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Sample records for metal-organic chemical vapor

  1. Half-sandwich cobalt complexes in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgi, Colin [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Hapke, Marko; Thiel, Indre [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. an der Universität Rostock (LIKAT), Albert-Einstein-Straße 29a, Rostock 18059 (Germany); Hildebrandt, Alexander [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E. [Fraunhofer Institute of Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Technologie-Campus 3, Chemnitz 09126 (Germany); Technische Universität Chemnitz, Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Chemnitz 09107 (Germany); Lang, Heinrich, E-mail: heinrich.lang@chemie.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Faculty of Natural Science, Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Chemnitz 09107 (Germany)

    2015-03-02

    A series of cobalt half-sandwich complexes of type [Co(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(L)(L′)] (1: L, L′ = 1,5-hexadiene; 2: L = P(OEt){sub 3}, L′ = H{sub 2}C=CHSiMe{sub 3}; 3: L = L′ = P(OEt){sub 3}) has been studied regarding their physical properties such as the vapor pressure, decomposition temperature and applicability within the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, with a focus of the influence of the phosphite ligands. It could be shown that an increasing number of P(OEt){sub 3} ligands increases the vapor pressure and thermal stability of the respective organometallic compound. Complex 3 appeared to be a promising MOCVD precursor with a high vapor pressure and hence was deposited onto Si/SiO{sub 2} (100 nm) substrates. The resulting reflective layer is closed, dense and homogeneous, with a slightly granulated surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies demonstrated the formation of metallic cobalt, cobalt phosphate, cobalt oxide and cobalt carbide. - Highlights: • Thermal studies and vapor pressure measurements of cobalt half-sandwich complexes was carried out. • Chemical vapor deposition with cobalt half-sandwich complexes is reported. • The use of Co-phosphites results in significant phosphorous-doped metallic layers.

  2. Two level undercut-profile substrate-based filamentary coated conductors produced using metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea R.; Sundaram, Aarthi; Hazelton, Drew W.

    2018-01-01

    of a filamentary CC produced in an industrial setup by SuperPower Inc. using ion beam assisted deposition and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (IBAD-MOCVD) on a 2LUPS substrate realized at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), whereas previous studies discussed the fabrication using alternating beam...

  3. Epitaxial Oxide Thin Films Grown by Solid Source Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zihong

    1995-01-01

    The conventional liquid source metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique is capable of producing large area, high quality, single crystal semiconductor films. However, the growth of complex oxide films by this method has been hampered by a lack of suitable source materials. While chemists have been actively searching for new source materials, the research work reported here has demonstrated the successful application of solid metal-organic sources (based on tetramethylheptanedionate) to the growth of high quality thin films of binary compound cerium dioxide (CeO_2), and two more complex materials, the ternary compound lithium niobate (LiNbO_3), with two cations, and the quaternary compound strontium barium niobate (SBN), with three cations. The growth of CeO_2 thin films on (1012)Al_2O_3 substrates has been used as a model to study the general growth behavior of oxides. Factors affecting deposition rate, surface morphology, out-of-plane mosaic structure, and film orientation have been carefully investigated. A kinetic model based on gas phase prereaction is proposed to account for the substrate temperature dependence of film orientation found in this system. Atomically smooth, single crystal quality cerium dioxide thin films have been obtained. Superconducting YBCO films sputtered on top of solid source MOCVD grown thin cerium dioxide buffer layers on sapphire have been shown to have physical properties as good as those of YBCO films grown on single crystal MgO substrates. The thin film growth of LiNbO_3 and Sr_{1-x}Ba _{x}Nb_2 O_6 (SBN) was more complex and challenging. Phase purity, transparency, in-plane orientation, and the ferroelectric polarity of LiNbO _3 films grown on sapphire substrates was investigated. The first optical quality, MOCVD grown LiNbO _3 films, having waveguiding losses of less than 2 dB/cm, were prepared. An important aspect of the SBN film growth studies involved finding a suitable single crystal substrate material. Mg

  4. Tuning of electrical and structural properties of indium oxide films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ch.Y.; Cimalla, V.; Romanus, H.; Kups, Th.; Niebelschuetz, M.; Ambacher, O.

    2007-01-01

    Tuning of structural and electrical properties of indium oxide (In 2 O 3 ) films by means of metal organic chemical vapor deposition is demonstrated. Phase selective growth of rhombohedral In 2 O 3 (0001) and body-centered cubic In 2 O 3 (001) polytypes on (0001) sapphire substrates was obtained by adjusting the substrate temperature and trimethylindium flow rate. The specific resistance of the as-grown films can be tuned by about two orders of magnitude by varying the growth conditions

  5. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition enabling all-solid-state Li-ion microbatteries:a short review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C; Eichel, R-A; Notten, PHL Peter

    2017-01-01

    For powering small-sized electronic devices, all-solid-state Li-ion batteries are the most promising candidates due to its safety and allowing miniaturization. Thin film deposition methods can be used for building new all-solid-state architectures. Well-known deposition methods are sputter deposition, pulsed laser deposition, sol-gel deposition, atomic layer deposition, etc. This review summarizes thin film storage materials deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for all...

  6. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  7. InAs/GaSb core-shell nanowires grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xianghai; Yang, Xiaoguang; Du, Wenna; Pan, Huayong; Luo, Shuai; Ji, Haiming; Xu, Hongqi; Yang, Tao

    2017-06-01

    We report the growth of InAs/GaSb core-shell heterostructure nanowires with smooth sidewalls on Si substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with no assistance from foreign catalysts. Sb adatoms were observed to strongly influence the morphology of the GaSb shell. In particular, Ga droplets form on the nanowire tips when a relatively low TMSb flow rate is used, whereas the droplets are missing and the radial growth of the GaSb is enhanced due to a reduction in the diffusion length of the Ga adatoms when the TMSb flow rate is increased. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed that the GaSb shell coherently grew on the InAs core without any misfit dislocations.

  8. Nanoscale leakage current measurements in metal organic chemical vapor deposition crystalline SrTiO3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozier, Y.; Gautier, B.; Hyvert, G.; Descamps, A.; Plossu, C.; Dubourdieu, C.; Ducroquet, F.

    2009-01-01

    The properties of SrTiO 3 thin films, grown by liquid injection metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si/SiO 2 , using a mixture of precursors, have been investigated at the nanoscale using an Atomic Force Microscope in the so-called Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy mode. Maps of the leakage currents with a nanometric resolution have been obtained on films elaborated at different temperatures and stoichiometries in order to discriminate the role of each parameter on the onset of leakage currents in the resulting layers. It appears that the higher the deposition temperature, the higher the leakage currents of the films. The mapping with a nanometric precision allows to show a heterogeneous behaviour of the surface with leaky grains and insulating boundaries. The study of films elaborated at the same temperature with different compositions supports the assumption that the leakage currents on Ti-rich layers are far higher than on Sr-rich layers

  9. Nanoscale leakage current measurements in metal organic chemical vapor deposition crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozier, Y. [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnology (INL), CNRS-UMR5270, INSA Lyon, 7 avenue Capelle, 69621 VILLEURBANNE Cedex (France); Gautier, B. [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnology (INL), CNRS-UMR5270, INSA Lyon, 7 avenue Capelle, 69621 VILLEURBANNE Cedex (France)], E-mail: bgautier@insa-lyon.fr; Hyvert, G.; Descamps, A.; Plossu, C. [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnology (INL), CNRS-UMR5270, INSA Lyon, 7 avenue Capelle, 69621 VILLEURBANNE Cedex (France); Dubourdieu, C. [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique (LMGP), CNRS, INPG, 3 parvis L. Neel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Ducroquet, F. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique (IMEP), 3, rue Parvis Louis Neel BP 257, 38016 GRENOBLE Cedex 1 (France)

    2009-01-30

    The properties of SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, grown by liquid injection metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si/SiO{sub 2}, using a mixture of precursors, have been investigated at the nanoscale using an Atomic Force Microscope in the so-called Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy mode. Maps of the leakage currents with a nanometric resolution have been obtained on films elaborated at different temperatures and stoichiometries in order to discriminate the role of each parameter on the onset of leakage currents in the resulting layers. It appears that the higher the deposition temperature, the higher the leakage currents of the films. The mapping with a nanometric precision allows to show a heterogeneous behaviour of the surface with leaky grains and insulating boundaries. The study of films elaborated at the same temperature with different compositions supports the assumption that the leakage currents on Ti-rich layers are far higher than on Sr-rich layers.

  10. Fabrication of single-phase ε-GaSe films on Si(100) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Zeng, Jia-Xian; Lan, Shan-Ming; Uen, Wu-Yih; Liao, Sen-Mao; Yang, Tsun-Neng; Ma, Wei-Yang; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Single-phase ε-gallium selenide (GaSe) films were fabricated on Si(100) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition using dual-source precursors: triethylgallium (TEG) and hydrogen selenide (H 2 Se) with the flow ratio of [H 2 Se]/[TEG] being maintained at 1.2. In particular, an arsine (AsH 3 ) flow was introduced to the Si substrate before the film deposition to induce an arsenic (As)-passivation effect on the substrate. The crystalline structure of GaSe films prepared was analyzed using X-ray diffraction and the surface morphology of them was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the film quality could be improved by the As-passivation effect. The optical properties of the films were studied by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. PL spectra obtained with different distributions and intensities favored for resolving the superior material quality of the films produced on the substrate with As-passivation compared to those produced on the substrate without As-passivation. The former was dominated by the excitonic emissions for the whole temperature range of 20–300 K examined, while the latter was initially dominated by the defect-related emission at 1.907 eV for a low-temperature range ≦ 80 K and then became dominated by the weak excitonic emission band instead. The ε modification of GaSe films prepared was further recognized by the Raman scattering measurements conducted at room temperature. - Highlights: • Gallium selenide (GaSe) layered structures are fabricated on Si(100) substrate. • Metal–organic chemical vapor deposition is used for film fabrication. • Arsenic-passivation effects of Si substrate on the GaSe film quality are analyzed. • Photoluminescence measurements of GaSe polycrystals are reported

  11. Influences of ultrathin amorphous buffer layers on GaAs/Si grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Zhuo; Yang, Zeyuan; Yin, Haiying; Fan, Yibing; Ma, Xing; Huang, Yongqing; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a technique for the growth of GaAs epilayers on Si, combining an ultrathin amorphous Si buffer layer and a three-step growth method, has been developed to achieve high crystalline quality for monolithic integration. The influences of the combined technique for the crystalline quality of GaAs on Si are researched in this article. The crystalline quality of GaAs epilayer on Si with the combined technique is investigated by scanning electron microscopy, double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), photoluminescence, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. By means of this technique, a 1.8-µm-thick high-quality GaAs/Si epilayer was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The full-width at half-maximum of the DCXRD rocking curve in the (400) reflection obtained from the GaAs/Si epilayers is about 163 arcsec. Compared with only using three-step growth method, the current technique reduces etch pit density from 3 × 106 cm-2 to 1.5 × 105 cm-2. The results demonstrate that the combined technique is an effective approach for reducing dislocation density in GaAs epilayers on Si.

  12. Effects of deposition temperature and ammonia flow on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Beechem, Thomas; Ohta, Taisuke; Spataru, Catalin; Figiel, Jeffrey; Smith, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The use of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition at high temperature is investigated as a means to produce epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at the wafer scale. Several categories of hBN films were found to exist based upon precursor flows and deposition temperature. Low, intermediate, and high NH3 flow regimes were found to lead to fundamentally different deposition behaviors. The low NH3 flow regimes yielded discolored films of boron sub-nitride. The intermediate NH3 flow regime yielded stoichiometric films that could be deposited as thick films. The high NH3 flow regime yielded self-limited deposition with thicknesses limited to a few mono-layers. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism is proposed to explain the onset of self-limited behavior for the high NH3 flow regime. Photoluminescence characterization determined that the intermediate and high NH3 flow regimes could be further divided into low and high temperature behaviors with a boundary at 1500 °C. Films deposited with both high NH3 flow and high temperature exhibited room temperature free exciton emission at 210 nm and 215.9 nm.

  13. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on Germanium Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on germanium substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Effects of growth temperature and InAs coverage on the size, density, and height of quantum dots were investigated. Growth temperature was varied from 400 to 450 °C and InAs coverage was varied between 1.40 and 2.35 monolayers (MLs. The surface morphology and structural characteristics of the quantum dots analyzed by atomic force microscope revealed that the density of the InAs quantum dots first increased and then decreased with the amount of InAs coverage; whereas density decreased with increase in growth temperature. It was observed that the size and height of InAs quantum dots increased with increase in both temperature and InAs coverage. The density of QDs was effectively controlled by growth temperature and InAs coverage on GaAs buffer layer.

  14. Behavior and impact of sulfur incorporation in Zinc Oxysulfide alloy grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingrui; Tang, Kun; Mao, Haoyuan; Ye, Jiandong; Zhu, Shunming; Xu, Zhonghua; Yao, Zhengrong; Gu, Shulin; Zheng, Youdou

    2018-03-01

    Highly mismatched ZnO1-xSx:N alloy films with various x were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by a near-equilibrium method, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The sulfur concentration in the films could be tuned by changing the flow rate of H2S during the growth process. The films that could maintain single phase have an upper limit for x ∼ 0.15, which is smaller than the x values obtained from other non-equilibrium-grown samples (x ∼ 0.23). When x > 0.15, phases other than the wurtzite ZnO (W-ZnO) one appeared. Those phases were ascribed to the sulfur-diluted W-ZnO like phase, low x W-ZnO like phase, and high x W-ZnS like phase. The S contents in different phase has been determined by using Vegard's law and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the compositional dependence of the bandgap energy in the ZnO1-xSx alloyed material has been investigated and studied comparing with other reported results. The dispersed bowing parameter b and the mechanism of the phase separation in samples grown by both the near-equilibrium method and the non-equilibrium one have also been discussed based on the difference of the atomic radius and electronegativity of the oxygen and sulfur atoms. Furthermore, the Raman and photoluminescence spectra have shown that the sulfur incorporation may suppress zinc interstitials related defects, while the oxygen vacancies related defects may be easily formed at the same time. These results indicate that ZnO1-xSx films could be beneficial to the realization of p-type doping in ZnO, although no obvious p-type characteristic has been attained in the work yet.

  15. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  16. Influence of vicinal sapphire substrate on the properties of N-polar GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhiyu; Zhang, Jincheng, E-mail: jchzhang@xidian.edu.cn; Xu, Shengrui; Chen, Zhibin; Yang, Shuangyong; Tian, Kun; Hao, Yue [Key Lab of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China); Su, Xujun [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Shi, Xuefang [School of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-08-25

    The influence of vicinal sapphire substrates on the growth of N-polar GaN films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition is investigated. Smooth GaN films without hexagonal surface feature are obtained on vicinal substrate. Transmission electron microscope results reveal that basal-plane stacking faults are formed in GaN on vicinal substrate, leading to a reduction in threading dislocation density. Furthermore, it has been found that there is a weaker yellow luminescence in GaN on vicinal substrate than that on (0001) substrate, which might be explained by the different trends of the carbon impurity incorporation.

  17. High-voltage vertical GaN Schottky diode enabled by low-carbon metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Chu, R.; Li, R.; Chen, M.; Chang, R.; Hughes, B.

    2016-02-01

    Vertical GaN Schottky barrier diode (SBD) structures were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on free-standing GaN substrates. The carbon doping effect on SBD performance was studied by adjusting the growth conditions and spanning the carbon doping concentration between ≤3 × 1015 cm-3 and 3 × 1019 cm-3. Using the optimized growth conditions that resulted in the lowest carbon incorporation, a vertical GaN SBD with a 6-μm drift layer was fabricated. A low turn-on voltage of 0.77 V with a breakdown voltage over 800 V was obtained from the device.

  18. An evaluation of absorption spectroscopy to monitor YBa2Cu3O7-x precursors for metal organics chemical vapor deposition processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Edward Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was evaluated as a technique to monitor the metal organics chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process for forming YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconducting coated conductors. Specifically, this study analyzed the feasibility of using absorption spectroscopy to monitor the MOCVD supply vapor concentrations of the organic ligand 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (TMHD) metal chelates of barium, copper, and yttrium. Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 compounds have successfully been vaporized in the MOCVD processing technique to form high temperature superconducting ''coated conductors,'' a promising technology for wire fabrication. The absorption study of the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors was conducted in the ultraviolet wavelength region from 200nm to 400nm. To simulate the MOCVD precursor flows the Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 complexes were vaporized at vacuum pressures of (0.03--10)Torr. Spectral absorption scans of each precursor were conducted to examine potential measurement wavelengths for determining vapor concentrations of each precursor via Beer's law. The experimental results show that under vacuum conditions the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors begin to vaporize between 90 C and 135 C, which are considerably lower vaporization temperatures than atmospheric thermal gravimetric analyses indicate. Additionally, complete vaporization of the copper and yttrium (TMHD) precursors occurred during rapid heating at temperatures between 145 C and 195 C and after heating at constant temperatures between 90 C and 125 C for approximately one hour, whereas the Ba(TMHD) 2 precursor did not completely vaporize. At constant temperatures, near constant vaporization levels for each precursor were observed for extended periods of time. Detailed spectroscopic scans at stable vaporization conditions were conducted

  19. Axial heterostructure of Au-catalyzed InGaAs/GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huibo; Li, Lin; Li, Zaijin; Wang, Yong; Qu, Yi; Ma, Xiaohui; Liu, Guojun

    2018-01-01

    Nanowires (NWs) of GaAs and InGaAs/GaAs axial heterostructure are fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) following the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Thin film of Au is coated to generate catalytic droplets and the impact of film thickness on distribution of catalytic droplets is studied. With growth temperature varying, different geometries of GaAs NWs are observed and an assumption has been proposed to explain the phenomenon. InGaAs/GaAs NWs with axial heterostructures are synthesized. Most of InGaAs/GaAs NWs are perpendicular to substrates with cylindrical morphology and distinct heterostructure interface. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) line-scan's been applied to investigate the concentration changes of nanowires, indicating pure axial heterostructures without radial growth.

  20. Epitaxial growth of CdTe thin film on cube-textured Ni by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaire, C.; Rao, S.; Riley, M.; Chen, L.; Goyal, A.; Lee, S.; Bhat, I.; Lu, T.-M.; Wang, G.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Single crystal-like CdTe thin film has been grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on cube-textured Ni(100) substrate. Using X-ray pole figure measurements we observed the epitaxial relationship of {111} CdTe //{001} Ni with [11 ¯ 0] CdTe //[010] Ni and [112 ¯ ] CdTe //[100] Ni . The 12 diffraction peaks in the (111) pole figure of CdTe film and their relative positions with respect to the four peak positions in the (111) pole figure of Ni substrate are consistent with four equivalent orientational domains of CdTe with three to four superlattice match of about 1.6% in the [11 ¯ 0] direction of CdTe and the [010] direction of Ni. The electron backscattered diffraction images show that the CdTe domains are 30° oriented from each other. These high structural quality films may find applications in low cost optoelectronic devices.

  1. Characterization of Pb(Zr, Ti)O sub 3 thin films prepared by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition using a solid delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, J C; Hwang, C S; Kim, H J; Lee, J M

    1999-01-01

    Pb(Zr, Ti)O sub 3 (PZT) thin films were deposited on Pt/SiO sub 2 /Si substrates by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition technique using a solid delivery system to improve the reproducibility of the deposition. The self-regulation mechanism, controlling the Pb-content of the film, was observed to work above a substrate temperature of 620 .deg. C. Even with the self-regulation mechanism, PZT films having low leakage current were obtained only when the molar mixing ratio of the input precursors was 1

  2. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10 7  cm −2 . Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm 2 /V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  3. Fabrication of 100 A class, 1 m long coated conductor tapes by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Lee, H.G.; Li, Y.; Xiong, X.; Qiao, Y.; Reeves, J.; Xie, Y.; Knoll, A.; Lenseth, K

    2003-10-15

    SuperPower has been scaling up YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}-based second-generation superconducting tapes by techniques such as pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using industrial laser and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Both techniques offer advantage of high deposition rates, which is important for high throughput. Using highly-polished substrates produced in a reel-to-reel polishing facility and buffer layers deposited in a pilot ion beam assisted deposition facility, meter-long second-generation high temperature superconductor tapes have been produced. 100 A class, meter-long coated conductor tapes have been reproducibly demonstrated in this work by both MOCVD and PLD. The best results to date are 148 A over 1.06 m by MOCVD and 135 A over 1.1 m by PLD using industrial laser.

  4. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  5. Epitaxial growth of CdTe thin film on cube-textured Ni by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaire, C. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Rao, S. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Riley, M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Chen, L. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Goyal, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak ridge, TN, 37831-6116 (United States); Lee, S. [US Army ARDEC Benet Labs, Watervliet, NY, 12189-4050 (United States); Bhat, I. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Lu, T.-M. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States); Wang, G.-C., E-mail: wangg@rpi.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180-3590 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Single crystal-like CdTe thin film has been grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on cube-textured Ni(100) substrate. Using X-ray pole figure measurements we observed the epitaxial relationship of {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub CdTe}//{l_brace}001{r_brace}{sub Ni} with [11{sup Macron }0]{sub CdTe}//[010]{sub Ni} and [112{sup Macron }] {sub CdTe}//[100]{sub Ni}. The 12 diffraction peaks in the (111) pole figure of CdTe film and their relative positions with respect to the four peak positions in the (111) pole figure of Ni substrate are consistent with four equivalent orientational domains of CdTe with three to four superlattice match of about 1.6% in the [11{sup Macron }0] direction of CdTe and the [010] direction of Ni. The electron backscattered diffraction images show that the CdTe domains are 30 Degree-Sign oriented from each other. These high structural quality films may find applications in low cost optoelectronic devices.

  6. Cu-Al alloy formation by thermal annealing of Cu/Al multilayer films deposited by cyclic metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hock Key; Yoon, Jaehong; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2013-05-01

    One of the most important issues in future Cu-based interconnects is to suppress the resistivity increase in the Cu interconnect line while decreasing the line width below 30 nm. For the purpose of mitigating the resistivity increase in the nanoscale Cu line, alloying Cu with traces of other elements is investigated. The formation of a Cu alloy layer using chemical vapor deposition or electroplating has been rarely studied because of the difficulty in forming Cu alloys with elements such as Al. In this work, Cu-Al alloy films were successfully formed after thermal annealing of Cu/Al multilayers deposited by cyclic metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (C-MOCVD). After the C-MOCVD of Cu/Al multilayers without gas phase reaction between the Cu and Al precursors in the reactor, thermal annealing was used to form Cu-Al alloy films with a small Al content fraction. The resistivity of the alloy films was dependent on the Al precursor delivery time and was lower than that of the aluminum-free Cu film. No presence of intermetallic compounds were detected in the alloy films by X-ray diffraction measurements and transmission electron spectroscopy.

  7. Preparation of silver thin films using liquid-phase precursors by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and their conversion to silver selenide films by selenium vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Jeong, Han-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Seok Hwan; Lee, Seung Soo; Seo, Kook Won; Shim, Il-Wun

    2005-01-01

    A series of new Ag precursors containing β-diketonate and neutral phosphite ligands were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. These volatile precursors in liquid phase were thermally stable and quite useful in the preparation of silver thin films through bubbler-type chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In a typical case of silver (I) 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedionate triethyl phosphite adduct ((tfac)AgP(OEt) 3 ) precursor, very pure silver thin films were obtained under relatively mild conditions without any appreciable amount of F, O, and P impurities. These thin films were easily converted to β-orthorhombic silver selenide by simple selenium vapor deposition method. In scanning electron microscopic analyses, the average particle size of the latter was found to increase to about 1.26 μm after gas-phase selenization reaction

  8. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Vertical GaSb Nanowires on InAs Stems by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xianghai; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Tao

    2017-06-01

    We report the first self-catalyzed growth of high-quality GaSb nanowires on InAs stems using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si (111) substrates. To achieve the growth of vertical InAs/GaSb heterostructure nanowires, the two-step flow rates of the trimethylgallium (TMGa) and trimethylantimony (TMSb) are used. We first use relatively low TMGa and TMSb flow rates to preserve the Ga droplets on the thin InAs stems. Then, the flow rates of TMGa and TMSb are increased to enhance the axial growth rate. Because of the slower radial growth rate of GaSb at higher growth temperature, GaSb nanowires grown at 500 °C exhibit larger diameters than those grown at 520 °C. However, with respect to the axial growth, due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect and the reduction in the droplet supersaturation with increasing growth temperature, GaSb nanowires grown at 500 °C are longer than those grown at 520 °C. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses reveal that the GaSb nanowires have a perfect zinc-blende (ZB) crystal structure. The growth method presented here may be suitable for other antimonide nanowire growth, and the axial InAs/GaSb heterostructure nanowires may have strong potential for use in the fabrication of novel nanowire-based devices and in the study of fundamental quantum physics.

  9. Structural, electrical and optical properties of indium tin oxide thin film grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition with tetramethyltin-precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yi; Chen, Zimin; Tu, Wenbin; Ma, Xuejin; Wang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) is grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using tetramethyltin (TDMASn) as tin precursor. The as-grown ITO films are polycrystalline with (111) and (100) textures. A gradual transition of crystallographic orientation from (111) preferred to (100) preferred is observed as the composition of tin changes. By precisely controlling the Sn doping, the ITO thin films present promising optical and electrical performances at either near-infrared-visible or visible-near-ultraviolet ranges. At low Sn doping level, the as-grown ITO possesses high electron mobility of 48.8 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, which results in high near-infrared transmittance and low resistivity. At higher Sn doping level, high carrier concentration (8.9 × 1020 cm‑3) and low resistivity (3 × 10‑4 Ω cm) are achieved. The transmittance is 97.8, 99.1, and 82.3% at the wavelength of 550, 365, and 320 nm, respectively. The results strongly suggest that MOCVD with TDMASn as tin precursor is an effective method to fabricate high quality ITO thin film for near-infrared, visible light, and near-ultraviolet application.

  10. High-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with nitrogen as nucleation layer carrier gas grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, high-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with sheet resistivity greater than 106 Ω/□ have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD. We have observed that the growth of GaN nucleation layers (NLs under N2 ambient leads to a large full width at half maximum (FWHM of (102 X-ray diffraction (XRD line in the rocking curve about 1576 arc sec. Unintentional carbon incorporation can be observed in the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS measurements. The results demonstrate the self-compensation mechanism is attributed to the increased density of edge-type threading dislocations and carbon impurities. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT grown on the high-resistivity GaN template has also been fabricated, exhibiting a maximum drain current of 478 mA/mm, a peak transconductance of 60.0 mS/mm, an ON/OFF ratio of 0.96×108 and a breakdown voltage of 621 V.

  11. Formation and characterization of the MgO protecting layer deposited by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, M S; Byun, J C; Kim, D S; Choi, C K; Lee, J Y; Kim, K H

    1999-01-01

    MgO films were prepared on Si(100) and soda-lime glass substrates by using plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition. Various ratios of the O sub 2 /CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu gas mixture and various gas flow rates were tested for the film fabrications. Highly (100)-oriented MgO films with good crystallinity were obtained with a 10 sccm CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu flow without an O sub 2 gas flow. About 5 % carbon was contained in all the MgO films. The refractive index and the secondary electron emission coefficient for the best quality film were 1.43 and 0.45, respectively. The sputtering rate was about 0.2 nm/min for 10 sup 1 sup 1 cm sup - sup 3 Ar sup + ion density. Annealing at 500 .deg. C in an Ar ambient promoted the grain size without inducing a phase transition.

  12. Fabrication of high-quality Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Norris, P.

    The great versatility of plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) in its application to the growth of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) has been demonstrated. Single-crystal epitaxial YBCO thin films with sharp superconducting transition temperatures above 89 K and critical current densities greater than 1 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K were formed in-situ by PE-MOCVD at a low substrate temperature of 670 C and a high oxygen partial pressure of 1 Torr. Our results reveal that high-quality YBCO thin films can be formed over an anomalously wide range of film compositions. The high degree of epitaxial crystallinity of the films was confirmed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy which gave a minimum channeling yield of 9%. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the films grew epitaxially with the c axis normal to the substrate surface and atomically abrupt interface.

  13. Enhanced and uniform in-field performance in long (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O tapes with zirconium doping fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvamanickam, V; Guevara, A; Zhang, Y; Kesgin, I; Xie, Y; Carota, G; Chen, Y; Dackow, J; Zhang, Y; Zuev, Y; Cantoni, C; Goyal, A; Coulter, J; Civale, L

    2010-01-01

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I c ) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 μm thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I c in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I c value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO 3 (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of B || c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I c value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  14. Enhanced and uniform in-field performance in long (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O tapes with zirconium doping fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V; Guevara, A; Zhang, Y; Kesgin, I [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77059 (United States); Xie, Y; Carota, G; Chen, Y; Dackow, J [SuperPower Incorporated, 450 Duane Avenue Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Zhang, Y; Zuev, Y; Cantoni, C; Goyal, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Coulter, J; Civale, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I{sub c}) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 {mu}m thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I{sub c} in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I{sub c} value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of B || c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I{sub c} value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  15. Influence of Zr and Ce doping on electromagnetic properties of (Gd,Y)-Ba-Cu-O superconducting tapes fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Chen, Y.; Xie, J.; Zhang, Y.; Guevara, A.; Kesgin, I.; Majkic, G.; Martchevsky, M.

    2009-01-01

    (Gd,Y)Ba 2 Cu 3 O x tapes have been fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Zr-doping levels of 0-15 mol.% and Ce doping levels of 0-10 mol.% in 0.4 μm thick films. The critical current density (J c ) of Zr-doped samples at 77 K, 1 T applied in the orientation of H -parallel c is found to increase with Zr content and shows a maximum at 7.5% Zr doping. The 7.5% Zr-doped sample exhibits a critical current density (J c ) of 0.95 MA/cm 2 at H -parallel c which is more than 70% higher than the J c of the undoped sample. The peak in J c at H -parallel c is 83% of that at H -parallel a-b in the 7.5% Zr-doped sample which is more than twice as that in the undoped sample. Superconducting transition temperature (T c ) values as high as about 89 K have been achieved in samples even with 15% Zr and 10% Ce. Ce-doped samples with and without Ba compensation are found to exhibit substantially different J c values as well as angular dependence characteristics.

  16. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, P., E-mail: pdutta2@central.uh.edu; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P. [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States); Martinez, J. [Materials Evaluation Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77085 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ∼10{sup 7 }cm{sup −2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300 cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  17. Enhanced and Uniform in-Field Performance in Long (Gd,Y)-Ba-Cu-O Tapes with Zirconium Doping Fabricated by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Guevara, A. [University of Houston, Houston; Zhang, Y. [University of Houston, Houston; Kesign, I. [University of Houston, Houston; Xie, Y. Y. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Carota, G. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Chen, Y. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Dackow, J. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Coulter, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I{sub c}) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 {mu}m thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I{sub c} in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I{sub c} value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of {beta} {parallel} c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I{sub c} value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  18. Influence of Zr and Ce doping on electromagnetic properties of (Gd,Y)-Ba-Cu-O superconducting tapes fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V., E-mail: selva@uh.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd., Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Chen, Y.; Xie, J. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Zhang, Y.; Guevara, A.; Kesgin, I.; Majkic, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd., Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Martchevsky, M. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    (Gd,Y)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} tapes have been fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Zr-doping levels of 0-15 mol.% and Ce doping levels of 0-10 mol.% in 0.4 mum thick films. The critical current density (J{sub c}) of Zr-doped samples at 77 K, 1 T applied in the orientation of H -parallel c is found to increase with Zr content and shows a maximum at 7.5% Zr doping. The 7.5% Zr-doped sample exhibits a critical current density (J{sub c}) of 0.95 MA/cm{sup 2} at H -parallel c which is more than 70% higher than the J{sub c} of the undoped sample. The peak in J{sub c} at H -parallel c is 83% of that at H -parallel a-b in the 7.5% Zr-doped sample which is more than twice as that in the undoped sample. Superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) values as high as about 89 K have been achieved in samples even with 15% Zr and 10% Ce. Ce-doped samples with and without Ba compensation are found to exhibit substantially different J{sub c} values as well as angular dependence characteristics.

  19. The Structural Evolution of (Gd, Y)Ba2Cu3Ox Tapes With Zr Addition Made by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, CH; Galstyan, E; Chen, YM; Shi, T; Liu, YH; Khatri, N; Liu, JF; Xiong, XM; Majkic, G; Selvamanickam, V

    2013-06-01

    Structural analysis of (Gd, Y) Ba2Cu3Ox tapes with Zr addition made by metal organic chemical vapor deposition has been conducted with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Zr content in the films was varied from 0 to 25% in the precursor. In all Zr-doped films, self-assembled nanocolumnar structures of BaZrO3 (BZO) were observed along the c-axis. The amount of BaZrO3 was found to increase steadily with Zr content. Additionally, planar BZO plates were found on the (001) plane of (Gd, Y) Ba2Cu3Ox film. The size and thickness of BZO plates were seen to increase with Zr doping level. Rare-earth copper oxide phases were observed to begin to emerge in the 20% Zr-doped film. Cross-sectional study of the interface between (Gd, Y)Ba2Cu3Ox and LaMnO3 cap layer revealed a thin discrete BZO layer on the LaMnO3 in the 20% Zr doped film.

  20. Catalyst-free selective-area epitaxy of GaAs nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using triethylgallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseok; Ren, Dingkun; Farrell, Alan C.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate catalyst-free growth of GaAs nanowires by selective-area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on GaAs and silicon substrates using a triethylgallium (TEGa) precursor. Two-temperature growth of GaAs nanowires—nucleation at low temperature followed by nanowire elongation at high temperature—almost completely suppresses the radial overgrowth of nanowires on GaAs substrates while exhibiting a vertical growth yield of almost 100%. A 100% growth yield is also achieved on silicon substrates by terminating Si(111) surfaces by arsenic prior to the nanowire growth and optimizing the growth temperature. Compared with trimethylgallium (TMGa) which has been exclusively employed in the vapor–solid phase growth of GaAs nanowires by MOCVD, the proposed growth technique using TEGa is advantageous because of lower growth temperature and fully suppressed radial overgrowth. It is also known that GaAs grown by TEGa induce less impurity incorporation compared with TMGa, and therefore the proposed method could be a building block for GaAs nanowire-based high-performance optoelectronic and nanoelectronic devices on both III–V and silicon platforms.

  1. High-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with nitrogen as nucleation layer carrier gas grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Sun, Shichuang; Deng, Xuguang; Fu, Kai; Yu, Guohao; Song, Liang; Hao, Ronghui; Fan, Yaming; Cai, Yong; Zhang, Baoshun

    2017-12-01

    In this letter, high-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with sheet resistivity greater than 106 Ω/□ have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have observed that the growth of GaN nucleation layers (NLs) under N2 ambient leads to a large full width at half maximum (FWHM) of (102) X-ray diffraction (XRD) line in the rocking curve about 1576 arc sec. Unintentional carbon incorporation can be observed in the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. The results demonstrate the self-compensation mechanism is attributed to the increased density of edge-type threading dislocations and carbon impurities. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT grown on the high-resistivity GaN template has also been fabricated, exhibiting a maximum drain current of 478 mA/mm, a peak transconductance of 60.0 mS/mm, an ON/OFF ratio of 0.96×108 and a breakdown voltage of 621 V.

  2. In-situ wafer bowing measurements of GaN grown on Si (111) substrate by reflectivity mapping in metal organic chemical vapor deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yi-Bin; Liu Ming-Gang; Chen Wei-Jie; Han Xiao-Biao; Chen Jie; Lin Xiu-Qi; Lin Jia-Li; Luo Hui; Liao Qiang; Zang Wen-Jie; Chen Yin-Song; Qiu Yun-Ling; Wu Zhi-Sheng; Liu Yang; Zhang Bai-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the wafer bowing during growth can be in-situ measured by a reflectivity mapping method in the 3×2″ Thomas Swan close coupled showerhead metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The reflectivity mapping method is usually used to measure the film thickness and growth rate. The wafer bowing caused by stresses (tensile and compressive) during the epitaxial growth leads to a temperature variation at different positions on the wafer, and the lower growth temperature leads to a faster growth rate and vice versa. Therefore, the wafer bowing can be measured by analyzing the discrepancy of growth rates at different positions on the wafer. Furthermore, the wafer bowings were confirmed by the ex-situ wafer bowing measurement. High-resistivity and low-resistivity Si substrates were used for epitaxial growth. In comparison with low-resistivity Si substrate, GaN grown on high-resistivity substrate shows a larger wafer bowing caused by the highly compressive stress introduced by compositionally graded AlGaN buffer layer. This transition of wafer bowing can be clearly in-situ measured by using the reflectivity mapping method. (paper)

  3. Doping characteristics of Si-doped n-GaN Epilayers grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, S K; Park, S E; Lee, I H; Choi, I H; Son, S J; Lim, K Y; Lee, H J

    1998-01-01

    We studied doping behaviors through analysis of the electronic properties of a series of undoped and Si-doped GaN epilayers grown on (0001) sapphire substrates by the low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD) technique. The doping efficiency was in the range of 0.4 - 0.8, and an empirical relation expressed as eta = 0.45 log[Si] - 8.1 was obtained. The temperature dependence of carrier concentration showed that the donor activation energy monotonically decreased from 17.6 meV to almost zero as the doping level increased. We suggest that the reduction in the activation energy is related not to autodoped defect centers but to doped Si donors and that the behavior originates from the formation of an impurity band. On the basis of an abrupt change in the compensation ratio from 0.9 to 0.5 by Si-doping, an exceptional difference in the Hall mobility between the undoped and the Si-doped films is explained by a mixed conduction mechanism of electrons and holes.

  4. As-grown deep-level defects in n-GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on freestanding GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shang; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Honda, Unhi; Shibata, Tatsunari; Matsumura, Toshiya; Tokuda, Yutaka; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Uesugi, Tsutomu; Kachi, Tetsu

    2012-01-01

    Traps of energy levels E c -0.26 and E c -0.61 eV have been identified as as-grown traps in n-GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition by using deep level transient spectroscopy of the Schottky contacts fabricated by resistive evaporation. The additional traps of E c -0.13 and E c -0.65 eV have been observed in samples whose contacts are deposited by electron-beam evaporation. An increase in concentration of the E c -0.13 and E c -0.65 eV traps when approaching the interface between the contact and the GaN film supports our argument that these traps are induced by electron-beam irradiation. Conversely, the depth profiles of as-grown traps show different profiles between several samples with increased or uniform distribution in the near surface below 50 nm. Similar profiles are observed in GaN grown on a sapphire substrate. We conclude that the growth process causes these large concentrations of as-grown traps in the near-surface region. It is speculated that the finishing step in the growth process should be an essential issue in the investigation of the surface state of GaN.

  5. In-situ wafer bowing measurements of GaN grown on Si (111) substrate by reflectivity mapping in metal organic chemical vapor deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Bin; Liu, Ming-Gang; Chen, Wei-Jie; Han, Xiao-Biao; Chen, Jie; Lin, Xiu-Qi; Lin, Jia-Li; Luo, Hui; Liao, Qiang; Zang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Yin-Song; Qiu, Yun-Ling; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bai-Jun

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the wafer bowing during growth can be in-situ measured by a reflectivity mapping method in the 3×2″ Thomas Swan close coupled showerhead metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The reflectivity mapping method is usually used to measure the film thickness and growth rate. The wafer bowing caused by stresses (tensile and compressive) during the epitaxial growth leads to a temperature variation at different positions on the wafer, and the lower growth temperature leads to a faster growth rate and vice versa. Therefore, the wafer bowing can be measured by analyzing the discrepancy of growth rates at different positions on the wafer. Furthermore, the wafer bowings were confirmed by the ex-situ wafer bowing measurement. High-resistivity and low-resistivity Si substrates were used for epitaxial growth. In comparison with low-resistivity Si substrate, GaN grown on high-resistivity substrate shows a larger wafer bowing caused by the highly compressive stress introduced by compositionally graded AlGaN buffer layer. This transition of wafer bowing can be clearly in-situ measured by using the reflectivity mapping method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274039 and 51177175), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB301903), the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20110171110021), the International Science and Technology Collaboration Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFG52260), the International Science and Technology Collaboration Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B051000041), the Science and Technology Plan of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B010401013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032606), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, China (Grant No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  6. The effect of thermal annealing on the adherence of Al2O3-films deposited by low-pressure, metal-organic, chemical-vapor deposition on AISI 304

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van de Vendel, D.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin alumina films, deposited at 280°C by low-pressure, metal-organic, chemical-vapor deposition on stainless steel, type AISI 304, were annealed at 0.17 kPa in a nitrogen atmosphere for 2,4, and 17 hr at 600, 700, and 800°C. The effect of the annealing process on the adhesion of the thin alumina

  7. Microstructural and superconducting properties of high current metal-organic chemical vapor deposition YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductor wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Ugurlu, O; Civale, L; Chen, Y; Xiong, X; Xie, Y; Selvamanickam, V

    2009-01-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on flexible, ion beam assisted deposition MgO templates has been used to produce high critical current density (J c ) (Y,Sm) 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O y (REBCO) films suitable for use in producing practical high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductor wires. Thick films on tape were produced with sequential additions of 0.7 μm of REBCO via a reel-to-reel progression through a custom-designed MOCVD reactor. Multi-pass processing for thick film deposition is critically dependent upon minimizing surface secondary phase formation. Critical currents (I c s) of up to 600 A/cm width (t = 2.8 μm, J c = 2.6 MA cm -2 , 77 K, self-field) were obtained in short lengths of HTS wires. These high performance MOCVD films are characterized by closely spaced (Y,Sm) 2 O 3 nanoparticle layers that may be tilted relative to the film normal and REBCO orientation. Small shifts in the angular dependence of J c in low and intermediate applied magnetic fields can be associated with the tilted nanoparticle layers. Also present in these films were YCuO 2 nanoplates aligned with the YBCO matrix (short dimension perpendicular to the film normal), threading dislocations, and oriented composite defects (OCDs). The latter structures consist of single or multiple a-axis oriented grains coated on each side with insulating (Y,Sm) 2 O 3 or CuO. The OCDs formed a connected network of insulating phases by the end of the fourth pass. Subsequent attempts at adding additional layers did not increase I c . There is an inconsistency between the measured J c and the observed microstructural degradation that occurs with each additional layer, suggesting that previously deposited layers are improving with each repeated reactor pass. These dynamic changes suggest a role for post-processing to optimize superconducting properties of as-deposited films, addressing issues associated with reproducibility and manufacturing yield.

  8. Understanding and optimization of InN and high indium containing InGaN alloys by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuna, Oecal

    2013-01-01

    Among the III-nitride semiconductors (Ga,Al,In)N, InN is the most attractive one due to having the narrowest bandgap of 0.64 eV. The revision in the bandgap of InN makes the InGaN more important since one can cover the whole solar spectrum by only changing In composition in an InGaN layer. The comparison of quality of InN and InGaN layers grown using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods indicate that growth with MOCVD is the more challenging, again due to the high dissociation temperature of NH 3 relative to the low decomposition temperature of InN (560-570 C). However, there is significant interest in developing an MOCVD process for InN and InGaN growth since MOCVD technology is the technology currently in use for commercial fabrication of group III nitride thin films. This thesis is therefore focused on a study of MOCVD growth of n- and p-type InN and In-rich InGaN films with the goal of providing new information on the influence of growth conditions on the film properties. Initially, a detailed investigation of MOCVD of InN is given. It is shown that MOCVD growth parameters (growth temperature and V/III ratio) have impacts on the layer properties such as In droplet formation on the surface as well as on its electrical and optical properties. PAS is employed for point defect analyzation. It is shown that In vacancies isolated by nitrogen vacancies are the dominant vacancy-type positron traps in InN. A decrease in the N vacancy concentration in InN is observed as a result of the growth temperature increase from 500 to 550 C. This is an indication of a reduction of N vacancy concentration by enhancing NH 3 dissociation at high growth temperature. Results obtained from optical techniques (Raman and PL) are used to estimate the free carrier concentrations in InN. Electrical characterizations are also carried out using Hall measurements. Carrier concentration values obtained by these three techniques revealed a

  9. Understanding and optimization of InN and high indium containing InGaN alloys by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuna, Oecal

    2013-07-18

    Among the III-nitride semiconductors (Ga,Al,In)N, InN is the most attractive one due to having the narrowest bandgap of 0.64 eV. The revision in the bandgap of InN makes the InGaN more important since one can cover the whole solar spectrum by only changing In composition in an InGaN layer. The comparison of quality of InN and InGaN layers grown using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods indicate that growth with MOCVD is the more challenging, again due to the high dissociation temperature of NH{sub 3} relative to the low decomposition temperature of InN (560-570 C). However, there is significant interest in developing an MOCVD process for InN and InGaN growth since MOCVD technology is the technology currently in use for commercial fabrication of group III nitride thin films. This thesis is therefore focused on a study of MOCVD growth of n- and p-type InN and In-rich InGaN films with the goal of providing new information on the influence of growth conditions on the film properties. Initially, a detailed investigation of MOCVD of InN is given. It is shown that MOCVD growth parameters (growth temperature and V/III ratio) have impacts on the layer properties such as In droplet formation on the surface as well as on its electrical and optical properties. PAS is employed for point defect analyzation. It is shown that In vacancies isolated by nitrogen vacancies are the dominant vacancy-type positron traps in InN. A decrease in the N vacancy concentration in InN is observed as a result of the growth temperature increase from 500 to 550 C. This is an indication of a reduction of N vacancy concentration by enhancing NH{sub 3} dissociation at high growth temperature. Results obtained from optical techniques (Raman and PL) are used to estimate the free carrier concentrations in InN. Electrical characterizations are also carried out using Hall measurements. Carrier concentration values obtained by these three techniques

  10. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of high quality, high indium composition N-polar InGaN layers for tunnel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cory; Romanczyk, Brian; Catalano, Massimo; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Wenjun; DiGiovanni, Domenic; Kim, Moon J.; Fay, Patrick; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the growth of high quality N-polar InGaN films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented with a focus on growth process optimization for high indium compositions and the structural and tunneling properties of such films. Uniform InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well stacks with indium compositions up to 0.46 were grown with local compositional analysis performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within a scanning transmission electron microscope. Bright room-temperature photoluminescence up to 600 nm was observed for films with indium compositions up to 0.35. To study the tunneling behavior of the InGaN layers, N-polar GaN/In0.35Ga0.65N/GaN tunnel diodes were fabricated which reached a maximum current density of 1.7 kA/cm2 at 5 V reverse bias. Temperature-dependent measurements are presented and confirm tunneling behavior under reverse bias.

  11. Control of residual carbon concentration in GaN high electron mobility transistor and realization of high-resistance GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.G. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, D.G., E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, D.S.; Liu, Z.S.; Chen, P.; Le, L.C.; Yang, J.; Li, X.J. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, S.M.; Zhu, J.J.; Wang, H.; Yang, H. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-08-01

    GaN films were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under various growth conditions. The influences of MOCVD growth parameters, i.e., growth pressure, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) flux, growth temperature, trimethyl-gallium flux and H{sub 2} flux, on residual carbon concentration ([C]) were systematically investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that [C] can be effectively modulated by growth conditions. Especially, it can increase by reducing growth pressure up to two orders of magnitude. High-resistance (HR) GaN epilayer with a resistivity over 1.0 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. The mechanism of the formation of HR GaN epilayer is discussed. An Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure with a HR GaN buffer layer and an additional low-carbon GaN channel layer is presented, exhibiting a high two dimensional electron gas mobility of 1815 cm{sup 2}/Vs. - Highlights: • Influence of MOCVD parameters on residual carbon concentration in GaN is studied. • GaN layer with a resistivity over 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. • High electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures were prepared. • Control of residual carbon content results in HEMT with high 2-D electron gas mobility.

  12. Pilot-scale electron cyclotron resonance-metal organic chemical vapor deposition system for the preparation of large-area fluorine-doped SnO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Bup Ju [Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Shinhan University, 233-1, Sangpae-dong, Dongducheon, Gyeonggi-do 483-777 (Korea, Republic of); Hudaya, Chairul [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus Baru UI, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Center for Energy Convergence, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14 gil 5, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, 176 Gajungro Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Kee, E-mail: leejk@kist.re.kr [Center for Energy Convergence, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14 gil 5, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, 176 Gajungro Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The authors report the surface morphology, optical, electrical, thermal and humidity impacts, and electromagnetic interference properties of fluorine-doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}:F or “FTO”) thin films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate fabricated by a pilot-scale electron cyclotron resonance–metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PS ECR-MOCVD). The characteristics of large area FTO thin films were compared with a commercially available transparent conductive electrode made of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), prepared with an identical film and PET thickness of 125 nm and 188 μm, respectively. The results revealed that the as-prepared FTO thin films exhibited comparable performances with the incumbent ITO films, including a high optical transmittance of 97% (substrate-subtracted), low electrical resistivity of about 5 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm, improved electrical and optical performances due to the external thermal and humidity impact, and an excellent shielding effectiveness of electromagnetic interference of nearly 2.3 dB. These excellent performances of the FTO thin films were strongly attributed to the design of the PS ECR-MOCVD, which enabled a uniform plasma environment resulting from a proper mixture of electromagnetic profiles and microwave power.

  13. Development of Microwave-Excited Plasma-Enhanced Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition System for Forming Ferroelectric Sr2(Ta1-x,Nbx)2O7 Thin Film on Amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ichirou; Funaiwa, Kiyoshi; Azumi, Keita; Yamashita, Satoru; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Hirayama, Masaki; Teramoto, Akinobu; Sugawa, Shigetoshi; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2007-04-01

    Sr2(Ta1-x,Nbx)2O7 (STN; x = 0.3) is suitable for use as ferroelectric gate field-effect transistors (FETs) for one-transistor-type ferroelectric memory devices, because it has a low dielectric constant. For applications using metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) FETs, crystallization of ferroelectric film on insulator is necessary. Perovskite STN can be successfully obtained on amorphous SiO2 by ferroelectric-multilayer-stack (FMLS) deposition, which uses alternating steps of STN sputtering deposition and oxygen radical treatment. In this study, we report on a newly developed microwave-excited plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system, in which STN can be deposited in radical oxygen atmosphere. We succeeded in the fabrication of STN on amorphous SiO2 in a single process. The IrO2/STN (200 nm)/SiO2 (10 nm)/p-type Si device shows capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis curves and a memory window of 1.2 V with a 5 V writing operation.

  14. Effect of AlN growth temperature on trap densities of in-situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition grown AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Freedsman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The trapping properties of in-situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD grown AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors (MIS-HFETs with AlN layers grown at 600 and 700 °C has been quantitatively analyzed by frequency dependent parallel conductance technique. Both the devices exhibited two kinds of traps densities, due to AlN (DT-AlN and AlGaN layers (DT-AlGaN respectively. The MIS-HFET grown at 600 °C showed a minimum DT-AlN and DT-AlGaN of 1.1 x 1011 and 1.2 x 1010 cm-2eV-1 at energy levels (ET -0.47 and -0.36 eV. Further, the gate-lag measurements on these devices revealed less degradation ∼ ≤ 5% in drain current density (Ids-max. Meanwhile, MIS-HFET grown at 700 °C had more degradation in Ids-max ∼26 %, due to high DT-AlN and DT-AlGaN of 3.4 x 1012 and 5 x 1011 cm-2eV-1 positioned around similar ET. The results shows MIS-HFET grown at 600 °C had better device characteristics with trap densities one order of magnitude lower than MIS-HFET grown at 700 °C.

  15. High-quality uniaxial In(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and light-emitting diode (LED) fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Yong-Ho; Navamathavan, R; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the growth and device characteristics of vertically aligned high-quality uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQW)/n-GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrates grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The resultant nanowires (NWs), with a diameter of 200-250 nm, have an average length of 2 μm. The feasibility of growing high-quality NWs with well-controlled indium composition MQW structure is demonstrated. These resultant NWs grown on Si(111) substrates were utilized for fabricating vertical-type light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The steep and intense photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are observed, based on the strain-free NWs on Si(111) substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis revealed that the MQW NWs are grown along the c-plane with uniform thickness. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of these NWs exhibited typical p-n junction LEDs and showed a sharp onset voltage at 2.75 V in the forward bias. The output power is linearly increased with increasing current. The result indicates that the pulsed MOCVD technique is an effective method to grow uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN MQW/n-GaN NWs on Si(111), which is more advantageous than other growth techniques, such as molecular beam epitaxy. These results suggest the uniaxial NWs are promising to allow flat-band quantum structures, which can enhance the efficiency of LEDs.

  16. Strain-Compensated InGaAsP Superlattices for Defect Reduction of InP Grown on Exact-Oriented (001 Patterned Si Substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Megalini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of InGaAsP strain-compensated superlattices (SC-SLs as a technique to reduce the defect density of Indium Phosphide (InP grown on silicon (InP-on-Si by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD. Initially, a 2 μm thick gallium arsenide (GaAs layer was grown with very high uniformity on exact oriented (001 300 mm Si wafers; which had been patterned in 90 nm V-grooved trenches separated by silicon dioxide (SiO2 stripes and oriented along the [110] direction. Undercut at the Si/SiO2 interface was used to reduce the propagation of defects into the III–V layers. Following wafer dicing; 2.6 μm of indium phosphide (InP was grown on such GaAs-on-Si templates. InGaAsP SC-SLs and thermal annealing were used to achieve a high-quality and smooth InP pseudo-substrate with a reduced defect density. Both the GaAs-on-Si and the subsequently grown InP layers were characterized using a variety of techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD; atomic force microscopy (AFM; transmission electron microscopy (TEM; and electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI; which indicate high-quality of the epitaxial films. The threading dislocation density and RMS surface roughness of the final InP layer were 5 × 108/cm2 and 1.2 nm; respectively and 7.8 × 107/cm2 and 10.8 nm for the GaAs-on-Si layer.

  17. The compositional, structural, and magnetic properties of a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN spin injecting hetero-structure grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhonghua; Huang, Shimin [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Tang, Kun, E-mail: ktang@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gu, Shulin, E-mail: slgu@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhu, Shunming [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ye, Jiandong [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing University Institute of Optoelectronics at Yangzhou, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Xu, Mingxiang [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Wang, Wei; Zheng, Youdou [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN hetero-structure has been fabricated by MOCVD successfully. • The formation mechanism of different layers in sample was revealed in details. • The properties of the hetero-structure have been presented and discussed extensively. • The effect of Ga diffusion on the magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} film has been shown. - Abstract: In this article, the authors have designed and fabricated a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN spin injecting hetero-structure by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The compositional, structural, and magnetic properties of the hetero-structure have been characterized and discussed. From the characterizations, the hetero-structure has been successfully grown generally. However, due to the unintentional diffusion of Ga ions from Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN layers, the most part of the nominal Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} layer is actually in the form of Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} with gradually decreased x values from the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface to the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} surface. Post-annealing process can further aggravate the diffusion. Due to the similar ionic radius of Ga and Fe, the structural configuration of the Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} does not differ from that of pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. However, the ferromagnetism has been reduced with the incorporation of Ga into Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which has been explained by the increased Yafet-Kittel angles in presence of considerable amount of Ga incorporation. A different behavior of the magnetoresistance has been found on the as-grown and annealed samples, which could be modelled and explained by the competition between the spin-dependent and spin-independent conduction channels. This work has provided detailed information on the interfacial properties of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN spin injecting hetero-structure, which is the solid basis for further improvement and application of

  18. Microstructural and superconducting properties of high current metal-organic chemical vapor deposition YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} coated conductor wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Ugurlu, O; Civale, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chen, Y; Xiong, X; Xie, Y; Selvamanickam, V [SuperPower, Inc., Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on flexible, ion beam assisted deposition MgO templates has been used to produce high critical current density (J{sub c}) (Y,Sm){sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (REBCO) films suitable for use in producing practical high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductor wires. Thick films on tape were produced with sequential additions of 0.7 {mu}m of REBCO via a reel-to-reel progression through a custom-designed MOCVD reactor. Multi-pass processing for thick film deposition is critically dependent upon minimizing surface secondary phase formation. Critical currents (I{sub c}s) of up to 600 A/cm width (t = 2.8 {mu}m, J{sub c} = 2.6 MA cm{sup -2}, 77 K, self-field) were obtained in short lengths of HTS wires. These high performance MOCVD films are characterized by closely spaced (Y,Sm){sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle layers that may be tilted relative to the film normal and REBCO orientation. Small shifts in the angular dependence of J{sub c} in low and intermediate applied magnetic fields can be associated with the tilted nanoparticle layers. Also present in these films were YCuO{sub 2} nanoplates aligned with the YBCO matrix (short dimension perpendicular to the film normal), threading dislocations, and oriented composite defects (OCDs). The latter structures consist of single or multiple a-axis oriented grains coated on each side with insulating (Y,Sm){sub 2}O{sub 3} or CuO. The OCDs formed a connected network of insulating phases by the end of the fourth pass. Subsequent attempts at adding additional layers did not increase I{sub c}. There is an inconsistency between the measured J{sub c} and the observed microstructural degradation that occurs with each additional layer, suggesting that previously deposited layers are improving with each repeated reactor pass. These dynamic changes suggest a role for post-processing to optimize superconducting properties of as-deposited films, addressing issues associated with

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer/Metal Organic Framework Based Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes recent advances in the concept of molecular imprinting using metal organic frameworks (MOF for development of chemical sensors. Two main strategies regarding the fabrication, performance and applications of recent sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers associated with MOF are presented: molecularly imprinted MOF films and molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using MOF as core. The associated transduction modes are also discussed. A brief conclusion and future expectations are described herein.

  20. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondloch, Joseph E.; Katz, Michael J.; Isley, William C., III; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W.; Hall, Morgan G.; Decoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic ZrIV ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  1. Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ìm to 110 ìm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

  2. InAlN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure with improved carrier confinement and high-temperature transport performance grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yi; Xue, Jun Shuai; Zhang, Jin Cheng; Zhou, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Ya Chao; Hao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    A nearly lattice-matched InAlN/InGaN/GaN double heterostructure (DH) and traditional InAlN/GaN single heterostructure (SH) were grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. The InN mole fraction of InGaN channel was deduced by XRD and photoluminescence. The electrical properties were characterized by capacitance-voltage and temperature-dependent Hall measurements. Both results revealed that the InAlN/InGaN/GaN DH possessed superior carrier confinement over traditional InAlN/GaN SH owing to the back barrier formed at the InGaN/GaN interface, which prevents the spilling over of carriers and thus remarkably improves the transport performance at high temperature. Furthermore, a thin InGaN layer was preferable for carrier channel applications to a thick one. (paper)

  3. Metal organic frameworks for the catalytic detoxification of chemical warfare nerve agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Katz, Michael J.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-04-18

    A method of using a metal organic framework (MOF) comprising a metal ion and an at least bidendate organic ligand to catalytically detoxify chemical warfare nerve agents including exposing the metal-organic-framework (MOF) to the chemical warfare nerve agent and catalytically decomposing the nerve agent with the MOF.

  4. Composition and doping control for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of InP-based double heterojunction bipolar transistor with hybrid base structure consisting of GaAsSb contact and InGaAsSb graded layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Takuya; Kashio, Norihide; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Haruki; Kurishima, Kenji; Ida, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    We report on a method for composition and doping control for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of a double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) with a hybrid base structure consisting of a compositionally graded InGaAsSb for boosting an average electron velocity and a heavily doped thin GaAsSb for lowering the base contact resistivity. The GaAsSb contact layer can be formed by simply turning off the supply of In precursor tetramethylindium (TMIn) after the growth of the composition and doping graded InGaAsSb base. Consequently, the solid composition and hole concentration of hybrid base can be properly controlled by just modulating the supply of only TMIn and carbon tetrabromide. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy for the DHBT wafer reveals that the contents of In, Ga, and C inside the base are actually modulated from the collector side to the emitter side as expected. Transmission-line-model measurements were performed for the compositionally graded-InGaAsSb/GaAsSb hybrid base. The contact resistivity is estimated to be 5.3 Ω µm2, which is lower than half the value of a compositionally graded InGaAsSb base without the GaAsSb contact layer. The results indicate that the compositionally-graded-InGaAsSb/GaAsSb-contact hybrid base structure grown by this simple method is very advantageous for obtaining DHBTs with a very high maximum oscillation frequency.

  5. Characterization of TiO{sub 2} thin films obtained by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition; Caracterizacao de filmes finos de TiO{sub 2} obtidos por deposicao quimica em fase vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriel, Rodrigo Crociati

    2015-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films were grown on silicon substrate (100) by MOCVD process (chemical deposition of organometallic vapor phase). The films were grown at 400, 500, 600 and 700 ° C in a conventional horizontal equipment. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as source of both oxygen and titanium. Nitrogen was used as carrier and purge gas. X-ray diffraction technique was used for the characterization of the crystalline structure. Scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun was used to evaluate the morphology and thickness of the films. The films grown at 400 and 500°C presented anatase phase. The film grown at 600ºC presented rutile besides anatase phase, while the film grown at 700°C showed, in addition to anatase and rutile, brookite phase. In order to evaluate the electrochemical behavior of the films cyclic voltammetry technique was used. The tests revealed that the TiO2 films formed exclusively by the anatase phase exhibit strong capacitive character. The anodic current peak is directly proportional to the square root of the scanning rate for films grown at 500ºC, suggesting that linear diffusion is the predominant mechanism of cations transport. It was observed that in the film grown during 60 minutes the Na+ ions intercalation and deintercalation easily. The films grown in the other conditions did not present the anodic current peak, although charge was accumulated in the film. (author)

  6. InAs film grown on Si(111) by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caroff, P; Jeppsson, M; Mandl, B; Wernersson, L-E; Wheeler, D; Seabaugh, A; Keplinger, M; Stangl, J; Bauer, G

    2008-01-01

    We report the successful growth of high quality InAs films directly on Si(111) by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy. A nearly mirror-like and uniform InAs film is obtained at 580 0 C for a thickness of 2 μm. We measured a high value of the electron mobility of 5100 cm 2 /Vs at room temperature. The growth is performed using a standard two-step procedure. The influence of the nucleation layer, group V flow rate, and layer thickness on the electrical and morphological properties of the InAs film have been investigated. We present results of our studies by Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, electrical Hall/van der Pauw and structural X-Ray Diffraction characterization

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of trimethylgallium decomposition during GaN metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kazuki; Shirakawa, Hiroki; Chokawa, Kenta; Araidai, Masaaki; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    We analyzed the decomposition of Ga(CH3)3 (TMG) during the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN on the basis of first-principles calculations and thermodynamic analysis. We performed activation energy calculations of TMG decomposition and determined the main reaction processes of TMG during GaN MOVPE. We found that TMG reacts with the H2 carrier gas and that (CH3)2GaH is generated after the desorption of the methyl group. Next, (CH3)2GaH decomposes into (CH3)GaH2 and this decomposes into GaH3. Finally, GaH3 becomes GaH. In the MOVPE growth of GaN, TMG decomposes into GaH by the successive desorption of its methyl groups. The results presented here concur with recent high-resolution mass spectroscopy results.

  8. Deposition of highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films by using metal organic chemical deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, K H; Choi, D K; Seong, W K; Kim, J D

    1999-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been grown on Pt/Ta/SiNx/Si substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition with Pb(C sub 2 H sub 5) sub 4 , Zr(O-t-C sub 4 H sub 9) sub 4 , and Ti(O-i-C sub 3 H sub 7) sub 4 as source materials and O sub 2 as an oxidizing gas. The Zr fraction in the thin films was controlled by varying the flow rate of the Zr source material. The crystal structure and the electrical properties were investigated as functions of the composition. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that at a certain range of Zr fraction, highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films with no pyrochlore phases were deposited. On the other hand, at low Zr fractions, there were peaks from Pb-oxide phases. At high Zr fractions, peaks from pyrochlore phase were seen. The films also showed good electrical properties, such as a high dielectric constant of more than 1200 and a low coercive voltage of 1.35 V.

  9. Properties of alumina films by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited at low temperatures (290–420°C) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using aluminum tri-sec-butoxide. The film properties including the protection of the underlying

  10. The mechanical properties of thin alumina film deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Gellings, P.J.; van de Vendel, D.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Amorphous alumina films were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The MOCVD experiments were performed in nitrogen at low and atmospheric pressures. The effects of deposition temperature, growth rate and film thickness on the mechanical

  11. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  12. Colorimetric Detection of Water Vapor Using Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: Water vapor trapped in encapsulation materials or enclosed volumes leads to corrosion issues for critical NW components. Sandia National Laboratories has created a new diagnostic to indicate the presence of water in weapon systems. Impact: Component exposure to water now can be determined instantly, without need for costly, time-consuming analytical methods.

  13. Pulsed injection metal organic chemical vapour deposition and characterisation of thin CaO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, R.P., E-mail: rpborges@fc.ul.p [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Ferreira, P. [Departamento de Engenharia Ceramica e do Vidro, CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Saraiva, A. [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Goncalves, R., E-mail: rjbarrosog@hotmail.co [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Rosa, M.A. [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Goncalves, A.P. [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, P-2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [Laboratorio de Feixe de Ioes, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Magalhaes, S. [Laboratorio de Feixe de Ioes, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Lourenco, M.J.V.; Santos, F.J.V. [Centro de Ciencias Moleculares e Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016, Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Godinho, M. [Centro de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-05-01

    Thin films of CaO were grown on silicon (Si) and lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) substrates by pulsed injection metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in a vertical injection MOCVD system. Growth parameters were systematically varied to study their effect on film growth and quality and to determine the optimal growth conditions for this material. Film quality and growth rate were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy measurements. Optimised conditions allowed growing transparent, single phase films textured along the (0 0 l) direction.

  14. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  15. Chemical vapor deposited boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Smith, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed analytical electron microscope (AEM) studies of yellow whiskers produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show that two basic types of whiskers are produced at low temperatures (between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C) and low boron to carbon gas ratios. Both whisker types show planar microstructures such as twin planes and stacking faults oriented parallel to, or at a rhombohedral angle to, the growth direction. For both whisker types, the presence of droplet-like terminations containing both Si and Ni indicate that the growth process during CVD is via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms

  16. Effect of gas flow on the selective area growth of gallium nitride via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, K. R.; Korakakis, D.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gas flow on the selective area growth (SAG) of gallium nitride (GaN) grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In this study, the SAG of GaN was carried out on a silicon dioxide striped pattern along the GaN direction. SAG was initiated with the striped pattern oriented parallel and normal to the incoming gas flow in a horizontal reactor. The orientation of the pattern did not impact cross section of the structure after re-growth as both orientations resulted in similar trapezoidal structures bounded by the (0 0 0 1) and {1 1 2¯ n} facets ( n≈1.7-2.2). However, the growth rates were shown to depend on the orientation of the pattern as the normally oriented samples exhibited enhanced vertical and cross-sectional growth rates compared to the parallel oriented samples. All growths occurred under identical conditions and therefore the difference in growth rates must be attributed to a difference in mass transport of species.

  17. Luminescent metal-organic frameworks for chemical sensing and explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhichao; Deibert, Benjamin J; Li, Jing

    2014-08-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a unique class of crystalline solids comprised of metal cations (or metal clusters) and organic ligands that have shown promise for a wide variety of applications. Over the past 15 years, research and development of these materials have become one of the most intensely and extensively pursued areas. A very interesting and well-investigated topic is their optical emission properties and related applications. Several reviews have provided a comprehensive overview covering many aspects of the subject up to 2011. This review intends to provide an update of work published since then and focuses on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of MOFs and their possible utility in chemical and biological sensing and detection. The spectrum of this review includes the origin of luminescence in MOFs, the advantages of luminescent MOF (LMOF) based sensors, general strategies in designing sensory materials, and examples of various applications in sensing and detection.

  18. Exploiting Diffusion Barrier and Chemical Affinity of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Hydrogen Isotope Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, Rafael; Zhang, Linda; Kang, Sung Gu; Hirscher, Michael; Oh, Hyunchul; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2017-10-25

    Deuterium plays a pivotal role in industrial and scientific research, and is irreplaceable for various applications such as isotope tracing, neutron moderation, and neutron scattering. In addition, deuterium is a key energy source for fusion reactions. Thus, the isolation of deuterium from a physico-chemically almost identical isotopic mixture is a seminal challenge in modern separation technology. However, current commercial approaches suffer from extremely low separation efficiency (i.e., cryogenic distillation, selectivity of 1.5 at 24 K), requiring a cost-effective and large-scale separation technique. Herein, we report a highly effective hydrogen isotope separation system based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) having the highest reported separation factor as high as ∼26 at 77 K by maximizing synergistic effects of the chemical affinity quantum sieving (CAQS) and kinetic quantum sieving (KQS). For this purpose, the MOF-74 system having high hydrogen adsorption enthalpies due to strong open metal sites is chosen for CAQS functionality, and imidazole molecules (IM) are employed to the system for enhancing the KQS effect. To the best of our knowledge, this work is not only the first attempt to implement two quantum sieving effects, KQS and CAQS, in one system, but also provides experimental validation of the utility of this system for practical industrial usage by isolating high-purity D 2 through direct selective separation studies using 1:1 D 2 /H 2 mixtures.

  19. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  20. Corrosion resistant coatings (Al@#2@#O@#3@#) produced by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using ATSB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) of amorphous alumina films on steel was performed in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. This MOCVD process is based on the thermal decomposition of aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB). The effect of the deposition temperature (within the range

  1. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide : Design and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and

  2. Chemical Reactions Catalyzed by Metalloporphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas Castro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic versatility and the potential application of metalloporphyrins (MP in different fields have aroused researchers’ interest in studying these complexes, in an attempt to mimic biological systems such as cytochrome P-450. Over the last 40 years, synthetic MPs have been mainly used as catalysts for homogeneous or heterogeneous chemical reactions. To employ them in heterogeneous catalysis, chemists have prepared new MP-based solids by immobilizing MP onto rigid inorganic supports, a strategy that affords hybrid inorganic-organic materials. More recently, materials obtained by supramolecular assembly processes and containing MPs as building blocks have been applied in a variety of areas, like gas storage, photonic devices, separation, molecular sensing, magnets, and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. These coordination polymers, known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, contain organic ligands or complexes connected by metal ions or clusters, which give rise to a 1-, 2- or 3-D network. These kinds of materials presents large surface areas, Brønsted or redox sites, and high porosity, all of which are desirable features in catalysts with potential use in heterogeneous phases. Building MOFs based on MP is a good way to obtain solid catalysts that offer the advantages of bioinspired systems and zeolitic materials. In this mini review, we will adopt a historical approach to present the most relevant MP-based MOFs applicable to catalytic reactions such as oxidation, reduction, insertion of functional groups, and exchange of organic functions.

  3. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagdale, Pravin, E-mail: pravin.jagdale@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy); Castellino, Micaela [Center for Space Human Robotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Marrec, Françoise [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Picardie Jules Verne (UPJV), Amiens 80039 (France); Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexicom (UNAM), Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Tagliaferro, Alberto [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl{sub 3}) in acetone (CH{sub 3}-CO-CH{sub 3}). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18–250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  4. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Castellino, Micaela; Marrec, Françoise; Rodil, Sandra E.; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl 3 ) in acetone (CH 3 -CO-CH 3 ). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18–250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  5. p and n-type germanium layers grown using iso-butyl germane in a III-V metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakomin, Roberto; Beaudoin, Gregoire; Gogneau, Noelle; Lamare, Bruno; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    We report on the growth of n- and p-doped Germanium (Ge) on Ge substrates by Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). Iso-butyl germane, a liquid metal-organic source less toxic than Germane, is used as Ge precursor. We demonstrate the p-doping of Germanium by MOVPE using Trimethylgallium. The influence of the growth parameters for n and p-type doping is studied in order to optimize the morphology, the structural and the electrical properties of the Ge layers. The controlled growth of p and n doped Ge layers opens the possibility to realize totally epitaxially grown Ge diodes with improved performances, for example, for solar cell applications.

  6. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Potential Platforms for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenyang

    The anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emission into the atmosphere, mainly through the combustion of fossil fuels, has resulted in a balance disturbance of the carbon cycle. Overwhelming scientific evidence proves that the escalating level of atmospheric CO2 is deemed as the main culprit for global warming and climate change. It is thus imperative to develop viable CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies to reduce CO2 emissions, which is also essential to avoid the potential devastating effects in future. The drawbacks of energy-cost, corrosion and inefficiency for amine-based wet-scrubbing systems which are currently used in industry, have prompted the exploration of alternative approaches for CCS. Extensive efforts have been dedicated to the development of functional porous materials, such as activated carbons, zeolites, porous organic polymers, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to capture CO2. However, these adsorbents are limited by either poor selectivity for CO2 separation from gas mixtures or low CO2 adsorption capacity. Therefore, it is still highly demanding to design next-generation adsorbent materials fulfilling the requirements of high CO2 selectivity and enough CO2 capacity, as well as high water/moisture stability under practical conditions. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been positioned at the forefront of this area as a promising type of candidate amongst various porous materials. This is triggered by the modularity and functionality of pore size, pore walls and inner surface of MOFs by use of crystal engineering approaches. In this work, several effective strategies, such as incorporating 1,2,3-triazole groups as moderate Lewis base centers into MOFs and employing flexible azamacrocycle-based ligands to build MOFs, demonstrate to be promising ways to enhance CO 2 uptake capacity and CO2 separation ability of porous MOFs. It is revealed through in-depth studies on counter-intuitive experimental observations that the local electric

  7. Heme-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Oxidative Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 metal-organic frameworks, catalysis , metalloporphyrins, oxidation chemistry REPORT DOCUMENTATION...respectively; hydrogen atoms are omitted for clarity. ARO Final Progress Report...red, gray, bright green, and dark green represent Fe, N, O, C, F, and Cl respectively; hydrogen atoms omitted from clarity. Right: Diffuse

  8. Characterization of TiO2 thin films obtained by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriel, Rodrigo Crociati

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) thin films were grown on silicon substrate (100) by MOCVD process (chemical deposition of organometallic vapor phase). The films were grown at 400, 500, 600 and 700 ° C in a conventional horizontal equipment. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as source of both oxygen and titanium. Nitrogen was used as carrier and purge gas. X-ray diffraction technique was used for the characterization of the crystalline structure. Scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun was used to evaluate the morphology and thickness of the films. The films grown at 400 and 500°C presented anatase phase. The film grown at 600ºC presented rutile besides anatase phase, while the film grown at 700°C showed, in addition to anatase and rutile, brookite phase. In order to evaluate the electrochemical behavior of the films cyclic voltammetry technique was used. The tests revealed that the TiO2 films formed exclusively by the anatase phase exhibit strong capacitive character. The anodic current peak is directly proportional to the square root of the scanning rate for films grown at 500ºC, suggesting that linear diffusion is the predominant mechanism of cations transport. It was observed that in the film grown during 60 minutes the Na+ ions intercalation and deintercalation easily. The films grown in the other conditions did not present the anodic current peak, although charge was accumulated in the film. (author)

  9. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  10. Influence of the interface on growth rates in AlN/GaN short period superlattices via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-11-01

    AlN/GaN short period superlattices are well suited for a number of applications including, but not limited to, digital alloys, intersubband devices, and emitters. In this work, AlN/GaN superlattices with periodicities ranging from 10 to 20 Å have been grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate the influence of the interface on the binary alloy growth rates. The GaN growth rate at the interface was observed to decrease with increasing GaN thickness while the AlN growth rate remained constant. This has been attributed to a decrease in the decomposition rate of GaN at the hetero-interface as seen in other III-V hetero-structures.

  11. Surfactant effects of indium on cracking in AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Miller, C. M.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) superlattice structures are often characterized by a network of cracks resulting from the large lattice mismatch and difference in thermal expansion coefficients, especially as the thickness of the layers increases. This work investigates the influence of indium as a surfactant on strain and cracking in AlN/GaN DBRs grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). DBRs with peak reflectivities ranging from 465 nm to 540 nm were grown and indium was introduced during the growth of the AlN layer. Image processing techniques were used to quantify the crack length per square millimeter and it was observed that indium has a significant effect on the crack formation and reduced the total crack length in these structures by a factor of two.

  12. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for chemical sensing and toxic anion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-Zhi; Yang, Xing; Zhang, Liang-Wei; Zhou, Pan-Pan

    2017-08-01

    Prototype lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (LnMOFs), Ln(BTC) (Ln = Eu and Tb; BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate), have been considered as luminescent sensors for detecting toxic anions, while their neutral pore structures have limited the entrance and encapsulation of anions to produce highly anion-responsive photoluminescence (PL). To facilitate anions to enter the pore space of Ln(BTC), a one-pot synthesis method was proposed in which BTC was partially replaced with its structural analogue L·BF 4 (H 3 L·BF 4 = 2,4,6-tricarboxy-1-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate) which consists of an anion affinity site of cationic methylpyridinium. Compared to the original Ln(BTC), the co-doped cationic framework Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 is highly sensitive for detecting different toxic anions by tuning the energy absorption of organic chromophores, the energy transfer efficiency to Ln 3+ ions and the energy allocation between different Ln 3+ ions in the PL spectra. We demonstrated that the Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 PL sensor has the capability of decoding various toxic anions with a clearly differentiable and unique emission intensity ratio of 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 (Tb 3+ , 545 nm) to 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 (Eu 3+ , 618 nm) transitions (I Tb /I Eu ). Compared to Ln(BTC), the co-doped Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 presents self-calibrating, high distinguishable and stable PL signals for detecting toxic anions.

  13. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH and Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations

  14. Impregnated Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Removal of Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    enhance reactivity towards toxic chemicals. Typical impregnations of current materials, such as ASZM-TEDA, are done in an aqueous and/or ammoniacal ...ammonium hydroxide/ammonium carbonate/water solution (referred to as ammoniacal solution). Clearly, this solution would not be suitable for impregnation

  15. High growth rate GaN on 200 mm silicon by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy for high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, M.; Baines, Y.; Bavard, A.; Bouveyron, R.

    2018-02-01

    It is increasingly important to reduce the cycle time of epitaxial growth, in order to reduce the costs of device fabrication, especially for GaN based structures which typically have growth cycles of several hours. We have performed a comprehensive study using metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) investigating the effects of changing GaN growth rates from 0.9 to 14.5 μm/h. Although there is no significant effect on the strain incorporated in the layers, we have seen changes in the surface morphology which can be related to the change in dislocation behaviour and surface diffusion effects. At the small scale, as seen by AFM, increased dislocation density for higher growth rates leads to increased pinning of growth terraces, resulting in more closely spaced terraces. At a larger scale of hundreds of μm observed by optical profiling, we have related the formation of grains to the rate of surface diffusion of adatoms using a random walk model, implying diffusion distances from 30 μm for the highest growth rates up to 100 μm for the lowest. The increased growth rate also increases the intrinsic carbon incorporation which can increase the breakdown voltage of GaN films. Despite an increased threading dislocation density, these very high growth rates of 14.5 μm/hr by MOVPE have been shown to be appealing for reducing epitaxial growth cycle times and therefore costs in High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures.

  16. Moisture-Stable Zn(II) Metal-Organic Framework as a Multifunctional Platform for Highly Efficient CO2 Capture and Nitro Pollutant Vapor Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di-Ming; Tian, Jia-Yue; Chen, Min; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2016-07-20

    A moisture-stable three-dimensional (3D) metal-organic framework (MOF), {(Me2NH2)[Zn2(bpydb)2(ATZ)](DMA)(NMF)2}n (1, where bpydb = 4,4'-(4,4'-bipyridine-2,6-diyl)dibenzoate, ATZ = deprotonated 5-aminotetrazole, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide, and NMF = N-methylformamide), with uncoordinated N-donor sites and charged framework skeleton was fabricated. This MOF exhibits interesting structural dynamic upon CO2 sorption at 195 K and high CO2/N2 (127) and CO2/CH4 (131) sorption selectivity at 298 K and 1 bar. Particularly, its CO2/CH4 selectivity is among the highest MOFs for selective CO2 separation. The results of Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation indicate that the polar framework contributes to the strong framework-CO2 binding at zero loading, and the tetrazole pillar contributes to the high CO2 uptake capacity at high loading. Furthermore, the solvent-responsive luminescent properties of 1 indicate that it could be utilized as a fluorescent sensor to detect trace amounts of nitrobenzene in both solvent and vapor systems.

  17. Growth of InGaAs nanowires on Ge(111) by selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akinobu; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Ishizaka, Fumiya; Motohisa, Junichi

    2017-04-01

    We report the growth of InGaAs nanowires (NWs) on Ge(111) substrates using selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE) for novel InGaAs/Ge hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications. Ge(111) substrates with periodic arrays of mask opening were prepared, and InGaAs was selectively grown on the opening region of Ge(111). A uniform array of InGaAs NWs with a diameter around 100 nm was successfully grown using appropriate preparation of the initial surfaces with an AsH3 thermal treatment and flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME). We found that optimizing partial pressure of AsH3 and the number of FME cycles improved the yield of vertical InGaAs NWs. Line-scan profile analysis of energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry showed that the In composition in the InGaAs NW was almost constant from the bottom to the top. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis revealed that the interface between InGaAs NW and Ge had misfit dislocations, but their distance was longer than that expected from the difference in their lattice constants.

  18. Influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties of β-Ga2O3 layers homoepitaxially grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, A.; Schewski, R.; Baldini, M.; Galazka, Z.; Wagner, G.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.

    2017-10-01

    We present a quantitative model that addresses the influence of incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical properties in β-Ga2O3. This model can explain the mobility collapse below a threshold electron concentration of 1 × 1018 cm-3 as well as partly the low doping efficiency in β-Ga2O3 layers grown homoepitaxially by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on (100) substrates of only slight off-orientation. A structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals a high density of twin lamellae in these layers. In contrast to the coherent twin boundaries parallel to the (100) plane, the lateral incoherent twin boundaries exhibit one dangling bond per unit cell that acts as an acceptor-like electron trap. Since the twin lamellae are thin, we consider the incoherent twin boundaries to be line defects with a density of 1011-1012 cm-2 as determined by TEM. We estimate the influence of the incoherent twin boundaries on the electrical transport properties by adapting Read's model of charged dislocations. Our calculations quantitatively confirm that the mobility reduction and collapse as well as partly the compensation are due to the presence of twin lamellae.

  19. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, P. A.; Tompa, G. S.; Norris, P. E.; Chern, C. S.; Caracciolo, R.; Kear, B. H.; Noh, D. W.; Gallois, B.

    1990-04-01

    The discovery of YBCO superconductors has stimulated a great deal of scientific and technological research into thin films of these materials. Because the MOCVD technique is known to produce high quality films in the III/V and II/VI material groups, our approach has been to apply the method to superconducting thin films. Thin films were grown in a vertical high speed (0 2000 rpm) rotating disk reactor. The source materials were metal β-diketonates kept at temperatures in excess of 100° in order to obtain growth rates of 0.3 to 0.5 μm/hr. The precursors were transported to the chamber with a nitrogen carrier and injected separately in order to avoid any gas phase reactions. The chamber pressure was maintained at 76 Torr with an oxygen partial pressure of 38 Torr. A resistance heater was used to keep the substrate temperature at 500° YBa2Cu3O7- x films were deposited simultaneously on a variety of substrates such as (100) MgO, (1-102) sapphire, (100) SrTiO3 and (100) YSZ. Full XPS spectra were collected for the binary oxides. The scans demonstrate the existence of Y2O3, BaO, and CuO with the correct valence state for the metallic species. Energy dispersive analysis of x-ray (EDAX) was used to determine film compositions by comparing EDAX spectral intensity to a known superconducting standard. Appropriate changes were made in the precursor flows to correct the stoichiometry. The as-grown films were dark brown and semi-transparent. Cross-sectional SEM photomicrographs revealed an ordered columnar structure. After annealing at 950 980° however, the films on (100) SrTiO3 appeared dull black and opaque. The surface morphology exhibited smooth large plate-like grains. X-ray data clearly display an orthorhombic phase, with c-axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. Four point resistance measurements for films on (100) SrTiO3 show the onset of superconductivity at 90 K with a complete loss of resistance at 88 K. This sharp (≤2K) transition shows the high quality of these MOCVD grown YBCO films and are the first reported results from a large area (2 × 50 mm substrates) commercial reactor.

  20. Ellipsometric study of metal-organic chemically vapor deposited III-V semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Sekula-Moise, Patricia A.; Sieg, Robert M.; Drotos, Mark N.; Bogner, Nancy A.

    1992-01-01

    An ellipsometric study of MOCVD-grown layers of AlGaAs and InGaAs in thick films and strained layer complex structures is presented. It is concluded that the ternary composition of thick nonstrained layers can be accurately determined to within experimental errors using numerical algorithms. In the case of complex structures, thickness of all layers and the alloy composition of nonstrained layers can be determined simultaneously, provided that the correlations between parameters is no higher than 0.9.

  1. Research and Development of Coated Conductors Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selvamanickam, V

    2007-01-01

    .... In the last year of this program, we made major progress in both objectives of the program. We fabricated films of different thickness by our standard MOCVD processes and worked with our collaborators (ORNL, LANL, FSU...

  2. The protective properties of thin alumina films deposited by metal organic chemical vapour deposition against high-temperature corrosion of stainless steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Heusinkveld, M.M.D.; Gellings, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Al2O3 were deposited on Incoloy 800H and AISI 304 by means of metal organic chemical vapour deposition. Diffusion limitation was the rate-determining step above 420 °C. Below this temperature, the activation energy of the reaction appeared to be 30 kJ mol−1. Coating with Al2O3 increases

  3. Properties of alumina films prepared by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure in hte presence of small amounts of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Rem, J.B.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen with low partial pressures of water (0–2.6 × 10−2 kPa (0−0.20 mmHg)) by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) with aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB) as the precursor.

  4. Ceramic composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Composites consisting of silicon carbide matrices reinforced with continuous ceramic fibers are being developed for high-temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques are very effective in fabricating composites with high strengths and exceptional fracture toughness. Mechanical properties of infiltrated composites are controlled by the strength of the interfacial bond between the fibers and matrix. This paper describes two CVD techniques and reviews the models being developed to better understand and control the infiltration process

  5. Metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of lithium manganese oxide thin films via single solid source precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedotun K.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithium manganese oxide thin films were deposited on sodalime glass substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD technique. The films were prepared by pyrolysis of lithium manganese acetylacetonate precursor at a temperature of 420 °C with a flow rate of 2.5 dm3/min for two-hour deposition period. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and van der Pauw four point probe method were used for characterizations of the film samples. RBS studies of the films revealed fair thickness of 1112.311 (1015 atoms/cm2 and effective stoichiometric relationship of Li0.47Mn0.27O0.26. The films exhibited relatively high transmission (50 % T in the visible and NIR range, with the bandgap energy of 2.55 eV. Broad and diffused X-ray diffraction patterns obtained showed that the film was amorphous in nature, while microstructural studies indicated dense and uniformly distributed layer across the substrate. Resistivity value of 4.9 Ω·cm was obtained for the thin film. Compared with Mn0.2O0.8 thin film, a significant lattice absorption edge shift was observed in the Li0.47Mn0.27O0.26 film.

  6. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Film Coated Optical Fiber Sensors: A Novel Waveguide-Based Chemical Sensing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Joong; Lu, Ping; Culp, Jeffrey T; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2018-02-23

    Integration of optical fiber with sensitive thin films offers great potential for the realization of novel chemical sensing platforms. In this study, we present a simple design strategy and high performance of nanoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) based optical gas sensors, which enables detection of a wide range of concentrations of small molecules based upon extremely small differences in refractive indices as a function of analyte adsorption within the MOF framework. Thin and compact MOF films can be uniformly formed and tightly bound on the surface of etched optical fiber through a simple solution method which is critical for manufacturability of MOF-based sensor devices. The resulting sensors show high sensitivity/selectivity to CO 2 gas relative to other small gases (H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , and CO) with rapid (optical fiber platform which results in an amplification of inherent optical absorption present within the MOF-based sensing layer with increasing values of effective refractive index associated with adsorption of gases.

  7. In Situ Probes of Capture and Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants by Zr-Based Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plonka, Anna M.; Wang, Qi; Gordon, Wesley O.; Balboa, Alex; Troya, Diego; Guo, Weiwei; Sharp, Conor H.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Morris, John R.; Hill, Craig L.; Frenkel, Anatoly I. (BNL); (Virginia Tech); (ECBC); (Emory); (SBU)

    2017-01-18

    Zr-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have been recently shown to be among the fastest catalysts of nerve-agent hydrolysis in solution. We report a detailed study of the adsorption and decomposition of a nerve-agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), on UiO-66, UiO-67, MOF-808, and NU-1000 using synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption, and infrared spectroscopy, which reveals key aspects of the reaction mechanism. The diffraction measurements indicate that all four MOFs adsorb DMMP (introduced at atmospheric pressures through a flow of helium or air) within the pore space. In addition, the combination of X-ray absorption and infrared spectra suggests direct coordination of DMMP to the Zr6 cores of all MOFs, which ultimately leads to decomposition to phosphonate products. These experimental probes into the mechanism of adsorption and decomposition of chemical warfare agent simulants on Zr-based MOFs open new opportunities in rational design of new and superior decontamination materials.

  8. Photoreflectance study of strained GaAsN/GaAs T-junction quantum wires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klangtakai, Pawinee; Sanorpim, Sakuntam; Onabe, Kentaro

    2011-12-01

    Strained GaAsN T-junction quantum wires (T-QWRs) with different N contents grown on GaAs by two steps metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy in [001] and [110] directions, namely QW1 and QW2 respectively, have been investigated by photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. Two GaAsN T-QWRs with different N contents were formed by T-intersection of (i) a 6.4-nm-thick GaAs0.89N0.011 QW1 and a 5.2-nm-thick GaAs0.968N0.032 QW2 and (ii) a 5.0-nm-thick GaAs0.985N0.015 QW1 and a 5.2-nm-thick GaAs0.968N0.032 QW2. An evidence of a one-dimensional structure at T-intersection of the two QWs on the (001) and (110) surfaces was established by PR resonances associated with extended states in all the QW and T-QWR samples. It is found that larger lateral confinement energy than 100 meV in both of [001] and [110] directions were achieved for GaAsN T-QWRs. With increasing temperature, the transition energy of GaAsN T-QWRs decreases with a faster shrinking rate compared to that of bulk GaAs. Optical quality of GaAsN T-QWRs is found to be affected by the N-induced band edge fluctuation, which is the unique characteristic of dilute III-V-nitrides.

  9. Lanthanide-Functionalized Metal-Organic Framework Hybrid Systems To Create Multiple Luminescent Centers for Chemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing

    2017-11-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) possess an important advantage over other candidate classes for chemosensory materials because of their exceptional structural tunability and properties. Luminescent sensing using MOFs is a simple, intuitive, and convenient method to recognize species, but the method has limitations, such as insufficient chemical selectivity and signal loss. MOFs contain versatile building blocks (linkers or ligands) with special chemical reactivity, and postsynthetic modification (PSM) provides an opportunity to exploit and expand their unique properties. The linkers in most MOFs contain aromatic subunits that can readily display luminescence after ultraviolet or visible (typically blue) excitation, and this is the main luminescent nature of most MOFs. The introduction of photoactive lanthanide ions (Ln 3+ ) into the MOF hosts may produce new luminescent signals at different positions from that of the MOF linker, but this depends on the intramolecular energy transfer (antenna effect) from the MOF (linkers) to the Ln 3+ ions. Controlling the Ln 3+ content in MOF hybrids may create multiple luminescent centers. The nature of the unique luminescent centers may cause different responses to sensing species (i.e., ratiometric sensing), which may provide a new opportunity for luminescence research with applications to chemical sensing. In this Account, recent research progress on using lanthanide-functionalized MOF hybrid materials to create multiple luminescent centers for chemical sensing is described. Here we propose a general strategy to functionalize MOF hosts with lanthanide ions, compounds, or other luminescent species (organic dyes or carbon dots) and to assemble types of photofunctional hybrid systems based on lanthanide-functionalized MOFs. Five main methods were used to functionalize the MOFs and assemble the hybrid materials: in situ composition, ionic doping, ionic exchange, covalent PSM, and coordinated PSM. Through the lanthanide

  10. Computational Investigations of Potential Energy Function Development for Metal--Organic Framework Simulations, Metal Carbenes, and Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, Christian R.

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional porous nanomaterials with a variety of applications, including catalysis, gas storage and separation, and sustainable energy. Their potential as air filtration systems is of interest for designer carbon capture materials. The chemical constituents (i.e. organic ligands) can be functionalized to create rationally designed CO2 sequestration platforms, for example. Hardware and software alike at the bleeding edge of supercomputing are utilized for designing first principles-based molecular models for the simulation of gas sorption in these frameworks. The classical potentials developed herein are named PHAST --- Potentials with High Accuracy, Speed, and Transferability, and thus are designed via a "bottom-up" approach. Specifically, models for N2 and CH4 are constructed and presented. Extensive verification and validation leads to insights and range of applicability. Through this experience, the PHAST models are improved upon further to be more applicable in heterogeneous environments. Given this, the models are applied to reproducing high level ab initio energies for gas sorption trajectories of helium atoms in a variety of rare-gas clusters, the geometries of which being representative of sorption-like environments commonly encountered in a porous nanomaterial. This work seeks to push forward the state of classical and first principles materials modeling. Additionally, the characterization of a new type of tunable radical metal---carbene is presented. Here, a cobalt(II)---porphyrin complex, [Co(Por)], was investigated to understand its role as an effective catalyst in stereoselective cyclopropanation of a diazoacetate reagent. Density functional theory along with natural bond order analysis and charge decomposition analysis gave insight into the electronics of the catalytic intermediate. The bonding pattern unveiled a new class of radical metal---carbene complex, with a doublet cobalt into which a triplet carbene

  11. Chemical Vapor Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    The generation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by Chemical Vapor Synthesis (CVS) may be described from the point of view of chemical engineering as a sequence of unit operations among which reactant delivery, reaction energy input, and product separation are key processes which determine the product characteristics and quality required by the applications of nanoparticles and powders. In case of CVS, the volatility of the reactants (precursors) may severely limit the possible type of products as well as the production rate. It is shown that these limits can be lifted by use of a laser flash evaporator which also enables the use of precursor mixtures for the production of complex oxides as shown for Co-doped ZnO and the pulsed operation to influence powder characteristics. The mode in which energy is supplied to the particle synthesis reactor has also substantial influence on particle and powder characteristics as is shown for TiO2 using different time-temperatureprofiles.

  12. Plasmon-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David A; Greengard, Leslie; Brongersma, Mark; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Goodwin, David G

    2006-11-01

    We introduce a new chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process that can be used to selectively deposit materials of many different types. The technique makes use of the plasmon resonance in nanoscale metal structures to produce the local heating necessary to initiate deposition when illuminated by a focused low-power laser. We demonstrate the technique, which we refer to as plasmon-assisted CVD (PACVD), by patterning the spatial deposition of PbO and TiO(2) on glass substrates coated with a dispersion of 23 nm gold particles. The morphology of both oxide deposits is consistent with local laser-induced heating of the gold particles by more than 150 degrees C. We show that temperature changes of this magnitude are consistent with our analysis of the heat-loss mechanisms. The technique is general and can be used to spatially control the deposition of virtually any material for which a CVD process exists.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  14. Electrical properties of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal-organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  15. Classification Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Chemical Vapor Detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hinshaw, Huynh A

    2006-01-01

    .... This is accomplished by the detection and identification of chemical agents. The Air Force has several instruments to detect chemical vapors, but is always looking for lighter, faster, and more accurate technology for a better capability...

  16. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  17. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS and EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors

  18. Understanding the chemical vapor deposition of diamond: recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J E; Mankelevich, Y A; Cheesman, A; Ma, Jie; Ashfold, M N R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review and provide an overview to the understanding of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond materials with a particular focus on the commonly used microwave plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The major topics covered are experimental measurements in situ to diamond CVD reactors, and MPCVD in particular, coupled with models of the gas phase chemical and plasma kinetics to provide insight into the distribution of critical chemical species throughout the reactor, followed by a discussion of the surface chemical process involved in diamond growth.

  19. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As1−xBix/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Wood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of GaAs1−xBix/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs1−xBix well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast” scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs1−xBix alloys as they currently are grown.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  1. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  2. A Chemical Role for Trichloromethane: Room-Temperature Removal of Coordinated Solvents from Open Metal Sites in the Copper-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Sun; Bae, Jinhee; Lee, Eun Ji; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2018-04-17

    Open coordination sites (OCSs) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown potential in applications such as molecular separation, sorption, catalysis, and sensing. Thus, the removal of coordinated solvent has been viewed as an essential step that needs to be performed prior to the use of the MOFs in the above applications. To date, a thermal method that is normally performed by applying heat and vacuum has been the most commonly employed activation method despite its negative influence on the structural integrity of the MOFs. In this report, we demonstrate that commonly inert trichloromethane (TCM) can activate OCSs; the TCM treatment process serves as an alternative chemical route to activation that does not require the external thermal energy. On the basis of the Raman study, we suggest a possible mechanism for the chemical activation process where TCM may weakly coordinate to the OCSs and then spontaneously dissociate. In addition, we prove that the chemical activation behavior is substantially boosted when a small amount of external heat energy (55 °C, 2.6 meV) is supplied during the TCM treatment. Using an HKUST-1-polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) mixed matrix (MM), we also demonstrate that this chemical activation strategy is a safe way to activate thermally deformable MOF-polymer mixed matrices.

  3. InP by Planar Reactive Deposition and GaAs by Low Pressure Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    This inter- pretation is consistent with the fact that In2S3 is quite stable,(L7,18) whereas Cd2P 3 is quite volatile. (19) InP did not form until the...hypothesis regarding InP grain boundary passivation. Besides InP and CdS, the compounds Cd 2P3 , CdIn 2 S4 (Ref. 20) and (CdS)3x - ( In2S3 ).x (Ref. 18...PROCESSING: 2HRSAT425 C CdS +,(BARS) 1 GLASS SIDE VIEW I n (S)~,I (DOTS)~ (BARS) In2S3 (DOTS) (Cd) Figure 6. Scanning electron microscope (left) and

  4. SAW Sensors for Chemical Vapors and Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Jagannath; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Greve, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology provides a sensitive platform for sensing chemicals in gaseous and fluidic states with the inherent advantages of passive and wireless operation. In this review, we provide a general overview on the fundamental aspects and some major advances of Rayleigh wave-based SAW sensors in sensing chemicals in a gaseous phase. In particular, we review the progress in general understanding of the SAW chemical sensing mechanism, optimization of the sensor characteristics, and the development of the sensors operational at different conditions. Based on previous publications, we suggest some appropriate sensing approaches for particular applications and identify new opportunities and needs for additional research in this area moving into the future. PMID:28397760

  5. Metal Organic Framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    X-ray crystallography is the most comprehensive character- ization tool to gain a molecular level understanding of a range of crystalline materials. One of the recent areas in which research with the aid of crystallography has exploded, is the metal organic frameworks (MOFs). These are porous crystal- line solids with ...

  6. Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Molecule Matters - Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). R Sarvanakumar S Sankararaman. Feature Article Volume 12 Issue 11 November 2007 pp 77-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Post-synthesis amine borane functionalization of metal-organic framework and its unusual chemical hydrogen release phenomenon

    KAUST Repository

    Berke, Heinz

    2017-05-11

    We report a novel strategy for post-synthesis amine borane functionalization of MOFs under gas-solid phase transformation utilizing gaseous diborane. The covalently confined amine borane derivative decorated on the framework backbone is stable when preserved at low temperature, but spontaneously liberates soft chemical hydrogen at room temperature leading to the development of an unusual borenium type species (-NH=BH2+) ion-paired with hydroborate anion. Furthermore, the unsaturated amino borane (-NH=BH2) and the -iminodiborane ((--NHB2H5) were detected as final products. A combination of DFT based molecular dynamics simulations and solid state NMR spectroscopy, utilizing isotopically enriched materials, were undertaken to unequivocally elucidate the mechanistic pathways for H2 liberation.

  8. Effect of vapor-phase oxygen on chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Tomo-o.; Saiki, Koichiro

    2015-03-01

    To obtain a large-area single-crystal graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on Cu is considered the most promising. Recently, the surface oxygen on Cu has been found to suppress the nucleation of graphene. However, the effect of oxygen in the vapor phase was not elucidated sufficiently. Here, we investigate the effect of O2 partial pressure (PO2) on the CVD growth of graphene using radiation-mode optical microscopy. The nucleation density of graphene decreases monotonically with PO2, while its growth rate reaches a maximum at a certain pressure. Our results indicate that PO2 is an important parameter to optimize in the CVD growth of graphene.

  9. Physical-chemical and technological aspects of the preparation of think layers of the high temperature superconductors Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O by method of metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stejskal, J.; Nevriva, M.; Leitner, J.

    1995-01-01

    The method of metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MO VPE) was used for preparation of think layers of the high temperature superconductors Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O. The suitable chemical precursors (β-diketonates) on the literature data and of the own thermodynamic calculations were selected. The optimal thermodynamic data and thermodynamic stability of the prepared samples were determined

  10. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  11. Chemical vapor deposition: A technique for applying protective coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, T.C. Sr.; Bowman, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition is discussed as a technique for applying coatings for materials protection in energy systems. The fundamentals of the process are emphasized in order to establish a basis for understanding the relative advantages and limitations of the technique. Several examples of the successful application of CVD coating are described. 31 refs., and 18 figs.

  12. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  13. Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teslenko, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of investigation of chemical reactions of deposition of different substances from the gas phase when using the energy of pulse quasicontinuous and continuous radiation of lasers in the wave length interval from 0.193 to 10.6 μm are generalized. Main attetion is paid to deposition of inorganic substances including nonmetals (C, Si, Ge and others), metals (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd, Al, Cr, Mo, W, Ni) and some simple compounds. Experimental data on the effect of laser radiation parameters and reagent nature (hydrides, halogenides, carbonyls, alkyl organometallic compounds and others) on the deposition rate and deposit composition are described in detail. Specific features of laser-chemical reactions of deposition and prospects of their application are considered

  14. Metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy of InAs/InGaAsP quantum dots for laser applications at 1.5 μm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenova, Elizaveta; Kulkova, Irina; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2011-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of InAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum dots (QDs) for emission around 1.5 mu m by depositing a thin layer of GaAs on top of the QDs is presented in this letter. The infuence of various growth parameters on the properties of the QDs, in particular, size, shape, chemical composition......, and emission wavelength are investigated. Continuous wave lasing in ridge waveguide QD laser structures in the 1.5 mu m wavelength range is demonstrated. VC 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3634029]...

  15. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  16. Effect of chemical structure of S-nitrosothiols on nitric oxide release mediated by the copper sites of a metal organic framework based environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Edinbyrd, Kiara; Li, Tanping; Kumar, Revati

    2017-05-17

    The effect of chemical structure of different biologically compatible S-nitrosothiols on the solvation environment at catalytic copper sites in a metal organic framework (MOF) suspended in a solution of ethanol is probed using computational methods. The use of a copper based MOF as a storage vehicle and catalyst (copper sites of the MOF) in the controlled and sustained release of chemically stored nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosocysteine has been shown to occur both experimentally and computationally [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 3330-3333; Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 23403]. Previous studies on a copper based MOF, namely HKUST-1, concluded that modifications in the R-group of s-nitrosothiols and/or organic linkers of MOFs led to a method capable of modulating NO release. In order to test the hypothesis that larger R-groups slow down NO release, four different RSNOs (R = cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine or glutathione) of varying size were investigated, which in turn required the use of a larger copper based MOF. Due to its desirable copper centers and more extensive framework, MOF-143, an analog of HKUST-1 was chosen to further explore both the effect of different RSNOs as well as MOF environments on NO release. Condensed phase classical molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to study the effect of the complex MOF environment as well as the chemical structure and size of the RSNO on the species on the catalytic reaction. The results indicate that in addition to the size of the RSNO species and the organic linkers within the MOF, the reaction rates can be modulated by the molecular structure of the RSNO and furthermore combining different RSNO species can also be used to tune the rate of NO release.

  17. Effect of growth conditions on the Al composition and optical properties of Al x Ga 1−x N layers grown by atmospheric-pressure metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Soltani, S.

    2017-02-17

    The effect of growth conditions on the Al composition and optical properties of AlxGa1-xN layers grown by atmospheric-pressure metal organic vapor phase epitaxy is investigated. The Al content of the samples is varied between 3.0% and 9.3% by changing the gas flow rate of either trimethylaluminum (TMA) or trimethylgallium (TMG) while other growth parameters are kept constant. The optical properties of the AlxGa1-xN layers are studied by photoreflectance and time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectroscopies. A degeneration in the material quality of the samples is revealed when the Al content is increased by increasing the TMA flow rate. When the TMG flow rate is decreased with a fixed TMA flow rate, the Al content of the AlxGa1-xN layers is increased and, furthermore, an improvement in the optical properties corresponding with an increase in the PL decay time is observed. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclodextrin-based metal-organic frameworks particles as efficient carriers for lansoprazole: Study of morphology and chemical composition of individual particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Guo, Tao; Lachmanski, Laurent; Manoli, Francesco; Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Manet, Ilse; Guo, Zhen; Wu, Li; Zhang, Jiwen; Gref, Ruxandra

    2017-10-15

    Cyclodextrin-based metal-organic frameworks (CD-MOFs) represent an environment-friendly and biocompatible class of MOFs drawing increasing attention in drug delivery. Lansoprazole (LPZ) is a proton-pump inhibitor used to reduce the production of acid in the stomach and recently identified as an antitubercular prodrug. Herein, LPZ loaded CD-MOFs were successfully synthesized upon the assembly with γ-CD in the presence of K + ions using an optimized co-crystallization method. They were characterized in terms of morphology, size and crystallinity, showing almost perfect cubic morphologies with monodispersed size distributions. The crystalline particles, loaded or not with LPZ, have mean diameters of around 6μm. The payloads reached 23.2±2.1% (wt) which corresponds to a molar ratio of 1:1 between LPZ and γ-CD. It was demonstrated that even after two years storage, the incorporated drug inside the CD-MOFs maintained its spectroscopic characteristics. Molecular modelling provided a deeper insight into the interaction between the LPZ and CD-MOFs. Raman spectra of individual particles were recorded, confirming the formation of inclusion complexes within the tridimensional CD-MOF structures. Of note, it was found that each individual particle had the same chemical composition. The LPZ-loaded particles had remarkable homogeneity in terms of both drug loading and size. These results pave the way towards the use of CD-MOFs for drug delivery purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gas analysis during the chemical vapor deposition of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, M.L.; Noles, G.T.

    1973-01-01

    Gas chromatographic analyses were performed during the chemical vapor deposition of carbon in both isothermal and thermal gradient systems. Such data offer insight into the gas phase processes which occur during deposition and the interrelations which exist between gas composition, deposition rate, and resultant structure of the deposit. The results support a carbon CVD model presented previously. The application of chromatographic analysis to research, development, and full-scale facilities is shown. (U.S.)

  20. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  1. New rht-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Acylamide Groups for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Fixation from Raw Power Plant Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhen; Chen, Cong; Bai, Junfeng; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2016-11-23

    The combination of carbon dioxide capture and chemical fixation in a one-pot process is attractive for both chemists and governments. The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is an atomic economical reaction without any side products. By incorporating acylamide to enhance the binding affinity toward CO 2 , new rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with (3, 28) and (3, 24) connected units were constructed. Zn-NTTA with two types of dinuclear paddlewheel building blocks-{Zn 2 (OOC - ) 4 } and {Zn 2 (OOC - ) 3 }. The high uptake of CO 2 (115.6 cm 3 ·g -1 ) and selectivity over N 2 (30:1) at 273 K indicated that these MOFs are excellent candidates for postcombustion CO 2 isolation and capture. The MOFs feature high catalytic activity, rapid dynamics of transformation and excellent stability with turnover number (TON) values up to 110 000 per paddlewheel unit after 5 × 6 rounds of recyclability, demonstrating that they are promising heterogeneous catalysts for CO 2 cyclo-addition to value-added cyclic carbonates. The cycloaddition of epoxides with wet gases demonstrated that the catalyst activity was not affected by moisture, and the indices of the PXRD patterns of the bulk samples filtered from the catalytic reaction revealed that the crystallinities were maintained. The combination of the selective capture and catalytic transformation in one-pot enables the use of a negative-cost feedstock-raw power plant flue gas without any separation and purification-revealing the broad prospects of such MOFs for practical CO 2 fixation in industry.

  2. Wafer-scale controlled exfoliation of metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN multi quantum well structures using low-tack two-dimensional layered h-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayari, Taha; Li, Xin; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean Paul [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, LMOPS, EA 4423, 57070 Metz (France)

    2016-04-25

    Recent advances in epitaxial growth have led to the growth of III-nitride devices on 2D layered h-BN. This advance has the potential for wafer-scale transfer to arbitrary substrates, which could improve the thermal management and would allow III-N devices to be used more flexibly in a broader range of applications. We report wafer scale exfoliation of a metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN Multi Quantum Well (MQW) structure from a 5 nm thick h-BN layer that was grown on a 2-inch sapphire substrate. The weak van der Waals bonds between h-BN atomic layers break easily, allowing the MQW structure to be mechanically lifted off from the sapphire substrate using a commercial adhesive tape. This results in the surface roughness of only 1.14 nm on the separated surface. Structural characterizations performed before and after the lift-off confirm the conservation of structural properties after lift-off. Cathodoluminescence at 454 nm was present before lift-off and 458 nm was present after. Electroluminescence near 450 nm from the lifted-off structure has also been observed. These results show that the high crystalline quality ultrathin h-BN serves as an effective sacrificial layer—it maintains performance, while also reducing the GaN buffer thickness and temperature ramps as compared to a conventional two-step growth method. These results support the use of h-BN as a low-tack sacrificial underlying layer for GaN-based device structures and demonstrate the feasibility of large area lift-off and transfer to any template, which is important for industrial scale production.

  3. Improvements in electrical properties of (Ba,Sr)TiO3 capacitor with chemical vapor deposited Pt top electrode using Pt hexafluoroacetylacetonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Myeong; Kang, Sang Yeol; Shin, Ju Cheol; Kim, Won Joon; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    1999-06-01

    Electrical properties of (Bs,Sr)TiO3 (BST) thin films are characterized with sputtered and metal organic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) Pt top electrodes. BST films with MOCVD Pt top electrodes, which were deposited using Pt(CF3COCHCOCF3)2 (Pt-HFA) as a precursor, showed less leakage current without bulged curves and a higher dielectric constant than those with sputtered Pt top electrodes. The improvement of electrical properties seems to result from the reduction of interface trap sites with the incorporation of fluorine atoms from HFA ligands.

  4. Kinetics, Chemistry, and Morphology of Syngas Photoinitiated Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhanian, Donya; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Tavares, Jason R

    2017-02-28

    Syngas is the product of gasification processes and is used for the production of petrochemicals. Little attention has been paid to its use in the production of oligomeric thin films under ambient conditions. Herein, the nature of the photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition of films made from syngas using high-wavelength ultraviolet light is discussed, including an exploration of the oligomeric films' structure, synthesis mechanism, and growth kinetics. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses provide insight into the chemical structure, illustrating the effect of photogenerated radicals in the formation of aliphatic, anhydride, and cyclic structures. The films are covalently bonded to the substrate and chemically uniform. Electron and atomic force microscopy identify an islandlike morphology for the deposit. These insights into the mechanism and structure are linked to processing parameters through a study on the effect of residence time and treatment duration on the deposition rate, as determined through profilometry.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory metals and ceramics III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallois, B.M.; Lee, W.Y.; Pickering, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume were originally presented at Symposium K on Chemical Vapor Deposition of Refractory Metals and Ceramics III, held at the Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society in Boston, Massachusetts, on November 28--30, 1994. This symposium was sponsored by Morton International Inc., Advanced Materials, and by The Department of Energy-Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of this symposium was to exchange scientific information on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metallic and ceramic materials. CVD technology is receiving much interest in the scientific community, in particular, to synthesize new materials with tailored chemical composition and physical properties that offer multiple functionality. Multiphase or multilayered films, functionally graded materials (FGMs), ''smart'' material structures and nanocomposites are some examples of new classes of materials being produced via CVD. As rapid progress is being made in many interdisciplinary research areas, this symposium is intended to provide a forum for reporting new scientific results and addressing technological issues relevant to CVD materials and processes. Thirty four papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  6. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  7. Kinetics of chemical vapor deposition of boron on molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, W.; Nakaanishi, N.; Kato, E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental rate data of chemical vapor deposition of boron by reduction of boron trichloride with hydrogen are analyzed to determine the reaction mechanism. The reaction orders with respect to the partial pressures of hydrogen and boron trichloride are one half and one third, respectively. It has been found that the outer layer of a deposited film is Mo/sub 2/B/sub 5/ and the inner layer is MoB by the use of X-ray diffraction and EPMA line analysis

  8. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  9. Chemical etching of copper foils for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Naoki; Noda, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    Chemical etching on copper surface is essential as a pre-treatment for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Here, we investigated the effect of chemical etching treatment on copper foils for single-layer graphene CVD growth. The chemical etching conditions, such as the type of chemical etchants and the treatment time, were found to strongly influence the graphene domain size. Moreover, a drastic change in the layer structure of graphene sheets, which was attributed to the surface morphology of the etched copper foil, was confirmed by graphene transmittance and Raman mapping measurements.

  10. Mechanical Alloying of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Tamas; Horike, Satoshi; Hagi, Keisuke; Ogiwara, Naoki; Kadota, Kentaro; Itakura, Tomoya; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2017-02-20

    The solvent-free mechanical milling process for two distinct metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals induced the formation of a solid solution, which is not feasible by conventional solution-based syntheses. X-ray and STEM-EDX studies revealed that performing mechanical milling under an Ar atmosphere promotes the high diffusivity of each metal ion in an amorphous solid matrix; the amorphous state turns into the porous crystalline structure by vapor exposure treatment to form a new phase of a MOF solid solution. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Modeling of flame assisted chemical vapor deposition of silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, M.; Cavallotti, C.; Raffa, E. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    The simulation of a flame assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) process is here proposed with reference to the growth of silicon thin films through the silane/chlorosilanes/hydrogen/chlorine route. The goal is to design a reactor able to deposit micromorphous or multicrystalline films at the high growth rates necessary for photovoltaic applications. In fact, since FACVD processes can operate in atmospheric conditions and in auto-thermal mode, they present significant energetic advantages with respect to the plasma assisted technology used today. This work is in particular devoted to illustrate the multi-hierarchical modeling procedure adopted to determine the process optimal operating conditions and to design the deposition chamber. Different burner geometries (single, porous or multiple nozzles burner) were investigated in order to exploit the advantages of the two classical stagnation flow and Bunsen stretched flames. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Anisotropic Friction of Wrinkled Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Fei; Yasaei, Poya; Yao, Wentao; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2017-06-21

    Wrinkle structures are commonly seen on graphene grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method due to the different thermal expansion coefficient between graphene and its substrate. Despite the intensive investigations focusing on the electrical properties, the nanotribological properties of wrinkles and the influence of wrinkle structures on the wrinkle-free graphene remain less understood. Here, we report the observation of anisotropic nanoscale frictional characteristics depending on the orientation of wrinkles in CVD-grown graphene. Using friction force microscopy, we found that the coefficient of friction perpendicular to the wrinkle direction was ∼194% compare to that of the parallel direction. Our systematic investigation shows that the ripples and "puckering" mechanism, which dominates the friction of exfoliated graphene, plays even a more significant role in the friction of wrinkled graphene grown by CVD. The anisotropic friction of wrinkled graphene suggests a new way to tune the graphene friction property by nano/microstructure engineering such as introducing wrinkles.

  13. Tribological Properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene Coating Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Kim, Se Chang; Baek, Seung Guk; Lee, Jong Gu; Choi, Jae-Boong; Seok, Chang Sung; Kim, Moon Ki; Koo, Ja Choon; Lim, Byeong Soo; Kang, Junmo

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has recently received high attention as a promising material for various applications, and many related studies have been undertaken to reveal its basic mechanical properties. However, the tribological properties of graphene film fabricated by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are barely known. In this study, the contact angle and frictional wear characteristics of graphene coated copper film were investigated under room temperature, normal air pressure, and no lubrication condition. The contact angle was measured by sessile drop method and the wear test was carried out under normal loads of 660 mN and 2940 mN, respectively. The tribological behaviors of a graphene coating layer were also examined. Compared to heat treated bare copper foil, the graphene coated one shows a higher contact angle and lower friction coefficient.

  14. Tribological Properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene Coating Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Kim, Se Chang; Baek, Seung Guk; Lee, Jong Gu; Choi, Jae-Boong; Seok, Chang Sung; Kim, Moon Ki; Koo, Ja Choon; Lim, Byeong Soo [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Junmo [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Graphene has recently received high attention as a promising material for various applications, and many related studies have been undertaken to reveal its basic mechanical properties. However, the tribological properties of graphene film fabricated by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are barely known. In this study, the contact angle and frictional wear characteristics of graphene coated copper film were investigated under room temperature, normal air pressure, and no lubrication condition. The contact angle was measured by sessile drop method and the wear test was carried out under normal loads of 660 mN and 2940 mN, respectively. The tribological behaviors of a graphene coating layer were also examined. Compared to heat treated bare copper foil, the graphene coated one shows a higher contact angle and lower friction coefficient.

  15. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  16. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  17. Kinetics of chemical vapor deposition of boron on molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Nakanishi, N.; Kato, E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental rate data of chemical vapor deposition of boron by reduction of boron trichloride with hydrogen are analyzed to determine the reaction mechanism. The experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure. The weight change of the sample was noted by means of a thermobalance. Molybdenum was used as the substrate. It has been found that the outer layer of the deposited film is Mo/sub 2/B/sub 5/ and the inner layer is MoB, and in the stational state of the reaction, the diffusion in the solid state is considered not to be rate controlling. When mass transport limitation was absent, the reaction orders with respect to boron trichloride and hydrogen were one third and one half, respectively. By comparing these orders with those obtained from Langmuir-Hinshelwood type equations, the rate controlling mechanism is identified to be the desorption of hydrogen chloride from the substrate

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of cadmium tellurium films for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.S.; Chu, T.L.; Han, K.D.; Liu, Y.Z.; Mantravadi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium telluride films have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS), and their structural and electrical properties have been characterized in detail. The CVD technique has the advantage of controlling the electrical resistivity of p-CdTe films while the CST technique is capable of depositing p-CdTe films at high rates. Thin film heterojunction solar cells of the configuration p-CdTe/CdS/SnO/sub 2/:F/glass have been prepared by the deposition techniques. Solar cells of 1 cm/sup 2/ or larger in area with AM1.5 (global) efficiency of 10.5% have been prepared

  19. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  20. New luminescence lines in nanodiamonds obtained by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V. G.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Feoktistov, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The spectral characteristics of the photoluminescence lines detected for nanodiamonds obtained by the reactive ion etching of diamond particles in oxygen plasma, deposited by chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate, are studied. At room temperature, narrow lines are observed in the visible and infrared spectral regions, with a full width at half-maximum in the range of 1-2 nm at an almost complete absence of a broadband photoluminescence background signal. At decreasing temperature, the lines narrowed to 0.2-0.6 nm at T = 79 K, and the minimum line width was 0.055 nm at T = 10 K. With increasing temperature, the narrow lines shifted to the long-wavelength region of the spectrum, and their intensity decreased.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.

    2015-09-01

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  2. Growth and Characterization of (211)B Cadmium Telluride Buffer Layer Grown by Metal-organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy on Nanopatterned Silicon for Mercury Cadmium Telluride Based Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintri, Shashidhar S.

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT or Hg1-xCdxTe) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is presently the material of choice for fabricating infrared (IR) detectors used in night vision based military applications. The focus of MCT epitaxy has gradually shifted since the last decade to using Si as the starting substrate since it offers several advantages. But the ˜19 % lattice mismatch between MCT and Si generates lots of crystal defects some of which degrade the performance of MCT devices. Hence thick CdTe films are used as buffer layers on Si to accommodate the defects. However, growth of high quality single crystal CdTe on Si is challenging and to date, the best MBE CdTe/Si reportedly has defects in the mid-105 cm -2 range. There is a critical need to reduce the defect levels by at least another order of magnitude, which is the main motivation behind the present work. The use of alternate growth technique called metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) offers some advantages over MBE and in this work MOVPE has been employed to grow the various epitaxial films. In the first part of this work, conditions for obtaining high quality (211)B CdTe epitaxy on (211)Si were achieved, which also involved studying the effect of having additional intermediate buffer layers such as Ge and ZnTe and incorporation of in-situ thermal cyclic annealing (TCA) to reduce the dislocation density. A critical problem of Si cross-contamination due to 'memory effect' of different reactant species was minimized by introducing tertiarybutylArsine (TBAs) which resulted in As-passivation of (211)Si. The best 8-10 µm thick CdTe films on blanket (non-patterned) Si had dislocations around 3×105 cm-2, which are the best reported by MOVPE till date and comparable to the highest quality films available by MBE. In the second part of the work, nanopatterned (211)Si was used to study the effect of patterning on the crystal quality of epitaxial CdTe. In one such study, patterning of ˜20 nm holes in SiO2

  3. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  4. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  5. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which form perfectly polar assemblies in their crystalline state are found to organize as uniaxially oriented crystallites in vapor deposited thin films on glass substrate.

  6. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  7. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  8. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis

  9. Chemically vapor deposited coatings for multibarrier containment of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.; Shade, J.W.; Kidd, R.W.; Browning, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was selected as a feasible method to coat ceramic cores, since the technology has previously been demonstrated for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles. CVD coatings, including SiC, PyC (pyrolytic carbon), SiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 were studied. This paper will discuss the development and characterization of PyC and Al 2 O 3 CVD coatings on supercalcine cores. Coatings were applied to 2 mm particles in either fluidized or vibrating beds. The PyC coating was deposited in a fluidized bed with ZrO 2 diluent from C 2 H 2 at temperatures between 1100 and 1200 0 C. The Al 2 O 3 coatings were deposited in a vibrated bed by a two-stage process to minimize loss of PyC during the overcoating operation. This process involved applying 10 μm of Al 2 O 3 using water vapor hydrolysis of AlCl 3 and then switching to the more surface-controlled hydrolysis via the H 2 + CO 2 reaction (3CO 2 + 3H 2 + 2AlCl 3 = Al 2 O 3 + 6HCl + 3CO). Typically, 50 to 80 μm Al 2 O 3 coatings were applied over 30 to 40 μm PyC coatings. The coatings were evaluated by metallographic examination, PyC oxidation tests, and leach resistance. After air oxidation for 100 hours at 750 0 C, the duplex PyC/Al 2 O 3 coated particles exhibited a weight loss of 0.01 percent. Leach resistance is being determined for temperatures from 50 to 150 0 C in various solutions. Typical results are given for selected ions. The leach resistance of supercalcine cores is significantly improved by the application of PyC and/or Al 2 O 3 coatings

  10. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  11. Development of microforming process combined with selective chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microforming has been received much attention in the recent decades due to the wide use of microparts in electronics and medical purpose. For the further functionalization of these micro devices, high functional surface with noble metals and nanomaterials are strongly required in bio- and medical fields, such as bio-sensors. To realize the efficient manufacturing process, which can deform the submillimeter scale bulk structure and can construct the micro to nanometer scale structures in one process, the present study proposes a combined process of microforming for metal foils with a selective chemical vapor deposition (SCVD on the active surface of work materials. To clarify the availability of this proposed process, the feasibility of SCVD of functional materials to active surface of titanium (Ti was investigated. CVD of iron (Fe and carbon nanotubes (CNTs which construct CNTs on the patterned surface of active Ti and non-active oxidation layer were conducted. Ti thin films on silicon substrate and Fe were used as work materials and functional materials, respectively. CNTs were grown on only Ti surface. Consequently, the selectivity of the active surface of Ti to the synthesis of Fe particles in CVD process was confirmed.

  12. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  13. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  14. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu, E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  15. Rapid thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of II VI compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarova, S.; Amir, N.; Nemirovsky, Y.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we analyze the potential benefits of rapid thermal processing combined with metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (RT-MOCVD) for II-VI compounds and review our first results of the application of RT-MOCVD to the growth of CdTe/CdZnTe, CdTe/HgCdTe and ZnTe/CdTe heterostructures. The RT-MOCVD growth of (1 1 1) CdTe and ZnTe was performed in the A.G. Associates Heatpulse CVD-800™ system using a horizontal quartz reactor heated from both sides by tungsten-halogen lamps. The main features of RT-MOCVD of II-VI materials are: very high growth rates (up to 60 μm/h for CdTe and 30 μm/h for ZnTe); low point defect densities in the epilayers; more abrupt interfaces and less substrate surface degradation compared to conventional MOCVD. Potential of RT-MOCVD for MCT passivation has been shown.

  16. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  17. The versatility of hot-filament activated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Lothar; Hoefer, Markus; Kroeger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    In the field of activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond films, hot-filament activation (HF-CVD) is widely used for applications where large deposition areas are needed or three-dimensional substrates have to be coated. We have developed processes for the deposition of conductive, boron-doped diamond films as well as for tribological crystalline diamond coatings on deposition areas up to 50 cm x 100 cm. Such multi-filament processes are used to produce diamond electrodes for advanced electrochemical processes or large batches of diamond-coated tools and parts, respectively. These processes demonstrate the high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of hot-filament CVD. The usability of hot-filament CVD for diamond deposition on three-dimensional substrates is well known for CVD diamond shaft tools. We also develop interior diamond coatings for drawing dies, nozzles, and thread guides. Hot-filament CVD also enables the deposition of diamond film modifications with tailored properties. In order to adjust the surface topography to specific applications, we apply processes for smooth, fine-grained or textured diamond films for cutting tools and tribological applications. Rough diamond is employed for grinding applications. Multilayers of fine-grained and coarse-grained diamond have been developed, showing increased shock resistance due to reduced crack propagation. Hot-filament CVD is also used for in situ deposition of carbide coatings and diamond-carbide composites, and the deposition of non-diamond, silicon-based films. These coatings are suitable as diffusion barriers and are also applied for adhesion and stress engineering and for semiconductor applications, respectively

  18. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuve, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M.G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M.E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma 'Tor Vergata' University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12 C ions produced by 15MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (100) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α 0 ) 9 Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5MeV for 14.8MeV neutrons and 0.3MeV for 14.1MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams

  19. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  20. Surface morphological properties of CdxZn(1-x)S thin films deposited by low-cost atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapour deposition technique (AP-MOCVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruddin, Nurhafiza; Yusoff, Yulisa; Hossain, Towhid; Amin, Nowshad; Akhtaruzzaman, Md.

    2017-11-01

    The CdxZn(1-x)S films have been deposited by low cost atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapour deposition (AP-MOCVD) technique and the resulting morphological properties were successfully evaluated for solar cell applications. All morphological properties presented here were investigated by Field-Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) spectroscopy. It has been observed that the film thickness and grain size have been greatly influenced by the molar ratio of cadmium and zinc, deposition temperature and time. The average grain size of Cd0.5Zn0.5S films (98.16 nm thick) was obtained with deposition temperature and time of 440°C and 2.5 minutes, respectively.

  1. Formation and some properties of Fe core-shell powders with experimental parameters of the chemical vapor condensation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.C.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, Y.D.; Kim, J.S.; Choi, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Core-shell powders, recently, have aroused interest because of their potential applications in various areas such as electronics, optics, catalysis, ferrofluids, and magnetic data storage. Their unique properties and superior performances are determined by their powder size, shell thickness and surface structure, phase and powder interaction. In this study, carbon-coated Fe core-shell powders were prepared by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) process using Fe metal-organic (Fe(CO) 5 ) precursor and carbon containing carrier gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. Effects of experimental parameters on the properties of the as-produced core-shell powders were studied by X-ray diffractometer, Brunauer-Emitter-Teller analyzer, high resolution transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. The microstructures and phases of the synthesized core-shell powders varied with the decomposition temperature of the precursors and the flow rate of the carrier gases. CVC Fe powders showed intricate long stand-like structure because of intrinsic magnetic properties of Fe.

  2. Metal-organic frameworks in chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Kareem; Aqel, Ahmad; ALOthman, Zeid

    2014-06-27

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) emerged approximately two decades ago and are the youngest class of porous materials. Despite their short existence, MOFs are finding applications in a variety of fields because of their outstanding chemical and physical properties. This review article focuses on the applications of MOFs in chromatography, including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), and other chromatographic techniques. The use of MOFs in chromatography has already had a significant impact; however, the utilisation of MOFs in chromatography is still less common than other applications, and the number of MOF materials explored in chromatography applications is limited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrical conductivity and oxygen exchange kinetics of La2NiO4+delta thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, G.; Burriel, M.; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial c-axis oriented La2NiO4+delta films were deposited onto SrTiO3 and NdGaO3 substrates by the pulsed injection metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Experimental conditions were optimized in order to accurately control the composition, thickness, and texture of the layers. X......-ray diffraction was used to confirm the high crystalline quality of the obtained material. Electrical characterizations were performed on thin (50 nm) and thick (335 nm) layers. The total specific conductivity, which is predominantly electronic, was found to be larger for the thinner films measured (50 nm......), probably due to the effect of the strain present in the layers. Those thin films (50 nm) showed values even larger than those observed for single crystals and, to our knowledge, are the largest conductivity values reported to date for the La2NiO4+delta material. The oxygen exchange kinetics was studied...

  4. Photovoltaic conversion of visible spectrum by GaP capped InP quantum dots grown on Si (100) by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Nripendra N. [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Biswas, Pranab; Banerji, P., E-mail: pallab@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in; Nagabhushan, B.; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Chowdhury, Sisir; Chaudhuri, Arunava [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Kundu, Souvik [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Growth of GaP capped strained InP quantum dots was carried out by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique on Si (100) substrates to explore an alternative material system for photovoltaic conversion. Studies on reflectance spectroscopy show higher absorption of visible photons compared to scattering. Smooth and defect free interface provides low dark current with high rectification ratio. A solar cell made of five periods of quantum dots is found to provide a conversion efficiency of 4.18% with an open circuit voltage and short circuit current density of 0.52 V and 13.64 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively, under AM 1.5 solar radiation.

  5. A Mini-Prototype YBCO SMES Using Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoup, Shara

    2000-01-01

    .... Textured nickel metal substrates were joined by 1 mm joints by several methods and in several physical configurations and then tested for feasibility by using the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD...

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  7. Highly stable [mambf6-n(o/h2o)n(ligand)2(solvent)x]n metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks having high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Metal organic frameworks can comprise metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Further provided are methods of making metal organic frameworks.

  8. Chemical Vapor Transport Deposition of Molybdenum Disulfide Layers Using H2O Vapor as the Transport Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 layers show excellent optical and electrical properties and have many potential applications. However, the growth of high-quality MoS2 layers is a major bottleneck in the development of MoS2-based devices. In this paper, we report a chemical vapor transport deposition method to investigate the growth behavior of monolayer/multi-layer MoS2 using water (H2O as the transport agent. It was shown that the introduction of H2O vapor promoted the growth of MoS2 by increasing the nucleation density and continuous monolayer growth. Moreover, the growth mechanism is discussed.

  9. Processing Research on Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    34 sea urchins ") predominated, suggesting that formation was primarily from the vapor phase with little of the nodular growths seen at only slightly...deposition parameters on crystallite size, morphology and deposition rate. Geometries include a cold-wall, flat plate reactor (CW) and 4-inch and 1-inch...typical crossections of banded deposits and deposits which showed transitions from amorphous to crystalline morphologies , respectively. Figure 2-5

  10. Chemical Vapor Detection with a Multispectral Thermal Imager

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Althouse, Mark L. G; Chang, Chein-I

    1991-01-01

    .... Real-time autonomous detection and alarm is also required. A detection system model by Warren, based on a Gaussian vapor concentration distribution is the basis for detection algorithms. Algorithms recursive in both time and spectral frequency have been derived using Kalman filter theory. Adaptive filtering is used for preprocessing clutter rejection. Various components of the detection system have been tested individually and an integrated system is now being fabricated.

  11. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  12. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  13. 3D Atomic-Scale Insights into Anisotropic Core-Shell-Structured InGaAs Nanowires Grown by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jiangtao; Du, Sichao; Burgess, Tim; Wang, Changhong; Cui, Xiangyuan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Weichao; Tan, Hark Hoe; Liu, Hui; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Hansheng; Khan, Mansoor; Ringer, Simon; Zheng, Rongkun

    2017-08-01

    III-V ternary InGaAs nanowires have great potential for electronic and optoelectronic device applications; however, the 3D structure and chemistry at the atomic-scale inside the nanowires remain unclear, which hinders tailoring the nanowires for specific applications. Here, atom probe tomography is used in conjunction with a first-principles simulation to investigate the 3D structure and chemistry of InGaAs nanowires, and reveals i) the nanowires form a spontaneous core-shell structure with a Ga-enriched core and an In-enriched shell, due to different growth mechanisms in the axial and lateral directions; ii) the shape of the core evolves from hexagon into Reuleaux triangle and grows larger, which results from In outward and Ga inward interdiffusion occurring at the core-shell interface; and iii) the irregular hexagonal shell manifests an anisotropic growth rate on {112}A and {112}B facets. Accordingly, a model in terms of the core-shell shape and chemistry evolution is proposed, which provides fresh insights into the growth of these nanowires. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Refractive Index of III-metal-polar and N-polar AlGaN Waveguides Grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Zgonik, Marc Hoffmann, Ronny Kirste, Milena Bobea, Ramon Collazo, Zlatko Sitar, Seiji Mita , Michael Gerhold North Carolina State University Research...Marc P. Hoffmann,2 Ronny Kirste,2 Milena Bobea,2 Ramon Collazo,2 Zlatko Sitar,2 Seiji Mita ,3 and Michael Gerhold4 1Faculty of Mathematics and Physics...SPIE 8631, 86311T (2013). 28R. Kirste et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 093503 (2011). 29S. Mita et al., Phys. Status Solidi C 8, 2078 (2011). 30R. Ulrich and

  15. Optimization of Strontium Titanate (SrTiO3) Thin Films Fabricated by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) for Microwave-Tunable Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    sccm was used, along with a supplemented oxygen ( O2 ) flow of 1,000 sccm to mitigate O2 vacancies and nonstoichiometry. Prior to sample loading and...growth pressure of 15 Torr for 60 min at a total precursor mass flow rate of 60 μmole/min. The sample was annealed at 750 °C for 60 min in an O2 gas...HT. Reduction of pinhole leakage current of SrTiO3 films by ARF excimer-laser deposition with shadow mask (eclipse method). Japanese Journal of

  16. Selective WSi2 Schottky diodes made by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of WCl6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincat, F.; Regolini, J. L.; Mercier, J.; Bensahel, D.

    1991-12-01

    Selective WSi2/Si Schottky diodes, with an ideality factor of 1.02, are obtained by limited reaction processing chemical vapor deposition at 800 °C, using WCl6 vapor diluted in H2. The deposition temperature is shown to be the most important parameter for defect formation. The diodes were fabricated on patterned and blanket wafers, and no additional thermal treatment is needed to obtain the final diode characteristics.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene at very low pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Thiago Henrique Rodrigues da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    A deposição química de vapor (CVD) de hidrocarbonetos vem se tornando um paradigma para a produção de grafeno em larga escala. No entanto, os mecanismos de crescimento associados ao processo ainda não são totalmente compreendidos, de forma que ainda não é possível um controle sistemático da qualidade dos filmes sintetizados. Nesta tese, apresentamos uma investigação detalhada do crescimento de grafeno por CVD à baixa pressão em um reator de parede fria, utilizando substratos de cobre. Uma com...

  18. Electron emission from nano-structured carbon films fabricated by hot-filament chemical-vapor deposition and microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K H; Lee, K M; Oh, S G; Lee, S I; Koh, K H

    2000-01-01

    The electron-emission characteristics of nano-structured carbon films fabricated by using the HFCVD (hot- filament chemical-vapor deposition) and the MPECVD (microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition) methods with a metal catalyst are presented. According to our observation, neither the formation nor the alignment of nano tubes is absolutely necessary to realize carbon-based electron emitters. However, utilization of chrome as an interlayer between Si substrates and metal catalyst particles results in a great improvement in the emission characteristics and the mechanical stability. Also, fabrication of good electron-emitting carbon films on glass substrates, with sputter-deposited chrome electrodes,at a nominal temperature approx 615 .deg. C was demonstrated.

  19. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  20. Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  1. Sinter-Resistant Platinum Catalyst Supported by Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Soo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Nanophotonics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 South Korea; Li, Zhanyong [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Zheng, Jian [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Platero-Prats, Ana E. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mavrandonakis, Andreas [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Pellizzeri, Steven [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 205 Earle Hall Clemson SC 29634 USA; Ferrandon, Magali [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Vjunov, Aleksei [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Gallington, Leighanne C. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Webber, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Penn, R. Lee [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Getman, Rachel B. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 205 Earle Hall Clemson SC 29634 USA; Cramer, Christopher J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Camaioni, Donald M. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Fulton, John L. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Lercher, Johannes A. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Institute, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstrasse 4 85748 Garching Germany; Farha, Omar K. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Hupp, Joseph T. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2018-01-02

    Installed on the zirconia nodes of a metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 via targeted vapor-phase synthesis. The catalytic Pt clusters, site-isolated by organic linkers, are shown to exhibit high catalytic activity for ethylene hydrogenation while exhibiting resistance to sintering up to 200 degrees C. In situ IR spectroscopy reveals the presence of both single atoms and few-atom clusters that depend upon synthesis conditions. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Xray pair distribution analyses reveal unique changes in chemical bonding environment and cluster size stability while on stream. Density functional theory calculations elucidate a favorable reaction pathway for ethylene hydrogenation with the novel catalyst. These results provide evidence that atomic layer deposition (ALD) in MOFs is a versatile approach to the rational synthesis of size-selected clusters, including noble metals, on a high surface area support.

  2. Thermodynamic calculations for chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1985-03-01

    The composition of vapor and condensed phases at equilibrium and CVD phase diagrams were calculated for the CH 3 SiCl 3 -H 2 -Ar system using a computer code SOLGASMIX-PV, which is based on the free energy minimization method. These calculations showed that β-SiC, β-SiC+C(s), β-SiC+Si(s), β-SiC+Si(l), Si(s), Si(l), or C(s) would be deposited depending on deposition parameters. In the CH 3 SiCl 3 -Ar system, condensed phase was found to be β-SiC+C(s) or C(s). Comparing the calculated CVD phase diagrams with the experimental results from the literature, β-SiC+C(s) and β-SiC+Si(s) were deposited in the experiments at the high temperature (more than 2000K) and low temperature (less than 1700K) parts of a resion, respectively, where only β-SiC would be deposited in the calculations. These are remakable results to consider the deposition mechanism of silicon carbide. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  4. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  5. Optimization of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition silicon oxynitride layers for integrated optics applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussein, M.G.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Sengo, G.; Sengo, G.; Driessen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride $(SiO_{x}N_{y}:H)$ layers were grown from 2% $SiH_{4}/N_{2}$ and $N_{2}O$ gas mixtures by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Layer properties such as refractive index, deposition rate, thickness non-uniformity and hydrogen bond content were correlated to the

  6. Influence of the catalyst type on the growth of carbon nanotubes via methane chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodin, Lucie; Dupuis, Anne-Claire; Rouvière, Emmanuelle; Reiss, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The preparation of the catalyst is one of the key parameters which governs the quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We investigated the influence of three different procedures of catalyst preparation on the type and diameter of CNTs formed under

  7. Monitoring the chemical vapor deposition growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by tapered element oscillating microbalance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švrček, Vladimír; Kleps, I.; Cracioniou, F.; Paillaud, J.L.; Dintzer, T.; Louis, B.; Begin, D.; Pham-Huu, C.; Ledoux, M.-J.; Le Normand, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 18 (2006), 184705/1-184705/11 ISSN 0021-9606 Grant - others:NANOTEMP(XE) HPRN-CT-2002-00192 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) * growth kinetics * catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  8. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely

  9. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mbar...

  10. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique

  11. An analytical kinetic model for chemical-vapor deposition of pureB layers from diborane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical model is established to describe the deposition kinetics and the deposition chamber characteristics that determine the deposition rates of pure boron (PureB-) layers grown by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) from diborane (B2H6) as gas source on a non-rotating silicon

  12. Pattern Dependency and Loading Effect of Pure-Boron-Layer Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    The pattern dependency of pure-boron (PureB) layer chemical-vapor Deposition (CVD) is studied with respect to the correlation between the deposition rate and features like loading effects, deposition parameters and deposition window sizes. It is shown experimentally that the oxide coverage ratio and

  13. Closed-loop control of laser assisted chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de; Bellouard, Y.; Mandamparambil, R.; Haluska, M.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition growth is an attractive mask-less process for growing locally aligned nanotubes in selected places on temperature sensitive substrates. An essential parameter for a successful and reproducible synthesis of nanotubes is the temperature during growth. Here, we

  14. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition silicon oxynitride optimized for application in integrated optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, A.; Lambeck, Paul; Hilderink, L.T.H.; Linders, Petrus W.C.; Popma, T.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon Oxynitride layers are grown from SiH4/N2, NH3 and N2O by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The process is optimized with respect to deposition of layers with excellent uniformity in the layer thickness, high homogeneity of the refractive index and good reproducibility of the layer

  15. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinhol...

  16. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occ...

  17. Growths of indium gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei-Che [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan, E-mail: hong@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    InGaN nanowires (NWs) were grown on Si(100) at 700 °C using Au catalyst in a plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor. As the indium vapor pressure was low around 16 mPa during the growths, only the curved GaN NWs could be grown containing indium impurities. By increasing the indium vapor pressure to 53 mPa during the growths, InGaN NWs were transformed to less curved NWs with a broad distribution of NW diameters from 20 to 90 nm. The room temperature photoluminescence of InGaN NWs grown at a high indium vapor pressure showed a broad emission peak at 417 nm, corresponding to an average of 14.5% indium composition in the NWs, with a large full-width at half maximum of 77 nm. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of InGaN NWs showed that the growth orientation was along [100] for the low indium vapor pressure growths and was transformed to along [001] for the high indium vapor pressure growths. - Highlights: • High-quality single-crystalline InGaN nanowires were synthesized. • The indium content of InGaN nanowires grown at 700 °C did not exceed 15%. • A small amount of indium added into the nanowires induced stacking faults.

  18. Chemical vapor detection using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoo J; Park, Kwan Kyu; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, O; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2011-12-15

    Distributed sensing of gas-phase chemicals using highly sensitive and inexpensive sensors is of great interest for many defense and consumer applications. In this paper we present ppb-level detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a common simulant for sarin gas, with a ppt-level resolution using an improved capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) as a resonant chemical sensor. The improved CMUT operates at a higher resonant frequency of 47.7 MHz and offers an improved mass sensitivity of 48.8 zg/Hz/μm(2) by a factor of 2.7 compared to the previous CMUT sensors developed. A low-noise oscillator using the CMUT resonant sensor as the frequency-selective device was developed for real-time sensing, which exhibits an Allan deviation of 1.65 Hz (3σ) in the presence of a gas flow; this translates into a mass resolution of 80.5 zg/μm(2). The CMUT resonant sensor is functionalized with a 50-nm thick DKAP polymer developed at Sandia National Laboratory for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. To demonstrate ppb-level detection of the improved chemical sensor system, the sensor performance was tested at a certified lab (MIT Lincoln Laboratory), which is equipped with an experimental chemical setup that reliably and accurately delivers a wide range of low concentrations down to 10 ppb. We report a high volume sensitivity of 34.5 ± 0.79 pptv/Hz to DMMP and a good selectivity of the polymer to DMMP with respect to dodecane and 1-octanol.

  19. Multifunctional Metal-Organic Frameworks for Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibo; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-07-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted significant research attention in diverse areas due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics that allow their innovative application in various research fields. Recently, the application of MOFs in heterogeneous photocatalysis for water splitting, CO2 reduction, and organic transformation have emerged, aiming at providing alternative solutions to address the world-wide energy and environmental problems by taking advantage of the unique porous structure together with ample physicochemical properties of the metal centers and organic ligands in MOFs. In this review, the latest progress in MOF-involved solar-to-chemical energy conversion reactions are summarized according to their different roles in the photoredox chemical systems, e.g., photocatalysts, co-catalysts, and hosts. The achieved progress and existing problems are evaluated and proposed, and the opportunities and challenges of MOFs and their related materials for their advanced development in photocatalysis are discussed and anticipated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  1. Rapid synthesis of tantalum oxide dielectric films by microwave microwave-assisted atmospheric chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndiege, Nicholas; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Shannon, Mark A.; Masel, Richard I.

    2008-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition has been used to generate high quality, high-k dielectric films on silicon at high deposition rates with film thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 110 μm using inexpensive equipment. Characterization of the post deposition products was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Film growth was determined to occur via rapid formation and accumulation of tantalum oxide clusters from tantalum (v) ethoxide (Ta(OC 2 H 5 ) 5 ) vapor on the deposition surface

  2. A quantitative infrared spectral library of vapor phase chemicals: applications to environmental monitoring and homeland defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.

    2004-12-01

    The utility of infrared spectroscopy for monitoring and early warning of accidental or deliberate chemical releases to the atmosphere is well documented. Regardless of the monitoring technique (open-path or extractive) or weather the spectrometer is passive or active (Fourier transform or lidar) a high quality, quantitative reference library is essential for meaningful interpretation of the data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory through the support of the Department of Energy has been building a library of pure, vapor phase chemical species for the last 4 years. This infrared spectral library currently contains over 300 chemicals and is expected to grow to over 400 chemicals before completion. The library spectra are based on a statistical fit to many spectra at different concentrations, allowing for rigorous error analysis. The contents of the library are focused on atmospheric pollutants, naturally occurring chemicals, toxic industrial chemicals and chemicals specifically designed to do damage. Applications, limitations and technical details of the spectral library will be discussed.

  3. The Improvement of Utilization Ratio of Metal Organic Sources for the Low Cost Preparation of MOCVD-synthesized YBCO Films based on a Self-heating Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruipeng; Liu, Qing; Xia, Yudong; Tao, Bowan; Li, Yanrong

    2017-12-01

    We have successfully applied metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) to synthesize biaxially textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) superconducting films on the templates of LaMnO3/epitaxial MgO/IBAD-MgO/solution deposition planarization (SDP) Y2O3/Hastelloy tape. The YBCO films have obtained dense and smooth surface with good structure and performance. A new self-heating method, which replaced the conventional heating-wire radiation heating method, has been used to heat the Hastelloy metal tapes by us. Compared with the heating-wire radiation heating method, the self-heating method shows higher energy efficiency and lower power consumption, which has good advantage to simplify the structure of the MOCVD system. Meanwhile, the utilization ratio of metal organic sources can be increased from 6% to 20% through adopting the new self-heating method. Then the preparation cost of the YBCO films can be also greatly reduced.

  4. Monolayer Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) via Chlorine-Driven Chemical Vapor Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modtland, Brian J; Navarro-Moratalla, Efren; Ji, Xiang; Baldo, Marc; Kong, Jing

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale production of high-quality tungsten disulfide (WS 2 ) monolayers is a prerequisite for potential device applications using this promising transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductor. The most researched technique is chemical vapor deposition, typically involving the reaction of sulfur vapors with tungsten oxide. Other techniques such as physical vapor deposition have been explored with some success, but low vapor pressures make growth difficult. This study demonstrates a growth process that relies on halide-driven vapor transport commonly utilized in bulk crystal growth. Using a small amount of sodium chloride salt as a source of chlorine, nonvolatile WS 2 can react to form gaseous tungsten chloride and sulfur. With an open tube system, a controlled reaction generates mono and few-layer WS 2 crystals. Optical and physical characterization of the monolayer material shows good uniformity and triangular domains over 50 µm in length. Photoluminescence transient measurements show similar nonlinear exciton dynamics as exfoliated flakes, attributed to multiparticle physics. Requiring only the powder of the desired crystal and appropriate halide salt as precursors, the technique has the potential to realize other layered materials that are challenging to grow with current processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen; Chen, Mingming; Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei; Chen, Anqi; Zhu, Hai; Tang, Zikang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future. - Highlights: • High-quality aligned ZnO nanowires were obtained via modified chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure. • The semi-open quartz tube plays very important roles in growing ZnO nanowires. • The transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber.

  6. Growth of aligned ZnO nanowires via modified atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuping; Li, Chengchen [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Mingming, E-mail: andychain@live.cn [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Yu, Xiao; Chang, Yunwei [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Chen, Anqi [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhu, Hai, E-mail: zhuhai5@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Tang, Zikang, E-mail: zktang@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics & Information Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (University Town), Guangzhou, 510006 (China); The Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macau (China)

    2016-12-09

    In this work, we report the growth of high-quality aligned ZnO nanowires via a facile atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The CVD reactor chamber used was more complicated than a conventional one due to the quartz boats loaded with sources (ZnO/C) and substrates being inserted into a semi-open quartz tube, and then placed inside the CVD reactor. The semi-open quartz tube played a very important role in growing the ZnO nanowires, and demonstrated that the transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber. Aligned ZnO nanowires were successfully obtained, though they were only found at substrates located upstream. The very high crystalline quality of the obtained ZnO nanowires was demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and room temperature photoluminescence investigations. Such ZnO nanowires with high crystalline quality may provide opportunities for the fabrication of ZnO-based nano-devices in future. - Highlights: • High-quality aligned ZnO nanowires were obtained via modified chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure. • The semi-open quartz tube plays very important roles in growing ZnO nanowires. • The transportation properties of Zn and O vapor differ from those in the conventional CVD reactor chamber.

  7. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Harris; Gan, K.K.; Kass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High quality plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, T.J.; Chapple-Sokol, J. (IBM General Technology Division, Hopewell Junction, NY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The qualities of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films can be improved by increasing the deposition temperature. This report compares PECVD silicon nitride films to low pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD) films. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters, specifically power and temperature, are investigated. The stress is shown to shift from tensile to compressive with increasing temperature and power. The deposition rate, uniformity, wet etch rate, index of refraction, composition, stress, hydrogen content, and conformality are considered to evaluate the film properties. Temperature affects the hydrogen content in the films by causing decreased incorporation of N-H containing species whereas the dependence on power is due to changes in the gas-phase precursors. All PECVD film properties, with the exception of conformality, are comparable to those of LPCVD films.

  10. Influence of Chemisorbed Oxygen on the Growth of Graphene on Cu(100) by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Ong, Eng Wen; Mowll, Tyler R.; Tyagi, Parul; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Geisler, Heike; Ventrice Jr, Carl A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the influence that copper substrate surface symmetry and oxygen impurities have on the growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition is important for developing techniques for producing high quality graphene. Therefore, we have studied the growth of graphene by catalytic decomposition of ethylene in an ultra-high vacuum chamber on both a clean Cu(100) surface and a Cu(100) surface pre-dosed with a layer of chemisorbed oxygen. The crystal structure of the graphene films was cha...

  11. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  12. A Review of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High-Temperature Superconducting Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, Ahmet; Zhang, K.; Kwak, B. S.; Boyd, E. P.

    1990-03-01

    A status report is given on the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of high-temperature superconducting thin films. The advantages of MOCVD processing manifest themselves in the quality of the films produced, and in the economy of the process. Metalorganic precursor requirements, deposition parameters and film properties are discussed. Also difficulties have been identified in making MOCVD a manufacturing technology. To solve these problems, future research directions are proposed.

  13. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  14. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-01-01

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals

  15. Nanomaterials derived from metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Song; Zhu, Qi-Long; Xu, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    The thermal transformation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) generates a variety of nanostructured materials, including carbon-based materials, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, metal phosphides and metal carbides. These derivatives of MOFs have characteristics such as high surface areas, permanent porosities and controllable functionalities that enable their good performance in sensing, gas storage, catalysis and energy-related applications. Although progress has been made to tune the morphologies of MOF-derived structures at the nanometre scale, it remains crucial to further our knowledge of the relationship between morphology and performance. In this Review, we summarize the synthetic strategies and optimized methods that enable control over the size, morphology, composition and structure of the derived nanomaterials. In addition, we compare the performance of materials prepared by the MOF-templated strategy and other synthetic methods. Our aim is to reveal the relationship between the morphology and the physico-chemical properties of MOF-derived nanostructures to optimize their performance for applications such as sensing, catalysis, and energy storage and conversion.

  16. Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Richard R [Cary, IL; Low, John J. , Faheem, Syed A.; Benin, Annabelle I [Oak Forest, IL; Snurr, Randall Q [Evanston, IL; Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur [Evanston, IL

    2012-07-24

    The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

  17. Metal organic frameworks for gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-06-09

    Embodiments provide a method of storing a compound using a metal organic framework (MOF). The method includes contacting one or more MOFs with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as O2 and CH4. O2 and CH4 can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF, wherein M can include aluminum, iron, gallium, indium, vanadium, chromium, titanium, or scandium.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Kyle W.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Sailer, Robert A.; Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H 2 O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF 2 . • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal

  19. Synthesis and characterization of diamond microcrystals and nanorods deposited by hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, L.; Peng, H.; Wang, W.; Chen, Y.; Lei, D.; Qi, W.; Liang, J.; Zhao, J.; Kong, X.; Zhang, H.

    2008-01-01

    (111) diamond microcrystals and (100) diamond microcrystals and nanorods were synthesized on Si substrate by hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition method. The morphology, structure, and optical properties of the diamond films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy,

  20. Copper-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition for high-quality and metal-free single-layer graphene on amorphous SiO2 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungki; Song, Intek; Park, Chibeom; Son, Minhyeok; Hong, Misun; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2013-08-27

    We report that high-quality single-layer graphene (SLG) has been successfully synthesized directly on various dielectric substrates including amorphous SiO2/Si by a Cu-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The Cu vapors produced by the sublimation of Cu foil that is suspended above target substrates without physical contact catalyze the pyrolysis of methane gas and assist nucleation of graphene on the substrates. Raman spectra and mapping images reveal that the graphene formed on a SiO2/Si substrate is almost defect-free and homogeneous single layer. The overall quality of graphene grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is comparable to that of the graphene grown by regular metal-catalyzed CVD on a Cu foil. While Cu vapor induces the nucleation and growth of SLG on an amorphous substrate, the resulting SLG is confirmed to be Cu-free by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SLG grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is fabricated into field effect transistor devices without transfer steps that are generally required when SLG is grown by regular CVD process on metal catalyst substrates. This method has overcome two important hurdles previously present when the catalyst-free CVD process is used for the growth of SLG on fused quartz and hexagonal boron nitride substrates, that is, high degree of structural defects and limited size of resulting graphene, respectively.

  1. Modeling of an improved chemical vapor infiltration process for ceramic composites fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, N.H.; Chou, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state approach is applied to model the pressure-driven, temperature-gradient chemical vapor infiltration (improved CVI process) for ceramic matrix composites fabrication. The deposited matrix in this study is SiC which is converted from the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane gas under excess hydrogen. A three-dimensional unit cell is adopted to simulate the spatial arrangements of reinforcements in discontinuous fiber mats and three-dimensionally woven fabrics. The objectives of this paper are to predict the temperature and density distributions in a fibrous preform during processing, the advancement of the solidified front, the total fabrication period, and the vapor inlet pressure variation for maintaining a constant flow rate

  2. Direct measurement of chemical composition of SOx in impact vapor using a laser gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Sohsuke; Kadono, Toshihiko; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hamura, Taiga; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Sugita, Seiji; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Watari, Takeshi; Matsui, Takafumi

    2011-06-01

    The SO3/SO2 ratio of the impact vapor cloud is a key parameter for understanding the environmental perturbation caused by the impact-induced SOx and the killing mechanism of. the mass extinction at the K-Pg boundary. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments using a high-speed laser gun (GEKKO XII-HIPER, ILE, Osaka University) and measured the chemical compositions of the SOx released from CaSO4. The experimental result indicates that SOx are dominated by SO3. It implies that the SOx generated by the K-Pg impact would have been also dominated by SO3, because the SO3/SO2 ratio of natural planetary scale impact vapor clouds would have been larger than that of the experimental result of this study.

  3. Sequential microcontroller-based control for a chemical vapor deposition process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Serrano Pérez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A cost-effective direct liquid injection system is developed for a chemical vapor deposition process using a microcontroller. The precursor gas phase is controlled by the precise sequential injection of a liquid precursor solution to a vaporizing chamber prior deposition. The electronic control system allows the human–machine interface through a LCD display and a keypad matrix. The core of the electronic system is based on an electro mechanical injector operated in time and frequency as a sequential control system by a popular PIC16F877A chip. The software has been developed in the BASIC language and it can be easily modified through an ICSP programmer for different sequential automatized routines. The injection calibration test has proven the linearity of the injection control system for different operation parameters. The results reported the sequential injection MOCVD deposition of alumina thin film.

  4. Reactive Chemical Vapor Deposition Method as New Approach for Obtaining Electroluminescent Thin Film Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina V. Utochnikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The new reactive chemical vapor deposition (RCVD method has been proposed for thin film deposition of luminescent nonvolatile lanthanide aromatic carboxylates. This method is based on metathesis reaction between the vapors of volatile lanthanide dipivaloylmethanate (Ln(dpm3 and carboxylic acid (HCarb orH2Carb′ and was successfully used in case of HCarb. Advantages of the method were demonstrated on example of terbium benzoate (Tb(bz3 and o-phenoxybenzoate thin films, and Tb(bz3 thin films were successfully examined in the OLED with the following structure glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/TPD/Tb(bz3/Ca/Al. Electroluminescence spectra of Tb(bz3 showed only typical luminescent bands, originated from transitions of the terbium ion. Method peculiarities for deposition of compounds of dibasic acids H2Carb′ are established on example of terbium and europium terephtalates and europium 2,6-naphtalenedicarboxylate.

  5. Controllable growth of nanostructured carbon from coal tar pitch by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuguang; Yang Yongzhen; Ji Weiyun; Liu Hongyan; Zhang Chunyi; Xu Bingshe

    2007-01-01

    The direct synthesis of vapor grown carbon fibers with different diameters was achieved by the pyrolysis of coal tar pitch by chemical vapor deposition. The products were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrated that ferrocene content, reaction temperature and Ar flow rate strongly influenced the yield and nature of nanostructured carbon materials, pure carbon microbeads, with diameter distribution ranging from 450 to 650 nm, were also obtained in the absence of catalyst, uniform and straight carbon nanofibers with the outer diameter of about 115 nm were obtained and curl and thick carbon fibers with narrow diameter distribution of 300-350 nm were produced

  6. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Leonid [Raymond, OH; Hornyak, Louis [Evergreen, CO; Dillon, Anne C [Boulder, CO; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  7. Vaporization of chemical species and the production of aerosols during a core debris/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butland, A.T.D.; Mignanelli, M.A.; Potter, P.E.; Smith, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The equilibrium chemical composition within gas bubbles sparging through isothermal molten corium-concrete mixtures has been evaluated theoretically. A series of sensitivity calculations gives some insight into a number of factors which are of importance in determining the radionuclide and non-radioactive releases during core-concrete interaction. The degree of mixing or layering of the pool has turned out to be of paramount importance in determining the magnitudes of the releases. The presence of unoxidized zirconium in the melt tends to enhance the release of a number of species and the type of concrete used for the base mat can have a significant effect. The predictions can be sensitive to the thermodynamic data used in the calculations. The vaporization of various species into the gas bubbles can require large amounts of heat; the loss of this heat from the melt can have an effect on the extent of the vaporization

  8. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  9. SiO2 coating of silver nanoparticles by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boies, Adam M; Roberts, Jeffrey T; Girshick, Steven L; Zhang, Bin; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Mochizuki, Amane

    2009-07-22

    Gas-phase silver nanoparticles were coated with silicon dioxide (SiO2) by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD). Silver nanoparticles, produced by inert gas condensation, and a SiO2 precursor, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures. The VUV photons dissociate the TEOS precursor, initiating a chemical reaction that forms SiO2 coatings on the particle surfaces. Coating thicknesses were measured for a variety of operation parameters using tandem differential mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the particle coatings was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest purity films were produced at 300-400 degrees C with low flow rates of additional oxygen. The photo-CVD coating technique was shown to effectively coat nanoparticles and limit core particle agglomeration at concentrations up to 10(7) particles cm(-3).

  10. SiO2 coating of silver nanoparticles by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boies, Adam M; Girshick, Steven L; Roberts, Jeffrey T; Zhang Bin; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Mochizuki, Amane

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase silver nanoparticles were coated with silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD). Silver nanoparticles, produced by inert gas condensation, and a SiO 2 precursor, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures. The VUV photons dissociate the TEOS precursor, initiating a chemical reaction that forms SiO 2 coatings on the particle surfaces. Coating thicknesses were measured for a variety of operation parameters using tandem differential mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the particle coatings was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest purity films were produced at 300-400 0 C with low flow rates of additional oxygen. The photo-CVD coating technique was shown to effectively coat nanoparticles and limit core particle agglomeration at concentrations up to 10 7 particles cm -3 .

  11. Formation of SiC thin films by chemical vapor deposition with vinylsilane precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takuma; Takeuchi, Wakana; Jin, Yong; Kokubun, Hiroshi; Yasuhara, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2018-01-01

    We have examined the formation of SiC thin films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using vinylsilane and investigated the chemical bonding state and crystallinity of the prepared SiC thin films. We achieved the formation of a Si–H–less SiC film at growth temperatures as low as 600 °C. Also, we investigated the in situ doping effect of N by the incorporation of NH3 gas in the SiC growth and demonstrated that the chemical composition of N in SiC thin films was controlled by adjusting the NH3 flow rate. In addition, we examined the growth of SiC thin films on a Cu substrate and achieved the formation of a SiC thin film while avoiding any significant reaction between SiC and Cu at a growth temperature of 700 °C.

  12. Self-Exfoliated Metal-Organic Nanosheets through Hydrolytic Unfolding of Metal-Organic Polyhedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Bikash; Mallick, Arijit; Das, Anuja; Mukherjee, Rabibrata; Banerjee, Rahul

    2017-05-29

    Few-layers thick metal-organic nanosheets have been synthesized using water-assisted solid-state transformation through a combined top-down and bottom-up approach. The metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) convert into metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) which subsequently self-exfoliate into few-layered metal-organic nanosheets. These MOP crystals experience a hydrophobicity gradient with the inner surface during contact with water because of the existence of hydrophobic spikes on their outer surface. When the amount of water available for interaction is higher, the resultant layers are not stacked to form bulk materials; instead few-layered nanosheets with high uniformity were obtained in high yield. The phenomenon has resulted high yield production of uniformly distributed layered metal-organic nanosheets from three different MOPs, showing its general adaptability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Modeling and control of diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waard, H.; De Koning, W. L.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper a study is made of the heat transfer inside cylindrical resistance diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces, aimed at developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived which also covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. It is shown that currently used temperature controllers are highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  14. Photoluminescence in Chemical Vapor Deposited ZnS: insight into electronic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Potter, B.g.

    2013-08-09

    Photoluminescence spectra taken from chemical vapor deposited (CVD) ZnS are shown to exhibit sub-band-gap emission bands characteristic of isoelectronic oxygen defects. The emission spectra vary spatially with position and orientation with respect to the major axis of CVD growth. These data suggest that a complex set of defects exist in the band gap of CVD ZnS whose structural nature is highly dependent upon local deposition and growth conditions, contributing to inherent heterogeneity in optical behavior throughout the material.

  15. Growth of highly oriented carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.P.; Xu, J.W.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, and Center for Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials (CAPEM), State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Provencio, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Highly oriented, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown on polished polycrystalline and single crystal nickel substrates by plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 666 {degree}C. The carbon nanotubes range from 10 to 500 nm in diameter and 0.1 to 50 {mu}m in length depending on growth conditions. Acetylene is used as the carbon source for the growth of the carbon nanotubes and ammonia is used for dilution gas and catalysis. The plasma intensity, acetylene to ammonia gas ratio, and their flow rates, etc. affect the diameters and uniformity of the carbon nanotubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Precise control of multiwall carbon nanotube diameters using thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Provencio, P. P.

    2002-03-01

    We grow multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films using thermal chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure using a mixture of acetylene and nitrogen from a 4-nm-thick Ni film catalyst. CNTs are characterized using electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. CNTs grown with this method are extremely uniform in diameter, both throughout the sample and within the lengths of individual tubes. Nanotube outer diameters, ranging from 5-350 nm, and the total deposition of carbon material, increase exponentially with growth temperature from 630 °C-790 °C.

  17. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. The structure and growth mechanism of Si nanoneedles prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, Jiří; Ledinský, Martin; Stuchlík, Jiří; Stuchlíková, The-Ha; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Hruška, Karel; Fejfar, Antonín; Kočka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 41 (2010), 415604/1-415604/7 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : nanoneedles * nanowires * silicon * plasma * chemical vapor deposition * crystal structure * growth * phonon * SEM * Raman Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  19. Remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RMPECVD) of silica and alumina films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmaison, J.; Hidalgo, H.; Tristant, P.; Naudin, F.; Merle, D. [Limoges Univ. (France). Lab. de Sciences des Procedes Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface

    2002-07-01

    Alumina or silica are attractive as insulation and protective layers for sensitive substrates. Oxides are deposited by remote microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RMPECVD) using an oxygen plasma and a mixture of precursor gas silane or trimethylaluminum (TMA) diluted in argon, respectively for silica and alumina, injected in the afterglow. This technique allows to deposit films of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with satisfactory characteristics (density, etch rate, stoichiometry) and high deposition rate. The comparison of the best deposition conditions reveals that in case of alumina higher temperatures and lower pressures are needed. (orig.)

  20. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  1. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Acharya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc and high critical current density (Jc. The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  2. Growth and characterization of Bi2Se3 crystals by chemical vapor transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Jiao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly-shaped high-quality Bi2Se3 crystals were grown by a chemical vapor transport using iodine as the transport agent. In addition to exhibiting a characteristic Dirac cone for a topological insulator, the Bi2Se3 crystals show some outstanding properties including additional crystallographic surfaces, large residual resistance ratio (∼10, and high mobility (∼8000 cm2·V−1·s−1. The low-temperature resistivity abnormally increases with applying pressures up to 1.7 GPa, and no superconductivity was observed down to 0.4 K.

  3. Growth and characterization of Bi2Se3 crystals by chemical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, W. H.; Jiang, S.; Feng, C. M.; Xu, Z. A.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, M.; Feng, D. L.; Yamada, A.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Regularly-shaped high-quality Bi2Se3 crystals were grown by a chemical vapor transport using iodine as the transport agent. In addition to exhibiting a characteristic Dirac cone for a topological insulator, the Bi2Se3 crystals show some outstanding properties including additional crystallographic surfaces, large residual resistance ratio (˜10), and high mobility (˜8000 cm2.V-1.s-1). The low-temperature resistivity abnormally increases with applying pressures up to 1.7 GPa, and no superconductivity was observed down to 0.4 K.

  4. Functionalized bioinspired microstructured optical fiber pores for applications in chemical vapor sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Jacob A.

    Chemical vapor sensing for defense, homeland security, environmental, and agricultural application is a challenge, which due combined requirements of ppt sensitivity, high selectivity, and rapid response, cannot be met using conventional analytical chemistry techniques. New sensing approaches and platforms are necessary in order to make progress in this rapidly evolving field. Inspired by the functionalized nanopores on moth sensilla hairs that contribute to the high selectivity and sensitivity of this biological system, a chemical vapor sensor based on the micro to nanoscale pores in microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) was designed. This MOF based chemical vapor sensor design utilizes MOF pores functionalized with organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for selectivity and separations and a gold plasmonic sensor for detection and discrimination. Thin well-controlled gold films in MOF pores are critical components for the fabrication of structured plasmonic chemical vapor sensors. Thermal decomposition of dimethyl Au(II) trifluoroacetylacetonate dissolved in near-critical CO2 was used to deposit gold island films within the MOF pores. Using a 3mercatopropyltrimethoxysilane adhesion layer, continuous gold thin films as thin as 20--30 nm were deposited within MOF pores as small as 500 nm in diameter. The gold island films proved to be SERS active and were used to detect 900 ppt 2,4 DNT vapor in high pressure nitrogen and 6 ppm benzaldehyde. MOF based waveguide Raman (WGR), which can probe the air/silica interface between a waveguiding core and surrounding pores, was developed to detect and characterize SAMs and other thin films deposited in micro to nanoscale MOF pores. MOF based WGR was used to characterize an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAM deposited in 1.6 mum diameter pores iv to demonstrate that the SAM was well-formed, uniform along the pore length, and only a single layer. MOF based WGR was used to detect a human serum albumin monolayer deposited on the

  5. Minerals with metal-organic framework structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskić, Igor; Pekov, Igor V; Krivovichev, Sergey V; Friščić, Tomislav

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an increasingly important family of advanced materials based on open, nanometer-scale metal-organic architectures, whose design and synthesis are based on the directed assembly of carefully designed subunits. We now demonstrate an unexpected link between mineralogy and MOF chemistry by discovering that the rare organic minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite exhibit structures found in well-established magnetic and proton-conducting metal oxalate MOFs. Structures of stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite, exhibiting almost nanometer-wide and guest-filled apertures and channels, respectively, change the perspective of MOFs as exclusively artificial materials and represent, so far, unique examples of open framework architectures in organic minerals.

  6. Simultaneous Chemical and Optical Patterning of Polyacrylonitrile Film by Vapor-Based Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Lee, Choonghyeon; Cha, Sang-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2015-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film is treated with ethyleneamines (EDA) in a simple chemical vapor phase reaction. Successful introduction of amine functional groups on the cyano group of PAN backbone is verified by FT-IR and NMR measurements. Further UV-vis and photoluminescence analyses show a red shift of the emission peak after repeated EDA treatment, which might be attributed to the formation of imine conjugation from newly formed carbon-nitrogen bonds on the PAN backbone. Further confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that selective patterning of EDA on PAN films is possible via local polydimethylsiloxane masking. The results indicate that both chemical and optical patterning on PAN film can be realized via a single reaction and show the potential of this novel methodology in selective patterning. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Laterally Stitched Heterostructures of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide: Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth on Lithographically Patterned Area

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2016-10-31

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have shown great promise in electronics and optoelectronics due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Heterostructured TMDC layers such as the laterally stitched TMDCs offer the advantages of better electronic contact and easier band offset tuning. Here, we demonstrate a photoresist-free focused ion beam (FIB) method to pattern as-grown TMDC monolayers by chemical vapor deposition, where the exposed edges from FIB etching serve as the seeds for growing a second TMDC material to form desired lateral heterostructures with arbitrary layouts. The proposed lithographic and growth processes offer better controllability for fabrication of the TMDC heterostrucuture, which enables the construction of devices based on heterostructural monolayers. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanowall by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rulin; Chi, Yaqing; Fang, Liang; Tang, Zhensen; Yi, Xun

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is widely used for the synthesis of carbon materials, such as diamond-like carbons (DLCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanowalls (CNWs). Advantages of PECVD are low synthesis temperature compared with thermal CVD and the ability to grow vertically, free-standing structures. Due to its self-supported property and high specific surface area, CNWs are a promising material for field emission devices and other chemical applications. This article reviews the recent process on the synthesis of CNW by the PECVD method. We briefly introduce the structure and properties of CNW with characterization techniques. Growth mechanism is also discussed to analyze the influence of plasma conditions, substrates, temperature, and other parameters to the final film, which will give a suggestion on parameter modulation for desired film.

  9. Low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on glass by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Jo, Wook; Song, Jean-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-07-01

    Although the deposition of crystalline silicon on a glass substrate has been pursued using hot wire chemical vapor deposition or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for applications in flat panel displays and solar cells, the process has been only partly successful because of the inevitable formation of an amorphous incubation layer on a glass substrate. Currently, the crystalline silicon films are prepared by depositing an amorphous silicon film on a glass substrate and then crystallizing it by excimer laser annealing (ELA), metal induced crystallization or rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Here we report a new process, which can remove the amorphous incubation layer and thereby deposit crystalline silicon directly on glass using HCl. The intrinsic crystalline silicon film has a conductivity of 3.7×10 -5 Scm -1 and the n-type doped crystalline silicon film has the Hall mobility of 15.8 cm 2V -1 s -1, whose values are comparable to those prepared by ELA and RTA, respectively.

  10. Understanding the reaction kinetics to optimize graphene growth on Cu by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Juergen; Boebel, Lena; Zwaschka, Gregor; Guenther, Sebastian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Zentralinstitut fuer Katalyseforschung, Chemie Department, Physikalische Chemie mit Schwerpunkt Katalyse, Garching (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Understanding and controlling the growth kinetics of graphene is a prerequisite to synthesize this highly wanted material by chemical vapor deposition on Cu, e.g. for the construction of ultra-stable electron transparent membranes. It is reviewed that Cu foils contain a considerable amount of carbon in the bulk which significantly exceeds the expected amount of thermally equilibrated dissolved carbon in Cu and that this carbon must be removed before any high quality graphene may be grown. Starting with such conditioned Cu foils, systematic studies of the graphene growth kinetics in a reactive CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} atmosphere allow to extract the following meaningful data: prediction of the equilibrium constant of the graphene formation reaction within a precision of a factor of two, the confirmation that the graphene growth proceeds from a C(ad)-phase on Cu which is in thermal equilibrium with the reactive gas phase, its apparent activation barrier and finally the prediction of the achievable growth velocity of the growing graphene flakes during chemical vapor deposition. As a result of the performed study, growth parameters are identified for the synthesis of high quality monolayer graphene with single crystalline domains of 100-1000 μm in diameter within a reasonable growth time. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Phase Equilibrium of TiO2 Nanocrystals in Flame-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changran; Camacho, Joaquin; Wang, Hai

    2018-01-19

    Nano-scale titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) is a material useful for a wide range of applications. In a previous study, we showed that TiO 2 nanoparticles of both rutile and anatase crystal phases could be synthesized over the size range of 5 to 20 nm in flame-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Rutile was unexpectedly dominant in oxygen-lean synthesis conditions, whereas anatase is the preferred phase in oxygen-rich gases. The observation is in contrast to the 14 nm rutile-anatase crossover size derived from the existing crystal-phase equilibrium model. In the present work, we made additional measurements over a wider range of synthesis conditions; the results confirm the earlier observations. We propose an improved model for the surface energy that considers the role of oxygen desorption at high temperatures. The model successfully explains the observations made in the current and previous work. The current results provide a useful path to designing flame-assisted chemical vapor deposition of TiO 2 nanocrystals with controllable crystal phases. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Phase relations and chemical vapor transport of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze InxWO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase relations of hexagonal bronze In x WO 3 with neighboring phases. • Chemical vapor transport experiments using NH 4 Cl as transport agent. • Single crystals of In x WO 3 up to a few mm in size were prepared. • Selective synthesis of crystals of the indium poor and indium rich phase boundary. - Abstract: Phase pure powder samples of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze In x WO 3 (x = 0.25–0.35) were synthesized by solid state reaction at 1173 K. The phase relations of In x WO 3 with neighboring binary and ternary phases were determined in the phase diagram In–W–O. Systematic chemical vapor transport experiments were carried out on source materials with compositions corresponding to miscellaneous two-phase and three-phase regions using NH 4 X (X = Cl, Br, I) as transport agent. Crystals of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze were deposited beside In 2 W 3 O 12 with composition corresponding to the indium poor phase boundary and dimensions up to a few mm in a temperature gradient 1173 K → 1073 K starting from ternary mixtures In x WO 3 /In 2 W 3 O 12 /In 0.02 WO 3 . Sole deposition of In x WO 3 single crystals with composition x ≈ 0.33 was observed from ternary mixtures In x WO 3 /W 18 O 49 /WO 2 with a migration rate of about 0.5 mg/h (transport agent NH 4 Cl)

  13. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source....... This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  14. Molecule Matters-Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Molecule Matters - Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). R Sarvanakumar S Sankararaman ... Author Affiliations. R Sarvanakumar1 S Sankararaman1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036, India.

  15. Metal Organic Framework: Crystalline Stacked Molecular Containers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Metal Organic Framework: ... Ramanathan Vaidhyanathan. General Article Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1147-1157 ... Vaidhyanathan1. Department of Chemistry Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Pune, India.

  16. The relevance of metal organic frameworks (MOFs)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have evolved to be an important family and a corner stone for research in the area of inorganic chemistry. The progress made since 2000 has attracted researchers from other disciplines to actively engage themselves in this area. This cooperative synergy of different scientific believes ...

  17. Magnetic behaviour in metal-organic frameworks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The article describes the synthesis, structure and magnetic investigations of a series of metal-organic framework compounds formed with Mn+2 and Ni+2 ions. The structures, determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction, indicated that the structures possess two- and three-dimensional structures with magnetically ...

  18. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  19. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene layers were grown on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition method and for the delicate removal of graphene from metal catalysts, electrolysis method was used by using different alkaline (sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide and barium hydroxide). • The delamination speed of PMMA/graphene stack was higher during the KOH and LiOH electrolysis as compare to NaOH and Ba(OH) 2 . Ba(OH) 2 is not advisable because of the residues left on the graphene surface which would further trapped in between graphene and SiO 2 /Si surface after transfer. The average peeling time in case of Pt electrode is ∼6 min for KOH and LiOH and ∼15 min for NaOH and Ba(OH) 2 . • Electrolysis method also works for the Cu catalyst. The peeling of graphene was faster in the case of Cu foil due to small size of bubbles which moves faster between the stack and the electrode surface. The average peeling time was ∼3–5 min. • XPS analysis clearly showed that the Pt substrates can be re-used again. Graphene layer was transferred to SiO 2 /Si substrates and to the flexible substrate by using the same peeling method. - Abstract: In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH) 2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for Na

  20. The Study of growth and coagulation of titania nanoparticles by chemical vapor synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahiminezhad-Soltani, M.; Saberyan, K.; Shahri, F.; Simchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Synthesis route was used for synthesis of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles in hot-walled reactor at 800 d egree C using TiCl 4 as precursor. The effect of processing parameters e.g., temperature and amount of precursor on phase structure, size, purity, coagulation and agglomeration of nanoparticles were investigated in this respect. Also, the H 2 O effects on the size, crystallinity, phase transformation and purity of nanoparticles were studied. Comprehensive experimental observations were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and thermal gravimetric-differential thermal analysis results. The obtained results showed that by increasing the precursor amount and temperature, no phase transformation can be observed but the size, coagulation and agglomeration of titania nanoparticles increase. Also, the results showed that by introducing water vapor, the average particle sizes decrease saliently and no phase transformation and impurity were observed. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can be used for synthesis of nano fluids. Nano fluids (nano-TiO 2 +water) as a cooling agent can be used for the enhanced economy and safety of the nuclear reactors.

  1. Growth and luminescence of ternary semiconductor ZnCdSe nanowires by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X T; Liu, Z; Li, Quan; Hark, S K

    2005-09-29

    ZnCdSe alloy nanowires were successfully grown on the GaAs (100) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using Au as a catalyst. The nanowires display two distinct types of morphology. The majority of them are straight, uniform in diameter, and have a smooth surface. However, a significant portion of them contain one or two constrictions along their length. The alloy is found to be rich in Zn; its composition, as determined from X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, is close to Zn(0.9)Cd(0.1)Se. The peak energy of its room temperature near-band-edge photoluminescence is also consistent with this composition. X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy find both types of nanowires to be single crystalline, have the metastable wurtzite structure, and a growth direction along 100. The presence of an Au-Cd-Zn alloy particle at the tip of the nanowires supports vapor-liquid-solid as the growth mechanism. The appearance of constrictions in some of the nanowires is found to be linked to the existence of structural defects, possibly stacking faults, during growth.

  2. A predictive model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprac, A.J.; Trachtenberg, I.; Edgar, T.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon from thermally activated silane in a cold wall, single-wafer rapid thermal system was studied by experimentation at a variety of low pressure conditions, including very high temperatures. The effect of diluent gas on polysilicon deposition rates was examined using hydrogen, helium, and krypton. A mass-transfer model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system was developed. This model was used to produce an empirical rate expression for silicon deposition from silane by regressing kinetic parameters to fit experimental data. The resulting model provided accurate predictions over widely varying conditions in the experimental data.

  3. Impact of inactive dopants in chemical vapor deposition layers on photomodulated optical reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanowicz, Janusz [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Electrical Engineering Department, INSYS, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: Janusz.Bogdanowicz@imec.be; Dortu, Fabian [Multitel, rue Pierre et Marie Curie 2, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Clarysse, Trudo [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysika, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Shaughnessy, Derrick; Salnik, Alex; Nicolaides, Lena [KLA-Tencor Corp., 160 Rio Robles, San Jose, CA 95134 (United States)

    2008-12-05

    The ITRS roadmap stresses the electrical characterization of the active doping profiles for sub-32 nm structures as a key challenge for future CMOS technology. Earlier work has shown the promising capabilities of non-destructive photomodulated optical reflectance (PMOR) techniques, based on the localized detection of variations in the reflectivity of the sample, due to thermal and plasma (excess carrier) effects as can be generated by a modulated pump laser such as the Therma-Probe (TP) system. In this work, we study the impact of the inactive dopant atoms in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) layers both on PMOR and DC reflectance signals. In particular, with the help of numerical simulations, this work shows that, by taking into account the combined degradation of the thermal diffusivity and the recombination lifetime as well as the enhancement of the absorption coefficient, the theory may be rendered semi-quantitative.

  4. Modeling and designing a new gas injection diffusion system for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. C.; Hsiau, S. S.; Chuang, T. C.

    2018-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is a critical process and is widely used for the epitaxial growth of light-emitting diode (LED) wafers. The key component, a gas injection system, delivers the gas into the reactor by using a nozzle or showerhead. In this paper, the numerical simulation method was applied to investigate the thermal fluid field and to design a new gas injection system for MOCVD. In this study, we developed a new gas injection system with inlet barriers. The inlet barriers can separate the various reactive gases, reduce the prereaction, and prevent adducted particles from forming and blocking the inlet gas system. The barrier geometry, including the barrier length, the barrier inclination angle, and the V/III precursor ratio was systematically studied to determine the optimal design conditions. Higher growth rate and improved uniformity were demonstrated using the new optimal gas inlet barrier design.

  5. Spin-Polarized Tunneling through Chemical Vapor Deposited Multilayer Molybdenum Disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankert, André; Pashaei, Parham; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Gaur, Anand P S; Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Rungger, Ivan; Narayan, Awadhesh; Dolui, Kapildeb; Hoque, Md Anamul; Patel, Ram Shanker; de Jong, Michel P; Katiyar, Ram S; Sanvito, Stefano; Dash, Saroj P

    2017-06-27

    The two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) has attracted widespread attention for its extraordinary electrical-, optical-, spin-, and valley-related properties. Here, we report on spin-polarized tunneling through chemical vapor deposited multilayer MoS 2 (∼7 nm) at room temperature in a vertically fabricated spin-valve device. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of 0.5-2% has been observed, corresponding to spin polarization of 5-10% in the measured temperature range of 300-75 K. First-principles calculations for ideal junctions result in a TMR up to 8% and a spin polarization of 26%. The detailed measurements at different temperature, bias voltages, and density functional theory calculations provide information about spin transport mechanisms in vertical multilayer MoS 2 spin-valve devices. These findings form a platform for exploring spin functionalities in 2D semiconductors and understanding the basic phenomena that control their performance.

  6. Spiral growth of few-layer MoS{sub 2} by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X.; Yan, C.; Tomer, D.; Li, L., E-mail: lianli@uwm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Li, C. H. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Growth spirals exhibit appealing properties due to a preferred layer stacking and lack of inversion symmetry. Here, we report spiral growth of MoS{sub 2} during chemical vapor deposition on SiO{sub 2}/Si and epitaxial graphene/SiC substrates, and their physical and electronic properties. We determine the layer-dependence of the MoS{sub 2} bandgap, ranging from 2.4 eV for the monolayer to a constant of 1.3 eV beyond the fifth layer. We further observe that spirals predominantly initiate at the step edges of the SiC substrate, based on which we propose a growth mechanism driven by screw dislocation created by the coalescence of two growth fronts at steps.

  7. Controlled density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes in a triode plasma chemical vapor deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Park, Kyu Chang; Moon, Jong Hyun; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Pribat, Didier; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Jang, Jin

    2006-01-01

    We report on the growth mechanism and density control of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using a triode plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The deposition reactor was designed in order to allow the intermediate mesh electrode to be biased independently from the ground and power electrodes. The CNTs grown with a mesh bias of + 300 V show a density of ∼ 1.5 μm -2 and a height of ∼ 5 μm. However, CNTs do not grow when the mesh electrode is biased to - 300 V. The growth of CNTs can be controlled by the mesh electrode bias which in turn controls the plasma density and ion flux on the sample

  8. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangling; Su Shi; Kundrát, Vojtěch; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao; Zhou Lei; Mushtaq, Fajer; Ouyang Defang; James, David; Roberts, Darren

    2013-01-01

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition polymerization the growth and properties of parylene thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jeffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Polymerization - The Growth and Properties of Parylene Thin Films is intended to be valuable to both users and researchers of parylene thin films. It should be particularly useful for those setting up and characterizing their first research deposition system. It provides a good picture of the deposition process and equipment, as well as information on system-to-system variations that is important to consider when designing a deposition system or making modifications to an existing one. Also included are methods to characterizae a deposition system's pumping properties as well as monitor the deposition process via mass spectrometry. There are many references that will lead the reader to further information on the topic being discussed. This text should serve as a useful reference source and handbook for scientists and engineers interested in depositing high quality parylene thin films.

  10. Finite-volume model for chemical vapor infiltration incorporating radiant heat transfer. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.W.; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Most finite-volume thermal models account for the diffusion and convection of heat and may include volume heating. However, for certain simulation geometries, a large percentage of heat flux is due to thermal radiation. In this paper a finite-volume computational procedure for the simulation of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in three dimensional complex enclosures is developed. The radiant heat transfer is included as a source term in each volume element which is derived by Monte Carlo ray tracing from all possible radiating and absorbing faces. The importance of radiative heat transfer is illustrated in the modeling of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of tubes. The temperature profile through the tube preform matches experimental measurements only when radiation is included. An alternative, empirical approach using an {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} thermal conductivity for the gas space can match the initial temperature profile but does not match temperature changes that occur during preform densification.

  11. One-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) for transparent superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrom, Sukrit; Tirawanichakul, Yutthana; Munsit, Nantakan; Deangngam, Chalongrat

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a rapid and environmental friendly fabrication technique to produce optically clear superhydrophobic surfaces using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a sole coating material. The inert PDMS chain is transformed into a 3-D irregular solid network through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) process. Thanks to high electron density in the microwave-activated plasma, coating can be done in just a single step with rapid deposition rate, typically much shorter than 10 s. Deposited layers show excellent superhydrophobic properties with water contact angles of ∼170° and roll-off angles as small as ∼3°. The plasma-deposited films can be ultrathin with thicknesses under 400 nm, greatly diminishing the optical loss. Moreover, with appropriate coating conditions, the coating layer can even enhance the transmission over the entire visible spectrum due to a partial anti-reflection effect.

  12. Anisotropic growth mechanism of tungsten diselenide domains using chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoobeen; Jeong, Heekyung; Park, Yi-Seul; Han, Seulki; Noh, Jaegeun; Lee, Jin Seok

    2018-02-01

    Anisotropic transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) domains have stimulated a growing interest mainly due to their electronic properties that depend on the size, shape, and edge structures of the domains. In this work, we investigated the anisotropic morphogenesis and edge terminations of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) domains grown on sapphire substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using tungsten oxide (WO3) and selenium (Se) powders as precursors. We varied the amount of Se powder and growth temperature during the CVD process, which in turn caused variations in the growth mechanism and kinetic energies of precursors. We succeeded in synthesizing hexagonal, square, circular, and triangular anisotropic WSe2 domains. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) analyses, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, we proposed the growth mechanism of anisotropic WSe2 domains with different edge terminations based on experimental observations through scanning tunneling microscope (STM).

  13. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  14. Monatomic chemical-vapor-deposited graphene membranes bridge a half-millimeter-scale gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Kwang; Hwangbo, Yun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Seung-Mo; Kim, Seong-Su; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Lee, Hak-Joo; Choi, Byung-Ik; Song, Chang-Kyu; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2014-03-25

    One of the main concerns in nanotechnology is the utilization of nanomaterials in macroscopic applications without losing their extreme properties. In an effort to bridge the gap between the nano- and macroscales, we propose a clever fabrication method, the inverted floating method (IFM), for preparing freestanding chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene membranes. These freestanding membranes were then successfully suspended over a gap a half-millimeter in diameter. To understand the working principle of IFM, high-speed photography and white light interferometry were used to characterize and analyze the deformation behaviors of the freestanding graphene membranes in contact with a liquid during fabrication. Some nanoscale configurations in the macroscopic graphene membranes were able to be characterized by simple optical microscopy. The proposed IFM is a powerful approach to investigating the macroscopic structures of CVD graphene and enables the exploitation of freestanding CVD graphene for device applications.

  15. Study of surface morphology and alignment of MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrullah, S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, M. S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Yasar, M., E-mail: Muhammad.yasar@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    In this research work, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized successfully by using floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Different ferrocene amounts (0.1, 0.125 and 0.15 g) were used as catalyst and ethylene was used as a carbon precursor at reaction temperature of 800°C. Characterization of the grown MWCNTs was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed that the catalyst weight affects the nanotubes diameter, alignment, crystallinity and growth significantly, whereas negligible influence was noticed on CNTs forest length. The dense, uniform and meadow like patterns of grown CNTs were observed for 0.15 g ferrocene. The average diameter of the grown CNTs was found in the range of 32 to 75 nm. Close inspection of the TEM images also confirmed the defects in some of the grown CNTs, where few black spots were evident in CNTs structure.

  16. Structured nanocarbon on various metal foils by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, G; Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a versatile process for the engineering of nanostructures made of crystalline carbon on metal foils. The single step process by microwave plasma-enhance chemical vapor deposition is demonstrated for various substrate materials, such as Ni or Cu. Either carbon nanotubes (CNT) or carbon nanowalls (CNW) are obtained under same growth conditions and without the need of additional catalyst. The use of spacer and insulator implies a certain control over the kind of allotropes that are obtained. High density and large surface area are morphological characteristics of the thus obtained C products. The possibility of application on many metals, and in the alloy composition, on as-delivered commercially available foils indicates that this strategy can be adapted to a bunch of specific applications, while the production of C nanostructures is of remarkable simplicity.

  17. Highly oriented, free-standing, superconducting NbN films growth on chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Saraswat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available NbN films are grown on chemical vapor deposited graphene using dc magnetron sputtering. The orientation and transition temperature of the deposited films is studied as a function of substrate temperature. A superconducting transition temperature of 14 K is obtained for highly oriented (111 films grown at substrate temperature of 150 °C, which is comparable to epitaxial films grown on MgO and sapphire substrates. These films show a considerably high upper critical field of ∼33 T. In addition, we demonstrate a process for obtaining flexible, free-standing NbN films by delaminating graphene from the substrate using a simple wet etching technique. These free-standing NbN layers can be transferred to any substrate, potentially enabling a range of novel superconducting thin-film applications.

  18. Two dimensional radial gas flows in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwihyun; Park, Seran; Shin, Hyunsu; Song, Seungho; Oh, Hoon-Jung; Ko, Dae Hong; Choi, Jung-Il; Baik, Seung Jae

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) operation of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is one of promising concepts for high quality and low cost processing. Atmospheric plasma discharge requires narrow gap configuration, which causes an inherent feature of AP PECVD. Two dimensional radial gas flows in AP PECVD induces radial variation of mass-transport and that of substrate temperature. The opposite trend of these variations would be the key consideration in the development of uniform deposition process. Another inherent feature of AP PECVD is confined plasma discharge, from which volume power density concept is derived as a key parameter for the control of deposition rate. We investigated deposition rate as a function of volume power density, gas flux, source gas partial pressure, hydrogen partial pressure, plasma source frequency, and substrate temperature; and derived a design guideline of deposition tool and process development in terms of deposition rate and uniformity.

  19. Complete long-term corrosion protection with chemical vapor deposited graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Feng; Camilli, Luca; Wang, Ting

    2018-01-01

    -graphene hybrid coating, comprising two single layers of CVD graphene sandwiched by three layers of polyvinyl butyral, which provides complete corrosion protection of commercial aluminum alloys even after 120 days of exposure to simulated seawater. The essential role played by graphene in the hybrid coating......Despite numerous reports regarding the potential of graphene for corrosion protection, examples of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene-based anticorrosive coatings able to provide long-term protection (i.e. several months) of metals have so far been absent. Here, we present a polymer...... coatings, which can be extended to other two-dimensional materials and polymers, for long-term protection of various relevant metals and alloys....

  20. Large single crystals of graphene on melted copper using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yimin A; Fan, Ye; Speller, Susannah; Creeth, Graham L; Sadowski, Jerzy T; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Allen, Christopher S; Warner, Jamie H

    2012-06-26

    A simple method is presented for synthesizing large single crystal graphene domains on melted copper using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This is achieved by performing the reaction above the melting point of copper (1090 °C) and using a molybdenum or tungsten support to prevent balling of the copper from dewetting. By controlling the amount of hydrogen during growth, individual single crystal domains of monolayer graphene greater than 200 μm are produced within a continuous film. Stopping growth before a complete film is formed reveals individual hexagonal domains of graphene that are epitaxially aligned in their orientation. Angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy is used to show that the graphene grown on copper exhibits a linear dispersion relationship and no sign of doping. HRTEM and electron diffraction reveal a uniform high quality crystalline atomic structure of monolayer graphene.

  1. Comparative study of tantalum deposition by chemical vapor deposition and electron beam vacuum evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, J.; Chevallier, J.

    1975-01-01

    The coating by tantalum of steel parts has been carried out by the two following methods: chemical vapor deposition by hydrogen reduction of TaCl 5 (temperature=1100 deg C, pressure=200 mmHg, H 2 /TaCl 5 =10); electron beam vacuum evaporation. In this case Ta was firstly condensed by ion plating (P(Ar)=5x10 -3 up to 2x10 -2 mmHg; U(c)=3 to -4kV and J(c)=0.2 to 1mAcm -2 ) in order to ensure a good adhesion between deposit and substrate; then by vacuum condensation (substrate temperature: 300 to 650 deg C) to ensure that the coating is impervious to HCl an H 2 SO 4 acids. The advantages and inconveniences of each method are discussed [fr

  2. Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride nanosheets prepared by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Yu, Jie; Kuang, Shengyong; Xiao, Chang; Bai, Xuedong

    2012-01-07

    Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride (BCN) nanosheets have been grown on Si substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of CH(4)-N(2)-H(2)-BF(3). The grown BCN nanosheets are oriented with their base planes perpendicular to the substrate surface. Ultrathin BCN nanosheets with thickness from 2 to a few atomic layers account for a considerable portion of the products, although many of them have more than 10 layers. Photoluminescence is measured for the BCN nanosheets and intense emission at 3.27 eV with very weak defect-related emission is observed for the nanosheets with the composition of B(0.38)C(0.27)N(0.35). The present BCN nanosheets are promising for applications in nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, gas adsorption, etc.

  3. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  5. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L

    2003-01-15

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/{mu}m and a field enhancement factor {beta}=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs.

  6. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/μm and a field enhancement factor β=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs

  7. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition and structural analysis of MoS2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mengting; Zhang, Meiqi; Yanase, Takashi; Uehara, Fumiya; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2018-03-01

    MoS2 nanotubes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using six-horned octahedral FeO nanoparticles and gasified MoO3 and sulfur. The morphology and structure of the nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), showing that the nanotubes had a hollow structure. The hexagonal lattice of MoS2 was aligned parallel to the direction of the nanotubes. The catalytic activities of the Fe films and nanoparticles of Fe2O3, NiO, and Cu2O for the growth of MoS2 nanotubes were investigated. FeO was found to be the most effective catalyst tested.

  8. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  9. Characterization of photoluminescent europium doped yttrium oxide thin-films prepared by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKittrick, J.; Bacalski, C.F.; Hirata, G.A.; Hubbard, K.M.; Pattillo, S.G.; Salazar, K.V.; Trkula, M.

    1998-01-01

    Europium doped yttrium oxide, (Y 1-x Eu x ) 2 O 3 , thin-films were deposited on silicon and sapphire substrates by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The films were grown in a MOCVD chamber reacting yttrium and europium tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5,-heptanedionates) precursors in an oxygen atmosphere at low pressures (5 Torr) and low substrate temperatures (500--700 C). The films deposited at 500 C were flat and composed of nanocrystalline regions of cubic Y 2 O 3 , grown in a textured [100] or [110] orientation to the substrate surface. Films deposited at 600 C developed from the flat, nanocrystalline morphology into a plate-like growth morphology oriented in the [111] with increasing deposition time. Monoclinic Y 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ was observed in x-ray diffraction for deposition temperatures ≥600 C on both (111) Si and (001) sapphire substrates. This was also confirmed by the photoluminescent emission spectra

  10. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.W.; Li, J.X.; Gao, C.Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of Key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  11. Uniformity of quantum well heterostructure GaAlAs lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scifres, D.R.; Burnham, R.D.; Bernstein, M.; Chung, H.; Endicott, F.; Mosby, W.; Tramontana, J.; Walker, J.; Yingling, R.D. Jr.

    1982-09-15

    The threshold current density, laser wavelength, grown layer thickness, reverse breakdown voltage, and far-field radiation pattern as a function of position on the grown wafer are reported for broad area multiple quantum well GaAlAs heterostructure lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. It is found that the layer thickness varies across a 1.5-in. sample by as much as 20% at the outer edges of the water, leading to a lasing wavelength shift of as much as 150 A owing to the quantum size effect. It is shown that this thickness variation has only a small effect on the threshold current density across the water such that the uniformity of threshold current density is comparable to that reported previously for molecular beam epitaxy-grown conventional double heterostructure lasers.

  12. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on polycarbonates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon films were coated on optical polycarbonate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of SiH 4 and CH 4 /H 2 gases was utilized to reduce the internal compressive stress of the deposited films. The structure of the DLC films was characterized as a function of film thickness using Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of G peak positions and the intensity ratio of I D /I G on the DLC film thicknesses was analyzed in detail. Other studies involving atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet visible spectrometry, and three adhesion tests were conducted. Good transparency in the visible region, and good adhesion between diamond-like carbon films and polycarbonate were demonstrated. One-time recordings before and after a DLC film was coated on compact rewritable disc substrates were analyzed as a case study. The results reveal that the diamond-like carbon film overcoating the optical polycarbonates effectively protects the storage media

  13. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si 3 N 4 , carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si 3 N 4 composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness

  14. Fabrication of thin-wall, freestanding inertial confinement fusion targets by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, D.W.; McCreary, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the requirements for plasma physics experiments in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in fluid beds was used to fabricate freestanding tungsten spheres and cylinders with wall thicknesses less than 5.0 μm. Molybdenum and molybdenum alloy (TZM) mandrels of the desired geometry were suspended in a carrier bed of dense microspheres contained in an induction-heated fluid-bed reactor. The mandrels were free to float randomly through the bed, and using the reaction WF 6 +3H 2 →/sub /KW +6HF, very fine-grained tungsten was deposited onto the surface at a rate and in a grain size determined by temperature, gas flow rate, system pressure, and duration of the reaction. After coating, a portion of each mandrel was exposed by hole drilling or grinding. The mandrel was then removed by acid leaching, leaving a freestanding tungsten shape. Experimental procedures, mandrel preparation, and results obtained are discussed

  15. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth on 4H-SiC using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eric; Jarrell, Joshua; Cao, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Deposition of heteroepitaxial diamond via microwave chemical vapor deposition has been performed on a 4H-SiC substrate using bias enhanced nucleation followed by a growth step. In future work, the diamond film will serve as a protective layer for an alpha particle sensor designed to function in an electrorefiner during pyroprocessing of spent fuel. The diamond deposition on the 4H-SiC substrate was carried out using a methane-hydrogen gas mixture with varying gas flow rates. The nucleation step was conducted for 30 minutes and provided sufficient nucleation sites to grow a diamond film on various locations on the substrate. The resulting diamond film was characterized using Raman spectroscopy exhibiting the strong Raman peak at 1332 cm -1 . Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology and the average grain size of the diamond film was observed to be on the order of ∼2-3 μm.

  16. Deposition and characterization of Ru thin films prepared by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, S Y; Lee, S K; Hwang, C S; Kim, H J

    2000-01-01

    Ru thin films were deposited at 300 approx 400 .deg. C by using Ru(C sub 5 H sub 4 C sub 2 H sub 5) sub 2 (Ru(EtCp) sub 2) as a precursor and low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The addition of O sub 2 gas was essential to form Ru thin films. The deposition rates of the films were about 200 A/min. For low oxygen addition and high substrate temperature, RuO sub 2 phases were formed. Also, thermodynamic calculations showed that all the supplied oxygen was consumed to oxidize carbon and hydrogen, cracked from the precursor ligand, rather than Ru. Thus, metal films could be obtained There was an optimum oxygen to precursor ratio at which the pure Ru phase could be obtained with minimum generation of carbon and RuO sub 2

  17. Study of surface morphology and alignment of MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukrullah, S.; Mohamed, N. M.; Shaharun, M. S.; Yasar, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this research work, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized successfully by using floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Different ferrocene amounts (0.1, 0.125 and 0.15 g) were used as catalyst and ethylene was used as a carbon precursor at reaction temperature of 800°C. Characterization of the grown MWCNTs was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed that the catalyst weight affects the nanotubes diameter, alignment, crystallinity and growth significantly, whereas negligible influence was noticed on CNTs forest length. The dense, uniform and meadow like patterns of grown CNTs were observed for 0.15 g ferrocene. The average diameter of the grown CNTs was found in the range of 32 to 75 nm. Close inspection of the TEM images also confirmed the defects in some of the grown CNTs, where few black spots were evident in CNTs structure

  18. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  20. SiO{sub 2} coating of silver nanoparticles by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boies, Adam M; Girshick, Steven L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Roberts, Jeffrey T [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Zhang Bin; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Mochizuki, Amane, E-mail: jtrob@umn.ed, E-mail: slg@umn.ed [Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2009-07-22

    Gas-phase silver nanoparticles were coated with silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD). Silver nanoparticles, produced by inert gas condensation, and a SiO{sub 2} precursor, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures. The VUV photons dissociate the TEOS precursor, initiating a chemical reaction that forms SiO{sub 2} coatings on the particle surfaces. Coating thicknesses were measured for a variety of operation parameters using tandem differential mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the particle coatings was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest purity films were produced at 300-400 {sup 0}C with low flow rates of additional oxygen. The photo-CVD coating technique was shown to effectively coat nanoparticles and limit core particle agglomeration at concentrations up to 10{sup 7} particles cm{sup -3}.

  1. Electrical Characterization of Ti-Silicate Films Grown by Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjae; Yong, Kijung

    2007-08-01

    Electrical characterization was performed for Ti-silicate films, which were deposited by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). Before the deposition of Ti-silicate films, the silicon substrates were pretreated differently using hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching, chemical oxidation, and thermal oxidation. Regardless of the pretreatment methods, the grown films showed a highly smooth surface with rms below 0.52 nm. The electrical properties of the grown Ti-silicate films showed a strong dependence on the substrate pretreatments. The 5-nm-thick Ti-silicate films grown on hydrogen-passivated Si and chemically oxidized Si showed rather high leakage currents, whereas the films grown on thermally oxidized Si showed low leakage currents below 1× 10-7 A/cm2 at a bias of -1 V. All of the films showed a positive shift in the flatband voltage (VFB) upon annealing. Also, each film showed low a hysteresis below 180 mV and the hysteresis decreased upon annealing.

  2. Prediction of aqueous solubility, vapor pressure and critical micelle concentration for aquatic partitioning of perfluorinated chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-10-01

    The majority of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of increasing risk to biota and environment due to their physicochemical stability, wide transport in the environment and difficulty in biodegradation. It is necessary to identify and prioritize these harmful PFCs and to characterize their physicochemical properties that govern the solubility, distribution and fate of these chemicals in an aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, available experimental data (10-35 compounds) of three important properties: aqueous solubility (AqS), vapor pressure (VP) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) on per- and polyfluorinated compounds were collected for quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) modeling. Simple and robust models based on theoretical molecular descriptors were developed and externally validated for predictivity. Model predictions on selected PFCs were compared with available experimental data and other published in silico predictions. The structural applicability domains (AD) of the models were verified on a bigger data set of 221 compounds. The predicted properties of the chemicals that are within the AD, are reliable, and they help to reduce the wide data gap that exists. Moreover, the predictions of AqS, VP, and CMC of most common PFCs were evaluated to understand the aquatic partitioning and to derive a relation with the available experimental data of bioconcentration factor (BCF).

  3. Effect of precursor supply on structural and morphological characteristics of fe nanomaterials synthesized via chemical vapor condensation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jong-Keun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2012-01-01

    Various physical, chemical and mechanical methods, such as inert gas condensation, chemical vapor condensation, sol-gel, pulsed wire evaporation, evaporation technique, and mechanical alloying, have been used to synthesize nanoparticles. Among them, chemical vapor condensation (CVC) has the benefit of its applicability to almost all materials because a wide range of precursors are available for large-scale production with a non-agglomerated state. In this work, Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation method using iron pentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) as the precursor. The effect of processing parameters on the microstructure, size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires were studied. In particular, we investigated close correlation of size and morphology of Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with atomic quantity of inflow precursor into the electric furnace as the quantitative analysis. The atomic quantity was calculated by Boyle's ideal gas law. The Fe nanoparticles and nanowires with various diameter and morphology have successfully been synthesized by the chemical vapor condensation method.

  4. Chemical interactions between aerosols and vapors in the primary circuit of an LWR during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Aerosol formation, agglomeration, convection and deposition within the primary circuit of an LWR during a severe accident significantly affect the transport of fission products, even though they may compose only a small fraction of the aerosol material. Intra-particle and vapor chemical interactions are important to this through mass transfer between the aerosol and vapor. The authors will describe a model that attempts to account for these processes and of the two-way coupling that exists with the thermal hydraulics. They will discuss what agglomeration and deposition mechanisms must be included, alternatives for treating intra-particle chemical interactions, mechanisms of aerosol formation, and methods for solving the resulting equations. Results will be presented that illustrate the importance of treating the two-way coupling and the extent to which disequilibrium between the aerosol and vapor affects fission product behavior

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of ?-Boron Layers on Silicon for Controlled Nanometer-Deep p+n Junction Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarubbi, F.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Nanver, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    Nanometer-thick amorphous boron (?-B) layers were formed on (100) Si during exposure to diborane (B2H6) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system, either at atmospheric or reduced pressures, at temperatures down to 500°C. The dependence of the growth mechanism on processing parameters was

  6. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films for optical waveguide bridges for use in mechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the influence of RF power, ammonia flow, annealing temperature, and annealing time on the optical and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films, is presented. A low refractive index (1.47 to 1.48) film having tensile stress has been...

  7. Nonradioactive Environmental Emissions Chemical Source Term for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Vapor Space During Waste Retrieval Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY, T.H.

    2000-04-21

    A nonradioactive chemical vapor space source term for tanks on the Phase 1 and the extended Phase 1 delivery, storage, and disposal mission was determined. Operations modeled included mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers. Concentrations of ammonia, specific volatile organic compounds, and quantitative volumes of aerosols were estimated.

  8. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field emitter arrays with Ohmic base contact to silicon by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morassutto, M.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, M.A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, dense arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes are obtained by thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition, using Fe catalyst dispersed on a thin Ta layer. Alignment of the carbon nanotubes depends on the original Fe layer thickness from which the catalyst dispersion is obtained by

  9. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-01-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm 3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  10. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-06-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  11. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hao [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States)]. E-mail: hao.jiang@wpafb.af.mil; Hong Lianggou [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States); Venkatasubramanian, N. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Eyink, Kurt [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Wiacek, Kevin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Fries-Carr, Sandra [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Enlow, Jesse [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2007-02-26

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} {sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F {sub b}) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F{sub b} of 610 V/{mu}m, an {epsilon} {sub r} of 3.07, and a tan {delta} of 7.0 x 10{sup -3} at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss.

  12. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Hao; Hong Lianggou; Venkatasubramanian, N.; Grant, John T.; Eyink, Kurt; Wiacek, Kevin; Fries-Carr, Sandra; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant (ε r ) and dielectric loss (tan δ) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F b ) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F b of 610 V/μm, an ε r of 3.07, and a tan δ of 7.0 x 10 -3 at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss

  13. Chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer graphene field-effect transistors with reduced impurity concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Lee, Alvin

    2015-07-01

    We report on the restoration of the electronic characteristics of waferscale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) monolayer graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) by reducing the impurity concentration. An optimized electropolishing process on copper foils combined with carbon-fluorine encapsulation using a suitable amorphous fluoropolymer enables reducing the surface roughness of graphene and screening out interfacial impurity scattering, which leads to an improvement in all key device metrics. The conductivity at the Dirac point is substantially reduced, resulting in an increase in the on-off current ratio. In addition, the field-effect mobility increased from 1817 to 3918 cm2/V-s, the impurity concentration decreased from 1.1 × 1012 to 2.1 × 1011 cm-2 and the electron and hole transport became more symmetric. Significantly, favorable shifts toward zero voltage were observed in the Dirac point. We postulate that the smoother surface due to electropolishing and a pool of strong dipole-dipole moments in the flouropolymer coating provide a charge buffer that relaxes the fluctuation in the electron-hole puddles. We also investigate the long-term stability in GFETs encapsulated with fluoropolymer, which exhibit a high hydrophobicity that suppresses the chemical interaction with water molecules. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Continuous, Highly Flexible, and Transparent Graphene Films by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomez De Arco, Lewis

    2010-05-25

    We report the implementation of continuous, highly flexible, and transparent graphene films obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) in organic photovoltaic cells. Graphene films were synthesized by CVD, transferred to transparent substrates, and evaluated in organic solar cell heterojunctions (TCE/poly-3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene:poly styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/copper phthalocyanine/fullerene/bathocuproine/aluminum). Key to our success is the continuous nature of the CVD graphene films, which led to minimal surface roughness (∼ 0.9 nm) and offered sheet resistance down to 230 Ω/sq (at 72% transparency), much lower than stacked graphene flakes at similar transparency. In addition, solar cells with CVD graphene and indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were fabricated side-by-side on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and were confirmed to offer comparable performance, with power conversion efficiencies (η) of 1.18 and 1.27%, respectively. Furthermore, CVD graphene solar cells demonstrated outstanding capability to operate under bending conditions up to 138°, whereas the ITO-based devices displayed cracks and irreversible failure under bending of 60°. Our work indicates the great potential of CVD graphene films for flexible photovoltaic applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Dosimetric characterization of chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film irradiated with UV and beta radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2003-03-01

    Diamond is an excellent prospect for clinical radiation dosimetry due to its tissue-equivalence properties and being chemically inert. The use of diamond in radiation dosimetry has been halted by the high market price; although recently the capability of growing high quality polycrystalline has renewed the interest in using diamond films as detectors and dosimeters. In the present work we have characterized the dosimetric properties of diamond films synthesized by using chemical vapor deposition. The thermoluminescence (TL) of UV and beta exposed samples shows a glow curve composed of at least four peaks; one located around 587 K presents excellent TL properties suitable for dosimetric applications with ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The TL excitation spectrum exhibits maximum TL efficiency at 220 nm. The samples show regions of linear as well as supralinear behavior as a function or irradiation dose. The linear dose dependence was found for up to sixteen minutes of UV irradiation and 300 Gy for beta irradiated samples. The activation energy and the frequency factor were determined and found in the range of 0.32 - 0.89 eV and 1.1x10^2 - 2x10^8s_-1, respectively. The observed TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as radiation dosimeters.

  16. Metal Nanoparticles Protected with Monolayers: Applications for Chemical Vapor Sensing and Gas Chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Nelson, David A.; Skaggs, Rhonda L.; Synovec, Robert E.; Gross, Gwen M.

    2004-03-31

    Nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based materials are of considerable interest for their unique properties and their potential for use in a variety of applications. Metal nanoparticles, in which each particle’s surface is coated with a protective organic monolayer, are of particular interest because the surface monolayer stabilizes them relative to aggregation and they can be taken up into solutions.(1-4) As a result they can be processed into thin films for device applications. We will refer to these materials as monolayer-protected nanoparticles, or MPNs. Typically the metal is gold, the organic layer is a self-assembled thiol layer, and this composition will be assumed throughout the remainder of this chapter. A diversity of materials and properties is readily accessible by straightforward synthetic procedures, either by the structures of the monolayer-forming thiols used in the synthesis or by post-synthetic modifications of the monolayers. A particularly promising application for these materials is as selective layers on chemical vapor sensors. In this role, the thin film of MPNs on the device surface serves to collect and concentrate gas molecules at the sensor’s surface. Their sorptive properties also lend them to use as new nanostructured gas chromatographic stationary phases. This chapter will focus on the sorptive properties of MPNs as they relate to chemical sensors and gas chromatography.

  17. The density factor in the synthesis of carbon nanotube forest by injection chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. W.; Read, C. G.; Mart, C.; Shen, T.-C.

    2012-12-01

    Beneath the seeming straight-forwardness of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) forests by the injection chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, control of the forest morphology on various substrates is yet to be achieved. Using ferrocene dissolved in xylene as the precursor, we demonstrate that the concentration of ferrocene and the injection rate of the precursor dictate the CNT density of these forests. However, CNT density will also be affected by the substrates and the growth temperature which determine the diffusion of the catalyst adatoms. The CNT growth rate is controlled by the temperature and chemical composition of the gases in the CVD reactor. We show that the final height of the forest is diffusion limited, at least in the conditions of our experiments. Because of the proximity and entanglement of the CNTs in a forest, the growing CNTs can lift-up the inactive CNTs resulting in reduced density toward the base of the forest unless the nucleation rate of the new catalyst particles is sufficiently high to replenish the inactive catalyst particles. Significant loss of CNT attachment by the lift-up effect reduces the adhesion of the forest to the substrate. Optimizing the ferrocene concentration in the precursor, precursor injection rate, gas mixture, substrate, and temperature is necessary to achieve desired forest morphology for specific applications.

  18. Synthesis of molybdenum carbide superconducting compounds by microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyang; Cai, Kang; Ma, Zhibin; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Fu, Qiuming; Tao, Hong; Xiong, Liwei

    2018-02-01

    A method to synthesize molybdenum carbides has been developed based on microwave plasma treatment with methane and hydrogen mixed gases, using a microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition device. The device framework and its mechanism are described in detail. Two-dimensional α-Mo2C has been directly synthesized by a plate-to-plate substrate holder structure with a microwave power of 920 W and a partial pressure of 20 kPa. In-situ optical emission spectroscopy was used to measure the radical types in the plasma ball during glow discharge. The as-grown α-Mo2C samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to determine their phases, purity and chemical groups. The superconducting transition temperature was measured, and the transition temperatures of the relevant phases are discussed in detail. The results confirmed that this method is an efficient way to obtain molybdenum carbides and inspire new research interest in transition metal carbides, which have many intrinsic local properties and applications.

  19. Monolayer MoSe 2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Fast Photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yung-Huang

    2014-08-26

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has become a promising building block in optoelectronics for its high photosensitivity. However, sulfur vacancies and other defects significantly affect the electrical and optoelectronic properties of monolayer MoS2 devices. Here, highly crystalline molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) monolayers have been successfully synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Low-temperature photoluminescence comparison for MoS2 and MoSe 2 monolayers reveals that the MoSe2 monolayer shows a much weaker bound exciton peak; hence, the phototransistor based on MoSe2 presents a much faster response time (<25 ms) than the corresponding 30 s for the CVD MoS2 monolayer at room temperature in ambient conditions. The images obtained from transmission electron microscopy indicate that the MoSe exhibits fewer defects than MoS2. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the differences in optoelectronic behaviors between MoSe2 and MoS2 and is useful for guiding future designs in 2D material-based optoelectronic devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. A directly patternable click-active polymer film via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Sung Gap; Kim, Byeong-Su; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E.; Hammond, Paula T.; Gleason, Karen K.

    2009-01-01

    A new 'click chemistry' active functional polymer film was directly obtained from a commercially available monomer of propargyl acrylate (PA) via easy, one-step process of initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed that significant amount of the click-active acetylene functional group was retained after the iCVD process. The degree of crosslinking could be controlled by intentionally adding crosslinker, such as ethylene glycol diacrylate (EGDA) that was polymerized with PA to form click-active, completely insoluble copolymer. The formed iCVD polymers could also be grafted on various inorganic substrates with silane coupling agents. These crosslinking and grafting techniques give iCVD polymers chemical and mechanical stability, which allows iCVD polymers applicable to various click chemistry without any modification of reaction conditions. Pre-patterned iCVD polymer could be obtained via photolithography and an azido-functionalized dye molecule was also successfully attached on iCVD polymer via click chemistry. Moreover, pPA film demonstrated sensitivity to e-beam irradiation, which enabled clickable substrates having nanometer scale patterns without requiring the use of an additional e-beam resist. Direct e-beam exposure of this multifunctional iCVD layer, a 200 nm pattern, and QD particles were selectively conjugated on the substrates via click chemistry. Thus, iCVD pPA has shown dual functionality as of 'clickable' e-beam sensitive material.

  1. Metal organic framework absorbent platforms for removal of co2 and h2s from natural gas

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands which have high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Methods include capturing one or more of H2S, H2O, and CO2 from fluid compositions, such as natural gas.

  2. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  3. Biomimicry in metal-organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, MW; Gu, ZY; Bosch, M; Perry, Z; Zhou, HC

    2015-06-15

    Nature has evolved a great number of biological molecules which serve as excellent constructional or functional units for metal-organic materials (MOMs). Even though the study of biomimetic MOMs is still at its embryonic stage, considerable progress has been made in the past few years. In this critical review, we will highlight the recent advances in the design, development and application of biomimetic MOMs, and illustrate how the incorporation of biological components into MOMs could further enrich their structural and functional diversity. More importantly, this review will provide a systematic overview of different methods for rational design of MOMs with biomimetic features. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped Si and Ge layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogumilowicz, Y.; Hartmann, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the in-situ boron (B) doping of germanium (Ge) and silicon (Si) in Reduced Pressure-Chemical Vapor Deposition. Three growth temperatures have been investigated for the B-doping of Ge: 400, 600 and 750 °C at a constant growth pressure of 13300 Pa (i.e. 100 Torr). The B concentration in the Ge:B epilayer increases linearly with the diborane concentration in the gaseous phase. Single-crystalline Ge:B layers with B concentrations in-between 9 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 were achieved. For the in-situ B doping of Si at 850 °C, two dichlorosilane mass flow ratios (MFR) have been assessed: F[SiH 2 Cl 2 ]/F[H 2 ] = 0.0025 and F[SiH 2 Cl 2 ]/F[H 2 ] = 0.0113 at a growth pressure of 2660 Pa (i.e. 20 Torr). Linear boron incorporation with the diborane concentration in the gas phase has been observed and doping levels in-between 3.5 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 were achieved. We almost kept the same ratio of B versus Si atoms in the gas phase and in the Si epilayer. By contrast, roughly half of the B atoms present in the gas phase were incorporated in the Ge:B layers irrespective of the growth temperature. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) allowed us to extract from the angular position of the Ge:B layer diffraction peak the substitutional B concentration. Values close to the B concentrations obtained by 4-probe resistivity measurements were obtained. Ge:B layers were smooth (< 1 m root mean square roughness associated with 20 × 20 μm 2 Atomic Force Microscopy images). Only for high F[B 2 H 6 ]/F[GeH 4 ] MFR (3.2 10 −3 ) did the Ge:B layers became rough; they were however still mono-crystalline (XRD). Above this MFR value, Ge:B layers became polycrystalline. - Highlights: • Boron doping of germanium and silicon in Reduced Pressure-Chemical Vapor Deposition • Linear boron incorporation in Ge:B and Si:B with the diborane flow • Single-crystal Ge:B layers with B concentrations in-between 9 ∙ 10 17 and 1 ∙ 10 20 cm −3 • Single-crystal Si

  5. Limitations of patterning thin films by shadow mask high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Michael; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    A key factor in engineering integrated devices such as electro-optic switches or waveguides is the patterning of high quality crystalline thin films into specific geometries. In this contribution high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (HV-CVD) was employed to grow titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) patterns onto silicon. The directed nature of precursor transport – which originates from the high vacuum environment during the process – allows shading certain regions on the substrate by shadow masks and thus depositing patterned thin films. While the use of such masks is an emerging field in stencil or shadow mask lithography, their use for structuring thin films within HV-CVD has not been reported so far. The advantage of the employed technique is the precise control of lateral spacing and of the distance between shading mask and substrate surface which is achieved by manufacturing them directly on the substrate. As precursor transport takes place in the molecular flow regime, the precursor impinging rates (and therefore the film growth rates) on the surface can be simulated as function of the reactor and shading mask geometry using a comparatively simple mathematical model. In the current contribution such a mathematical model, which predicts impinging rates on plain or shadow mask structured substrates, is presented. Its validity is confirmed by TiO 2 -deposition on plain silicon substrates (450 °C) using titanium tetra isopropoxide as precursor. Limitations of the patterning process are investigated by the deposition of TiO 2 on structured substrates and subsequent shadow mask lift-off. The geometry of the deposits is according to the mathematical model. Shading effects due to the growing film enables to fabricate deposits with predetermined variations in topography and non-flat top deposits which are complicated to obtain by classical clean room processes. As a result of the enhanced residual pressure of decomposition products and titanium precursors and the

  6. Metal-Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, Matthew J; Castillo-Martínez, Elizabeth; Wu, Yue; Lee, Jeongjae; Forse, Alexander C; Firth, Francesca C N; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Gaultois, Michael W; Hill, Joshua A; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Slater, Ben; Goodwin, Andrew L; Grey, Clare P

    2017-04-19

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed "double cluster" (Hf 12 O 8 (OH) 14 ), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal-organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal-organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials.

  7. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxynitride for micromachined millimeter-wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, M.; Peyrou, D.; Achkar, H.; Pennec, F.; Bouscayrol, L.; Rousset, B.; Boyer, P. T.; Scheid, E.; Pons, P.; Plana, R.

    2008-03-01

    Silicon oxynitride films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature and frequency using SiH4 + NH3 + N2O gas mixtures. The process is optimized in order to deposit film with low tensile stress and high resistance during KOH etching. By increasing the gas flow of nitrous oxide (N2O), the film tends to be oxygen rich and the usual as-deposited high compressive stress is reduced to its lowest state at O/Si = 0.74. Annealing films above 480 °C generates low tensile stress suitable for membrane fabrication, and further infrared spectroscopy analysis shows that the shrinking of Si-O and Si-N bonds seems to be the cause of reversing the stress's nature. Young's modulus of the optimized layer is characterized by indentation. In application, 75 Ω coplanar waveguides (CPW) were fabricated on the top of an oxynitride membrane and characterized in term of insertion loss and effective permittivity. The results were compared to those obtained with the well-controlled bilayer silicon oxide-nitride membrane technology. The obtained losses are lower than 0.2 dB at 30 GHz with a free-space propagation signal.

  8. Fabrication of layered self-standing diamond film by dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G. C.; Dai, F. W.; Li, B.; Lan, H.; Askari, J.; Tang, W. Z.; Lu, F. X.

    2007-01-01

    Layered self-standing diamond films, consisting of an upper layer, buffer layer, and a lower layer, were fabricated by fluctuating the ratio of methane to hydrogen in high power dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition. There were micrometer-sized columnar diamond crystalline grains in both upper layer and lower layer. The size of the columnar diamond crystalline grains was bigger in the upper layer than that in the lower layer. The orientation of the upper layer was (110), while it was (111) for the lower layer. Raman results showed that no sp 3 peak shift was found in the upper layer, but it was found and blueshifted in the lower layer. This indicated that the internal stress within the film body could be tailored by this layered structure. The buffer layer with nanometer-sized diamond grains formed by secondary nucleation was necessary in order to form the layered film. Growth rate was over 10 μm/h in layered self-standing diamond film fabrication

  9. Hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Er-Xiong; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Jing; Luo, Zhi-Jia; Li, Guangfen; Wang, Wen-Yi; Li, Lin-Ge; Yang, Hai-Jie; Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2016-02-01

    Novel hierarchical chrysanthemum-flower-like carbon nanomaterials (CFL-CNMs) were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition based on acetylene decomposition. A scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope were employed to observe the morphology and structure of the unconventional nanostructures. It is found that the CFL-CNMs look like a blooming chrysanthemum with a stem rather than a spherical flower. The carbon flower has an average diameter of 5 μm, an average stem diameter of 150 nm, branch diameters ranging from 20 to 70 nm, and branch lengths ranging from 0.5 to 3 μm. The morphologies of the CFL-CNMs are unlike any of those previously reported. Fishbone-like carbon nanofibers with a spindle-shaped catalyst locating at the tip can also be found. Furthermore, the catalyst split was proposed to elucidate the formation mechanism of CFL-CNMs. A large and glomerate catalyst particle at the tip of the carbon nanofiber splits into smaller catalyst particles which are catalytic-active points for branch formation, resulting in the formation of CFL-CNMs.

  10. Feasibility study of the microforming combined with selective chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microforming has been received much attention in the recent decades due to the wide use of microparts in electronics and medical applications. For the further functionalization of these micro devices, high functional surfaces with noble metals and nanomaterials are strongly required in bio- and medical fields, such as bio-sensors. To realize an efficient manufacturing process, which can deform the submillimeter scale bulk structure and can construct the micro to nanometer scale structures in one process, the present study proposes a combined process of microforming for metal foils with a selective chemical vapor deposition (SCVD on the active surfaces of the working material. To demonstrate feasibility of this proposed process, feasibility of SCVD of functional materials onto active surfaces of titanium (Ti was investigated. CVD of iron (Fe and carbon nanotubes (CNTs which construct CNTs on the patterned surfaces of the active Ti and non-active Ti oxidation layers were conducted. Ti thin films on silicon substrate and Fe were used as working materials and functional materials respectively. CNTs were grown only on the Ti surface. Consequently, selectivity of the active surface of Ti to the synthesis of Fe particles in CVD was confirmed.

  11. Selective Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Cubic FeGe Nanowires That Support Stabilized Magnetic Skyrmions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Matthew J; Li, Zi-An; Phillips, Brandon; Song, Dongsheng; Mathur, Nitish; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Jin, Song

    2017-01-11

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically stable vortex-like spin structures that are promising for next generation information storage applications. Materials that host magnetic skyrmions, such as MnSi and FeGe with the noncentrosymmetric cubic B20 crystal structure, have been shown to stabilize skyrmions upon nanostructuring. Here, we report a chemical vapor deposition method to selectively grow nanowires (NWs) of cubic FeGe out of three possible FeGe polymorphs for the first time using finely ground particles of cubic FeGe as seeds. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm that these micron-length NWs with ∼100 nm to 1 μm diameters have the cubic B20 crystal structure. Although Fe 13 Ge 8 NWs are also formed, the two types of NWs can be readily differentiated by their faceting. Lorentz TEM imaging of the cubic FeGe NWs reveals a skyrmion lattice phase under small applied magnetic fields (∼0.1 T) at 233 K, a skyrmion chain state at lower temperatures (95 K) and under high magnetic fields (∼0.4 T), and a larger skyrmion stability window than bulk FeGe. This synthetic approach to cubic FeGe NWs that support stabilized skyrmions opens a route toward the exploration of new skyrmion physics and devices based on similar nanostructures.

  12. Preparation of Al O N Films by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takashi; Zhang, Wei; Hirai, Toshio

    1999-06-01

    Al O N films were prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (ECR PACVD) using an AlBr3 N2O N2 Ar H2 gas system. The structure, composition, deposition rate and optical properties were investigated. The compositions were controlled by changing the N2O/(N2O+N2) flow rate ratio (R). The refractive index was varied from 1.60 to 2.10, and the cutoff photon energy at 10% transmittance (Eg/10) from 5.1 to 7.0 eV as the R changed from 0 to 1.0. The Al O N films were composed mainly of a mixture of Al2O3 and AlN. An aluminum oxynitride phase was also identified at R=0.2 to 0.53. The Al O N films contained a (001)-oriented hexagonal AlN phase at R=0.025, and the films were amorphous at R>0.05.

  13. Application of Chlorine-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chenyu; Altemir, David A.; Margrave, John L.; Hauge, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Low temperature deposition of diamond has been achieved by a chlorine-assisted diamond chemical vapor deposition (CA-CVD) process. This method begins with the thermal dissociation of molecular chlorine into atomic chlorine in a resistively heated graphite furnace at temperatures between 1300 and 1500 deg. C. The atomic chlorine, upon mixing, subsequently reacts with molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons. The rapid exchange reactions between the atomic chlorine, molecular hydrogen, and hydrocarbons give rise to the atomic hydrogen and carbon precursors required for diamond deposition. Homoepitaxial diamond growth on diamond substrates has been studied over the substrate temperature range of 100-950 C. It was found that the diamond growth rates are approximately 0.2 microns/hr in the temperature range between 102 and 300 C and that the growth rates do not decrease significantly with a decrease in substrate temperature. This is unique because the traditional diamond deposition using H2/CH4 systems usually disappears at substrate temperatures below approx. 500 deg. C. This opens up a possible route to the deposition of diamond on low-melting point materials such as aluminum and its alloys.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of graphenated carbon nanotubes on IONPs using acetylene by chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Perumal, Suguna; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Lee, Yong Rok

    2015-11-01

    The graphenated carbon nanotubes (G-CNTs) were synthesized on monodisperse spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) using acetylene as carbon precursor by simple chemical vapor deposition method. The reaction parameters such as temperature and flow of carbon source were optimized in order to achieve G-CNTs with excellent quality and quantity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly illustrated that the graphene flakes are forming along the whole length on CNTs. The degree of graphitization was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The intensity of D to G value was less than one which confirms the obtained G-CNTs have high degree of graphitization. The optimum reaction temperature for the IONPs to form metallic clusters which in turn lead to the formation of G-CNTs with high carbon deposition yield is at 900 °C. The TEM shows the CNTs diameter is 50 nm with foiled graphene flakes of diameter around 70 nm. Our results advocate for IONPs as a promising catalytic template for quantitative and qualitative productivity of nanohybrid G-CNTs. The produced G-CNTs with high degree of graphitization might be an ideal candidate for nanoelectronic application like super capacitors and so on.

  15. Synthesis-condition dependence of carbon nanotube growth by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhito Inami et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the dependence of growth yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on heat-treatment time and catalyst film thickness by the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. Three types of heat-treatment, synthesis of 30 min, synthesis of 30 min after annealing of 30 min, and synthesis of 60 min, were investigated. Thickness of Co catalyst film was varied from 1 to 10 nm. In the case of thinner Co film less than 3 nm, long synthesis time of 60 min is favorable for the effective SWNT growth, because of the small amount of Co catalyst. In the case of thicker Co film more than 3 nm, an amount of grown SWNTs by 30 min synthesis after 30 min annealing and by 60 min synthesis was much higher than that by 30 min synthesis without annealing, showing that total heat-treatment time of 60 min is important for the SWNT growth. Results suggest that the conversion from the thicker film of Co to nano-particle which acts as catalyst takes place during the first 30 min.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition diamond based multilayered radiation detector: Physical analysis of detection properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Dolbnya, I.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, solid state photovoltaic Schottky diodes, able to detect ionizing radiation, in particular, x-ray and ultraviolet radiation, have been developed at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata'. We report on a physical and electrical properties analysis of the device and a detailed study of its detection capabilities as determined by its electrical properties. The design of the device is based on a metal/nominally intrinsic/p-type diamond layered structure obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of homoepitaxial single crystal diamond followed by thermal evaporation of a metallic contact. The device can operate in an unbiased mode by using the built-in potential arising from the electrode-diamond junction. We compare the expected response of the device to photons of various energies calculated through Monte Carlo simulation with experimental data collected in a well controlled experimental setup i.e., monochromatic high flux x-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV, available at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (U.K.).

  17. Early evaluation of potential environmental impacts of carbon nanotube synthesis by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, Desirée L; Hart, A John; Reddy, Christopher M; Gschwend, Philip M

    2009-11-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is expanding rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of CNT manufacture. Here, we evaluate the effluent composition of a representative multiwalled CNT synthesis by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in order to provide data needed to design strategies for mitigating any unacceptable emissions. During thermal pretreatment of the reactant gases (ethene and H(2)), we found over 45 side-products were formed, including methane, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This finding suggests several environmental concerns with the existing process, including potential discharges of the potent greenhouse gas, methane (up to 1.7%), and toxic compounds such as benzene and 1,3-butadiene (up to 36000 ppmv). Extrapolating these laboratory-scale data to future industrial CNT production, we estimate that (1) contributions of atmospheric methane will be negligible compared to other existing sources and (2) VOC and PAH emissions may become important on local scales but will be small when compared to national industrial sources. As a first step toward reducing such unwanted emissions, we used continuous in situ measures of CNT length during growth and sought to identify which thermally generated compounds correlated with CNT growth rate. The results suggested that, in future CNT production approaches, key reaction intermediates could be delivered to the catalyst without thermal treatment. This would eliminate the most energetically expensive component of CVD synthesis (heating reactant gases), while reducing the formation of unintended byproducts.

  18. Preparation of Ti species coating hydrotalcite by chemical vapor deposition for photodegradation of azo dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gaofei; Zeng, HongYan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, ChaoRong; Zhao, Quan; Liu, XiaoJun

    2017-10-01

    TiO 2 in anatase crystal phase is a very effective catalyst in the photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds in water. To improve its photocatalytic activity, the Ti-coating MgAl hydrotalcite (Ti-MgAl-LDH) was prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Response surface method (RSM) was employed to evaluate the effect of Ti species coating parameters on the photocatalytic activity, which was found to be affected by the furnace temperature, N 2 flow rate and influx time of precursor gas. Application of RSM successfully increased the photocatalytic efficiency of the Ti-MgAl-LDH in methylene blue photodegradation under UV irradiation, leading to improved economy of the process. According to the results from X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Brunner-Emmet-Teller and Barrett-Joyner-Hallender, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra analyses, the Ti species (TiO 2 or/and Ti 4+ ) were successfully coated on the MgAl-LDH matrix. The Ti species on the surface of the Ti-MgAl-LDH lead to a higher photocatalytic performance than commercial TiO 2 -P25. The results suggested that CVD method provided a new approach for the industrial preparation of Ti-coating MgAl-LDH material with good photocatalytic performances. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Planar structured perovskite solar cells by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition with optimized perovskite film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangyang; Peng, Yanke; Jing, Gaoshan; Cui, Tianhong

    2018-05-01

    The thickness of perovskite absorber layer is a critical parameter to determine a planar structured perovskite solar cell’s performance. By modifying the spin coating speed and PbI2/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution concentration, the thickness of perovskite absorber layer was optimized to obtain high-performance solar cells. Using a PbI2/DMF solution of 1.3 mol/L, maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a perovskite solar cell is 15.5% with a perovskite film of 413 nm at 5000 rpm, and PCE of 14.3% was also obtained for a solar cell with a perovskite film of 182 nm thick. It is derived that higher concentration of PbI2/DMF will result in better perovskite solar cells. Additionally, these perovskite solar cells are highly uniform. In 14 sets of solar cells, standard deviations of 11 sets of solar cells were less than 0.50% and the smallest standard deviation was 0.25%, which demonstrates the reliability and effectiveness of hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method.

  20. Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

  1. Thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades: Chemical vapor deposition (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenov, I. K.; Aksenov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Schemes are presented for experimental setups (reactors) developed at leading scientific centers connected with the development of technologies for the deposition of coatings using the CVD method: at the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), the French Aerospace Research Center, the Materials Research Institute (Tohoku University, Japan) and the National Laboratory Oak Ridge (USA). Conditions and modes for obtaining the coatings with high operational parameters are considered. It is established that the formed thermal barrier coatings do not fundamentally differ in their properties (columnar microstructure, thermocyclic resistance, thermal conductivity coefficient) from standard electron-beam condensates, but the highest growth rates and the perfection of the crystal structure are achieved in the case of plasma-chemical processes and in reactors with additional laser or induction heating of a workpiece. It is shown that CVD reactors can serve as a basis for the development of rational and more advanced technologies for coating gas turbine blades that are not inferior to standard electron-beam plants in terms of the quality of produced coatings and have a much simpler and cheaper structure. The possibility of developing a new technology based on CVD processes for the formation of thermal barrier coatings with high operational parameters is discussed, including a set of requirements for industrial reactors, high-performance sources of vapor precursors, and promising new materials.

  2. Rapid Chemical Vapor Infiltration of Silicon Carbide Minicomposites at Atmospheric Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroski, Kenneth; Poges, Shannon; Monteleone, Chris; Grady, Joseph; Bhatt, Ram; Suib, Steven L

    2018-02-07

    The chemical vapor infiltration technique is one of the most popular for the fabrication of the matrix portion of a ceramic matrix composite. This work focuses on tailoring an atmospheric pressure deposition of silicon carbide onto carbon fiber tows using the methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 ) and H 2 deposition system at atmospheric pressure to create minicomposites faster than low pressure systems. Adjustment of the flow rate of H 2 bubbled through CH 3 SiCl 3 will improve the uniformity of the deposition as well as infiltrate the substrate more completely as the flow rate is decreased. Low pressure depositions conducted at 50 Torr deposit SiC at a rate of approximately 200 nm*h -1 , while the atmospheric pressure system presented has a deposition rate ranging from 750 nm*h -1 to 3.88 μm*h -1 . The minicomposites fabricated in this study had approximate total porosities of 3 and 6% for 10 and 25 SCCM infiltrations, respectively.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Spray Chemical Vapor Deposited CuInS2 Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. D.; Raffaelle, R. P.; Banger, K. K.; Smith, M. A.; Scheiman, D. A.; Hepp, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    Solar cells have been prepared using atmospheric pressure spray chemical vapor deposited CuInS2 absorbers. The CuInS2 films were deposited at 390 C using the single source precursor (PPh3)2CuIn(SEt)4 in an argon atmosphere. The absorber ranges in thickness from 0.75 - 1.0 micrometers, and exhibits a crystallographic gradient, with the leading edge having a (220) preferred orientation and the trailing edge having a (112) orientation. Schottky diodes prepared by thermal evaporation of aluminum contacts on to the CuInS2 yielded diodes for films that were annealed at 600 C. Solar cells were prepared using annealed films and had the (top down) composition of Al/ZnO/CdS/CuInS2/Mo/Glass. The Jsc, Voc, FF and (eta) were 6.46 mA per square centimeter, 307 mV, 24% and 0.35%, respectively for the best small area cells under simulated AM0 illumination.

  4. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  5. Comparative investigation of smooth polycrystalline diamond films on dental burs by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Rego, Christopher; Jackson, Mark; Polini, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    Depositions of hot filament chemical vapor-deposited diamond on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) rotary cutting dental burs are presented. Conventional dental tools made of sintered polycrystalline diamond have a number of problems associated with the heterogeneity of the crystallite, decreased cutting efficiency, and short life. A preferential (111) faceted diamond was obtained after 15 h of deposition at a growth rate of 1.1 µm/h. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs and conventional sintered burs are mainly used in turning, milling, and drilling operations for machining metal ceramic hard alloys such as CoCr, composite teeth, and aluminum alloy in the dental laboratory. The influence of structure, the mechanical characteristics of both diamond grains and hard alloys on the wear behavior, as well as the regimen of grinding on diamond wear are considered. Erosion wear properties are also investigated under air-sand erosion testing. After machining with excessive cutting performance, calculations can be made on flank and crater wear areas. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs offered significantly better erosion and wear resistance compared with uncoated WC-Co tools and sintered burs.

  6. Heteroepitaxial growth of wafer scale highly oriented graphene using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Libo; Xu, Hai; Li, Linjun; Loh, Kian Ping; Yang, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu has attracted much attention because of its industrial scalability. Herein, we report inductively coupled plasma-assisted CVD of epitaxially grown graphene on (111)-textured Cu film alloyed with a small amount of Ni, where large area high quality graphene film can be grown in less than 5 min at 800 °C, thus affording industrial scalability. The epitaxially grown graphene films on (111)-textured Cu contain grains which are predominantly aligned with the Cu lattice and about 10% of 30°-rotated grains (anti-grains). Such graphene films are exclusively monolayer and possess good electrical conductivity, high carrier mobility, and room temperature quantum Hall effect. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal that the reduction of the grain sizes from 150 nm to 50 nm produce increasing Anderson localization and the appearance of a transport gap. Owing to the presence of grain boundaries in these anti-grains, epitaxially grown graphene films possess n-type characteristics and exhibit ultra-high sensitivity to adsorbates. (letter)

  7. Threefold atmospheric-pressure annealing for suppressing graphene nucleation on copper in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seiya; Nagamori, Takashi; Matsuoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2014-09-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising method of producing a large single-crystal graphene on a catalyst, especially on copper (Cu), and a further increase in domain size is desirable for electro/optic applications. Here, we report on threefold atmospheric-pressure (ATM) annealing for suppressing graphene nucleation in atmospheric CVD. Threefold ATM annealing formed a step and terrace surface of the underlying Cu, in contrast to ATM annealing. Atomic force microscopy and Auger electron mapping revealed that Si-containing particles existed on threefold-ATM- and ATM-annealed surfaces; particles on Cu had a lower density after threefold ATM annealing than after ATM annealing. The formation of a step and terrace surface and the lower density of particles following the threefold ATM annealing would play a role in reducing graphene nucleation. By combining threefold ATM annealing and electropolishing of Cu, the nucleation of graphene was effectively suppressed, and a submillimeter-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene was successfully obtained.

  8. Substrate Effect on Plasma Clean Efficiency in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ko JangJian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma clean in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD system plays an important role to ensure the same chamber condition after numerous film depositions. The periodic and applicable plasma clean in deposition chamber also increases wafer yield due to less defect produced during the deposition process. In this study, the plasma clean rate (PCR of silicon oxide is investigated after the silicon nitride deposited on Cu and silicon oxide substrates by remote plasma system (RPS, respectively. The experimental results show that the PCR drastically decreases with Cu substrate compared to that with silicon oxide substrate after numerous silicon nitride depositions. To understand the substrate effect on PCR, the surface element analysis and bonding configuration are executed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS is used to analyze microelement of metal ions on the surface of shower head in the PECVD chamber. According to Cu substrate, the results show that micro Cu ion and the CuOx bonding can be detected on the surface of shower head. The Cu ion contamination might grab the fluorine radicals produced by NF3 ddissociation in the RPS and that induces the drastic decrease on PCR.

  9. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  10. Aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition using nanoparticle precursors: a route to nanocomposite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgrave, Robert G; Parkin, Ivan P

    2006-02-08

    Gold nanoparticle and gold/semiconductor nanocomposite thin films have been deposited using aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A preformed gold colloid in toluene was used as a precursor to deposit gold films onto silica glass. These nanoparticle films showed the characteristic plasmon absorption of Au nanoparticles at 537 nm, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging confirmed the presence of individual gold particles. Nanocomposite films were deposited from the colloid concurrently with conventional CVD precursors. A film of gold particles in a host tungsten oxide matrix resulted from co-deposition with [W(OPh)(6)], while gold particles in a host titania matrix resulted from co-deposition with [Ti(O(i)Pr)(4)]. The density of Au nanoparticles within the film could be varied by changing the Au colloid concentration in the original precursor solution. Titania/gold composite films were intensely colored and showed dichromism: blue in transmitted light and red in reflected light. They showed metal-like reflection spectra and plasmon absorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of metallic gold, and SEM imaging showed individual Au nanoparticles embedded in the films. X-ray diffraction detected crystalline gold in the composite films. This CVD technique can be readily extended to produce other nanocomposite films by varying the colloids and precursors used, and it offers a rapid, convenient route to nanoparticle and nanocomposite thin films.

  11. Three-Dimensional Nanostructure Fabrication by Focused Ion Beam Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Shinji

    In this chapter, we describe three-dimensional nanostructure fabrication using 30 keV Ga+ focused ion beam chemical vapor deposition (FIB-CVD) and a phenanthrene (C14H10) source as a precursor. We also consider microstructure plastic art, which is a new field that has been made possible by microbeam technology, and we present examples of such art, including a "micro wine glass" with an external diameter of 2.75 μm and a height of 12 μm. The film deposited during such processes is diamond-like amorphous carbon, which has a Young's modulus exceeding 600 GPa, appearing to make it highly desirable for various applications. The production of three-dimensional nanostructures is also discussed. The fabrication of microcoils, nanoelectrostatic actuators, and 0.1 μm nanowiring - all potential components of nanomechanical systems - is explained. The chapter ends by describing the realization of nanoinjectors and nanomanipulators, novel nanotools for manipulating and analyzing subcellular organelles.

  12. Thermal stability of multilayer graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and stained by metallic impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Sangchul; Park, Woojin; Jo, Gunho; Choe, Minhyeok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Yu, Hyunung; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Kwanghee

    2012-02-24

    Thermal stability is an important property of graphene that requires thorough investigation. This study reports the thermal stability of graphene films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic nickel substrates in a reducing atmosphere. Electron microscopies, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, as well as electronic measurements, were used to determine that CVD-grown graphene films are stable up to 700 °C. At 800 °C, however, graphene films were etched by catalytic metal nanoparticles, and at 1000 °C many tortuous tubular structures were formed in the film and carbon nanotubes were formed at the film edges and at catalytic metal-contaminated sites. Furthermore, we applied our pristine and thermally treated graphene films as active channels in field-effect transistors and characterized their electrical properties. Our research shows that remnant catalytic metal impurities play a critical role in damaging graphene films at high temperatures in a reducing atmosphere: this damage should be considered in the quality control of large-area graphene films for high temperature applications.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanofibers grown on Ni and Mo catalysts by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Yi; Park, Heai Ku; Lee, Chang Seop [Keimyung University, Deagu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Ha [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we synthesized carbon nanofibers using Ni and Mo catalysts by chemical vapor deposition. Catalysts used in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers were prepared by changing the molar ratio of nickel nitrate and ammonium molybdate. Precipitates were then obtained by reacting with ammonium carbonate. The optimum temperature for synthesis of carbon nanofibers was found by changing it between 600 and 800 °C. At these temperatures, carbon nanofibers were synthesized with various ratios of catalysts. Structural and physiochemical properties were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The specific surface area of synthesized carbon nanofibers was measured by BET. It was found that characterization of carbon nanofibers were significantly affected by the synthesis temperature and the concentration ratio of metal catalysts. When the catalyst with the concentration ratio of Ni and Mo was 6:4 at 800 °C, uniform carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 50 nm were grown. Crystallinity and amorphicity of the synthesized carbon nanofiber were excellent compared to those of carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts in different concentration ratios. A three-electrode cell was prepared by using the synthesized carbon nanofibers as anode of Li secondary battery. The electrochemical properties of carbon nanofibers were examined through cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge–discharge.

  14. Magnetotransport study of granular chromium dioxide thin films prepared by the chemical vapor deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.-J.; Lee, S.F.; Yao, Y.D.; Wu, C.C.; Shyu, S.G.; Yu, C.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of granular chromium dioxide (CrO 2 ) films with grain size about 1 μm grown by chemical vapor deposition on Si(0 0 1) substrates has been studied over a temperature range from 2 to 300 K. The magnetoresistance (MR) of about 20% at T=2 K decreases very fast with increasing temperature as a result of the rapid increase of the spin-independent hopping channel, whilst the temperature-dependent MR is almost the same for samples after 100 days annealing in air at room temperature, and its electrical resistivity at room temperature increases from roughly 50 to >75 μΩ m. The contribution to the conductance at T 1.33 . It becomes a poor metal at temperatures >160 K and its resistance follows R∼T 2 exp(-Δ/T). We have shown experimentally that the room temperature annealing results in the decomposition of CrO 2 into Cr 2 O 3 mainly near the surface of the films

  15. Layer-selective synthesis of bilayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Choi, Kyoungjun; Robertson, John; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    A controlled synthesis of high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition demands a detailed understanding of the mechanism and kinetics. By decoupling the growth of the two layers via a growth-and-regrowth scheme, we report the kinetics and termination mechanisms of the bilayer graphene growth on copper. We observe, for the first time, that the secondary layer growth follows Gompertzian kinetics. Our observations affirm the postulate of a time-variant transition from a mass-transport-limited to a reaction-limited regimes and identify the mechanistic disparity between the monolayer growth and the secondary-layer expansion underneath the monolayer cover. It is the continuous carbon supply that drives the expansion of the graphene secondary layer, rather than the initially captured carbon amount, suggesting an essential role of the surface diffusion of reactant adsorbates in the interspace between the top graphene layer and the underneath copper surface. We anticipate that the layer selectivity of the growth relies on the entrance energetics of the adsorbed reactants to the graphene-copper interspace across the primary-layer edge, which could be engineered by tailoring the edge termination state. The temperature-reliant saturation area of the secondary-layer expansion is understood as a result of competitive attachment of carbon and hydrogen adatoms to the secondary-layer graphene edge.

  16. Transfer and patterning of chemical vapor deposited graphene by a multifunctional polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplas, Tommi; Bera, Arijit; Matikainen, Antti; Pääkkönen, Pertti; Lipsanen, Harri

    2018-02-01

    Graphene is seeking pathways towards applications, but there are still plenty of unresolved problems on the way. Many of those obstacles are related to synthesis and processing of graphene. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene is currently one of the most promising techniques that enable scalable synthesis of high quality graphene on a copper substrate. From the transient metal substrate, the CVD graphene film is transferred to the desired dielectric substrate. Most often, the transfer process is done by using a supporting poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film, which is also a widely used electron beam resist. Conventionally, after graphene is transferred to the substrate, the supporting PMMA film is removed by organic solvents. Hence, the potential of using the same PMMA layer as a resist mask remains unexplored. Since PMMA is an electron beam resist, the same polymer film can be useful both for transferring and for patterning of graphene. In this work, we demonstrate simultaneous transfer and patterning of graphene by using the same PMMA film. With our demonstrated method, we are able to receive sub-micron resolution very easily. The graphene transfer and its subsequent patterning with the same resist layer may help developing device applications based on graphene and other 2D materials in the near future.

  17. Large-Area WS2 Film with Big Single Domains Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengyu; Luo, Tao; Xing, Jie; Xu, Hong; Hao, Huiying; Liu, Hao; Dong, Jingjing

    2017-10-01

    High-quality WS2 film with the single domain size up to 400 μm was grown on Si/SiO2 wafer by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. The effects of some important fabrication parameters on the controlled growth of WS2 film have been investigated in detail, including the choice of precursors, tube pressure, growing temperature, holding time, the amount of sulfur powder, and gas flow rate. By optimizing the growth conditions at one atmospheric pressure, we obtained tungsten disulfide single domains with an average size over 100 μm. Raman spectra, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy provided direct evidence that the WS2 film had an atomic layer thickness and a single-domain hexagonal structure with a high crystal quality. And the photoluminescence spectra indicated that the tungsten disulfide films showed an evident layer-number-dependent fluorescence efficiency, depending on their energy band structure. Our study provides an important experimental basis for large-area, controllable preparation of atom-thick tungsten disulfide thin film and can also expedite the development of scalable high-performance optoelectronic devices based on WS2 film.

  18. Surface functionalization of 3D-printed plastics via initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a useful fabrication technique because it offers design flexibility and rapid prototyping. The ability to functionalize the surfaces of 3D-printed objects allows the bulk properties, such as material strength or printability, to be chosen separately from surface properties, which is critical to expanding the breadth of 3D printing applications. In this work, we studied the ability of the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD process to coat 3D-printed shapes composed of poly(lactic acid and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. The thermally insulating properties of 3D-printed plastics pose a challenge to the iCVD process due to large thermal gradients along the structures during processing. In this study, processing parameters such as the substrate temperature and the filament temperature were systematically varied to understand how these parameters affect the uniformity of the coatings along the 3D-printed objects. The 3D-printed objects were coated with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers. Contact angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalized surfaces. Our results can enable the use of iCVD to functionalize 3D-printed materials for a range of applications such as tissue scaffolds and microfluidics.

  19. Defects in silicon carbide grown by fluorinated chemical vapor deposition chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Pontus; Booker, Ian D.; Karhu, Robin; Pedersen, Henrik; Janzén, Erik; Ivanov, Ivan G.

    2018-04-01

    Point defects in n- and p-type 4H-SiC grown by fluorinated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been characterized optically by photoluminescence (PL) and electrically by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and minority carrier transient spectroscopy (MCTS). The results are considered in comparison with defects observed in non-fluorinated CVD growth (e.g., using SiH4 instead of SiF4 as silicon precursor), in order to investigate whether specific fluorine-related defects form during the fluorinated CVD growth, which might prohibit the use of fluorinated chemistry for device-manufacturing purposes. Several new peaks identifying new defects appear in the PL of fluorinated-grown samples, which are not commonly observed neither in other halogenated chemistries, nor in the standard CVD chemistry using silane (SiH4). However, further investigation is needed in order to determine their origin and whether they are related to incorporation of F in the SiC lattice, or not. The electric characterization does not find any new electrically-active defects that can be related to F incorporation. Thus, we find no point defects prohibiting the use of fluorinated chemistry for device-making purposes.

  20. Continuous, highly flexible, and transparent graphene films by chemical vapor deposition for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez De Arco, Lewis; Zhang, Yi; Schlenker, Cody W; Ryu, Koungmin; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-05-25

    We report the implementation of continuous, highly flexible, and transparent graphene films obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) in organic photovoltaic cells. Graphene films were synthesized by CVD, transferred to transparent substrates, and evaluated in organic solar cell heterojunctions (TCE/poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/copper phthalocyanine/fullerene/bathocuproine/aluminum). Key to our success is the continuous nature of the CVD graphene films, which led to minimal surface roughness ( approximately 0.9 nm) and offered sheet resistance down to 230 Omega/sq (at 72% transparency), much lower than stacked graphene flakes at similar transparency. In addition, solar cells with CVD graphene and indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were fabricated side-by-side on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and were confirmed to offer comparable performance, with power conversion efficiencies (eta) of 1.18 and 1.27%, respectively. Furthermore, CVD graphene solar cells demonstrated outstanding capability to operate under bending conditions up to 138 degrees , whereas the ITO-based devices displayed cracks and irreversible failure under bending of 60 degrees . Our work indicates the great potential of CVD graphene films for flexible photovoltaic applications.

  1. Analysis techniques of lattice fringe images for quantified evaluation of pyrocarbon by chemical vapor infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaoling; Zhao, Hongxia; Qi, Lehua; Li, Hejun

    2014-10-01

    Some image analysis techniques are developed for simplifying lattice fringe images of deposited pyrocarbon in carbon/carbon composites by chemical vapor infiltration. They are mainly the object counting method for detecting the optimum threshold, the self-adaptive morphological filtering, the node-separation technique for breaking the aggregate fringes, and some post processing algorithms for reconstructing the fringes. The simplified fringes are the foundation for defining and extracting quantitative nanostructure parameters of pyrocarbon. The frequency filter window of a Fourier transform is defined as the circular band that retains only those fringes with interlayer distance between 0.3 and 0.45 nm. Some judge criteria are set to define topological relation between fringes. For example, the aspect ratio and area of fringes are employed to detect aggregate fringes. Fringe coaxality and distance between endpoints are used to judge the disconnected fringes. The optimum values are determined by using the iterative correction techniques. The best cut-off value for the short fringes is chosen only when there is a reasonable match between the mean fringe length and the value measured by X-ray diffraction. The adopted techniques have been verified to be feasible and to have the potential to convert the complex lattice fringe image to a set of distinct fringe structures.

  2. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  3. Three dimensional graphene synthesis on nickel foam by chemical vapor deposition from ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D multi-layers graphene networks were synthesized from ethylene on nickel foam. • The weight of graphene increased with run duration and when decreasing temperature. • Weight percentages of graphene as high as 15% were obtained. • A continuous mechanism of graphene formation probably exists in presence of ethylene. -- Abstract: 3D multi-layers graphene networks were synthesized on nickel foam from ethylene between 700 and 1000 °C by chemical vapor deposition. Large nickel foam substrates were used allowing the accurate measurement of graphene masses. The weight of graphene increased with run duration and when decreasing temperature. Graphene was also present inside the hollow branches of the foam. We demonstrated that the weights of graphene formed largely exceed the masses corresponding to carbon solubility into nickel. Indeed weight percentages of graphene as high as 15% were obtained, corresponding to graphene layers of 500 nm to 1 μm thick. This means that graphene formation could not be due only to carbon dissolution into nickel and then precipitation during the cooling step. Another mechanism probably co-exists, involving continuous graphene formation in presence of ethylene either by segregation from the dissolved carbon into nickel or by surface CVD growth

  4. Upcycling Waste Lard Oil into Vertical Graphene Sheets by Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjian Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical graphene (VG sheets were single-step synthesized via inductively coupled plasma (ICP-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD using waste lard oil as a sustainable and economical carbon source. Interweaved few-layer VG sheets, H2, and other hydrocarbon gases were obtained after the decomposition of waste lard oil. The influence of parameters such as temperature, gas proportion, ICP power was investigated to tune the nanostructures of obtained VG, which indicated that a proper temperature and H2 concentration was indispensable for the synthesis of VG sheets. Rich defects of VG were formed with a high I D / I G ratio (1.29, consistent with the dense edges structure observed in electron microscopy. Additionally, the morphologies, crystalline degree, and wettability of nanostructure carbon induced by PECVD and ICP separately were comparatively analyzed. The present work demonstrated the potential of our PECVD recipe to synthesize VG from abundant natural waste oil, which paved the way to upgrade the low-value hydrocarbons into advanced carbon material.

  5. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa, E-mail: tanaka@dipole7.kuic.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2017-01-15

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches −5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods. - Highlights: • Thin film of polycrystalline Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} was prepared by the mist CVD method. • Optimized conditions were found for the synthesis of single phase of Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}. • The Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm is –5.2 deg/μm at room temperature. • The Faraday rotation is interpreted by the electronic transitions of Fe{sup 3+} ions.

  6. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  7. Equilibrium chemical vapor deposition growth of Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Kim, Sungjin; Chen, Xiao; Einarsson, Erik; Wang, Miao; Song, Yenan; Wang, Hongtao; Chiashi, Shohei; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2014-11-25

    Using ethanol as the carbon source, self-limiting growth of AB-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) has been achieved on Cu via an equilibrium chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. We found that during this alcohol catalytic CVD (ACCVD) a source-gas pressure range exists to break the self-limitation of monolayer graphene on Cu, and at a certain equilibrium state it prefers to form uniform BLG with a high surface coverage of ∼94% and AB-stacking ratio of nearly 100%. More importantly, once the BLG is completed, this growth shows a self-limiting manner, and an extended ethanol flow time does not result in additional layers. We investigate the mechanism of this equilibrium BLG growth using isotopically labeled (13)C-ethanol and selective surface aryl functionalization, and results reveal that during the equilibrium ACCVD process a continuous substitution of graphene flakes occurs to the as-formed graphene and the BLG growth follows a layer-by-layer epitaxy mechanism. These phenomena are significantly in contrast to those observed for previously reported BLG growth using methane as precursor.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition based tungsten disulfide (WS2) thin film transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-04-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a reported band gap of 1.8 eV in bulk and 1.32-1.4 eV in its thin film form. 2D atomic layers of metal dichalcogenides have shown changes in conductivity with applied electric field. This makes them an interesting option for channel material in field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, we show a highly manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) based simple process to grow WS2 directly on silicon oxide in a furnace and then its transistor action with back gated device with room temperature field effect mobility of 0.1003 cm2/V-s using the Schottky barrier contact model. We also show the semiconducting behavior of this WS2 thin film which is more promising than thermally unstable organic materials for thin film transistor application. Our direct growth method on silicon oxide also holds interesting opportunities for macro-electronics applications. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Growth and electrical properties of AlOx grown by mist chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kawaharamura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxide (AlOx thin films were grown using aluminum acetylacetonate (Al(acac3 as a source solute by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD. The AlOx thin films grown at temperatures above 400°C exhibited a breakdown field (EBD over 6 MV/cm and a dielectric constant (κ over 6. It is suggested that residual OH bonding in the AlOx thin films grown at temperatures below 375°C caused degradation of the breakdown field (EBD. With FC type mist CVD, the reaction proceeded efficiently (Ea = 22–24 kJ/mol because the solvent, especially H2O, worked as a stronger oxygen source. The AlOx film could be grown at 450°C with a high deposition rate (23 nm/min and smooth surface (RMS = 1.5 nm. Moreover, the AlOx thin films grown by mist CVD had excellent practicality as insulators because the gate leakage current (IG of the oxide thin film transistor (TFT with an IGZO/AlOx stack was suppressed below 1 pA at a gate voltage (VG of 20 V.

  10. Computer Simulation of Temperature Parameter for Diamond Formation by Using Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Weon Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the deposition parameters of diamond films, the temperature, pressure, and distance between the filament and the susceptor need to be considered. However, it is difficult to precisely measure and predict the filament and susceptor temperature in relation to the applied power in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD system. In this study, the temperature distribution inside the system was numerically calculated for the applied powers of 12, 14, 16, and 18 kW. The applied power needed to achieve the appropriate temperature at a constant pressure and other conditions was deduced, and applied to actual experimental depositions. The numerical simulation was conducted using the commercial computational fluent dynamics software ANSYS-FLUENT. To account for radiative heat-transfer in the HF-CVD reactor, the discrete ordinate (DO model was used. The temperatures of the filament surface and the susceptor at different power levels were predicted to be 2512–2802 K and 1076–1198 K, respectively. Based on the numerical calculations, experiments were performed. The simulated temperatures for the filament surface were in good agreement with the experimental temperatures measured using a two-color pyrometer. The results showed that the highest deposition rate and the lowest deposition of non-diamond was obtained at a power of 16 kW.

  11. Direct growth of graphene on gallium nitride by using chemical vapor deposition without extra catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yun; An Tie-Lei; Yang Jian-Kun; Wei Tong-Bo; Duan Rui-Fei; Wang Gang; Yang Huai-Chao; Chen Min-Jiang; Yu Fang; Tao Li; Sun Lian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Graphene on gallium nitride (GaN) will be quite useful when the graphene is used as transparent electrodes to improve the performance of gallium nitride devices. In this work, we report the direct synthesis of graphene on GaN without an extra catalyst by chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene films are uniform and about 5–6 layers in thickness. Meanwhile, the effects of growth temperatures on the growth of graphene films are systematically studied, of which 950 °C is found to be the optimum growth temperature. The sheet resistance of the grown graphene is 41.1 Ω/square, which is close to the lowest sheet resistance of transferred graphene reported. The mechanism of graphene growth on GaN is proposed and discussed in detail. XRD spectra and photoluminescence spectra indicate that the quality of GaN epi-layers will not be affected after the growth of graphene. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  12. An efficient laser vaporization source for chemically modified metal clusters characterized by thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Tsugunosuke; Eckhard, Jan F.; Lange, Kathrin; Visser, Bradley; Tschurl, Martin; Heiz, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    A laser vaporization cluster source that has a room for cluster aggregation and a reactor volume, each equipped with a pulsed valve, is presented for the efficient gas-phase production of chemically modified metal clusters. The performance of the cluster source is evaluated through the production of Ta and Ta oxide cluster cations, TaxOy+ (y ≥ 0). It is demonstrated that the cluster source produces TaxOy+ over a wide mass range, the metal-to-oxygen ratio of which can easily be controlled by changing the pulse duration that influences the amount of reactant O2 introduced into the cluster source. Reaction kinetic modeling shows that the generation of the oxides takes place under thermalized conditions at less than 300 K, whereas metal cluster cores are presumably created with excess heat. These characteristics are also advantageous to yield "reaction intermediates" of interest via reactions between clusters and reactive molecules in the cluster source, which may subsequently be mass selected for their reactivity measurements.

  13. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD Apparatus: Simulations and Approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Geiser

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We are motivated to compute delicate chemical vapor deposition (CVD processes. Such processes are used to deposit thin films of metallic or ceramic materials, such as SiC or a mixture of SiC and TiC. For practical simulations and for studying the characteristics in the deposition area, we have to deal with delicate multiscale models. We propose a multiscale model based on two different software packages. The large scales are simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD software based on the transportreaction model (or macroscopic model, and the small scales are simulated with ordinary differential equations (ODE software based on the reactive precursor gas model (or microscopic model. Our contribution is to upscale the correlation of the underlying microscale species to the macroscopic model and reformulate the fast reaction model. We obtain a computable model and apply a standard CFD software code without losing the information of the fast processes. For the multiscale model, we present numerical results of a real-life deposition process.

  15. Robust numerical simulation of porosity evolution in chemical vapor infiltration III: three space dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Shi

    2003-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process is an important technology to fabricate ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). In this paper, a three-dimension numerical model is presented to describe pore microstructure evolution during the CVI process. We extend the two-dimension model proposed in [S. Jin, X.L. Wang, T.L. Starr, J. Mater. Res. 14 (1999) 3829; S. Jin. X.L. Wang, T.L. Starr, X.F. Chen, J. Comp. Phys. 162 (2000) 467], where the fiber surface is modeled as an evolving interface, to the three space dimension. The 3D method keeps all the virtue of the 2D model: robust numerical capturing of topological changes of the interface such as the merging, and fast detection of the inaccessible pores. For models in the kinetic limit, where the moving speed of the interface is constant, some numerical examples are presented to show that this three-dimension model will effectively track the change of porosity, close-off time, location and shape of all pores.

  16. Synthesis of high performance ceramic fibers by chemical vapor deposition for advanced metallics reinforcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of fibers capable of effectively reinforcing intermetallic matrices at elevated temperatures which can be used for potential applications in high temperature composite materials is described. This process was used due to its advantage over other fiber synthesis processes. It is extremely important to produce these fibers with good reproducible and controlled growth rates. However, the complex interplay of mass and energy transfer, blended with the fluid dynamics makes this a formidable task. The design and development of CVD reactor assembly and system to synthesize TiB2, CrB, B4C, and TiC fibers was performed. Residual thermal analysis for estimating stresses arising form thermal expansion mismatch were determined. Various techniques to improve the mechanical properties were also performed. Various techniques for improving the fiber properties were elaborated. The crystal structure and its orientation for TiB2 fiber is discussed. An overall view of the CVD process to develop CrB2, TiB2, and other high performance ceramic fibers is presented.

  17. Characterization and modeling of tungsten nanoparticles generated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landstroem, L.; Kokavecz, J.; Lu, J.; Heszler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten nanoparticles were generated by photolytical (UV) laser-activated chemical vapor deposition from WF 6 /H 2 /Ar gas mixture. Emission spectroscopy of thermal radiation allowed temperature determination of the nanoparticles while varying the laser fluence. A model including known cooling mechanisms was used to calculate the laser-induced temperature as a function of time and laser fluence, where the only fitting parameter was the absorption efficiency of the particles, obtained from measured temperatures. Size decrease of the particles due to evaporation was modeled at different laser fluences, and connected to size-distribution measurements from transmission electron microscopy micrographs, where a maximum geometric mean diameter (for the experimental conditions used) of 10 nm was observed at a laser fluence of ∼120 mJ/cm2. Measurements and the model calculations showed that the laser-excited particles reached the melting temperature of tungsten at ∼95 mJ/cm2. Above ∼130 mJ/cm2, very high rates of evaporation of W atoms were found, resulting in a decrease in size of the deposited particles. Crystalline, metastable β-W nanoparticles were found above ∼100 mJ/cm2 by both electron and x-ray diffraction. Below fluences of ∼100 mJ/cm2, i.e., corresponding to the value necessary for melting, amorphous nanoparticles were obtained

  18. Effect of e-beam irradiation on graphene layer grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Kumar Singh, Arun; Iqbal, M. W.; Seo, Sunae; Eom, Jonghwa

    2012-01-01

    We have grown graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred it onto Si/SiO 2 substrates to make tens of micron scale devices for Raman spectroscopy study. The effect of electron beam (e-beam) irradiation of various doses (600 to 12 000 μC/cm 2 ) on CVD grown graphene has been examined by using Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the radiation exposures result in the appearance of the strong disorder D band attributed the damage to the lattice. The evolution of peak frequencies, intensities, and widths of the main Raman bands of CVD graphene is analyzed as a function of defect created by e-beam irradiation. Especially, the D and G peak evolution with increasing radiation dose follows the amorphization trajectory, which suggests transformation of graphene to the nanocrystalline and then to amorphous form. We have also estimated the strain induced by e-beam irradiation in CVD graphene. These results obtained for CVD graphene are in line with previous findings reported for the mechanically exfoliated graphene [D. Teweldebrhan and A. A. Balandin, Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 013101 (2009)]. The results have important implications for CVD graphene characterization and device fabrication, which rely on the electron microscopy.

  19. Superhydrophobic multi-scale ZnO nanostructures fabricated by chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Feng, Chengheng; Wu, Chunxia; Ma, Weiwei; Cai, Lan

    2009-07-01

    The ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on Si(100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Different Morphologies of ZnO nanostructures, such as nanoparticle film, micro-pillar and micro-nano multi-structure, were obtained with different conditions. The results of XRD and TEM showed the good quality of ZnO crystal growth. Selected area electron diffraction analysis indicates the individual nano-wire is single crystal. The wettability of ZnO was studied by contact angle admeasuring apparatus. We found that the wettability can be changed from hydrophobic to super-hydrophobic when the structure changed from smooth particle film to single micro-pillar, nano-wire and micro-nano multi-scale structure. Compared with the particle film with contact angle (CA) of 90.7 degrees, the CA of single scale microstructure and sparse micro-nano multi-scale structure is 130-140 degrees, 140-150 degrees respectively. But when the surface is dense micro-nano multi-scale structure such as nano-lawn, the CA can reach to 168.2 degrees . The results indicate that microstructure of surface is very important to the surface wettability. The wettability on the micro-nano multi-structure is better than single-scale structure, and that of dense micro-nano multi-structure is better than sparse multi-structure.

  20. Effect of temperature on growth and structure of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    The effect of temperature on growth and structure of carbon nanotubes (NTs) using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated. Iron embedded silica was used to grow NTs in large quantity at various temperatures from 600 to 1050 °C with gas pressure fixed at 0.6 and 760 Torr, respectively. The growth and structure of the NTs are strongly affected by the temperature. At low gas pressure, the NTs are completely hollow at low temperature and bamboo-like structure at high temperature. While at high gas pressure, all the NTs are bamboo-like structure regardless of temperature. The diameter of NTs increases significantly with temperature. At low gas pressure the diameter gets bigger by mainly increasing the number of graphene layers of the wall of NTs, whereas at high gas pressure the diameter gets bigger by increasing both the number of graphene layers of the wall and the inner diameter of the NTs. This result indicates that the growth temperature is crucial in synthesizing NTs with different structures. The findings here are important for realizing controlled growth of NTs for their applications in different fields.

  1. H2-dependent attachment kinetics and shape evolution in chemical vapor deposition graphene growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca, Esteban; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Lowengrub, John

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on graphene growth through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) involving methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases reveal a complex shape evolution and a non-monotonic dependence on the partial pressure of H2 ({{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} ). To explain these intriguing observations, we develop a microkinetic model for the stepwise decomposition of CH4 into mobile radicals and consider two possible mechanisms of attachment to graphene crystals: CH radicals to hydrogen-decorated edges of the crystals and C radicals to bare crystal edges. We derive an effective mass flux and an effective kinetic coefficient, both of which depend on {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} , and incorporate these into a phase field model. The model reproduces both the non-monotonic dependence on {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} and the characteristic shapes of graphene crystals observed in experiments. At small {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} , growth is limited by the kinetics of attachment while at large {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} growth is limited because the effective mass flux is small. We also derive a simple analytical model that captures the non-monotone behavior, enables the two mechanisms of attachment to be distinguished and provides guidelines for CVD growth of defect-free 2D crystals.

  2. Substrate-orientation dependent epitaxial growth of highly ordered diamond nanosheet arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Ji, Xixi; Ao, Yu; Yu, Jie

    2018-02-08

    Three-dimensional ordering of two-dimensional nanomaterials has long been a challenge. Simultaneously, diamond nanomaterials are difficult to synthesize due to the harsh synthesizing conditions required. Here, we report substrate-crystal-orientation dependent growth of diamond nanosheets (DNSs) by chemical vapor deposition, which generates different DNS arrays on different substrates. The DNSs are grown by the in-plane epitaxy of the diamond {111} planes. So the arrays are highly ordered and solely determined by the spatial orientation of the {111} planes in the diamond FCC structure. The DNSs grown on the {110}, {111}, {001}, and {113} oriented substrates show inclination angles ranging from 90 to 29.5°. The DNSs with larger inclination angles grow preferentially, forming parallelogram arrays with inclination angles of 90° on the {110} substrates and parallel-line arrays with inclination angles of 80° on the {113} substrates. The density, thickness, size, and morphology of the DNSs have been well controlled. The present understanding and materials are highly promising for many applications such as sensors, catalysis, photonics, thermal management, and electronics.

  3. Desalination by Membrane Distillation using Electrospun Polyamide Fiber Membranes with Surface Fluorination by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Servi, Amelia; Liu, Andong; Gleason, Karen K; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2015-04-22

    Fibrous membranes of poly(trimethyl hexamethylene terephthalamide) (PA6(3)T) were fabricated by electrospinning and rendered hydrophobic by applying a conformal coating of poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) (PPFDA) using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). A set of iCVD-treated electrospun PA6(3)T fiber membranes with fiber diameters ranging from 0.25 to 1.8 μm were tested for desalination using the air gap membrane distillation configuration. Permeate fluxes of 2-11 kg/m2/h were observed for temperature differentials of 20-45 °C between the feed stream and condenser plate, with rejections in excess of 99.98%. The liquid entry pressure was observed to increase dramatically, from 15 to 373 kPa with reduction in fiber diameter. Contrary to expectation, for a given feed temperature the permeate flux was observed to increase for membranes of decreasing fiber diameter. The results for permeate flux and salt rejection show that it is possible to construct membranes for membrane distillation even from intrinsically hydrophilic materials after surface modification by iCVD and that the fiber diameter is shown to play an important role on the membrane distillation performance in terms of permeate flux, salt rejection, and liquid entry pressure.

  4. In situ preparation of nickel/carbon core–shell structure by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Fuyang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Jiang, Qi, E-mail: jiangqi66@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Fang, Yuan; Ban, Shengguang; Ou, Shisheng; Qian, Hongxia [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Nickel/carbon core–shell structure with uniform diameter has been synthesized by galvanostatic electrodeposition nickel on its surface followed by chemical vapor deposition. We proposed the growth mechanism of the core–shell structure that the precipitation of carbon from metal catalysts during the high temperature growth period lifts up metal particles leading to the formation of core–shell structure or carbon nanotubes with respect to the diameter of catalyst particles. The substrate with deposited nickel was characterized by optical microscope. The elements and features of the substrate were studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. The morphology of the resulting material was examined by field emitting scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the electrochemical performance of the core–shell structure modified electrodes was also investigated. The result shows that electrodes modified with core structure have better electrochemical property than the bare electrodes in the [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−}/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4−} solution at a scan rate of 20 mV s{sup −1}.

  5. Composition and Morphology Control of Metal Dichalcogenides via Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic and Nanoelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Leith L. J.

    The body of work reviewed here encompasses a variety of metal dichalcogenides all synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for solar and electronics applications. The first reported phase-pure CVD synthesis of iron pyrite thin films is presented with detailed structural and electrochemical analysis. The phase-pure thin film and improved crystal growth on a metallic backing material represents one of the best options for potential solar applications using iron pyrite. Large tin-sulfur-selenide solid solution plates with tunable bandgaps were also synthesized via CVD as single-crystals with a thin film geometry. Solid solution tin-sulfur-selenide plates were demonstrated to be a new material for solar cells with the first observed solar conversion efficiencies up to 3.1%. Finally, a low temperature molybdenum disulfide vertical heterostructure CVD synthesis with layered controlled growth was achieved with preferential growth enabled by Van der Waals epitaxy. Through recognition of additional reaction parameters, a fully regulated CVD synthesis enabled the controlled growth of 1-6 molybdenum disulfide monolayers for nanoelectronic applications. The improvements in synthesis and materials presented here were all enabled by the control afforded by CVD such that advances in phase purity, growth, and composition control of several metal dichalcogenides were achieved. Further work will be able to take full advantage of these advances for future solar and electronics technologies.

  6. Surface functionalization of 3D-printed plastics via initiated chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christine; Gupta, Malancha

    2017-01-01

    3D printing is a useful fabrication technique because it offers design flexibility and rapid prototyping. The ability to functionalize the surfaces of 3D-printed objects allows the bulk properties, such as material strength or printability, to be chosen separately from surface properties, which is critical to expanding the breadth of 3D printing applications. In this work, we studied the ability of the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process to coat 3D-printed shapes composed of poly(lactic acid) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. The thermally insulating properties of 3D-printed plastics pose a challenge to the iCVD process due to large thermal gradients along the structures during processing. In this study, processing parameters such as the substrate temperature and the filament temperature were systematically varied to understand how these parameters affect the uniformity of the coatings along the 3D-printed objects. The 3D-printed objects were coated with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers. Contact angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalized surfaces. Our results can enable the use of iCVD to functionalize 3D-printed materials for a range of applications such as tissue scaffolds and microfluidics.

  7. Morphological Evolution of a-GaN on r-Sapphire by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang Ling; Liu Jian-Ming; Xu Xiao-Qing; Wang Jun; Zhao Gui-Juan; Liu Chang-Bo; Gu Cheng-Yan; Liu Gui-Peng; Wei Hong-Yuan; Liu Xiang-Lin; Yang Shao-Yan; Zhu Qin-Sheng; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The morphological evolution of a-GaN deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on r-sapphire is studied. The influences of V/III ratio and growth temperature on surface morphology are investigated. V-pits and stripes are observed on the surface of a-GaN grown at 1050°C and 1100°C, respectively. The overall orientation and geometry of V-pits are uniform and independent on the V/III molar ratio in the samples grown at 1050°C, while in the samples grown at 1100°C, the areas of stripes decrease with the adding of V/III ratio. We deduce the origin of V-pits and stripes by annealing the buffer layers at different temperatures. Because of the existence of inclined (101-bar1) facets, V-pits are formed at 1050°C. The (101-bar1) plane is an N terminated surface, which is metastable at higher temperature, so stripes instead of V-pits are observed at 1100°C. Raman spectra suggest that the growth temperature of the first layer in the two-step process greatly affects the strain of the films. Hence, to improve the growth temperature of the first layer in the two-step method may be an effective way to obtain high quality a-GaN film on r-sapphire. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  8. The evolution of carbon nanotubes during their growth by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengzhi; Ren, Z F

    2011-01-01

    During the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), plasma etching is the crucial factor that determines the growth mode and alignment of the CNTs. Focusing on a thin catalyst coating (Ni = 5 nm), this study finds that the CNT growth by PECVD goes through three stages from randomly entangled (I-CNTs) to partially aligned (II-CNTs) to fully aligned (III-CNTs). The I-CNTs and II-CNTs are mostly etched away by the plasma as time goes by ending up with III-CNTs as the only product when growth time is long enough. However, with a thickness of the catalyst coating of 10 nm or more, neither I-CNTs nor II-CNTs are produced, but III-CNTs are the only type of CNTs grown during the whole growth process. During the growth of III-CNTs, the catalyst particles (Ni) stay on the tips of each of the aligned CNTs and act as a 'safety helmet' to protect the CNTs from plasma ion bombardment. On the other hand, it is also the plasma that limits the growth of III-CNTs, since the plasma eventually etches all the catalytic particles out and stops the growth.

  9. Uniformly Distributed Graphene Domain Grows on Standing Copper via Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniformly distributed graphene domains were synthesized on standing copper foil by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. This method improved the distribution of the graphene domains at different positions on the same piece of copper foil along the forward direction of the gas flow. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the average size of the graphene domains to be about ~20 m. This results show that the sheet resistance of monolayer graphene on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate is about ~359 /□ whereas that of the four-layer graphene films is about ~178 /□, with a transmittance value of 88.86% at the 550 nm wavelength. Furthermore, the sheet resistance can be reduced with the addition of HNO3 resulting in a value of 84 /□. These values meet the absolute standard for touch sensor applications, so we believe that this method can be a candidate for some transparent conductive electrode applications.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of metal nitrides, phosphides and arsenides. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.M. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-03-01

    The author recently reported that dialkylamido complexes are promising precursors to nitride thin films. On this basis it was reasoned that transition metal and main group disilazide complexes in which the silicon has dialkylamido substituents are potential precursors to ternary silicon nitride films. Bulky disilazide ligands are known to stabilize main group and transition metal complexes with low coordination numbers. Reaction of dimethylamine with Cl{sub 3}SiN(H)SiMe{sub 3} in hexane solution at 25{degrees}C gave the bulky disilazane [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(h)SiMe{sub 3} (1) in 73% yield. Reaction of (1) with n-butyl lithium in benzene at 0{degrees}C produced [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(Li)SiMe{sub 3} in 82% yield. LiN[Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2} was chemically prepared in 92% yield and was converted to the amine with 83% yield. The author examined the use of amido precursors for main group oxide thin films. Sn(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} and Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} react with oxygen in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor to give SnO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films, respectively. The films were deposited on quartz, silicon, and glass at substrate temperatures of 250--400 {degrees}C. The results of the characterizations of the films and compounds are presented in this report.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous tungsten nitride for applications in ultra-large scale interconnect technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jean E.

    Increasing demands on computer chip technology require exploration of novel materials and deposition techniques. The driving need to reduce device dimensions without increasing device delay time has forced a move towards copper interconnects. Copper interconnects require an encapsulating barrier layer to prevent diffusion into the dielectric layer, as well as a passivation layer to protect against oxidation. One potential material for the barrier layer is tungsten nitride (WNx). Tungsten nitride is expected to perform well as a barrier because of its refractory nature and excellent thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties. In addition, it can be deposited in amorphous form. Amorphous materials have no grain boundaries, thereby making grain boundary diffusion, a fast path diffusion mechanism, impossible. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was developed for the deposition of tungsten nitride. CVD was selected because it has the potential to deposit highly conformal film. High conformality is critical in a barrier layer in order to ensure viable coverage at the bottom and sides of device structures without sacrificing critical space that would be better used by the copper metal. In this manner, the total resistivity of the interconnect is minimized. The CVD WNx process was systematically optimized for film conformality, resistivity and growth rate. This was achieved by thoroughly examining film nucleation and growth characteristics, and analyzing resulting film properties. Adhesion of copper to the CVD films was qualified using stud pull tests, while X-ray diffraction was implemented to determine crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase. Additionally, diffusion barrier properties of the CVD tungsten nitride were assessed using sputter deposited copper, and compared to those of sputter deposited tungsten nitride. Thermally activated barrier failure was studied as a function of barrier thickness using Rutherford backscattering

  12. Characterization and electrolytic cleaning of poly(methyl methacrylate) residues on transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Finklea, Harry O; Liu, Yuxin

    2017-03-24

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) residue has long been a critical challenge for practical applications of the transferred chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Thermal annealing is empirically used for the removal of the PMMA residue; however experiments imply that there are still small amounts of residues left after thermal annealing which are hard to remove with conventional methods. In this paper, the thermal degradation of the PMMA residue upon annealing was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The study reveals that post-annealing residues are generated by the elimination of methoxycarbonyl side chains in PMMA and are believed to be absorbed on graphene via the π-π interaction between the conjugated unsaturated carbon segments and graphene. The post-annealing residues are difficult to remove by further annealing in a non-oxidative atmosphere due to their thermal and chemical stability. An electrolytic cleaning method was shown to be effective in removing these post-annealing residues while preserving the underlying graphene lattice based on Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy studies. Additionally, a solution-gated field effect transistor was used to study the transport properties of the transferred CVD graphene before thermal annealing, after thermal annealing, and after electrolytic cleaning, respectively. The results show that the carrier mobility was significantly improved, and that the p-doping was reduced by removing PMMA residues and post-annealing residues. These studies provide a more in-depth understanding on the thermal annealing process for the removal of the PMMA residues from transferred CVD graphene and a new approach to remove the post-annealing residues, resulting in a residue-free graphene.

  13. From metal-organic squares to porous zeolite-like supramolecular assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuang

    2010-12-29

    We report the synthesis, structure, and characterization of two novel porous zeolite-like supramolecular assemblies, ZSA-1 and ZSA-2, having zeolite gis and rho topologies, respectively. The two compounds were assembled from functional metal-organic squares (MOSs) via directional hydrogen-bonding interactions and exhibited permanent microporosity and thermal stability up to 300 °C. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Metal-organic framework catalysts for selective cleavage of aryl-ether bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2017-08-01

    The present invention relates to methods of employing a metal-organic framework (MOF) as a catalyst for cleaving chemical bonds. In particular instances, the MOF results in selective bond cleavage that results in hydrogenolyzis. Furthermore, the MOF catalyst can be reused in multiple cycles. Such MOF-based catalysts can be useful, e.g., to convert biomass components.

  15. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiang, S.C.; He, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, H.; Zhou, W.; Krishna, R.; Chen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve

  16. Metal-organic scintillator crystals for X-ray, gamma ray, and neutron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A [Oak Ridge, TN; Kolopus, James A [Clinton, TN; Neal, John S [Knoxville, TN; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [Knoxville, TN; Wisniewski, Dariusz J [Torun, PL

    2012-01-03

    New metal-organic materials are useful as scintillators and have the chemical formula LX.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4 where L is Y, Sc, or a lanthanide element, and X is a halogen element. An example of the scintillator materials is CeCl.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4.

  17. Lipase-supported metal-organic framework bioreactor catalyzes warfarin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ling; Yang, Ni-Shin; Chen, Ya-Ting; Lirio, Stephen; Wu, Cheng-You; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2015-01-02

    A green and sustainable strategy synthesizes clinical medicine warfarin anticoagulant by using lipase-supported metal-organic framework (MOF) bioreactors (see scheme). These findings may be beneficial for future studies in the industrial production of chemical, pharmaceutical, and agrochemical precursors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Resonant-Gravimetric Detection of Trace-Level Xylene Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xu, Pengcheng; Zheng, Dan; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-12-20

    As one of typical VOCs, xylene is seriously harmful to human health. Nowadays, however, there is really lack of portable sensing method to directly detect environmental xylene that has chemical inertness. Especially when the concentration of xylene is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb, people are indeed hard to be aware of and avoid this harmful vapor. Herein the metal-organic framework (MOF) of HKUST-1 is first explored for sensing to the nonpolar molecule of p-xylene. And the sensing mechanism is identified that is via host-guest interaction of MOF with xylene molecule. By loading MOFs on mass-gravimetric resonant-cantilevers, sensing experiments for four MOFs of MOF-5, HKUST-1, ZIF-8, and MOF-177 approve that HKUST-1 has the highest sensitivity to p-xylene. The resonant-gravimetric sensing experiments with our HKUST-1 based sensors have demonstrated that trace-level p-xylene of 400 ppb can be detected that is lower than the human olfactory threshold of 470 ppb. We analyze that the specificity of HKUST-1 to xylene comes from Cu 2+ -induced moderate Lewis acidity and the "like dissolves like" interaction of the benzene ring. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to elucidate the adsorbing/sensing mechanism of HKUST-1 to p-xylene, where p-xylene adsorbing induced blue-shift phenomenon is observed that confirms the sensing mechanism. Our study also indicates that the sensor shows good selectivity to various kinds of common interfering gases. And the long-term repeatability and stability of the sensing material are also approved for the usage/storage period of two months. This research approves that the MOF materials exhibit potential usages for high performance chemical sensors applications.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, John T.; De, P.K.; Dubey, Vivekanand; Srinivasa, Raman

    2009-08-01

    Aluminide coatings are a class of intermetallic coatings applied on nickel and cobalt base superalloys and steels to protect them from different forms of environmental degradation at high temperatures. In this report a CVD system that can produce the aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and nickel base alloys has been described and the result of chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron specimens, their characterization, and property evaluation have been presented. The CVD system consists of an AlCl 3 bath, a stainless steel retort as a hot-wall reacto, cold traps and vacuum system. Aluminium chloride vapor was carried in a stream of hydrogen gas at a flow rate of 150 SCCM (standard cubic centimeter per minute) into the CVD reactor maintained in the temperature range of 1173 - 1373 K and at a pressure of 1.33 kPa (10 Torr). Aluminum deposition takes place from aluminium subchlorides produced by reaction between AlCl 3 and pure aluminum kept in the CVD reactor. The aluminum diffuses into the iron samples and iron aluminide phases are formed at the surface. The coatings were shining bright and showed good adherence to the substrate. The coatings consisted of FeAl phase over a wide range of experimental conditions. The growth kinetics of the coating followed a parabolic rate law and the mean activation energy was 212 ±16 kJ/mol. Optical microscopic studies on the transverse section of the coating showed that the aluminide coating on iron consisted of two layers. The top layer had a thickness in the range of 20-50 μm, and the under layer had thickness ranging from 35 to 250 μm depending on coating temperature in two hours. The thickness of the aluminide layer increased with coating duration and temperature. Electron microprobe studies (EPMA) showed that the aluminum concentration decreased steadily as distance from the surface increased. TEM studies showed that the outer most layer had a B2 order (of the FeAl phase), which extended even into the under

  20. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Compatible, High-Mobility, ⟨111⟩-Oriented GaSb Nanowires Enabled by Vapor-Solid-Solid Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zai-Xing; Liu, Lizhe; Yip, SenPo; Li, Dapan; Shen, Lifan; Zhou, Ziyao; Han, Ning; Hung, Tak Fu; Pun, Edwin Yue-Bun; Wu, Xinglong; Song, Aimin; Ho, Johnny C

    2017-04-25

    Using CMOS-compatible Pd catalysts, we demonstrated the formation of high-mobility ⟨111⟩-oriented GaSb nanowires (NWs) via vapor-solid-solid (VSS) growth by surfactant-assisted chemical vapor deposition through a complementary experimental and theoretical approach. In contrast to NWs formed by the conventional vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, cylindrical-shaped Pd 5 Ga 4 catalytic seeds were present in our Pd-catalyzed VSS-NWs. As solid catalysts, stoichiometric Pd 5 Ga 4 was found to have the lowest crystal surface energy and thus giving rise to a minimal surface diffusion as well as an optimal in-plane interface orientation at the seed/NW interface for efficient epitaxial NW nucleation. These VSS characteristics led to the growth of slender NWs with diameters down to 26.9 ± 3.5 nm. Over 95% high crystalline quality NWs were grown in ⟨111⟩ orientation for a wide diameter range of between 10 and 70 nm. Back-gated field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the Pd-catalyzed GaSb NWs exhibit a superior peak hole mobility of ∼330 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , close to the mobility limit for a NW channel diameter of ∼30 nm with a free carrier concentration of ∼10 18 cm -3 . This suggests that the NWs have excellent homogeneity in phase purity, growth orientation, surface morphology and electrical characteristics. Contact printing process was also used to fabricate large-scale assembly of Pd-catalyzed GaSb NW parallel arrays, confirming the potential constructions and applications of these high-performance electronic devices.

  1. Zno Micro/Nanostructures Grown on Sapphire Substrates Using Low-Temperature Vapor-Trapped Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition: Structural and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Po-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-En; Chen, Guan-Lin

    2017-12-21

    In this research, the Zn(C₅H₇O₂)₂·xH₂O-based growth of ZnO micro/nanostructures in a low temperature, vapor-trapped chemical vapor deposition system was attempted to optimize structural and optical properties for potential biomedical applications. By trapping in-flow gas molecules and Zinc vapor inside a chamber tube by partially obstructing a chamber outlet, a high pressure condition can be achieved, and this experimental setup has the advantages of ease of synthesis, being a low temperature process, and cost effectiveness. Empirically, the growth process proceeded under a chamber condition of an atmospheric pressure of 730 torr, a controlled volume flow rate of input gas, N₂/O₂, of 500/500 Standard Cubic Centimeters per Minute (SCCM), and a designated oven temperature of 500 °C. Specifically, the dependence of structural and optical properties of the structures on growth duration and spatially dependent temperature were investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), and ultraviolet-visible transmission spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that the grown thin film observed with hexagonal structures and higher structural uniformity enables more prominent structural and optical signatures. XRD spectra present the dominant peaks along crystal planes of (002) and (101) as the main direction of crystallization. In addition, while the structures excited with laser wavelength of 325 nm emit a signature radiation around 380 nm, an ultraviolet lamp with a wavelength of 254 nm revealed distinctive photoluminescence peaks at 363.96 nm and 403.52 nm, elucidating different degrees of structural correlation as functions of growth duration and the spatial gradient of temperature. Transmittance spectra of the structures illustrate typical variation in the wavelength range of 200 nm to 400 nm, and its structural correlation is less significant when compared with PL.

  2. Zno Micro/Nanostructures Grown on Sapphire Substrates Using Low-Temperature Vapor-Trapped Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition: Structural and Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sheng Hu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the Zn(C5H7O22·xH2O-based growth of ZnO micro/nanostructures in a low temperature, vapor-trapped chemical vapor deposition system was attempted to optimize structural and optical properties for potential biomedical applications. By trapping in-flow gas molecules and Zinc vapor inside a chamber tube by partially obstructing a chamber outlet, a high pressure condition can be achieved, and this experimental setup has the advantages of ease of synthesis, being a low temperature process, and cost effectiveness. Empirically, the growth process proceeded under a chamber condition of an atmospheric pressure of 730 torr, a controlled volume flow rate of input gas, N2/O2, of 500/500 Standard Cubic Centimeters per Minute (SCCM, and a designated oven temperature of 500 °C. Specifically, the dependence of structural and optical properties of the structures on growth duration and spatially dependent temperature were investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, photoluminescence (PL, and ultraviolet-visible transmission spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that the grown thin film observed with hexagonal structures and higher structural uniformity enables more prominent structural and optical signatures. XRD spectra present the dominant peaks along crystal planes of (002 and (101 as the main direction of crystallization. In addition, while the structures excited with laser wavelength of 325 nm emit a signature radiation around 380 nm, an ultraviolet lamp with a wavelength of 254 nm revealed distinctive photoluminescence peaks at 363.96 nm and 403.52 nm, elucidating different degrees of structural correlation as functions of growth duration and the spatial gradient of temperature. Transmittance spectra of the structures illustrate typical variation in the wavelength range of 200 nm to 400 nm, and its structural correlation is less significant when compared with PL.

  3. A chemical and fluid dynamic study of the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum nitride in a vertical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bather, Wayne Anthony

    The metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of compound semiconductors has become important in producing many high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices from the wide bandgaps III-V nitrides, for example, aluminum nitride (AlN). A systematic theoretical and experimental investigation of the chemistry and mass transport process in a MOCVD system can yield predictive models of the deposition process. The chemistries and fluid dynamics of the MOCVD growth of AlN in a vertical reactor is analyzed and characterized in order to parameterize and model the deposition process. A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study of the predeposition reactions between trimethylaluminum (TMAl) and ammonia (NHsb3) is carried out in a static gas cell to examine the primary homogeneous gas phase reactions, pyrolysis of the reactants, and adduct formation, possibly accompanied by elimination reactions. A series of reactions, based on laboratory studies and literature review, is then proposed to model the deposition process. All pertinent kinetic, thermochemical, and transport properties were obtained. Utilizing a mass transport model, we performed computational fluid dynamics calculations using the FLUENT software package. We determined temperature, velocity, and concentration profiles, along with deposition rates inside the experimental vertical CVD reactor in the Howard University Material Science Research Center of Excellence. Experimental deposition rate data were found to be in good agreement with those predicted from the simulations, thus validating the proposed model. The control of the homogeneous gas phase reaction leading to the formation and subsequent decomposition of the adduct is critical to the formation of device-grade AlN films. Many basic processes occurring during MOCVD of AlN are still not completely understood, and none of the detailed surface reaction mechanisms are known.

  4. Organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stringfellow, Gerald B

    1989-01-01

    Here is one of the first single-author treatments of organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)--a leading technique for the fabrication of semiconductor materials and devices. Also included are metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and chemical-beam epitaxy (CBE) ultra-high-vacuum deposition techniques using organometallic source molecules. Of interest to researchers, students, and people in the semiconductor industry, this book provides a basic foundation for understanding the technique and the application of OMVPE for the growth of both III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials and the

  5. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  6. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of MoS2 on SiO2/Si by chemical vapor deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, single layer MoS2 with a direct band gap of 1.9 eV has been proposed as a candidate for two dimensional nanoelectronic devices. However, the synthetic approach to obtain high-quality MoS2 atomic thin layers is still problematic. Spectroscopic and microscopic results reveal that both single layers and tetrahedral clusters of MoS2 are deposited directly on the SiO2/Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition. The tetrahedral clusters are mixtures of 2H- and 3R-MoS2. By ex situ optical analysis, both the single layers and tetrahedral clusters can be attributed to van der Waals epitaxial growth. Due to the similar layered structures we expect the same growth mechanism for other transition-metal disulfides by chemical vapor deposition. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Spectroscopic properties of nitrogen doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Y., Hayashi; G., Yu; M. M., Rahman; K. M., Krishna; Tetsuo, Soga; Takashi, Jimbo; Masayoshi, Umeno

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films have been deposited by rf plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4 as the source of carbon and with different nitrogen flow rates (N2/CH4 gas ratios between 0 and 3), at 300 K. The dependence modifications of the optical and the structural properties on nitrogen incorporation were investigated using different spectroscopic techniques, such as, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spe...

  8. Structure of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflector grown on Si substrate by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi, Egawa; Takashi, Jimbo; Masayoshi, Umeno

    1995-01-01

    A vertical‐cavity surface‐emitting laser diode with 20 pairs of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) has been grown on a Si substrate using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Interfacial roughness and compositional profile of the AlAs/GaAs DBR structure were studied by cross‐sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Auger electron spectroscopy. Cross‐sectional SEM and TEM observations reveal quasi‐periodic zigzag roughness and nonu...

  9. Large area plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline graphite on insulator for electronic device application

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Marek E.; Xu, Cigang; Cooke, Mike; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Chong, H.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on large area plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG) on thermally grown SiO2 wafer, quartz and sapphire substrates. Grown films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical characterization and optical transmission measurementsindicate promising properties of this material for use as transparent electrodes and for electronic device applicati...

  10. Relationship between heating atmosphere and copper foil impurities during graphene growth via low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Yasemin; Escoffier, Walter; Yang, Ming; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Suvacı, Ender

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition synthesis of graphene films on two different Cu foils, with different surface oxygen and carbon contents, was performed by controlling H2 and/or Ar flow rates during heating. The influences of heating atmosphere on the final impurity level, quality of the synthesized graphene films and thickness uniformity were investigated depending on Cu foil impurities. Heating of carbon-rich, but oxygen-poor Cu foil in H2 environment resulted ...

  11. Superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces through direct incorporation of titania nanoparticles into a polymer matrix by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Colin R; Bear, Joseph C; Kafizas, Andreas; Parkin, Ivan P

    2012-07-10

    A new class of superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces that are self-cleaning through light-induced photodegradation and the Lotus effect are presented. The films are formed in a single-step aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process. The films are durable and show no degradation on continuous exposure to UV-C radiation. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Silver chemical vapor generation for atomic absorption spectrometry: Minimization of transport losses, interferences and application to water analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Kratzer, Jan; Vobecký, Miloslav; Benada, Oldřich; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 10 (2010), s. 1618-1626 ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chemical vapor generation * 111Ag radioindicator * transport losses Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.372, year: 2010

  13. Near-equilibrium chemical vapor deposition of high-quality single-crystal graphene directly on various dielectric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyi; Guo, Yunlong; Jiang, Lili; Xu, Zhiping; Huang, Liping; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Wu, Bin; Hu, Wenping; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2014-03-05

    By using near-equilibrium chemical vapor deposition, it is demonstrated that high-quality single-crystal graphene can be grown on dielectric substrates. The maximum size is about 11 μm. The carrier mobility can reach about 5650 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , which is comparable to those of some metal-catalyzed graphene crystals, reflecting the good quality of the graphene lattice. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of group 14 oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.M. [Houston Univ., TX (United States); Atagi, L.M. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chu, Wei-Kan; Liu, Jia-Rui; Zheng, Zongshuang [Houston Univ., TX (United States); Rubiano, R.R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Springer, R.W.; Smith, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Depositions of high quality SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} films from the reaction of homoleptic amido precursors M(NMe{sub 2})4 (M = Si,Sn) and oxygen were carried out in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition r. The films were deposited on silicon, glass and quartz substrates at temperatures of 250 to 450C. The silicon dioxide films are stoichiometric (O/Si = 2.0) with less than 0.2 atom % C and 0.3 atom % N and have hydrogen contents of 9 {plus_minus} 5 atom %. They are deposited with growth rates from 380 to 900 {angstrom}/min. The refractive indexes of the SiO{sub 2} films are 1.46, and infrared spectra show a possible Si-OH peak at 950 cm{sup {minus}1}. X-Ray diffraction studies reveal that the SiO{sub 2} film deposited at 350C is amorphous. The tin oxide films are stoichiometric (O/Sn = 2.0) and contain less than 0.8 atom % carbon, and 0.3 atom % N. No hydrogen was detected by elastic recoil spectroscopy. The band gap for the SnO{sub 2} films, as estimated from transmission spectra, is 3.9 eV. The resistivities of the tin oxide films are in the range 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}cm and do not vary significantly with deposition temperature. The tin oxide film deposited at 350C is cassitterite with some (101) orientation.

  15. Phosphorus atomic layer doping in SiGe using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Heinemann, Bernd; Murota, Junichi; Tillack, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe is investigated at temperatures between 100 °C to 600 °C using a single wafer reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system. SiGe(100) surface is exposed to PH 3 at different PH 3 partial pressures by interrupting SiGe growth. The impact of the SiGe buffer/cap growth condition (total pressure/SiGe deposition precursors) on P adsorption, incorporation, and segregation are investigated. In the case of SiH 4 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, steeper P spikes due to lower segregation are observed by SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric (ATM) pressure compared with reduced pressure (RP). The steepness of P spike of ∼ 5.7 nm/dec is obtained for ATM pressure without reducing deposition temperature. This result may be due to the shift of equilibrium of P adsorption/desorption to desorption direction by higher H 2 pressure. Using Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system for SiGe cap deposition in RP, lowering the SiGe growth temperature is possible, resulting in higher P incorporation and steeper P profile due to reduced desorption and segregation. In the case of Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, the P dose could be simulated assuming a Langmuir-type kinetics model. Incorporated P shows high electrical activity, indicating P is adsorbed mostly in lattice position. - Highlights: • Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe (100) is investigated using CVD. • P adsorption is suppressed by the hydrogen termination of Ge surface. • By SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric pressure, P segregation was suppressed. • By using Si 2 H 6 -based SiGe cap, P segregation was also suppressed. • The P adsorption process is self-limited and follows Langmuir-type kinetics model

  16. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo, Wenlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji, E-mail: hongjili@yeah.net [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Xu, Sheng [School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g{sup −1}. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  17. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-10

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm(2)) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  18. Growth of thick p-type SiC epitaxial layers by halide chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, M. A.; Weiland, B. E.; Redwing, J. M.

    2008-08-01

    The halide chemical vapor deposition process for single-crystal SiC achieves growth rates over 200 μm/h at temperatures approaching 2000 °C. This work examines the conditions required to produce 80-100-μm-thick heavily p-type doped layers on 4H-SiC substrates by using boron trichloride and trimethylaluminum at high growth temperatures. Dopant incorporation as a function of the dopant concentration in the growth ambient was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The maximum Al and B concentrations achieved were 5×10 17 and 4×10 19 atoms/cm 3, respectively. Low Al incorporation efficiency was attributed to the high growth temperature and reaction of Al with Cl to form volatile chloride species. Aluminum incorporation was consistent with incorporation as a simple solid solution, while B incorporation exhibited a much stronger interaction with the SiC matrix. Aluminum incorporation was found to be an order of magnitude higher on the Si-face of the substrate, while B incorporation was essentially the same on both the Si-face and C-face. Aluminum incorporation was increased by a factor of five as the C/Si ratio increased from 0.42 to 0.86, while boron incorporation showed no sensitivity to the C/Si ratio. The B concentrations measured by SIMS were of the same magnitude as the net acceptor concentrations estimated from capacitance-voltage measurements, indicating a significant fraction of the B dopant was activated.

  19. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm2) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  20. Formation of vanadium oxides with various morphologies by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Q.; Huang, C.K.; Wang, Y.; Fan, Y.C.; Lu, B.A.; Lan, W.; Wang, Y.Y. [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, X.Q. [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: xqliu@lzu.edu.cn

    2009-05-05

    We reported the formation of vanadium oxides with various morphologies, including V{sub 2}O{sub 5} rods, VO{sub x} microspheres, VO{sub 2} microblocks etc., by chemical vapor deposition using vanadyl acetylacetonate (VO(acac){sub 2}) powder as a vanadium precursor. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results revealed that the morphologies and microstructures of vanadium oxides were significantly dependent on the depositing temperature. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} rods with a diameter of {approx}250 nm, VO{sub x} microstructure with V{sup 5+} and V{sup 4+} cations and VO{sub 2} microblocks were obtained at the depositing temperature of 500, 450-250 and 150 deg. C, respectively. VO{sub 2} structures were formed at the beginning of growth process, and V{sup 4+} cations were partially oxidized to V{sup 5+} cations at the higher depositing temperature (250-450 deg. C). Various morphologies of VO{sub x} were attributed to the mixed microstructure of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and VO{sub 2}. The difference between V{sup 4+}-O and V{sup 5+}-O bonds induced the distortion and various structures in VO{sub x}. When the depositing temperature was as high as 500 deg. C, most of the V{sup 4+} cations were oxidized to V{sup 5+} cations and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} rods were obtained.

  1. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of diamond chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, W J; May, P W; Allan, N L; Harvey, J N

    2015-06-07

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the chemical vapor deposition of a diamond (100) surface under conditions used to grow single-crystal diamond (SCD), microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. The model includes adsorption of CHx (x = 0, 3) species, insertion of CHy (y = 0-2) into surface dimer bonds, etching/desorption of both transient adsorbed species and lattice sidewalls, lattice incorporation, and surface migration but not defect formation or renucleation processes. A value of ∼200 kJ mol(-1) for the activation Gibbs energy, ΔG(‡) etch, for etching an adsorbed CHx species reproduces the experimental growth rate accurately. SCD and MCD growths are dominated by migration and step-edge growth, whereas in NCD and UNCD growths, migration is less and species nucleate where they land. Etching of species from the lattice sidewalls has been modelled as a function of geometry and the number of bonded neighbors of each species. Choice of appropriate parameters for the relative decrease in etch rate as a function of number of neighbors allows flat-bottomed etch pits and/or sharp-pointed etch pits to be simulated, which resemble those seen when etching diamond in H2 or O2 atmospheres. Simulation of surface defects using unetchable, immobile species reproduces other observed growth phenomena, such as needles and hillocks. The critical nucleus for new layer growth is 2 adjacent surface carbons, irrespective of the growth regime. We conclude that twinning and formation of multiple grains rather than pristine single-crystals may be a result of misoriented growth islands merging, with each island forming a grain, rather than renucleation caused by an adsorbing defect species.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition on chabazite (CHA) zeolite membranes for effective post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Taehee; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Won-Jin; Han, Doug-Young; Baik, Hionsuck; Choi, Nakwon; Choi, Jungkyu

    2014-12-16

    Chabazite (CHA) zeolites with a pore size of 0.37 × 0.42 nm(2) are expected to separate CO2 (0.33 nm) from larger N2 (0.364 nm) in postcombustion flue gases by recognizing their minute size differences. Furthermore, the hydrophobic siliceous constituent in CHA membranes can allow for maintaining the CO2/N2 separation performance in the presence of H2O in contrast with the CO2 affinity-based membranes. In an attempt to increase the molecular sieving ability, the pore mouth size of all silica CHA (Si-CHA) particles was reduced via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a silica precursor (tetraethyl orthosilicate). Accordingly, an increase of the CVD treatment duration decreased the penetration rate of CO2 into the CVD-treated Si-CHA particles. Furthermore, the CVD process was applied to siliceous CHA membranes in order to improve their CO2/N2 separation performance. Compared to the intact CHA membranes, the CO2/N2 maximum separation factor (max SF) for CVD-treated CHA membranes was increased by ∼ 2 fold under dry conditions. More desirably, the CO2/N2 max SF was increased by ∼ 3 fold under wet conditions at ∼ 50 °C, a representative temperature of the flue gas stream. In fact, the presence of H2O in the feed disfavored the permeation of N2 more than that of CO2 through CVD-modified CHA membranes and thus, contributed to the increased CO2/N2 separation factor.

  3. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  4. Worker exposures to chemical agents in the manufacture of rubber tires: solvent vapor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ert, M D; Arp, E W; Harris, R L; Symons, M J; Williams, T M

    1980-03-01

    Environmental sampling surveys have been conducted in ten large tire manufacturing plants across the U.S. to characterize the nature and intensity of current exposure to solvent vapors. These plants were chosen to represent a cross-section of the industry and include both old and new plants, plants of four different companies and plants with wide geographic distributions. A variety of organic solvents is used in the manufacture of tires and tubes; accordingly solvent vapors comprise one category of exposure for workers in specific Occupational Title Groups (OTGs). Approximately 1000 determinations of various solvent vapor components in air samples have been made with special emphasis on pentane, hexane, heptane, benzene and toluene vapor levels. Exposures stem from the widespread use of bulk materials including petroleum naphthas, gasoline and aliphatic and rubber solvents in various tire manufacturing operations.

  5. Laser chemical vapor deposition of millimeter scale three-dimensional shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawi, Mohammed Saad

    2001-07-01

    Laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) has been successfully developed as a technique to synthesize millimeter-scale components directly from the gas phase. Material deposition occurs when heat generated by the interaction of a laser beam with a substrate thermally decomposes the gas precursor. Selective illumination or scanning the laser beam over portions of a substrate forms the single thin layer of material that is the building block of this process. Sequential scanning of the laser in a pre-defined pattern on the substrate and subsequent deposit causes the layers to accumulate forming the three-dimensional shape. The primary challenge encountered in LCVD shape forming is the synthesis of uniform layers. Three deposition techniques are studied to address this problem. The most successful technique, Active Surface Deposition, is based on the premise that the most uniform deposits are created by measuring the deposition surface topology and actively varying the deposition rate in response to features at the deposition surface. Defects observed in the other techniques were significantly reduced or completely eliminated using Active Surface Deposition. The second technique, Constant Temperature Deposition, maintains deposit uniformity through the use of closed-loop modulation of the laser power to sustain a constant surface temperature during deposition. The technique was successful in depositing high quality graphite tubes >2 mm tall from an acetylene precursor and partially successful in depositing SiC + C composite tubes from tetramethylsilane (TMS). The final technique, Constant Power Deposition, is based on the premise that maintaining a uniform power output throughout deposition would result in the formation of uniform layers. Constant Power Deposition failed to form coherent shapes. Additionally, LCVD is studied using a combination of analytic and numerical models to gain insight into the deposition process. Thermodynamic modeling is used to predict the

  6. Physico-chemical characterization of aerosols produced by a PWR control rods vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabu, B.; Pagano, C.; Tourasse, M.; Gros d'Aillon, L.; Boucenna, A.; Boulaud, D.; Dubourg, R.

    2000-01-01

    During a PWR type reactor accident, the aerosols produced by the vaporization of the control rods condition the released fission products evolution, for instance, the iodine or the tellurium. The EMAIC experiment has to characterize the aerosols emitted during the core degradation. The IPSN and EDF finances this program, realized at the CEA Grenoble. The results should allow the simulation of the aerosols source resulting from the vaporization to introduce in the ASTEC code, serious accident codes system. (A.L.B.)

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The design and characterization of new materials for hydrogen storage is an important area of research, as the ability to store hydrogen at lower pressures and higher temperatures than currently feasible would lower operating costs for small hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent promising materials for use in storing hydrogen in this capacity. MOFs are highly porous, three-dimensional crystalline solids that are formed via linkages between metal ions (e.g., iron, nickel, and zinc) and organic molecules. MOFs can store hydrogen via strong adsorptive interactions between the gas molecules and the pores of the framework, providing a high surface area for gas adsorption and thus the opportunity to store hydrogen at significantly lower pressures than with current technologies. By lowering the energy required for hydrogen storage, these materials hold promise in rendering hydrogen a more viable fuel for motor vehicles, which is a highly desirable outcome given the clean nature of hydrogen fuel cells (water is the only byproduct of combustion) and the current state of global climate change resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The work presented in this report is the result of collaborative efforts between researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and General Motors Corporation (GM) to discover novel MOFs promising for H2 storage and characterize their properties. Described herein are several new framework systems with improved gravimetric and volumetric capacity to strongly bind H2 at temperatures relevant for vehicle storage. These materials were rigorously characterized using neutron diffraction, to determine the precise binding locations of hydrogen within the frameworks, and high-pressure H2 adsorption measurements, to provide a comprehensive picture of H2 adsorption at all relevant pressures. A

  8. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  9. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-18

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule's magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  10. Thin films by metal-organic precursor plasma spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Sailer, Robert A.; Payne, Scott; Leach, James; Molz, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    While most plasma spray routes to coatings utilize solids as the precursor feedstock, metal-organic precursor plasma spray (MOPPS) is an area that the authors have investigated recently as a novel route to thin film materials. Very thin films are possible via MOPPS and the technology offers the possibility of forming graded structures by metering the liquid feed. The current work employs metal-organic compounds that are liquids at standard temperature-pressure conditions. In addition, these complexes contain chemical functionality that allows straightforward thermolytic transformation to targeted phases of interest. Toward that end, aluminum 3,5-heptanedionate (Al(hd) 3 ), triethylsilane (HSi(C 2 H 5 ) 3 or HSiEt 3 ), and titanium tetrakisdiethylamide (Ti(N(C 2 H 5 ) 2 ) 4 or Ti(NEt 2 ) 4 ) were employed as precursors to aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and titanium nitride, respectively. In all instances, the liquids contain metal-heteroatom bonds envisioned to provide atomic concentrations of the appropriate reagents at the film growth surface, thus promoting phase formation (e.g., Si-C bond in triethylsilane, Ti-N bond in titanium amide, etc.). Films were deposited using a Sulzer Metco TriplexPro-200 plasma spray system under various experimental conditions using design of experiment principles. Film compositions were analyzed by glazing incidence x-ray diffraction and elemental determination by x-ray spectroscopy. MOPPS films from HSiEt 3 showed the formation of SiC phase but Al(hd) 3 -derived films were amorphous. The Ti(NEt 2 ) 4 precursor gave MOPPS films that appear to consist of nanosized splats of TiOCN with spheres of TiO 2 anatase. While all films in this study suffered from poor adhesion, it is anticipated that the use of heated substrates will aid in the formation of dense, adherent films.

  11. Synthesis of Three-dimensional Polymer Nanostructures via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kenneth

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely practiced methodology for preparing thin film polymer coatings, and the coatings can be applied to a broad range of materials, including three-dimensional solid structures and low-vapor pressure liquids. Reactive poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) coatings prepared by CVD can be used as a powerful tool for surface functionalization and bio-conjugation. The first portion of this dissertation serves to extend the use of CVD-based reactive PPX coatings as a surface functionalization strategy for the conjugation of biomolecules. Micro-structured PPX coatings having multiple surface reactive groups were fabricated. Multiple orthogonal click reactions were then employed to selectively immobilize galactose and mannobiose to the micro-structured polymer coatings. The presence of different types of carbohydrate enables lectins binding for examining ligands/cell receptor interactions. This dissertation also demonstrates the use of CVD-based reactive PPX coatings as intermediate layers to immobilize adenoviral vectors onto tissue scaffolds. The ability to tether adenoviral vectors on tissue scaffolds localizes the transduction near the scaffold surface and reduces acute toxicity and hepatic pathology cause by direct administration of the viral vector, providing a safe and efficient gene therapy delivery strategy. In the second portion of this dissertation, we explore the CVD of PPX onto surfaces coated with a thin layer of liquid crystal (LC). Instead of forming a conformal PPX coating encapsulating the LC layer, PPX assembled into an array of high-aspect ratio nanofibers inside the LC layer. The LC layer was demonstrated to act as a template where the anisotropic internal ordering of the LC facilitated the formation of nanofibers. The diameter of the nanofibers was in the range of 100 nm and could be tuned by type of LC template used, and the length of the nanofibers could be precisely controlled by varying the thickness of the LC film. The

  12. Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) for highly selective separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaghi, Omar M

    2012-09-17

    Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) have been investigated for the realization as separation media with high selectivity. These structures are held together with strong bonds, making them architecturally, chemically, and thermally stable. Therefore, employing well designed building units, it is possible to discover promising materials for gas and vapor separation. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs and ZIFs with these specific objectives: (i) to develop a strategy for producing MOFs and ZIFs that combine high surface areas with active sites for their use in gas adsorption and separation of small organic compounds, (ii) to introduce active sites in the framework by a post-synthetic modification and metalation of MOFs and ZIFs, and (iii) to design and synthesize MOFs with extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes to accommodate large amounts of guest molecules. By the systematic study, this effort demonstrated how to introduce active functional groups in the frameworks, and this is also the origin of a new strategy, which is termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. One of the solutions to overcome this challenge is an isoreticular expansion of a MOF's structure. With triangular organic linker and square building units, we demonstrated that MOF-399 has a unit cell volume 17 times larger than that of the first reported material isoreticular to it, and it has the highest porosity (94%) and lowest density (0.126 g cm-3) of any MOF reported to date. MOFs are not just low density materials; the guest-free form of MOF-210 demonstrates an ultrahigh porosity, whose BET surface area was estimated to be 6240 m2 g-1 by N2 adsorption measurements.

  13. Text Mining Metal-Organic Framework Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Baekjun; Choi, Sihoon; Boyd, Peter G; Smit, Berend; Kim, Jihan

    2018-02-26

    We have developed a simple text mining algorithm that allows us to identify surface area and pore volumes of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) using manuscript html files as inputs. The algorithm searches for common units (e.g., m 2 /g, cm 3 /g) associated with these two quantities to facilitate the search. From the sample set data of over 200 MOFs, the algorithm managed to identify 90% and 88.8% of the correct surface area and pore volume values. Further application to a test set of randomly chosen MOF html files yielded 73.2% and 85.1% accuracies for the two respective quantities. Most of the errors stem from unorthodox sentence structures that made it difficult to identify the correct data as well as bolded notations of MOFs (e.g., 1a) that made it difficult identify its real name. These types of tools will become useful when it comes to discovering structure-property relationships among MOFs as well as collecting a large set of data for references.

  14. Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films of metal-organic compounds and metal nanoparticle-embedded polymers for nonlinear optical applications. S Philip Anthony Shatabdi Porel D ... Thin films based on two very different metal-organic systems are developed and some nonlinear optical applications are explored. A family of zinc complexes which ...

  15. Study of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition process on very dense powder for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanni, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is part of the development of low-enriched nuclear fuel, for the Materials Test Reactors (MTRs), constituted of uranium-molybdenum particles mixed with an aluminum matrix. Under certain conditions under irradiations, the U(Mo) particles interact with the aluminum matrix, causing unacceptable swelling of the fuel plate. To inhibit this phenomenon, one solution consists in depositing on the surface of the U(Mo) particles, a thin silicon layer to create a barrier effect. This thesis has concerned the study of the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process to deposit silicon from silane, on the U(Mo) powder, which has an exceptional density of 17,500 kg/m 3 . To achieve this goal, two axes were treated during the thesis: the study and the optimization of the fluidization of a so dense powder, and then those of the silicon deposition process. For the first axis, a series of tests was performed on a surrogate tungsten powder in different columns made of glass and made of steel with internal diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm, at room temperature and at high temperature (650 C) close to that of the deposits. These experiments helped to identify wall effects phenomena within the fluidized bed, which can lead to heterogeneous deposits or particles agglomeration. Some dimensions of the fluidization columns and operating conditions allowing a satisfactory fluidization of the powder were identified, paving the way for the study of silicon deposition. Several campaigns of deposition experiments on the surrogate powder and then on the U(Mo) powder were carried out in the second axis of the study. The influence of the bed temperature, the inlet molar fraction of silane diluted in argon, and the total gas flow of fluidization, was examined for different diameters of reactor and for various masses of powder. Morphological and structural characterization analyses (SEM, XRD..) revealed a uniform silicon deposition on all the powder and around each particle

  16. The Tribological Behaviors of Three Films Coated on Biomedical Titanium Alloy by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Three thin films (DLC, a-C, and TiN) were performed on Ti6Al4V by chemical vapor deposition. Carbon ion implantation was pretreated for DLC and a-C films while Ti transition layer was pretreated for TiN film to strengthen the bonding strength. X-ray diffraction, Raman measurement, nano-hardness and nano-scratch tester, and cross-section etching by FIB method were used to analyze film characteristics. Tribological behaviors of these coatings were studied by articulation with both ZrO2 and UHMWPE balls using ball-on-disk sliding. The thickness values reached ~0.46, ~0.33, and ~1.67 μm for DLC, a-C, and TiN film, respectively. Nano-hardness of the coatings compared with that of untreated and bonding strength (critical load in nano-scratch test) values of composite coatings compared with that of monolayer film all increased significantly, respectively. Under destructive test (ZrO2 ball conterface) in bovine serum lubrication, TiN coating revealed the best wear resistance while DLC showed the worst. Film failure was mainly attributed to the plowing by hard ZrO2 ball characterized by abrasive and adhesive wear. Under normal test (UHMWPE ball conterface), all coatings showed significant improvement in wear resistance both in dry sliding and bovine serum lubrication. Both DLC and a-C films showed less surface damage than TiN film due to the self-lubricating phenomenon in dry sliding. TiN film showed the largest friction coefficient both in destructive and normal tests, devoting to the big TiN grains thus leading to much rougher surface and then a higher value. The self-lubricating film formed on DLC and a-C coating could also decrease their friction coefficients. The results indicated that three coatings revealed different wear mechanisms, and thick DLC or a-C film was more promising in application in lower stress conditions such as artificial cervical disk.

  17. Improved Semipolar (112¯2) GaN Quality Grown on m-Plane Sapphire Substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Self-Organized SiN x Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng-Rui, Xu; Ying, Zhao; Teng, Jiang; Jin-Cheng, Zhang; Pei-Xian, Li; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 61204006 and 61574108, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No JB141101, and the Foundation of Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications of Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics of Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No 15CS01.

  18. Enhanced flux pinning by BaZrO3 and (Gd,y)2O3 nano-structures in metal organic chemical vapor deposited GdYBCO high temperature superconductor tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Lee, Dominic F [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We have formed BaZrO3 nano-columns and (Gd,Y)2O3 nano-precipitates in reel-to-reel MOCVD processed (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3O7-x coated conductors and increased the critical currents (Ic) of the conductors in applied magnetic fields to remarkable levels. A (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3O7-x tape of 1m length with 6.5% Zr-additions and 30% composition rich in both Gd and Y showed Ic values of 813 A/cm-width at (self-field, 77K) and above 186 A/cm-width at (1T, 77K). The strongly enhanced flux pinning over a wide range of magnetic field orientations can be attributed to the bidirectionally aligned defect structures of BaZrO3 and (Gd,Y)2O3 created by optimized MOCVD conditions.

  19. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  20. Structural and chemical evolution of propionate based metal-organic precursors for superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} epitaxial film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armenio, A Angrisani; Augieri, A; Galluzzi, V; Mancini, A; Rufoloni, A; Vannozzi, A; Celentano, G [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati Research Centre, Via E Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Ciontea, L; Petrisor, T [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. C. Daicoviciu 15, 3400 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Contini, G; Giovannantonio, M Di [Istituto di Struttura della Materia-CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Davoli, I, E-mail: giorgio.contini@ism.cnr.it, E-mail: giuseppe.celentano@enea.it [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    The structural and chemical evolution of propionate based low fluorine YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) precursor during the conversion thermal treatment to obtain superconducting film has been investigated by both x-ray photoelectron and diffraction techniques in a set of partially converted films on SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals. The pyrolysis temperature within the range 400-480 deg. C mainly affects the copper valence state with an increase of the Cu{sup 2+} fraction with temperature with respect to the Cu{sup 1+} oxidation state. During the subsequent thermal treatment up to 700 deg. C, the reduction of fluorine content is mainly ascribed to the hydrolysis of YF{sub 3}. At higher temperatures, Ba hydrolysis, Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} and YBCO phase formation (nucleation at 700 deg. C and 725 deg. C, respectively) have been observed. The temperature dependences of the formation and decomposition of YBCO, Y{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ba-oxyfluoride were evaluated by x-ray diffraction measurements. The reaction path emerging from these analyses agrees with the one observed for YBCO films obtained with the standard MOD method based on metal tri-fluoroacetate precursors.

  1. Epoxy Resin Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agent Sulfur Mustard Vapor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra BUNKAR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An epoxy resin polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance (PC-QCM is used for detection of sulfur mustard vapor (SM. When SM vapor is exposed to PC-QCM sensor frequency shift is observed. The response of the sensor in ambient condition is 554 Hz with ±10 % variation upon exposure of 155 ppm of the SM concentration. The observed response loss is nearly 40 % over the period of 15 months. The response of the sensor is higher for SM than compare to structurally similar chloroethyl ether (CEE and other interferences.

  2. A CHEMICAL OXYGEN-IODINE LASER WITH A HIGH WATER VAPOR CONTENT

    OpenAIRE

    Gerasimenko, N.; Yeroshenko, V.; Kalinovski, V.; Konovalov, V.; Krukovski, I.; Nikolaev, V.; Shornikov, L.

    1991-01-01

    To check whether it is possible to make the construction of an oxygen-iodine laser less complicated and to give up in the future a cold water trap, we investigated the possibility for COIL operation at a high content of the water vapor in the active medium. With the oxygen pressure increase between 0.5 ... 2.5 Torr and the water vapor content between 0.3 ... 1.0 Torr at the constant iodine concentration [MATH] 10 mTorr, the generation power increased from 1.0 to 4.5 kW, saturation of the radi...

  3. Shock Wave Energy Dissipation by Metal-Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Miao, Yurun; Banlusan, Kiettipong; Shaw, William; Strachan, Alejandro; Suslick, Kenneth; Dlott, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) such as ZIF-8 and UiO-66 show promising shock energy dissipation abilities through mechano-chemical reactions including bond breaking and pore collapse. In this work, we performed quantitative measurements on the shock wave energy attenuated by MOF films using a laser-driven flyer-plate apparatus. Aluminum flyer plates of 75-um thick were accelerated to speeds up to 2.0 km/s by a flat-top pulsed laser to impact the MOF film. The MOF layer was coated on a 200-nm thick gold mirror, which was deposited previously on glass substrate. Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) was used to track the motions of the gold mirror, which can be converted to the energy flux and fluence of the shock wave that transmitted through the MOF layer. We deduced the shock energy that was attenuated by the MOF film by comparing the transmitted energy flux/fluence obtained with and without the presence of the MOF layer. A two-wave-shaped flux-time curve was obtained with the MOF layer because of its nanoporous structure. Studies on the shock wave energy attenuation by ZIF-8 and UiO-66 were carried out under various flyer speeds and sample thicknesses. We used in situ emission spectroscopy to verify that pore collapse was accompanied by chemical bond breakage. Corresponding author:dlott@illinois.edu.

  4. Semi-continuous high speed gas analysis of generated vapors of chemical warfare agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trap, H.C.; Langenberg, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented for the continuous analysis of generated vapors of the nerve agents soman and satin and the blistering agent sulfur mustard. By using a gas sampling valve and a very short (15 cm) column connected to an on-column injector with a 'standard length' column, the system can either

  5. Aerosol - assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Metal Oxide Structures: Zinc Oxide Rods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vallejos, S.; Pizúrová, Naděžda; Čechal, J.; Grácia, I.; Cané, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, Č. 127 (2017), č. článku e56127. ISSN 1940-087X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Zinc oxide * columnar structures * rods * AACVD * non-catalyzed growth * vapor-solid mechanism Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016 https://www.jove.com/video/56127

  6. Long-term stable water vapor permeation barrier properties of SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at extremely low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the water vapor permeation barrier properties of 30-nm-thick SiN/SiCN/SiN nanolaminated multilayer structures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 7 mTorr. The derived water vapor transmission rate was 1.12 × 10 −6 g/(m 2 day) at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity, and this value was maintained up to 15 000 h of aging time. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the nanolaminated film was composed of an amorphous phase. A mixed phase was observed upon performing high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis, which indicated that a thermodynamically stable structure was formed. It was revealed amorphous SiN/SiCN/SiN multilayer structures that are free from intermixed interface defects effectively block water vapor permeation into active layer

  7. Passivation of metal surface states: microscopic origin for uniform monolayer graphene by low temperature chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Insu; Yang, Heejun; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Heo, Jinseong; Seo, David H; Shin, Jaikwang; Chung, U-In; Kim, Zheong Gou; Chung, Hyun-Jong; Seo, Sunae

    2011-03-22

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the surface morphology and electronic structure of graphene synthesized on Cu by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Periodic line patterns originating from the arrangements of carbon atoms on the Cu surface passivate the interaction between metal substrate and graphene, resulting in flawless inherent graphene band structure in pristine graphene/Cu. The effective elimination of metal surface states by the passivation is expected to contribute to the growth of monolayer graphene on Cu, which yields highly enhanced uniformity on the wafer scale, making progress toward the commercial application of graphene.

  8. High-Resolution Magnetic Force Microscopy Using Carbon Nanotube Probes Fabricated Directly by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been successfully grown on the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM cantilever by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations reveal that the diameter of the CNTs is ∼30 nm and the magnetic particles with diameter of ∼20 nm, which was used as catalyst for the CNT growth, exist on the top. This CNT probe has been applied to magnetic force microscopy (MFM on the ultrahigh-density magnetic recording media with 1200 kilo flux change per inch (kfci.

  9. Oxygen source-oriented control of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of VO2 for capacitive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Vernardou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium dioxides of different crystalline orientation planes have successfully been fabricated by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure using propanol, ethanol and O2 gas as oxygen sources. The thick a-axis textured monoclinic vanadium dioxide obtained through propanol presented the best electrochemical response in terms of the highest specific discharge capacity of 459 mAh g-1 with a capacitance retention of 97 % after 1000 scans under constant specific current of 2 A g-1. Finally, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicated that the charge transfer of Li+ through the vanadium dioxide / electrolyte interface was easier for this sample enhancing significantly its capacitance performance.

  10. In-situ growth of YBCO high- Tc superconducting thin films by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Chern, C. S.; Li, Y. Q.; Noh, D. W.; Norris, P. E.; Zawadzki, P.; Kear, B.; Gallois, B.

    1991-01-01

    Highly c-axis oriented, highly dense, low carbon YBa 2Cu 3O x superconducting thin films have been formed in-situ at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570°C by a novel plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. Superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O x thin films, having a zero resistance transition temperature of 82 K and critical current density of 10 4A/cm 2 at 70 K have been directly deposited on sapphire substrates by such a process.

  11. Limiting Size of Monolayer Graphene Flakes Grown on Silicon Carbide or via Chemical Vapor Deposition on Different Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, N. I.

    2018-05-01

    The maximum size of homogeneous monolayer graphene flakes that form during the high-temperature evaporation of silicon from a surface of SiC or during graphene synthesis via chemical vapor deposition is estimated, based on the theoretical calculations developed in this work. Conditions conducive to the fragmentation of a monolayer graphene sheet to form discrete fragments or terrace-type structures in which excess energy due to dangling bonds at the edges is compensated for by the lack of internal stress are indentified and described. The results from calculations for the sizes of graphene structures are compared with experimental findings for the most successful graphene syntheses reported in the literature.

  12. Adsorption and desorption of P on (001) InP surface in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition by surface photoabsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, T W; Moon, Y B; Yoon, E J; Kim, Y D

    1999-01-01

    We studied the surface structure of (001) InP in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) ambient by surface photoabsorption (SPA). A P-dimer peak at 430 nm and an In-dimer peak at 600 nm were observed from the SPA subtraction spectra. A maximum SPA reflectivity change of 8 % between the P-stabilized and the In-stabilized surfaces was obtained at 470 nm. A first-order desorption kinetics was assumed to curve-fit the SPA signal and an activation energy of 3.36 eV was obtained.

  13. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  14. Physical and electrical properties of graphene grown under different hydrogen flow in low pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sajjad; Iqbal, Muhmmad Waqas; Park, Jaehyun; Ahmad, Muneer; Singh, Jai; Eom, Jonghwa; Jung, Jongwan

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen flow during low pressure chemical vapor deposition had significant effect not only on the physical properties but also on the electrical properties of graphene. Nucleation and grain growth of graphene increased at higher hydrogen flows. And, more oxygen-related functional groups like amorphous and oxidized carbon that probably contributed to defects or contamination of graphene remained on the graphene surface at low H2 flow conditions. It is believed that at low hydrogen flow, those remained oxygen or other oxidizing impurities make the graphene films p-doped and result in decreasing the carrier mobility.

  15. ZnO/SnO2 nanoflower based ZnO template synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sin, N. D. Md.; Amalina, M. N.; Ismail, Ahmad Syakirin; Shafura, A. K.; Ahmad, Samsiah; Mamat, M. H.; Rusop, M.

    2016-01-01

    The ZnO/SnO 2 nanoflower like structures was grown on a glass substrate deposited with seed layer using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with combining two source materials. The ZnO/SnO 2 nanoflower like structures had diameter in the range 70 to 100 nm. The atomic percentage of ZnO nanoparticle , SnO 2 nanorods and ZnO/SnO 2 nanoflower was taken using EDS. Based on the FESEM observations, the growth mechanism is applied to describe the growth for the synthesized nanostructures.

  16. ZnO/SnO{sub 2} nanoflower based ZnO template synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sin, N. D. Md., E-mail: diyana0366@johor.uitm.edu.my; Amalina, M. N., E-mail: amalina0942@johor.uitm.edu.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Fakulti Kejuruteraan Elektrik, Universiti Teknologi MARA Cawangan Johor, Kampus Pasir Gudang, 81750 Masai, Johor (Malaysia); Ismail, Ahmad Syakirin, E-mail: kyrin-samaxi@yahoo.com; Shafura, A. K., E-mail: shafura@ymail.com; Ahmad, Samsiah, E-mail: samsiah.ahmad@johor.uitm.edu.my; Mamat, M. H., E-mail: mhmamat@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M., E-mail: rusop@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Universiti Teknologi MARA - UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    The ZnO/SnO{sub 2} nanoflower like structures was grown on a glass substrate deposited with seed layer using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with combining two source materials. The ZnO/SnO{sub 2} nanoflower like structures had diameter in the range 70 to 100 nm. The atomic percentage of ZnO nanoparticle , SnO{sub 2} nanorods and ZnO/SnO{sub 2} nanoflower was taken using EDS. Based on the FESEM observations, the growth mechanism is applied to describe the growth for the synthesized nanostructures.

  17. Review on mechanism of directly fabricating wafer-scale graphene on dielectric substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jing; Wang, Dong; Chai, Yang; Feng, Xin; Mu, Meishan; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2017-07-01

    To date, chemical vapor deposition on transition metal catalysts is a potential way to achieve low cost, high quality and uniform wafer-scale graphene. However, the removal and transfer process of the annoying catalytic metals underneath can bring large amounts of uncertain factors causing the performance deterioration of graphene, such as the pollution of surface polymeric residues, unmentioned doping and structural damages. Thus, to develop a technique of directly fabricating graphene on dielectric substrates is quite meaningful. In this review, we will present specific methods of catalyst- or transfer-free techniques for graphene growth and discuss the diversity of growth mechanisms.

  18. Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposited tantalum silicon nitride thin films for applications in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wanxue

    The scaling issues resulting from diminishing device feature sizes have prompted the investigation of alternative materials and deposition techniques for copper diffusion barrier applications. As device sizes shrink to sub 100-nm technology nodes, the allowable copper diffusion barrier thickness falls to less than 10 nm. In this respect, novel materials are needed to stop copper diffusion into surrounding materials. TaSiN has been regarded as one of the most promising materials for copper diffusion barrier applications, owing to its excellent thermal stability, amorphous structure, and low resistivity. In this respect, a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process using TaF5, SiI4, N2, H2, and in-situ radio frequency (RF) plasma was optimized for depositing ultrathin TaSiN films, employing a design of experiments (DOE) approach. Film properties were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), four-point resistivity probe, and cross-section scanning electron microscopy (CS-SEM). The TaSiN films, deposited via optimized process conditions, exhibited low resistivity, low contamination levels, smooth surface morphology, good step coverage, excellent thermal stability, and amorphous structure. The copper diffusion barrier performance of optimized PACVD TaSiN films was assessed in Cu/TaSiN/Si structures using traditional high temperature annealing methods and in Cu/TaSiN/SiO2/Si structures using a triangular voltage sweep (TVS) method. The results from the former technique show that the diffusion barrier performance of TaSiN films with higher silicon concentration, corresponding to a more prevalent amorphous structure, leads to worse Cu diffusion barrier performance. The results from the TaSiN barrier testing also show that thinner TaSiN films (≤5 nm) performed better as Cu diffusion barriers than thicker Ta

  19. Amorphous fluorocarbon polymer (a-C:F) films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from perfluoro-octane (C8F18) vapor I: Deposition, morphology, structural and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biloiu, Costel; Biloiu, Ioana Arabela; Sakai, Yosuke; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Akitsugu

    2004-01-01

    The method of obtaining amorphous fluorocarbon polymer (a-C:F) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in a capacitively coupled, 13.56 MHz reactor, from a new monomer, namely perfluoro-octane (C 8 F 18 ) vapor, is presented. For monomer pressure ranging from 0.2 to 1 Torr and input power density from 0.15 to 0.85 W/cm 3 , the maximum deposition rate reached 300 nm/min, while 10% monomer dilution with argon led to a deposition rate of 200 nm/min. The film surface and bulk morphologies, chemical and structural compositions were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the films have a dense and compact structure. The fluorine to carbon ratio (F/C) of the films was between 1.57 and 1.75, and the degree of cross-linking was between 55% and 58%. The relative amount of perfluoroalkyl (CF 2 ) groups in the films was 29%. The FTIR spectra showed absorption bands corresponding to the different vibrational modes of CF, CF 2 , and CF 3 moieties

  20. Zeolite-like metal-organic frameworks with ana topology

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-04-20

    Embodiments of the present disclosure describe a zeolite-like metal-organic framework composition comprising a metal-organic framework composition with ana topology characterized by the formula [MIII(4, 5-imidazole dicarboxylic acid)2X(solvent)a]n wherein MIII comprises a trivalent cation of a rare earth element, X comprises an alkali metal element or alkaline earth metal element, and solvent comprises a guest molecule occupying pores. Embodiments of the present disclosure describe a method of separating paraffins comprising contacting a zeolite-like metal-organic framework with ana topology with a flow of paraffins, and separating the paraffins by size.

  1. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shengchang; He, Yabing; Zhang, Zhangjing; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Krishna, Rajamani; Chen, Banglin

    2012-07-17

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve such separations and to replace current technologies, which use aqueous solvents to chemically absorb carbon dioxide. Here we show that a metal-organic frameworks (UTSA-16) displays high uptake (160 cm(3) cm(-3)) of CO(2) at ambient conditions, making it a potentially useful adsorbent material for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture and biogas stream purification. This has been further confirmed by simulated breakthrough experiments. The high storage capacities and selectivities of UTSA-16 for carbon dioxide capture are attributed to the optimal pore cages and the strong binding sites to carbon dioxide, which have been demonstrated by neutron diffraction studies.

  2. Metal-organic frameworks: structure, properties, methods of synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butova, V V; Soldatov, M A; Guda, A A; Lomachenko, K A; Lamberti, C

    2016-01-01

    This review deals with key methods of synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The modular structure affords a wide variety of MOFs with different active metal sites and organic linkers. These compounds represent a new stage of development of porous materials in which the pore size and the active site structure can be modified within wide limits. The set of experimental methods considered in this review is sufficient for studying the short-range and long-range order of the MOF crystal structure, determining the morphology of samples and elucidating the processes that occur at the active metal site in the course of chemical reactions. The interest in metal-organic frameworks results, first of all, from their numerous possible applications, ranging from gas separation and storage to chemical reactions within the pores. The bibliography includes 362 references

  3. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube paper for monitoring chemical vapors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, R.; Saha, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2015), s. 4003-4008 ISSN 1533-4880 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotube network * electrical resistance * organic vapor sensor Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.338, year: 2015

  4. Increasing the Stability of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Bosch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs are a new category of advanced porous materials undergoing study by many researchers for their vast variety of both novel structures and potentially useful properties arising from them. Their high porosities, tunable structures, and convenient process of introducing both customizable functional groups and unsaturated metal centers have afforded excellent gas sorption and separation ability, catalytic activity, luminescent properties, and more. However, the robustness and reactivity of a given framework are largely dependent on its metal-ligand interactions, where the metal-containing clusters are often vulnerable to ligand substitution by water or other nucleophiles, meaning that the frameworks may collapse upon exposure even to moist air. Other frameworks may collapse upon thermal or vacuum treatment or simply over time. This instability limits the practical uses of many MOFs. In order to further enhance the stability of the framework, many different approaches, such as the utilization of high-valence metal ions or nitrogen-donor ligands, were recently investigated. This review details the efforts of both our research group and others to synthesize MOFs possessing drastically increased chemical and thermal stability, in addition to exemplary performance for catalysis, gas sorption, and separation.

  5. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Turner, John A.; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

  6. Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by combining hot-wire and dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin Cojocaru, Costel; Kim, Dohyung; Pribat, Didier; Bouree, Jean-Eric

    2006-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been grown on 7 nm Ni-coated substrates consisting of crystalline silicon covered with a thin layer (10 nm) of TiN, by combining hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (dc PECVD), at 620 deg. C. Acetylene (C 2 H 2 ) gas is used as the carbon source and ammonia (NH 3 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) are used either for dilution or etching. The carbon nanotubes range from 20 to 100 nm in diameter and 0.3 to 5 μm in length, depending on growth conditions: plasma intensity, filament current, pressure, C 2 H 2 , NH 3 , H 2 flow rates, C 2 H 2 /NH 3 and C 2 H 2 /H 2 mass flow ratios. By combining the HWCVD and the dc PECVD processes, uniform growth of oriented MWCNTs was obtained, whereas by using only the HWCVD process, tangled MWCNTs were obtained. By patterning the nickel catalyst, with the use of the HW dc PECVD process, uniform arrays of nanotubes have been grown as well as single free-standing aligned nanotubes, depending on the catalyst patterning (optical lithography or electron-beam lithography). In the latter case, electron field emission from the MWCNTs was obtained with a maximum emission current density of 0.6 A/cm 2 for a field of 16 V/μm

  7. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of n-heptane and methyl methacrylate for potential cell alignment applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annina; Tautzenberger, Andrea; Schaller, Andreas; Kalytta-Mewes, Andreas; Tränkle, Sebastian; Ignatius, Anita; Volkmer, Dirk

    2012-10-24

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers (plasma polymers) are promising candidates for biomaterials applications. In the present study, plasma deposition as a fast and easily scalable method was adapted to deposit coatings from n-heptane and methyl methacrylate monomers onto glass substrates. Linear patterns with line and groove widths between 1.25 and 160 μm were introduced by degrative UV-lithography for cell alignment. Differential interference contrast optical microscopy, profilometry and atomic force microscopy revealed that the patterned surfaces had a smooth, homogeneous appearance and a pattern height of 8 and 45 nm for plasma deposited n-heptane and methyl methacrylate, respectively. UV-lithography increased the oxygen content on the surface drastically as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After immersion in simulated body fluid for 21 days, the pattern was still intact, and the ester groups were also maintained for the most part as shown by infrared spectroscopy. To test the coatings' potential applicability for biomaterial surfaces in a preliminary experiment, we cultured murine preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on these coatings. Light and electron microscopically, a normal spindle-shaped and aligned cell morphology was observed. At the mRNA level, cells showed no signs of diminished proliferation or elevated expression of apoptosis markers. In conclusion, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers can be patterned with a fast and feasible method and might be suitable materials to guide cell alignment.

  8. The role of surface chemical analysis in a study to select replacement processes for TCA vapor degreasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesley, Michael W.; Davis, Lawrence E.; Moulder, John F.; Carlson, Brad A.

    1995-01-01

    The role of surface-sensitive chemical analysis (ESCA, AES, and SIMS) in a study to select a process to replace 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) vapor degreasing as a steel and aluminum bonding surface preparation method is described. The effort was primarily concerned with spray-in-air cleaning processes involving aqueous alkaline and semi-aqueous cleaners and a contamination sensitive epoxy-to-metal bondline. While all five cleaners tested produced bonding strength results equal to or better than those produced by vapor degreasing, the aqueous alkaline cleaners yielded results which were superior to those produced by the semi-aqueous cleaners. The main reason for the enhanced performance appears to be a silicate layer left behind by the aqueous alkaline cleaners. The silicate layer increases the polarity of the surface and enhances epoxy-to-metal bonding. On the other hand, one of the semi-aqueous cleaners left a nonpolar carbonaceous residue which appeared to have a negative effect on epoxy-to-metal bonding. Differences in cleaning efficiency between cleaners/processes were also identified. These differences in surface chemistry, which were sufficient to affect bonding, were not detected by conventional chemical analysis techniques.

  9. Crack-free yttria stabilized zirconia thin films by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition: Influence of water and carrier gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlupp, M.V.F., E-mail: Meike.Schlupp@mat.ethz.ch [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Binder, S.; Martynczuk, J.; Prestat, M. [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gauckler, L.J. [Nonmetallic Inorganic Materials, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia thin films are deposited on silicon single crystal substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition from precursor solutions of zirconium and yttrium 2,4-pentanedionate in ethanol. Continuous films are obtained using pure oxygen, pure nitrogen, or mixtures of both as carrier gas. In the simultaneous presence of water and oxygen, crack formation is observed for films deposited at intermediate substrate temperatures (450 Degree-Sign C), while those deposited at low (300 Degree-Sign C) and high (600 Degree-Sign C) temperatures remain crack-free. Crack-free films can be deposited at 450 Degree-Sign C in a water-free setting, or in the presence of water using pure nitrogen as carrier gas. The addition of water to the precursor solutions also significantly reduces film growth rates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin film deposition by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AA-CVD) Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films deposited between 300 Degree-Sign C and 600 Degree-Sign C Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water decreases growth rates and leads to crack formation in AA-CVD of YSZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crack-free YSZ thin films deposited using oxygen and/or nitrogen as carrier gas Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YSZ thin films deposited by AA-CVD show low shrinkage on annealing at 1000 Degree-Sign C.

  10. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of pH responsive poly(2-diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaman, Mustafa; Çabuk, Nihat

    2012-01-01

    Poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDPAEMA) thin films were deposited on low temperature substrates by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) method using tertbutyl peroxide as an initiator. Very high deposition rates up to 38 nm/min were observed at low filament temperatures due to the use of the initiator. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show the formation of PDPAEMA films with high retention of tertiary amine functionality which is responsible for pH induced changes in the wetting behavior of the surfaces. As-deposited PDPAEMA thin films on flat Si surface showed a reversible switching of water contact angle values between 87° and 28°; after successive treatments of high and low pH water solutions, respectively. Conformal and non-damaging nature of iCVD allowed to functionalize fragile and rough electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber mat surfaces by PDPAEMA, which creates a surface with a switching behavior between superhydrophobic and approaching superhydrophilic with contact angle values of 155 ± 3°and 22 ± 5°, respectively. - Highlights: ► Poly(2-diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate) thin films were deposited by a dry process. ► Initiated chemical vapor deposition can produce thin films on fragile substrates. ► We report a reversible pH-induced transition from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic.

  11. Novel Metal Organic Framework Synthesis for Spacecraft Oxygen Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek and University of Utah propose to develop novel metal organic framework (MOF) material to efficiently capture oxygen in spacecraft cabin environment. The...

  12. Dual Mechanism Nonlinear Response of Selected Metal Organic Chromophores

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peak, John D

    2007-01-01

    13 The goal for the research described herein is the development of a series of transition metal based metal organic chromophores that display both two-photon and excited state absorption (TPA/ESA) character...

  13. Highly stable ni-m f6-nh2o/onpyrazine2(solvent)x metal organic frameworks and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands. Methods for capturing chemical species from fluid compositions comprise contacting a metal organic framework characterized by the formula [MaMbF6-n(O/H2O)w(Ligand)x(solvent)y]z with a fluid composition and capturing one or more chemical species from the fluid composition.

  14. In situ synthesis of a large area boron nitride/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Jang, Sung Kyu; Park, Sangwoo; Jung, Seong Jun; Suh, Hwansoo; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2015-04-01

    We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the mobility or the Dirac point, unlike the conventional graphene devices prepared on a SiO2 substrate. The in situ-grown BGB film properties suggest a novel approach to the fabrication of commercial-grade graphene-based electronic devices.We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the

  15. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula I. Nandasiri; Jian Liu; B. Peter McGrail; Jeromy Jenks; Herbert T. Schaef; Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan; Zimin Nie; Paul F. Martin; Satish K. Nune

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with th...

  16. Fuel upgrading and reforming with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods for separating hydrocarbons on an internal combustion powered vehicle via one or more metal organic frameworks are disclosed. Systems and methods can further include utilizing separated hydrocarbons and exhaust to generate hydrogen gas for use as fuel. In one aspect, a method for separating hydrocarbons can include contacting a first component containing a first metal organic framework with a flow of hydrocarbons and separating hydrocarbons by size. In certain embodiments, the hydrocarbons can include alkanes.

  17. Metal organic frameworks for removal of compounds from a fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Embodiments provide a method of compound removal from a fluid. The method includes contacting one or more metal organic framework (MOF) compositions with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons. One or more of CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF.

  18. Synthesis of carbon nanomaterials by catalytic chemical vapor deposition: growth mechanisms on metal powders and foils

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Rodríguez, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Actualmente, las excelentes propiedades proporcionadas a escala nanométrica por los nanomateriales de carbono, como nanotubos y grafeno, motivan la propuesta teórica de un gran número de aplicaciones. Estos nanomateriales se pueden producir por deposición química en fase vapor (CVD), que consiste en la descomposición térmica de hidrocarburos sobre catalizadores metálicos. La técnica de CVD permite, a través del control de las condiciones de síntesis y la composición y morfología del catalizad...

  19. Self-catalytic growth of tin oxide nanowires by chemical vapor deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thabethe, BS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available are commercially available for detecting fuel gas, carbon monoxide, combustible gases, ammonia, water vapour, and numerous other gases and vapors [11]. Due to the enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of 1D struc- tures, tin oxide nanowires have been shown to have... power consumption [15]. It has been reported by several authors that the performances of gas sensors can be enhanced by increasing the specific surface area by way of achieving nanoparticles [16, 17] and by incorporation of noble metals [18...

  20. Ultrasharp Si nanowires produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, Jiří; Ledinský, Martin; Stuchlíková, The-Ha; Stuchlík, Jiří; Výborný, Zdeněk; Holovský, Jakub; Hruška, Karel; Fejfar, Antonín; Kočka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, 1-2 (2010), s. 37-39 ISSN 1862-6254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanowires * silicon * scanning electron microscopy * hemical vapor deposition * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.660, year: 2010 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123213957/HTMLSTART