uranium chloride production method without impurities. In thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, it was predicted that only uranium chlorides can be produced by the reactions between uranium metal and NH 4 Cl. Experimental conditions for the chlorination of uranium metal were determined using a chlorination test of cerium metal using NH 4 Cl. It was confirmed that UCl 3 and UCl 4 in the form of particles as uranium chlorination products can be obtained from the chlorination method using NH 4 Cl. (author)

  12. Uranium mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; U 4+ minerals (uraninite; coffinite; brannerite; ningyoite; lermontovite; U 4+ molybdates; U 4+ pyrochlores; U 4+ columbites; petscheckite and liandratite) minerals (uranyl oxide hydrates; uranyl silicates; uranyl phosphates and arsenates; uranyl vanadates; uranyl molybdates; uranyl sulphates; uranyl carbonates; uranyl selenates and tellurates). Appendices contain X-ray data and optical data for uranium minerals. (U.K.)

  13. Uranium 2009: Resources, Production and Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry - the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors - is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23. edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres around the world, as well as from countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2035 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  14. Uranium in soil, forest litter and living plant material above three uranium mineralizations in Northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, John

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of biogeochemical sampling media in uranium exploration, samples from the most common trees and low bushes together with forest litter were collected over the areas of three uranium mineralizations in Northern Sweden and analyzed for uranium. The results were compared with uranium content of the till and its radioactivity. The average uranium content was low for all sample types and considerably lower in the ash of the organic sample types compared to that of the till. No sample type showed any tendency of having higher uranium concentration above mineralizations compared to background areas. These results suggest that, under conditions prevailing in Sweden, the investigated sample types are not suitable for uranium exploration

  15. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  16. Retrospective - the beginnings of the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a historical perspective of the uranium industry, from the discovery of uranium in 1789 to the discovery of fission in 1939. It is the first in a series of articles. In this part of the series, the initial discovery of uranium is mentioned. Early ore discoveries, especially in the USA, are also noted, and the market conditions at the end of the 19th century are reviewed. Shortly after the discovery of radium in 1898 and natural radioactivity, the connection between uranium and radium was noted, and this is outlined in the article. Due to the intimate relationship between the two elements, radium product and radium markets are also reviewed

  17. Recent activity on disposal of uranium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Noboru

    1999-01-01

    The concept on the disposal of uranium waste has not been discussed in the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, but the research and development of it are carried out in the company and agency which are related to uranium waste. In this paper, the present condition and problems on disposal of uranium waste were shown in aspect of the nuclear fuel manufacturing companies' activity. As main contents, the past circumstances on the disposal of uranium waste, the past activity of nuclear fuel manufacturing companies, outline and properties of uranium waste were shown, and ideas of nuclear fuel manufacturing companies on the disposal of uranium waste were reported with disposal idea in the long-term program for development and utilization of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Drawing of uranium in γ phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1955-01-01

    It describes the study of working and drawing of uranium in γ phase. In a first part, the forgeable characteristics of uranium metal in the three different phases (α, β and γ) are compared by using BASTIEN-PORTEVIN method. The different experiments are testing the behaviour metal in each phase under different stresses and a temperature gradient as slow and shock traction, slow and shock compression, resilience, flexibility. Results show that optimum conditions for uranium drawing is uranium in phase γ. In a second part, it described the drawing method and process. The uranium rods obtained by this technique are of very good quality. In addition, the material wear is very low which permits a low production cost. Finally, the uranium rod physical properties are studied. (M.P.)

  19. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  20. The uranium resources and production of Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfi, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The promulgation of the Minerals (Prospecting and Mining) Act, 1992, on 1 April 1994 and the simultaneous repeal of restrictive South African legislation on reporting uranium exploration and production results, allowed the Namibian Government for the first time to present information for publication of the report ''Uranium 1995 - Resource, Production and Demand'', by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the IAEA. Namibia, one of the youngest independent nations in Africa, has a large number of uranium occurrences and deposits in several geological environments. The total estimated uranium resource amounts to about 299 thousand tonnes recoverable uranium at a cost of less than US$ 130/kg U, within the known conventional resources category. The most prominent geological type of these is the unique, granite-related uranium occurrences located in the central part of the Namib Desert. Permo-Triassic age Karoo sandstone-hosted uranium deposits were subject to only limited exploration due to the down-turn of uranium prices in the latter part of 1980s, despite they very encouraging exploration results. As only limited Karoo sandstone-covered areas were tested there is still great potential for further discoveries. The planned output of Roessing Uranium Mine at 40,000 tonnes of ore per day which results in an annual production of 4536 tonnes of uranium oxide, was achieved in 1979. In case of improved uranium market conditions, Namibia is in a strong position to increase uranium production and open up new production centres to strengthen the country's position as an important uranium producer in the world. 6 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Processes affecting transport of uranium in a suboxic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Curtis, G.P.; Wilkins, M.J.; Kohler, M.; Fox, P.; Naftz, D.L.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    At the Naturita site in Colorado, USA, groundwaters were sampled and analyzed for chemical composition and by culture and culture-independent microbiological techniques. In addition, sediments were extracted with a dilute sodium carbonate solution to determine quantities of labile uranium within the sediments. Samples from the upgradient portion of the contaminated aquifer, where very little dissolved Fe(II) is found in the groundwater, have uranium content that is controlled by U(VI) adsorption and few metal-reducing bacteria are observed. In the extreme downgradient portion of the aquifer, where dissolved Fe(II) is observed, uranium content of the sediments includes significant quantities of reduced U(IV) and diverse populations of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were present in the subsurface with the potential of reducing U(VI) to U(IV). ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  3. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  4. Uranium concentrations in groundwater, northeastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Welch, Wendy B.; Tecca, Alison E.; Eliason, Devin M.

    2018-04-18

    88,600 μg/L, and the median concentration of uranium in groundwater for all sites was 1.4 μg/L.New (2017) uranium in groundwater concentration data were obtained by sampling 13 private domestic wells for uranium in areas without recent (2000s) water-quality data. Uranium was detected in all 13 wells sampled for this study; concentrations ranged from 1.03 to 1,180 μg/L with a median of 22 μg/L. Uranium concentrations of groundwater samples from 6 of the 13 wells exceeded the MCL for uranium. Uranium concentrations in water samples from two wells were 1,130 and 1,180 μg/L, respectively; nearly 40 times the MCL.Additional data collection and analysis are needed in rural areas where self-supplied groundwater withdrawals are the primary source of water for human consumption. Of the roughly 43,000 existing water wells in the study area, only 1,755 wells, as summarized in this document, have available uranium concentration data, and some of those data are decades old. Furthermore, analysis of area groundwater quality would benefit from a more extensive chemical-analysis suite including general chemistry in order to better understand local geochemical conditions that largely govern the mobility of uranium. Although the focus of the present study is uranium, it also is important to recognize that there are other radionuclides of concern that may be present in area groundwater.

  5. Mise en solution et précipitation de l'uranium et du thorium dans les conditions de moyenne et haute température (résumé Solution and Precipitation of Uranium and Thorium under Average and High-Temperature (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les études tant analytiques qu'expérimentales réalisées au cours des vingt dernières années ont bien montré le rôle joué par les complexes d'uranylcarbonates dans le transport de l'uranium en milieu hydrothermal oxydant ou faiblement réducteur. Les travaux expérimentaux actuels sur la mobilité de U et Th, à haute température et haute pression, montrent la très grande différence de solubilité entre UO2 et ThO2, comme l'influence des ions complexants et celles de fO2 et aH+. Ces résultats expérimentaux sont comparés aux données recueillies sur les leucogranites et les granites calcoalcalins (France et divers gisements ou anomalies en uranium (Québec, Rössing, Madagascar, etc.. Dans la catazone U et Th précipitent sous forme de solutions solides d'uranothorianite dans les milieux déficitaires en silice, et sous forme d'uranothorite dans les granites et les syénites La précipitation d'uraninite non thorifère dans les leucogranites français s'explique d'abord par la faible concentration en thorium des solutions aqueuses durant la phase deutérique. Au cours du métamorphisme progressif on peut observer un retard dans la mobilisation de l'uranium en conditions relativement oxydantes, quand U est associé à Ti et OH. Dans le domaine mésozonal la brannérite stabilise l'uranium en présence de titane jusqu'à l'anatexie. Au-delà elle se dissocie en donnant de l'uraninite non thorifère et du rutile. Both analytic and experimental research done over the Iast twenty years has revealed the role played by uranylcarbonate complexes in the transfer of uranium in an oxidant or slightly reducing hydrothermal medium. Recent experimental research on the mobility of U and Th, at high temperature and high pressure, shows the great difference in solubility between UO2 and ThO2, like the influence of complexing ions and of fO2 and aH+. These experimental findings are compared to data gathered on leucogranites and colcoalkaline granites

  6. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  7. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  8. Uranium - resources development and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Australia possesses a major portion of the world's low cost uranium and it is confidently expected that further exploration will delineate yet more reserves. The level of such exploration and the rate of development of new production will remain critically dependent on world market developments. For the foreseeable future all development will be dedicated to supplying the export market. Australian government policies for uranium take account of both domestic and international concerns. With Australia, the policies act to protect the interests of the Aboriginal people affected by uranium production. In response to national interests and concerns, foreign investment in uranium production ventures is regulated in a manner which requires Australian control but allows a measure of foreign equity. Environmental concerns are recognized and projects may only be approved after comprehensive environmental protection procedures have been complied with. Without these policies public acceptability, which provides the foundations for long-term stability of the industry, would be prejudiced. On the world scene, Australia's safeguards policy serves to support international nuclear safeguards and, in particular, to honour its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Export policy requires that reasonable sales contract conditions apply and that fair negotiated market prices are obtained for Australia's uranium. Australia's recent re-emergence as a major producer and exporter of uranium is convincing testimony to the success of these policies. (author)

  9. Economical indexes of uranium hydrometallurgical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.; Efimova, Z.I.; Sokolova, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for calculating capitalized and operating costs and total uranium concentrate production costs for evaluation of technical-and-economic indices and the new plant commissioning conditions are considered. Data on costs of uranium concentrate production using different techniques (sulfuric acid, soda, underground and concentrated leaching) are presented. The structure of capitalized costs and operating expenditures for the ore mining and reprocessing is indicated

  10. Ideate about building green mine of uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zuyuan

    2012-01-01

    Analysing the current situation of uranium mining and metallurgy; Setting up goals for green uranium mining and metallurgy, its fundamental conditions, Contents and measures. Putting forward an idea to combine green uranium mining and metallurgy with the state target for green mining, and keeping its own characteristics. (author)

  11. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  12. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  13. Uranium in Canada 1994 assessment of supply and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    A summary of results of the annual assessment conducted by the Uranium Resource Appraisal Group of Natural Resources Canada. The appraisal group's mandate includes auditing the measured, indicated and inferred resources contained in Canadian uranium deposits mineable under current technological conditions in given price ranges and assessing the levels of Canadian uranium production that could by supported by these deposits. The group also relates known resources to domestic uranium requirements and export commitments. 2 tabs., 7 figs

  14. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  15. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  16. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  17. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  18. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  19. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  20. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  1. Geochemistry of uranium in the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhorov, V.A.; Bogushlavskij, S.G.; Babinets, A.E.; Solov'eva, L.V.; Kirchanova, A.I.; Kir'yanov, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    According to the results of expedition investigations on the base of SCOICH program (''Acade''Mmician Vernadsky'' and ichael Lomonosov'' shiptrips) main geometrical peculiarities of uranium distribution in deep water of the Black Sea including benthic and silt waters are studied. Sampling have been made from the surface layer across the whole width of the water and from benthic sediments (silt water). Uranium in samples has been determined by the adsorption-colorimetric method. Nonuniform uranium distribution (depending on water dynamics) over the basin area and across the whole width of water is established. Most of uranium is contained in the 0-500 m layer and in the eastern part of the sea. Uranium content decreases in depth, it is higher in the benthic water layer. It is shown that uranium decrease in a hydrogen-sulphide sea zone is conditioned by its reduction due to formation of more adsorption-active forms and effective sedimentation. Causes of differences in uranium content in silt waters have been found. High uranium concentrations in silt waters are confined to active sulphate reduction characterized by elevated values of pHsub(#betta#), alkalinity, Eh. In weak suphate reduction zones (pHsub(#betta#), Alsub(k) value decrease) in silt waters uranium content is lower as a result of sorption-active forms formation and their transition into the solid phase of sediments

  2. Uranium preconcentration from seawater using adsorptive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.; Athawale, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium recovery from bio-aggressive but lean feed like seawater is a challenging problem as it requires in situ preconcentration of uranium in presence of huge excess of competing ions with fast sorption kinetics. In our laboratory, widely used amidoxime membrane (AO-membrane) was evaluated for uranium sorption under seawater conditions. This study indicated that AO-membrane was inherently slow because of the complexation chemistry involved in transfer of U(VI) from (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4 - to AO sites in membrane. In order to search better options, several chemical compositions of membrane were scanned for their efficacy for uranium preconcentration from seawater, and concluded that EGMP-membrane offers several advantages over AO-membrane. In this paper, the comparison of EGMP-membrane with AO-membrane for uranium sorption under seawater conditions has been reviewed. (author)

  3. Biotransformation and Its Application: Biogenic Nano-Catalyst and Metal-Reducing-Bacteria for Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyunhee; Roh, Yul

    2015-08-01

    The use of ubiquitous metal-reducing bacteria (MRB) and the synthesis and transforming capability of nano-sized catalysts (BNC) provide enormous potential for the transformation of environmental waste to environmental catalysts, such as abandoned mine precipitates that are transformed into nontoxic and inexpensive catalysts for remediating contaminated groundwater. In this study, BNC from acid mine drainage (AMD) precipitates are transformed to nm-sized siderite after a fermenting process under anaerobic conditions, and MRB enriched from inter-tidal flat sediments were examined for efficiency in the Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization in upward flow-through sand column tests. As a result, BNC and MRB proved to have excellent Cr(VI) reducing/immobilizing capacity independently and when used in conjunction. In addition the combination of BNC+MRB showed to have a capacity enhanced with 20% more capability of Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization in flow-through column test for 168 h.

  4. Environmental conditioning on uranium surface distribution in the tropical region; Condicionantes ambientais sobre a distribuicao superficial de uranio numa regiao de climatologia tropical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Heitor Evangelista da; Licinio, Marcus V.S.; Miranda, Marcio R. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2001-07-01

    Based on a high resolution aerogammaspectrometer survey over the State of Rio de Janeiro, it is presented an associative study of equivalent uranium concentration and environmental parameters. The aspects considered in this study included geological domains like Sandys, Gnaisses, Granites, Xists; soils domains like Organic and Alluvial ones, Litolic, Glei, Podzolic, Red-yellow, Latossolo, Planossolo, Red bruizem, Cambissolo, Hidromorphic Podzol, Yellow latossolo; geomorphology (Coast Plains and River Accumulation Land, Coast Tabulators, Pomba-Muriae Rivers Spread Depression, Northern Mantiqueira, main Hills and Coastal Rock Massifs, Steep slopes and Reverses of Serra do Mar Mountain Range ,Serra dos Orgaos Mountain Range and Bocaina Tablelands), Paraiba do Sul Crests Alignment, Medium Paraiba do Sul Depression); influence of mean annual rain intensity and hydrographical categories were also evaluated. Geoprocessing of each environmental data base at the same cartographical base of uranium surface distribution was the basic methodology employed. (author)

  5. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  6. Present status of development of uranium resources in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The book with the same title as this was published in 1981. Thereafter, the necessity to correct the contents arose, such as the remarkable change in uranium market condition and the change of uranium resource policy in Australia accompanying the change of regime, accordingly, the revision was carried out by adding more new information. As the main sources of the information collected in this book, 25 materials are shown. The confirmed resources of uranium in the free world as of the beginning of 1981 amounted to 2,293,000 t U, and the estimated additional resources were 2,720,000 t U. The political system and uranium policy, the present status of uranium export, the quantity of resources and the estimated amount of deposits, the uranium production and the status of uranium exploration and development of 25 foreign countries are reported. Japan has carried out uranium development activities in Australia, Canada, Niger, Gabon, Zambia and so on. (Kako, I.)

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The geology of Israel is relatively simple. Most of the country is underlain by sedimentary rocks of Secondary and Tertiary age. As far as the IAEA is aware no systematic exploration has been done for conventional type uranium deposits. Israel has no uranium deposits, and no high or low-grade uranium ores. However, there are uranium 'sources' which are mainly phosphate rock.Proven phosphate reserves in Israel are estimated at about 220 million tons in five different locations. The average uranium concentration is between 100 and 170 ppm. This makes the uranium content in the proven phosphate reserves of Israel to be about 25,000 tons. Together with the possibility of additional discoveries and on the assumption that the economic conditions for the production of both phosphate and uranium become favourable the Speculative Potential is placed in the 10,000 to 50,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  8. Current status and prospects of uranium geology developments of foreign in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang

    2002-01-01

    Firstly, with emphasis on in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits, the prospecting history of uranium deposits worldwide and its scientific research development are generally reviewed in four steps, and their basic historical experience is also summarized. Secondly, based on the detailed description of current development status of uranium geology of foreign in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits the important strategic position of sandstone-type uranium deposits in overall uranium resources all-over-the-world and its classification, spatial-temporal distribution and regulation, and metallogenic condition of sandstone-type uranium deposits are analysed thoroughly in five aspects: techtonics, paleo-climate, hydrogeology, sedimentary facies and lithology, as well as uranium sources: Afterwards, evaluation principles of three type of hyper-genic, epigenetic infiltrated sandstone-type uranium deposits are summarized. Based on sandstone-type uranium deposits located two important countries: the United States and Russia, the current development status of prospecting technology for in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in foreign countries is outlined. Finally, according to the prospects of supply-demand development of global uranium resources, the author points out seriously that Chinese uranium geology is faced with a severe challenge, and proposes directly four strategic measures that should be taken

  9. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; McWhirter, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed.

  10. Microbial uptake of uranium, cesium, and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; McWhirter, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of diverse microbial species to concentrate uranium, cesium, and radium was examined. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium to 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight. Only a fraction of the cells in a given population had visible uranium deposits in electron micrographs. While metabolism was not required for uranium uptake, mechanistic differences in the metal uptake process were indicated. Uranium accumulated slowly (hours) on the surface of S. cerevisiae and was subject to environmental factors (i.e., temperature, pH, interfering cations and anions). In contrast, P. aeruginosa and the mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense, apparently random, intracellular deposits. This very rapid accumulation has prevented us from determining whether the uptake rate during the transient between the initial and equilibrium distribution of uranium is affected by environmental conditions. However, the final equilibrium distributions are not affected by those conditions which affect uptake by S. cerevisiae. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several microbial species tested. The potential utility of microorganisms for the removal and concentration of these metals from nuclear processing wastes and several bioreactor designs for contacting microorganisms with contaminated waste streams will be discussed

  11. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  12. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Hwang et al.

  14. Drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase; Filage de l'uranium en phase gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Chevigny, R. [Conpagnie, Pechiney, 73 - Chambery (France)

    1955-07-01

    It describes the study of working and drawing of uranium in {gamma} phase. In a first part, the forgeable characteristics of uranium metal in the three different phases ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}) are compared by using BASTIEN-PORTEVIN method. The different experiments are testing the behaviour metal in each phase under different stresses and a temperature gradient as slow and shock traction, slow and shock compression, resilience, flexibility. Results show that optimum conditions for uranium drawing is uranium in phase {gamma}. In a second part, it described the drawing method and process. The uranium rods obtained by this technique are of very good quality. In addition, the material wear is very low which permits a low production cost. Finally, the uranium rod physical properties are studied. (M.P.)

  15. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  16. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  17. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  18. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lounis, A.

    1983-05-01

    A study has been carried out for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid produced in Algeria. First of all, the Algerian phosphoric acid produced in Algeria by SONATRACH has been characterised. This study helped us to synthesize a phosphoric acid that enabled us to pass from laboratory tests to pilot scale tests. We have then examined extraction and stripping parameters: diluent, DZEPHA/TOPO ratio and oxidising agent. The laboratory experiments enabled us to set the optimum condition for the choice of diluent, extractant concentration, ratio of the synergic mixture, oxidant concentration, redox potential. The equilibrium isotherms lead to the determination of the number of theoretical stages for the uranium extraction and stripping of uranium, then the extraction from phosphoric acid has been verified on a pilot scale (using a mixer-settler)

  19. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  20. Studies on uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.H.; Park, S.W.; Lim, J.K.; Chung, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical and chemical engineering techniques of the uranium ore processing established by France COGEMA (Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires) have been comprehensively reviewed in preparation for successful test operation of the pilot plant to be completed by the end of 1981. It was found that the amount of sulfuric acid (75 Kg/t, ore) and sodium chlorate (2.5 Kg/t, ore) recommended by COGEMA should be increased up to 100 Kg/t, ore and 10 Kg/t, ore respectively to obtain satisfactory leach of uranium for some ore samples produced at the different pits of Goesan uranium mine. Conditions of the other processes such as solvent extraction, stripping, and precipitation of yellow cake were generally agreed with the results of intensive studies done by this laboratory

  1. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  2. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  3. Surficial uranium deposits: summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otton, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium occurs in a variety of surficial environments in calcretes, gypcretes, silcretes, dolocretes and in organic sediments. Groundwater moving on low gradients generates these formations and, under favourable circumstances, uranium deposits. A variety of geomorphic settings can be involved. Most surficial deposits are formed in desert, temperate wetland, tropical, or transitional environments. The largest deposits known are in sedimentary environments in arid lands. The deposits form largely by the interaction of ground or surface waters on the geomorphic surface in favourable geologic terrains and climates. The deposits are commonly in the condition of being formed or reconstituted, or being destroyed. Carnotite is common in desert deposits while in wetland deposits no uranium minerals may be seen. Radioactive disequilibrium is common, particularly in wetland deposits. Granites and related rocks are major source rocks and most large deposits are in regions with enriched uranium contents, i.e. significantly greater than 5 ppm uranium. Uranium dissolution and transport is usually under oxidizing conditions. Transport in desert conditions is usually as a bicarbonate. A variety of fixation mechanisms operate to extract the uranium and form the deposits. Physical barriers to groundwater flow may initiate ore deposition. Mining costs are likely to be low because of the near surface occurrence, but there may be processing difficulties as clay may be present and the saline or carbonate content may be high. (author)

  4. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs

  5. Uranium isotopes in ground water as a prospecting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1980-02-01

    The isotopic concentrations of dissolved uranium were determined for 300 ground water samples near eight known uranium accumulations to see if new approaches to prospecting could be developed. It is concluded that a plot of 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio (A.R.) versus uranium concentration (C) can be used to identify redox fronts, to locate uranium accumulations, and to determine whether such accumulations are being augmented or depleted by contemporary aquifer/ground water conditions. In aquifers exhibiting flow-through hydrologic systems, up-dip ground water samples are characterized by high uranium concentration values (> 1 to 4 ppB) and down-dip samples by low uranium concentration values (less than 1 ppB). The boundary between these two regimes can usually be identified as a redox front on the basis of regional water chemistry and known uranium accumulations. Close proximity to uranium accumulations is usually indicated either by very high uranium concentrations in the ground water or by a combination of high concentration and high activity ratio values. Ground waters down-dip from such accumulations often exhibit low uranium concentration values but retain their high A.R. values. This serves as a regional indicator of possible uranium accumulations where conditions favor the continued augmentation of the deposit by precipitation from ground water. Where the accumulation is being dispersed and depleted by the ground water system, low A.R. values are observed. Results from the Gulf Coast District of Texas and the Wyoming districts are presented

  6. A Mine-Based Uranium Market Clearing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Auzans

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Economic analysis and market simulation tools are used to evaluate uranium (U supply shocks, sale or purchase of uranium stockpiles, or market effects of new uranium mines or enrichment technologies. This work expands on an existing U market model that couples the market for primary U from uranium mines with those of secondary uranium, e.g., depleted uranium (DU upgrading or highly enriched uranium (HEU down blending, and enrichment services. This model accounts for the interdependence between the primary U supply on the U market price, the economic characteristics of each individual U mine, sources of secondary supply, and the U enrichment market. This work defines a procedure for developing an aggregate supply curve for primary uranium from marginal cost curves for individual firms (Uranium mines. Under this model, market conditions drive individual mines’ startup and short- and long-term shutdown decisions. It is applied to the uranium industry for the period 2010–2030 in order to illustrate the evolution of the front end markets under conditions of moderate growth in demand for nuclear fuel. The approach is applicable not only to uranium mines but also other facilities and reactors within the nuclear economy that may be modeled as independent, decision-making entities inside a nuclear fuel cycle simulator.

  7. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  8. Price of military uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical results about optimum strategy of use of military uranium confirmed by systems approach accounts are received. The numerical value of the system approach price of the highly enriched military uranium also is given

  9. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  10. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  11. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  12. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  13. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  14. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  15. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  16. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  17. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  18. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  19. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  20. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  2. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  3. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    Australia's economic, demonstrated resources of uranium (U) at the end of 1996 amounted to 622,000 tonnes U, the largest of any country. Uranium is currently produced at two mining/milling operations in Australia - Ranger in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, and Olympic Dam in South Australia. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Government policies have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 6000 tonncs (t) U 3 O 8 to approximately 12 000 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  4. Government influence on international trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections, entitled; introduction (history of uncertainty in the uranium market, opposition to nuclear power); unsatisfactory features of today's trade conditions (including discussion of restrictions in production, exports and imports); desirable principles governing international trade in uranium, apart from the non-proliferation issue (limitation on governmental intervention for economic purposes, reservation of adequate uranium resources in exporting countries, government export price control); desirable principles for achieving balance between security of supply and non-proliferation (need for consensus, reprocessing and fast breeder reactors, principles guiding government controls established for non-proliferation purposes). (U.K.)

  5. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1: Insights into the Metabolic Versatility of a Gram-positive Sulfate and Metal-reducing Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Elyse Otwell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The proteomes of the metabolically versatile and poorly characterized Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 were compared across four cultivation conditions including sulfate reduction, soluble Fe(III reduction, insoluble Fe(III reduction, and pyruvate fermentation. Collectively across conditions, we observed at high confidence ~38% of genome-encoded proteins. Here, we focus on proteins that display significant differential abundance on conditions tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first full-proteome study focused on a Gram-positive organism grown either on sulfate or metal-reducing conditions. Several proteins with uncharacterized function encoded within heterodisulfide reductase (hdr-containing loci were upregulated on either sulfate (Dred_0633-4, Dred_0689-90, and Dred_1325-30 or Fe(III-citrate-reducing conditions (Dred_0432-3 and Dred_1778-84. Two of these hdr-containing loci display homology to recently described flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB pathways (Dred_1325-30 and Dred_1778-84. Additionally, we propose that a cluster of proteins, which is homologous to a described FBEB lactate dehydrogenase (LDH complex, is performing lactate oxidation in D. reducens (Dred_0367-9. Analysis of the putative sulfate reduction machinery in D. reducens revealed that most of these proteins are constitutively expressed across cultivation conditions tested. In addition, peptides from the single multiheme c-type cytochrome (MHC in the genome were exclusively observed on the insoluble Fe(III condition, suggesting that this MHC may play a role in reduction of insoluble metals.

  6. Comparing recent uranium supply scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, N.; Gufler, K.

    2014-01-01

    For more than one decade – even after the Fukushima accidents - an increase in global nuclear energy generation capacity is widely expected. At the same time a variety of uranium supply scenarios were published by industry, academics or international organizations, drawing different pictures of future uranium supply. They were created with the background of a uranium market facing several challenges. First an excursion in the uranium market price, in 2007, then reduced nuclear growth expectations after 2011, at least in non-Asian countries, also implying considerable changes to the supply side. For this publication a meta-study was carried out identifying, evaluating and comparing different recent scenarios on the availability of uranium. While there are some differences in the frame conditions (e.g. the expected uranium demand, the time fame, the considered mining projects,..), there are also notable similarities in these scenarios. This concerns long lead times for mine openings as well as the dependence on large mining projects (e.g. Olympic Dam, Cigar Lake). Generally, a decline in production in about 10 years is assumed, and thus the necessity of the timely development of mining projects is pointed out. In addition the omission of uranium from Russian nuclear weapons and the chances of keeping the changes in secondary supplies in balance with primary production have been widely discussed. Here, the production growth in Kazakhstan but also the role of the current market situation are central aspects. As another aspect the possible contribution from unconventional resources is of interest, particularly against the background of rising production costs for conventional resources. Finally, it shall be reflected how well older scenarios were able to map the reality and which trends could or could not be anticipated. It is relevant to identify which aspects in the development of mining capacities are essential for security of supply, and can therefore be regarded

  7. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  8. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  9. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  10. Australia's uranium export policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    In developing the policy framework for the export of uranium, successive governments have been keenly aware that, in Australia, as in most countries, there has been considerable community interest and controversy surrounding the subject of uranium. When the Australian Labor Government was elected in 1983, it commissioned the Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) to report on Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. In particular, the report examined: (i) Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements, giving particular attention to the effectiveness of the bilateral and multilateral agreements and to the scope for strengthening these agreements, (ii) the opportunities for Australia through the conditions of its involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle to further advance the cause of nuclear non-proliferation having regard to the policies and practices of recipient countries, (iii) the adequacy of existing technology for the handling and disposal of waste products by consuming countries, and the ways in which Australia could further contribute to the development of safe disposal methods. (orig./UA) [de

  11. Uranium uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper highlights the transport of uranium present in the soil to plants. An increase in the uranium content in soil enhances its transport in various parts of plants. The transport of uranium from the soil to the grain follows the order: black gram>maize>lentil>chick-pea>rice>wheat. In certain vegetables and fruits, this order is: spinach>carrot>radish> brinjal>banana>tomato>beet. In vegetables and fruits, the stem reflects minimum percentage of uranium present in the soil. The uranium transport is appreciably high in arecanut plant. The chances of uranium transport to the human organs, are expected to be more through consumption of crops grown in uranium-rich soil. (author)

  12. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Calmoi, Rodica; Melniciuc-Puica, Nicoleta

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  13. Application of alkaline leaching to the extraction of uranium from shale of the Vosges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Pottier, P.; Le Bris, J.

    1958-01-01

    Description of chemical treatment of Vosges shales to obtain uranium by alkaline leaching. Mineralogy aspects of ore, physical and chemical conditions of leaching, solid/liquid separation, uranium recovery by either ion exchange process or electrolytic precipitation. (author) [fr

  14. Gravimetric Analysis of Uranium in Yellow Cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinuttrakul, Wannee; Jantha, Suwat

    2007-08-01

    Full text: The gravimetric analysis of uranium in yellow cake is composed of several stages. The analysis takes a long time, which is the disadvantage of this method. However, this gravimetric method provides accurate result for determining the major content of sample. Uranium is the main composition of yellow cake, while Thorium, rare earths and other elements are minor and trace elements. In this work, anion exchange resin was used to separate uranium from other elements to yield highly pure uranium suitable for precipitation. This pure uranium was burnt to U3O8, a form that is stable enough to be weighed. From the optimal condition, the recovery of U3O8 after separating uranium from rare earths and iron is 99.85 ± 0.21%. The application of anion exchange separation was used to analyze uranium in yellow cake obtained from monazite digestion process. It was found that U3O8 in yellow cake is 78.85 ± 2.03%

  15. Foreign uranium supply. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, N.B.; Steyn, J.J.

    1978-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the extent to which foreign uranium may be available to United States utilities in the short term (through 1980), the intermediate term (1981--1985), and the long term (1986--95). All free world foreign uranium producers and prospects are included, with particular emphasis on Australia, Canada, southern Africa, France, and French-speaking Africa. The assessment includes reserves, resources, exploration and prospects; firm and potential production capacity and prospects; national policies and relevant political and economic conditions; foreign uranium demand; etc. Conclusions are: Foreign supply capability is greater than foreign demand in the near term. The current availability of uncommitted future Australian production presents an unusual opportunity for establishing commercial relations with very substantial producers. Foreign uranium contracts represent an increase in diversity of supply and access to resources but have less assurance of supply than do domestic contracts. However, uncertainties can frequently be accommodated within an overall procurement program, thereby retaining the diversity and price advantages of foreign procurement. The practice of market pricing of contracts reduces the incentives for foreign contracting

  16. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  17. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin [Center for Biosignatures Discovery Automation, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA; Francis, Arokiasamy J. [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea; Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production.

  18. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendall, Matthew L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Luong, Khai [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wetmore, Kelly M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blow, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Korlach, Jonas [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutschbauer, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malmstrom, Rex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  19. Geology of hydrothermal uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, K.G.; Belov, V.K.; Putilov, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    Geological characteristics of hydrothermal phosphorus-uranium deposits placed in sedimentary, igneous-sedimentary, metamorphic and intrusion formations are presented. Attention is paid to mineral composition, texture and structure of ores, their genesis, tectonics. Geochemical peculiarities of ores and age of molybdenum-uranium and uranium deposits are described. Geological criteria and prospecting features of uranium and uranium-molybdenum deposits are given

  20. Solubility of airborne uranium samples from uranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, T.; Oved, S.; Sarah, R.; Gonen, R.; Paz-Tal, O.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Tshuva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: During the production and machining processes of uranium metal, aerosols might be released to the air. Inhalation of these aerosols is the main route of internal exposure of workers. To assess the radiation dose from the intake of these uranium compounds it is necessary to know their absorption type, based on their dissolution rate in extracellular aqueous environment of lung fluid. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has assigned UF4 and U03 to absorption type M (blood absorption which contains a 10 % fraction with an absorption rate of 10 minutes and 90 % fraction with an absorption rate of 140 fays) and UO2 and U3O8 to absorption type S (blood absorption rate with a half-time of 7000 days) in the ICRP-66 model.The solubility classification of uranium compounds defined by the ICRP can serve as a general guidance. At specific workplaces, differences can be encountered, because of differences in compounds production process and the presence of additional compounds, with different solubility characteristics. According to ICRP recommendations, material-specific rates of absorption should be preferred to default parameters whenever specific experimental data exists. Solubility profiles of uranium aerosols were determined by performing in vitro chemical solubility tests on air samples taken from uranium production and machining facilities. The dissolution rate was determined over 100 days in a simultant solution of the extracellular airway lining fluid. The filter sample was immersed in a test vial holding 60 ml of simultant fluid, which was maintained at a 37 o C inside a thermostatic bath and at a physiological pH of 7.2-7.6. The test vials with the solution were shaken to simulate the conditions inside the extracellular aqueous environment of the lung as much as possible. The tests indicated that the uranium aerosols samples taken from the metal production and machining facilities at the Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN

  1. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fan; Wu Weimin; Parker, Jack C.; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Christopher; Brooks, Scott C.; Criddle, Craig S.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  2. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Wu Weimin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Parker, Jack C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Mehlhorn, Tonia [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zhang, Gengxin [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Schadt, Christopher; Brooks, Scott C. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Criddle, Craig S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  3. Ventilation conditions and atmospheric characteristics of a laboratory uranium mine. Application to the distribution of radioactive particles in the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duport, Philippe.

    1978-09-01

    The CEA laboratory uranium mine and the characteristics of its ventilation are described. A method of measuring air flows based on the determination of a tracer gas was developed. Variations of radon concentrations and of its daughter products concentrations and radioactive equilibrium were observed as a function of the various ventilation rates. Particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols was studied in the laboratory mine when unoperated. Several methods of evaluation of the free fraction were compared, and the application of the laws of aerosol physics to the production of radioactive aerosols in a mine was investigated. A study of radioactive ions showed that the usual equations of atmospheric electricity could be applied to charged radioactive aerosols in a mine. Finally an experimental method was developed in order to directly examine the deposit of an aerosol labelled by radon daughter products in the respiratory tract of animals. The experimental results obtained with aerosols in the particle size range 5.10 -8 - 5.10 -6 were compared to the theoretical data derived from models published in the literature [fr

  4. Uranium of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsalyuk, Yu.; Gurevich, D.

    2000-01-01

    Over 25 % of the world's uranium reserves are concentrated in Kazakhstan. So, the world's largest Shu-Sarysu uranium province is situated on southern Kazakhstan, with resources exceeding 1 billion tonnes of uranium. No less, than 3 unique deposits with resources exceeding 100,000 tonnes are situated here. From the economic point of view the most important thing is that these deposits are suitable for in-situ leaching, which is the cheapest, environmentally friendly and most efficient method available for uranium extracting. In 1997 the Kazatomprom National Joint-Stock Company united all Kazakhstan's uranium enterprises (3 mine and concentrating plants, Volkovgeologiya Joint-Stock Company and the Ulbinskij Metallurgical plant). In 1998 uranium production came to 1,500 tonnes (860 kg in 1997). In 1999 investment to the industry were about $ 30 million. Plans for development of Kazakhstan's uranium industry provide a significant role for foreign partners. At present, 2 large companies (Comeco (Canada), Cogema (France) working in Kazakhstan. Kazakatomprom continues to attract foreign investors. The company's administration announced that in that in next year they have plan to make a radical step: to sell 67 % of stocks to strategic investors (at present 100 % of stocks belongs to state). Authors of the article regard, that the Kazakhstan's uranium industry still has significant reserves to develop. Even if the scenario for the uranium industry could be unfavorable, uranium production in Kazakhstan may triple within the next three to four years. The processing of uranium by the Ulbinskij Metallurgical Plant and the production of some by-products, such as rhenium, vanadium and rare-earth elements, may provide more profits. Obviously, the sale of uranium (as well as of any other reserves) cannot make Kazakhstan a prosperous country. However, country's uranium industry has a god chance to become one of the most important and advanced sectors of national economy

  5. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  6. Uranium determination by isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1978-01-01

    The method of determination by isotopic dilution is reviewed. The method principle is outlined with emphasis on sample preparation and on tracer solution preparation and calibration. The validity conditions of the method are defined for both high uranium concentrations and trace determination, the detection limit being around 0.1 ppb. The main advantages of the method are its selectivity, very high sensitivity and precision. The main fields of application are nuclear industry, geochronology and isotopic geochemistry [fr

  7. Uranium: active even at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Lestaevel, Ph.; Gueguen, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The human body, in normal conditions, contains 40 to 90 10 -6 grams of uranium, this quantity is mainly stored in the bones (66%), in the kidneys (8%) and in soft tissues. Man daily absorbs between 1 to 3 10 -6 grams of uranium. A recent experiment on rats has showed that water contaminated with low quantities of uranium (10 -6 grams a day and per rat) can lead to short-term memory impairment, to higher level of anxiety and to a 38% increase of the paradoxal sleep. No toxic effects on liver and kidneys have been found but it has been showed that low quantities of uranium can entail changes, in some organs, concerning the expression of the genes coding the P450 cytochromes. (A.C.)

  8. Investigations for the Recycle of Pyroprocessed Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, B. R.; Price, J. C.; Chambers, E. E.; Patterson, M. N.

    Given the renewed interest in uranium from the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel in a molten salt system, the two biggest hurdles for marketing the uranium are radiation levels and transuranic content. A radiation level as low as possible is desired so that handling operations can be performed directly with the uranium. The transuranic content of the uranium will affect the subsequent waste streams generated and, thus also should be minimized. Although the pyroprocessing technology was originally developed without regard to radiation and transuranic levels, adaptations to the process have been considered. Process conditions have been varied during the distillation and casting cycles of the process with increasing temperature showing the largest effect on the reduction of radiation levels. Transuranic levels can be reduced significantly by incorporating a pre-step in the salt distillation operation to remove a majority of the salt prior to distillation.

  9. Preparation of uranium ingots from double fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Boulbin, E.

    1967-05-01

    A simple method has been developed for the preparation of uranium double fluorides and has given a new impetus to the study of the reduction of these compounds with a view to obtaining very pure uranium ingots. This reduction can be carried out using calcium or magnesium as the reducing agent, this latter metal being very interesting from the practical point of view. A comparative study of the heat balances of the reduction processes for the double fluorides and for uranium tetrafluoride has shown that reduction of the double fluorides is possible. The exact experimental conditions for these reductions have been determined. Our study has shown in particular that the reduction of the double salt UF 4 , CaF 2 by magnesium leads to the production of small (20 to 500 g) samples of high-purity uranium with a yield of 99 per cent. (author) [fr

  10. Layered metal sulfides capture uranium from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Manolis J; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-10-03

    Uranium is the main source for nuclear energy but also one of the most toxic heavy metals. The current methods for uranium removal from water present limitations, such as narrow pH operating range, limited tolerance to high salt concentrations, or/and high cost. We show here that a layered sulfide ion exchanger K(2)MnSn(2)S(6) (KMS-1) overcomes these limitations and is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly sequestering high (ppm) as well as trace (ppb) quantities of UO(2)(2+) under a variety of conditions, including seawater. KMS-1 can efficiently absorb the naturally occurring U traces in seawater samples. The results presented here reveal the exceptional potential of sulfide-based ion-exchangers for remediating of uranium-containing wastes and groundwater and for extracting uranium from the sea.

  11. Characterization of the surfaceome of the metal-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eDalla Vecchia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Desulfotomaculum reducens strain MI-1 is a Gram-positive, sulfate-reducing bacterium also capable of reducing Fe(III. Metal reduction in Gram-positive bacteria is poorly understood. Here, we investigated Fe(III reduction with lactate, a non-fermentable substrate, as the electron donor. Lactate consumption is concomitant to Fe(III reduction, but does not support significant growth, suggesting that little energy can be conserved from this process and that it may occur fortuitously. D. reducens can reduce both soluble (Fe(III-citrate and insoluble (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO Fe(III. Because physically inaccessible HFO was not reduced, we concluded that reduction requires direct contact under these experimental conditions. This implies the presence of a surface exposed reductase capable of transferring electrons from the cell to the extracellular electron acceptor. With the goal of characterizing the role of surface proteins in D. reducens and of identifying candidate Fe(III reductases, we carried out an investigation of the surface proteome (surfaceome of D. reducens. Cell surface exposed proteins were extracted by trypsin cell shaving or by lysozyme treatment, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation revealed that the surfaceome fulfills many functions, including solute transport, protein export, maturation and hydrolysis, peptidoglycan synthesis and modification, and chemotaxis. Furthermore, a few redox-active proteins were identified. Among these, three are putatively involved in Fe(III reduction, i.e., a membrane-bound hydrogenase 4Fe-4S cluster subunit (Dred_0462, a heterodisulfide reductase subunit A (Dred_0143 and a protein annotated as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase but likely functioning as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (Dred_1533.

  12. Ingot formation using uranium dendrites recovered by electrolysis in LiCl-KCl-PuCl3-UCl3 melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo Fukushima; Akira Nakayoshi; Shinichi Kitawaki; Masaki Kurata; Noboru Yahagi

    2008-01-01

    Products on solid cathodes recovered by the metal pyrochemical processing were processed to obtain uranium ingot. Studies on process conditions of uranium formation, assay recovered uranium products and by-products and evaluation of mass balance were carried out. In these tests, it is confirmed that uranium ingots can be obtained with heating the products more than melting temperature of metal uranium under atmospheric pressure because adhered salt cover the uranium not to oxidize it during uranium cohering. Covered salt can be removed after ingot formation. Inside the ingot, there were a lump of uranium and dark brown colored dross was observed. Material balance of uranium is 77 ∼ 96%, that of plutonium is 71 ∼ 109%, and that of americium that is a volatile substance more than uranium and plutonium become 79 ∼ 119%. Volatilization of americium is very small under the condition of high temperature. (authors)

  13. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  14. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  15. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  16. Politics of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is the most political of all the elements, the material for the production of both the large amounts of electricity and the most destructive weapons in the world. The problems that its dual potential creates are only now beginning to become evident. Author Norman Moss looks at this situation and sheds light on many of the questions that emerge. The nuclear issue always comes back to how much uranium there is, what can be done with it, and which countries have it. Starting with a concise history of uranium and explaining its technology in terms the nonspecialist can understand, The Politics of Uranium considers the political issues that technical arguments obscure. It tells the little-known story of the international uranium cartel, explains the entanglements of governments with the uranium trade, and describes the consequences of wrong decisions and blunders-especially the problems of nuclear waste. It also examines the intellectual and emotional roots of the anti-nuclear movement

  17. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  18. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  19. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  20. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  1. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  2. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  3. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  4. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  5. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  6. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  7. Uranium concentration in fossils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, J.; Uyeda, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it is known that fossil bones tend to accumulate uranium. The uranium concentration, C u in fossils has been measured so far by γ ray spectroscopy or by fission track method. The authors applied secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, to detect the uranium in fossil samples. The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of semi-quantitative analyses of uranium in fossils, and to study the correlation between C u and the age of fossil bones. The further purpose of this work is to apply SIMS to measure the distribution of C u in fossil teeth

  8. analysis methods of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekdemir, N.; Acarkan, S.

    1997-01-01

    There are various methods for the determination of uranium. The most often used methods are spectrophotometric (PAR, DBM and Arsenazo III) and potentiometric titration methods. For uranium contents between 1-300 g/LU potentiometric titration method based on oxidation-reduction reactions gives reliable results. PAR (1-pyridiyl-2-azo resorcinol) is a sensitive reagent for uranium, forming complexes in aqueous solutions. It is a suitable method for determination of uranium at concentrations between 2-400microgram U. In this study, the spectrophotometric and potentiometric analysis methods, used in the Nuclear Fuel Department will be discussed in detail and other methods and their principles will be briefly mentioned

  9. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzinel, Z.; Folkman, Y.

    1979-05-01

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P 2 O 5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  10. The Shewanella Federation: Functional Genomic Investigations of Dissimilatory Metal-Reducing Shewanella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); He, Zhili [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2009-01-30

    Generation and validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 clone set for protein expression and phage display. An ORF clone set for S. oneidensis was created using the lambda recombinase system. ORFs within entry vectors in this system can be readily transferred into multiple destination vectors, making the clone set a useful resource for research groups studying this microorganism. To establish that the S. oneidensis clone set could be used for protein expression and functional studies, three sets of ORFs were examined for expression of His-tag proteins, expression of His/GST-tag proteins, or for effective display on phage. A total of 21 out of 30 (70%) predicted two-component transcriptional regulators from S. oneidensis were successfully expressed in the His-tag format. The use of the S. oneidensis clone set for functional studies was tested using a phage display system. The method involves the fusion of peptides or proteins to a coat protein of a bacteriophage. This results in display of the fused protein on the exterior of the phage, while the DNA encoding the fusion resides within the virion. The physical linkage between the displayed protein and the DNA encoding it allows screening of vast numbers of proteins for ligand-binding properties. With this technology, a phage clone encoding thioredoxin TrxA was isolated from a sub-library consisting of 80 clones. It is evident that the S. oneidensis clone set can be used for expression of functional S. oneidensis proteins in E. coli using the appropriate destination vectors. Characterization of ArcA. In Escherichia coli, metabolic transitions between aerobic and anaerobic growth states occur when cells enter an oxygen-limited condition. Many of these metabolic transitions are controlled at the transcriptional level by the activities of the global regulatory proteins ArcA (aerobic respiration control) and Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator). A homolog of ArcA (81% amino acid sequence identity) was identified in S

  11. Uranium in the black schists of Goesan (Ogcheon, Korea): relationships between organic matter and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichet, J.; Chun-Hyuck, O.

    1990-01-01

    The uranium deposit of Goesan is polyphased: its genesis resulted from sedimentary, diagenetic and metamorphic processes which occurred from late Proterozoic (presumed age of the deposition of the black shales) to late Trias. By its geochemical characters, this deposit resulted from the affinity existing between uranium and organic matter. The latter had a role both through the formation of organo-metallic complexes and as a reducing agent of the metal during the diagenetic evolution. Beside these factors favourable to metal accumulation, the possible development of evaporitic conditions and tectono-metamorphic processes can also have played an important role in the reconcentration of uranium as well as other metals [fr

  12. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed

  13. Uranium in phosphorites of submarine untains in the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baturin, G.N.; Kochenov, A.V.; Dubinchuk, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium geochemical behaviour was studied under present sharply oxidizing conditions of sedimentation within the boundaries of submarine mountains in the Pacific Ocean (pelagic zone). It has been ascertained that the uranium content in phosphorites of submarine mountains in the Pacific Ocean does not exceed 10 -4 % which is considerably lower as compared phosphorites of submarine margins of the continents and terrestrial deposits. Iron and manganese hydroxides are the most active concentrators of uranium in a sharply oxidizing environment and to a lesser degree - phosphates, silicates, carbonates. Uranium bonded to phosphate is not an isomorphic impurity in it [ru

  14. Production and analysis of ultradispersed uranium oxide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajogin, A. P.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.; Umreiko, S. D.

    2010-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies are made of the laser plasma formed near the surface of a porous body containing nanoquantities of uranium compounds which is irradiated by two successive laser pulses. The feasibility of using laser chemical methods for obtaining nanoclusters of uranium oxide particles in the volume of a porous body and the simultaneous possibility of determining the uranium content with good sensitivity are demonstrated. The thermochemical and spectral characteristics of the analogs of their compounds with chlorine are determined and studied. The possibility of producing uranium dioxides under ordinary conditions and their analysis in the reaction products is demonstrated.

  15. Extraction of uranium from seawater by the fibrous composite adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Nogi, Tatsuo; Yoshizumi, Nobuo; Mima, Kooji.

    1986-01-01

    The fibrous composite adsorbents consisting of hydrous titanium oxide and activated carbon were prepared with hydrophilic polyacrylonitrile system polymer as a binder under various conditions, and the adsorptive property of the fibrous composite adsorbents for uranium from seawater was examined. The fibrous composite adsorbents which spun under high pressure (10 kg/cm 2 ) was the finest having the largest pore volume. In addition, the amount of uranium adsorbed of the fibrous adsorbent was the largest. The rate of uranium adsorption by the fibrous adsorbent was the same as the rate of uranium adsorption by the powdery adsorbent. The excellent fibrous adsorbent adsorbed 0.23 mg U/g adsorbent for 10 d and 0.65 mg U/g adsorbent for 100 d. The rate of uranium desorption from the fibrous adsorbent by alkali carbonate solution was large, and the uranium in the fibrous adsorbent desorbed 75 % for 8 h and about 100 % for 24 h. (author)

  16. South African uranium resource and production capability estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camisani-Calzolari, F.A.G.M.; Toens, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    South Africa, along with Canada and the United States, submitted forecasts of uranium capacities and capabilites to the year 2025 for the 1979 'Red Book' edition. This report deals with the methodologies used in arriving at the South African forecasts. As the future production trends of the South African uranium producers cannot be confidently defined, chiefly because uranium is extracted as a by-product of the gold mining industry and is thus highly sensitive to market fluctuations for both uranium and gold, the Evaluation Group of the Atomic Energy Board has carried out numerous forecast exercises using current and historical norms and assuming various degrees of 'adverse', 'normal' and 'most favourable' conditions. The two exercises, which were submitted for the 'Red Book', are shown in the Appendices. This paper has been prepared for presentation to the Working Group on Methodologies for Forecasting Uranium Availability of the NEA/IAEA Steering Group on Uranium Resources [af

  17. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 ± 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 ± 0.0006 wt. % 234 U, 19.8336 ± 0.0059 wt. % 235 U, 0.1337 ± 0.0006 wt. % 236 U, and 79.9171 ± 0.0057 wt. % 238 U

  18. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 {+-} 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 234}U, 19.8336 {+-} 0.0059 wt. % {sup 235}U, 0.1337 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 236}U, and 79.9171 {+-} 0.0057 wt. % {sup 238}U.

  19. Ventilation of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Y.; Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Dumas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the authors describe the ventilation of French mines in terms of the primary ventilation system, which brings the outside air close to the working places using the overall structure of the mine to form the airways, and the secondary ventilation system, which is for the distribution of the primary air or for the ventilation of the development drifts and blind tunnels. Brief mention is made of the French regulations on the ventilation of mines in general and uranium mines in particular. The authors describe the equipment used and discuss the installed capacities and air flow per man and per working place. The difficulties encountered in properly ventilating various types of working places are mentioned, such as sublevel development drifts, reinforced stopes, and storage chambers with an artificial crown. The second part of the paper is devoted to computer calculations of the primary ventilation system. It is explained why the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has found it necessary to make these calculations. Without restating the mathematical theories underlying the methods employed, the authors demonstrate how simple measuring instruments and a small-size computer can be used to solve the ventilation problems arising in French mines. Emphasis is given to the layout of the ventilation system and to air flow and negative pressure measurements at the base of the mine. The authors show how calculations can be applied to new heading operations, a change in resistance, the replacement or addition of a ventilator, and a new air inlet or outlet. The authors come to the conclusion that since ventilation is at present the most reliable way of avoiding the pollution of mines, a thorough knowledge of the capabilities in this respect can often help improve working conditions. Despite the progress made, however, constant surveillance of the ventilation systems in uranium mines by a separate team with no responsibility for production problems is

  20. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  1. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  2. Trends in uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  3. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  4. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  5. Studies on O/M ratio determination in uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, S.; Chawla, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Thermogravimetric studies were carried out in unsintered and sintered samples of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide under different atmospheric conditions (air, argon and moist argon/hydrogen). Moisture loss was found to occur below 200 0 C for uranium dioxide samples, upto 700 0 C for sintered plutonium dioxide and negligible for sintered samples. The O/M ratios for non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (sintered and unsintered), plutonium dioxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxides (sintered) could be obtained with a precision of +- 0.002. Two reference states UOsub(2.000) and UOsub(2.656) were obtained for uranium dioxide and the reference state MOsub(2.000) was used for other cases. For unsintered plutonium dioxide samples, accurate O/M ratios could not be obtained of overlap of moisture loss with oxygen loss/gain. (author)

  6. Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Development growth of uranium reserves during mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroux, M.

    1989-01-01

    According to the 1988 issue of the Nuclear Energy Agency report 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand' (the Red Book), total uranium resources remained constant, and compare with those given in the 1986 issue. However, the low cost category of the Reasonably Assured Resources (RAR), that is to say potentially mineable reserves under present market conditions, presents a different picture. These show a decrease of 54 000 tonnes U, or about 3.5%, from the 1 January 1985 level. It seems insignificant until compared with what was removed from the ground - only a quarter of the 71 500 tonnes U of the low cost uranium that was extracted during 1985 and 1986 was renewed by the industry. This is probably related to the low level of exploration activity since 1983. Moreover, new uranium might be not as easy to find as some past discoveries have led us to believe. While in 1988 it appears there is enough low cost uranium to supply existing reactors, the picture quickly changes. From 1991 onwards, for 30 years' supply for existing reactors, uranium will have to come from RAR in the higher cost category. (author)

  8. Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Developments of uranium and gold ores heap leaching technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yuan; Guan Zibin; Gao Renxi

    1998-01-01

    The author reviews developments in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores at home and abroad, summarises condition of application. The author also presents problems having to be studied and settled urgently in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores in China

  10. Approach to increasing techno-economic effects of ventilation in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xinhuo

    1989-01-01

    The main factors affecting techno-economic effects of ventilation in uranium mines are discussed in this paper. Under the conditions of technical feasibility and economic rationality, the method of economic analysis for ventilation and radiation protection in uranium mines is proposed. The technically feasible and economically reasonable suggestions are presented for increasing the techno-economic effects of ventilation in uranium mines

  11. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  12. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically uranium, iron and sulfur reduction dynamics during such bioremediation episodes. This technique uses in-well columns to obtain direct access to chemical and physical forms of U(IV) produced in the aquifer, evolving microbial communities, and trace and major ion groundwater constituents. While several studies have explored bioreduction of uranium under sulfate-reducing conditions, less attention has been paid to the initial iron-reducing phase, noted as being of particular importance to uranium removal. The aim of this work was to assess the formation of U(IV) during the early stages of a bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution. Chemical extractions of the reduced sediments have also been performed, to determine the rate of Fe(II) and U

  13. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  14. Preparation of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirths, G.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is converted to uranium tetrafluoride under stoichiometric excess of hydrogen fluoride. The water formed in the process and the unreacted hydrogen fluoride are cooled and the condensate fractionally distilled into water and approx. 40% hydrofluoric acid. The hydrofluoric acid and water-free hydrogen fluoride are fed back into the process. (WI) [de

  15. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  16. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Details are given of an agreement between Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and Ranger Uranium Mines Pty. Ltd. regarding the management of the joint Ranger uranium project in the Northern Territory of Australia

  17. Rheinbraun's Australian uranium business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, S.

    1989-01-01

    The leaflet argues against the mining activities of the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG in Germany and especially against uranium mining in Australia. The ethno-ecological impact on flora and fauna, aborigines and miners are pointed out. Uranium mining and lignite mining are compared. (HSCH) [de

  18. Nuclear and uranium policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNabb, G.M.; Uranium Canada Ltd., Ottawa, Ontario)

    The background of the uranium industry in Canada is described. Government policies with respect to ownership of the uranium mining industry, price stabilization, and especially reservation of sufficient supplies of nuclear fuels for domestic utilities, are explained. Canadian policy re nuclear exports and safeguards is outlined. (E.C.B.)

  19. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  20. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion replaces calcium in the hydroxyapatite complex of the bone crystal. Although in North India, there is a risk of radiological toxicity from orally ingested natural uranium, the principal health effects are chemical toxicity. The skeleton and kidney are the primary sites of uranium accumulation. Acute high dose of uranyl nitrate delays tooth eruption, and mandibular growth and development, probably due to its effect on target cells. Based on all previous research and recommendations, the role of a dentist is to educate the masses about the adverse effects of uranium on the overall as well as the dental health. The authors recommended that apart from the discontinuation of the addition of uranium to porcelain, the Public community water supplies must also comply with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards of uranium levels being not more than 30 ppb (parts per billion). PMID:24478959

  1. Uranium and transuranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical chemistry of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium is reviewed. Uranium and neptunium are mainly treated and curium is only briefly evoked. Analysis methods include coulometry, titration, mass spectrometry, absorption spectrometry, spectrofluorometry, X-ray spectrometry, nuclear methods and radiation spectrometry [fr

  2. Effect of uranium (VI) on two sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures from a uranium mine site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    This work was conducted to assess the impact of uranium (VI) on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) communities obtained from environmental samples collected on the Portuguese uranium mining area of Urgeirica. Culture U was obtained from a sediment, while culture W was obtained from sludge from the wetland of that mine. Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was used to monitor community changes under uranium stress conditions. TGGE profiles of dsrB gene fragment demonstrated that the initial cultures were composed of SRB species affiliated with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfomicrobium spp. (sample U), and by species related to D. desulfuricans (sample W). A drastic change in SRB communities was observed as a result of uranium (VI) exposure. Surprisingly, SRB were not detected in the uranium removal communities. Such findings emphasize the need of monitoring the dominant populations during bio-removal studies. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed that the uranium removal consortia are composed by strains affiliated to Clostridium genus, Caulobacteraceae and Rhodocyclaceae families. Therefore, these communities can be attractive candidates for environmental biotechnological applications associated to uranium removal.

  3. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourneux, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R 2 C 2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph 2 P(=S)} 2 2- (SCS 2- ) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M + on the evolution of the di-anion M 2 SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K 2 [C(PhPS) 2 (C 6 H 4 )]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS 2- and UCl 4 , as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt 2 ) by the neutral ligand SCH 2 S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)] 2 [U(SCS)Cl 3 ] and [U(SCS)Cl 2 (THF) 2 ] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl 2 (py) 2 ] and [M(Cp) 2 (SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl - ligands and pyridine by C 5 H 5 - groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO 2 (SCS)(THF) 2 ], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO 2 2+ . The reactions of compounds UO 2 X 2

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Yemen Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Yemen Arab Republic occupies a part of the southern Arabian Shield and has been subject to considerable faulting and movement. As far as is known no uranium exploration has ever been undertaken or is presently contemplated in the country. Uranium could occur in the Shield rocks and conditions are right for calcrete type uranium deposits. The Speculative Potential may be in category 2, i.e. between 1000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  5. Micelle-mediated methodology for the preconcentration of uranium prior to its determination by flow injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Laespada, M.E.; Perez Pavon, J.L.; Moreno Cordero, B. (Univ. de Salamanca (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia)

    1993-02-01

    Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration of uranium, prior to its determination by flow injection. The non-ionic surfactant employed was Triton X-114 and the reagent chosen to form a hydrophobic chelate of uranium was 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol. The optimum conditions for the preconcentration and determination of uranium have been studied. This methodology has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of uranium in tap and river waters from Salamanca. (Author).

  6. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  7. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Lupei, V.

    1984-02-01

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  8. Jabiluka uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  9. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, V.; LeCheminant, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  10. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Canadian uranium exploration and development efforts in 1985 and 1986 resulted in a significant increase in estimates of measured uranium resources. New discoveries have more than made up for production during 1985 and 1986, and for the elimination of some resources from the overall estimates, due to the sustained upward pressure on production costs and the stagnation of uranium prices in real terms. Canada possesses a large portion of the world's uranium resources that are of current economic interest and remains the major focus of inter-national uranium exploration activity. Expenditures for uranium exploration in Canada in 1985 and 1986 were $32 million and $33 million, respectively. Although much lower than the $130 million total reported for 1979, expenditures for 1987 are forecast to increase. Exploration and surface development drilling in 1985 and 1986 were reported to be 183 000 m and 165σ2 000 m, respectively, 85 per cent of which was in Saskatchewan. Canada has maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium. By the year 2000, Canada's annual uranium requirements will be about 2 100 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are either in operation now or expected to be in service by the late 1990s. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Annual sales currently approach $1 billion, of which exports account for 85 per cent. Forward domestic and export contract commitments totalled 73 000 tU and 62 000 tU, respectively, as of early 1987

  11. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocton, G.

    2009-09-01

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO 2 py 5 ][KI 2 py 3 ]} n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO 2 (dbm) 2 (K 18 C 6 )] 2 . (author)

  12. Uranium producers foresee new boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, H.

    1979-01-01

    The status of uranium production in Canada is reviewed. Uranium resources in Saskatchewan and Ontario are described and the role of the Cluff Lake inquiry in securing a government decision in favour of further uranium development is mentioned. There have been other uranium strikes near Kelowna, British Columbia and in the Northwest Territories. Increasing uranium demand and favourable prices are making the development of northern resources economically attractive. In fact, all uranium currently produced has been committed to domestic and export contracts so that there is considerable room for expanding the production of uranium in Canada. (T.I.)

  13. Investigation of Uranium Extraction from Seawater by Electrosorption Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Aznan Fazli; Yim, Mansung

    2014-01-01

    The uranium recovery from seawater reported that the cost of extracting uranium using amidoxime based adsorbent material was about 10 times higher than that of the conventional uranium mining. This high cost is mainly due to the poor adsorbent performance and high production cost. Recently, porous carbon material (e. g. activated carbon, mesoporous carbon) received attention due to its high efficiency in absorbing uranium. The cumulative efficiency for activated carbon fibers (ACF) was reported to be 600 g-Uranium / kg-ACF. However, this materials were only tested in uranium solution with different uranium species at high concentration. While the interesting performance was found for porous carbon under different conditions, the ability of porous carbon materials in seawater has never been tested. Therefore, the objective of this research is to study the performance of porous carbon materials in absorbing uranium ions from seawater. Adsorption process involves two adsorption mechanism either by physical sorption onto adsorbent material or by ion exchange mechanism. In order to increase the selectivity of uranium ions to be adsorbed by the adsorbent (activated carbon electrode), electrosorption approach has been applied in this research. This preliminary research has demonstrated the utility of activated carbon electrode as a candidate material to adsorb uranium ions from seawater, and the results shows that it has good performance of adsorbing uranium in the presence of competing ions. The performance of activated carbon electrode at 300 minutes of was 3.3 g-U/kg-Ads, which is not the maximum adsorbent capacity. If the electrosorption period is extended, the activated carbon performance might be higher than 3.3 g-U/kg-Ads. However, further investigation such as on various positive voltage potential, pH effect, temperature effect are needed in order to study the performance of activated carbon electrode in absorbing uranium from seawater

  14. Study of the Formation of Eutectic Melt of Uranium and Thermal Analysis for the Salt Distillation of Uranium Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Hwang, Sung Chan; Kang, Young Ho; Park, Ki Min; Jun, Wan Gi; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Dong Wook

    2010-01-01

    Uranium deposits from an electrorefining process contain about 30% salt. In order to recover pure uranium and transform it into an ingot, the salts have to be removed from the uranium deposits. Major process variables for the salt distillation process of the uranium deposits are hold temperature and vacuum pressure. Effects of the variables on the salt removal efficiency were studied in the previous study 1. By applying the Hertz-Langmuir relation to the salt evaporation of the uranium deposits, the evaporation coefficients were obtained at the various conditions. The operational conditions for achieving above 99% salt removal were deduced. The salt distilled uranium deposits tend to form the eutectic melt with iron, nickel, chromium for structural material of salt evaporator. In this study, we investigated the hold temperature limitation in order to prevent the formation of the eutectic melt between uranium and other metals. The reactions between the uranium metal and stainless steel were tested at various conditions. And for enhancing the evaporation rate of the salt and the efficient recovery of the distilled salt, the thermal analysis of the salt distiller was conducted by using commercial CFX software. From the thermal analysis, the effect of Ar gas flow on the evaporation of the salt was studied.

  15. Uranium: active even at low doses; Uranium: actif meme a faible dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, M.; Lestaevel, Ph.; Gueguen, Y. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2006-11-15

    The human body, in normal conditions, contains 40 to 90 10{sup -6} grams of uranium, this quantity is mainly stored in the bones (66%), in the kidneys (8%) and in soft tissues. Man daily absorbs between 1 to 3 10{sup -6} grams of uranium. A recent experiment on rats has showed that water contaminated with low quantities of uranium (10{sup -6} grams a day and per rat) can lead to short-term memory impairment, to higher level of anxiety and to a 38% increase of the paradoxal sleep. No toxic effects on liver and kidneys have been found but it has been showed that low quantities of uranium can entail changes, in some organs, concerning the expression of the genes coding the P450 cytochromes. (A.C.)

  16. Chlorination of uranium ore for extraction of uranium, thorium and radium and for pyrite removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeaf, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature chlorination of uranium ore was investigated. The objective was to develop a process which is both economically viable and environmentally acceptable. Test work was directed toward obtaining high extractions of uranium, thorium and radium-226, as well as iron, sulphur and the rare earths, and consists of chlorinating samples of an Elliot Lake uranium ore at elevated temperatures and repulping the resulting calcine in dilute hydrochloric acid. The effect of temperature and chlorine throughput on the extraction of the various metals was investigated. The best conditions yielded extractions of uranium, iron and sulphur (all as chlorides) greater than 95 percent. Chlorine consumption varied between 6 and 16 percent by weight of the ore charge. (author)

  17. The use of the chelating sorbent polyarsenazo-N for the concentration of uranium(VI) in water analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvoeva, O.P.; Kuchava, G.P.; Myasoedova, G.V.; Savvin, S.B.; Mezhirov, M.S.; Boiko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium(VI) sorption has been studied on Polyarsenazo-N, a new type of sorbent, which is a polyacrylonitrile fiber filled with the finely divided chelating sorbent Polyarsenazo. Sorption and desorption curves were obtained, and conditions for concentrating uranium(VI) under dynamic conditions were chosen. A procedure was developed for the sorption-spectrophotometric determination of uranium in water

  18. Uranium tipped ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    1993-01-01

    During the uranium enrichment process required to make nuclear weapons or fuel, the concentration of the 'fissile' U-235 isotope has to be increased. What is left, depleted uranium, is about half as radioactive as natural uranium, but very dense and extremely hard. It is used in armour piercing shells. External radiation levels from depleted uranium (DU) are low. However DU is about as toxic as lead and could be harmful to the kidneys if eaten or inhaled. It is estimated that between 40 and 300 tonnes of depleted uranium were left behind by the Allied armies after the Gulf war. The biggest hazard would be from depleted uranium shells which have hit Iraqui armoured vehicles and the resulting dust inhaled. There is a possible link between depleted uranium shells and an illness known as 'Desert Storm Syndrome' occurring in some Gulf war veterans. As these shells are a toxic and radioactive hazard to health and the environment their use and testing should be stopped because of the risks to troops and those living near test firing ranges. (UK)

  19. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpolt, R.H.; Simov, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  20. The uranium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The uranium is a natural element omnipresent in the environment, with a complex chemistry more and more understood. Many studies are always today devoted to this element to better improve the uranium behavior in the environment. To illustrate this knowledge and for the public information the CEA published this paper. It gathers in four chapters: historical aspects and properties of the uranium, the uranium in the environment and the impacts, the metrology of the uranium and its migration. (A.L.B.)

  1. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  2. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K.

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ , suggesting that Fe 3+ and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass

  3. Uranium resource assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine what is generally known about uranium resources, what is subject to conjecture, how well do the explorers themselves understand the occurrence of uranium, and who are the various participants in the exploration process. From this we hope to reach a better understanding of the quality of uranium resource estimates as well as the nature of the exploration process. The underlying questions will remain unanswered. But given an inability to estimate precisely our uranium resources, how much do we really need to know. To answer this latter question, the various Department of Energy needs for uranium resource estimates are examined. This allows consideration of whether or not given the absence of more complete long-term supply data and the associated problems of uranium deliverability for the electric utility industry, we are now threatened with nuclear power plants eventually standing idle due to an unanticipated lack of fuel for their reactors. Obviously this is of some consequence to the government and energy consuming public. The report is organized into four parts. Section I evaluates the uranium resource data base and the various methodologies of resource assessment. Part II describes the manner in which a private company goes about exploring for uranium and the nature of its internal need for resource information. Part III examines the structure of the industry for the purpose of determining the character of the industry with respect to resource development. Part IV arrives at conclusions about the emerging pattern of industrial behavior with respect to uranium supply and the implications this has for coping with national energy issues

  4. Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

    2011-11-01

    The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

  5. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium under non-growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truex, M.J.; Peyton, B.M.; Valentine, N.B.; Gorby, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms may be useful in processes designed for selective removal of uranium from aqueous streams. These bacteria can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor and thereby reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). While significant research has been devoted to demonstrating and describing the mechanism of dissimilatory metal reduction, the reaction kinetics necessary to apply this for remediation processes have not been adequately defined. In this study, pure culture Shewanella alga strain BrY reduced U(VI) under non-growth conditions in the presence of excess lactate as the electron donor. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 13 to 1,680microM. A maximum specific U(VI) reduction rate of 2.37 micromole-U(VI)/(mg-biomass h) and Monod half-saturation coefficient of 132 microM-U(VI) were calculated from measured U(VI) reduction rates. U(VI) reduction activity was sustained at 60% of this rate for at least 80 h. The initial presence of oxygen at a concentration equal to atmospheric saturation at 22 C delays but does not prevent U(VI) reduction. The rate of U(VI) reduction by BrY is comparable or better than rates reported for other metal reducing species. BrY reduces U(VI) at a rate that is 30% of its Fe(III) reduction rate

  6. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  7. Vacuum fusion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1957-01-01

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results

  8. Uranium absorption study pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Sautiez, B.

    1959-01-01

    The report describes a pile designed to measure the absorption of fuel slugs. The pile is of graphite and comprises a central section composed of uranium rods in a regular lattice. RaBe sources and BF 3 counters are situated on either side of the center. A given uranium charge is compared with a specimen charge of about 560 kg, and the difference in absorption between the two noted. The sensitivity of the equipment will detect absorption variations of about a few ppm boron (10 -6 boron per gr. of uranium) or better. (author) [fr

  9. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK) [de

  10. Uranium in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facer, J.F. Jr.

    1979-05-01

    United States production of coal in 1977 was 695 million short tons of which 477 million tons were burned in power plants. The ash from these power plants was about 67 million tons containing an estimated 900 tons U 3 O 8 , assuming 14 percent ash from the type of coal used by utilities and 12 ppM U contained in ash. Perhaps 1 to 3 percent of the domestic uranium requirement could be met from coal ash, provided processing technology could be developed for uranium recovery at acceptable costs. However, the environmental problems for disposal of the slimy leached ash would be enormous. The average uranium grade of coal in the United States is less than half of that of the Earth's crust. Burning the coal concentrates the contained uranium in the ash from 2 to 20 times. However, even at 20 times concentration, the percent uranium in coal ash is less than 1/100 of the grade of the uranium ore being processed today from conventional deposits. Although it is conceivable that some coal ash might contain enough uranium to make the ash an economic source of uranium, this is not now the case for ash from any major coal-fired power plant in the United States. During 1963 to 67, about 180,000 tons of uranium-bearing carbonaceous rock from the southwestern part of the Williston Basin were mined and processed to recover about 1 million pounds of U 3 O 8 . None of this material has been mined since 1967. The uranium reserves of the area are small, and the environmental problems with calcining the lignitic material may be prohibitive. Some other uraniferous coal and lignite could be mined and processed as a uranium ore, but less than half of one percent of the domestic $30 reserves are in coal. A few samples of mid-continent coal have been reported to contain about 100 ppM U but little is known about the size of such deposits or the likelihood that they will be mined and used for power plant fuel to produce a high-uranium ash

  11. Possible uranium sources of Streltsovsky uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lisheng

    2005-01-01

    The uranium deposit of the Late Jurassic Streltsovaky caldera in Transbaikalia of Russia is the largest uranium field associated with volcanics in the world, its uranium reserves are 280 000 t U, and it is the largest uranium resources in Russia. About one third of the caldera stratigraphic pile consists of strongly-altered rhyolites. Uranium resources of the Streltsovsky caldera are much larger than any other volcanic-related uranium districts in the world. Besides, the efficiency of hydrothermal alteration, uranium resources appear to result from the juxtaposition of two major uranium sources; highly fractionated peralkaline rhyolites of Jurassic age in the caldera, and U-rich subalkaline granites of Variscan age in the basement in which the major uranium-bearing accessory minerals were metamict at the time of the hydrothermal ore formation. (authors)

  12. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  13. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedrach, L.W.; Glamm, A.C.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process of refining or decontaminating uranium is presented. The impure uranium is made the anode of an electrolytic cell. The molten salt electrolyte of this cell comprises a uranium halide such as UF/sub 4/ or UCl/sub 3/ and an alkaline earth metal halide such as CaCl/sub 2/, BaF/sub 2/, or BaCl/sub 2/. The cathode of the cell is a metal such as Mn, Cr, Co, Fe, or Ni which forms a low melting eutectic with U. The cell is operated at a temperature below the melting point of U. In operation the electrodeposited uranium becomes alloyed with the metal of the cathode, and the low melting alloy thus formed drips from the cathode.

  14. Uranium market activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized from the 1974 ERDA annual survey of buyers and sellers and from a survey of uranium price data which provided information on additional domestic buying activity during the first half of 1975 through 1982

  15. Uranium extraction from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bals, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    Problems and work of other institutes in the field of uranium extraction from sea water are presented. UEB developments, UEB processes, and work done to realize the UEB concept are discussed. (HK) [de

  16. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  17. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  18. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  19. Uranium Research in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanouté, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    The work of mining companies have so far not proved economic uranium resources, but they have nevertheless contributed greatly to a better understanding of the geology, particularly in Eastern Senegal, on the upper Precambrian basin including which equivalents exist throughout West Africa (the uranium belt of Zaire) prospected by CEA-COGEMA teams. The researches carried out in Senegal, but also in Guinea and Mali helped establish a detailed map and understand the course of geological history. With new exploration techniques and data of airborne geophysical (radiometric) provided by the Mining Sector Support Programme (PASMI 9th EDF 9 ACP SE 09), AREVA, at the end of the first period validity of the exploration permit increased significantly, the resources. Prospects are favorable to a doubling of resources; objective of a uranium mine in Senegal. Synergies are possible and desirable with joint exploitation of uranium deposits located in Mali, near the border with Senegal.

  20. The uranium market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.

    1981-01-01

    A historical analysis of the uranium market points out the cyclical nature of the market and suggests that the spot price, exploration levels, and mill capacity utilization rate are dependent on economic factors. An examination of the current uranium market suggests that the effects of the forecasted surplus supply, the diminishing returns in exploration and the long lead times and high costs of development may mean that future production levels are uncertain. The general prospects for the uranium industry are also uncertain because of barriers to trade, environmental regulations and public opinion. The paper concludes that by the use of long term contracts, appropriate inventory policy and greater discussion between producers and consumers the prospects for the uranium market can be made more certain and further imbalances in demand and supply can be avoided. (author)

  1. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Y.T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  2. Uranium purchases report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B,'' Uranium Marketing Activities,'' are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year's report. The report contains a glossary of terms

  3. Uranium hexafluoride purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Eneas F. de

    1986-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride might contain a large amount of impurities after manufacturing or handling. Three usual methods of purification of uranium hexafluoride were presented: selective sorption, sublimation, and distillation. Since uranium hexafluoride usually is contaminated with hydrogen fluoride, a theoretical study of the phase equilibrium properties was performed for the binary system UF 6 -HF. A large deviation from the ideal solution behaviour was observed. A purification unity based on a constant reflux batch distillation process was developed. A procedure was established in order to design the re boiler, condenser and packed columns for the UF 6 -HF mixture separation. A bench scale facility for fractional distillation of uranium hexafluoride was described. Basic operations for that facility and results extracted from several batches were discussed. (author)

  4. Hydrogen in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.; Caillat, R.

    1959-01-01

    Hydrogen impairs the properties of metals, in particular this can assume considerable importance with uranium when used as a fuel material. Hydrogen can be associated with uranium in two distinct ways: either dissolved in the metal, or in the form of a hydride. The solubility of hydrogen in uranium depends on the allotropic form of the metal; it is in addition greater in molten than in solid uranium. Two types of hydride, both given by the formula UH 3 , have been identified. The first, the α-type. is stable at low temperature. It is generally accompanied by small amounts of the β-type, into which it is wholly transformed above 140 deg.C. Reprint of a paper published in Progress in Nuclear Energy, Series V, Vol. 2, 'Metallurgy and Fuels', p. 19-27

  5. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  6. Chemical treatment of uranium ores in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Sartorius, R.

    1958-01-01

    The various processes of chemical treatment of uranium ores, from the oldest to the more recent, are exposed, considering the following conditions: economics, geography, techniques and safety. The interest of obtaining a final concentrate as uranyl nitrate is discussed. (author) [fr

  7. US uranium market developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Thomas, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Domestic uranium delivery commitments for the 1981 to 1990 period reached a peak in the July 1980 survey and then declined in the January 1981 survey and again in the July 1981 survey. However, there are sizable sales contracts through the mid-1980s. In the latter part of this decade, unfilled requirements increase which can provide a needed market for domestic producers. Older contracts are helping to keep the average contract prices, including market price settlements, rather stable. However, average market price settlements decreased from data reported in January 1981, but some of these deliveries represent settlement of litigation. Foreign uranium procurement is scheduled to exceed deliveries of US uranium to foreign buyers in the 1981 to 1990 period. However, the actual use of foreign uranium has been quite low as US enrichment services customers have preferred to buy US uranium. Based on over four and one-half years of data, only about 7% foreign uranium has been brought to the Department of Energy for enrichment. Inventories of natural and enriched uranium in buyers' hands continue to increase. This is a concern to the uranium-producing industry. However, the industry should not be concerned about DOE-owned inventories, which are needed to supply Government requirements. There is absolutely no plan to dispose of DOE inventories on the commercial market. Capital expenditures reached a peak of $800 million in 1979. This decreased to $780 million in 1980, although higher expenditures were planned for the year. A very sharp reduction in plans for 1981, from $830 to $450 million, has been reported. A further reduction to $350 million is planned for 1982. However, it is interesting to note that the planned expenditures for 1982 are above the expenditures for 1975, a period of industury expansion

  8. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  9. Uranium determination in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudenzo, E.J.; Puga, Maria J.; Cerchietti, Maria L.R.; Arguelles, Maria G.

    2005-01-01

    In our laboratory, a procedure has been assessed to determine uranium content of water in normal situations. The method proposed without sample pre-treatment, is simple and rapid. Uranium mass is measured by fluorimetry. For calculation of detection limit (Ld) and quantification level (Lq) we used blank samples and the results were analyzed for different statistical test. The calculation of total propagated uncertainty and sources contribution on real samples are presented. (author)

  10. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.

    1983-01-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  11. Worldwide developments in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoellen, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    World uranium production will continue to change in most major producing nations. Canadian production will increase and will be increasingly dominated by western producers as eastern Canadian high-cost production declines. Australian production will increase as major projects come into operation before 2000. US production will stabilize through the end of the century. South African production will be dependent upon the worldwide support for economic sanctions. China's entry into the world market injects yet another variable into the already cloudy supply picture. Many risks and uncertainties will face uranium producers through the 1980s. Recognizing that the uranium industry is not a fast-growing market, many existing and potential producers are seeking alternate investment courses, causing a restructuring of the world uranium production industry in ways not anticipated even a few years ago. During the restructuring process, world uranium production will most likely continue to exceed uranium consumption, resulting in a further buildup of world uranium inventories. Inventory sales will continue to redistribute this material. As inventory selling runs its course, users will turn to normal sources of supply, stimulating additional production to meet needs. Stimulation in the form of higher prices will be determined by how fast producers are willing and able to return to the market. Production costs are expected to have an increasing impact as it has become apparent that uranium resources are large in comparison to projected consumption. Conversely, security-of-supply issues have seemed to be of decreasing magnitude as Canada, Australia, and other non-US producers continue to meet delivery commitments

  12. U for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Beisa Mine is unique in South Africa - it is the only underground mine with uranium as its main product and gold as a by-product. At the rate of 1,2 Mt/a, the life of Beisa is estimated on 26 years. Beisa's metallurgical plant is designed to handle initially a monthly throughput of 100 000t of ore, from which uranium, gold and silver will be extracted

  13. Uranium leads political stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, D.

    2009-01-01

    Until the announcement by the federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett that the government would permit uranium mining at Beverly Four Mile, South Australia, there had been little news flow from the sector over the past year. Uranium was the first to turn down, even before the United States sub-prime mortgage crisis began to cause shock waves through the global economy, a report by BGF Equities analyst Warwick Grigor shows.

  14. Uranium purchases report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs

  15. Ranger uranium environmental enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The submission is divided into three sections. Section A considers the international implications of the development of uranium resources including economic and resource aspects and environmental and social aspects. Section B outlines the government's position on export controls over uranium and its effect on the introduction of nuclear power in Australia. Section C describes the licensing and regulatory functions that would be needed to monitor the environmental and health aspects of the Ranger project. (R.L.)

  16. Uranium - the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.E.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief history is presented of Canadian uranium exploration, production, and sales. Statistics show that Canada is a good customer for its own uranium due to a rapidly expanding nuclear power program. Due to an average 10 year lag between commencement of exploration and production, and with current producers sold out through 1985, it is imperative that exploration efforts be increased. (E.C.B.)

  17. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holoway, C.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Eldridge, V.M.

    1975-12-01

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  18. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, W.L.

    1962-04-17

    A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

  19. Dissolution of metallic uranium in alkalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.; Wilkinson, Maria V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of U metallic foils has been studied in the framework of the development of an improved 99 Mo-production process. The best conditions for the dissolution of uranium foils of approximately 150 μm are the following: a) NaClO concentrations of 0.20 and 0.23 M with NaOH of 0.27 and 0.31 M respectively; b) temperature of the solution, 70 C degrees; c) volume of the solution, 15 ml / cm 2 of uranium foil; d) dissolution time, 30 minutes. (author)

  20. Bacterial leaching of uranium ores - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-11-01

    The bacterial leaching of uranium ores involves the bacterially catalysed oxidation of associated pyrite to sulphuric acid and Fe 3+ by autotrophic bacteria and the leaching of the uranium by the resulting acidic, oxidising solution. Industrial application has been limited to Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at pH 2 to 3, and examples of these are described. The bacterial catalysis can be improved with nutrients or prevented with poisons. The kinetics of leaching are controlled by the bed depth, particle size, percolation rate, mineralogy and temperature. Current work is aimed at quantitatively defining the parameters controlling the kinetics and extending the method to alkaline conditions with other autotrophic bacteria. (author)

  1. Ingot formation using uranium dendrites recovered by electrolysis in LiCl-KCl-PuCl{sub 3}-UCl{sub 3} melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineo Fukushima; Akira Nakayoshi; Shinichi Kitawaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 4-33 Muramatsu Tokai-mura Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1194 (Japan); Masaki Kurata; Noboru Yahagi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 2-11-1 Iwadokita Komae-shi, Tokyo, 201-8511 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Products on solid cathodes recovered by the metal pyrochemical processing were processed to obtain uranium ingot. Studies on process conditions of uranium formation, assay recovered uranium products and by-products and evaluation of mass balance were carried out. In these tests, it is confirmed that uranium ingots can be obtained with heating the products more than melting temperature of metal uranium under atmospheric pressure because adhered salt cover the uranium not to oxidize it during uranium cohering. Covered salt can be removed after ingot formation. Inside the ingot, there were a lump of uranium and dark brown colored dross was observed. Material balance of uranium is 77 {approx} 96%, that of plutonium is 71 {approx} 109%, and that of americium that is a volatile substance more than uranium and plutonium become 79 {approx} 119%. Volatilization of americium is very small under the condition of high temperature. (authors)

  2. The Streltsovskoye uranium district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischukova, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the geology of the Streltsovskoye uranium district located in south-eastern Zabaikalie region, Chita Province, Siberia, Russia. This district hosts Russia's only currently active uranium production centre. The uranium ore was discovered from 1963 to 1967 by drilling below fluorite veins which had minor associated uranium mineralization and radioactive anomalies. The uranium occurs as large scale vein stockwork deposits of hydrothermal origin within a volcano-tectonic caldera formed by continental volcanism of Late Mesozoic age. Rocks occurring in the caldera include basalt and trachydacite, overlain by rhyolite, and with associated interbedded sediments. The ore bodies occur in steeply dipping faults, with the greatest concentrations located where faults along the margins of the caldera intersect steeply dipping, cross cutting, northeasterly and northwesterly striking faults. The Streltsovskoye caldera extends over an area of 150 km 2 and is underlain by a large batholith. The 19 identified uranium deposits occurred in structural features that cut through the caldera sequence and extend into the basement rocks. The caldera has a maximum thickness of 1400 metres. Details of several deposits are given, including descriptions of mineralization and associated alteration. (author). 10 figs

  3. Uranium deposits through time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of different types of uranium deposits through geological time has been noted by various authors, especially as affecting deposits formed in the Precambrian era. While this is significant, it may have been oversimplified by grouping deposits within geological time limits that are very extensive when compared with Phanerozoic groupings. As more detailed information becomes available, we find that some of the higher-grade deposits have complicated histories involving several stages of concentration separated by long periods of time. A comparison of the proportion of uranium production and reserves contributed by individual classes (and geological ages) of deposits shows a changing trend in favour of the unconformity class. Possibly more attention should be paid to metallographic uranium areas and their localizations. Some areas, e.g. Gabon, West Africa and Baker Lake, N.W.T., have more than one type of uranium deposit. A further consideration is that much of the known uranium reserves in the non-Communist world lies within a dozen areas, each ranging between 3000 and 130 000 km 2 . It is possible that such uranium metallographic areas were localized by very ancient fracture systems, now not easily recognized, in the original Earth's crust

  4. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  5. Automated uranium titration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kato, Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated titration system based on the Davies-Gray method has been developed for accurate determination of uranium. The system consists of a potentiometric titrator with precise burettes, a sample changer, an electronic balance and a desk-top computer with a printer. Fifty-five titration vessels are loaded in the sample changer. The first three contain the standard solution for standardizing potassium dichromate titrant, and the next two and the last two contain the control samples for data quality assurance. The other forty-eight measurements are carried out for sixteen unknown samples. Sample solution containing about 100 mg uranium is taken in a titration vessel. At the pretreatment position, uranium (VI) is reduced to uranium (IV) by iron (II). After the valency adjustment, the vessel is transferred to the titration position. The rate of titrant addition is automatically controlled to be slower near the end-point. The last figure (0.01 mL) of the equivalent titrant volume for uranium is calculated from the potential change. The results obtained with this system on 100 mg uranium gave a precision of 0.2% (RSD,n=3) and an accuracy of better than 0.1%. Fifty-five titrations are accomplished in 10 hours. (author)

  6. Uranium-scintillator device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The calorimeter subgroup of the 1977 ISABELLE Summer Workshop strongly recommended investigation of the uranium-scintillator device because of its several attractive features: (1) increased resolution for hadronic energy, (2) fast time response, (3) high density (i.e., 16 cm of calorimeter per interaction length), and, in comparison with uranium--liquid argon detectors, (4) ease of construction, (5) simple electronics, and (6) lower cost. The AFM group at the CERN ISR became interested in such a calorimeter for substantially the same reasons, and in the fall of 1977 carried out tests on a uranium-scintillator (U-Sc) calorimeter with the same uranium plates used in their 1974 studies of the uranium--liquid argon (U-LA) calorimeter. The chief disadvantage of the scintillator test was that the uranium plates were too small to fully contain the hadronic showers. However, since the scintillator and liquid argon tests were made with the plates, direct comparison of the two types of devices could be made

  7. Uranium mining in Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, B.W.; Whillans, R.T.; Williams, R.M.; Doggett, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared the impact of taxation on the economic viability and competitive position of uranium mining in Canada and Australia. The evaluation is based on four types of uranium deposit and four hypothetical project models. The deposits are assumed to have been discovered and delineated, and are awaiting a mine development decision. The models, initially appraised on a before-tax basis, are then subjected to taxation in each of six jurisdictions. Several taxation criteria are assessed in each case, including after-tax measures of investment incentive, discounted tax revenues, effective tax rates, intergovernmental tax shares, and comparative tax levels. The impact of taxation is shown to be both high and variable. The taxation systems in Saskatchewan and Australia's Northern Territory generate the most government revenue and provide the lowest incentive for investment. Canada's Northwest Territories and Ontario provide the best investment incentive and collect the least amount of taxes. South Australia and Western Australia tend to be positioned between these extremes. The study demonstrates that only the very best uranium mining projects have a chance of being developed under current market conditions, and even these can be rendered uneconomic by excessive taxation regimes. It follows that exceptionally good quality targets will have to be identified to provide the economic justification for uranium exploration. These realities will likely restrict uranium exploration and development activities for some time, not an unexpected response to a market situation where low prices have been caused largely by excess supply. (L.L.)

  8. Basic data for uranium prospecting in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belluco, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Martinez, C.; Marinkeff, K.

    1977-01-01

    After dealing briefly with the geochemical cycle of uranium in the earth's crust, and indicating the principal conditions under which different types of deposits are formed, the paper goes on to determine the uraniferous are of mainland Argentina (approximately 900000 km 2 ). Since evidence for the presence of uranium and other radioactive elements in many parts of the country has long been available, an attempt was made to systemize the existing information and classify the uraniferous sites so as to determine their temporal, spatial and genetic relationships with the different containing rocks. In addition, a study was made of the factors which contribute to the concentration of uranium in rocks which are accessible to prospecting (litho-stratigraphy, geological history, mettallogenic cycles, etc.). On the basis of these studies and considering the regional geology of Argentina, 21 ''regional environments'' were defined with varying degrees of probability of containing uranium; these environments will be submitted to long-term regional prospecting studies. It was necessary, however, to make a further sub-division into more homogeneous units with more clearly graded levels of priority, with the result that there are 65 ''prospecting units''. Each of these units, in order of priority, will be subjected to systematic prospecting. Exploratory work on a suitable scale will be carried out in the ''uraniferous'' districts of the ''prospecting units''. The main features of Argentine geology relating to the likelihood of uranium occurrences are briefly described, and maps of the large geotechtonic areas and the ''regional environments'' are included. (author)

  9. Modeling of geochemical processes related to uranium mobilization in the groundwater of a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, P.; Garralon, A.; Buil, B.; Turrero, Ma.J.; Sanchez, L.; Cruz, B. de la

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the processes leading to uranium distribution in the groundwater of five boreholes near a restored uranium mine (dug in granite), and the environmental impact of restoration work in the discharge area. The groundwater uranium content varied from < 1 μg/L in reduced water far from the area of influence of the uranium ore-containing dyke, to 104 μg/L in a borehole hydraulically connected to the mine. These values, however, fail to reflect a chemical equilibrium between the water and the pure mineral phases. A model for the mobilization of uranium in this groundwater is therefore proposed. This involves the percolation of oxidized waters through the fractured granite, leading to the oxidation of pyrite and arsenopyrite and the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. This in turn leads to the dissolution of the primary pitchblende and, subsequently, the release of U(VI) species to the groundwater. These U(VI) species are retained by iron hydroxides. Secondary uranium species are eventually formed as reducing conditions are re-established due to water-rock interactions

  10. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  11. The evolution of the enriched uranium markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaiz, J.; Moleres, C.; Tarin, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of the enriched uranium component markets (uranium concentrates, conversion and enrichment), starting with the situation of historically low prices that occurred during 2000. The situation that has been reached as on December 2003, when the concentrates and conversion markets were 44% and 70% (current US$) respectively, and the enrichment prices 30%, higher, is analysed. Finally, the negative impact of the 90's depressed prices, due to abundant alternative sources of uranium components, on the primary production of all three components and, as a conclusion, the impact of the new situation on the transport logistics, and the need of appropriate economic conditions to make the future primary production sustainable, is commented. (Author)

  12. Preparation and certification of a reference uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-06-01

    The CEA Analysis Coordination has produced a reference uranium metal of guaranteed minimum uranium content. The metal was purified by electro-refining in fused salt baths and the dendrites obtained were cast in the form of an ingot by electron bombardment. The ingot was rolled and cut into pieces of mass between 0.5 g and 1.5 g, and each piece conditioned in a glass ampoule under primary vacuum. The total number of reference samples is about 4500. The uranium content was inferred from the impurity concentration determined by spark mass spectrometry and atomic or molecular adsorption spectrophotometry and from the gas concentration determined by specific methods. A certificate of guarantee gives instructions for the use of these reference samples [fr

  13. International uranium production. An eastern Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albino, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Eastern Canadian perspective on uranium production is based on 30 years of continuous mining at Elliot Lake and on the experience of selling uranium over the same time period, mainly to export markets. In Ontario the orebodies are basically contiguous, being part of the same large formation. All the mining is underground. Ore grades are low, but economic extraction is improved by continuity and uniformity of grades, stable ground conditions, and the ability to mine and mill on a large scale. Mining is being carried out by two companies, Denison and Rio Algom. It is unlikely that mine capacity will be increased. Government policies have significant effects on the Eastern Canadian uranium industry in particular, as to U.S. import policies. (L.L.)

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-01-01

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination

  15. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  16. Possible domestication of uranium oxides using biological assistance reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slah Hidouri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium has been defined in material research engineering field as one of the most energetic radioactive elements in the entire Mendeleev periodic table. The manipulation of uranium needs higher theories and sophisticated apparatus even in nuclear energy extraction or in many other chemical applications. Above the nuclear exploitation level, the chemical conventional approaches used, require a higher temperature and pressure to control the destination of ionic form. However, it has been discovered later that at biological scale, the manipulation of this actinide is possible under friendly conditions. The review summarizes the relevant properties of uranium element and a brief characterization of nanoparticles, based on some structural techniques. These techniques reveal the common link between chemical approaches and biological assistance in nanoparticles. Also, those biological entities have been able to get it after reduction. Uranium is known for its ability to destroy ductile materials. So, if biological cell can really reduce uranium, then how does it work?

  17. Gastrointestinal absorption of soluble uranium from drinking water by man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Ruth, H.; Rallison, M.L.; Burleigh, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption of uranium has been measured in ten normal healthy adult volunteers of both sexes by feeding them one litre of water containing 200 to 300 μg of uranium per litre. The water was consumed during normal daytime activities while food was also ingested at its normal rate. Complete collections of urine and faeces were made and compounded on a daily basis over a period of two weeks, one week being prior to the consumption of the uranium-containing water. Uranium was measured by radiochemical separation followed by alpha spectrometry. Both 234 U and 238 U were determined. The results on these people showed that the uptake of uranium under these conditions averaged 0.6%, well below the f 1 of 5% assumed by the ICRP. (author)

  18. Recovering and recycling uranium used for production of molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-12-12

    A processes for recycling uranium that has been used for the production of molybdenum-99 involves irradiating a solution of uranium suitable for forming fission products including molybdenum-99, conditioning the irradiated solution to one suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina. Another process involves irradiation of a solid target comprising uranium, forming an acidic solution from the irradiated target suitable for inducing the formation of crystals of uranyl nitrate hydrates, then forming the crystals and a supernatant and then separating the crystals from the supernatant, thus using the crystals as a source of uranium for recycle. Molybdenum-99 is recovered from the supernatant using an adsorbent such as alumina.

  19. South African uranium resources - 1997 assessment methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainslie, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    The first commercial uranium production in South Africa started in 1953 to meet the demand for British/US nuclear weapons. This early production reached its peak in 1959 and began to decline with the reduced demand. The world oil crisis in the 1970s sparked a second resurgence of increased uranium production that peaked in 1980 to over 6,000 tonnes. Poor market condition allied with increasing political isolation resulted in uranium production declining to less than a third of the levels achieved in the early 1980s. South Africa is well endowed with uranium resource. Its uranium resources in the RAR and EAR-I categories, extractable at costs of less than $80/kg U, as of 1 January 1997, are estimated to 284 400 tonnes U. Nearly two thirds of these resources are associated with the gold deposits in the Witwatersrand conglomerates. Most of the remaining resources occur in the Karoo sandstone and coal deposits. (author)

  20. Recovery of uranium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi; Taki, Tomihiro

    1988-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate by conventional process is generally uneconomic, except that uranium is recovered as a by-product. If an economical process by which uranium is recovered efficiently as a chief product is discovered, uraniferous phosphate will be used effectively as uranium ore. By using chiorination which will be expected to be favorable in comparison with conventional process, the recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate has been carried out. The paper describes the reaction machanism and general characteristics of the uranium chiorination, and the research done so for. (author)

  1. A preliminary discussion on the environment of uranium metallogenesis is Kangdian axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yiyue.

    1990-01-01

    According to the history of the crustal evolution of kangdian (West Sichuan-Yunnan) axis and uranium geochemical features, a discussion on the environment of uranium metallogenesis in kangdian axis is made. It is suggested that there are some advantageous geological environments and good conditions as well as some disadvantageous factors for uranium deposit. So the second phase of uranium exploration in kangdian axis must be based on strengthening investigation on basic geology and choosing the favourable section by various metallogenetic theories about uranium deposit

  2. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  3. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  4. Recovery of uranium from phosphatic rock and its derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Guzman, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    The recovery of uranium present in the manufacture process of phosphoric acid and fertilizers has been one interesting field of study in chemistry. It is true that the recovery of uranium it is not very attractive from the commercial point of view, however the phosphatic fertilizers have an important amount of uranium which comes from the starting materials (phosphatic rock), therefore there must be many tons of uranium that are dispersed in the environmental together with the fertilizers used in agriculture every year. They are utilized for the enrichment of the nutrients which are exhausted in the soil. In this work, uranium was identified and quantified in the phosphatic rocks and in inorganic fertilizers using Gamma Spectroscopy, Neutron Activation Analysis, UV/Visible Spectrophotometry, Alpha Spectroscopy. On the other hand, it was done a correlation of the behaviour of uranium with inorganic elements present in the samples such as phosphorus, calcium and iron; which were determined by UV/Visible Spectrophotometry for phosphorus and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for calcium and iron. The quantity of uranium found in the phosphatic rock, phosphoric acid and fertilizers was considerable (70-200 ppm). The adequate conditions for the recovery of 40% of total of uranium from the phosphatic rock with the addition of leaching solutions were stablished. (Author)

  5. Biosorption of uranium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU: Characterization and comparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Faison, B.D.; Reeves, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium (as UO 2 2+ and/or its cationic hydroxo complexes) was characterized with respect to its sorptive activity. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa CSU was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ . Thus, a two-state process in which iron and uranium are removed in consecutive steps was proposed for efficient use of the biomass as a biosorbent in uranium removal from mine wastewater, especially acidic leachates

  6. Oxidation of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orman, S.

    1976-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of uranium in oxygen, water and water + oxygen mixtures is compared and contrasted. A considerable amount of work, much of it conflicting, has been published on the U + H 2 O and U + H 2 O + O 2 systems. An attempt has been made to summarise this data and to explain the reasons for the lack of agreement between the experimental results. The evidence for the mechanism involving OH - ion diffusion as the reacting entity in both the U + H 2 O and U + O 2 + H 2 O reactions is advanced. The more limited corrosion data on some lean uranium alloys and on some higher addition alloys referred to as stainless materials is summarised together with some previously unreported results obtained with these materials at AWRE. The data indicates that in the absence of oxygen the lean alloys behave in a similar manner to uranium and evolve hydrogen in approximately theoretical quantities. But the stainless alloys absorb most of the product hydrogen and assessments of reactivity based on hydrogen evolution would be very inaccurate. The direction that future corrosion work on these materials should take is recommended

  7. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Ams, David; Richmann, M.K.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  8. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  9. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  10. Thermoluminescence applied to uranium exploration and genesis of the Westmoreland uranium deposits - implications for the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochman, M.B.M.; Ypma, P.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Westmoreland uranium deposits occur on the northern flank of the Murphy Tectonic Ridge in the upper member of the Westmoreland Conglomerate. Uranium mineralisation is spatially associated with the contact of the overlying basaltic Siegal Volcanics and the margins of intrusive dolerite dykes which are geochemically similar to the Siegal Volcanics. Thermoluminescence measurements on 800 samples from within the orebodies and surrounding host rock have indicated that all of the Westmoreland Conglomerate has suffered major radiation damage attributable to at least 10 ppm uranium over 10 9 years. The underlying rhyolitic Mid Proterozoic Cliffdale Volcanics have distinctive TL glow curves indicative of radiation sensitisation caused by high uranium contents. These volcanics are part of the Mid Proterozoic volcanic event known to be enriched in uranium. The Westmoreland Conglomerate has been derived by erosion of the uranium-rich Cliffdale Volcanics and associated Nicholson Granite Complex which makes it likely that the Westmoreland Conglomerate had a high inherent uranium content. It is proposed that this precontained uranium within the Westmoreland Conglomerate was remobilized in a convective cell system possibly triggered by intrusion of dolerite dykes, or by a later rejuvenation of vertical structures which provided an ascending heat flow. Pitchblende was precipitated where suitable reducing conditions existed close to the basic volcanics and dykes

  11. Uranium Supply Strategy of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shangxiong; Zhang Decun; Zhang Yi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: With the rapid development of nuclear power in the next few years, uranium demand will increase accordingly. Overseas uranium development will be the major channel to meet the future requirement of NPP demand in China.

  12. Collect method of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, S.C.; Bustillos, O.W.V.

    1991-01-01

    A collect method of uranium hexafluoride was designed, constructed and assembled in Analytical Laboratory from Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil. This method of collect is main for quality control of uranium hexafluoride. (author)

  13. The case against uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robotham, F.P.

    1980-01-01

    Australia is a potential uranium supplier. The case against uranium mining is presented. Biological effects of radiation, risks involved in reactor operation and the problems of waste disposal are discussed

  14. Uranium hexafluoride handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF 6 from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride

  15. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, S.; Reades, D.W.; Cherry, J.A.; Chambers, D.B.; Case, G.G.; Ibbotson, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  16. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Uranium resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power-generating capacity will continue to expand, albeit at a slower pace than during the past fifteen years. This expansion must be matched by an adequately increasing supply of uranium. This report compares uranium supply and demand data in free market countries with the nuclear industry's natural uranium requirements up to the year 2000. It also reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production in 46 countries

  18. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  19. Uranium. Resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The events characterising the world uranium market in the last several years illustrate the persistent uncertainly faced by uranium producers and consumers worldwide. With world nuclear capacity expanding and uranium production satisfying only about 60 per cent of demand, uranium stockpiles continue to be depleted at a high rate. The uncertainty related to the remaining levels of world uranium stockpiles and to the amount of surplus defence material that will be entering the market makes it difficult to determine when a closer balance between uranium supply and demand will be reached. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand until well into the next century. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost reference on uranium. This world report is based on official information from 59 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1997. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States, including the first-ever official reports on uranium production in Estonia, Mongolia, the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and worldwide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply

  20. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.I.; Davis, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    World-class sandstone-type uranium deposits are defined as epigenetic concentrations of uranium minerals occurring as uneven impregnations and minor massive replacements primarily in fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic sandstone formations. The main purpose of this introductory paper is to define, classify, and introduce to the general geologic setting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

  1. Yeguang granite and uranium metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Wenshu

    1988-03-01

    The geological, petrologic and geochemical characteristics of rock body of yeguang granite are discussed with emphasis on clarification of occurrence of uranium in rock body and uranium deposit characteristics related to rock body, based on extensive field observations and laboratory test. View points are presented that granite refers to genetic series of terrestial crust transformation tye and uranium deposit is hot water deposit

  2. Uranium industry in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikipelov, B.V.; Chernov, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A brief historical account of the Soviet production of natural and enriched uranium is given. The geological and geographical location of major uranium deposits are mentioned. The processing of natural ores including in-situ leaching (ISL) is also briefly described. Gas centrifuges play a large part in uranium enrichment. The role of Techsnabexport for the export of nuclear materials is explained

  3. Uranium content of Philippine coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Rosa, A.M.; Sombrito, E.Z.; Nuguid, Z.S.; Bulos, A.M.; Bucoy, B.M.; De la Cruz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium content of coal samples from seven areas in the Philippines, i.e. Cebu, Semirara, Bislig, Albay, Samar, Malangas and Polilio Is. was found to contain trace quantities of uranium. The mean value of 0.401 ppm U is lower than reported mean uranium contents for coal from other countries. (ELC)

  4. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  5. Treatment of radioactive wastes from uranium concentrating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtari, Parviz.

    1995-06-01

    Radioactive wastes from uranium and thorium ore processing pose potential environmental and public health problems because of their radioactivity and chemical composition. The radionuclides exist in these wastes are those resulting from the uranium 238, uranium 235 and thorium 232 decay series. The most important radionuclide in U 238 decay series are uranium 234, thorium 230, radium 226 and some short lived radionuclides such as radon-222. Radium 226 is the nuclide of principal concern from the standpoint of the assessment and control of the radiological hazard associated with the wastes. Thus determination of uranium, thorium and radium concentration in wastes resulting from nuclear fuel cycle is very important because of its potential hazard. Various analytical methods such as fluorimetry, neutron activation analysis, radon emanation, spectrophotometry and spectroscopy are used for determination of these radionuclides. Uranium and thorium are separated from interfering element by ion exchange chromatography and measured by spectrophotometry method using arsenazo III and thorin as indicator. Radium is separated from interfering elements and α-emitters by coprecipitation of radium barium sulphate and measured by counting α-particles with surface barrier detector. Regarding to physical and chemical characteristic of waste being investigated, decontamination factors and treatment methods, chemical precipitation and coprecipitation procedure were carried out in this research work. By adding barium chloride, radium is separated from liquid waste and optimum condition were determined. Precipitation with lime and sodium-hydroxide were also studied and good result were obtained. The results show that by neutralization of waste by lime and sodium hydroxide more than 99.9% of activity was removed from stream. Advantage and disadvantage of each methods were studied and finally, effluent resulted from treatment were discharged after analysis with γ-spectroscopy and

  6. Redox behaviour of uranium with iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ithurbide, A.

    2009-10-01

    An option investigated for the management of long-term nuclear waste is a repository in deep geological formations. It is generally admitted that the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel in the geosphere could occur several thousand years after the beginning of the storage. Therefore, to assess the safety of the long-term disposal, it is important to consider the phenomena that can reduce the migration, and in particular the migration of uranium. The aim of this work is to study if siderite, an iron compound present both in the near - and far -field, can limit this migration as well as the role played by the redox process. Siderite thin layers have been obtained by electrochemistry. The layers are adherent and homogeneous. Their thickness is about 1 μm and they are composed of spherical grains. Analytical characterizations performed show that siderite is free of any impurity and does not exhibit any trace of oxidation. The interactions between siderite and uranium (VI) have been carried out in solutions considered as representative of environmental waters, in terms of pH and carbonate concentration. The retention of uranium on the thin layer is important since, after 24 hours of interaction, it corresponds to retention capacities of several hundreds of uranium micro-moles per gram of siderite. XPS analysis show that, in any studied condition, part of uranium present on the thin layer is reduced into an over stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The process of interaction differs depending on the considered environment, specially on the stability of siderite. (author)

  7. Protection of uranium by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Koch, P.; Dominget, R.; Darras, R.

    1968-01-01

    A study is made of the possibilities of inhibiting or limiting, by means of protective metallic coatings, the oxidation of uranium by carbon dioxide at high temperature. In general, surface films containing intermetallic compounds or solid solutions of uranium with aluminium, zirconium, copper, niobium, nickel or chromium are formed, according to the techniques employed which are described here. The processes most to be recommended are those of direct diffusion starting from a thin sheet or tube, of vacuum deposition, or of immersion in a molten bath of suitable composition. The conditions for preparing these coatings have been optimized as a function of the protective effect obtained in carbon dioxide at 450 or at 500 C. Only the aluminium and zirconium based coatings are really satisfactory since they can lead to a reduction by a factor of 5 to 10 in the oxidation rate of uranium in the conditions considered; they make it possible in particular to avoid or to reduce to a very large extent the liberation of powdered oxide. Furthermore, the coatings produced generally give the uranium good protection against atmospheric corrosion. (author) [fr

  8. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance.

  9. Uranium remediation using modified Vigna radiata waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, Hafiza; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Sadaf, Sana; Iqbal, Munawar

    2017-01-01

    Present study was designed to explore the possibility of Vigna radiata biomass for recovery of uranium ions. Various fundamental process parameters i.e., pH, contact time, temperature and initial uranium ions concentration were optimized and maximum uranium removal (230 mg/g) was achieved at pH 4, biosorbent dose 0.05 g, contact time 60 min contact time and temperature 40 °C using 400 mg/L uranium ions concentration. The biomass was also pre-treated by different physical and chemical pretreatments to check out their effect on the adsorption capacity. Different kinetic and equilibrium models were applied to the experimental data to understand the uranium adsorption mechanism. Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetic model explained well the adsorption of uranium ions onto Vigna radiata biomass. The biomass physical and chemical pretreatments significantly affected the uranium adsorption and CH 3 COOH 0.15 M solution found out to be efficient for de-sorption. FT-IR analysis of native and loaded biomass confirmed the involvement of carbonyl and hydroxyl groups in the uranium adsorption process. The results outcome revealed that Vigna radiata biomass can be used for uranium adsorption in view of low cost and high adsorption efficiency. - Highlights: • Uranium (U) adsorption was carried out using modified low cast V. radiata biomass. • At optimized conditions, up to 230 mg/g U adsorption was achieved. • CH 3 COOH solution found out to be efficient for U recovery. • FT-IR study confirmed the involvement of carbonyl and hydroxyl in U adsorption. • Modified V. radiata biomass could be used as for the adsorption of radioactive metal adsorption.

  10. Uranium deposits of Zaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitmut, D.; Malu wa Kalenga

    1979-01-01

    Since April 1960, following the closing of the Shinkolobwe mine, the Republic of Zaire has ceased to be a producer of uranium. Nevertheless, Gecamines (Generale des carrieres et mines du Zaire), a wholly state-owned company, is continuing its research on uranium occurrences which have been discovered in its concession in the course of aerial radiometric prospecting. The most recent campaign was the one carried out in 1969 and 1972 by Hunting Company. On-the-ground verification of these shows has not yet resulted in the discovery of a workable deposit. There are other sectors cutting across Zaire which might well contain uranium deposits: this is true of the sedimentary phosphates of the region of Lower Zaire as well as of the frontier region between Zaire and the Central African Empire. However, no detailed exploration work has yet been carried out. (author)

  11. Process for recovering uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  12. The Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production

  13. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Under the combined effect of various factors, such as interrogations related to facing the climatic changes, the increasing prices of oil versus announced decrease of its resources, the major geopolitical evolution and the remarkable development of Asia, we live nowadays a revival of nuclear power in the very front of stage. In tis context, the following question is posed: could the nuclear fission be a sustainable source of energy when taking into consideration the availability of uranium resources? The article aims at pinpointing the knowledge we have about the world uranium resources, their limits of uncertainty and the relation between knowledge resources and market evolution. To conclude, some susceptible tracks are proposed to improve the using process of uranium resources particularly in softening the impact of high prices

  14. Australian uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; Miezitis, Y.; McKay, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Australia's uranium resources amount to 29% of the WOCA countries (world outside centrally-planned-economies areas) low-cost Reasonably Assured Resources and 28% of the WOCA countries low-cost Estimated Additional Resources. As at 1 January 1986, the Bureau of Mineral Resources estimated Australia's uranium resources as: (1) Cost range to US$80/kg U -Reasonably Assured Resources, 465 000 t U; Estimated Additional Resources, 256 000 t U; (2) Cost range US$80-130/kg U -Reasonably Assured Resources, 56 000 t U; Estimated Additional Resources, 127 000 t U. Most resources are contained in Proterozoic unconformity-related deposits in the Alligator Rivers uranium field in the Northern Territory (Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek deposits) and the Proterozoic stratabound deposit at Olympic Dam on the Stuart Shelf in South Australia

  15. Uranium exploration in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severne, B.; Penaherrera, P.F.; Fiallos, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    The 600-km segment of the Andean Cordillera in Ecuador includes zones that can be correlated, geologically, with uranium districts elsewhere in the Andes. It is believed that these essentially unexplored zones have the potential for economic uranium mineralization. Exploration activity to date has been limited, although it has involved both geochemical and radiometric techniques to evaluate geological concepts. Minor uranium occurrences (with chemical analyses up to 100 ppm) have been encountered, which provide further incentive to commence large-scale systematic exploration. It is recognized that a very large exploration budget and considerable technical expertise will be required to ensure exploration success. Consequently, participation by groups of proven capability from other countries will be sought for Ecuador's national exploration programme. (author)

  16. Uranium Enrichment, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    This general presentation on uranium enrichment will be followed by lectures on more specific topics including descriptions of enrichment processes and assessments of the prevailing commercial and industrial situations. I shall therefore avoid as much as possible duplications with these other lectures, and rather dwell on: some theoretical aspects of enrichment in general, underlying the differences between statistical and selective processes, a review and comparison between enrichment processes, remarks of general order regarding applications, the proliferation potential of enrichment. It is noteworthy that enrichment: may occur twice in the LWR fuel cycle: first by enriching natural uranium, second by reenriching uranium recovered from reprocessing, must meet LWR requirements, and in particular higher assays required by high burn up fuel elements, bears on the structure of the entire front part of the fuel cycle, namely in the conversion/reconversion steps only involving UF 6 for the moment. (author). tabs., figs., 4 refs

  17. Uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In 1983 the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) and the IAEA jointly published a book on Uranium Extraction Technology. A primary objective of this report was to document the significant technological developments that took place during the 1970s. The purpose of this present publication is to update and expand the original book. It includes background information about the principle of the unit operations used in uranium ore processing and summarizes the current state of the art. The publication also seeks to preserve the technology and the operating 'know-how' developed over the past ten years. This publication is one of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing that have been prepared by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management at the IAEA. A complete list of these reports is included as an addendum. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  19. Discussion for management of ventilation system in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianjie; Ren Jianjun; Hu Penghua

    2014-01-01

    Radon exhaustion and ventilation are surely regarded as key links for safety production and radiation protection in underground uranium mines, and the crucial point to achieve safety production goals lies in timely and accurately adjusting and controlling of ventilation technical measures and ventilation system management with the changing operation conditions of mines. This paper proposes corresponding countermeasures based on the respectively systematical analysis of daily ventilation management, ventilation facilities and structures management, and ventilation system information management in uranium mines. Furthermore, standardized management approaches and suggestions are put forward to realize standardization of uranium mines' ventilation management and radon exhaustion technique. (authors)

  20. Protein Hydrogel Microbeads for Selective Uranium Mining from Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Songzi; Yang, Zhongguang; Sun, Fei

    2017-01-25

    Practical methods for oceanic uranium extraction have yet to be developed in order to tap into the vast uranium reserve in the ocean as an alternative energy. Here we present a protein hydrogel system containing a network of recently engineered super uranyl binding proteins (SUPs) that is assembled through thiol-maleimide click chemistry under mild conditions. Monodisperse SUP hydrogel microbeads fabricated by a microfluidic device further enable uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) enrichment from natural seawater with great efficiency (enrichment index, K = 2.5 × 10 3 ) and selectivity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using protein hydrogels to extract uranium from the ocean.

  1. Metallization of uranium oxide powders by lithium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. S.; Seo, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments on the reduction of uranium oxide powders into metal by lithium were performed in order to determine the equipment setup and optimum operation conditions. The method of filtration using the porous magnesia filter was introduced to recover uranium metal powders produced. Based on the laboratory scale experimental results, mock-up scale (20 kg U/batch) metallizer was designed and made. The applicability to the metallization process was estimated with respect to the thermal stability of the porous magnesia filter in the high temperature molten salt, the filtration of the fine uranium metal powders, and the operability of the equipment

  2. Uranium 2000 : International symposium on the process metallurgy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozberk, E.; Oliver, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The International Symposium on the Process Metallurgy of Uranium has been organized as the thirtieth annual meeting of the Hydrometallurgy Section of the Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM). This meeting is jointly organized with the Canadian Mineral Processors Division of CIM. The proceedings are a collection of papers from fifteen countries covering the latest research, development, industrial practices and regulatory issues in uranium processing, providing a concise description of the state of this industry. Topics include: uranium industry overview; current milling operations; in-situ uranium mines and processing plants; uranium recovery and further processing; uranium leaching; uranium operations effluent water treatment; tailings disposal, water treatment and decommissioning; mine decommissioning; and international regulations and decommissioning. (author)

  3. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.; Randall, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  4. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  5. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  6. Uranium ore dressing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floter, W.; Schoning, G.; Landsiedel, K.

    1982-01-01

    A process for dressing uranium ore containing water-soluble substances is claimed. In a mixture of crushed ore and water the solid material and water are partly separated. The first fraction, which contains the smaller grain-size portion of the solid material and the major part of the water is passed through a water softening means for removal of undesired ions. The second fraction, which contains the coarser grain-size portion of the solid material and most of the solids of the first fraction from which undesired ions have been at least partly removed is leached. The liquid is processed to obtain the dissolved uranium compounds

  7. Uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelelli, Victorio.

    1984-01-01

    The main uranium deposits and occurrences in the Argentine Republic are described, considering, in principle, their geologic setting, the kind of 'model' of the mineralization and its possible origin, and describing the ore species present in each case. The main uraniferous accumulations of the country include the models of 'sandstong type', veintype and impregnation type. There are also other kinds of accumulations, as in calcrete, etc. The main uranium production has been registered in the provinces of Mendoza, Salta, La Rioja, Chubut, Cordoba and San Luis. In each case, the minerals present are mentioned, having been recognized 37 different species all over the country (M.E.L.) [es

  8. Uranium exploration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (genetic description of some uranium deposits; typical concentrations of uranium in the natural environment); sedimentary host rocks (sandstones; tabular deposits; roll-front deposits; black shales); metamorphic host rocks (exploration techniques); geologic techniques (alteration features in sandstones; favourable features in metamorphic rocks); geophysical techniques (radiometric surveys; surface vehicle methods; airborne methods; input surveys); geochemical techniques (hydrogeochemistry; petrogeochemistry; stream sediment geochemistry; pedogeochemistry; emanometry; biogeochemistry); geochemical model for roll-front deposits; geologic model for vein-like deposits. (U.K.)

  9. Uranium conversion wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, R.; Dellamano, J.C.

    1989-12-01

    A set of mathematical equations was developed and used to estimate the radiological significance of each radionuclide potentially present in the uranium refining industry effluents. The equations described the evolution in time of the radionuclides activities in the uranium fuel cycle, from mining and milling, through the yellowcake, till the conversion effluents. Some radionuclides that are not usually monitored in conversion effluents (e.g. Pa-231 and Ac-227) were found to be potentially relevant from the radiological point of view in conversion facilities, and are certainly relevant in mining and milling industry, at least in a few waste streams. (author) [pt

  10. Joining uranium to steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1976-05-01

    A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected

  11. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used

  12. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry. 1984 viability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the second annual assessment of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry's resource capability, supply response capability, financial capability, and import commitment dependency. The data and analysis in support of this assessment and the report itself have been developed pursuant to requirements set forth in Section 23(b) of Public Law 97-415, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Authorization Act, which was enacted on January 4, 1983. The report provides information on recent uranium supply, demand, and marketing conditions and projections of the domestic uranium industry's ability to continue to supply the needs of the domestic nuclear power industry through the year 2000. Industry capability is assessed under a variety of assumed conditions with respect to hypothetical disruptions of uranium imports

  13. Domestic uranium mining and milling industry: 1986 viability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the fourth annual assessment of the domestic uranium mining and milling industry's resource capability, supply response capability, financial capability, and import commitment dependency. The data and analysis in support of this assessment and the report itself have been developed pursuant to Public Law 97-415, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Authorization Act of 1982. The report provides information on recent uranium supply, demand, and marketing conditions, as well as projections of the domestic uranium industry's ability to continue to supply the needs of the domestic nuclear power industry through the year 2000. Industry capability is assessed under a variety of assumed conditions with respect to hypothetical disruptions of uranium imports. 13 refs., 26 figs., 37 tabs

  14. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    . Heathgate Pty. Ltd. proposes to develop an in situ leach mining operation at the Beverley deposit with capacity to produce 900 tpa U 3 O 8 , commencing in the year 2000. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Commonwealth Government policies on uranium mining have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 5867 t U 3 O 8 (for 1996) to approximately 12,700 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  15. The uranium market 1980 - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmayan, Philippe

    1980-01-01

    The Supply and Demand Committee of the Uranium Institute was established to monitor continuously information and developments bearing on the uranium market and to publish from time to time reports giving its views on the supply and demand outlook. The last Uranium institute supply and demand report was published in July 1979 and a summary was given by Mr. Erkes at the last Uranium Institute symposium. Its main conclusions were that from 1979 to 1990 the flexibilities of the market were such as to offer adequate scope to producers and consumers of uranium to ensure a balance between supply and demand. Is that conclusion still valid one and a half years later [fr

  16. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  17. Fault rocks and uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Hangshou.

    1991-01-01

    The types of fault rocks, microstructural characteristics of fault tectonite and their relationship with uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area are discussed. According to the synthetic analysis on nature of stress, extent of crack and microstructural characteristics of fault rocks, they can be classified into five groups and sixteen subgroups. The author especially emphasizes the control of cataclasite group and fault breccia group over uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area. It is considered that more effective study should be made on the macrostructure and microstructure of fault rocks. It is of an important practical significance in uranium exploration

  18. International training course on uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barretto, P.M.C.

    1978-01-01

    Full text: As part of its Technical Assistance Programme for developing countries, the IAEA has conducted a series of training courses in prospecting for nuclear raw materials for example, in 1974 a regional course on uranium and thorium prospecting was held in India, and an interregional training course on uranium geochemical prospecting methods was held in Austria in 1975. In September 1977, another interregional training course on uranium geochemical prospecting methods was held at Skofja Loka, Slovenia, Yugoslavia. Twenty-four delegates from Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Czechoslovakia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Venezuela and Yugoslavia participated in the four-week training course. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia acted as host for the course. The Skofja Loka area was selected because it contains sedimentary rocks with known uranium mineralization, and presented ideal conditions (soil, drainage and topography) for Uranium geochemical surveys. In addition, the participants could benefit from a technical visit to a very interesting type of uranium mineralization near the town of Gorenje Vaz. Several well-known geologists, such as Dr. A. Grimbert (France) and Prof. Ian Nichol (Canada) were present as guest lecturers. In the first week the lectures dealt with the basic concepts of geochemical exploration for uranium, as well as preparing the participants for the field work. In addition to specific topics on geochemistry and uranium behaviour in the natural environment, the lectures also covered other topics of interest, such as world uranium resources and demand, types of uranium deposits and technical advances in exploration equipment. A visit to the Zirovski Vrh uranium mine was made, where the participants saw different techniques for mining ore bodies with complex structure and rapid change in grade concentration. At the end of the mine tour, there was a lengthy discussion of

  19. Recovery of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Takagi, Norio; Katoh, Shunsaku

    1995-01-01

    Present status of the development of chelating adsorbents for the recovery of uranium from seawater is outlined with emphasis on the research by the author. Uranium is estimated to exist as stable tri (carbonate) uranylate (6) ion in seawater in a very low concentration. The adsorbent for uranium from seawater in a very low concentration. The adsorbent for uranium from seawater should have high selectivity and affinity for uranium around pH 8. The required characteristics for uranium adsorbent are examined. Various chelating adsorbents have been proposed for the uranium adsorbent and their structures are discussed. Amidoxime type adsorbents have the highest adsorbing power for uranium among the adsorbents hitherto developed and fibrous amidoxime adsorbents are most promising for the practical application. Synthesis, structure and suitable shape of the amidoxime adsorbents are discussed. Uranium adsorption behavior and the amount of saturated adsorption are examined theoretically based on the complexation of an amidoxime monomer and the formula for the adsorption equiliburium is derived. The adsorption and recovery process for uranium from seawater is composed of adsorption, desorption, separation and concentration and finally, uranium is recovered as the yellow cake. A floating body mooring system is proposed by Nobukawa. (T.H.)

  20. Types of hydrogenic uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Lisitsin, A.K.; Komarova, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of uranium deposit systematics are considered. Systematization, presented in this paper, is based on a regularity that the main industrial exogenic epigenetic uranium concentrations are formed in zones of reduction geochemical barriers. Types of uranium-bearing ground waters and nature of uranium reducing agents were taken into account during systematization. Hydrogenic uranium deposits are related to 3 types: formed by ground (1 type), stratal (2 type) and vein (3 type) waters. By the nature of uranium reducing agents 2 deposit subtypes are marked out: A - in rocks with syngenetic reducing agents, B - in rocks with epigenetic reducing agents. Uranium deposits are also differentiated by nature of reducing agents distribution in ore-containing rocks [ru

  1. Investigation of uranium molecular species using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curreli, Davide [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    2017-07-12

    The goal of this project is to investigate the dynamic evolution of uranium oxide (UOx) molecular species in a rapidly cooling low-temperature plasma using a coupled experimental and modeling approach. Our purpose is to develop quantitative constraints on the UOx phase chemistry under physical conditions similar to that of a nuclear fireball at the time of debris condensation. This work is motivated by a need to better understand the factors controlling uranium chemical fractionation in post-detonation nuclear debris.

  2. Examination of long-stored uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gate, A.M.; Hambley, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    A small quantity of unirradiated uranium from Magnox fuel elements is currently held in archive storage. Some of these samples date back to the late fifties. This material has been stored, untreated, in unsealed containers in air at ambient temperature, humidity and pressure conditions. Such conditions are relevant to those that may exist in a passive storage facility. A sample of this material has been subject to optical, electron-optical and Raman spectroscopic examination to determine the extent of corrosion and the composition of corrosion product arising from long-term, low-temperature oxidation of uranium metal in air. The examinations have established that, even after a period in excess of 40 years, there was no observable spalling of uranium oxide from the sample during storage. The extent of oxidation of the metal, derived by SEM analysis, was slight and insignificant in relation to overall structural stability of the material. Raman spectroscopy data showed that the bulk of the oxide layer was comprised of hyper-stoichiometric UO 2 , with U 4 O 9 being the dominant component. The oxygen/uranium ratio was observed to be decreased at the metal/oxide interface, with a very thin layer that consisted of mainly UO 2 at the metal surface. At the oxide/air interface, a very thin U 3 O 8 layer was detected. U 4 O 9 is relatively mechanically stable, due to a significantly higher density than UO 2 and U 3 O 8 . It is likely that the lower internal stresses in the thick U 4 O 9 layer have resulted in less oxide film cracking than would be expected from UO 2 or U 3 O 8 and hence the low oxidation rate observed. These results suggest that storage of uranium metal in air over decades is a safe and credible option. (authors)

  3. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  4. Uranium mineralizations in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, Ch.; Gerbeaud, O.; James, O.; Le Goux, F.; Pouradier, A.; Salabert, J.; Wagani, I.; Breton, G.; Feybesse, J.L.; Parize, O.; Wattinne, A.; Flotte, N.; Brouand, M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the analysis of mineralizations located in the Tim Mersoi basin in Niger where sediments deposited between the Paleozoic and the Cretaceous era. They analyse and describe the tectonic evolution of this area during different periods, and focus on some specific uranium mineralisation sites

  5. Method to extract uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, A.J.; Hollemann, R.A.; Lyon, W.L.; Randell, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The invented method to clean the commercial wet-method phosphoric acid - as pretreatment stage in the recovery of uranium - can be carried out at low capital and operational costs and requires little maintenance. In order to recover 0.2 g uranium which are contained in 1 litre of phosphoric acid solution obtained from the wet process, the solution is firstly largely cleared and cleaned. A cleaning agent, essentially of hydrocarbon with a boiling point between 150 and 300 0 C, reacts with the remaining slurry-forming impurities in the acid and enables these to be separated off in a solvent-extraction mixer separator with the slurry. Kerosine is used as cleaning agent in wet-process phosphoric acid with humus impurities. The same process can also be used with oxidation or reduction extraction separation methods to obtain uranium from industrial crude wet phosphoric acid solutions. Comparing a flow sheet each of a known method of separating uranium and the new one as according to the invention, one can see the attained simplification and probable cost reduction. (RW) [de

  6. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This agreement between the Commonwealth of Australia, Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited, and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission sets out articles under which the Ranger uranium project in the Northern Territory of Australia is to be operated

  7. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Details of alterations to the Atomic Energy Act 1953 are described which authorize the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., and Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited to carry out uranium mining operations in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory of Australia

  8. Uranium extraction from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koske, P.H.; Ohlrogge, K.; Denzinger, H.

    1982-01-01

    Besides basic considerations about the problem of Uranium extraction from seawater system studies on process engineering and marine technology approaches are presented. In addition the present and future developments in the Federal Republic of Germany are discussed in somewhat more detail. (orig.) [de

  9. Uranium and nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This seminar focussed on the major issues affecting the future of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. In particular it covered issues bearing on the formation of public policy in relation to the use of uranium as an energy source: economic risk, industrial risks, health effects, site selection, environmental issues, and public acceptance

  10. Geophysics in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnley, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    There are no revolutionary new methods of uranium exploration on the horizon. Continuing improvements in existing methods and types of instrumentation are to be expected, but the main scope of improvement will hinge upon using the best of the available methods more meticulously and systematically, and paying more attention to the analysis of data. (author)

  11. Hydrometallurgic treatment of a mineral containing uranium, vanadium and phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echenique, Patricia; Fruchtenicht, Fernando; Gil, Daniel; Vigo, Daniel; Bouza, Angel; Vert, Gabriela; Becquart, Elena

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary study of a mineral has been made towards the hydrometallurgy separation of uranium, vanadium and phosphorus. After the ore dressing, work on sulfuric acid with oxidation leaching has been made, to get the uranium, vanadium and phosphorus in solution. For the separation and purification of these elements, two alternative solvent extraction methods have been tested. One of them has been the extraction of uranium and vanadium and a selective stripping of both elements. The second one has been the selective extraction of uranium and vanadium at different aqueous solutions pH. In both methods, the same reagent has been used: di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid, kerosene as diluent with two different synergistic agents: TOPO (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) and TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate). Batch studies have been made to determine the equilibrium isotherms for uranium and vanadium. A continuous countercurrent simulation method has been used to get the best phase ratio and to test different stripping agents. For the first method, an important loss of uranium and vanadium at the feed solution conditioning for the extraction step has been observed. For the second method, a good recovery of uranium has been reached, but there has been losses of vanadium in pH adjustment. Nevertheless, among these processes, the last seems to work better in this mineral hydrometallurgy. (Author) [es

  12. Sorption of uranium on rocks in anaerobic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakanen, M.

    1992-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains substantial amounts of long lived isotopes of actinoide elements, the most abundant of which is the oxide from uranium in the fuel matrix. The behaviour of uranium, also present in small concentrations in natural rocks and waters, is redox sensitive. The concentration controlling mechanisms in groundwaters of uranium are not well-known. In this work a series of laboratory experiments was made to study the redox and sorption behaviour of uranium under anaerobic conditions. The experiments indicated that a part of uranium(VI) was reduced to uranium(IV). The sorbed uranium was of mixed oxidation states. The redox potential of water was not an appropriate indicator of the U(IV)/U(VI) ratio. Spiking of the water with the U(IV) was followed by very strong sorption. The derived lower limit (conservative) and the realistic mass distribution ratios (R d ) for U(IV) are 0.7 m 3 /kg and 3.5 m 3 /kg. (orig.)

  13. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  14. Uranium extraction from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A. A.; Eltayeb, M. A. H.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out mainly to extract uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba mountains near Abu Gibiha town in southern Kurdufan state. For this purpose first, the phosphate ore samples were decomposed with sulphuric acid. the resulting phosphoric acid was filtered off, and pretreated with pyrite and activated charcoal. the chemical analysis of the obtained grain phosphoric acid showed that about 98% of uranium content of the phosphate ore was rendered soluble in the phosphoric acid. The clear green phosphoric acid was introduced to uranium extraction by 25% tributylphosphate (Tbp) in kerosene. The effect of several factors on the extraction and stripping processes namely, interference's effect, the suitable strip solution, the required number of extraction and stripping stages, the optimum phase ratio have been studied in details. A three stage extraction at a phase ratio (aqueous/organic) of 1:2, followed by two stages stripping using 0.5 M sodium carbonate solution at a phase ratio (A/O) of 1:4 were found to be the optimum conditions to report more than 98% of uranium content in green phosphoric acid to the aqueous phase as uranyl tricarbonate complex (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- . By applying sodica decomposition upon the stripping carbonate solution using 50% sodium hydroxide, about 98% of uranium content was precipitated as sodium diuranate concentrate (Na 2 U 2 O 7 ). The chemical analysis using atomic absorption spectrometry (Aas) showed a good agreement between the specification of the obtained uranium concentrate with the standard commercial specification of sodium diuranate concentrate. Further purification was achieved for the yellow cake by selective precipitation of uranium from the solution as uranium peroxide (UO 4 .2H 2 O) using 30% hydrogen peroxide. Finally the uranium peroxide precipitated was calcined at 450 degree C to obtain the orange powder uranium trioxide (UO 3 ). The chemical analysis of the final uranium trioxide

  15. REDUKSI AKTIVITAS URANIUM DALAM LIMBAH RADIOAKTIF CAIR MENGGUNAKAN PROSES ELEKTROKOAGULASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayitno Prayitno

    2017-01-01

    activity decrease in waste water which is produced in the electrolysis process is conducted with voltage variations, the dwelling time, electrode spacing, and the waste inlet pH. The waste that will be treated has uranium contaminant levels of 500 mg/L. The experiment was conducted by a batch system with aluminum electrodes. Parameters affecting electrocoagulation process, such as voltage, time, distance electrode, and the pH have been studied and the best voltage optimization condition has been obtained of 12.50 V, a distance of 1 cm, pH 7, and in the processing time of 60 minutes efficiency of 97.20 % was obtained. Keywords: electrocoagulation, reduction of uranium waste, voltage, aluminium.

  16. Biosorption of uranium with Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakubu, N.A.; Dudeney, A.W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers interactions of uranium with the microfilamentous fungus Aspergillus niger grown as pellets 4 mm in diameter for column application. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, a range of physical measurements, and a derived mechanistic model, indicated that a simple ion exchange process predominates in which uranyl cations reversibly replace protons on the amino acid groups of proteins and glycoproteins within the cell wall structure. Under the conditions employed uranium adsorbed onto A. niger (CMI 296409) some fourteen times more efficiently at pH 4 than onto the ion exchange resin IRA-400, and was readily desorbed at pH 1. The fungus had inferior selectivity and wet volume/dry weight ratio. Uranium was adsorbed semi-continuously by heat-killed A. niger pellets fluidised in a compartmentalised column. When operated with an intermittent countercurrent flow of the biomass, uranium concentrations of 100 g/m 3 and 5 g/m 3 at pH 4 could be reduced to less than 10 g/m 3 and 1 g/m 3 , respectively. (author)

  17. Sweetwater Uranium Project. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Minerals Exploration Company for the construction and operation of the proposed Sweetwater Uranium Mill with a nominal capacity of 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day of uranium ore in Wyoming. The applicant proposes also to construct a heap-leaching and resin ion-exchange facility to extract uranium from low-grade ores and mine water. Impacts to the area due to the operation of the Sweetwater Uranium Mine/Mill Project will result in: Alternations of up to 2200 acres by the mill, mine pit area, and roads, and about 3450 acres of Battle Spring Flat to be inundated by mine dewatering operations; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Rawlins and other nearby areas; and tailings from the mill will be produced at a rate of about 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day and will be stored onsite in a lined impoundment. Conditions for the issuance of the license are given

  18. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlendsson, G.; Jensen, J.; Kofoed, S.; Paulsen, J.L.

    1983-11-01

    The draft uranium project ''Kvanefjeld'' describes the establishment and operation of an industrial plant for exploiting the uranium deposit at Kvanefjeld. The draft project is part of the overall pre-feasibility project and is based on its results. The draft project includes two alternative locations for the processing plant and the tailings deposit plant. The ore reserve is estimated at 56 million tons with an average content of 365 PPM. The mine will be established as an open pit, with a slope angle of 55deg. Conventional techniques are used in drilling, blasting and handling the ore. Waste rock with no uranium content will be disposed of in two ponds near the mine. The waste rock volume is estimated at 80 million tons. A processing plant for extracting uranium from the ore will be established. The technical layout of the plant is based on the extraction experiments performed at Risoe from 1981-83. Yearly capacity is 4.2 million tons of ore. Electrical energy will be supplied from a hydroelectric station to be built at Johan Dahl Land. Thermal energy (steam/heat) will be supplied from a coal-fired district heating plant to be built in connection with the processing plant. Expected power consumption is estimated at 225 GWh/year. Heat consumption is of the same order. In the third year the plant is expected to operate at full capacity. Operating costs will be Dkr. 121/ton of ore from years 1 through 7. Consumption of chemicals will be reduced from the 7th year, and operating costs will consequently drop to Dkr. 115/ton of ore. Calculations show that industrial extraction of the uranium deposit in Kvanefjeld is economically advantageous. In addition, the economy of the project is expected to improve by extracting byproducts from the ore. (EG)

  19. Uranium from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  20. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  1. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  2. Australia's Uranium and thorium resources and their global significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.; Miezitis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Australia's world-leading uranium endowment appears to result from the emplacement of uranium enriched felsic igneous rocks in three major periods during the geological evolution of the continent. Australia has over 27% of the world's total reasonably assured uranium resources (RAR) recoverable at < US$80/kgU (which approximates recent uranium spot prices). Olympic Dam is the largest known uranium deposit, containing approximately 19% of global RAR (and over 40% of global inferred resources) recoverable at < US$80/kg U; the uranium is present at low concentrations and the viability of its recovery is underpinned by co-production of copper and gold. Most of Australia's other identified resources are within Ranger, Jabiluka, Koongarra, Kintyre and Yeelirrie, the last four of which are not currently accessible for mining. In 2004, Australia's three operating uranium mines - Ranger, Olympic Dam, and Beverley -produced 22% of global production. Canada was the only country to produce more uranium (29%) and Kazakhstan (9%) ranked third. Considerably increased uranium production has been recently foreshadowed from Australia (through developing a large open pit at Olympic Dam), Canada (mainly through opening of the Cigar Lake mine), and Kazakhstan (developing several new in situ leach mines). These increases should go a long way towards satisfying demand from about 2010. Olympic Dam has sufficient resources to sustain such increased production over many decades. Thorium is expected to be used in some future generations of nuclear reactors. Australia also has major (but incompletely quantified) resources of this commodity, mainly in heavy mineral sands deposits and associated with alkaline igneous rocks. It is inevitable that the international community will be looking increasingly to Australia to sustain its vital role in providing fuels for future nuclear power generation, given its world-leading identified resources, considerable potential for new

  3. Recovery of uranium from uranium bearing black shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amrita; Yadav, Manoj; Singh, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Black shale is the unconventional resource of uranium. Recovery of uranium from black shale has been carried out by the following steps: i) size reduction, ii) leaching of uranium in the aqueous medium, iii) fluoride ion removal, iv) solvent extraction of uranium from the aqueous leach solution, v) scrubbing of the loaded solvent after extraction to remove impurities as much as possible and vi) stripping of uranium from the loaded organic into the aqueous phase. Leaching of black shale has been carried out in hydrochloric acid. Free acidity of the leach solution has been determined by potentiometric titration method. Removal of fluoride ions has been done using sodium chloride. Solvent extraction has been carried out by both tributyl phosphate and alamine-336 as extractants. Scrubbing has been tried with oxalic acid and sulphuric acid. Stripping with sodium carbonate solution has been carried out. Overall recovery of uranium is 95%. (author)

  4. Radiation-induced synthesis of PAN and its amidoximation to produce beads for uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Krishan Kant; Shah, Chetan; Dwivedi, Charu; Kumar, Manmohan; Bajaj, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Microporous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, containing the amidoximated polyacrylonitrile sorbent, were synthesized for extraction of uranium. The kinetic measurement showed that about 120 minutes of equilibration time was enough to extract saturation amount of uranium from aqueous solution. The polymeric beads exhibited optimum extraction at 20 deg C and at neutral or near neutral pH conditions. The loaded uranium could also be leached out from the beads, by treating with dilute acids. (author)

  5. Application of ion-exchange unit in uranium extraction process in China (to be continued)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Chuanwen

    2004-01-01

    The application conditions of five different ion exchange units in uranium milling plant and wastewater treatment plant of uranium mine in China are introduced, including working parameters, existing problems and improvements. The advantages and disadvantages of these units are reviewed briefly. The procedure points to be followed in selecting ion exchange unit are recommended in the engineering design. The primary views are presented upon the application prospects of some ion exchange units in uranium extraction process in China

  6. Study on direct determination of uranium and efficient equilibrium factor by gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunkui

    1990-01-01

    The test principle, test set and surveying methods for conducting gamma-ray spectrometry on conveyer are presented. The conversion coefficient of the spectrometer has been found by using duallinear regression analysis of uranium and radon and their higher and lower bands of gamma-ray spectra. The efficient equilibrium factor can be quickly determined, and the direct determination of uranium in the non-equilibrium condition of uranium and radium can be made

  7. Solubilities of uranium for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.; Ahonen, L.

    1998-11-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the uranium solubilities in the reference waters of TILA-99. The behaviour of uranium has been discussed separately in the near-field and far-field conditions. The bentonite/groundwater interactions have been considered in the compositions of the fresh and saline near-field reference waters. The far-field groundwaters' compositions include fresh, brackish, saline and very saline, almost brine-type compositions. The pH and redox conditions, as the main parameters affecting the solubilities, are considered. A literature study was made in order to obtain information on the recent dissolution and leaching experiments of UO 2 and spent fuel. The latest literature includes studies on UO 2 solubility under anoxic conditions, in which the methods for simulating the reducing conditions of deep groundwater have been improved. Studies on natural uraninite and its alteration products give a valuable insight into the long-term behaviour of spent fuel. Also the solubility equilibria for some relevant poorly known uranium minerals have been determined. The solubilities of the selected solubility-limiting phases were calculated using the geochemical code, EQ3/6. The NEA database for uranium was the basis for the modelling. The recently extended and updated SR '97 database was used for comparison. The solubility products for uranophane were taken from the latest literature. The recommended values for solubilities were given after a comparison between the calculated solubilities, experimental information and measured concentrations in natural groundwaters. The experiments include several UO 2 dissolution studies in synthetic groundwaters with compositions close to the reference groundwaters. (author)

  8. Effects of ammonium on uranium partitioning and kaolinite mineral dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Hilary P; Di Pietro, Silvina; Katsenovich, Yelena; Szecsody, Jim

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia gas injection is a promising technique for the remediation of uranium within the vadose zone. It can be used to manipulate the pH of a system and cause co-precipitation processes that are expected to remove uranium from the aqueous phase and decrease leaching from the solid phase. The work presented in this paper explores the effects of ammonium and sodium hydroxide on the partitioning of uranium and dissolution of the kaolinite mineral in simplified synthetic groundwaters using equilibrium batch sorption and sequential extraction experiments. It shows that there is a significant increase in uranium removal in systems with divalent cations present in the aqueous phase but not in sodium chloride synthetic groundwaters. Further, the initial conditions of the aqueous phase do not affect the dissolution of kaolinite. However, the type of base treatment does have an effect on mineral dissolution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A new method for alkaline dissolution of uranium metal foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, A.V.; Wilkinson, M.V.; Manzini, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop a production process of 99 Mo by fission of low-enriched uranium, the first purification step, which consists of dissolution of a uranium metal foil target, was studied. It was found that alkaline NaClO gave good results, reaching the dissolution of up to 300 μm of uranium foil. The different conditions for the dissolution were studied and the optimum ones were found. The influence of NaClO and NaOH concentration, temperature, dissolving solution volume per unit of surface and dissolution time were investigated. During this step, a gas identified as H 2 , was generated, and a precipitate characterized as Na 2 U 2 O 7 was observed. A stoichiometric reaction for this uranium dissolution is proposed. (author)

  10. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  11. The recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    Phosphoric acid is an important alternative source of uranium: the world's reserves of phosphoric rock are estimated to be about 18,000 million tonnes and there are approximately 400 wet-process phosphoric acid plants in operation from which some 13,000 metric tonnes of U 3 O 8 could in principle be recovered each year. The recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is a proven technology that is being used commercially, albeit on a limited scale because currently prevailing market conditions make it marginally economic. Nevertheless, many developing countries are interested in the recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid for use in their own nuclear power programmes. Several important reasons, such as assurance of supply, savings in foreign currency, acquisition of technology and generation of employment, may render this operation attractive in spite of the marginal economics. In view of the interest shown by several Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened an Advisory Group Meeting on the Recovery of Uranium from Phosphoric Acid from 16 to 19 March 1987 with the main objectives of reviewing the current status of the technology and to suggest guidelines for the application of existing processes in developing countries. This document includes a Summary and Recommendations, followed by two review papers which discuss the current status of the technology and industrial practice of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid. Other papers discuss operating experience and current research and development work. Two Panel Discussions are also included, one on capital and operating costs and the other on guidelines for the preparation of feasibility studies. Refs, Figs and tabs

  12. Uranium and Thorium precipitation from solution of slag II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutia Anggraini; Budi Sarono; Sugeng Waluyo; Rusydi; Sujono

    2015-01-01

    Tin smelting process produces waste in the form of large amount of slag II. Slag II still consist of major elements such as 0.0619% uranium, 0.530% thorium, 0.179% P 2 O 5 and 6.194% RE total oxide. Based on that fact, the processing of slag II is interesting to be researched, particularly in separating uranium and thorium which contained in slag II. Uranium and thorium dissolved using acid reagent (H 2 SO 4 ). Percentage recovery of uranium, thorium, phosphate and RE oxides by dissolution method are 98.52%, 83.16%, 97.22%, and 69.62% respectively. Dissolved uranium, thorium, phosphate, and RE were each precipitated. The factors which considerable affect the precipitation process are reagent, pH, temperature, and time. NH 4 OH is used as precipitation reagent, optimum condition are pH 4. Temperature and time reaction did not influence this reaction. Percentage recovery of this precipitation process at optimum condition are 93.84% uranium and 84.33% thorium. (author)

  13. Linking bacterial diversity and geochemistry of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kelly; Zholi, Alma; Frabutt, Dylan; Flood, Matthew; Floyd, Dalton; Tiquia, Sonia M

    2012-01-01

    To understand the link between bacterial diversity and geochemistry in uranium-contaminated groundwater, microbial communities were assessed based on clone libraries of 16S rDNA genes from the USDOE Oak Ridge Field Research Centre (FRC) site. Four groundwater wells (GW835, GW836, FW113-47 and FW215-49) with a wide range of pH (3 to 7), nitrate (44 to 23,400 mg L(-1)), uranium (0.73 to 60.36 mg L(-1)) and other metal contamination, were investigated. Results indicated that bacterial diversity correlated with the geochemistry of the groundwater. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. The highly contaminated well (FW113-47) had lower gene diversity than less contaminated wells (FW215-49, GW835 and GW836). The high concentrations of contaminants present in well FW113-47 stimulated the growth of organisms capable of reducing uranium (Shewanella and Pseudomonas), nitrate (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter and Xanthomonas) and iron (Stenotrophomonas), and which were unique to this well. The clone libraries consisted primarily of sequences closely related to the phylum Proteobacteria, with FW-113-47 almost exclusively containing this phylum. Metal-reducing bacteria were present in all four wells, which may suggest that there is potential for successful bioremediation of the groundwater at the Oak Ridge FRC. The microbial community information gained from this study and previous studies at the site can be used to develop predictive multivariate and geographical information system (GIS) based models for microbial populations at the Oak Ridge FRC. This will allow for a better understanding of what organisms are likely to occur where and when, based on geochemistry, and how these organisms relate to bioremediation processes at the site.

  14. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, Kirk [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  15. Optimization of uranium leach mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schecter, R.S.; Bommer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of well pattern and well spacing on uranium recovery and oxidant utilization are considered. As expected, formation permeability heterogeneities and anisotropies are found to be important issues requiring careful consideration; however, it also is shown that the oxidant efficiency and the produced uranium solution concentrations are sensitive to the presence of other minerals competing with uranium for oxidant. If the Damkohler number for competing minerals, which measures the speed of the reaction, exceeds that for uranium, the competing mineral will have to be oxidized completely to recover a large proportion of the uranium. If the Damkohler number is smaller, it may be possible to achieve considerable selectivity for uranium by adjusting the well spacing. 9 refs

  16. Yellowcake: the international uranium cartel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.H.; Yokell, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    The dramatic events that occurred in the uranium market between 1972 and 1976, and their repercussions is discussed. In particular, the book concentrates on the international uranium cartel's attempt to fix yellowcake prices. The background of the yellowcake industry is discussed in Part I of the book, and the demand for uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle isdiscussed, along with a brief anecdotal history of the uranium industry. Part II describes the political conflicts in Australia which led to the public exposure of the uranium cartel and the situation in the world uranium market that led to the cartel's formation. The legal repercussions of the cartel's exposure are discussed in Part III, and in Part IV, the authors reflect on the ramifications of the events described in the book and some of the issues they raise

  17. World uranium production in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time since the political and economic opening of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, world uranium production actually increased in 1995. Preliminary estimates for 1996 continue this trend, indicating additional (if slight) production increases over 1995 levels. Natural uranium production increased by about 5% in 1995 to 34,218 tons uranium or 89 Mlbs U3O8. This is an increase of approximately 1700 tons of uranium or 4.3 Mlbs of U3O8 over the updated 1994 quantities. Data is presented for each of the major uranium producing countries, for each of the world's largest uranium mines, for each of the world's largest corporate producers, and for major regions of the world

  18. Promotion of uranium enrichment business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurushima, Morihiro

    1981-01-01

    The Committee on Nuclear Power has studied on the basic nuclear power policy, establishing its five subcommittees, entrusted by the Ministry of Nternational Trade and Industry. The results of examination by the subcommittee on uranium enrichment business are given along with a report in this connection by the Committee. In order to establish the nuclear fuel cycle, the aspect of uranium enrichment is essential. The uranium enrichment by centrifugal process has proceeded steadily in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The following matters are described: the need for domestic uranium enrichment, the outlook for overseas enrichment services and the schedule for establishing domestic enrichment business, the current state of technology development, the position of the prototype enrichment plant, the course to be taken to establish enrichment business the main organization operating the prototype and commercial plants, the system of supplying centrifuges, the domestic conversion of natural uranium the subsidies for uranium enrichment business. (J.P.N.)

  19. Recovery of uranium from lignites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium in raw lignite is associated with the organic matter and is readily soluble in acid (and carbonate) solutions. However, beneficiation techniques were not successful for concentrating the uranium or removing part of the reagent-consuming materials. Once the lignite was heated, the uranium became much less soluble in both acid and carbonate solutions, and complete removal of carbon was required to convert it back to a soluble form. Proper burning improves acid-leaching efficiency; that is, it reduces the reagent consumption and concentrates the uranium, thereby reducing plant size for comparable uranium throughput, and it eliminates organic fouling of leach liquors. Restrictions are necessary during burning to prevent the uranium from becoming refractory. The most encouraging results were obtained by flash-burning lignite at 1200 to 1300 0 C and utilizing the released SO 2 to supplement the acid requirement. The major acid consumers were aluminum and iron

  20. Aluminum titanate crucible for molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    An improved crucible for molten uranium is described. The crucible or crucible liner is formed of aluminum titanate which essentially eliminates contamination of uranium and uranium alloys during molten states thereof. (U.S.)