WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal-binding chimeric antibodies

  1. The biological characteristics of anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuo; Jiang Lin; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin; Cui Wuren; Wang Yanggong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological characteristics of an anti-CD71 mouse/human chimeric antibody (D2C). Methods: Analysis of the chimeric Ab production in culture supernatant was made by the standard concentration curve method with ELISA. The antibody was purified by DEAE-Sephredax-A50 ion-exchange chromatography and was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The competition inhibition studies for binding to the same epitope on CD71 were performed between the chimeric Ab(D2C) in the culture supernatant was about 0.5-5 μg/ml in 5-day cultures when seeded at 1 x 10 5 cells/5ml compared with 12.5-25 μg/ml in the supernatant from their parental monoclonal Ab(7579). The purified chimeric Ab(D2C) from mouse ascetics was 1-2 mg/ml. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified chimeric Ab(D2C) with discontinuous system confirmed two protein bands of 55 kDa and 25 kDa. It was clear that both chimeric Ab(D2C) and murine monoclonal Ab (7579) compete effectively to join the same epitope of CD71 each other. The chimeric antibody's affinity constant (Ka), quantitated by Scatchard analysis, is about 9.34-9.62 x 10 9 L/mol. Conclusion: The chimeric Ab(D2C) produced from the transfectomas is stable. The binding capacity of the chimeric Ab(D2C) to the antigen (CD71) was retained

  2. Nanoscale orientation and lateral organization of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein on lipid membrane determined by epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy was successfully applied to explore the orientation and lateral organization of a group of chimeric green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) on lipid membrane. Incorporation of the chimeric GFP carrying Cd-binding region (His6CdBP4GFP) to the fluid phase of DPPC monolayer resulted in a strong fluorescence intensity at the air-water interface. Meanwhile, non-specific adsorption of the GFP having hexahistidine (His6GFP) led to the perturbation of the protein structure in which very low fluorescence was observed. Specific binding of both of the chimeric GFPs to immobilized zinc ions underneath the metal-chelating lipid membrane was revealed. This specific binding could be reversibly controlled by addition of metal ions or metal chelator. Binding of the chimeric GFPs to the metal-chelating lipid membrane was proven to be the end-on orientation while the side-on adsorption was contrarily noted in the absence of metal ions. Increase of lateral mobility owing to the fluidization effect on the chelating lipid membrane subsequently facilitated crystal formation. All these findings have opened up a potential approach for a specific orientation of immobilization of protein at the membrane interface. This could have accounted for a better opportunity of sensor development

  3. In vitro and in vivo properties of human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Konishi, J.; Ueda, R.; Nishimura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Watanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen was efficiently obtained by ligating human heavy-chain enhancer element to the chimeric heavy- and light-chain genes. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays of both radioiodine and indium-111- (111In) labeled chimeric antibodies demonstrated in vitro immunoreactivity identical with that of the parental murine monoclonal antibodies. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled chimeric antibody in tumor-bearing nude mice was similar to that of the parental murine antibody. Tumor accumulation of radioiodinated parental and chimeric antibodies was lower than that of 111 In-labeled antibodies, probably because of dehalogenation of the radioiodinated antibodies. Indium-111-labeled chimeric antibody clearly visualized xenografted tumor. These results suggest that a human/mouse chimeric antibody can be labeled with 111 In and radioiodine without the loss of its immunoreactivity, and that chimeric antibody localizes in vivo in the same way as the parental murine antibody

  4. Chimeric recombinant antibody fragments in cardiac troponin I immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Kekki, Henna; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Lövgren, Timo; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To introduce a novel nanoparticle-based immunoassay for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) utilizing chimeric antibody fragments and to demonstrate that removal of antibody Fc-part and antibody chimerization decrease matrix related interferences. A sandwich-type immunoassay for cTnI based on recombinant chimeric (mouse variable/human constant) antigen binding (cFab) antibodies and intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles was developed. To test whether using chimeric antibody fragments helps to avoid matrix related interferences, samples (n=39) with known amounts of triglycerides, bilirubin, rheumatoid factor (RF) or human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) were measured with the novel assay, along with a previously published nanoparticle-based research assay with the same antibody epitopes. The limit of detection (LoD) was 3.30ng/L. Within-laboratory precision for 29ng/L and 2819ng/L cTnI were 13.7% and 15.9%, respectively. Regression analysis with Siemens ADVIA Centaur® yielded a slope (95% confidence intervals) of 0.18 (0.17-1.19) and a y-intercept of 1.94 (-1.28-3.91) ng/L. When compared to a previously published nanoparticle-based assay, the novel assay showed substantially reduced interference in the tested interference prone samples, 15.4 vs. 51.3%. A rheumatoid factor containing sample was decreased from 241ng/L to

  5. Interaction analysis of chimeric metal-binding green fluorescent protein and artificial solid-supported lipid membrane by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Hinz, Andreas; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Non-specific adsorption and specific interaction between a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) carrying metal-binding region and the immobilized zinc ions on artificial solid-supported lipid membranes was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance technique and the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Supported lipid bilayer, composed of octanethiol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N- (5-amino-1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid)succinyl] (NTA-DOGS)-Zn 2+ , was formed on the gold electrode of quartz resonator (5 MHz). Binding of the chimeric GFP to zinc ions resulted in a rapid decrease of resonance frequency. Reversibility of the process was demonstrated via the removal of metal ions by EDTA. Nanoscale structural orientation of the chimeric GFP on the membrane was imaged by AFM. Association constant of the specific binding to metal ions was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of the non-specific adsorption, which was caused by the fluidization effect of the metal-chelating lipid molecules as well as the steric hindrance effect. This infers a possibility for a further development of biofunctionalized membrane. However, maximization is needed in order to attain closer advancement to a membrane-based sensor device

  6. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of 99mTc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoscintigraphy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Hiroomi

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal diseases and its prognosis is still poor. To improve the survival rate, it is essential to develop new technologies for early and definitive diagnosis. In this study, chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 were successfully radio-labeled with 99m Tc, preventing depression of the antigen-binding activity. 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7, 99m Tc-labeled normal mouse IgG and 99m Tc-labeled Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG were injected intravenously into nude mice bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts and the radioactivity was subsequently measured. The tumor accumulation was significantly higher with labeled monoclonal antibody A7 than with normal mouse IgG, and higher with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 than with Fab fragments of normal mouse IgG. The tumor/blood ratio of radioactivity increased rapidly over time with chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7. These results suggest that chimeric Fab fragments of monoclonal antibody A7 may be useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer by means of radioimmunoscintigraphy. (author)

  8. [Construction of the lentiviral expression vector for anti-p185(erbB2) mouse/human chimeric antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Li, Li; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qi

    2013-04-01

    This research was to construct the lentiviral expression vector for anti- p185(erbB2) mouse/human chimeric antibody and to determine the expression of the chimeric antibody gene in 293T cells transfected with this vector. The genes (vL and vH) coding light and heavy chain of variable regions of anti-p185(erbB2) mAb and the constant regions of human IgG1 (kappa and gamma1) were cloned with PCR method. The target genes were assembled by three-primers PCR method to obtain the chimeric light chain (L) and the chimeric heavy chain (H). Both chains inserted into the down stream and upper stream of IRES gene of the plasmid pVAX1/IRES respectively. We digested the plasmid pVAX1/ H-IRES-L with endoenzyme and subcloned H-IRES-L into the lentiviral vector pWPI. The enzyme digestion and sequence analysis showed that the lentiviral expression vector pWPI/H-IRES-L was constructed correctly. Then, it was transfected into 293T cells and after 48h, GFP protein expression in 293T cells were detected by fluorescent microscope and the chimeric antibody expression was detected by RT-PCR and direct ELISA. The results showed that after 293T cells were transfected with recombination plasmid, both light and heavy chains of the chimeric antibody genes could express together. The chimeric antibody expressed could bind to p185(erbB2) specifically. This research may lay a sound foundation for further study of anti-p185(erbB2) engineered antibody.

  9. A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Miyuki; Hinoda, Yuji; Sasaki, Shigeru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Imai, Kohzoh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo.

    1996-01-01

    A mouse-human chimeric antibody for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was established by using heavy chain loss mouse mutant hybridoma and human immunoglobulin expression vector. The HA58 hybridoma secreted anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (IgG1,κ). The gene of the mouse variable region of heavy chain was amplified and cloned by the polymerase chain reaction technique directly from the HA58 hybridoma RNA. The variable region of heavy chain was joined with an expression vector which contains human γ1 constant gene. The expression vector was transfected into heavy chain loss mutant cells HA58-7, which produced only murine immunoglobulin light chains. The resultant chimeric MoAb HA58, chHA58, retained full-binding reactivity to ICAM-1 compared with murine HA58 parental antibody. The chimeric MoAb chHA58 showed little antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxic activity against cultured tumor cells. Biodistribution studies with 99m Tc-labeled chHA58 in nude mice bearing human gastric carcinoma JRST cells, demonstrated that the tumor-blood ratio was 1.55 at 18 h after injection, when the tumors were clearly visible in gamma scintigraphy. These data suggest that chHA58 may be of practical use for radioimmunoimaging of a wide variety of tumors. (author)

  10. Characterization of hemopoietic stem cell chimerism in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescutti, L.H.; Gambel, P.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have previously described a model for bone marrow transplantation that involves preparation of the host with monoclonal antibody against class I or class II antigens instead of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. This allows engraftment and subsequent repopulation of the host by donor tissue. They have previously reported on chimerism in the peripheral blood of P1----(P1 X P2)F1 animals. In this report, the authors describe the examination of the bone marrow and spleen stem cell chimerism of these antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras, by determining, with an isozyme assay, the phenotype of methylcellulose colonies grown from stem cells. They have found a correlation between peripheral blood chimerism and the stem cell constitution of both spleen and bone marrow. The peripheral blood chimerism also correlates with the level of chimerism in macrophages derived from peritoneal exudate cells. These findings indicate that assaying the peripheral blood of such chimeras provides an excellent indication of the degree of chimerism at the stem cell level and stands in sharp contrast to the level of chimerism in certain lymphoid compartments

  11. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  12. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  13. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  14. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  15. Chimeric Anti-Human Podoplanin Antibody NZ-12 of Lambda Light Chain Exerts Higher Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Compared with NZ-8 of Kappa Light Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Abe, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Yamada, Shinji; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane 36-kDa glycoprotein, is expressed not only in normal cells, such as renal epithelial cells (podocytes), lymphatic endothelial cells, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells, but also in cancer cells, including brain tumors and lung squamous cell carcinomas. Podoplanin activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, and the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction facilitates blood/lymphatic vessel separation. We previously produced neutralizing anti-human podoplanin monoclonal antibody (mAb), clone NZ-1 (rat IgG 2a , lambda), which neutralizes the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction and inhibits platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. Human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-8, was previously developed using variable regions of NZ-1 and human constant regions of heavy chain (IgG 1 ) and light chain (kappa chain). Although NZ-8 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cells, the binding affinity of NZ-8 was lower than that of NZ-1. Herein, we produced a novel human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-12, the constant regions of which consist of IgG 1 heavy chain and lambda light chain. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of NZ-12 was much higher than that of NZ-8. Furthermore, ADCC and CDC activities of NZ-12 were significantly increased against glioblastoma cell lines (LN319 and D397) and lung cancer cell line (PC-10). These results suggested that NZ-12 could become a promising therapeutic antibody against podoplanin-expressing brain tumors and lung cancers.

  16. Experimental and clinical analysis of the characteristics of a chimeric monoclonal antibody, MOv18, reactive with an ovarian cancer-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molthoff, C. F.; Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Boven, E.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) MOv18 preferentially reacts with gynecological carcinomas. We have analyzed the characteristics of murine MOv18 (m-MOv18) and chimeric MOv18 (c-MOv18). We found no differences in affinity and binding to IGROV1 cells between c-MOv18 as IgG and F(ab')2 fragments and m-MOv18.

  17. Anti-Bovine Programmed Death-1 Rat–Bovine Chimeric Antibody for Immunotherapy of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okagawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blockade of immunoinhibitory molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1, is a promising strategy for reinvigorating exhausted T cells and preventing disease progression in a variety of chronic infections. Application of this therapeutic strategy to cattle requires bovinized chimeric antibody targeting immunoinhibitory molecules. In this study, anti-bovine PD-1 rat–bovine chimeric monoclonal antibody 5D2 (Boch5D2 was constructed with mammalian expression systems, and its biochemical function and antiviral effect were characterized in vitro and in vivo using cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV. Purified Boch5D2 was capable of detecting bovine PD-1 molecules expressed on cell membranes in flow cytometric analysis. In particular, Biacore analysis determined that the binding affinity of Boch5D2 to bovine PD-1 protein was similar to that of the original anti-bovine PD-1 rat monoclonal antibody 5D2. Boch5D2 was also capable of blocking PD-1/PD-L1 binding at the same level as 5D2. The immunomodulatory and therapeutic effects of Boch5D2 were evaluated by in vivo administration of the antibody to a BLV-infected calf. Inoculated Boch5D2 was sustained in the serum for a longer period. Boch5D2 inoculation resulted in activation of the proliferation of BLV-specific CD4+ T cells and decrease in the proviral load of BLV in the peripheral blood. This study demonstrates that Boch5D2 retains an equivalent biochemical function to that of the original antibody 5D2 and is a candidate therapeutic agent for regulating antiviral immune response in vivo. Clinical efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade awaits further experimentation with a large number of animals.

  18. Template-directed covalent conjugation of DNA to native antibodies, transferrin and other metal-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Christian B.; Kodal, Anne L. B.; Nielsen, Jesper S.; Schaffert, David H.; Scavenius, Carsten; Okholm, Anders H.; Voigt, Niels V.; Enghild, Jan J.; Kjems, Jørgen; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2014-09-01

    DNA-protein conjugates are important in bioanalytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics and bionanotechnology, as the DNA provides a unique handle to identify, functionalize or otherwise manipulate proteins. To maintain protein activity, conjugation of a single DNA handle to a specific location on the protein is often needed. However, preparing such high-quality site-specific conjugates often requires genetically engineered proteins, which is a laborious and technically challenging approach. Here we demonstrate a simpler method to create site-selective DNA-protein conjugates. Using a guiding DNA strand modified with a metal-binding functionality, we directed a second DNA strand to the vicinity of a metal-binding site of His6-tagged or wild-type metal-binding proteins, such as serotransferrin, where it subsequently reacted with lysine residues at that site. This method, DNA-templated protein conjugation, facilitates the production of site-selective protein conjugates, and also conjugation to IgG1 antibodies via a histidine cluster in the constant domain.

  19. Construction of a hepatitis B virus neutralizing chimeric monoclonal antibody recognizing escape mutants of the viral surface antigen (HBsAg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Farid, Samira; Bahadori, Motahareh; Bohne, Felix; Altstetter, Sebastian; Wolff, Lisa; Kazemi, Tohid; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Chudy, Michael; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Protzer, Ulrike; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global burden on the health-care system and is considered as the tenth leading cause of death in the world. Over 248 million patients are currently suffering from chronic HBV infection worldwide and annual mortality rate of this infection is 686000. The "a" determinant is a hydrophilic region present in all antigenic subtypes of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and antibodies against this region can neutralize the virus and are protective against all subtypes. We have recently generated a murine anti-HBs monoclonal antibody (4G4), which can neutralize HBV infection in HepaRG cells and recognize most of the escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Here, we describe the production and characterization of the chimeric human-murine antibody 4G4 (c-4G4). Variable region genes of heavy and light chains of the m-4G4 were cloned and fused to constant regions of human kappa and IgG1 by splice overlap extension (SOE) PCR. The chimeric antibody was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO)-K1 cells and purified from culture supernatant. Competition ELISA proved that both antibodies bind the same epitope within HBsAg. Antigen-binding studies using ELISA and Western blot showed that c-4G4 has retained the affinity and specificity of the parental murine antibody, and displayed a similar pattern of reactivity to 13 escape mutant forms of HBsAg. Both, the parental and c-4G4 showed a comparably high HBV neutralization capacity in cell culture even at the lowest concentration (0.6μg/ml). Due to the ability of c-4G4 to recognize most of the sub-genotypes and escape mutants of HBsAg, this antibody either alone or in combination with other anti-HBs antibodies could be considered as a potent alternative for Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) as an HBV infection prophylactic or for passive immunotherapy against HBV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody improves detection and resection of human colon cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new fluorescently labeled chimeric anti-CEA antibody for improved detection and resection of colon cancer. Frozen tumor and normal human tissue samples were stained with chimeric and mouse antibody-fluorophore conjugates for comparison. Mice with patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) of colon cancer underwent fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) or bright-light surgery (BLS) 24 hr after tail vein injection of fluorophore-conjugated chimeric anti-CEA antibody. Resection completeness was assessed using postoperative images. Mice were followed for 6 months for recurrence. The fluorophore conjugation efficiency (dye/mole ratio) improved from 3-4 to >5.5 with the chimeric CEA antibody compared to mouse anti-CEA antibody. CEA-expressing tumors labeled with chimeric CEA antibody provided a brighter fluorescence signal on frozen human tumor tissues (P = 0.046) and demonstrated consistently lower fluorescence signals in normal human tissues compared to mouse antibody. Chimeric CEA antibody accurately labeled PDOX colon cancer in nude mice, enabling improved detection of tumor margins for more effective FGS. The R0 resection rate increased from 86% to 96% with FGS compared to BLS. Improved conjugating efficiency and labeling with chimeric fluorophore-conjugated antibody resulted in better detection and resection of human colon cancer in an orthotopic mouse model. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of anti-factor H binding protein monoclonal antibodies against the meningococcus relies upon blocking factor H binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C; Granoff, Dan M

    2011-09-01

    Binding of the complement-downregulating protein factor H (fH) to the surface of the meningococcus is important for survival of the organism in human serum. The meningococcal vaccine candidate factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important ligand for human fH. While some fHbp-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) block binding of fH to fHbp, the stoichiometry of blocking in the presence of high serum concentrations of fH and its effect on complement-mediated bactericidal activity are unknown. To investigate this question, we constructed chimeric antibodies in which the human IgG1 constant region was paired with three murine fHbp-specific binding domains designated JAR 3, JAR 5, and MAb502. By surface plasmon resonance, the association rates for binding of all three MAbs to immobilized fHbp were >50-fold higher than that for binding of fH to fHbp, and the MAb dissociation rates were >500-fold lower than that for fH. While all three MAbs elicited similar C1q-dependent C4b deposition on live bacteria (classical complement pathway), only those antibodies that inhibited binding of fH to fHbp (JAR 3 and JAR 5) had bactericidal activity with human complement. MAb502, which did not inhibit fH binding, had complement-mediated bactericidal activity only when tested with fH-depleted human complement. When an IgG1 anti-fHbp MAb binds to sparsely exposed fHbp on the bacterial surface, there appears to be insufficient complement activation for bacteriolysis unless fH binding also is inhibited. The ability of fHbp vaccines to elicit protective antibodies, therefore, is likely to be enhanced if the antibody repertoire is of high avidity and includes fH-blocking activity.

  2. Antitumor activity of chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric cancer-specific antihuman podoplanin antibody, via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Nakamura, Takuro; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), a platelet aggregation-inducing transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed in different types of tumors, and it binds to C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The overexpression of hPDPN is involved in invasion and metastasis. Anti-hPDPN monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as NZ-1 have shown antitumor and antimetastatic activities by binding to the platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain of hPDPN. Recently, we developed a novel mouse anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-2, using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. In this study we developed chLpMab-2, a human-mouse chimeric anti-hPDPN antibody, derived from LpMab-2. chLpMab-2 was produced using fucosyltransferase 8-knockout (KO) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-S cell lines. By flow cytometry, chLpMab-2 reacted with hPDPN-expressing cancer cell lines including glioblastomas, mesotheliomas, and lung cancers. However, it showed low reaction with normal cell lines such as lymphatic endothelial and renal epithelial cells. Moreover, chLpMab-2 exhibited high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against PDPN-expressing cells, despite its low complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment with chLpMab-2 abolished tumor growth in xenograft models of CHO/hPDPN, indicating that chLpMab-2 suppressed tumor development via ADCC. In conclusion, chLpMab-2 could be useful as a novel antibody-based therapy against hPDPN-expressing tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  4. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  5. Variation in N-linked carbohydrate chains in different batches of two chimeric monoclonal IgG1 antibodies produced by different murine SP2/0 transfectoma cell subclones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergwerff, A A; Stroop, C J; Murray, B; Holtorf, A P; Pluschke, G; Van Oostrum, J; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F

    1995-06-01

    Two chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibodies were constructed by substitution of the murine constant regions with human gamma 1 and kappa constant regions for heavy and light chains, respectively. The chimeric human/murine molecules are anti-idiotypic antibodies, meaning that they were directed against the antigen binding site in the variable region of another antibody. Antibody batches were produced under identical production conditions, using two selected SP2/0 myeloma cell subclones, which produce chimeric antibodies with different variable regions, but identical constant regions. Several samples were collected during the production of the antibodies in hollow-fibre reactors. The heavy chain, but not the light chain, of the two different chimeric IgG1 antibodies is glycosylated. Structural analysis of the enzymically released N-linked carbohydrate chains by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, as well as by chromatographic profiling, demonstrated that the collection of N-glycans comprises a small amount of monoantennary, and for the greater part diantennary structures. The N-glycans are completely (alpha 1-->6)-fucosylated at the innermost GlcNAc residue. The antennae of the neutral diantennary N-glycans are built up from GlcNAc beta 1-->2, Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 or Gal alpha 1-->3G alpha 1 beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->2 elements, whereas the antennae of the neutral monoantennary carbohydrate chains have only (beta 1-->2)-linked GlcNAc residues. Galactosylation of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->6 branch occurs four times more frequently than that of the GlcNAc beta 1-->2Man alpha 1-->3 branch, independently of the production batch. A small amount of the diantennary N-glycans are mono- or disialylated, carrying N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) or N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), exclusively (alpha 2-->6)-linked to beta Gal. Analysis of the different production batches demonstrates that the structures of the N-linked carbohydrate chains are identical in the two

  6. Preparation and characterization of chimeric CD19 monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, H.; Macardle, P.J.; Bradford, T.; Weedon, H.; Yasui, H.; Kurosawa, Y.

    1991-01-01

    CD19 antibodies have been suggested as candidates for immunological attack on leukemic and lymphoma cells of the B lineage because the antigen is restricted to the B lineage. With the potential use of FMC63 in immunotherapy in mind a mouse-human chimera was produced in which the genes coding for the VDJ region of the heavy chain and the VJ region of the light chain derive from the FMC63 mouse hybridoma, while the C region genes code for human IgG1. The genes have been transfected back into a mouse myeloma line, which secretes low levels of immunoglobulin. (Ig). This Ig was purified and biotinylated in order to determine the specificity of the antibody. The chimeric antibody has a reaction profile concordant with the original FMC63 antibody, but has the properties of a human IgG1, including the ability to fix human complement. However, the antibody is not cytotoxic in vitro in the presence of complement or cells capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Possible reasons for this and ways of using the antibody are discussed. 47 refs., 7 figs

  7. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chimeric anti-NCA 95 antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody for bone marrow imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-09-01

    Chimeric mouse-human antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (ch MAb) against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) was labeled with {sup 99m}Tc (using a direct method) and {sup 125}I (using the chloramine T method), and its binding to human granulocytes and LS-180 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing carcinoembryonic antigen on their surfaces, cross-reactive with anti-NCA-95 chimeric monoclonal antibody, increased in proportion to the number of cells added and reached more than 80% and 90%, respectively. In biodistribution studies, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 125}I-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 MAb revealed high tumor uptake, and the tumor-to-blood ratio was 2.9 after 24 hours. The tumor-to-normal-organ ratio was also more than 3.0 in all organs except for the tumor-to-kidney ratio. Scintigrams of athymic nude mice confirmed the results of biodistribution studies that showed higher radioactivity in tumor and kidney of the mice administered with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch MAb. A normal volunteer injected with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ch anti-NCA-95 antigranulocyte MAb showed clear bone marrow images, and a patient with aplastic anemia revealed irregular uptake in his lumbar spine, suggesting its utility for bone marrow scintigraphy and for the detection of hematological disorders, infections, and bone metastasis. (author)

  8. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  9. Construction and expression of a functional monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for GMP-140 chimeric fab fragment in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jianming; Zhang Xiaomin; Xia Lijun; Wan Haiying; Liu Yue; Li Peixia; Ruan Changgeng

    1996-04-01

    The variable region cDNAs of a monoclonal antibody SZ-51 specific for α-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) on the surface of activated human platelets were spliced with the constant region cDNA of the heavy chain CH1 and light chain k of human Ig G by means of the gene recombination techniques. The above recombinant gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The expression vector of phage plasmid pHEN1 SZ-51 Fab/Hu was constructed. The pHEN1-51 Fab/Hu was introduced into non-suppressor E. coli HB2151. The amount of expression of SZ-51 chimeric Fab/Hu measured by quantitative ELISA was about 500 μg/L. Western blot demonstrated that the SZ-51 chimeric Fab fragment could specifically bind to GMP-140. (2 figs.)

  10. Generation and characterization of a human-mouse chimeric high-affinity antibody that detects the DYKDDDDK FLAG peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Koki; Koga, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Ueno, Ayumi; Saeki, Kazuko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2017-05-13

    DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) is a useful tool for investigating the function and localization of proteins whose antibodies (Abs) are not available. We recently established a high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) for FLAG (clone 2H8). The 2H8 Ab is highly sensitive for detecting FLAG-tagged proteins by flowcytometry and immunoprecipitation, but it can yield nonspecific signals in immunohistochemistry of mouse tissues because it is of mouse origin. In this study, we reduced nonspecific signals by generating a chimeric 2H8 Ab with Fc fragments derived from human immunoglobulin. We fused a 5' terminal cDNA fragments for the Fab region of 2H8 mAb with 3' terminal cDNA fragments for Fc region of human IgG1. We transfected both chimeric plasmids and purified the resulting human-mouse chimeric 2H8. The chimeric 2H8 Ab successfully detected FLAG-tagged proteins in flowcytometry with anti-human IgG secondary Ab with comparable sensitivity to 2H8 mAb. Importantly, chimeric 2H8 detected specific FLAG peptide signals without nonspecific signals in immunohistochemical analysis with mouse tissues. This human-mouse chimeric high-affinity anti-FLAG Ab will prove useful for future immunohistochemical analysis of mouse tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of cetuximab by a chimeric protein encompassing interleukin-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Maria Carmen; Minute, Luna; López, Ascensión; Pérez-Ruiz, Elisabeth; Gomar, Celia; Vasquez, Marcos; Inoges, Susana; Etxeberria, Iñaki; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Garasa, Saray; Mayer, Jan-Peter Andreas; Wirtz, Peter; Melero, Ignacio; Berraondo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Enhancement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) may potentiate the antitumor efficacy of tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies. Increasing the numbers and antitumor activity of NK cells is a promising strategy to maximize the ADCC of standard-of-care tumor-targeted antibodies. For this purpose, we have preclinically tested a recombinant chimeric protein encompassing the sushi domain of the IL15Rα, IL-15, and apolipoprotein A-I (Sushi-IL15-Apo) as produced in CHO cells. The size-exclusion purified monomeric fraction of this chimeric protein was stable and retained the IL-15 and the sushi domain bioactivity as measured by CTLL-2 and Mo-7e cell proliferation and STAT5 phosphorylation in freshly isolated human NK and CD8 + T cells. On cell cultures, Sushi-IL15-Apo increases NK cell proliferation and survival as well as spontaneous and antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) is the receptor for ApoA-I and is expressed on the surface of tumor cells. SR-B1 can adsorb the chimeric protein on tumor cells and can transpresent IL-15 to NK and CD8 + T cells. A transient NK-humanized murine model was developed to test the increase of ADCC attained by the chimeric protein in vivo . The EGFR + human colon cancer cell line HT-29 was intraperitoneally inoculated in immune-deficient Rag2 -/- γc -/- mice that were reconstituted with freshly isolated PBMCs and treated with the anti-EGFR mAb cetuximab. The combination of the Sushi-IL15-Apo protein and cetuximab reduced the number of remaining tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity and delayed tumor engraftment in the peritoneum. Furthermore, Sushi-IL15-Apo increased the anti-tumor effect of a murine anti-EGFR mAb in Rag1 -/- mice bearing subcutaneous MC38 colon cancer transfected to express EGFR. Thus, Sushi-IL15-Apo is a potent tool to increase the number and the activation of NK cells to promote the ADCC activity of antibodies targeting tumor antigens.

  12. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  13. Chimeric anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies and lovastatin act synergistically to provide in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulualem E Tilahun

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is one of a family of toxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that act as superantigens, activating a large fraction of the T-cell population and inducing production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS and death. Extracellular engagement of the TCR of T-cells and class II MHC of antigen presenting cells by SEB triggers the activation of many intracellular signaling processes. We engineered chimeric antibodies to block the extracellular engagement of cellular receptors by SEB and used a statin to inhibit intracellular signaling. Chimeric human-mouse antibodies directed against different neutralizing epitopes of SEB synergistically inhibited its activation of human T-cells in vitro. In the in vivo model of lethal toxic shock syndrome (TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, two of these antibodies conferred significant partial protection when administered individually, but offered complete protection in a synergistic manner when given together. Similarly, in vivo, lovastatin alone conferred only partial protection from TSS similar to single anti-SEB antibodies. However, used in combination with one chimeric neutralizing anti-SEB antibody, lovastatin provided complete protection against lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. These experiments demonstrate that in vivo protection against lethal doses of SEB can be achieved by a statin of proven clinical safety and chimeric human-mouse antibodies, agents now widely used and known to be of low immunogenicity in human hosts.

  14. Characterization and biodistribution of recombinant and recombinant/chimeric constructs of monoclonal antibody B72.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Milenic, D.; Roselli, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiolabeled B72.3 has been administered both i.v. and i.p. in patients with colorectal and ovarian cancer as well as other carcinomas and has been shown to selectively bind to approximately 70-80% of metastatic lesions. Greater than 50% of the patients that have been treated with B72.3 have developed an immunological response to murine IgG after a single injection. In an attempt to minimize the immune response of these patients to the administered murine monoclonal antibody, we developed a recombinant form of the murine B72.3 as well as a recombinant/chimeric antibody, using the variable regions of the murine B72.3 and human heavy chain (gamma 4) and light chain (kappa) constant regions. We report here that both the recombinant B72.3 [rB72.3] and the recombinant/chimeric B72.3 [cB72.3(gamma 4)] IgGs maintain the tissue binding and idiotypic specificity of the native murine IgG. The native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4) IgGs were radiolabeled and the biodistribution of these IgGs was studied in athymic mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts (LS-174T). Differences were observed between the cB72.3(gamma 4) and the native B72.3 in the percentage of injected dose/g that localized in the tumor. The somewhat lower absolute amounts of the cB72.3(gamma 4) in the tumor are mostly likely due to the observed more rapid clearance from the blood and body of the mouse as compared to the native B72.3 and rB72.3. All three forms [native B72.3, rB72.3, and cB72.3(gamma 4)] of the IgG, however, were able to localize the colon tumor with similar radiolocalization indices [percentage of injected dose/g in tumor divided by the percentage of injected dose/g in normal tissue

  15. Conserved epitope on several human vitamin K-dependent proteins: location of the antigenic site and influence of metal ions on antibody binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, W.R.; Messier, T.; Howard, P.R.; Amiral, J.; Meyer, D.; Mann, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated H-11) produced by injecting mice with purified human protein C was found to bind several human vitamin K-dependent proteins. Using a solid-phase competitive radioimmunoassay with antibody immobilized onto microtiter plates, binding of 125 I-labeled protein C to the antibody was inhibited by increasing amounts of protein C, prothrombin, and Factors X and VII over a concentration range of 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 M. Chemical treatment of prothrombin with a variety of agents did not destroy the antigenic site recognized by the antibody as measured by immunoblotting of prothrombin or prothrombin derivative immobilized onto nitrocellulose. Immunoblotting of purified vitamin K-dependent polypeptides with the monoclonal antibody following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose indicated that the antigenic site was found on the light chains of protein C and Factor X. The exact location of the antigenic determinant for antibody H-11 was established using synthetic peptides. Comparison of protein sequences of bovine and human vitamin K-dependent proteins suggests that the sequence Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Xaa-Arg/Lys is required for antibody binding. Increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , or Mn 2+ partially inhibited binding of 125 I-protein C to the antibody in a solid-phase assay system with half-maximal binding observed at divalent metal ion concentrations of 2, 4, and 0.6 mM, respectively. The antigenic site thus recognized by monoclonal antibody H-11 is located at the amino-terminal region in the highly conserved γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing domains of several, but not all, vitamin K-dependent proteins

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to meningococcal factor H binding protein with overlapping epitopes and discordant functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Reason, Donald C; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine candidate. Anti-fHbp antibodies can bind to meningococci and elicit complement-mediated bactericidal activity directly. The antibodies also can block binding of the human complement down-regulator, factor H (fH). Without bound fH, the organism would be expected to have increased susceptibility to bacteriolysis. Here we describe bactericidal activity of two anti-fHbp mAbs with overlapping epitopes in relation to their different effects on fH binding and bactericidal activity. Both mAbs recognized prevalent fHbp sequence variants in variant group 1. Using yeast display and site-specific mutagenesis, binding of one of the mAbs (JAR 1, IgG3) to fHbp was eliminated by a single amino acid substitution, R204A, and was decreased by K143A but not by R204H or D142A. The JAR 1 epitope overlapped that of previously described mAb (mAb502, IgG2a) whose binding to fHbp was eliminated by R204A or R204H substitutions, and was decreased by D142A but not by K143A. Although JAR 1 and mAb502 appeared to have overlapping epitopes, only JAR 1 inhibited binding of fH to fHbp and had human complement-mediated bactericidal activity. mAb502 enhanced fH binding and lacked human complement-mediated bactericidal activity. To control for confounding effects of different mouse IgG subclasses on complement activation, we created chimeric mAbs in which the mouse mAb502 or JAR 1 paratopes were paired with human IgG1 constant regions. While both chimeric mAbs showed similar binding to fHbp, only JAR 1, which inhibited fH binding, had human complement-mediated bactericidal activity. The lack of human complement-mediated bactericidal activity by anti-fHbp mAb502 appeared to result from an inability to inhibit binding of fH. These results underscore the importance of inhibition of fH binding for anti-fHbp mAb bactericidal activity.

  17. Radiotoxicity of systemically administered 211At-labeled human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody: a long-term survival study with histologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLendon, Roger E.; Archer, Gary E.; Larsen, Roy H.; Akabani, Gamal; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The antitenascin human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody labeled with the α-particle-emitting radionuclide 211 At is of interest as an endo radiotherapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors. To facilitate the investigation of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in patients, the long-term radiotoxicity of this radiopharmaceutical has been evaluated. Methods and Materials: Antibody labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astato-benzoate. After an initial dose-finding experiment, a second toxicity study was carried out at 4 dose levels in groups of 30 non thyroid blocked B6C3F 1 mice per group (15 males, 15 females). Male mice received either saline or 15-81 kBq/g and females received either saline or 16-83 kBq/g of 211 At-labeled antibody. Ten animals (5 males, 5 females) were followed for 6 months and the remainder for 1 year. Results: The lethal dose in 10% of animals (LD 10 ) for 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 was 46 kBq/g in females and 102 kBq/g in males. Toxic effects--perivascular fibrosis of the intraventricular septum of the heart, bone marrow suppression, splenic white pulp atrophy, and spermatic maturational delay--generally were confined to a few animals receiving the highest doses of labeled antibody. Conclusions: The LD 10 of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 in this mouse strain was about half that of [ 211 At]astatide. These results establish the preclinical maximum tolerated dose of 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6 and define in the mouse the target organs for toxicity. These studies will be useful for determining starting doses for clinical studies with 211 At-labeled chimeric 81C6

  18. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy. PMID:28448627

  19. The Construction of Chimeric T-Cell Receptor with Spacer Base of Modeling Study of VHH and MUC1 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Pirooznia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive cell immunotherapy with the use of chimeric receptors leads to the best and most specific response against tumors. Chimeric receptors consist of a signaling fragment, extracellular spacer, costimulating domain, and an antibody. Antibodies cause immunogenicity; therefore, VHH is a good replacement for ScFv in chimeric receptors. Since peptide sequences have an influence on chimeric receptors, the effect of peptide domains on each other's conformation were investigated. CD3Zeta, CD28, VHH and CD8α, and FcgIIα are used as signaling moieties, costimulating domain, antibody, and spacers, respectively. To investigate the influence of the ligation of spacers on the conformational structure of VHH, models of VHH were constructed. Molecular dynamics simulation was run to study the influence of the presence of spacers on the conformational changes in the binding sites of VHH. Root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation of critical segments in the binding site showed no noticeable differences with those in the native VHH. Results from molecular docking revealed that the presence of spacer FcgIIα causes an increasing effect on VHH with MUC1 interaction. Each of the constructs was transformed into the Jurkat E6.1. Expression analysis and evaluation of their functions were examined. The results showed good expression and function.

  20. Rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment for adult refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braendstrup, Peter; Bjerrum, Ole W; Nielsen, Ove J

    2005-01-01

    . Recent studies have shown that rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is useful in the treatment of these patients, with overall response rates of about 50%. Most published reports have included a small number patients including case reports. The present study reports the results...

  1. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Luciano Neves Santos

    Full Text Available The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6, demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies.

  2. Bioactivity assays and application of 125I labeled human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Pingping; Meng Zhiyun; Dou Guifang; Wu Yingliang; Wang Minwei

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the bioactivity and application of 125 I labeled human mouse chimeric monoclonal SM03, SM03 was labeled with 125 I using Indogen method. The labeled mixture was purified by Sephacryl S-300 HR separation chromospectry. The purity and concentration of separated fractions were determined by HPLC and Protein Assay Kit, respectively. Competitive binding method and ELISA method were used for bioactivity assays. 125 I-SM03 was applied to screen cell lines which express the most abundant CD22 antigen. The purity and recovery of 125 I-SM03 were >99% and >47%, respectively. The bioactivity of 125 I- SM03 and SM03 hasn't significant difference in statistics. Ramos cell line had the strongest special radioactivity when 125 I-SM03 bound with in Raji, Daudi and Ramos cell lines. Indogen method is a good way to label Human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody SM03 and the label will not affect the activity of SM03. The 125 I-SM03 not only can be used for detect agent, but also may be put into market for NHL therapy. (authors)

  3. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  4. Close-up of the alpha-1,3-Gal epitope as defined by a monoclonal chimeric IgE and human serum using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    of an alpha-Gal-specific murine IgM antibody was employed to construct chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies. Reactivity and specificity of the resulting antibodies were assessed by means of ELISA and receptor binding studies. Using defined carbohydrates, interaction of the IgE and human serum was assessed...... by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and STD NMR analyses. The alpha-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference...

  5. Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive effects of chimeric peptides consisting of a micro-opioid receptor agonist and an ORL1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Susumu; Ito, Risa; Nishiyama, Miharu; Kubo, Mai; Matsushima, Tomoko; Minamisawa, Motoko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2007-07-01

    Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive activities of chimeric peptides linked by spacers were investigated. The peptides consisted of the micro-opioid receptor ligand dermorphin (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH(2)) or its analog YRFB (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-betaAla-NH(2)) linked to the ORL1 receptor ligand Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-NH(2) (Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2)). All chimeric peptides were found to possess high receptor binding affinities for both micro-opioid and ORL1 receptors in mouse brain membranes although their binding affinities for both receptors in spinal membranes were significantly lower. Among them, chimeric peptide 2, which consists of dermorphin and Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2) connected by a long spacer, had the highest binding affinity towards both receptors. In the tail-flick test following intrathecal (i.t.) administration to mice, all chimeric peptides showed potent and dose-dependent antinociceptive activities with an ED(50) of 1.34-4.51 (pmol/mouse), nearly comparable to dermorphin alone (ED(50); 1.08 pmol/mouse). In contrast to their micro-opioid receptor binding profiles, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the chimeric peptides resulted in much less potent antinociceptive activity (ED(50) 5.55-100peptides, and the regulation of mu-opioid receptor-mediated antinociception in brain. The present chimeric peptides may be useful as pharmacological tools for studies on micro-opioid receptor/ORL1 receptor heterodimers.

  6. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  7. Beyond Antibodies as Binding Partners: The Role of Antibody Mimetics in Bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Yang, Yu-Ping; Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-06-12

    The emergence of novel binding proteins or antibody mimetics capable of binding to ligand analytes in a manner analogous to that of the antigen-antibody interaction has spurred increased interest in the biotechnology and bioanalytical communities. The goal is to produce antibody mimetics designed to outperform antibodies with regard to binding affinities, cellular and tumor penetration, large-scale production, and temperature and pH stability. The generation of antibody mimetics with tailored characteristics involves the identification of a naturally occurring protein scaffold as a template that binds to a desired ligand. This scaffold is then engineered to create a superior binder by first creating a library that is then subjected to a series of selection steps. Antibody mimetics have been successfully used in the development of binding assays for the detection of analytes in biological samples, as well as in separation methods, cancer therapy, targeted drug delivery, and in vivo imaging. This review describes recent advances in the field of antibody mimetics and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, specifically in diagnostics and other analytical methods.

  8. Role of the Antigen Capture Pathway in the Induction of a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Anthrax Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Verma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin neutralizing antibodies represent the major mode of protective immunity against a number of toxin-mediated bacterial diseases, including anthrax; however, the cellular mechanisms that lead to optimal neutralizing antibody responses remain ill defined. Here we show that the cellular binding pathway of anthrax protective antigen (PA, the binding component of anthrax toxin, determines the toxin neutralizing antibody response to this antigen. PA, which binds cellular receptors and efficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, was found to elicit robust anti-PA IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses. In contrast, a receptor binding-deficient mutant of PA, which does not bind receptors and only inefficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by macropinocytosis, elicited very poor antibody responses. A chimeric protein consisting of the receptor binding-deficient PA mutant tethered to the binding subunit of cholera toxin, which efficiently enters cells using the cholera toxin receptor rather than the PA receptor, elicited an anti-PA IgG antibody response similar to that elicited by wild-type PA; however, the chimeric protein elicited a poor toxin neutralizing antibody response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the antigen capture pathway can dictate the magnitudes of the total IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses to PA as well as the ratio of the two responses.

  9. Induction of HIV neutralizing antibodies against the MPER of the HIV envelope protein by HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based DNA and VLP vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ye

    Full Text Available Several conserved neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the HIV Env protein and among these, the MPER of gp41 has received great attention and is widely recognized as a promising target. However, little success has been achieved in eliciting MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by a number of different vaccine strategies. We investigated the ability of HA/gp41 chimeric protein-based vaccines, which were designed to enhance the exposure of the MPER in its native conformation, to induce MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies. In characterization of the HA/gp41 chimeric protein, we found that by mutating an unpaired Cys residue (Cys-14 in its HA1 subunit to a Ser residue, the modified chimeric protein HA-C14S/gp41 showed increased reactivity to a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody against HA and formed more stable trimers in VLPs. On the other hand, HA-C14S/gp41 and HA/gp41 chimeric proteins expressed on the cell surfaces exhibited similar reactivity to monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of guinea pigs using the HA-C14S/gp41 DNA or VLP vaccines induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 as well as to a peptide corresponding to a segment of MPER at higher levels than immunization by standard HIV VLPs. Further, sera from vaccinated guinea pigs were found to exhibit HIV neutralizing activities. Moreover, sera from guinea pigs vaccinated by HA-C14S/gp41 DNA and VLP vaccines but not the standard HIV VLPs, were found to neutralize HIV pseudovirions containing a SIV-4E10 chimeric Env protein. The virus neutralization could be blocked by a MPER-specific peptide, thus demonstrating induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies by this novel vaccine strategy. These results show that induction of MPER-specific HIV neutralizing antibodies can be achieved through a rationally designed vaccine strategy.

  10. Minor human antibody response to a mouse and chimeric monoclonal antibody after a single i.v. infusion in ovarian carcinoma patients: a comparison of five assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; van Kamp, G. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')2 (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3 mg).

  11. Minor displacements in the insertion site provoke major differences in the induction of antibody responses by chimeric parvovirus-like particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rueda, P.; Hurtado, A.; del Barrio, M.

    1999-01-01

    inserted into these positions was well recognized by the specific monoclonal antibody C3 by immunoelectron microscopy. BALB/c mice immunized with these chimeric C3:B CPV:VLPs were able to elicit an strong neutralizing antibody response (>3 log(10) units) against poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain...

  12. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  13. Antibody-Based Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nurit Becker; Itai Benhar

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based immunotoxins comprise an important group in targeted cancer therapeutics. These chimeric proteins are a form of biological guided missiles that combine a targeting moiety with a potent effector molecule. The targeting moiety is mostly a monoclonal antibody (MAb) or a recombinant antibody-based fragment that confers target specificity to the immunotoxin. The effector domain is a potent protein toxin of bacterial or plant origin, which, following binding to the target cells, unde...

  14. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  15. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Laverde, Diana; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Muller, Cécile; Bernay, Benoit; Benachour, Abdellah; Hartke, Axel; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens. We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72%) between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm,) and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm). These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens. Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier proteins

  16. Development of mPMab-1, a Mouse-Rat Chimeric Antibody Against Mouse Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Ichii, Osamu; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is used as a lymphatic endothelial marker. We previously established clone PMab-1 of rat IgG 2a as a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) against mouse PDPN. PMab-1 is also very sensitive in immunohistochemical analysis; however, rat mAbs seem to be unfavorable for pathologists because anti-mouse IgG and anti-rabbit IgG are usually used as secondary antibodies in commercially available kits for immunohistochemical analysis. In this study, we develop a mouse-rat chimeric antibody, mPMab-1 of mouse IgG 2a , which was derived from rat PMab-1 mAb. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that mPMab-1 detects podocytes of the kidney, lymphatic endothelial cells of the colon, and type I alveolar cells of the lung. Importantly, mPMab-1 is more sensitive than PMab-1. This conversion strategy from rat mAb to mouse mAb could be applicable to other mAbs.

  17. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Patrycja J.; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J.; Nara, Peter L.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization. PMID:24725950

  18. Combined roles of human IgG subclass, alternative complement pathway activation, and epitope density in the bactericidal activity of antibodies to meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    Meningococcal vaccines containing factor H binding protein (fHbp) are in clinical development. fHbp binds human fH, which enables the meningococcus to resist complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Previously, we found that chimeric human IgG1 mouse anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) had human complement-mediated bactericidal activity only if the MAb inhibited fH binding. Since IgG subclasses differ in their ability to activate complement, we investigated the role of human IgG subclasses on antibody functional activity. We constructed chimeric MAbs in which three different murine fHbp-specific binding domains were each paired with human IgG1, IgG2, or IgG3. Against a wild-type group B isolate, all three IgG3 MAbs, irrespective of their ability to inhibit fH binding, had bactericidal activity that was >5-fold higher than the respective IgG1 MAbs, while the IgG2 MAbs had the least activity. Against a mutant with increased fHbp expression, the anti-fHbp MAbs elicited greater C4b deposition (classical pathway) and greater bactericidal activity than against the wild-type strain, and the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater activity than the respective IgG3 MAbs. The bactericidal activity against both wild-type and mutant strains also was dependent, in part, on activation of the alternative complement pathway. Thus, at lower epitope density in the wild-type strain, the IgG3 anti-fHbp MAbs had the greatest bactericidal activity. At a higher epitope density in the mutant, the IgG1 MAbs had similar or greater bactericidal activity than the IgG3 MAbs, and the activity was less dependent on the inhibition of fH binding than at a lower epitope density.

  19. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV

  20. Enhanced acquired antibodies to a chimeric Plasmodium falciparum antigen; UB05-09 is associated with protective immunity against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinga, J N; Gamua, S D; Titanji, V P K

    2017-08-01

    It has been shown that covalently linking two antigens could enhance the immunogenicity of the chimeric construct. To prioritize such a chimera for malaria vaccine development, it is necessary to demonstrate that naturally acquired antibodies against the chimera are associated with protection from malaria. Here, we probe the ability of a chimeric construct of UB05 and UB09 antigens (UB05-09) to better differentiate between acquired immune protection and susceptibility to malaria. In a cross-sectional study, recombinant UB05-09 chimera and the constituent antigens were used to probe for specific antibodies in the plasma from children and adults resident in a malaria-endemic zone, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anti-UB05-09 antibody levels doubled that of its constituent antigens, UB09 and UB05, and this correlated with protection against malaria. The presence of enhanced UB05-09-specific antibody correlated with the absence of fever and parasitaemia, which are the main symptoms of malaria infection. The chimera is more effective in detecting and distinguishing acquired protective immunity against malaria than any of its constituents taken alone. Online B-cell epitope prediction tools confirmed the presence of B-cell epitopes in the study antigens. UB05-09 chimera is a marker of protective immunity against malaria that needs to be studied further. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Replacement of the V3 domain in the surface subunit of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein with the equivalent region of a T cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 results in a chimeric surface protein that efficiently binds to CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia A; Falcón, Juan I; Affranchino, José L

    2014-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the T cell-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) share the use of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for cell entry. To study this process further we developed a cell surface binding assay based on the expression of a soluble version of the FIV SU C-terminally tagged with the influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope (HA). The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by the following evidence: (1) the SU-HA protein bound to HeLa cells that express CXCR4 but not to MDCK cells that lack this chemokine receptor; and (2) binding of the SU-HA to HeLa cells was blocked by incubation with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 as well as with the anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12G5. Deletion of the V3 region from the FIV SU glycoprotein abolished its ability to bind CXCR4-expressing cells. Remarkably, substitution of the V3 domain of the FIV SU by the equivalent region of the HIV-1 NL4-3 isolate resulted in efficient cell surface binding of the chimeric SU protein to CXCR4. Moreover, transfection of MDCK cells with a plasmid encoding human CXCR4 allowed the association of the chimeric SU-HA glycoprotein to the transfected cells. Interestingly, while cell binding of the chimeric FIV-HIV SU was inhibited by an anti-HIV-1 V3 MAb, its association with CXCR4 was found to be resistant to AMD3100. Of note, the chimeric FIV-HIV Env glycoprotein was capable of promoting CXCR4-dependent cell-to-cell fusion.

  2. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuji; Nishihara, Tamahiro; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111 In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 111 In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. (author)

  3. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  4. Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding of an SH3 domain to proline-rich peptides using a chimeric fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, Adela M; van Nuland, Nico A J; Martin-Sierra, Francisco M; Martinez, Jose C; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2008-03-14

    A complete understanding of the thermodynamic determinants of binding between SH3 domains and proline-rich peptides is crucial to the development of rational strategies for designing ligands for these important domains. Recently we engineered a single-chain chimeric protein by fusing the alpha-spectrin Src homology region 3 (SH3) domain to the decapeptide APSYSPPPPP (p41). This chimera mimics the structural and energetic features of the interaction between SH3 domains and proline-rich peptides. Here we show that analysing the unfolding thermodynamics of single-point mutants of this chimeric fusion protein constitutes a very useful approach to deciphering the thermodynamics of SH3-ligand interactions. To this end, we investigated the contribution of each proline residue of the ligand sequence to the SH3-peptide interaction by producing six single Pro-Ala mutants of the chimeric protein and analysing their unfolding thermodynamics by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Structural analyses of the mutant chimeras by circular dichroism, fluorescence and NMR together with NMR-relaxation measurements indicate conformational flexibility at the binding interface, which is strongly affected by the different Pro-Ala mutations. An analysis of the DSC thermograms on the basis of a three-state unfolding model has allowed us to distinguish and separate the thermodynamic magnitudes of the interaction at the binding interface. The model assumes equilibrium between the "unbound" and "bound" states at the SH3-peptide binding interface. The resulting thermodynamic magnitudes classify the different proline residues according to their importance in the interaction as P2 approximately P7 approximately P10>P9 approximately P6>P8, which agrees well with Lim's model for the interaction between SH3 domains and proline-rich peptides. In addition, the thermodynamic signature of the interaction is the same as that usually found for this type of binding, with a strong enthalpy

  5. Development of radioactivity labelling method of new antibody by using the antibody engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Takeshi; Nakajima, Osamu; Saito, Yoshiro; Hachisuka, Akiko; Tanaka, Toichi; Sawada, Junichi

    1999-01-01

    With an aim to develop a method to produce labelled antibodies with low immunogenicity, two recombinant fusion proteins; scFv-His and scFv-MTβ were produced using gene engineering techniques. The former was constructed with scFv-antibody and histidine hexamer, a metal-chelated protein (or peptide). The latter was done with scFv-antibody and β-domain of metallothionein. Then, antigen-binding activity and metal-binding activity of these fusion proteins were determined using gel-filtration chromatography and ELISA. The main antigen-binding activity of scFv-His preparation was detected in a domain of about 25-30 kDa, which agreed with the peak of 29 kDa corresponding to the presumed molecular weight for the protein. Whereas the antigen-binding activity of scFv-MTβ was found in a domain of 30-35 kDa, which agreed with 32 kDa, the presumed molecular weight of scFv-MTβ. Gel-filtration chromatography of scFv-His preparation after the addition of Cu 2+ ion revealed an optical absorption at 280 nm and a Cu-peak near at 14 kDa. These results suggested that the metal affinity of the histidine-hexamer was too weak to chelate Cu 2+ in a solution. The chromatography of scFv-MTβ preparation added with Cd 2+ showed a peak of Cd appeared around a position of about 20 kDa but the peak was not coincident with that of the antigen-binding activity (ca. 30 kDa), suggesting that the present preparation of scFv-MTβ had no Cd-binding activity due to metal-exchange reaction. Based on these results, problems on the production of recombinant scFv-antibody fused with metal-binding domain of cystein-binding type or histidine-binding one were discussed. (M.N.)

  6. Binding-site analysis of opioid receptors using monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Structural relatedness between the variable region of anti-ligand antibodies and opioid binding sites allowed the generation of anti-idiotypic antibodies which recognized opioid receptors. The IgG 3 k antibodies which bound to opioid receptors were obtained when an anti-morphine antiserum was the idiotype. Both antibodies bound to opioid receptors, but only one of these blocked the binding of [ 3 H]naloxone. The antibody which did not inhibit the binding of [ 3 H]naloxone was itself displaced from the receptor by opioid ligands. The unique binding properties displayed by this antibody indicated that anti-idiotypic antibodies are not always a perfect image of the original ligand, and therefore may be more useful than typical ligands as probes for the receptor. An auto-anti-idiotypic technique was successfully used to obtain anti-opioid receptor antibodies. Another IgG 3 k antibody that blocked the binding of [ 3 H]naloxone to rat brain opioid receptors was obtained when a mouse was immunized with naloxone conjugated to bovine serum albumin. These data confirmed that an idiotype-anti-idiotype network which can generate an anti-receptor antibody normally functions when an opioid ligand is introduced into an animal in an immunogenic form

  7. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking...

  8. Useful oriented immobilization of antibodies on chimeric magnetic particles: direct correlation of biomacromolecule orientation with biological activity by AFM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciello, Marzia; Filice, Marco; Olea, David; Velez, Marisela; Guisan, José M; Mateo, Cesar

    2014-12-16

    The preparation and performance of a suitable chimeric biosensor based on antibodies (Abs) immobilized on lipase-coated magnetic particles by means of a standing orienting strategy are presented. This novel system is based on hydrophobic magnetic particles coated with modified lipase molecules able to orient and further immobilize different Abs in a covalent way without any previous site-selective chemical modification of biomacromolecules. Different key parameters attending the process were studied and optimized. The optimal preparation was performed using a controlled loading (1 nmol Ab g(-1) chimeric support) at pH 9 and a short reaction time to recover a biological activity of about 80%. AFM microscopy was used to study and confirm the Abs-oriented immobilization on lipase-coated magnetic particles and the final achievement of a highly active and recyclable chimeric immune sensor. This direct technique was demonstrated to be a powerful alternative to the indirect immunoactivity assay methods for the study of biomacromolecule-oriented immobilizations.

  9. Chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (infliximab in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the pathogenesis of psoriasis have provided opportunities to target key steps in the disease process. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a being crucial to the pathogenesis of psoriasis, monoclonal antibodies against this cytokine have proved useful in its treatment. Aim: To study the efficacy of chimeric monoclonal antibody to TNF-a (infliximab in Indian patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris. Materials and Methods: Three patients with recalcitrant psoriasis vulgaris were studied. Baseline haemogram, biochemical parameters, chest radiograph and Mantoux skin test were performed. A loading dose regimen of 5 mg/kg infliximab was administered at weeks 0, 2 and 6. PASI assessment, adverse drug event monitoring and laboratory assessments were carried out at 2-week intervals until week 10. Patients were followed up until week 22 for relapse. Results: Infliximab was well tolerated. The mean PASI was 25.4 at presentation and declined to 5.5 at 10 weeks. PASI 75 was attained at a mean of 9.6 weeks. Relapse occurred at a mean of 18.6 weeks after the first infusion. Conclusions: This study on Indian patients brings out the importance of cytokine-based therapies in psoriasis. Indigenous production could make these therapies a viable therapeutic option for psoriasis patients in the near future.

  10. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  11. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  12. Radiometric immunosorbent assay for the detection of anti-hormone-binding protein antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, E.A.; Dame, M.C.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    A radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) for the detection of monoclonal antibodies to hormone-binding proteins has been developed. The assay involves incubating hybridoma supernatants in microtiter wells that have been coated with goat anti-mouse IgG antibodies. Any mouse IgG in the test supernatant is thus specifically retained in the wells. Radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes are then incubated in the wells. The presence of anti-binding protein antibodies in the supernatant is indicated by specific retention of radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes in the wells. Crude antigen preparations, such as tissue homogenates, can be used to detect antibodies. The assay is capable of detecting antibody at concentrations 20 ng/ml (approx. 100 pM IgG). The RISA has been used successfully to screen for monoclonal antibodies to the intracellular receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 and should be useful for the detection of antibodies to ligand-binding proteins in general

  13. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  14. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Li, Lixin; Piatek, Marek J.; Fang, Xiaoyun; Mansour, Hicham; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  15. Anti-idiotypes against a monoclonal anti-haloperidol antibody bind to dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elazar, Z.; Kanety, H.; Schreiber, M.; Fuchs, S.

    1988-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies were raised in rabbits by immunization with a monoclonal anti-haloperidol antibody. Some of these anti-idiotypic antibodies bind in a concentration dependent manner to bovine striatal membranes. Following affinity purification, these antibodies inhibit haloperidol binding to striatal membranes and deplete [ 3 H]-spiperone binding sites from a solubilized preparation of striatal membranes. It is thus concluded that these anti-idiotypic antibodies are an internal image of haloperidol and as such can interact with D 2 -dopamine receptors

  16. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  17. Isolation and functional effects of monoclonal antibodies binding to thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, M M; Todd, M B; Malech, H L; Bertino, J R

    1985-01-29

    Monoclonal antibodies against electrophoretically pure thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells have been produced. Antibodies (M-TS-4 and M-TS-9) from hybridoma clones were shown by enzyme-linked immunoassay to recognize thymidylate synthase from a variety of human cell lines, but they did not bind to thymidylate synthase from mouse cell lines. The strongest binding of antibodies was observed to enzyme from HeLa cells. These two monoclonal antibodies bind simultaneously to different antigenic sites on thymidylate synthase purified from HeLa cells, as reflected by a high additivity index and results of cross-linked radioimmunoassay. Both monoclonal antibodies inhibit the activity of thymidylate synthase from human cell lines. The strongest inhibition was observed with thymidylate synthase from HeLa cells. Monoclonal antibody M-TS-9 (IgM subclass) decreased the rate of binding of [3H]FdUMP to thymidylate synthase in the presence of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate while M-TS-4 (IgG1) did not change the rate of ternary complex formation. These data indicate that the antibodies recognize different epitopes on the enzyme molecule.

  18. Engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial and titanium-binding functions to inhibit biofilm formation on Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Yang; Adayi, Aidina; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xin; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants have been commonly used in oral medicine. However, despite their widespread clinical application, these implants are susceptible to failure induced by microbial infection due to bacterial biofilm formation. Immobilization of chimeric peptides with antibacterial properties on the Ti surface may be a promising antimicrobial approach to inhibit biofilm formation. Here, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting three sequences (hBD-3-1/2/3) derived from human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) with Ti-binding peptide-l (TBP-l: RKLPDAGPMHTW) via a triple glycine (G) linker to modify Ti surfaces. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the properties of individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their binding activity toward the Ti surface. The antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy of the peptides against initial settlers, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), was evaluated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study cell membrane changes and the underlying antimicrobial mechanism. Compared with the other two peptides, TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3 presented stronger antibacterial activity and remained stable in saliva and serum. Therefore, it was chosen as the best candidate to modify Ti surfaces in this study. This peptide inhibited the growth of initial streptococci and biofilm formation on Ti surfaces with no cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 cells. Disruption of the integrity of bacterial membranes and decreased expression of adhesion protein genes from S. gordonii revealed aspects of the antibacterial mechanism of TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3. We conclude that engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial activity provide a potential solution for inhibiting biofilm formation on Ti surfaces to reduce or prevent the occurrence of peri

  19. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  20. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  1. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif...... vaccinated pigs were protected. This new chimeric pestivirus represents a C-strain based DIVA vaccine candidate that can be differentiated based on CSFV E2 specific antibodies....

  2. LAMP-1-chimeric DNA vaccines enhance the antibody response in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Barragán, Iang; Nozaki, Reiko; Hirono, Ikuo; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2017-08-01

    DNA vaccination is one method to protect farmed fish from viral and bacterial diseases. Chimeric antigens encoded by DNA vaccines have been shown to increase the resistance to viral diseases. Here, we sequenced the gene encoding lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, (JfLAMP-1) and assessed its use in a chimeric DNA vaccine fused with the major capsule protein (MCP) from red seabream iridovirus (RSIV). JfLAMP-1 cDNA has a length of 1248 bp encoding 415 aa, which contains transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. JfLAMP-1 is constitutively expressed in several tissues and its expression in spleen was upregulated following injection of formalin-killed cells (FKC) of Edwardsiella tarda. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that JfLAMP-1 is distributed in the small and large granules in the cytoplasm and groups close to the nucleus. The DNA encoding the luminal domain of JfLAMP-1 was replaced with the gene for the RSIV MCP, and the construct was cloned in an expression vector (pCIneo). Fish vaccinated with pCLAMP-MCP had significantly higher antibody levels than fish vaccinated with pCIneo vector harboring the MCP gene (p day 30 post-vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell surface expression system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of bacillus halodurans isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of a Bacillus halodurans isolate Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Bacillus halodurans Alk 36 xrhombus Ability to over-produce cell... for functionality of the His-tag for metal binding. Slide 13 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za PAGE gel showing over-production of chimeric poly-His flagellin proteins 66.2 kDa 45.0 kDa 31.0 kDa 1. LMW ladder 2. NC3 3. NHisC3 4. NC6 5...

  4. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M.; Persson, M.; Dongen, G.A.M.S. van; Jensen, H.J.; Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with 211 At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with 125 I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with 131 I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between 211 At-cMAb U36 and 125 I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31±2% vs 42.6±1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for 211 At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The 131 I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  5. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  6. Epitopes of MUC1 Tandem Repeats in Cancer as Revealed by Antibody Crystallography: Toward Glycopeptide Signature-Guided Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally O-glycosylated MUC1 tandem repeat glycopeptide epitopes expressed by multiple types of cancer have long been attractive targets for therapy in the race against genetic mutations of tumor cells. Glycopeptide signature-guided therapy might be a more promising avenue than mutation signature-guided therapy. Three O-glycosylated peptide motifs, PDTR, GSTA, and GVTS, exist in a tandem repeat HGVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPA, containing five O-glycosylation sites. The exact peptide and sugar residues involved in antibody binding are poorly defined. Co-crystal structures of glycopeptides and respective monoclonal antibodies are very few. Here we review 3 groups of monoclonal antibodies: antibodies which only bind to peptide portion, antibodies which only bind to sugar portion, and antibodies which bind to both peptide and sugar portions. The antigenicity of peptide and sugar portions of glyco-MUC1 tandem repeat were analyzed according to available biochemical and structural data, especially the GSTA and GVTS motifs independent from the most studied PDTR. Tn is focused as a peptide-modifying residue in vaccine design, to induce glycopeptide-binding antibodies with cross reactivity to Tn-related tumor glycans, but not glycans of healthy cells. The unique requirement for the designs of antibody in antibody-drug conjugate, bi-specific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptors are also discussed.

  7. Novel chimeric virus-like particles vaccine displaying MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain induce specific humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zheng, Xuexing; Gai, Weiwei; Wong, Gary; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zhang, Weijiao; Li, Nan; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Junfu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has continued spreading since its emergence in 2012 with a mortality rate of 35.6%, and is a potential pandemic threat. Prophylactics and therapies are urgently needed to address this public health problem. We report here the efficacy of a vaccine consisting of chimeric virus-like particles (VLP) expressing the receptor binding domain (RBD) of MERS-CoV. In this study, a fusion of the canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 structural protein gene with the RBD of MERS-CoV can self-assemble into chimeric, spherical VLP (sVLP). sVLP retained certain parvovirus characteristics, such as the ability to agglutinate pig erythrocytes, and structural morphology similar to CPV virions. Immunization with sVLP induced RBD-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. sVLP-specific antisera from these animals were able to prevent pseudotyped MERS-CoV entry into susceptible cells, with neutralizing antibody titers reaching 1: 320. IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-2 secreting cells induced by the RBD were detected in the splenocytes of vaccinated mice by ELISpot. Furthermore, mice inoculated with sVLP or an adjuvanted sVLP vaccine elicited T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 2 (Th2) cell-mediated immunity. Our study demonstrates that sVLP displaying the RBD of MERS-CoV are promising prophylactic candidates against MERS-CoV in a potential outbreak situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ChLpMab-23: Cancer-Specific Human-Mouse Chimeric Anti-Podoplanin Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity via Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Fujii, Yuki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-06-01

    Podoplanin is expressed in many cancers, including oral cancers and brain tumors. The interaction between podoplanin and its receptor C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to be involved in cancer metastasis and tumor malignancy. We previously established many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human podoplanin using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. LpMab-23 (IgG 1 , kappa), one of the mouse anti-podoplanin mAbs, was shown to be a CasMab. However, we have not shown the usefulness of LpMab-23 for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers. In this study, we first determined the minimum epitope of LpMab-23 and revealed that Gly54-Leu64 peptide, especially Gly54, Thr55, Ser56, Glu57, Asp58, Arg59, Tyr60, and Leu64 of podoplanin, is a critical epitope of LpMab-23. We further produced human-mouse chimeric LpMab-23 (chLpMab-23) and investigated whether chLpMab-23 exerts antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antitumor activity. In flow cytometry, chLpMab-23 showed high sensitivity against a podoplanin-expressing glioblastoma cell line, LN319, and an oral cancer cell line, HSC-2. chLpMab-23 also showed ADCC activity against podoplanin-expressing CHO cells (CHO/podoplanin). In xenograft models with HSC-2 and CHO/podoplanin, chLpMab-23 exerts antitumor activity using human natural killer cells, indicating that chLpMab-23 could be useful for antibody therapy against podoplanin-expressing cancers.

  9. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  10. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies that bind the renal Na+/glucose symport system. 1. Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.S.R.; Lever, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Phlorizin is a specific, high-affinity ligand that binds the active site of the Na + /glucose symporter by a Na + -dependent mechanism but is not itself transported across the membrane. The authors have isolated a panel of monoclonal antibodies that influence high-affinity, Na + -dependent phlorizin binding to pig renal brush border membranes. Antibodies were derived after immunization of mice either with highly purified renal brush border membranes or with apical membranes purified from LLC-PK 1 , a cell line of pig renal proximal tubule origin. Antibody 11A3D6, an IgG/sub 2b/, reproducibly stimulated Na + -dependent phlorizin binding whereas antibody 18H10B12, an IgM, strongly inhibited specific binding. These effects were maximal after 30-min incubation and exhibited saturation at increased antibody concentrations. Antibodies did not affect Na + -dependent sugar uptake in vesicles but significantly prevented transport inhibition by bound phlorizin. Antibodies recognized a 75-kDa antigen identified by Western blot analysis of brush border membranes, and a 75-kDa membrane protein could be immunoprecipitated by 18H10B12. These properties, provide compelling evidence that the 75-kDa antigen recognized by these antibodies is a component of the renal Na + /glucose symporter

  12. Analytical characterization of ch14.18: a mouse-human chimeric disialoganglioside-specific therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Gopalan; Kallarakal, Abraham T; Michiel, Dennis; Yang, Xiaoyi; Saptharish, Nirmala; Jiang, Hengguang; Giardina, Steve; Gilly, John; Mitra, George

    2012-01-01

    Ch14.18 is a mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibody to the disialoganglioside (GD2) glycolipid. In the clinic, this antibody has been shown to be effective in the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma, either alone or in combination therapy. Extensive product characterization is a prerequisite to addressing the potential issues of product variability associated with process changes and manufacturing scale-up. Charge heterogeneity, glycosylation profile, molecular state and aggregation, interaction (affinity) with Fcγ receptors and functional or biological activities are a few of the critical characterization assays for assessing product comparability for this antibody. In this article, we describe the in-house development and qualification of imaged capillary isoelectric focusing to assess charge heterogeneity, analytical size exclusion chromatography with online static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), batch mode DLS for aggregate detection, biosensor (surface plasmon resonance)-based Fcγ receptor antibody interaction kinetics, N-glycoprofiling with PNGase F digestion, 2-aminobenzoic acid labeling and high performance liquid chromatography and N-glycan analysis using capillary electrophoresis. In addition, we studied selected biological activity assays, such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The consistency and reproducibility of the assays are established by comparing the intra-day and inter-day assay results. Applications of the methodologies to address stability or changes in product characteristics are also reported. The study results reveal that the ch14.18 clinical product formulated in phosphate-buffered saline at a concentration of 5 mg/ml and stored at 2-8°C is stable for more than five years.

  13. FcγRII-binding Centyrins mediate agonism and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis when fused to an anti-OX40 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Whitaker, Brian; Derebe, Mehabaw G; Chiu, Mark L

    2018-04-01

    Immunostimulatory antibodies against the tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. The agonism activity of such antibodies depends on crosslinking to Fc gamma RIIB receptor (FcγRIIB) to enable the antibody multimerization that drives TNFR activation. Previously, Fc engineering was used to enhance the binding of such antibodies to Fcγ receptors. Here, we report the identification of Centyrins as alternative scaffold proteins with binding affinities to homologous FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but not to other types of Fcγ receptors. One Centyrin, S29, was engineered at distinct positions of an anti-OX40 SF2 antibody to generate bispecific and tetravalent molecules named as mAbtyrins. Regardless of the position of S29 on the SF2 antibody, SF2-S29 mAbtyrins could bind FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA specifically while maintaining binding to OX40 receptors. In a NFκB reporter assay, attachment of S29 Centyrin molecules at the C-termini, but not the N-termini, resulted in SF2 antibodies with increased agonism owing to FcγRIIB crosslinking. The mAbtyrins also showed agonism in T-cell activation assays with immobilized FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but this activity was confined to mAbtyrins with S29 specifically at the C-termini of antibody heavy chains. Furthermore, regardless of the position of the molecule, S29 Centyrin could equip an otherwise Fc-silent antibody with antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity without affecting the antibody's intrinsic antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In summary, the appropriate adoption FcγRII-binding Centyrins as functional modules represents a novel strategy to engineer therapeutic antibodies with improved functionalities.

  14. Chimeric bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody mediates lysis of tumor cells expressing the folate-binding protein (MOv18) and displays decreased immunogenicity in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Warnaar, S. O.; Sanborn, D.; Lamers, C. H.; Bolhuis, R. L.; Litvinov, S. V.; Zurawski, V. R.; Coney, L. R.

    1997-01-01

    The bispecific OC/TR monoclonal antibody (mAb) cross-links the CD3 molecule on T cells with the human folate-binding protein (FBP), which is highly expressed on nonmucinous ovarian carcinomas. Clinical trials of patients with ovarian carcinoma with the OC/TR mAb have shown some complete and partial

  15. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Persson, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden); Dongen, G.A.M.S. van [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensen, H.J. [Righshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V. [Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with {sup 211}At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with {sup 125}I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with {sup 131}I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 and {sup 125}I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31{+-}2% vs 42.6{+-}1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for {sup 211}At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The {sup 131}I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  16. Endothelial chimerism and vascular sequestration protect pancreatic islet grafts from antibody-mediated rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chia; Pouliquen, Eric; Broisat, Alexis; Andreata, Francesco; Racapé, Maud; Bruneval, Patrick; Kessler, Laurence; Ahmadi, Mitra; Bacot, Sandrine; Saison-Delaplace, Carole; Marcaud, Marina; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Loupy, Alexandre; Villard, Jean; Demuylder-Mischler, Sandrine; Morelon, Emmanuel; Tsai, Meng-Kun; Kolopp-Sarda, Marie-Nathalie; Koenig, Alice; Mathias, Virginie; Ghezzi, Catherine; Dubois, Valerie; Defrance, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Humoral rejection is the most common cause of solid organ transplant failure. Here, we evaluated a cohort of 49 patients who were successfully grafted with allogenic islets and determined that the appearance of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) did not accelerate the rate of islet graft attrition, suggesting resistance to humoral rejection. Murine DSAs bound to allogeneic targets expressed by islet cells and induced their destruction in vitro; however, passive transfer of the same DSAs did not affect islet graft survival in murine models. Live imaging revealed that DSAs were sequestrated in the circulation of the recipients and failed to reach the endocrine cells of grafted islets. We used murine heart transplantation models to confirm that endothelial cells were the only accessible targets for DSAs, which induced the development of typical microvascular lesions in allogeneic transplants. In contrast, the vasculature of DSA-exposed allogeneic islet grafts was devoid of lesions because sprouting of recipient capillaries reestablished blood flow in grafted islets. Thus, we conclude that endothelial chimerism combined with vascular sequestration of DSAs protects islet grafts from humoral rejection. The reduced immunoglobulin concentrations in the interstitial tissue, confirmed in patients, may have important implications for biotherapies such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:29202467

  17. Kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18 IgG and F(ab')2 fragments in ovarian carcinoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; den Hollander, W.; Vermorken, J. B.; Molthoff, C. J.; Burger, C. W.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Baak, J. P.; Roos, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma received i.v. injection with a combination of radiolabeled intact IgG (1 mg) and F(ab')2 fragments (1 mg) of the chimeric monoclonal antibody MOv18, each form labeled with 1.85 MBq 131I or 125I. Laparotomy was performed either 2 or 6 days

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of 131I-labeled F(ab')2 fragments of the chimeric monoclonal antibody G250: preclinical and clinical pilot studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical and animal studies of chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 (moAb cG250) for the targeting of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), to date, have been with the intact IgG form. To determine whether F(ab')2 fragments are more suited for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) than intact IgG,

  19. Chimeric cellulase matrix for investigating intramolecular synergism between non-hydrolytic disruptive functions of carbohydrate-binding modules and catalytic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuguo; Tang, Rentao; Tao, Jin; Wang, Xiaonan; Zheng, Baisong; Feng, Yan

    2012-08-24

    The conversion of renewable cellulosic biomass is of considerable interest for the production of biofuels and materials. The bottleneck in the efficient conversion is the compactness and resistance of crystalline cellulose. Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which disrupt crystalline cellulose via non-hydrolytic mechanisms, are expected to overcome this bottleneck. However, the lack of convenient methods for quantitative analysis of the disruptive functions of CBMs have hindered systematic studies and molecular modifications. Here we established a practical and systematic platform for quantifying and comparing the non-hydrolytic disruptive activities of CBMs via the synergism of CBMs and a catalytic module within designed chimeric cellulase molecules. Bioinformatics and computational biology were also used to provide a deeper understanding. A convenient vector was constructed to serve as a cellulase matrix into which heterologous CBM sequences can be easily inserted. The resulting chimeric cellulases were suitable for studying disruptive functions, and their activities quantitatively reflected the disruptive functions of CBMs on crystalline cellulose. In addition, this cellulase matrix can be used to construct novel chimeric cellulases with high hydrolytic activities toward crystalline cellulose.

  20. Chimeric Cellulase Matrix for Investigating Intramolecular Synergism between Non-hydrolytic Disruptive Functions of Carbohydrate-binding Modules and Catalytic Hydrolysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuguo; Tang, Rentao; Tao, Jin; Wang, Xiaonan; Zheng, Baisong; Feng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of renewable cellulosic biomass is of considerable interest for the production of biofuels and materials. The bottleneck in the efficient conversion is the compactness and resistance of crystalline cellulose. Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which disrupt crystalline cellulose via non-hydrolytic mechanisms, are expected to overcome this bottleneck. However, the lack of convenient methods for quantitative analysis of the disruptive functions of CBMs have hindered systematic studies and molecular modifications. Here we established a practical and systematic platform for quantifying and comparing the non-hydrolytic disruptive activities of CBMs via the synergism of CBMs and a catalytic module within designed chimeric cellulase molecules. Bioinformatics and computational biology were also used to provide a deeper understanding. A convenient vector was constructed to serve as a cellulase matrix into which heterologous CBM sequences can be easily inserted. The resulting chimeric cellulases were suitable for studying disruptive functions, and their activities quantitatively reflected the disruptive functions of CBMs on crystalline cellulose. In addition, this cellulase matrix can be used to construct novel chimeric cellulases with high hydrolytic activities toward crystalline cellulose. PMID:22778256

  1. Effects of altered FcγR binding on antibody pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leabman, Maya K; Meng, Y Gloria; Kelley, Robert F; DeForge, Laura E; Cowan, Kyra J; Iyer, Suhasini

    2013-01-01

    Antibody interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), like FcγRIIIA, play a critical role in mediating antibody effector functions and thereby contribute significantly to the biologic and therapeutic activity of antibodies. Over the past decade, considerable work has been directed towards production of antibodies with altered binding affinity to FcγRs and evaluation of how the alterations modulate their therapeutic activity. This has been achieved by altering glycosylation status at N297 or by engineering modifications in the crystallizable fragment (Fc) region. While the effects of these modifications on biologic activity and efficacy have been examined, few studies have been conducted to understand their effect on antibody pharmacokinetics (PK). We present here a retrospective analysis in which we characterize the PK of three antibody variants with decreased FcγR binding affinity caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fc region (N297A, N297G, and L234A/L235A) and three antibody variants with increased FcγRIIIA binding affinity caused by afucosylation at N297, and compare their PK to corresponding wild type antibody PK in cynomolgus monkeys. For all antibodies, PK was examined at a dose that was known to be in the linear range. Since production of the N297A and N297G variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells results in aglycosylated antibodies that do not bind to FcγRs, we also examined the effect of expression of an aglycosylated antibody, without sequence change(s), in E. coli. All the variants demonstrated similar PK compared with that of the wild type antibodies, suggesting that, for the six antibodies presented here, altered FcγR binding affinity does not affect PK. PMID:24492343

  2. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Dina N; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2009-09-27

    Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTAs). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Wistar Furth (RT1A(u)) rats were conditioned with 600 to 300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), and 100 x 10(6) T-cell-depleted ACI (RT1A(abl)) bone marrow cells were transplanted on day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of antilymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4 to 6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-alphabeta-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving more than or equal to 300 cGy TBI plus anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap acceptors lost peripheral blood chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in the transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared with other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of peripheral blood chimerism. Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA, which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in the transplanted donor bone.

  3. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  4. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  5. In vitro and in vivo antivirus activity of an anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 rat-bovine chimeric antibody against bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Nishimori

    Full Text Available Programmed death-1 (PD-1, an immunoinhibitory receptor on T cells, is known to be involved in immune evasion through its binding to PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1 in many chronic diseases. We previously found that PD-L1 expression was upregulated in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV and that an antibody that blocked the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction reactivated T-cell function in vitro. Therefore, this study assessed its antivirus activities in vivo. First, we inoculated the anti-bovine PD-L1 rat monoclonal antibody 4G12 into a BLV-infected cow. However, this did not induce T-cell proliferation or reduction of BLV provirus loads during the test period, and only bound to circulating IgM+ B cells until one week post-inoculation. We hypothesized that this lack of in vivo effects was due to its lower stability in cattle and so established an anti-PD-L1 rat-bovine chimeric antibody (Boch4G12. Boch4G12 was able to bind specifically with bovine PD-L1, interrupt the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction, and activate the immune response in both healthy and BLV-infected cattle in vitro. Therefore, we experimentally infected a healthy calf with BLV and inoculated it intravenously with 1 mg/kg of Boch4G12 once it reached the aleukemic (AL stage. Cultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from the tested calf indicated that the proliferation of CD4+ T cells was increased by Boch4G12 inoculation, while BLV provirus loads were significantly reduced, clearly demonstrating that this treatment induced antivirus activities. Therefore, further studies using a large number of animals are required to support its efficacy for clinical application.

  6. Specific binding of antigen-antibody in physiological environments: Measurement, force characteristics and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xin; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lu; Xie, Shusen; Petti, Lucia; Wang, Shaomin; Wang, Fuyan

    2018-05-01

    The specific recognition of the antigen by the antibody is the crucial step in immunoassays. Measurement and analysis of the specific recognition, including the ways in which it is influenced by external factors are of paramount significance for the quality of the immunoassays. Using prostate-specific antigen (PSA)/anti-PSA antibody and α-fetoprotein (AFP) /anti-AFP antibody as examples, we have proposed a novel solution for measuring the binding forces between the antigens and their corresponding antibodies in different physiological environments by combining laminar flow control technology and optical tweezers technology. On the basis of the experimental results, the different binding forces of PSA/anti-PSA antibody and AFP/anti-AFP antibody in the same phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) environments are analysed by comparing the affinity constant of the two antibodies and the number of antigenic determinants of the two antigens. In different electrolyte environments, the changes of the binding force of antigens-antibodies are explained by the polyelectrolyte effect and hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, in different pH environments, the changes of binding forces of antigens-antibodies are attributed to the role of the denaturation of protein. The study aims to recognise the antigen-antibody immune mechanism, thus ensuring further understanding of the biological functions of tumour markers, and it promises to be very useful for the clinical diagnosis of early-stage cancer.

  7. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  8. Antigen-binding radioimmunoassays for human IgG antibodies to bovine ν-lactoglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.W.; Paganelli, R.; Levinsky, R.J.; Williams, A.

    1983-01-01

    A double antibody antigen-binding assay for the detection of human IgG antibodies to the bovine milk allergen ν-lactoglobulin is described. The levels of such antibodies in patients with established cows' milk protein intolerance were significantly higher than the levels observed in a healthy control group (P<0.01). The assay showed excellent correlation with a solid phase antigen binding assay (rsub(s) = 0.8, P<0.001). (Auth.)

  9. Antibody binding constants from Farr test and other radioimmunoassays. A theoretical and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Schalch, W.

    1980-01-01

    For the reaction of monovalently reacting antibody (116-700pIEF) with its antigen (streptococcal group A-variant polysaccharide), an apparent binding constant Ksub(a) was derived by the ammonium sulfate precipitation technique (Farr assay) which was 40 times larger than the true binding constant K = 10 6 M -1 determined by fluorescence titration and equilibrium dialysis. For monovalently reacting antibodies the time needed for re-equilibration of the binding reaction is short as compared to the time of ammonium sulfate incubation. A thermodynamic analysis was therefore performed for the case of complete equilibration of all components in solution and in the ammonium sulfate precipitate. It was found that in this limiting case Ksub(a)/K is equal to the ratio of the solubilities of the antibody and the antibody complex corrected by the activity coefficients of the components in the precipitate. For other antibody-antigen reactions in which the antibody reacts with both binding sites to the same antigen molecule, re-equilibration of the binding reaction in solution is much slower. For such systems a disturbance of the binding reaction by the precipitation is less likely and correct binding constants may be obtained by the Farr technique or other radioimmunoassays involving precipitation. (author)

  10. Effects of genetic engineering on the pharmacokinetics of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Goel, A.; Pavlinkova, G.; Beresford, G.; Booth, B.; Batra, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) may be considered 'magic bullets' due to their ability to recognize and eradicate malignant cells. MAbs, however, have practical limitations for their rapid application in the clinics. The structure of the antibody molecules can be engineered to modify functional domains such as antigen-binding sites and/or effectors functions. Advanced in genetic engineering have provided rapid progress the development of new immunoglobulin constructs of MAbs with defined research and therapeutic application. Recombinant antibody constructs are being engineered, such as human mouse chimeric, domain-dispositioned, domain-deleted, humanized and single-chain Fv fragments. Genetically-engineered antibodies differ in size and rate of catabolism. Pharmacokinetics studies show that the intact IgG (150 kD), enzymatically derived fragments Fab' (50 kD) and single chain Fv (28 kD) have different clearance rates. These antibody forms clear 50% from the blood pool in 2.1 days, 30 minutes and 10 minutes, respectively. Genetically-engineered antibodies make a new class of immunotherapeutic tracers for cancer treatment

  11. Chimeric Hemagglutinin Constructs Induce Broad Protection against Influenza B Virus Challenge in the Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermler, Megan E; Kirkpatrick, Ericka; Sun, Weina; Hai, Rong; Amanat, Fatima; Chromikova, Veronika; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-06-15

    Seasonal influenza virus epidemics represent a significant public health burden. Approximately 25% of all influenza virus infections are caused by type B viruses, and these infections can be severe, especially in children. Current influenza virus vaccines are an effective prophylaxis against infection but are impacted by rapid antigenic drift, which can lead to mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Here, we describe a broadly protective vaccine candidate based on chimeric hemagglutinins, consisting of globular head domains from exotic influenza A viruses and stalk domains from influenza B viruses. Sequential vaccination with these constructs in mice leads to the induction of broadly reactive antibodies that bind to the conserved stalk domain of influenza B virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated mice are protected from lethal challenge with diverse influenza B viruses. Results from serum transfer experiments and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays indicate that this protection is antibody mediated and based on Fc effector functions. The present data suggest that chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccination is a viable strategy to broadly protect against influenza B virus infection. IMPORTANCE While current influenza virus vaccines are effective, they are affected by mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Furthermore, the antiviral drug oseltamivir is less effective for treating influenza B virus infections than for treating influenza A virus infections. A vaccine that induces broad and long-lasting protection against influenza B viruses is therefore urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Production and immunogenicity of chimeric virus-like particles containing the spike glycoprotein of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lishan; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Genmei; Li, Ran; Liu, Qiliang; Shen, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Xue, Chunyi; Cao, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) poses a severe threat to the poultry industry and causes heavy economic losses worldwide. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infection and controlling the spread of IBV, but currently available inactivated and attenuated virus vaccines have some disadvantages. We developed a chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for IBV protection. The chimeric VLP was composed of matrix 1 protein from avian influenza H5N1 virus and a fusion protein neuraminidase (NA)/spike 1 (S1) that was generated by fusing IBV S1 protein to the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of NA protein of avian influenza H5N1 virus. The chimeric VLPs elicited significantly higher S1-specific antibody responses in intramuscularly immunized mice and chickens than inactivated IBV viruses. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher neutralization antibody levels than inactivated H120 virus in SPF chickens. Finally, the chimeric VLPs induced significantly higher IL-4 production in mice. These results demonstrate that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against IBV infection.

  13. Rifampicin-dependent antibodies bind a similar or identical epitope to glycoprotein IX-specific quinine-dependent antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K.; Lopez, Jose A.; Gaudry, Leonie E.; Chong, Beng H.

    2000-01-01

    The drug-dependent antibody of a patient with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia was characterized using the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAIPA assay), flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation. The antibody was found to bind glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX but not GPIIb-IIIa because

  14. [Biological characteristics of a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Zhao-Jin; Shi, He-He; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Bido; Sun, Jing-Chen; Guo, Xiao-Feng

    2009-09-01

    To obtain a bivalence vaccine against canine rabies virus and canine parvovirus, a chimeric rabies virus expressing canine parvovirus VP2 protein was generated by the technique of reverse genetics. It was shown that the chimeric virus designated as HEP-Flury (VP2) grew well on BHK-21 cells and the VP2 gene could still be stably expressed after ten passages on BHK-21 cells. Experiments on the mice immunized with the chimeric virus HEP-Flury (VP2) demonstrated that specific antibodies against rabies virus and canine parvovirus were induced in immunized mice after vaccination with the live chimeric virus.

  15. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...... identify the mechanism behind this rather unusual paternally derived chimerism. This exceptional case illustrates that careful scrutiny of HLA-typing results may produce atypical conclusions. Clinically, the father is considered the best donor based on immunogenetics....

  16. Generation of chimeric bispecific G250/anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a tool to combat renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Coney, L. R.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) G250 binds to a tumour-associated antigen, expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been demonstrated to be a suitable target for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. A bispecific antibody having both G250 and anti-CD3 specificity can cross-link G250

  17. Radiolabeling and animal experimental studies of anti-breast cancer McAb 6C6 and mouse-human chimeric antibody 6C6CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhi; Hu Xiaoqian; Li Erqiu

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study bio-distribution and tumor absorption of anti breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 and its chimeric antibody 6C6-CHI. The modified Schwartz method was employed to label 6C6 and 6C6CHI with 99 Tc m . The labeled antibody was injected to mouse via tail vein and the blood clearance and whole body clearance were observed. Nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 were injected with 99 Tc m -labeled antibody and the bio-distribution was studied and imaged with γ-ray camera. The yield of the two labeled antibodies was more than 90% and their immunoactivities were more than 80%. The whole body eliminated half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6 was 4.1h, and the half-times in blood were T α =0.55h and T β =12.42h respectively. The whole body half-time of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI was 4.28h and the half-times in blood were T α =0.98h and T β =12.42h respectively. The bio-distribution of nude mice bearing breast cancer MCF7 cells was as follows: the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (7.42±0.85) and (5.67±1.44) respectively at 23h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except kidney and the ID%/g of tumor and blood was (4.23±0.64) and (6.97±0.23) respectively at 23 h after injection of 99 Tc m -6C6CHI. The T/NT (tumor to non tumor) ratios were all more than 1.0 except blood and kidney. The γ imaging results showed that the tumor was imaged clearly at 24h after injection of radiolabeled antibodies and the other organs did not concentrate the antibodies except kidney. Anti-breast cancer monoclonal antibody 6C6 can be well located in tumor. Although ID%/g of tumor of the chimeric antibody 6C6CHI was slightly lower than that of 6C6 antibody, and ID%/g of blood was higher than that of 6C6, the tumor imaging of 6C6-CHI was also clear

  18. 77 FR 62520 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... Exclusive License: The Development of Anti- CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) for the Treatment of B... ``Anti-CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptors'' [HHS Ref. E-265-2011/0-US-01], and (b) U.S. Patent Application... CD22 on their cell surface using chimeric antigen receptors which contain the HA22 or BL22 antibody...

  19. Therapeutic efficacy of antibodies lacking Fcγ receptor binding against lethal dengue virus infection is due to neutralizing potency and blocking of enhancing antibodies [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS are life-threatening complications following infection with one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV. At present, no vaccine or antiviral therapies are available against dengue. Here, we characterized a panel of eight human or mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and their modified variants lacking effector function and dissected the mechanism by which some protect against antibody-enhanced lethal DENV infection. We found that neutralizing modified MAbs that recognize the fusion loop or the A strand epitopes on domains II and III of the envelope protein, respectively, act therapeutically by competing with and/or displacing enhancing antibodies. By analyzing these relationships, we developed a novel in vitro suppression-of-enhancement assay that predicts the ability of modified MAbs to act therapeutically against antibody-enhanced disease in vivo. These studies provide new insight into the biology of DENV pathogenesis and the requirements for antibodies to treat lethal DENV disease.

  20. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs. PMID:22925561

  1. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  2. Functional participation of a nifH-arsA2 chimeric fusion gene in arsenic reduction by Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2008-01-01

    The NifH (dimer) and ArsA proteins are structural homologs and share common motifs like nucleotide-binding domains, signal transduction domains and also possible similar metal center ligands. Given the similarity between two proteins, we investigated if the NifH protein from Azotobacter vinelandii could functionally substitute for the ArsA1 half of the ArsA protein of Escherichia coli. The chimeric NifH-ArsA2 protein was expressed and detected in the E. coli strain by Western blotting. Growth comparisons of E. coli strains containing plasmids encoding for complete ArsA, partial ArsA (ArsA2) or chimeric ArsA (NifH-ArsA2) in media with increasing sodium arsenite concentrations (0-5 mM) showed that the chimeric NifH-ArsA2 could substitute for the ArsA. This functional complementation demonstrated the strong conservation of essential domains that have been maintained in NifH and ArsA even after their divergence to perform varied functions

  3. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W. J.; Noort, Willy A. Noort

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody...... sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38- chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence......, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite...

  4. Clostridium difficile chimeric toxin receptor binding domain vaccine induced protection against different strains in active and passive challenge models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing-Hui; Glenn, Gregory; Flyer, David; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ye; Sullivan, Eddie; Wu, Hua; Cummings, James F; Elllingsworth, Larry; Smith, Gale

    2017-07-24

    Clostridium difficile is the number one cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. Historically, pathogenesis was attributed two homologous glucosylating toxins, toxin-A (TcdA) and toxin-B (TcdB). Over the past decade, however, highly virulent epidemic strains of C. difficile (B1/NAP1/027) have emerged and are linked to an increase in morbidity and mortality. Increased virulence is attributed to multiple factors including: increased production of A- and B-toxins; production of binary toxin (CDT); and the emergence of more toxic TcdB variants (TcdB (027) ). TcdB (027) is more cytotoxicity to cells; causes greater tissue damage and toxicity in animals; and is antigenically distinct from historical TcdB (TcdB (003) ). Broadly protective vaccines and therapeutic antibody strategies, therefore, may target TcdA, TcdB variants and CDT. To facilitate the generation of multivalent toxin-based C. difficile vaccines and therapeutic antibodies, we have generated fusion proteins constructed from the receptor binding domains (RBD) of TcdA, TcdB (003) , TcdB (027) and CDT. Herein, we describe the development of a trivalent toxin (T-toxin) vaccine (CDTb/TcdB (003) /TcdA) and quadravalent toxin (Q-toxin) vaccine (CDTb/TcB (003) /TcdA/TcdB (027) ) fusion proteins that retain the protective toxin neutralizing epitopes. Active immunization of mice or hamsters with T-toxin or Q-toxin fusion protein vaccines elicited the generation of toxin neutralizing antibodies to each of the toxins. Hamsters immunized with the Q-toxin vaccine were broadly protected against spore challenge with historical C. difficile 630 (toxinotype 0/ribotype 003) and epidemic NAP1 (toxinotype III/ribotype 027) strains. Fully human polyclonal antitoxin IgG was produced by immunization of transgenic bovine with these fusion proteins. In passive transfer studies, mice were protected against lethal toxin challenge. Hamsters treated with human antitoxin IgG were completely protected when

  5. The linker domain of poly(rC) binding protein 2 is a major determinant in poliovirus cap-independent translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean, Polen; Nguyen, Joseph H C; Semler, Bert L

    2008-09-01

    Poliovirus, a member of the enterovirus genus in the family Picornaviridae, is the causative agent of poliomyelitis. Translation of the viral genome is mediated through an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) encoded within the 5' noncoding region (5' NCR). IRES elements are highly structured RNA sequences that facilitate the recruitment of ribosomes for translation. Previous studies have shown that binding of a cellular protein, poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2), to a major stem-loop structure in the genomic 5' NCR is necessary for the translation of picornaviruses containing type I IRES elements, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and human rhinovirus. PCBP1, an isoform that shares approximately 90% amino acid identity to PCBP2, cannot efficiently stimulate poliovirus IRES-mediated translation, most likely due to its reduced binding affinity to stem-loop IV within the poliovirus IRES. The primary differences between PCBP1 and PCBP2 are found in the so-called linker domain between the second and third K-homology (KH) domains of these proteins. We hypothesize that the linker region of PCBP2 augments binding to poliovirus stem-loop IV RNA. To test this hypothesis, we generated six PCBP1/PCBP2 chimeric proteins. The recombinant PCBP1/PCBP2 chimeric proteins were able to interact with poliovirus stem-loop I RNA and participate in protein-protein interactions. We demonstrated that the PCBP1/PCBP2 chimeric proteins with the PCBP2 linker, but not with the PCBP1 linker, were able to interact with poliovirus stem-loop IV RNA, and could subsequently stimulate poliovirus IRES-mediated translation. In addition, using a monoclonal anti-PCBP2 antibody (directed against the PCBP2 linker domain) in mobility shift assays, we showed that the PCBP2 linker domain modulates binding to poliovirus stem-loop IV RNA via a mechanism that is not inhibited by the antibody.

  6. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  7. Immunoglobulin classes, metal binding proteins, and trace metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , IgA and IgM), metal binding proteins (Transferrin, Caeruloplasmin, Alpha-2- Macroglobulin and Haptoglobin) and nutritionally essential trace metals/heavy metals (Zn, Fe, Se, Cu, Mg, Cd and Pb) in Nigerian cassava processors using single ...

  8. Generation of anti-idiotype antibodies for application in clinical immunotherapy laboratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanqi; Panousis, Con; Smyth, Fiona E; Murphy, Roger; Wirth, Veronika; Cartwright, Glenn; Johns, Terrance G; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    The chimeric monoclonal antibody ch806 specifically targets the tumor-associated mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (de 2-7EGFR or EGFRVIII) and is currently under investigation for its potential use in cancer therapy. The humanised monoclonal antibody hu3S193 specifically targets the Lewis Y epithelial antigen and is currently in Phase I clinical trials in patients with advanced breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. To assist the clinical evaluation of ch806 and hu3S193, laboratory assays are required to monitor their serum pharmacokinetics and quantitate any immune responses to the antibodies. Mice immunized with ch806 or hu3S193 were used to generate hybridomas producing antibodies with specific binding to ch806 or hu3S193 and competitive for antigen binding. These anti-idiotype antibodies (designated Ludwig Melbourne Hybridomas, LMH) were investigated as reagents suitable for use as positive controls for HAHA or HACA analyses and for measuring hu3S193 or ch806 in human serum. Anti-idiotypes with the ability to concurrently bind two target antibody molecules were identified, which enabled the development of highly reproducible, sensitive, specific ELISA assays for determining serum concentrations of hu3S193 and ch806 with a 3 ng/mL limit of quantitation using LMH-3 and LMH-12, respectively. BIAcore analyses determined high apparent binding affinity for both idiotypes: LMH-3 binding immobilized hu3S193, Ka = 4.76 x 10(8) M(-1); LMH-12 binding immobilised ch806, Ka = 1.74 x 10(9) M(-1). Establishment of HAHA or HACA analysis of sera samples using BIAcore was possible using LMH-3 and LMH-12 as positive controls for quantitation of immune responses to hu3S193 or ch806 in patient sera. These anti-idiotypes could also be used to study the penetrance and binding of ch806 or hu3S193 to tumor cells through immunohistochemical analysis of tumor biopsies. The generation of anti-idiotype antibodies capable of concurrently binding a target antibody on each variable

  9. Metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies, wherein the metal is an α emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansow, O.A.; Strand, M.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of manufacturing and purifying metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies are described, wherein the chelated metal emits alpha radiation. The conjugates are suited for therapeutic uses being substantially free of nonchelated radiometal. (author)

  10. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Alonso-Camino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs. The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2 bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR and the selection context (cell synapse, which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells.

  11. Function-blocking antibodies to human vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Christopher M; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena; Nieminen, Antti; Merinen, Marika; Stolen, Craig M; Armour, Kathryn; Smith, David J; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Clark, Michael R

    2005-11-01

    Human vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a homodimeric 170-kDa sialoglycoprotein that is expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and functions as a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and as an adhesion molecule. Blockade of VAP-1 has been shown to reduce leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting that VAP-1 is a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy. In this study we have constructed mouse-human chimeric antibodies by genetic engineering in order to circumvent the potential problems involved in using murine antibodies in man. Our chimeric anti-VAP-1 antibodies, which were designed to lack Fc-dependent effector functions, bound specifically to cell surface-expressed recombinant human VAP-1 and recognized VAP-1 in different cell types in tonsil. Furthermore, the chimeric antibodies prevented leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in vitro and in vivo. Hence, these chimeric antibodies have the potential to be used as a new anti-inflammatory therapy.

  12. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer......Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance......) can be employed as a highly useful tool to characterize the inhibitory mechanism of specific antagonist antibodies. Two inhibitory antibodies against uPAR, mAb R3 and mAb R5, were shown to exhibit competitive and non-competitive inhibition, respectively, of ligand binding to the receptor. The former...

  13. Distance between two binding sites of the same antibody molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cser, L.; Gladkikh, I.A.; Ostanevich, Y.M.; Franek, F.; Novotny, J.; Nezlin, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering experiments are reported, aimed at determining the distance between the two binding sites of the same antibody molecule employing complexes of anti-Dnp antibody with an antigenically univalent, high molecular weight ligand. Although the distance values could be determined only with a large statistical error, the data allowed the conclusion that the geometrical parameters of the complexes formed with the early (i.e., precipitating) antibody are significantly different from those of the complexes formed with the late (i.e, non-precipitating) antibody. The data suggest that the precipitating antibody complexed with a high molecular weight antigen assumes an extended shape with an antigen to antigen distance of 35.8 +- 1.3 nm. (Auth.)

  14. Heparin-independent, PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to platelets: implications for HIT pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Anand; Jones, Curtis G; Bougie, Daniel W; Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G; Wang, Demin; Aster, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies specific for platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes are the hallmark of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HIT), but many antibody-positive patients have normal platelet counts. The basis for this is not fully understood, but it is believed that antibodies testing positive in the serotonin release assay (SRA) are the most likely to cause disease. We addressed this issue by characterizing PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to intact platelets and found that most antibodies testing positive in the SRA, but none of those testing negative, bind to and activate platelets when PF4 is present without any requirement for heparin (P HIT antibodies recognize PF4 in a complex with heparin, only a subset of these antibodies recognize more subtle epitopes induced in PF4 when it binds to CS, the major platelet glycosaminoglycan. Antibodies having this property could explain "delayed HIT" seen in some individuals after discontinuation of heparin and the high risk for thrombosis that persists for weeks in patients recovered from HIT. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. [Immunoreactivity of chimeric proteins carrying poliovirus epitopes on the VP6 of rotavirus as a vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X-X; Zhao, B-X; Teng, Y-M; Xia, W-Y; Wang, J; Li, X-F; Liao, G-Y; Yang, С; Chen, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus and poliovirus continue to present significant risks and burden of disease to children in developing countries. Developing a combined vaccine may effectively prevent both illnesses and may be advantageous in terms of maximizing compliance and vaccine coverage at the same visit. Recently, we sought to generate a vaccine vector by incorporating multiple epitopes into the rotavirus group antigenic protein, VP6. In the present study, a foreign epitope presenting a system using VP6 as a vector was created with six sites on the outer surface of the vector that could be used for insertion of foreign epitopes, and three VP6-based PV1 epitope chimeric proteins were constructed. The chimeric proteins were confirmed by immunoblot, immunofluorescence assay, and injected into guinea pigs to analyze the epitope-specific humoral response. Results showed that these chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6F and -PV1 antibodies, and elicited antibodies against both proteins in guinea pigs. Antibodies against the chimeric proteins carrying PV1 epitopes neutralized rotavirus Wa and PV1 infection in vitro. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the use of VP6-based vectors as multiple-epitope delivery vehicles and the epitopes displayed in this form could be considered for development of epitope-based vaccines against rotavirus and poliovirus.

  16. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application

  17. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  18. Antibody-Based Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Becker

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-based immunotoxins comprise an important group in targeted cancer therapeutics. These chimeric proteins are a form of biological guided missiles that combine a targeting moiety with a potent effector molecule. The targeting moiety is mostly a monoclonal antibody (MAb or a recombinant antibody-based fragment that confers target specificity to the immunotoxin. The effector domain is a potent protein toxin of bacterial or plant origin, which, following binding to the target cells, undergoes internalization and causes cell death. Over time and following research progression, immunotoxins become better fitted to their purpose, losing immunogenic fragments and non-specific targeting moieties. Many immunotoxins have gone through clinical evaluation. Some of these have been shown to be active and work is progressing with them in the form of further clinical trials. Others, mostly developed in the previous century, failed to generate a response in patients, or even caused undesired side effects. This article reviews the antibody and protein-toxin based immunotoxins that were clinically evaluated up to the present day.

  19. Many Routes to an Antibody Heavy-Chain CDR3: Necessary, Yet Insufficient, for Specific Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Erasmus, M. Frank; Hraber, Peter; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2018-01-01

    Because of its great potential for diversity, the immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) is taken as an antibody molecule’s most important component in conferring binding activity and specificity. For this reason, HCDR3s have been used as unique identifiers to investigate adaptive immune responses in vivo and to characterize in vitro selection outputs where display systems were employed. Here, we show that many different HCDR3s can be identified within a target-specific antibody population after in vitro selection. For each identified HCDR3, a number of different antibodies bearing differences elsewhere can be found. In such selected populations, all antibodies with the same HCDR3 recognize the target, albeit at different affinities. In contrast, within unselected populations, the majority of antibodies with the same HCDR3 sequence do not bind the target. In one HCDR3 examined in depth, all target-specific antibodies were derived from the same VDJ rearrangement, while non-binding antibodies with the same HCDR3 were derived from many different V and D gene rearrangements. Careful examination of previously published in vivo datasets reveals that HCDR3s shared between, and within, different individuals can also originate from rearrangements of different V and D genes, with up to 26 different rearrangements yielding the same identical HCDR3 sequence. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the same HCDR3 can be generated by many different rearrangements, but that specific target binding is an outcome of unique rearrangements and VL pairing: the HCDR3 is necessary, albeit insufficient, for specific antibody binding. PMID:29568296

  20. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  1. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  2. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  3. Monoclonal antibody to the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Relationship between the immunoreactive and DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisen, L.P.; Reichman, M.E.; Thompson, E.B.; Gametchu, B.; Harrison, R.W.; Eisen, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The region of the glucocorticoid receptor that reacted with a monoclonal antibody (BUGR-1) was identified. In order to identify the immunoreactive region, the rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was subjected to limited proteolysis; immunoreactive fragments were identified by Western blotting. The monoclonal antibody reacted with both the undigested Mr approximately 97,000 receptor subunit and a Mr approximately 45,000 fragment containing the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains. Digestion by trypsin also produced two steroid-binding fragments of Mr approximately 27,000 and 31,000 which did not react with the antibody and an immunoreactive Mr approximately 16,000 fragment. This Mr approximately 16,000 fragment was shown to bind to DNA-cellulose, indicating that it contained a DNA-binding domain of the receptor. The undigested receptor must have steroid associated with it to undergo activation to a DNA-binding form. However, the Mr approximately 16,000 immunoreactive fragment binds to DNA-cellulose even if it is obtained by digestion of the steroid-free holoreceptor which does not itself bind to DNA

  4. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of

  5. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  6. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  7. Binding of monoclonal antibody to protein antigen in fluid phase or bound to solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S J

    1982-01-01

    Rat monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to fragment D (FgD) of human fibrinogen was used to characterize the direct binding of antibody to protein in solution or bound to solid supports. Purified IgG, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' were prepared from ascites fluid of hybridoma 104-14B which is a fusion product of spleen cells from a rat immunized with FgD and the mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of radioiodinated antibody preparations demonstrated the presence of hybrid immunoglobulin molecules, but only structures having rat heavy and rat light chains had active antibody combinig sites. The affinity constant for IgG as well as F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab', 6x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, was identical when tested using fluid phase antigen (/sup 125/I-labeled FgD). Affinity constants determined for direct binding of iodinated IgG using FgD immobilized on solid supports showed a slight dependence on the antigen concentration used in the measurement. These values ranged from 0.5x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at high antigen concentrations (1.3x10/sup -7/ M) to 9x10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ at low antigen concentration (1.3x10/sup -10/ M). Binding constants for F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab' gave similar results indicating that binding was homogeneous and univalent. The capacity of solid state antigen to bind antibody varied with the method used to bind FgD to the solid support. FgD bound directly to polystyrene plates was least efficient at binding labeled antibody; FgD bound to plates through intermediate carriers poly(L-lysine) was only slightly more efficient, while antigen bound to Sepharose beads by cyanogen bromide activation was the most active.

  8. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  9. HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE REDUCES BINDING OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES TO SYNCYTIOTROPHOBLASTS AND RESTORES ANNEXIN A5 EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Guller, Seth; Rand, Jacob H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 (AnxA5) anticoagulant shield has been posited to be a thrombogenic mechanism in the antiphospholipid syndrome. We recently showed that the antimalarial drug, hydroxychloroquine, dissociates antiphospholipid immune complexes and restores AnxA5 binding to planar phospholipid bilayer. Using quantitative immunoassays, we demonstrated similar effects on BeWo trophoblasts. We therefore investigated the effects of the drug on localization of AnxA5 in primary cultures of human placental syncytiotrophoblasts (SCTs). Study Laser confocal microscopy with computer-based morphometric analysis was used to localize AnxA5 and antiphospholipid antibodies on SCTs exposed to polyclonal and monoclonal antiphospholipid and control IgGs. Results Hydroxychloroquine reversed the effects of the antiphospholipid antibodies on the SCTs by markedly reducing IgG binding and restoring AnxA5 expression. Conclusions These results provide the first morphologic evidence for this effect of hydroxychloroquine on human placental SCTs and support the possibility of novel treatments that target antiphospholipid antibody binding. PMID:21871597

  10. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-02-17

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn't showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins.

  11. Direct observation of hematopoietic progenitor chimerism in fetal freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taponen Juhani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cattle twins are well known as blood chimeras. However, chimerism in the actual hematopoietic progenitor compartment has not been directly investigated. Here, we analyzed fetal liver of chimeric freemartin cattle by combining a new anti-bovine CD34 antibody and Y-chromosome specific in situ hybridization. Results Bull-derived CD34+ cells were detected in the liver of the female sibling (freemartin at 60 days gestation. The level of bull-derived CD34+ cells was lower in the freemartin than in its male siblings. Bull (Y+ and cow hematopoietic cells often occurred in separate clusters. Around clusters of Y+CD34+ cells, Y+CD34- cells were typically observed. The thymi were also strongly chimeric at 60 days of gestation. Conclusion The fetal freemartin liver contains clusters of bull-derived hematopoietic progenitors, suggesting clonal expansion and differentiation. Even the roots of the hematopoietic system in cattle twins are thus strongly chimeric from the early stages of fetal development. However, the hematopoietic seeding of fetal liver apparently started already before the onset of functional vascular anastomosis.

  12. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  13. Metal ion binding with dehydroannulenes – Plausible two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Theoretical investigations have been carried out at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory to study the binding ... Alkali metals; dehydroannulenes; binding energy; penetration barrier. 1. .... can be discriminated from larger metal ions by running.

  14. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  15. Binding of HIV-1 gp41-directed neutralizing and non-neutralizing fragment antibody binding domain (Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv antibodies to the ectodomain of gp41 in the pre-hairpin and six-helix bundle conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Louis

    Full Text Available We previously reported a series of antibodies, in fragment antigen binding domain (Fab formats, selected from a human non-immune phage library, directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR of HIV-1 gp41. Broadly neutralizing antibodies from that series bind to both the fully exposed N-HR trimer, representing the pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41, and to partially-exposed N-HR helices within the context of the gp41 six-helix bundle. While the affinities of the Fabs for pre-hairpin intermediate mimetics vary by only 2 to 20-fold between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, differences in inhibition of viral entry exceed three orders of magnitude. Here we compare the binding of neutralizing (8066 and non-neutralizing (8062 antibodies, differing in only four positions within the CDR-H2 binding loop, in Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv formats, to several pre-hairpin intermediate and six-helix bundle constructs of gp41. Residues 56 and 58 of the mini-antibodies are shown to be crucial for neutralization activity. There is a large differential (≥ 150-fold in binding affinity between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to the six-helix bundle of gp41 and binding to the six-helix bundle does not involve displacement of the outer C-terminal helices of the bundle. The binding stoichiometry is one six-helix bundle to one Fab or three ScFvs. We postulate that neutralization by the 8066 antibody is achieved by binding to a continuum of states along the fusion pathway from the pre-hairpin intermediate all the way to the formation of the six-helix bundle, but prior to irreversible fusion between viral and cellular membranes.

  16. Mining Naïve Rabbit Antibody Repertoires by Phage Display for Monoclonal Antibodies of Therapeutic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haiyong; Nerreter, Thomas; Chang, Jing; Qi, Junpeng; Li, Xiuling; Karunadharma, Pabalu; Martinez, Gustavo J; Fallahi, Mohammad; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Beerli, Roger R; Grawunder, Ulf; Hudecek, Michael; Rader, Christoph

    2017-09-15

    Owing to their high affinities and specificities, rabbit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated value and potential primarily as basic research and diagnostic reagents, but, in some cases, also as therapeutics. To accelerate access to rabbit mAbs bypassing immunization, we generated a large naïve rabbit antibody repertoire represented by a phage display library encompassing >10 billion independent antibodies in chimeric rabbit/human Fab format and validated it by next-generation sequencing. Panels of rabbit mAbs selected from this library against two emerging cancer targets, ROR1 and ROR2, revealed high diversity, affinity, and specificity. Moreover, ROR1- and ROR2-targeting rabbit mAbs demonstrated therapeutic utility as components of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells, further corroborating the value of the naïve rabbit antibody library as a rich and virtually unlimited source of rabbit mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A radioisotope dilution assay for unlabelled vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex employing the binding intrinsic factor antibody: probable evidence for two types of binding antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, E.; O'Brien, H.A.W.; Mollin, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A new radioisotope dilution assay for vitamin B 12 -intrinsic factor complex is described. The method is based on the use of the binding type intrinsic antibody (the binding reagent), which when combined with the intrinsic factor-vitamin B 12 complex (labelled ligand), is quantitatively adsorbed onto zirconium phosphate gel pH 6.25. The new assay has been shown to provide a measure of intrinsic factor comparable with other intrinsic factor assays, but it has the important advantage of being able to measure the unlabelled vitamin B 12 -intrinsic factor complex (unlabelled ligand), and will, therefore, be valuable in the study of physiological events in the gastrointestinal tract. During the study, it was found that there is some evidence for at least two types of binding intrinsic factor antibody: One which combines preferentially with the intrinsic factor-vitamin B 12 complex and one which combines equally well with this complex or with free intrinsic factor. (author)

  18. Distinct roles of beta1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), and ligand-associated metal-binding site (LIMBS) cation-binding sites in ligand recognition by integrin alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J; Mould, A Paul

    2008-11-21

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha2beta1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the alpha subunit I domain. However, activation of the alphaI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the beta subunit known as the I-like or betaI domain. The top face of the betaI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS), and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal-binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the alphaI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to alpha2beta1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating monoclonal antibody TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between alphaI and betaI, whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of betaI. An activating mutation in the alpha2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn(2+) stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca(2+)-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg(2+) for the MIDAS.

  19. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  20. Specific binding of large aggregates of amphiphilic molecules to the respective antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabok, Alexei; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Holloway, Alan; Starodub, Nikolay F; Demchenko, Anna

    2007-07-31

    The Binding of nonylphenol to respective antibodies immobilized on solid substrates was studied with the methods of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance) impedance spectroscopy. The binding reaction was proved to be highly specific having an association constant of KA=1.6x10(6) mol(-1) L and resulted in an increase in both the adsorbed layer thickness of 23 nm and the added mass of 18.3 microg/cm2 at saturation. The obtained responses of both TIRE and QCM methods are substantially higher than anticipated for the immune binding of single molecules of nonylphenol. The mechanism of binding of large aggregates of nonylphenol was suggested instead. Modeling of the micelle of amphiphilic nonylphenol molecules in aqueous solutions yielded a micelle size of about 38 nm. The mechanism of binding of large molecular aggregates to respective antibodies can be extended to other hydrophobic low-molecular-weight toxins such as T-2 mycotoxin. The formation of large molecular aggregates of nonylphenol and T-2 mycotoxin molecules on the surface was proved by the AFM study.

  1. Chimeric rabbit/human Fab antibodies against the hepatitis Be-antigen and their potential applications in assays, characterization, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Watts, Norman R; Palmer, Ira W; Kaufman, Joshua D; Dearborn, Altaira D; Trenbeath, Joni L; Eren, Elif; Steven, Alasdair C; Rader, Christoph; Wingfield, Paul T

    2017-10-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection afflicts millions worldwide, causing cirrhosis and liver cancer. HBV e-antigen (HBeAg), a clinical marker for disease severity, is a soluble variant of the viral capsid protein. HBeAg is not required for viral replication but is implicated in establishing immune tolerance and chronic infection. The structure of recombinant e-antigen (rHBeAg) was recently determined, yet to date, the exact nature and quantitation of HBeAg still remain uncertain. Here, to further characterize HBeAg, we used phage display to produce a panel of chimeric rabbit/human monoclonal antibody fragments (both Fab and scFv) against rHBeAg. Several of the Fab/scFv, expressed in Escherichia coli , had unprecedentedly high binding affinities ( K d ∼10 -12 m) and high specificity. We used Fab/scFv in the context of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for HBeAg quantification, which we compared with commercially available kits and verified with seroconversion panels, the WHO HBeAg standard, rHBeAg, and patient plasma samples. We found that the specificity and sensitivity are superior to those of existing commercial assays. To identify potential fine differences between rHBeAg and HBeAg, we used these Fabs in microscale immunoaffinity chromatography to purify HBeAg from individual patient plasmas. Western blotting and MS results indicated that rHBeAg and HBeAg are essentially structurally identical, although HBeAg from different patients exhibits minor carboxyl-terminal heterogeneity. We discuss several potential applications for the humanized Fab/scFv.

  2. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  3. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  5. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  6. Light-chain residue 95 is critical for antigen binding and multispecificity of monoclonal antibody G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Daiki; Inaba, Satomi; Kamatari, Yuji O; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-09-02

    The monoclonal antibody, G2, specifically binds to the immunogen peptide derived from the chicken prion protein, Pep18mer, and two chicken proteins derived peptides, Pep8 and Pep395; G2 binds with equal affinity to Pep18mer. The amino acid sequences of the three peptides are completely different, and so the recognition mechanism of G2 is unique and interesting. We generated a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody of G2, and demonstrated its correct folding with an antigen binding function similar to intact G2 antibody. We also generated a Pro containing mutant of G2 scFv at residue 95 of the light chain, and analyzed its antigen binding using a surface plasmon biosensor. The mutant lost its binding ability to Pep18mer, but remained those to Pep8 and Pep395. The results clearly indicate residue 95 as being critical for multispecific antigen binding of G2 at the site generated from the junctional diversity introduced at the joints between the V and J gene segments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heparin-associated thrombocytopenia: antibody binding specificity to platelet antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, D M; Howe, S E

    1985-11-01

    Sera from four patients with heparin-associated thrombocytopenia (HAT) were evaluated by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect heparin-dependent serum platelet-bindable immunoglobulin (S-PBIg) and by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation to investigate the specificity of the antibody binding. All HAT sera showed mildly increased S-PBIg (mean, 7.8 fg per platelet; normal, less than 6.0 fg per platelet) to intact target platelets in the ELISA, which was markedly increased in the presence of heparin (mean, 20.9 fg per platelet). This increase was 20-fold greater than normal control sera, which showed a mean differential increase of only 0.5 fg per platelet. Immunoglobulin binding specificity to platelet antigens was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of platelet lysate with transfer of the platelet fractions onto nitrocellulose strips (Western blotting) and subsequent immunoassay using HAT and normal sera. In the presence of heparin, the four HAT patients demonstrated increased binding of immunoglobulin to platelet antigens of apparent molecular weights of 180, 124, and 82 kd. Radiolabeled heparin when incubated with HAT sera, normal sera, or albumin blanks bound to platelet proteins of the same apparent molecular weights. These observations are consistent with current hypotheses suggesting that HAT antibody is directed to heparin-platelet complexes or, alternatively, that heparin induces conformational change of antigenic sites on the platelet membrane.

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Novel ELISA for Detection of Antibodies against HTLV-I Using Chimeric Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghi, Parvin; Heydari-Zarnagh, Hafez

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to develope a peptide-based indirect ELISA to detect antibodies against Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Two chimeric peptides (CP-1 and CP-2) were designed using linear immunodominant epitopes of gp-46-I, and gp21-I proteins, according to the sequence from Uniprot database. These peptides were studied initially in the ELISA using infected sera. The most promising peptideCP-1, was used to develop a peptide ELISA for detection of HTLV-I infected sera. The optimal conditions for CP-1ELISA were: the optimum coating buffer was 100mM NaHCO3, pH 9.6; coating peptide concentration was 10 µg/mL; the optimal blocking buffer was5% fetal bovine serum (FBS); the secondary antibody concentration was 1:2000; and serum dilution was 1:20. 20serum samples from HTLV-I infected patients were evaluated by ELISA developed. CP-1 showed high antigenicity while lacking any cross-reactivity with normal human sera. The results of evaluations indicated that in comparison with commercial ELISA, CP-1 ELISA showed good sensitivity and specificity. With further validation, CP-1as described in the present study could be introduced as novel reliable and cost-effective candidates for the high-specific screening of HTLV-I/-II infections in endemic regions.

  9. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  10. Identification of carbohydrate-binding domains in the attachment proteins of type 1 and type 3 reoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, J D; Duong, J L; Wright, B W; Dermody, T S

    2000-09-01

    The reovirus attachment protein, sigma1, is responsible for strain-specific patterns of viral tropism in the murine central nervous system and receptor binding on cultured cells. The sigma1 protein consists of a fibrous tail domain proximal to the virion surface and a virion-distal globular head domain. To better understand mechanisms of reovirus attachment to cells, we conducted studies to identify the region of sigma1 that binds cell surface carbohydrate. Chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins derived from prototype reovirus strains type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) were expressed in insect cells by using a baculovirus vector. Assessment of expressed protein susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage, binding to anti-sigma1 antibodies, and oligomerization indicates that the chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins are properly folded. To assess carbohydrate binding, recombinant sigma1 proteins were tested for the capacity to agglutinate mammalian erythrocytes and to bind sialic acid presented on glycophorin, the cell surface molecule bound by type 3 reovirus on human erythrocytes. Using a panel of two wild-type and ten chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins, the sialic acid-binding domain of type 3 sigma1 was mapped to a region of sequence proposed to form the more amino terminal of two predicted beta-sheet structures in the tail. This unit corresponds to morphologic region T(iii) observed in computer-processed electron micrographs of sigma1 protein purified from virions. In contrast, the homologous region of T1L sigma1 sequence was not implicated in carbohydrate binding; rather, sequences in the distal portion of the tail known as the neck were required. Results of these studies demonstrate that a functional receptor-binding domain, which uses sialic acid as its ligand, is contained within morphologic region T(iii) of the type 3 sigma1 tail. Furthermore, our findings indicate that T1L and T3D sigma1 proteins contain different arrangements of receptor-binding

  11. The expression and genetic immunization of chimeric fragment of Hantaan virus M and S segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fanglin; Wu Xingan; Luo Wen; Bai Wentao; Liu Yong; Yan Yan; Wang Haitao; Xu Zhikai

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is characterized by severe symptoms and high mortality, is caused by hantavirus. There are still no effective prophylactic vaccines directed to HFRS until now. In this research, we fused expressed G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment. We expect it could be a candidate vaccine. Chimeric gene G2S0.7 was first expressed in prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T. After inducing expressed fusion proteins, GST-G2S0.7 was induced and its molecular weight was about 100 kDa. Meanwhile, the fusion protein kept the activity of its parental proteins. Further, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the chimeric gene. ELISA, cell microculture neutralization test in vitro were used to detect the humoral immune response in immunized BALB/c mice. Lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to detect the cellular immune response. The results showed that the chimeric gene could simultaneously evoke specific antibody against nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein (GP). And the immunized mice of every group elicited neutralizing antibodies with different titers. But the titers were low. Lymphocyte proliferation assay results showed that the stimulation indexes of splenocytes of chimeric gene to NP and GP were significantly higher than that of control. It suggested that the chimeric gene of Hantaan virus containing G2 fragment of M segment and 0.7 kb fragment of S segment could directly elicit specific anti-Hantaan virus humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice

  12. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  13. Fv-clasp: An Artificially Designed Small Antibody Fragment with Improved Production Compatibility, Stability, and Crystallizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimori, Takao; Kitago, Yu; Umitsu, Masataka; Fujii, Yuki; Asaki, Ryoko; Tamura-Kawakami, Keiko; Takagi, Junichi

    2017-10-03

    Antibody fragments are frequently used as a "crystallization chaperone" to aid structural analysis of complex macromolecules that are otherwise crystallization resistant, but conventional fragment formats have not been designed for this particular application. By fusing an anti-parallel coiled-coil structure derived from the SARAH domain of human Mst1 kinase to the variable region of an antibody, we succeeded in creating a novel chimeric antibody fragment of ∼37 kDa, termed "Fv-clasp," which exhibits excellent crystallization compatibility while maintaining the binding ability of the original IgG molecule. The "clasp" and the engineered disulfide bond at the bottom of the Fv suppressed the internal mobility of the fragment and shielded hydrophobic residues, likely contributing to the high heat stability and the crystallizability of the Fv-clasp. Finally, Fv-clasp antibodies showed superior "chaperoning" activity over conventional Fab fragments, and facilitated the structure determination of an ectodomain fragment of integrin α6β1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibody-Unfolding and Metastable-State Binding in Force Spectroscopy and Recognition Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parminder; Qiang-Fu; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Ros, Robert; Kutner, Linda Obenauer; Schneeweis, Lumelle A.; Navoa, Ryman; Steger, Kirby; Xie, Lei; Yonan, Christopher; Abraham, Ralph; Grace, Michael J.; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Force spectroscopy and recognition imaging are important techniques for characterizing and mapping molecular interactions. In both cases, an antibody is pulled away from its target in times that are much less than the normal residence time of the antibody on its target. The distribution of pulling lengths in force spectroscopy shows the development of additional peaks at high loading rates, indicating that part of the antibody frequently unfolds. This propensity to unfold is reversible, indicating that exposure to high loading rates induces a structural transition to a metastable state. Weakened interactions of the antibody in this metastable state could account for reduced specificity in recognition imaging where the loading rates are always high. The much weaker interaction between the partially unfolded antibody and target, while still specific (as shown by control experiments), results in unbinding on millisecond timescales, giving rise to rapid switching noise in the recognition images. At the lower loading rates used in force spectroscopy, we still find discrepancies between the binding kinetics determined by force spectroscopy and those determined by surface plasmon resonance—possibly a consequence of the short tethers used in recognition imaging. Recognition imaging is nonetheless a powerful tool for interpreting complex atomic force microscopy images, so long as specificity is calibrated in situ, and not inferred from equilibrium binding kinetics. PMID:21190677

  15. The monoclonal S9.6 antibody exhibits highly variable binding affinities towards different R-loop sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian König

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody S9.6 is a widely-used tool to purify, analyse and quantify R-loop structures in cells. A previous study using the surface plasmon resonance technology and a single-chain variable fragment (scFv of S9.6 showed high affinity (0.6 nM for DNA-RNA and also a high affinity (2.7 nM for RNA-RNA hybrids. We used the microscale thermophoresis method allowing surface independent interaction studies and electromobility shift assays to evaluate additional RNA-DNA hybrid sequences and to quantify the binding affinities of the S9.6 antibody with respect to distinct sequences and their GC-content. Our results confirm high affinity binding to previously analysed sequences, but reveals that binding affinities are highly sequence specific. Our study presents R-loop sequences that independent of GC-content and in different sequence variations exhibit either no binding, binding affinities in the micromolar range and as well high affinity binding in the nanomolar range. Our study questions the usefulness of the S9.6 antibody in the quantitative analysis of R-loop sequences in vivo.

  16. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound [ 125 I]EDP I, [ 125 I]Glu-plasminogen, and [ 125 I]Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of [ 125 I]EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 μM, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. α 2 -Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of [ 125 I]EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor

  17. Neutralisation and binding of VHS virus by monovalent antibody fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupit, P.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; Strachan, G.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and characterisation of the heavy and light chain variable domain genes encoding three monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) that bind viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Two of these antibodies, 3F1H10 and 3F1A2 both neutralised the virus though 3F1A2...... appeared to recognise a broader range of virus isolates. The variable domains of these two antibodies differ by only four residues (Lorenzen et al., 2000a. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 10, 129-142). To further study the mechanism of neutralisation, Fab fragments as well as a series of recombinant bacterial...... single chain antibody (scAb) fragments were generated from the three anti-VHSV Mabs and their variable domain genes, respectively. Fabs and scAbs derived from the neutralising Mabs were both able to neutralise the VHSV type 1 isolate DK-F1. In addition, a series of scAb fragments were produced using...

  18. Maximizing in vivo target clearance by design of pH-dependent target binding antibodies with altered affinity to FcRn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danlin; Giragossian, Craig; Castellano, Steven; Lasaro, Marcio; Xiao, Haiguang; Saraf, Himanshu; Hess Kenny, Cynthia; Rybina, Irina; Huang, Zhong-Fu; Ahlberg, Jennifer; Bigwarfe, Tammy; Myzithras, Maria; Waltz, Erica; Roberts, Simon; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel; Singh, Sanjaya

    2017-10-01

    Antibodies with pH-dependent binding to both target antigens and neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) provide an alternative tool to conventional neutralizing antibodies, particularly for therapies where reduction in antigen level is challenging due to high target burden. However, the requirements for optimal binding kinetic framework and extent of pH dependence for these antibodies to maximize target clearance from circulation are not well understood. We have identified a series of naturally-occurring high affinity antibodies with pH-dependent target binding properties. By in vivo studies in cynomolgus monkeys, we show that pH-dependent binding to the target alone is not sufficient for effective target removal from circulation, but requires Fc mutations that increase antibody binding to FcRn. Affinity-enhanced pH-dependent FcRn binding that is double-digit nM at pH 7.4 and single-digit nM at pH 6 achieved maximal target reduction when combined with similar target binding affinities in reverse pH directions. Sustained target clearance below the baseline level was achieved 3 weeks after single-dose administration at 1.5 mg/kg. Using the experimentally derived mechanistic model, we demonstrate the essential kinetic interplay between target turnover and antibody pH-dependent binding during the FcRn recycling, and identify the key components for achieving maximal target clearance. These results bridge the demand for improved patient dosing convenience with the "know-how" of therapeutic modality by design.

  19. Comparison of in vitro cell binding characteristics of four monoclonal antibodies and their individual tumor localization properties in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, S.M.; Johnstone, R.W.; Russell, S.M.; McKenzie, I.F.; Pietersz, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Although many antibodies are being used for imaging studies, it is not clear which in vitro properties of antibodies will best reflect their in vivo characteristics. The ability to correlate in vitro binding characteristics of monoclonal antibodies to tumor antigens with their in vivo localization characteristics, particularly with respect to tumor localization properties, is desirable for rapid selection of monoclonal antibodies with potential for clinical use. The in vitro binding characteristics of three monoclonal antibodies to the murine Ly-2.1 antigen and one to the Ly-3.1 antigen have been studied on cultured tumor cells bearing these antigens. The association and dissociation rate constants, apparent affinity, and immunoreactivity of each antibody in vitro were compared with their ability to localize the s.c. tumors from the same cell line growing in Ly-2.1-/Ly-3.1-mice. The antibody with the highest affinity and fastest association rate localized to tumor at the earliest time (16-20 h after injection) and had the highest percentage of the injected dose/g in the tumor (greater than 25%). The antibody with the lowest affinity showed significantly less localization to tumor cells, compared with the other three antibodies. The ranking of the antibodies by affinity agreed with the ranking in terms of their ability to localize to tumors, but the in vitro immunoreactivity of the antibodies, as measured by a cell binding assay, did not correlate with their tumor localization properties. Immunoscintigraphic studies did not precisely correlate with biodistribution data or in vitro binding characteristics, because tumors could be satisfactorily imaged with each antibody, although it was noted that the antibody with the highest affinity gave the best image

  20. An avirulent chimeric Pestivirus with altered cell tropism protects pigs against lethal infection with classical swine fever virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, Ilona; Depner, Klaus; Trapp, Sascha; Beer, Martin

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric Pestivirus was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) [J. Virol. 70 (1996) 8606]. After deletion of the envelope protein E2-encoding region, the respective sequence of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Alfort 187 was inserted in-frame resulting in plasmid pA/CP7 E 2alf. After transfection of in vitro-transcribed CP7 E 2alf RNA, autonomous replication of chimeric RNA in bovine and porcine cell cultures was observed. Efficient growth of chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus, however, could only be demonstrated on porcine cells, and in contrast to the parental BVDV strain CP7, CP7 E 2alf only inefficiently infected and propagated in bovine cells. The virulence, immunogenicity, and 'marker vaccine' properties of the generated chimeric CP7 E 2alf virus were determined in an animal experiment using 27 pigs. After intramuscular inoculation of 1 x 10 7 TCID 50 , CP7 E 2alf proved to be completely avirulent, and neither viremia nor virus transmission to contact animals was observed; however, CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected from day 11 after inoculation. In addition, sera from all animals reacted positive in an E2-specific CSFV-antibody ELISA, but were negative for CSFV-E RNS -specific antibodies as determined with a CSFV marker ELISA. After challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Eystrup, pigs immunized with CP7 E 2alf were fully protected against clinical signs of CSFV infection, viremia, and shedding of challenge virus, and almost all animals scored positive in a CSFV marker ELISA. From our results, we conclude that chimeric CP7 E 2alf may not only serve as a tool for a better understanding of Pestivirus attachment, entry, and assembly, but also represents an innocuous and efficacious modified live CSFV 'marker vaccine'

  1. Naturally Acquired Antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) in Rural Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, Flávia A.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Ceravolo, Isabela P.; Malafronte, Rosely S.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2010-01-01

    Duffy binding protein (DBP), a leading malaria vaccine candidate, plays a critical role in Plasmodium vivax erythrocyte invasion. Sixty-eight of 366 (18.6%) subjects had IgG anti-DBP antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a community-based cross-sectional survey in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. Despite continuous exposure to low-level malaria transmission, the overall seroprevalence decreased to 9.0% when the population was reexamined 12 months later. Antibodies from 16 of 50 (36.0%) subjects who were ELISA-positive at the baseline were able to inhibit erythrocyte binding to at least one of two DBP variants tested. Most (13 of 16) of these subjects still had inhibitory antibodies when reevaluated 12 months later. Cumulative exposure to malaria was the strongest predictor of DBP seropositivity identified by multiple logistic regression models in this population. The poor antibody recognition of DBP elicited by natural exposure to P. vivax in Amazonian populations represents a challenge to be addressed by vaccine development strategies. PMID:20133990

  2. Site-directed antibody immobilization using a protein A-gold binding domain fusion protein for enhanced SPR immunosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Franco, Elena; Caruz, Antonio; Pedrajas, J R; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-04-07

    We have implemented a novel strategy for the oriented immobilization of antibodies onto a gold surface based on the use of a fusion protein, the protein A-gold binding domain (PAG). PAG consists of a gold binding peptide (GBP) coupled to the immunoglobulin-binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. This fusion protein provides an easy and fast oriented immobilization of antibodies preserving its native structure, while leaving the antigen binding sites (Fab) freely exposed. Using this immobilization strategy, we have demonstrated the performance of the immunosensing of the human Growth Hormone by SPR. A limit of detection of 90 ng mL(-1) was obtained with an inter-chip variability lower than 7%. The comparison of this method with other strategies for the direct immobilization of antibodies over gold surfaces has showed the enhanced sensitivity provided by the PAG approach.

  3. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Martin D; Theile, Christopher S; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P; Blom, Annet E M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2013-09-01

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a simple procedure for the production of such chimeric proteins, starting from correctly folded proteins and readily available peptides. By equipping the N terminus or C terminus of the proteins of interest with a set of click handles using sortase A, followed by a strain-promoted click reaction, unnatural N-to-N and C-to-C linked (hetero) fusion proteins are established. Examples of proteins that have been conjugated via this method include interleukin-2, interferon-α, ubiquitin, antibodies and several single-domain antibodies. If the peptides, sortase A and the proteins of interest are in hand, the unnaturally N-to-N and C-to-C fused proteins can be obtained in 3-4 d.

  4. Collaborative enhancement of antibody binding to distinct PECAM-1 epitopes modulates endothelial targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Chacko

    Full Text Available Antibodies to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 facilitate targeted drug delivery to endothelial cells by "vascular immunotargeting." To define the targeting quantitatively, we investigated the endothelial binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to extracellular epitopes of PECAM-1. Surprisingly, we have found in human and mouse cell culture models that the endothelial binding of PECAM-directed mAbs and scFv therapeutic fusion protein is increased by co-administration of a paired mAb directed to an adjacent, yet distinct PECAM-1 epitope. This results in significant enhancement of functional activity of a PECAM-1-targeted scFv-thrombomodulin fusion protein generating therapeutic activated Protein C. The "collaborative enhancement" of mAb binding is affirmed in vivo, as manifested by enhanced pulmonary accumulation of intravenously administered radiolabeled PECAM-1 mAb when co-injected with an unlabeled paired mAb in mice. This is the first demonstration of a positive modulatory effect of endothelial binding and vascular immunotargeting provided by the simultaneous binding a paired mAb to adjacent distinct epitopes. The "collaborative enhancement" phenomenon provides a novel paradigm for optimizing the endothelial-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

  5. Design and kinetic analysis of hammerhead ribozyme and DNAzyme that specifically cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo-Hyung; Choi, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jae Hyun; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Oh, Sangtaek; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop the oligonucleotides to abolish an expression of TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA, which is a genetic aberration that causes the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), hammerhead ribozymes and deoxyoligoribozymes that can specifically cleave TEL-AML1 fusion RNA were designed. Constructs of the deoxyribozyme with an asymmetric substrate binding arm (Dz26) and the hammerhead ribozyme with a 4 nt-bulged substrate binding arm in the stem III (buRz28) were able to cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA specifically at sites close to the junction in vitro, without cleaving the normal TEL and AML1 RNA. Single-turnover kinetic analysis under enzyme-excess condition revealed that the buRz28 is superior to the Dz26 in terms of substrate binding and RNA-cleavage. In conjunction with current progress in a gene-delivery technology, the designed oligonucleotides that specifically cleave the TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA are hoped to be applicable for the treatment of ALL in vivo

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  7. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Michael; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Schmid, Silvan

    2011-01-01

    -BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending...

  8. Development and characterization of polyclonal antibodies against the linker region of the telomere-binding protein TRF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya V. Ilicheva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2 is an essential component of the telomere-binding protein complex shelterin. TRF2 induces the formation of a special structure of telomeric DNA and counteracts activation of DNA damage-response pathways telomeres. TRF2 has a poorly characterized linker region (udTRF2 between its homodimerization and DNA-binding domains. Some lines of evidence have shown that this region could be involved in TRF2 interaction with nuclear lamina. Results: In this study, the fragment of the TERF2 gene encoding udTRF2 domain of telomere-binding protein TRF2 was produced by PCR and cloned into the pET32a vector. The resulting plasmid pET32a-udTRF2 was used for the expression of the recombinant udTRF2 in E. coli RosettaBlue (DE3. The protein was isolated and purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The purified recombinant protein udTRF2 was injected into guinea pigs to generate polyclonal antibodies. The ability of anti-udTRF2 antibodies to bind endogenous TRF2 in human skin fibroblasts was tested by western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Conclusions: In this study, the recombinant protein udTRF2 and antibodies to it were generated. Both protein and antibodies will provide a useful tool for investigation of the functions of the udTRF2 domain and its role in the interaction between TRF2 and nuclear lamina. Keywords: Chromosomes, Molecular cloning, Nuclear lamina, Nucleoprotein complexes, Polyclonal antibodies, Recombinant polypeptide, Shelterin, Telomere-binding protein TRF2, Telomeres, Telomeric DNA, TTAGGG repeats

  9. Chimeric vaccine composed of viral peptide and mammalian heat-shock protein 60 peptide protects against West Nile virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Landes, Shimon; Kleiman-Shoval, Smadar; Ben-Nathan, David; Kam, Michal; Lachmi, Bat-El; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Samina, Itzhak; Eitan, Anat; Cohen, Irun R; Rager-Zisman, Bracha; Porgador, Angel

    2010-08-01

    The protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a chimeric peptide against West Nile virus (WNV) was evaluated. This virus is the aetiological agent of West Nile fever, which has recently emerged in the western hemisphere. The rapid spread of WNV throughout North America, as well as the constantly changing epidemiology and transmission of the virus by blood transfusion and transplantation, have raised major public-health concerns. Currently, there are no effective treatments for WNV or vaccine for human use. We previously identified a novel, continuous B-cell epitope from domain III of the WNV envelope protein, termed Ep15. To test whether this epitope can protect against WNV infection, we synthesized a linear chimeric peptide composed of Ep15 and the heat-shock protein 60 peptide, p458. The p458 peptide is an effective carrier peptide for subunit vaccines against other infectious agents. We now report that mice immunized with the chimeric peptide, p458-Ep15, were resistant to lethal challenges with three different WNV strains. Moreover, their brains were free of viral genome and infectious virus. Mice immunized with Ep15 alone or with p431-Ep15, a control conjugate, were not protected. The chimeric p458-Ep15 peptide induced WNV-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies that neutralized the virus and induced the secretion of interferon-gammain vitro. Challenge of chimeric peptide-immunized mice considerably enhanced WNV-specific neutralizing antibodies. We conclude that this chimeric peptide can be used for formulation of a human vaccine against WNV.

  10. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, JianQing.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin 'chase' in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs

  11. Radiolabeling and biotinylation of internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96: Potential use of extracorporeal immunoadsorption with enhanced tumor radioactivity retention of Iodine, Indium and Rhenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, JianQing

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, methodology of radiolabeling and simultaneous biotinylation for internalizing monoclonal antibody chimeric BR96 have been investigated by using three element groups of potential therapeutic radionuclides iodine, indium and rhenium, and their different labeling methods. The biodistribution and kinetics of biotinylated and radiolabeled chiBR96 have been studied in colon carcinoma isografted rats. The potential use of ECIA, based on the biotin-avidin concept, has been evaluated and compared with the approach of avidin `chase` in the same animal tumor model with respect to an enhancement of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N) activity ratio. 131 refs.

  12. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Rostova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  13. Perforator chimerism for the reconstruction of complex defects: A new chimeric free flap classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan; Ghanem, Ali M

    2015-11-01

    Complex defects present structural and functional challenges to reconstructive surgeons. When compared to multiple free flaps or staged reconstruction, the use of chimeric flaps to reconstruct such defects have many advantages such as reduced number of operative procedures and donor site morbidity as well as preservation of recipient vessels. With increased popularity of perforator flaps, chimeric flaps' harvest and design has benefited from 'perforator concept' towards more versatile and better reconstruction solutions. This article discusses perforator based chimeric flaps and presents a practice based classification system that incorporates the perforator flap concept into "Perforator Chimerism". The authors analyzed a variety of chimeric patterns used in 31 consecutive cases to present illustrative case series and their new classification system. Accordingly, chimeric flaps are classified into four types. Type I: Classical Chimerism, Type II: Anastomotic Chimerism, Type III: Perforator Chimerism and Type IV Mixed Chimerism. Types I on specific source vessel anatomy whilst Type II requires microvascular anastomosis to create the chimeric reconstructive solution. Type III chimeric flaps utilizes the perforator concept to raise two components of tissues without microvascular anastomosis between them. Type IV chimeric flaps are mixed type flaps comprising any combination of Types I to III. Incorporation of the perforator concept in planning and designing chimeric flaps has allowed safe, effective and aesthetically superior reconstruction of complex defects. The new classification system aids reconstructive surgeons and trainees to understand chimeric flaps design, facilitating effective incorporation of this important reconstructive technique into the armamentarium of the reconstruction toolbox. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Stephan A; Kalos, Michael; Barrett, David; Aplenc, Richard; Porter, David L; Rheingold, Susan R; Teachey, David T; Chew, Anne; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Milone, Michael C; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-04-18

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells with specificity for CD19 have shown promise in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It remains to be established whether chimeric antigen receptor T cells have clinical activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two children with relapsed and refractory pre-B-cell ALL received infusions of T cells transduced with anti-CD19 antibody and a T-cell signaling molecule (CTL019 chimeric antigen receptor T cells), at a dose of 1.4×10(6) to 1.2×10(7) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. In both patients, CTL019 T cells expanded to a level that was more than 1000 times as high as the initial engraftment level, and the cells were identified in bone marrow. In addition, the chimeric antigen receptor T cells were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they persisted at high levels for at least 6 months. Eight grade 3 or 4 adverse events were noted. The cytokine-release syndrome and B-cell aplasia developed in both patients. In one child, the cytokine-release syndrome was severe; cytokine blockade with etanercept and tocilizumab was effective in reversing the syndrome and did not prevent expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells or reduce antileukemic efficacy. Complete remission was observed in both patients and is ongoing in one patient at 11 months after treatment. The other patient had a relapse, with blast cells that no longer expressed CD19, approximately 2 months after treatment. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells are capable of killing even aggressive, treatment-refractory acute leukemia cells in vivo. The emergence of tumor cells that no longer express the target indicates a need to target other molecules in addition to CD19 in some patients with ALL.

  15. Human vaccination against Plasmodium vivax Duffy-binding protein induces strain-transcending antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Ruth O.; Silk, Sarah E.; Elias, Sean C.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Rawlinson, Thomas A.; Llewellyn, David; Shakri, A. Rushdi; Jin, Jing; Labb?, Genevi?ve M.; Edwards, Nick J.; Poulton, Ian D.; Roberts, Rachel; Farid, Ryan; J?rgensen, Thomas; Alanine, Daniel G.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread human malaria geographically; however, no effective vaccine exists. Red blood cell invasion by the P. vivax merozoite depends on an interaction between the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) and region II of the parasite's Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP_RII). Naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies against this interaction associate with clinical immunity, but it is unknown whether these responses can be induced by human vac...

  16. Thermodynamic model of binding of flexible bivalent haptens to antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembo, M; Goldstein, B

    1978-01-01

    Studies by Wilder et al. of the binding of Fab' fragments to small haptens have shown that the cross-linking constant (the equilibrium constant for binding an additional Fab' fragment to a hapten-Fab' complex) is strongly dependent on the length of the hapten. We present a simple model for predicting the relationship between the intermolecular cross-linking constant and the monovalent hapten-antibody binding constant. In particular we used the model to obtain the dependence of the cross-linking constant on the length of th hapten, the depth to which the hapten fills th Fab' binding site, and the size of the Fab' fragment. To test the model, we devised expressions which allowed us to analyze the data of Wilder et al. From their data we determined the values of two parameters which we took to be unknown in the theory, the size of the Fab' fragment and the depth to which the hapten fills the Fab' binding site. The values arrived at in this way agreed well with published measurements of these parameters.

  17. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltazar, Ludmila M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2016-03-30

    ABSTRACT

    Histoplasma capsulatumproduces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment ofH. capsulatumcells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bindH. capsulatumheat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion.

    IMPORTANCEDiverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-06-07

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50-80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen.

  19. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamand Jens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system.

  20. Chimeric infectious DNA clones, chimeric porcine circoviruses and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to infectious DNA clones, infectious chimeric DNA clones of porcine circovirus (PCV), vaccines and means of protecting pigs against viral infection or postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) caused by PCV2. The new chimeric infectious DNA clone and its derived, avirulent chimeric virus are constructed from the nonpathogenic PCV1 in which the immunogenic ORF gene of the pathogenic PCV2 replaces a gene of the nonpathogenic PCV1, preferably in the same pos...

  1. Solid phase measurements of antibody and lectin binding to xenogenic carbohydrate antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In future pig-to-man xenotransplantation it is important to master tools that identify potentially xenogenic alphagalactose (Galalpha) antigens in the doner tissue. DESIGN AND METHODS: We have measured the binding potentials of Galalpha detecting lectins and antibodies, including...

  2. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves' patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves' disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs

  3. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  4. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  5. Autodisplay of an avidin with biotin-binding activity on the surface of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardavé-Alejandre, H D; Alvarado-Yaah, J E; Pompa-Mera, E N; Muñoz-Medina, J E; Sárquiz-Martínez, B; Santacruz-Tinoco, C E; Manning-Cela, R G; Ortíz-Navarrete, V; López-Macías, C; González-Bonilla, C R

    2018-03-01

    To display a recombinant avidin fused to the autotransporter ShdA to bind biotinylated molecules on the surface of Escherichia coli. Two chimeric protein constructs containing avidin fused to the autotransporter ShdA were expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli DH5α. One fusion protein contained 476 amino acids of the ShdA α and β domains, whereas the second consisted of a 314 amino acid from α and truncated β domains. Protein production was verified by SDS-PAGE using an antibody to the molecular FLAG-tag. The surface display of the avidin-shdA fusion protein was confirmed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, and the biotin-binding activity was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry using biotin-4-fluorescein and biotinylated-ovalbumin (OVA). Expression of a recombinant avidin with biotin-binding activity on the surface of E. coli was achieved using the autotransporter ShdA. This system is an alternative to bind biotinylated molecules to E. coli.

  6. Chimeric FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae: a bacterial surface display system for heterologous sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, L; Poulsen, LK; Christiansen, Gunna

    1995-01-01

    of heterologous DNA segments encoding two reporter sequences. In the selected positions such insertions did not significantly alter the function of the FimH protein with regard to surface location and adhesive ability. The system seemed to be quite flexible, since chimeric versions of the FimH adhesin containing...... as many as 56 foreign amino acids were transported to the bacterial surface as components of the fimbrial organelles. Furthermore, the foreign protein segments were recognized by insert-specific antibodies when expressed within chimeric proteins on the surface of the bacteria. The results from...

  7. Development of a chimeric Plasmodium berghei strain expressing the repeat region of the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein for in vivo evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Diego A; Yadava, Anjali; Angov, Evelina; Maurizio, Paul L; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Zavala, Fidel

    2013-08-01

    The development of vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax-the most geographically widespread human malaria species-is challenged by technical difficulties, such as the lack of in vitro culture systems and availability of animal models. Chimeric rodent Plasmodium parasites are safe and useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of new vaccine formulations. We report the successful development and characterization of chimeric Plasmodium berghei parasites bearing the type I repeat region of P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP). The P. berghei-P. vivax chimeric strain develops normally in mosquitoes and produces highly infectious sporozoites that produce patent infection in mice that are exposed to the bites of as few as 3 P. berghei-P. vivax-infected mosquitoes. Using this transgenic parasite, we demonstrate that monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against P. vivax CSP strongly inhibit parasite infection and thus support the notion that these antibodies play an important role in protective immunity. The chimeric parasites we developed represent a robust model for evaluating protective immune responses against P. vivax vaccines based on CSP.

  8. Use of thermodynamic coupling between antibody-antigen binding and phospholipid acyl chain phase transition energetics to predict immunoliposome targeting affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klegerman, Melvin E; Zou, Yuejiao; Golunski, Eva; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of ligand-target binding has been a useful tool for dissecting the nature of the binding mechanism and, therefore, potentially can provide valuable information regarding the utility of targeted formulations. Based on a consistent coupling of antibody-antigen binding and gel-liquid crystal transition energetics observed for antibody-phosphatidylethanolamine (Ab-PE) conjugates, we hypothesized that the thermodynamic parameters and the affinity for antigen of the Ab-PE conjugates could be effectively predicted once the corresponding information for the unconjugated antibody is determined. This hypothesis has now been tested in nine different antibody-targeted echogenic liposome (ELIP) preparations, where antibody is conjugated to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) head groups through a thioether linkage. Predictions were satisfactory (affinity not significantly different from the population of values found) in five cases (55.6%), but the affinity of the unconjugated antibody was not significantly different from the population of values found in six cases (66.7%), indicating that the affinities of the conjugated antibody tended not to deviate appreciably from those of the free antibody. While knowledge of the affinities of free antibodies may be sufficient to judge their suitability as targeting agents, thermodynamic analysis may still provide valuable information regarding their usefulness for specific applications.

  9. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A camelid single-domain antibody neutralizes botulinum neurotoxin A by blocking host receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Weisemann, Jasmin; Peng, Lisheng; Krez, Nadja; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Dong, Min; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (BCH); (Cornell); (Tufts CTSI); (UCI); (MHH)

    2017-08-07

    Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Previously, we identified a potent neutralizing antitoxin against BoNT/A1 termed ciA-C2, derived from a camelid heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH). In this study, we demonstrate that ciA-C2 prevents BoNT/A1 intoxication by inhibiting its binding to neuronal receptor SV2. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structure of ciA-C2 in complex with the receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A1 (HCA1) at 1.68 Å resolution. The structure revealed that ciA-C2 partially occupies the SV2-binding site on HCA1, causing direct interference of HCA1 interaction with both the N-glycan and peptide-moiety of SV2. Interestingly, this neutralization mechanism is similar to that of a monoclonal antibody in clinical trials, despite that ciA-C2 is more than 10-times smaller. Taken together, these results enlighten our understanding of BoNT/A1 interactions with its neuronal receptor, and further demonstrate that inhibiting toxin binding to the host receptor is an efficient countermeasure strategy.

  11. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...... epitopes specific for the complex. By Hp-Hb-affinity screening of a phage-Fab library, we isolated a phage clone against the ligand complex. Surface plasmon resonance analyses of the Fab part expressed as a recombinant protein revealed a high affinity binding (KD = 3.9 nm) to Hp-Hb, whereas no binding...... was measured for non-complexed Hp or Hb. The Fab antibody completely inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled Hp-Hb complexes to CD163 and blocked their uptake in CD163-transfected cells. In conclusion, we have raised a receptor-blocking antibody specifically recognizing the Hp-Hb complex. In addition to provide...

  12. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Borre, Mette; Petersen, E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta-galactos......This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta...

  13. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C

    2000-01-01

    of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  14. Regulation of the heavy metal pump AtHMA4 by a metal-binding autoinhibitory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Roed, Maria Dalgaard; Zhang, Yang

    Heavy metal pumps, or P1B ATPases, are important for heavy metal homeostasis in most cells. In general, these pumps contain extended N- and/or C-termini with one or more metal-binding domains (MBDs), but the role of the extended termini is still not clear. The Arabidopsis thaliana Zn2+-ATPase At......HMA4 contains a very long C-terminus with 13 cysteine pairs and an 11 amino acid residue long histidine stretch at the end. To ascertain the role of the potentially metal-binding domains in the C-terminus of AtHMA4, the C-terminal region alone was expressed in yeast. This resulted in increased Zn...

  15. Carrageenans as a new source of drugs with metal binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotimchenko, Yuri S; Khozhaenko, Elena V; Khotimchenko, Maxim Y; Kolenchenko, Elena A; Kovalev, Valeri V

    2010-04-01

    Carrageenans are abundant and safe non-starch polysaccharides exerting their biological effects in living organisms. Apart from their known pro-inflammation properties and some pharmacological activity, carrageenans can also strongly bind and hold metal ions. This property can be used for creation of the new drugs for elimination of metals from the body or targeted delivery of these metal ions for healing purposes. Metal binding activity of different carrageenans in aqueous solutions containing Y(3+) or Pb(2+) ions was studied in a batch sorption system. The metal uptake by carrageenans is not affected by the change of the pH within the range from 2.0 to 6.0. The rates and binding capacities of carrageenans regarding metal ions were evaluated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants, and the sorption isothermal data could be explained well by the Langmuir equation. The results obtained through the study suggest that kappa-, iota-, and lambda-carrageenans are favorable sorbents. The largest amount of Y(3+) and Pb(2+) ions are bound by iota-carrageenan. Therefore, it can be concluded that this type of polysaccharide is the more appropriate substance for elaboration of the drugs with high selective metal binding properties.

  16. Carrageenans as a New Source of Drugs with Metal Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri S. Khotimchenko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Carrageenans are abundant and safe non-starch polysaccharides exerting their biological effects in living organisms. Apart from their known pro-inflammation properties and some pharmacological activity, carrageenans can also strongly bind and hold metal ions. This property can be used for creation of the new drugs for elimination of metals from the body or targeted delivery of these metal ions for healing purposes. Metal binding activity of different carrageenans in aqueous solutions containing Y3+ or Pb2+ ions was studied in a batch sorption system. The metal uptake by carrageenans is not affected by the change of the pH within the range from 2.0 to 6.0. The rates and binding capacities of carrageenans regarding metal ions were evaluated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants, and the sorption isothermal data could be explained well by the Langmuir equation. The results obtained through the study suggest that κ-, ι-, and λ-carrageenans are favorable sorbents. The largest amount of Y3+ and Pb2+ ions are bound by i-carrageenan. Therefore, it can be concluded that this type of polysaccharide is the more appropriate substance for elaboration of the drugs with high selective metal binding properties.

  17. Resistance of Subtype C HIV-1 Strains to Anti-V3 Loop Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Almond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1’s subtype C V3 loop consensus sequence exhibits increased resistance to anti-V3 antibody-mediated neutralization as compared to the subtype B consensus sequence. The dynamic 3D structure of the consensus C V3 loop crown, visualized by ab initio folding, suggested that the resistance derives from structural rigidity and non-β-strand secondary protein structure in the N-terminal strand of the β-hairpin of the V3 loop crown, which is where most known anti-V3 loop antibodies bind. The observation of either rigidity or non-β-strand structure in this region correlated with observed resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization in a series of chimeric pseudovirus (psV mutants. The results suggest the presence of an epitope-independent, neutralization-relevant structural difference in the antibody-targeted region of the V3 loop crown between subtype C and subtype B, a difference that we hypothesize may contribute to the divergent pattern of global spread between these subtypes. As antibodies to a variable loop were recently identified as an inverse correlate of risk for HIV infection, the structure-function relationships discussed in this study may have relevance to HIV vaccine research.

  18. Beyond CDR-grafting: Structure-guided humanization of framework and CDR regions of an anti-myostatin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apgar, James R; Mader, Michelle; Agostinelli, Rita; Benard, Susan; Bialek, Peter; Johnson, Mark; Gao, Yijie; Krebs, Mark; Owens, Jane; Parris, Kevin; St Andre, Michael; Svenson, Kris; Morris, Carl; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies are an important class of biotherapeutics that offer specificity to their antigen, long half-life, effector function interaction and good manufacturability. The immunogenicity of non-human-derived antibodies, which can be a major limitation to development, has been partially overcome by humanization through complementarity-determining region (CDR) grafting onto human acceptor frameworks. The retention of foreign content in the CDR regions, however, is still a potential immunogenic liability. Here, we describe the humanization of an anti-myostatin antibody utilizing a 2-step process of traditional CDR-grafting onto a human acceptor framework, followed by a structure-guided approach to further reduce the murine content of CDR-grafted antibodies. To accomplish this, we solved the co-crystal structures of myostatin with the chimeric (Protein Databank (PDB) id 5F3B) and CDR-grafted anti-myostatin antibody (PDB id 5F3H), allowing us to computationally predict the structurally important CDR residues as well as those making significant contacts with the antigen. Structure-based rational design enabled further germlining of the CDR-grafted antibody, reducing the murine content of the antibody without affecting antigen binding. The overall "humanness" was increased for both the light and heavy chain variable regions.

  19. Chimeric Ply187 endolysin kills Staphylococcus aureus more effectively than the parental enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptidoglycan hydrolases are an effective new source of antimicrobials. A chimeric fusion protein of the Ply187 endopeptidase domain and LysK SH3b cell wall binding domain is a potent agent against Staphylococcus aureus in three functional assays....

  20. An efficiently cleaved HIV-1 clade C Env selectively binds to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Boliar

    Full Text Available An ideal HIV-1 Env immunogen is expected to mimic the native trimeric conformation for inducing broadly neutralizing antibody responses. The native conformation is dependent on efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env. The clade B isolate, JRFL Env is efficiently cleaved when expressed on the cell surface. Here, for the first time, we report the identification of a native clade C Env, 4-2.J41 that is naturally and efficiently cleaved on the cell surface as confirmed by its biochemical and antigenic characteristics. In addition to binding to several conformation-dependent neutralizing antibodies, 4-2.J41 Env binds efficiently to the cleavage-dependent antibody PGT151; thus validating its native cleaved conformation. In contrast, 4-2.J41 Env occludes non-neutralizing epitopes. The cytoplasmic-tail of 4-2.J41 Env plays an important role in maintaining its conformation. Furthermore, codon optimization of 4-2.J41 Env sequence significantly increases its expression while retaining its native conformation. Since clade C of HIV-1 is the prevalent subtype, identification and characterization of this efficiently cleaved Env would provide a platform for rational immunogen design.

  1. Imaging of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by a bifunctional chimeric RGD peptide not cross-reacting with alpha(v)beta(5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannetti, Antonella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Iommelli, Francesca; Del Gatto, Annarita; De Luca, Stefania; Zaccaro, Laura; Papaccioli, Angela; Sommella, Jvana; Panico, Mariarosaria; Speranza, Antonio; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2009-08-15

    To test whether a novel bifunctional chimeric peptide comprising a cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp pentapeptide covalently bound to an echistatin domain can discriminate alpha(v)beta(3) from alpha(v)beta(5) integrin, thus allowing the in vivo selective visualization of alpha(v)beta(3) expression by single-photon and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The chimeric peptide was preliminarily tested for inhibition of alpha(v)beta(3)-dependent cell adhesion and competition of 125I-echistatin binding to membrane of stably transfected K562 cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) (Kalpha(v)beta(3)) or alpha(v)beta(5) (Kalpha(v)beta(5)) integrin. The chimeric peptide was then conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and labeled with 111In for single-photon imaging, whereas a one-step procedure was used for labeling the full-length peptide and a truncated derivative, lacking the last five C-terminal amino acids, with 18F for PET imaging. Nude mice bearing tumors from Kalpha(v)beta(3), Kalpha(v)beta(5), U87MG human glioblastoma, and A431 human epidermoid cells were subjected to single-photon and PET imaging. Adhesion and competitive binding assays showed that the novel chimeric peptide selectively binds to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin and does not cross-react with alpha(v)beta(5). In agreement with in vitro findings, single-photon and PET imaging studies showed that the radiolabeled chimeric peptide selectively localizes in tumor xenografts expressing alphavbeta3 and fails to accumulate in those expressing alpha(v)beta(5) integrin. When 18F-labeled truncated derivative was used for PET imaging, alphavbeta3- and alpha(v)beta(5)-expressing tumors were visualized, indicating that the five C-terminal amino acids are required to differentially bind the two integrins. Our findings indicate that the novel chimeric Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, having no cross-reaction with alphavbeta5 integrin, allows highly selective alphavbeta3 expression imaging and monitoring.

  2. Metal binding characterization and conformational studies using Raman microscopy of resin-bound poly(aspartic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stair, Jacqueline L; Holcombe, James A

    2007-03-01

    The metal binding capacities, conditional stability constants, and secondary structure of immobilized polyaspartic acid (PLAsp) (n = 6, 20, and 30) on TentaGel resin were determined when binding Mg2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Ni2+. Metal binding to the synthesized peptides was evaluated using breakthrough curves from a packed microcolumn and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) detection. The metal capacities reached values of 590, 2160, and 3710 mumol of metal/g of resin for the 6-mer, 20-mer, and 30-mer, respectively, and this resulted in 2-3 residues per metal for all peptides and metals tested. Surprisingly, the concentrated environment of the resin along with the spatial distribution of attachment groups allowed for most residues to participate in metal binding regardless of the peptide length. Conditional stability constants calculated using single metal binding isotherms indicated that binding strength decreased as the chain length increased on the resin. Raman microscopy on single beads was used to determine PLAsp secondary structure, and all peptides were of a mixed conformation (i.e., beta-sheets, alpha-helices, random chain, etc.) during neutral conditioning and metal binding. Uniquely, the longer 20-mer and 30-mer peptides showed a distinct change from a mixed conformation to beta-sheets and alpha-helices during metal release with acid. This study confirms that metal release by longer immobilized peptides is often assisted by a conformational change, which easily spoils the binding cavity, while shorter peptides may release metal primarily by H+ displacement.

  3. Synthesis of indium-labeled antibody-chelate conjugates for radioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokce, A; Nakamura, R M; Tubis, M; Wolf, W

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed to achieve rapid and reproducible complexation of indium to transferrin at pH 7.4. The system consists of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as the intermediate carrier ligand, whose function is to allow the /sup 113/m In ion, in a solution in Tris buffer, pH 7.4, to be transferred rapidly to the specific binding sites on transferrin. Just as in the case of iron, this complexation requires the presence of a synergistic ion such as bicarbonate. The present system can be used to allow the binding of /sup 113/mIn to transferrin when coupled to an antibody. This method has been tested by studying the conjugation of an antibody, the IgG fraction of goat anti-rabbit-IgG, with either transferrin or desferoxamine, using glutaraldehyde as the coupling agent. Optimization in terms of total protein concentration and glutaraldehyde levels lead to products where the specific metal binding capacity of the transferrin moiety remains unchanged, and where the antibody retains 70% of its antigenic activity. The present system can be considered an extension of the ELISA techniques and can be used to determine, by a terminal /sup 113/mIn labeling technique, the level of specific binding of an antibody to its antigen.

  4. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  5. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  6. Receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein induces highly potent neutralizing antibodies: implication for developing subunit vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxian; Zhou Yusen; Liu Shuwen; Kou Zhihua; Li Wenhui; Farzan, Michael; Jiang Shibo

    2004-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV), a type I transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, consists of S1 and S2 domains responsible for virus binding and fusion, respectively. The S1 contains a receptor-binding domain (RBD) that can specifically bind to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the receptor on target cells. Here we show that a recombinant fusion protein (designated RBD-Fc) containing 193-amino acid RBD (residues 318-510) and a human IgG1 Fc fragment can induce highly potent antibody responses in the immunized rabbits. The antibodies recognized RBD on S1 domain and completely inhibited SARS-CoV infection at a serum dilution of 1:10,240. Rabbit antisera effectively blocked binding of S1, which contains RBD, to ACE2. This suggests that RBD can induce highly potent neutralizing antibody responses and has potential to be developed as an effective and safe subunit vaccine for prevention of SARS

  7. Quantitative relationship between antibody affinity and antibody avidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griswold, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between antibody avidity, measured by the dissociation of the antigen-antibody bond in antigen excess, and antibody affinity was studied. Complexes of radiolabelled antigen and antibody of known affinity were prepared in vitro and allowed to stand for seven days to reach equilibrium. Then nonlabelled antigen in one hundred fold excess was added to dissociate the complexes. After an appropriate incubation the fraction of antigen bound to antibody was measured by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method. The dissociation index was the fraction bound in the experimental sample divided by the fraction bound in the control. The correlation coefficient between the dissociation index and the antibody binding constant was 0.92 for early dissociation and 0.98 for late dissociation. The regression equation relating the binding constant to the dissociation index was K = 6.4(DI) + 6.25, where DI is the late dissociation index and K is the logarithm to the base 10 of the binding constant. There is a high correlation between avidity and affinity of antibody. Antibody affinity can be estimated from avidity data. The stability of antigen-antibody complexes can be predicted from antibody affinity

  8. A chimeric receptor of the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGFR1) and a single chain antibody specific to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein activates the IGF1R signalling cascade in CG4 oligodendrocyte progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annenkov, A.; Rigby, A.; Amor, S.; Zhou, D.M.; Yousaf, N.; Hemmer, B.; Chernajovsky, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate neural stem cells with increased ability to survive after transplantation in brain parenchyma we developed a chimeric receptor (ChR) that binds to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) via its ectodomain and activates the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGF1R)

  9. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey); Tumen, Fikret, E-mail: ftumen@firat.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol{sup -1} for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}H{sup o} values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low {Delta}H{sup o} values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  11. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Theile, Christopher S.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a

  12. The study of conjugation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody for labeling with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignancies or cancers that start from the malign transformation of a lymphocyte in the lymphatic system. Generally, lymphomas start from the lymph nodes or from the agglomeration of the lymphatic tissues, organs like stomach, intestines, in some cases it can involve the bone marrow and the blood, it can also disseminate to other organs. Lymphomas are divided in two major categories: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patient with NHL are generally treated with radiotherapy alone or combined with immunotherapy using monoclonal antibody rituximab (MabThera®). Currently, monoclonal antibodies (Acm) conjugated with bifunctional chelate agents and radiolabeled with metallic or lanthanides radionuclides are a treatment reality for patients with NHL by the principle of radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study focused on the conditions of conjugation of Acm rituximab (MabThera®) with bifunctional chelating agents DOTA and DTPA. Various parameters were studied: method of Acm purification, conditions of Acm conjugation, the method for determination of number of chelate agent coupled to the Acm, method for purification of the conjugated antibody Acm, conditions of labeling of the conjugated antibody with lutetium-177, method of purification of the radiolabeled immuno conjugate, method of radiochemical purity (RP), specific binding in vitro Raji cells (Human Burkitt) and biological distribution performed in normal Balb-c mouse. The three methodologies employed in pre-purification of Acm (dialysis, size exclusion chromatograph and dial filtration) demonstrated to be efficient; they provided sample recovery exceeding 90%. However, the methodology of dial filtration presents minimal sample loss, and gave the final recovery of the sample in micro liters; thereby facilitating sample use in subsequent experiments. Numbers of chelators attached to the Acm molecule was proportional to the molar ratio studied. When we evaluated the influence of different

  13. Site-specific photoconjugation of antibodies using chemically synthesized IgG-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perols, Anna; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2014-03-19

    Site-specific labeling of antibodies can be performed using the immunoglobulin-binding Z domain, derived from staphylococcal protein A (SpA), which has a well-characterized binding site in the Fc region of antibodies. By introducing a photoactivable probe in the Z domain, a covalent bond can be formed between the Z domain and the antibody by irradiation with UV light. The aim of this study was to improve the conjugation yield for labeling of different subclasses of IgG having different sequence composition, using a photoactivated Z domain variant. Four different variants of the Z domain (Z5BPA, Z5BBA, Z32BPA, and Z32BBA) were synthesized to investigate the influence of the position of the photoactivable probe and the presence of a flexible linker between the probe and the protein. For two of the variants, the photoreactive benzophenone group was introduced as part of an amino acid side chain by incorporation of the unnatural amino acid benzoylphenylalanine (BPA) during peptide synthesis. For the other two variants, the photoreactive benzophenone group was attached via a flexible linker by coupling of benzoylbenzoic acid (BBA) to the ε-amino group of a selectively deprotected lysine residue. Photoconjugation experiments using human IgG1, mouse IgG1, and mouse IgG2A demonstrated efficient conjugation for all antibodies. It was shown that differences in linker length had a large impact on the conjugation efficiency for labeling of mouse IgG1, whereas the positioning of the photoactivable probe in the sequence of the protein had a larger effect for mouse IgG2A. Conjugation to human IgG1 was only to a minor extent affected by position or linker length. For each subclass of antibody, the best variant tested using a standard conjugation protocol resulted in conjugation efficiencies of 41-66%, which corresponds to on average approximately one Z domain attached to each antibody. As a combination of the two best performing variants, Z5BBA and Z32BPA, a Z domain variant with

  14. Characterisation of peptide microarrays for studying antibody-antigen binding using surface plasmon resonance imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Nogues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-specific binding to biosensor surfaces is a major obstacle to quantitative analysis of selective retention of analytes at immobilized target molecules. Although a range of chemical antifouling monolayers has been developed to address this problem, many macromolecular interactions still remain refractory to analysis due to the prevalent high degree of non-specific binding. We describe how we use the dynamic process of the formation of self assembling monolayers and optimise physical and chemical properties thus reducing considerably non-specific binding and allowing analysis of specific binding of analytes to immobilized target molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We illustrate this approach by the production of specific protein arrays for the analysis of interactions between the 65kDa isoform of human glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and a human monoclonal antibody. Our data illustrate that we have effectively eliminated non-specific interactions with the surface containing the immobilised GAD65 molecules. The findings have several implications. First, this approach obviates the dubious process of background subtraction and gives access to more accurate kinetic and equilibrium values that are no longer contaminated by multiphase non-specific binding. Second, an enhanced signal to noise ratio increases not only the sensitivity but also confidence in the use of SPR to generate kinetic constants that may then be inserted into van't Hoff type analyses to provide comparative DeltaG, DeltaS and DeltaH values, making this an efficient, rapid and competitive alternative to ITC measurements used in drug and macromolecular-interaction mechanistic studies. Third, the accuracy of the measurements allows the application of more intricate interaction models than simple Langmuir monophasic binding. CONCLUSIONS: The detection and measurement of antibody binding by the type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD65 represents an example of an antibody

  15. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava; Nielsen, Jens; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse

    2014-06-04

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals, together with archival samples from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2gif and subsequently CSFV challenged, were analysed for specific antibodies using ELISAs and for homologous neutralising antibodies. In animals vaccinated with CP7_E2gif, neutralising antibodies were detected from day 10. However, the sera remained negative for anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies whereas pigs vaccinated with C-strain seroconverted against CSFV by 14 days after vaccination, as determined by a CSFV-E2 specific blocking ELISA. One week after subsequent CSFV challenge, a strong anti-CSFV E2 reaction was detected in CP7_E2gif vaccinated pigs and anti-E(rns) antibodies were detected from 10 days after infection. In conclusion, CP7_E2gif has the potential to be used as a DIVA vaccine in combination with detection of anti-CSFV E2-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chimeric rhinoviruses displaying MPER epitopes elicit anti-HIV neutralizing responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    Full Text Available The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been a formidable task, but remains a critical necessity. The well conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein is one of the crucial targets for AIDS vaccine development, as it has the necessary attribute of being able to elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse isolates of HIV.Guided by X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and powerful selection techniques, we designed and produced six combinatorial libraries of chimeric human rhinoviruses (HRV displaying the MPER epitopes corresponding to mAbs 2F5, 4E10, and/or Z13e1, connected to an immunogenic surface loop of HRV via linkers of varying lengths and sequences. Not all libraries led to viable chimeric viruses with the desired sequences, but the combinatorial approach allowed us to examine large numbers of MPER-displaying chimeras. Among the chimeras were five that elicited antibodies capable of significantly neutralizing HIV-1 pseudoviruses from at least three subtypes, in one case leading to neutralization of 10 pseudoviruses from all six subtypes tested.Optimization of these chimeras or closely related chimeras could conceivably lead to useful components of an effective AIDS vaccine. While the MPER of HIV may not be immunodominant in natural infection by HIV-1, its presence in a vaccine cocktail could provide critical breadth of protection.

  17. Chloramine-T induced binding of monoclonal antibody B72. 3 to concanavalin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, W.C.; Jhingran, S.G. (Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States) Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The effects of chloramine-T (CT) on monoclonal antibody B72.3 were studied with particular reference to Con-A lectin binding. After exposure to chloramine-T concentrations from 0.8 to 4.0 mg/mL (115-574 mol CT/mol B72.3), B72.3 showed progressive binding to agarose-linked Con-A. This behavior was paralleled by decreasing immunoreactivity and increasing fragmentation and aggregation of B72.3 demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and size exclusion HPLC. (Author).

  18. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn (NHLS-South Africa); (NIH); (Witwatersrand); (KwaZulu-Natal)

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  19. Fab-dsFv: A bispecific antibody format with extended serum half-life through albumin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davé, Emma; Adams, Ralph; Zaccheo, Oliver; Carrington, Bruce; Compson, Joanne E; Dugdale, Sarah; Airey, Michael; Malcolm, Sarah; Hailu, Hanna; Wild, Gavin; Turner, Alison; Heads, James; Sarkar, Kaushik; Ventom, Andrew; Marshall, Diane; Jairaj, Mark; Kopotsha, Tim; Christodoulou, Louis; Zamacona, Miren; Lawson, Alastair D; Heywood, Sam; Humphreys, David P

    2016-10-01

    An antibody format, termed Fab-dsFv, has been designed for clinical indications that require monovalent target binding in the absence of direct Fc receptor (FcR) binding while retaining substantial serum presence. The variable fragment (Fv) domain of a humanized albumin-binding antibody was fused to the C-termini of Fab constant domains, such that the VL and VH domains were individually connected to the Cκ and CH1 domains by peptide linkers, respectively. The anti-albumin Fv was selected for properties thought to be desirable to ensure a durable serum half-life mediated via FcRn. The Fv domain was further stabilized by an inter-domain disulfide bond. The bispecific format was shown to be thermodynamically and biophysically stable, and retained good affinity and efficacy to both antigens simultaneously. In in vivo studies, the serum half-life of Fab-dsFv, 2.6 d in mice and 7.9 d in cynomolgus monkeys, was equivalent to Fab'-PEG.

  20. Generation of Gene-Engineered Chimeric DNA Molecules for Specific Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Vera; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Dimitrova, Iliyana; Nikolova, Maria; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of self-reactive B and T cells and autoantibody production. In particular, double-stranded DNA-specific B cells play an important role in lupus progression, and their selective elimination is a reasonable approach for effective therapy of SLE. DNA-based vaccines aim at the induction of immune response against the vector-encoded antigen. Here, we are exploring, as a new DNA-based therapy of SLE, a chimeric DNA molecule encoding a DNA-mimotope peptide, and the Fv but not the immunogenic Fc fragment of an FcγRIIb-specific monoclonal antibody. This DNA construct was inserted in the expression vector pNut and used as a naked DNA vaccine in a mouse model of lupus. The chimeric DNA molecule can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and cross-links cell surface receptors on DNA-specific B cells, delivering an inhibitory intracellular signal. Intramuscular administration of the recombinant DNA molecule to lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice prevented increase in IgG anti-DNA antibodies and was associated with a low degree of proteinuria, modulation of cytokine profile, and suppression of lupus nephritis. PMID:23075110

  1. Immunization with a novel chimeric peptide representing B and T cell epitopes from HER2 extracellular domain (HER2 ECD) for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Manijeh; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Jafarian, Abbas; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Because of direct stimulating immune system against disease, vaccination or active immunotherapy is preferable compared to passive immunotherapy. For this purpose, a newly designed chimeric peptide containing epitopes for both B and T cells from HER2 ECD subdomain III was proposed. To evaluate the effects of the active immunization, a discontinuous B cell epitope peptide was selected based on average antigenicity by bioinformatics analysis. The selected peptide was collinearly synthesized as a chimera with a T helper epitope from the protein sequence of measles virus fusion (208-302) using the GPSL linker. Three mice were immunized with the chimeric peptide. Reactive antibodies with HER2 protein in ELISA and immunofluorescence assays with no cross-reactivity were generated. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that the anti-peptide sera had inhibitory effects on proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells. Hence, the newly designed, discontinuous chimeric peptide representing B and T cell epitopes from subdomain III of HER2-ECD can form the basis for future vaccines design, where these data can be applied for monoclonal antibody production targeting the distinct epitope of HER2 receptor compared to the two broadly used anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies, Herceptin and pertuzumab.

  2. Thermodynamics of binding interactions between extracellular polymeric substances and heavy metals by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Xia, Jia-Shuai; Chen, You-Peng; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play a crucial role in heavy metal bio-adsorption using activated sludge, but the interaction mechanism between heavy metals and EPS remains unclear. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to illuminate the mechanism in this study. The results indicate that binding between heavy metals and EPS is spontaneous and driven mainly by enthalpy change. Extracellular proteins in EPS are major participants in the binding process. Environmental conditions have significant impact on the adsorption performance. Divalent and trivalent cations severely impeded the binding of heavy metal ions to EPS. Electrostatic interaction mainly attributed to competition between divalent cations and heavy metal ions; trivalent cations directly competed with heavy metal ions for EPS binding sites. Trivalent cations were more competitive than divalent cations for heavy metal ion binding because they formed complexing bonds. This study facilitates a better understanding about the interaction between heavy metals and EPS in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct 99mTc labeling of monoclonal antibodies: radiolabeling and in vitro stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garron, J.Y.; Moinereau, M.; Pasqualini, R.; Saccavini, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Direct labeling involves 99m Tc binding to different donor groups on the protein, giving multiple binding sites of various affinities resulting in an in vivo instability. The stability has been considerably improved by activating the antibody using a controlled reduction reaction (using 2-aminoethanethiol). This reaction generates sulfhydryl groups, which are known to strongly bind 99m Tc. The direct 99m Tc antibody labeling method was explored using whole antibodies and fragments. Analytical methods were developed for routine evaluation of radiolabeling yield and in vitro stability. Stable direct antibody labeling with 99m Tc requires the generation of sulfhydryl groups, which show high affinity binding sites for 99m Tc. Such groups are obtained with 2-aminoethanethiol (AET), which induces the reduction of the intrachain or interchain disulfide bond, with no structural deterioration or any loss of immunobiological activity of the antibody. The development of fast, reliable analytical methods has made possible the qualitative and quantitative assessment of technetium species generated by the radiolabeling process. Labeling stability is determined by competition of the 99m Tc-antibody bond with three ligands, Chelex 100 (a metal chelate-type resin), free DTPA solution and 1% HSA solution. Very good 99m Tc-antibody stability is obtained with activated IgG (IgGa) and Fab' fragment, which makes these substances possible candidates for immunoscintigraphy use. (author)

  4. Identification of metal ion binding sites based on amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyong; Hu, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sujuan; Ding, Changjiang; Feng, Yonge; Bao, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The identification of metal ion binding sites is important for protein function annotation and the design of new drug molecules. This study presents an effective method of analyzing and identifying the binding residues of metal ions based solely on sequence information. Ten metal ions were extracted from the BioLip database: Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Na+, K+ and Co2+. The analysis showed that Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ were sensitive to the conservation of amino acids at binding sites, and promising results can be achieved using the Position Weight Scoring Matrix algorithm, with an accuracy of over 79.9% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of over 0.6. The binding sites of other metals can also be accurately identified using the Support Vector Machine algorithm with multifeature parameters as input. In addition, we found that Ca2+ was insensitive to hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity information and Mn2+ was insensitive to polarization charge information. An online server was constructed based on the framework of the proposed method and is freely available at http://60.31.198.140:8081/metal/HomePage/HomePage.html.

  5. Metal ion interaction of an oligopeptide fragment representing the regulatory metal binding site of a CueR protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szokolai, Hajnalka; Roszahegyi, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Metalloregulatory proteins of the MerR family are transcriptional activators that sense/control the concentration of various metal ions inside bacteria.1 The Cu+ efflux regulator CueR, similarly to other MerR proteins, possesses a short multiple Cys-containing metal binding loop close to the C...... of cognate metal ions.2 Nevertheless, it is an interesting question whether the same sequence, when removed from the protein, shows a flexibility to adopt different coordination environments and may efficiently bind metal ions having preferences for larger coordination numbers....

  6. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash

    2008-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall...... investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls...

  7. Simplifying complex sequence information: a PCP-consensus protein binds antibodies against all four Dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David M; Lewis, Jessica A; Lu, Wenzhe; Schein, Catherine H

    2012-09-14

    Designing proteins that reflect the natural variability of a pathogen is essential for developing novel vaccines and drugs. Flaviviruses, including Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV), evolve rapidly and can "escape" neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by mutation. Designing antigens that represent many distinct strains is important for DENV, where infection with a strain from one of the four serotypes may lead to severe hemorrhagic disease on subsequent infection with a strain from another serotype. Here, a DENV physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequence was derived from 671 unique sequences from the Flavitrack database. PCP-consensus proteins for domain 3 of the envelope protein (EdomIII) were expressed from synthetic genes in Escherichia coli. The ability of the purified consensus proteins to bind polyclonal antibodies generated in response to infection with strains from each of the four DENV serotypes was determined. The initial consensus protein bound antibodies from DENV-1-3 in ELISA and Western blot assays. This sequence was altered in 3 steps to incorporate regions of maximum variability, identified as significant changes in the PCPs, characteristic of DENV-4 strains. The final protein was recognized by antibodies against all four serotypes. Two amino acids essential for efficient binding to all DENV antibodies are part of a discontinuous epitope previously defined for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The PCP-consensus method can significantly reduce the number of experiments required to define a multivalent antigen, which is particularly important when dealing with pathogens that must be tested at higher biosafety levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Senile amyloidosis and neuron binding antibody in the aging Syrian hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenthal, H.T.; Musacchia, X.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of age, sex, and irradiation on the genesis of amyloidosis, neuron-binding antibody (NBA), and the concomitant appearance of these two phenomena were studied in a colony of Syrian hamsters. In nonirradiated controls amyloidosis increased in prevalence with age after 12 months, and prevalence was higher in females than in males. Irradiation had the effect of advancing the appearance of amyloidosis to the 7-12 months group but did not intensify the amyloidotic process. IgG binding to the nucleus or cytoplasm of neurons was rare, and, despite the fact that IgM and IgA binding to these structures was present in about one-third of the animals, there was neither an aging nor an irradiation effect. The only statistically significant findings with respect to the concomitant occurrence of amyloid and NBA were negative correlations between nuclear IgM and IgA binding and amyloidosis. Of the various species thus far studied, the hamster is the first in which there has been no aging effect in respect to NBA

  9. Biological, immunological and functional properties of two novel multi-variant chimeric recombinant proteins of CSP antigens for vaccine development against Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Samaneh H; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Salmanian, Ali H; Amani, Jafar; Mehrizi, Akram A; Snounou, Georges; Nosten, François; Andolina, Chiara; Mourtazavi, Yousef; Djadid, Navid D

    2017-10-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is a major pre-erythrocyte vaccine candidate. The protein has a central repeat region that belongs to one of repeat families (VK210, VK247, and the P. vivax-like). In the present study, computer modelling was employed to select chimeric proteins, comprising the conserved regions and different arrangements of the repeat elements (VK210 and VK247), whose structure is similar to that of the native counterparts. DNA encoding the selected chimeras (named CS127 and CS712) were synthetically constructed based on E. coli codons, then cloned and expressed. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; anti-Pv-210-CDC and -Pv-247-CDC), recognized the chimeric antigens in ELISA, indicating correct conformation and accessibility of the B-cell epitopes. ELISA using IgG from plasma samples collected from 221 Iranian patients with acute P. vivax showed that only 49.32% of the samples reacted to both CS127 and CS712 proteins. The dominant subclass for the two chimeras was IgG1 (48% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.777±0.420 for CS127; 48.41% of the positive responders, OD 492 =0.862±0.423 for CS712, with no statistically significant difference P>0.05; Wilcoxon signed ranks test). Binding assays showed that both chimeric proteins bound to immobilized heparan sulphate and HepG2 hepatocyte cells in a concentration-dependent manner, saturable at 80μg/mL. Additionally, anti-CS127 and -CS712 antibodies raised in mice recognized the native protein on the surface of P. vivax sporozoite with high intensity, confirming the presence of common epitopes between the recombinant forms and the native proteins. In summary, despite structural differences at the molecular level, the expression levels of both chimeras were satisfactory, and their conformational structure retained biological function, thus supporting their potential for use in the development of vivax-based vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. A multiple multicomponent approach to chimeric peptide-peptoid podands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Daniel G; León, Fredy; Concepción, Odette; Morales, Fidel E; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2013-05-10

    The success of multi-armed, peptide-based receptors in supramolecular chemistry traditionally is not only based on the sequence but equally on an appropriate positioning of various peptidic chains to create a multivalent array of binding elements. As a faster, more versatile and alternative access toward (pseudo)peptidic receptors, a new approach based on multiple Ugi four-component reactions (Ugi-4CR) is proposed as a means of simultaneously incorporating several binding and catalytic elements into organizing scaffolds. By employing α-amino acids either as the amino or acid components of the Ugi-4CRs, this multiple multicomponent process allows for the one-pot assembly of podands bearing chimeric peptide-peptoid chains as appended arms. Tripodal, bowl-shaped, and concave polyfunctional skeletons are employed as topologically varied platforms for positioning the multiple peptidic chains formed by Ugi-4CRs. In a similar approach, steroidal building blocks with several axially-oriented isocyano groups are synthesized and utilized to align the chimeric chains with conformational constrains, thus providing an alternative to the classical peptido-steroidal receptors. The branched and hybrid peptide-peptoid appendages allow new possibilities for both rational design and combinatorial production of synthetic receptors. The concept is also expandable to other multicomponent reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  12. Effect of iodination site on binding of radiolabeled ligand by insulin antibodies and insulin autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, J.L.; Wilkin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Four human insulins and four porcine insulins, each monoiodinated to the same specific activity at one of the four tyrosine residues (A14, A19, B16, B26) and purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, were tested in a radiobinding assay against a panel of insulin-antibody (IA)-positive sera from 10 insulin-treated diabetics and insulin-autoantibody-positive (IAA) sera from 10 nondiabetics. Of the 10 IAA-positive sera, five were fully cross reactive with both insulin species, and five were specific for human insulin. The rank order of binding of sera with the four ligands from each species was random for IA (mean rank values of 1.9 for A14, 2.0 for A19, 2.5 for B16, and 3.6 for B26 from a possible ranking range of 1 to 4), but more consistent for non-human-insulin-specific IAA (mean rank values 1.3 for A14, 3.8 for A19, 1.7 for B16, and 3.2 for B26 for labeled human insulins; 1.2 for A14, 4.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 3.0 for B26 for labeled porcine insulins). The rank order of binding was virtually uniform for human-insulin-specific IAA (mean values 1.2 for A14, 3.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 4.0 for B26). The influence of iodination site on the binding of labeled insulin appears to be dependent on the proximity of the labeled tyrosine to the antibody binding site and the clonal diversity, or restriction, of insulin-binding antibodies in the test serum. When IA and IAA are measured, the implications of this study regarding the choice of assay ligand may be important

  13. Comparison of (/sup 125/I)beta-endorphin binding to rat brain and NG108-15 cells using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidlack, J.M.; O' Malley, W.E.; Schulz, R.

    1988-02-01

    The properties of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin-binding sites from rat brain membranes and membranes from the NG108-15 cell line were compared using a monoclonal antibody directed against the opioid receptor and opioid peptides as probes. The binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to both rat brain and NG108-15 membranes yielded linear Scatchard plots with Kd values of 1.2 nM and 1.5 nM, respectively, and Bmax values of 865 fmol/mg rat brain membrane protein and 1077 fmol/mg NG108-15 membrane protein. A monoclonal antibody, OR-689.2.4, capable of inhibiting mu and delta binding but not kappa binding to rat brain membranes, noncompetitively inhibited the binding of 1 nM (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to rat brain and NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 405 nM for rat brain membranes and 543 nM for NG108-15 membranes. The monoclonal antibody also inhibited the binding of 3 nM (/sup 3/H) (D-penicillamine2, D-penicillamine5) enkephalin to NG108-15 membranes with an IC50 value of 370 nM. In addition to blocking the binding of (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin to brain membranes, the antibody also displaced (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin from membranes. Site-specific opioid peptides had large variations in their IC50 values depending on whether they were inhibiting (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to rat brain or the NG108-15 membranes. When the peptides were tested with the monoclonal antibody for their combined ability to inhibit (/sup 125/I)beta h-endorphin binding to both membrane preparations, the peptides and antibody blocked binding as though they were acting at allosterically coupled sites, not two totally independent sites. These studies suggest that mu-, delta-, and beta-endorphin-binding sites share some sequence homology with the 35,000-dalton protein that the antibody is directed against.

  14. Chimeric Lyssavirus Glycoproteins with Increased Immunological Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallet, Corinne; Jacob, Yves; Bahloul, Chokri; Drings, Astrid; Desmezieres, Emmanuel; Tordo, Noël; Perrin, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein molecule (G) can be divided into two parts separated by a flexible hinge: the NH2 half (site II part) containing antigenic site II up to the linear region (amino acids [aa] 253 to 275 encompassing epitope VI [aa 264]) and the COOH half (site III part) containing antigenic site III and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The structural and immunological roles of each part were investigated by cell transfection and mouse DNA-based immunization with homogeneous and chimeric G genes formed by fusion of the site II part of one genotype (GT) with the site III part of the same or another GT. Various site II-site III combinations between G genes of PV (Pasteur virus strain) rabies (GT1), Mokola (GT3), and EBL1 (European bat lyssavirus 1 [GT5]) viruses were tested. Plasmids pGPV-PV, pGMok-Mok, pGMok-PV, and pGEBL1-PV induced transient expression of correctly transported and folded antigens in neuroblastoma cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies against parental viruses in mice, whereas, pG-PVIII (site III part only) and pGPV-Mok did not. The site III part of PV (GT1) was a strong inducer of T helper cells and was very effective at presenting the site II part of various GTs. Both parts are required for correct folding and transport of chimeric G proteins which have a strong potential value for immunological studies and development of multivalent vaccines. Chimeric plasmid pGEBL1-PV broadens the spectrum of protection against European lyssavirus genotypes (GT1, GT5, and GT6). PMID:9847325

  15. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV F occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV F , we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV F at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy

  16. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  17. Covalent Binding of Antibodies to Cellulose Paper Discs and Their Applications in Naked-eye Colorimetric Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanfen; Gelder, Victor Van; Amaladoss, Anburaj; Patel, Kadamb Haribhai

    2016-10-21

    This report presents two methods for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies on cellulose filter paper grade No. 1 (medium-flow filter paper) discs and grade No. 113 (fast-flow filter paper) discs. These cellulose paper discs were grafted with amine functional groups through a silane coupling technique before the antibodies were immobilized on them. Periodate oxidation and glutaraldehyde cross-linking methods were used to graft capture antibodies on the cellulose paper discs. In order to ensure the maximum binding capacity of the capture antibodies to their targets after immobilization, the effects of various concentrations of sodium periodate, glutaraldehyde, and capture antibodies on the surface of the paper discs were investigated. The antibodies that were coated on the amine-functionalized cellulose paper discs through a glutaraldehyde cross-linking agent showed enhanced binding activity to the target when compared to the periodate oxidation method. IgG (in mouse reference serum) was used as a reference target in this study to test the application of covalently immobilized antibodies through glutaraldehyde. A new paper-based, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was successfully developed and validated for the detection of IgG. This method does not require equipment, and it can detect 100 ng/ml of IgG. The fast-flow filter paper was more sensitive than the medium-flow filter paper. The incubation period of this assay was short and required small sample volumes. This naked-eye, colorimetric immunoassay can be extended to detect other targets that are identified with conventional ELISA.

  18. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    , the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing......Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...... whether EGF-R1 could recognize molecules unrelated to the EGF receptor, the EGF binding and EGF-R1 recognition profiles were compared on cultures of SVK14 cells, a SV40 transformed human keratinocyte cell line. EGF binding and EGF-R1 monoclonal antibody distribution on these cells was found to be similar...

  19. Epitopes in α8β1 and other RGD-binding integrins delineate classes of integrin-blocking antibodies and major binding loops in α subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Kawashima, Nagako; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2015-09-09

    Identification of epitopes for integrin-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has aided our understanding of structure-function relationship of integrins. We mapped epitopes of chicken anti-integrin-α8-subunit-blocking mAbs by mutational analyses, examining regions that harboured all mapped epitopes recognized by mAbs against other α-subunits in the RGD-binding-integrin subfamily. Six mAbs exhibited blocking function, and these mAbs recognized residues on the same W2:41-loop on the top-face of the β-propeller. Loop-tips sufficiently close to W2:41 (face was identified as an additional component of the epitope of one antibody, clone YZ5. Binding sequences on the two loops were conserved in virtually all mammals, and that on W3:34 was also conserved in chickens. These indicate 1) YZ5 binds both top and bottom loops, and the binding to W3:34 is by interactions to conserved residues between immunogen and host species, 2) five other blocking mAbs solely bind to W2:41 and 3) the α8 mAbs would cross-react with most mammals. Comparing with the mAbs against the other α-subunits of RGD-integrins, two classes were delineated; those binding to "W3:34 and an top-loop", and "solely W2:41", accounting for 82% of published RGD-integrin-mAbs.

  20. In silico prediction of monovalent and chimeric tetravalent vaccines for prevention and treatment of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Subramaniyan; Ramesh, Venkatachalam; Prabhu, Srinivasan; Manogar, Palani

    2017-11-01

    Reverse vaccinology method was used to predict the monovalent peptide vaccine candidate to produce antibodies for therapeutic purpose and to predict tetravalent vaccine candidate to act as a common vaccine to cover all the fever dengue virus serotypes. Envelope (E)-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were used for vaccine prediction using NCBI, Uniprot/Swissprot, Swiss-prot viewer, VaxiJen V2.0, TMHMM, BCPREDS, Propred-1, Propred and MHC Pred,. E-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were identified as antigen from which T cell epitopes, through B cell epitopes, were predicted to act as peptide vaccine candidates. Each selected T cell epitope of E-protein was confirmed to act as vaccine and to induce complementary antibody against particular serotype of dengue virus. Chimeric tetravalent vaccine was formed by the conjugation of four vaccines, each from four dengue serotypes to act as a common vaccine candidate for all the four dengue serotypes. It can be justifiably concluded that the monovalent 9-mer T cell epitope for each DENV serotypes can be used to produce specific antibody agaomst dengue virus and a chimeric common tetravalent vaccine candidate to yield a comparative vaccine to cover any of the four dengue virus serotype. This vaccine is expected to act as highly immunogenic against preventing dengue fever.

  1. Kidney Versus Islet Allograft Survival After Induction of Mixed Chimerism With Combined Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Tetsu; Ko, Dicken S C; Boskovic, Svjetlan; O'Neil, John J; Chipashvili, Vaja; Koulmanda, Maria; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Kawai, Kento; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Smith, R Neal; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of transient mixed chimerism and long-term acceptance of renal allografts in MHC mismatched nonhuman primates. In this study, we attempted to extend this tolerance induction approach to islet allografts. A total of eight recipients underwent MHC mismatched combined islet and bone marrow (BM) transplantation after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Three recipients were treated after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen that included low-dose total body and thymic irradiation, horse Atgam (ATG), six doses of anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody (mAb), and a 1-month course of cyclosporine (CyA) (Islet A). In Islet B, anti-CD8 mAb was administered in place of CyA. In Islet C, two recipients were treated with Islet B, but without ATG. The results were compared with previously reported results of eight cynomolgus monkeys that received combined kidney and BM transplantation (Kidney A) following the same conditioning regimen used in Islet A. The majority of kidney/BM recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival after induction of transient chimerism. However, prolonged islet survival was not achieved in similarly conditioned islet/BM recipients (Islet A), despite induction of comparable levels of chimerism. In order to rule out islet allograft loss due to CyA toxicity, three recipients were treated with anti-CD8 mAb in place of CyA. Although these recipients developed significantly superior mixed chimerism and more prolonged islet allograft survival (61, 103, and 113 days), islet function was lost soon after the disappearance of chimerism. In Islet C recipients, neither prolonged chimerism nor islet survival was observed (30 and 40 days). Significant improvement of mixed chimerism induction and islet allograft survival were achieved with a CyA-free regimen that included anti-CD8 mAb. However, unlike the kidney allograft, islet allograft tolerance was not induced with transient chimerism. Induction of more

  2. A novel HPV 16 L1-based chimeric virus-like particle containing E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes permits highly specific detection of antibodies in patients with CIN 1 and HPV-16 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Osorio Edelmiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of IgG antibodies to HPV-16 L1-virus like particles (VLPs in serum has been reported as a result of persistent exposure to the virus and as a marker of disease progression. However, detection of VLP-specific antibodies in sera does not always indicate a malignant lesion as positive results may also be due to a nonmalignant viral infection. Furthermore, malignant lesions are associated with an increased antibody titer for E6 and E7 proteins. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA using a novel chimeric virus-like particle (cVLP encoding an L1 protein fused with a string of HPV-16 E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes to its C-terminus to be used for detection of HPV-16 specific antibodies in patients with cervical intraepithelial lesion grade 1 (CIN 1. Results The sera of 30 patients with CIN 1 who also tested positive for HPV-16 DNA and of 30 age-matched normal donors negative for HPV infection were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies specific for either VLP-L1 (HPV-16 L1, gVLP (derived from Gardasil, or cVLP by ELISA. The cVLP-reactive sera yielded two distinct groups of results: (H reactivity levels that presented very strong cVLP-specific titers, and (L reactivity levels with significantly lower titers similar to those obtained with VLP-L1 and gVLP antigens. Additionally, the sera that presented the higher cVLP titers closely matched those that had significantly stronger reactivity to E6 and E7 epitopes. Interestingly, the samples with the highest titers corresponded to patients with the higher numbers of sexual partners and pregnancies. On the other hand only 4 out of the 12 sera that harbored antibodies with VLP neutralizing ability corresponded to the group with high cVLP antibody titers. Conclusion We report for the first time that chimeric particles containing HPV-16 L1 protein fused with E6 and E7 seroreactive epitopes enable much better detection of IgG antibodies in the sera of CIN 1 patients

  3. Biomimetic chimeric peptide-tethered hydrogels for human mesenchymal stem cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Gunwoo; Choi, Junhyeok; Yi, TacGhee; Cho, Yun Kyoung; Song, Sun Uk; Byun, Youngro; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report a chimeric peptide-tethered fibrin hydrogel scaffold for delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Osteopontin-derived peptide (OP) was used as an hMSC-tethering moiety. OP showed hMSC adhesion properties and enhanced hMSC proliferation. A natural fibrin-binding protein-derived peptide (FBP) was tested for its ability to tether hMSC to the fibrin gel matrix. FBP loading on fibrin gels was 8.2-fold higher than that of a scrambled peptide (scFBP). FBP-loaded fibrin gels were retained at injection sites longer than scFBP-loaded fibrin gels, showing a 15.9-fold higher photon intensity of fluorescent FBP-grafted fibrin gels than fluorescent scFBP-loaded fibrin gels 48 h after injection. On the basis of the fibrin gel-binding properties of FBP and the hMSC-binding and proliferation-supporting properties of OP, we constructed chimeric peptides containing FBP and OP linked with a spacer (FBPsOP). Four days after transplantation, the survival of hMSC in FBPsOP-grafted fibrin gels was 3.9-fold higher than hMSC in fibrin gels alone. Our results suggest the potential of FBPsOP-grafted fibrin gels as a bioactive delivery system for enhanced survival of stem cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. NPYFa, A Chimeric Peptide of Met-Enkephalin, and NPFF Induces Tolerance-Free Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgal, Annu; Kumar, Krishan; Mollereau, Catherine; Pasha, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe is an endogenous amphiactive analgesic peptide. Neuropeptide FF, on the other hand, is reported for its role in opioid modulation and tolerance development. Based on these reports, in the present study we designed a chimeric peptide NPYFa (YGGFMKKKPQRFamide), having the Met-enkephalin (opioid) and PQRFamide sequence of neuropeptide FF, which can then target both the opioid and neuropeptide FF receptors. We hypothesized that the chimeric peptide so designed would have both analgesic properties and further aid in understanding of the role of neuropeptide FF in the development of opiate tolerance. Our studies indicated that NPYFa induced an early onset, potent, dose-dependent and prolonged antinociception. Additionally, antagonists (MOR, KOR, and DOR) pretreatment studies determined a KOR-mediated antinociception activity of the ligand. Further, in vitro binding studies using the Eu-GTP-γS binding assay on cell lines expressing opioid and NPFF receptors showed binding to both the opioid and neuropeptide FF receptors suggesting a multiple receptor binding character of NPYFa. Moreover, chronic (6 days) treatment with NPYFa exhibited an absence of tolerance development subsequent to its analgesia. The current study proposes NPYFa as a potent, long-acting antinociceptor lacking tolerance development as well as a probe to study opioid analgesia and the associated complex mechanisms of tolerance development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Time resolved native ion-mobility mass spectrometry to monitor dynamics of IgG4 Fab arm exchange and "bispecific" monoclonal antibody formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaene, François; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Colas, Olivier; Ayoub, Daniel; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Beck, Alain; Cianférani, Sarah

    2013-10-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and derivatives such as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and bispecific antibodies (bsAb), are the fastest growing class of human therapeutics. Most of the therapeutic antibodies currently on the market and in clinical trials are chimeric, humanized, and human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). An increasing number of IgG2s and IgG4s that have distinct structural and functional properties are also investigated to develop products that lack or have diminished antibody effector functions compared to IgG1. Importantly, wild type IgG4 has been shown to form half molecules (one heavy chain and one light chain) that lack interheavy chain disulfide bonds and form intrachain disulfide bonds. Moreover, IgG4 undergoes a process of Fab-arm exchange (FAE) in which the heavy chains of antibodies of different specificities can dissociate and recombine in bispecific antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. Here, native mass spectrometry (MS) and time-resolved traveling wave ion mobility MS (TWIM-MS) were used for the first time for online monitoring of FAE and bsAb formation using Hz6F4-2v3 and natalizumab, two humanized IgG4s which bind to human Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) and alpha4 integrin, respectively. In addition, native MS analysis of bsAb/JAM-A immune complexes revealed that bsAb can bind up to two antigen molecules, confirming that the Hz6F4 family preferentially binds dimeric JAM-A. Our results illustrate how IM-MS can rapidly assess bsAb structural heterogeneity and be easily implemented into MS workflows for bsAb production follow up and bsAb/antigen complex characterization. Altogether, these results provide new MS-based methodologies for in-depth FAE and bsAb formation monitoring. Native MS and IM-MS will play an increasing role in next generation biopharmaceutical product characterization like bsAbs, antibody mixtures, and antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) as well as for biosimilar and biobetter antibodies.

  7. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark [NIH

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  8. Identification of a divalent metal cation binding site in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 required for HSV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Kevin F; Yan, Zhipeng; Dreyfus, David H; Knipe, David M

    2012-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that is necessary for viral DNA replication and exhibits recombinase activity in vitro. Alignment of the HSV-1 ICP8 amino acid sequence with ICP8 homologs from other herpesviruses revealed conserved aspartic acid (D) and glutamic acid (E) residues. Amino acid residue D1087 was conserved in every ICP8 homolog analyzed, indicating that it is likely critical for ICP8 function. We took a genetic approach to investigate the functions of the conserved ICP8 D and E residues in HSV-1 replication. The E1086A D1087A mutant form of ICP8 failed to support the replication of an ICP8 mutant virus in a complementation assay. E1086A D1087A mutant ICP8 bound DNA, albeit with reduced affinity, demonstrating that the protein is not globally misfolded. This mutant form of ICP8 was also recognized by a conformation-specific antibody, further indicating that its overall structure was intact. A recombinant virus expressing E1086A D1087A mutant ICP8 was defective in viral replication, viral DNA synthesis, and late gene expression in Vero cells. A class of enzymes called DDE recombinases utilize conserved D and E residues to coordinate divalent metal cations in their active sites. We investigated whether the conserved D and E residues in ICP8 were also required for binding metal cations and found that the E1086A D1087A mutant form of ICP8 exhibited altered divalent metal binding in an in vitro iron-induced cleavage assay. These results identify a novel divalent metal cation-binding site in ICP8 that is required for ICP8 functions during viral replication.

  9. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  10. Generation and characterization of rat and mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for MeCP2 and their use in X-inactivation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Laurence Jost

    Full Text Available Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 binds DNA, and has a preference for methylated CpGs and, hence, in cells, it accumulates in heterochromatin. Even though it is expressed ubiquitously MeCP2 is particularly important during neuronal maturation. This is underscored by the fact that in Rett syndrome, a neurological disease, 80% of patients carry a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Since the MECP2 gene lies on the X chromosome and is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, affected patients are usually chimeric for wild type and mutant MeCP2. Here, we present the generation and characterization of the first rat monoclonal MeCP2 specific antibodies as well as mouse monoclonal antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal antibody. We demonstrate that our antibodies are suitable for immunoblotting, (chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence of endogenous and ectopically expressed MeCP2. Epitope mapping revealed that most of the MeCP2 monoclonal antibodies recognize the C-terminal domain and one the N-terminal domain of MeCP2. Using slot blot analysis, we determined a high sensitivity of all antibodies, detecting amounts as low as 1 ng of MeCP2 protein. Moreover, the antibodies recognize MeCP2 from different species, including human, mouse, rat and pig. Lastly, we have validated their use by analyzing and quantifying X chromosome inactivation skewing using brain tissue of MeCP2 heterozygous null female mice. The new MeCP2 specific monoclonal antibodies described here perform well in a large variety of immunological applications making them a very valuable set of tools for studies of MeCP2 pathophysiology in situ and in vitro.

  11. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Amy W; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2014-11-13

    To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4(+) binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140(SR162), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcγRIIa, FcγRIIb and FcγRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcγRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection.

  12. Homologous recombination in hybridoma cells: heavy chain chimeric antibody produced by gene targeting.

    OpenAIRE

    Fell, H P; Yarnold, S; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Folger, K R

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate that murine myeloma cells can efficiently mediate homologous recombination. The murine myeloma cell line J558L was shown to appropriately recombine two transfected DNA molecules in approximately 30% of cells that received and integrated intact copies of both molecules. This activity was then exploited to direct major reconstructions of an endogenous locus within a hybridoma cell line. Production of antigen-specific chimeric heavy chain was achieved by targeting the human IgG1 h...

  13. Novel chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles harboring serotype O VP1 protect guinea pigs against challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Li, Zhiyong; Xie, Yinli; Qin, Xiaodong; Qi, Xingcai; Sun, Peng; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Youji; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious, acute viral disease of cloven-hoofed animal species causing severe economic losses worldwide. Among the seven serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), serotype O is predominant, but its viral capsid is more acid sensitive than other serotypes, making it more difficult to produce empty serotype O VLPs in the low pH insect hemolymph. Therefore, a novel chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for serotype O FMDV was developed and characterized in the present study. The chimeric VLPs were composed of antigenic VP1 from serotype O and segments of viral capsid proteins from serotype Asia1. These VLPs elicited significantly higher FMDV-specific antibody levels in immunized mice than did the inactivated vaccine. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs protected guinea pigs from FMDV challenge with an efficacy similar to that of the inactivated vaccine. These results suggest that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against serotype O FMDV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequence of ligand binding and structure change in the diphtheria toxin repressor upon activation by divalent transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan; Marin, Vedrana; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Semavina, Maria; Guerrero, Luis; Love, John F; Murphy, John R; Logan, Timothy M

    2005-04-19

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is an Fe(II)-activated transcriptional regulator of iron homeostatic and virulence genes in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. DtxR is a two-domain protein that contains two structurally and functionally distinct metal binding sites. Here, we investigate the molecular steps associated with activation by Ni(II)Cl(2) and Cd(II)Cl(2). Equilibrium binding energetics for Ni(II) were obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry, indicating apparent metal dissociation constants of 0.2 and 1.7 microM for two independent sites. The binding isotherms for Ni(II) and Cd(II) exhibited a characteristic exothermic-endothermic pattern that was used to infer the metal binding sequence by comparing the wild-type isotherm with those of several binding site mutants. These data were complemented by measuring the distance between specific backbone amide nitrogens and the first equivalent of metal through heteronuclear NMR relaxation measurements. Previous studies indicated that metal binding affects a disordered to ordered transition in the metal binding domain. The coupling between metal binding and structure change was investigated using near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. Together, the data show that the first equivalent of metal is bound by the primary metal binding site. This binding orients the DNA binding helices and begins to fold the N-terminal domain. Subsequent binding at the ancillary site completes the folding of this domain and formation of the dimer interface. This model is used to explain the behavior of several mutants.

  15. Basic evaluation of 67Ga labeled digoxin derivative as a metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Junji; Takemura, Yasutaka; Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Iijima, Naoko; Yokoyama, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    To develop metal-labeled digoxin radiopharmaceuticals with affinity with anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase, a digoxin derivative conjugated with deferoxamine was synthesized. The derivative had a high binding affinity with 67 Ga at deferoxamine introduced to the terminal sugar ring of digoxin. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative showed enough in vitro binding affinity and selectivity to anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative is considered to be a potential metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical for digoxin RIA as well as myocardial Na + , K + -ATPase imaging. (author)

  16. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  17. [International classification of various types of monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of monoclonal antibodies ("mabs") have been acknowledged during the last two decades. Successive developments led to the marketing of murine antibodies ("o-mab" first, followed by chimeric antibodies ("xi-mab"), humanised antibodies ("zu-mab") and, finally, human monoclonal antibodies ("u-mab"). In order to facilitate the distinction between the various monoclonal antibodies used in clinical practice, an international nomenclature has been proposed with the use of a specific suffix corresponding to the origine/source of "mabs" preceded by an infix referring to the medicine's target. The efforts in developing new types of monoclonal antibodies aimed at improving their pharmacokinetics (longer half-life), pharmacodynamics (better efficacy because of stronger affinity to human receptor), and safety profile (less antigenic and immunogenic reactions). These progresses could be obtained thanks to the remarkable development of molecular biotechnology.

  18. An indirect antibody assay using haptenated antigen and 125I-labelled anti-hapten antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalberse, R.C.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1978-01-01

    Hapten (trinitrophenyl) was coupled to antigen (ovalbumin). The haptenated antigen was bound by anti-ovalbumin antibody and binding was quantitated with 125 I-labelled anti-hapten antibodies. Thus, with a single radioactive reagent, antibodies against a variety of antigens can be detected while the problems inherent in a labelled antiglobulin binding test are avoided. In the ovalbumin system, the haptenated antigen binding test proved to be approximately 20 times as sensitive as the iodinated ovalbumin binding test

  19. Study the effect of F17S mutation on the chimeric Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Khaleghinejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipases (triacylglycerol acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3 are one of the highest value commercial enzymes as they have potential applications in biotechnology for detergents, food, pharmaceuticals, leather, textiles, cosmetics, and paper industries; and are currently receiving considerable attention because of their potential applications in biotechnology. Bacillus thermocatenulatus Lipase 2 (BTL2 is one of the most important research targets, because of its potential industrial applications. In this study, the effect of substitution Phe17 with Ser in mutated BTL2 lipase, which conserved pentapeptide (112Ala-His-Ser-Gln-Gly116 was replaced with similar sequences (207Gly-Glu-Ser-Ala-Gly211 of Candida rugosa lipase (CLR at the nucleophilic elbow region. Docking results confirmed the mutated lipase to be better than the chimeric lipase. So, cloning was conducted, and the mutated and chimeric btl2 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the enzymes were purified by anion exchange chromatography. The mutation increased lipase lipolytic activity against most of the applied substrates, with the exception of tributyrin when compared with chimeric lipase. Further, the mutated lipase exhibited higher activity than the chimeric lipase at all temperatures. Optimum pH of the mutated lipase was obtained at pH 9.5, which was more than the chimeric one. Enzyme activity of the mutated lipase in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and metal ions was also improved than the chimeric lipase.

  20. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  1. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  2. Labeling an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Leyva Montaña, René; Prats Capote, Anaís; Góngora Bravo, Magdiel; Alberti Ramírez, Alejandro; León, Mariela; Hernández González, Ignacio; Dorvignit, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are among the 10 leading causes of death, both in Cuba and in the world, with an increasing incidence in recent years. Follicular lymphoma low-grade (indolent) is one of the most common in the Western world, representing 1/3 of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). More than 90% of patients present with disseminated disease at diagnosis and generally have a slow evolution and good response to conventional treatment; but radically changed its forecast to relapse, resistance to therapeutic and histologic transformation can occur. The monoclonal antibody therapy has been a promising therapeutic. In this respect CD20 antigen it has been considered one of the most attractive targets in the therapy of follicular B cell lymphoma This is expressed in more than 90% of cases, while not present in stem cells and lines progenitors. Despite the success of immunotherapy, the relapse rate is still considerable. In order to increase the cytotoxic potential of immunotherapy, marked with beta emitting radionuclides alpha particles or monoclonal antibodies are used today. Despite encouraging results in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas refractory to other treatments, the extremely high costs of these commercial radiopharmaceuticals have greatly limited its application, even in the first world. A sustainable alternative is the marking of other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, so researchers from several countries have concentrated their efforts on rituximaby other similar antibodies labeled with therapeutic radionuclides, as a possible cost-effectively to more problem. Today in Cuba it has an electrolytic generator 90 Sr- 90 Y Isotope Center, which ensures the availability of the radionuclide. In addition, the chimeric MAb rituximab is applied as part of the therapy of NHL in its health system and, recently, the Center for Molecular Immunology has obtained a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody biosimilar rituximab, which is in phase clinical trial; which opens prospects for

  3. Mycoplasma infection of cell lines can simulate the expression of Fc receptors by binding of the carbohydrate moiety of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, H; Krausse, R; Lorenzen, J; Havsteen, B

    1985-05-01

    During the production of Fc receptor (FcR)-bearing hybridomas it was observed with a particular monoclonal anti-sheep red blood cell antibody (anti-SRBC 1/5, IgG1) that the contamination with Mycoplasma arginini of in vitro cultured cell lines leads to an apparent FcR activity. This property did not correspond with the serological typing since other antibodies of the same isotype could not support FcR rosette formation. Another mycoplasma strain M. orale lacked this property. Analysis of the binding reaction revealed that M. arginini contains a lectin which binds the carbohydrate moiety of the anti-SRBC 1/5 antibody, i.e. anti-SRBC 1/5 synthesized under the influence of tunicamycin or deglycosylated by NaIO4 oxidation did not support rosette formation. These data suggest that binding of antibodies to certain mycoplasma strains may be a pathogenic factor during mycoplasma infections by masking the microorganisms with the host's own defense molecules. The experiments with M. arginini-infected cell lines gain immunological importance since we obtained identical results with staphylococcal protein A, as another bacteriological FcR, and cell lines expressing intrinsic membrane FcR. Although it is an open question whether the glycoconjugates are directly bound by the FcR or else by influencing the three-dimensional structure of the antibodies, it seems possible that FcR in general may be lectins.

  4. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs

  5. Designing two-in-one antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ignacio Garcia; Espinoza, Luis R

    2009-09-01

    Evaluation of: Bostrom J, Shang-Fan Y, Kan D et al.: Variants of the antibody Herceptin that interact with HER2 and VEGF at the antigen binding site. Science 323, 1610-1614 (2009). The longstanding held notion that one antibody equals one antigen and, hence, one function has been challenged in recent years. Improved technology in antibody production, especially the accumulation of sequence data of immunoglobulin genes and the advent of PCR have made it possible to clone antibody gene repertoires. The current paper provides further challenge to the notion of one antibody = one antigen by developing 'two-in-one' antibodies with an antigen-binding site that binds two distinct proteins with high affinity. A therapeutic variant antibody of Herceptin (Genentech, CA, USA) was isolated that binds the human EGF receptor (HER)2 and also to VEGF. This development may represent a breakthrough discovery and may have significant implications in the therapy of malignant, infectious, allergic and autoimmune disorders.

  6. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  7. Identification of epitopes within integrin β4 for binding of auto-antibodies in ocular cicatricial and mucous membrane pemphigoid: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Khwaja Aftab; Foster, C Stephen; Ahmed, A Razzaque

    2013-11-19

    To identify the epitopes on human β4 integrin to which the sera of patients with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP) and mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) without ocular involvement bind. Fragments of the intracellular domain of the β4 molecule were cloned, expressed, purified and peptides were synthesized. Antibodies to various fragments and peptides were produced in rabbits. Binding specificity was determined via Western blot and blocking experiments. Test sera and controls were injected into neonatal BALB/c mice for in vivo passive transfer. Sera from patients with OCP, MMP, and both OCP and MMP were bound to cloned fragments of IC3.0. Its subcloned fragments IC3.4 (1489 aa-1572 aa) and IC3.4.1 (1489 aa-1510 aa) were bound with the sera from patients with OCP only. Subcloned fragments IC3.6 (1573 aa-1822 aa) and IC3.6.1 (1689 aa-1702 aa) were bound with MMP sera only. No cross-reactivity in binding was observed. Immuno-affinity-purified sera from patients with OCP, MMP, and rabbit antibodies to IC3.0, IC3.4, IC3.4.1, IC3.6, and IC3.6.1, when injected in neonatal BALB/c mice, produced subepidermal blisters in their skin. These preliminary observations identified IC3.4.1 as the possible epitope for the binding of OCP auto-antibody and IC3.6.1 as the possible epitope for the binding of MMP auto-antibody without ocular disease. Antibodies specific to these peptides produced blisters when injected in mice. Still-unidentified epitopes may exist. These observations may enhance our understanding of the role of β4 integrin in the pathobiology of OCP and MMP. Early diagnosis may be possible if serologic tests with specificity and sensitivity can be developed.

  8. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone...

  9. Isolation and characterization of iron chelators from turmeric (Curcuma longa): selective metal binding by curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donald J; Surrago, Christine; Fiordalisi, Celia; Chung, Wing Yin; Kowdley, Kris V

    2017-10-01

    Iron overload disorders may be treated by chelation therapy. This study describes a novel method for isolating iron chelators from complex mixtures including plant extracts. We demonstrate the one-step isolation of curcuminoids from turmeric, the medicinal food spice derived from Curcuma longa. The method uses iron-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-agarose, to which curcumin binds rapidly, specifically, and reversibly. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin each bound iron-NTA-agarose with comparable affinities and a stoichiometry near 1. Analyses of binding efficiencies and purity demonstrated that curcuminoids comprise the primary iron binding compounds recovered from a crude turmeric extract. Competition of curcuminoid binding to the iron resin was used to characterize the metal binding site on curcumin and to detect iron binding by added chelators. Curcumin-Iron-NTA-agarose binding was inhibited by other metals with relative potency: (>90% inhibition) Cu 2+  ~ Al 3+  > Zn 2+  ≥ Ca 2+  ~ Mg 2+  ~ Mn 2+ (80% by addition of iron to the media; uptake was completely restored by desferoxamine. Ranking of metals by relative potencies for blocking curcumin uptake agreed with their relative potencies in blocking curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose. We conclude that curcumin can selectively bind toxic metals including iron in a physiological setting, and propose inhibition of curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose for iron chelator screening.

  10. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure-based engineering to restore high affinity binding of an isoform-selective anti-TGFβ1 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Denise M.; Best, Annie; Qiu, Huawei

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metelimumab (CAT192) is a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody developed as a TGFβ1-specific antagonist. It was tested in clinical trials for the treatment of scleroderma but later terminated due to lack of efficacy. Subsequent characterization of CAT192 indicated that its TGFβ1 binding affinity was reduced by ∼50-fold upon conversion from the parental single-chain variable fragment (scFv) to IgG4. We hypothesized this result was due to decreased conformational flexibility of the IgG that could be altered via engineering. Therefore, we designed insertion mutants in the elbow region and screened for binding and potency. Our results indicated that increasing the elbow region linker length in each chain successfully restored the isoform-specific and high affinity binding of CAT192 to TGFβ1. The crystal structure of the high binding affinity mutant displays large conformational rearrangements of the variable domains compared to the wild-type antigen-binding fragment (Fab) and the low binding affinity mutants. Insertion of two glycines in both the heavy and light chain elbow regions provided sufficient flexibility for the variable domains to extend further apart than the wild-type Fab, and allow the CDR3s to make additional interactions not seen in the wild-type Fab structure. These interactions coupled with the dramatic conformational changes provide a possible explanation of how the scFv and elbow-engineered Fabs bind TGFβ1 with high affinity. This study demonstrates the benefits of re-examining both structure and function when converting scFv to IgG molecules, and highlights the potential of structure-based engineering to produce fully functional antibodies. PMID:29333938

  12. Chimeric peptide-mediated siRNA transduction to inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Mehla, Rajeev; Chauhan, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Persistent human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection provokes immune activation and depletes CD4 +  lymphocytes, leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Uninterrupted administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected patients suppresses viral replication to below the detectable level and partially restores the immune system. However, cART-unresponsive residual HIV-1 infection and elusive transcriptionally silent but reactivatable viral reservoirs maintain a permanent viral DNA blue print. The virus rebounds within a few weeks after interruption of suppressive therapy. Adjunct gene therapy to control viral replication by ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional gene silencing strategy that could suppress residual HIV-1 burden and overcome viral resistance. Small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) are efficient transcriptional inhibitors, but need delivery systems to reach inside target cells. We investigated the potential of chimeric peptide (FP-PTD) to deliver specific siRNAs to HIV-1-susceptible and permissive cells. Chimeric FP-PTD peptide was designed with an RNA binding domain (PTD) to bind siRNA and a cell fusion peptide domain (FP) to enter cells. FP-PTD-siRNA complex entered and inhibited HIV-1 replication in susceptible cells, and could be a candidate for in vivo testing.

  13. Tumor scintigraphy by the method for subtracting the initial image with technetium-99m labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Kentaro; Ito, Sanae; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Takata, Jiro; Kuroki, Masahide; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The method for subtracting the initial image from the localization image was evaluated for radioimmunoscintigraphy of tumors with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were parental mouse and mouse-human chimeric antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), designated F11-39 and ChF11-39, respectively, both of which have been found to discriminate CEA in tumor tissues from the CEA-related antigens. After reduction of the intrinsic disulfide bonds, these antibodies were labeled with Tc-99m. In vivo studies were performed on athymic nude mice bearing the human CEA-producing gastric carcinoma xenografts. Though biodistribution results showed selective and progressive accumulation of Tc-99m labeled antibodies at the tumor site, high radioactivity in blood was inappropriate for scintigraphic visualization of the tumors within a few hours. We examined the subtraction of the initial Tc-99m image from the Tc-99m localization image after a few hours. Subtracted images of the same count reflected the in vivo behavior of the Tc-99m radioactivity. The subtracted scintigrams revealed excellent tumor images with no significant extrarenal background. Visualization of the tumor site was dependent on antigen-specific binding and nonspecific exudation. These results demonstrate that a method of subtraction of the initial image may serve as a potentially useful diagnostic method for an abnormal site for agents with a low pharmacokinetic value. (author)

  14. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  15. Engineered Chimeric Peptides as Antimicrobial Surface Coating Agents toward Infection-Free Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hilal; O'Neill, Mary B; Kacar, Turgay; Wilson, Brandon R; Oren, E Emre; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-03-02

    Prevention of bacterial colonization and consequent biofilm formation remains a major challenge in implantable medical devices. Implant-associated infections are not only a major cause of implant failures but also their conventional treatment with antibiotics brings further complications due to the escalation in multidrug resistance to a variety of bacterial species. Owing to their unique properties, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have gained significant attention as effective agents to combat colonization of microorganisms. These peptides have been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities with specificity to a target cell while having a low tendency for developing bacterial resistance. Engineering biomaterial surfaces that feature AMP properties, therefore, offer a promising approach to prevent implant infections. Here, we engineered a chimeric peptide with bifunctionality that both forms a robust solid-surface coating while presenting antimicrobial property. The individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their solid-binding kinetics to titanium substrate as well as for their antimicrobial properties in solution. The antimicrobial efficacy of the chimeric peptide on the implant material was evaluated in vitro against infection by a variety of bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus. epidermidis, and Escherichia coli, which are commonly found in oral and orthopedic implant related surgeries. Our results demonstrate significant improvement in reducing bacterial colonization onto titanium surfaces below the detectable limit. Engineered chimeric peptides with freely displayed antimicrobial domains could be a potential solution for developing infection-free surfaces by engineering implant interfaces with highly reduced bacterial colonization property.

  16. Liver transplantation : chimerism, complications and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Willem Rogier ten

    2011-01-01

    Chimerism after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the main focus of the studies described in this thesis. The first study showed that chimerism of different cell lineages within the liver graft does occur after OLT. Subsequently, in allogeneic blood stem cell recipients, chimerism was

  17. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  18. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  19. Built-in adjuvanticity of genetically and protein-engineered chimeric molecules for targeting of influenza A peptide epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekov, Nikola S; Ivanova, Iva I; Mihaylova, Nikolina M; Nikolova, Maria; Prechl, Jozsef; Tchorbanov, Andrey I

    2014-10-01

    Highly purified, subunit, or synthetic viral antigens are known to be weakly immunogenic and potentate only the antibody, rather than cell-mediated immune responses. An alternative approach for inducing protective immunity with small viral peptides would be the direct targeting of viral epitopes to the immunocompetent cells by DNA vaccines encoding antibody fragments specific to activating cell surface co-receptor molecules. Here, we are exploring as a new genetic vaccine, a DNA chimeric molecule encoding a T and B cell epitope-containing influenza A virus hemagglutinin peptide joined to sequences encoding a single-chain variable fragment antibody fragment specific for the costimulatory B cell complement receptors 1 and 2. This recombinant DNA molecule was inserted into eukaryotic expression vector and used as a naked DNA vaccine in WT and CR1/2 KO mice. The intramuscular administration of the DNA construct resulted in the in vivo expression of an immunogenic chimeric protein, which cross-links cell surface receptors on influenza-specific B cells. The DNA vaccination was followed by prime-boosting with the protein-engineered replica of the DNA construct, thus delivering an activation intracellular signal. Immunization with an expression vector containing the described construct and boosting with the protein chimera induced a strong anti-influenza cytotoxic response, modulation of cytokine profile, and a weak antibody response in Balb/c mice. The same immunization scheme did not result in generation of influenza-specific response in mice lacking the target receptor, underlining the molecular adjuvant effect of receptor targeting.

  20. Characteristics Studies of 125I- and total PSA antibody's Binding with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in Human Uterus Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mudaffar, S.; Al-Salihi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Two groups of uterus tumors (benign and malignant) postmenopausal patients were used to investigate the presence of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary experiments were performed to follow the binding of '1 25 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA in uterus tissues homogenates of the two groups with their corresponding antigen and found to be (8.8,7.1%) for benign and malignant tumors, respectively. An Immuno Radio Metric Assay (IRMA) procedure was developed for measuring PSA in benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates. The optimum conditions of the binding of 125 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA were as follows: PSA concentration (150,200 μg protein),tracer antibody concentration (125,250 μg protein), p H (7.6,7.2), temp (15,25?C) and time (1.5 hrs) for postmenopausal benign and malignant uterus tumors tissue homogenates, respectively. The use of different concentrations of Na + and Mg 2+ ions were shown to cause an increase in the binding at concentration of (125,75 mΜ) of Na 1+ ions (75,225 mΜ) of Mg 2+ ions for benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates, respectively, while the use of different concentrations of urea and polyethylene glycol (PEG) Caused a decrease in the binding with the increase in the concentration of each of urea and PEG in the both cases

  1. Characterization of a Novel Humanized Anti-CD20 Antibody with Potent Anti-Tumor Activity against Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rituximab, a mouse Fab and human Fc chimeric antibody, has been widely used to treat Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. However, only 48% of patients respond to the treatment and complete response rate is below 10%. Also, immunogenicity was reported in 17-20% patients receiving the treatment, making it unsuitable for long term diseases such as autoimmune disorders. It has been a hot research field to “humanize” rituximab toward improved efficacy and reduced immunogenicity. Methods: In this study, an advanced antibody humanization technology was applied to the sequence of the anti-CD20 antibody 2B8, its sequence of which was based on the original murine monoclonal antibody of rituximab in Roche. The complementarity-determining regions (CDRs of the humanized antibodies were further optimized through computer-aided molecular dock. Results: Five novel humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5(1635, 1534, 3637, 1634 and 1536 were generated and their immunogenicity was significantly decreased when compared to rituximab. The novel humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5 retained the binding activity of their murine counterpart, as demonstrated by the fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis (FACS. When compared to rituximab, the humanized antibodies still have the similar properties on both complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC. Furthermore, its anti-tumor efficacy in xenograft model is comparable to that of rituximab. Conclusion: The humanized anti-CD20 antibodies 1-5 have lower immunogenicity than rituximab. And at the same time, they still retain the anti-tumor effect both in vitro and vivo.

  2. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.A.; Friedman, B.; Gruskin, E.A.; Schrock, R.D. III; Lloyd, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  3. Mechanism of Binding to Ebola Virus Glycoprotein by the ZMapp, ZMAb, and MB-003 Cocktail Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Edgar; Bryan, Christopher; Fong, Rachel H.; Barnes, Trevor; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Mabila, Manu; Rucker, Joseph B.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Cocktails of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that target the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) are effective in nonhuman primate models and have been used under emergency compassionate-treatment protocols in human patients. However, the amino acids that form the detailed binding epitopes for the MAbs in the ZMapp, ZMAb, and the related MB-003 cocktails have yet to be identified. Other binding properties that define how each MAb functionally interacts with GP—such as affinity, epito...

  4. Cucumber Metallothionein-Like 2 (CsMTL2 Exhibits Metal-Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We identified a novel member of the metallothionein (MT family, Cucumis sativus metallothionein-like 2 (CsMTL2, by screening a young cucumber fruit complementary DNA (cDNA library. The CsMTL2 encodes a putative 77-amino acid Class II MT protein that contains two cysteine (Cys-rich domains separated by a Cys-free spacer region. We found that CsMTL2 expression was regulated by metal stress and was specifically induced by Cd2+ treatment. We investigated the metal-binding characteristics of CsMTL2 and its possible role in the homeostasis and/or detoxification of metals by heterologous overexpression in Escherichia coli cells. Furthermore, we produced a deletion mutant form of the protein, CsMTL2m, that contained the two Cys-rich clusters but lacked the spacer region, in E. coli. We compared the metal-binding properties of CsMTL2 with those of CsMTL2m, the β domain of human metallothionein-like protein 1 (HsMTXb, and phytochelatin-like (PCL heterologously expressed in E. coli using metal-binding assays. We found that E. coli cells expressing CsMTL2 accumulated the highest levels of Zn2+ and Cd2+ of the four transformed cell types, with levels being significantly higher than those of control cells containing empty vector. E. coli cells expressing CsMTL2 had a higher tolerance for cadmium than for zinc ions. These findings show that CsMTL2 improves metal tolerance when heterologously expressed in E. coli. Future studies should examine whether CsMTL2 improves metal tolerance in planta.

  5. Basic evaluation of [sup 67]Ga labeled digoxin derivative as a metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Junji (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takemura, Yasutaka; Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Iijima, Naoko; Yokoyama, Akira

    1993-11-01

    To develop metal-labeled digoxin radiopharmaceuticals with affinity with anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase, a digoxin derivative conjugated with deferoxamine was synthesized. The derivative had a high binding affinity with [sup 67]Ga at deferoxamine introduced to the terminal sugar ring of digoxin. The [sup 67]Ga labeled digoxin derivative showed enough in vitro binding affinity and selectivity to anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase. The [sup 67]Ga labeled digoxin derivative is considered to be a potential metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical for digoxin RIA as well as myocardial Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase imaging. (author).

  6. A Transition Metal-Binding, Trimeric βγ-Crystallin from Methane-Producing Thermophilic Archaea, Methanosaeta thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shanti Swaroop; Jamkhindikar, Aditya Anand; Raman, Rajeev; Jobby, Maroor K; Chadalawada, Swathi; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Sharma, Yogendra

    2017-03-07

    βγ-Crystallins are important constituents of the vertebrate eye lens, whereas in microbes, they are prevalent as Ca 2+ -binding proteins. In archaea, βγ-crystallins are conspicuously confined to two methanogens, viz., Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. One of these, i.e., M-crystallin from Methanosarcina acetivorans, has been shown to be a typical Ca 2+ -binding βγ-crystallin. Here, with the aid of a high-resolution crystal structure and isothermal titration calorimetry, we report that "Methallin", a βγ-crystallin from Methanosaeta thermophila, is a trimeric, transition metal-binding protein. It binds Fe, Ni, Co, or Zn ion with nanomolar affinity, which is consistent even at 55 °C, the optimal temperature for the methanogen's growth. At the center of the protein trimer, the metal ion is coordinated by six histidines, two from each protomer, leading to an octahedral geometry. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirms that the trimer seen in the crystal lattice is a biological assembly; this assembly dissociates to monomers upon removal of the metal ion. The introduction of two histidines (S17H/S19H) into a homologous βγ-crystallin, Clostrillin, allows it to bind nickel at the introduced site, though with micromolar affinity. However, because of the lack of a compatible interface, nickel binding could not induce trimerization, affirming that Methallin is a naturally occurring trimer for high-affinity transition metal binding. While βγ-crystallins are known to bind Ca 2+ and form homodimers and oligomers, the transition metal-binding, trimeric Methallin is a new paradigm for βγ-crystallins. The distinct features of Methallin, such as nickel or iron binding, are also possible imprints of biogeochemical changes during the period of its origin.

  7. Metal centre effects on HNO binding in porphyrins and the electronic origin: metal's electronic configuration, position in the periodic table, and oxidation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Weihai; Zhang, Yong

    2012-04-21

    HNO binds to many different metals in organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. To help understand experimentally observed metal centre effects, a quantum chemical investigation was performed, revealing clear general binding trends with respect to metal centre characteristics and the electronic origin for the first time. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  8. The use of chimeric vimentin citrullinated peptides for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoutikhah, Morteza; Gómara, María J; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Sanmartí, Raimon; Haro, Isabel

    2011-11-10

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and, in many cases, destruction of the joints. To prevent progressive and irreversible structural damage, early diagnosis of RA is of paramount importance. The present study addresses the search of new RA citrullinated antigens that could supplement or complement diagnostic/prognostic existing tests. With this aim, the epitope anticitrullinated vimentin antibody response was mapped using synthetic peptides. To improve the sensitivity/specificity balance, a vimentin peptide that was selected, and its cyclic analogue, were combined with fibrin- and filaggrin-related peptides to render chimeric peptides. Our findings highlight the putative application of these chimeric peptides for the design of RA diagnosis systems and imply that more than one serological test is required to classify RA patients based on the presence or absence of ACPAs. Each of the target molecules reported here (fibrin, vimentin, filaggrin) has a specific utility in the identification of a particular subset of RA patients.

  9. Identification of a CD4-Binding-Site Antibody to HIV that Evolved Near-Pan Neutralization Breadth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Ishida, Elise; Zhou, Tongqing; Griesman, Trevor; Sheng, Zizhang; Wu, Fan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Zheng, Anqi; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Ransier, Amy; Darko, Sam; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Louder, Mark K.; Alam, S.  Munir; Parks, Robert; Kelsoe, Garnett; Von Holle, Tarra; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.; Hirsch, Vanessa; Seaman, Michael S.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Detailed studies of the broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that underlie the best available examples of the humoral immune response to HIV are providing important information for the development of therapies and prophylaxis for HIV-1 infection. Here, we report a CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody, named N6, that potently neutralized 98% of HIV-1 isolates, including 16 of 20 that were resistant to other members of its class. N6 evolved a mode of recognition such that its binding was not impacted by the loss of individual contacts across the immunoglobulin heavy chain. In addition, structural analysis revealed that the orientation of N6 permitted it to avoid steric clashes with glycans, which is a common mechanism of resistance. Thus, an HIV-1-specific bNAb can achieve potent, near-pan neutralization of HIV-1, making it an attractive candidate for use in therapy and prophylaxis.

  10. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Gregory W., E-mail: gmann@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mesosphere, Inc., San Francisco, California 94105 (United States); Lee, Kyuho, E-mail: kyuholee@lbl.gov [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Synopsys, Inc., Mountain View, California 94043 (United States); Cococcioni, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.cococcioni@epfl.ch [Theory and Simulation of Materials (THEOS), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Smit, Berend, E-mail: Berend-Smit@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Valais Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l’Industrie 17, CH-1951 Sion (Switzerland); Neaton, Jeffrey B., E-mail: jbneaton@lbl.gov [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO{sub 2}-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO{sub 2} binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data.

  11. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Gregory W.; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO 2 -MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO 2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data.

  12. Generation of HER2 monoclonal antibodies using epitopes of a rabbit polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2014-01-25

    One of the issues in using polyclonal antibodies is the limited amount of reagent available from an immunisation, leading to batch-to-batch variation and difficulties in obtaining the same antibody performance when the same antigen is re-immunised into several separate animals. This led to the development of hybridoma technology allowing, at least theoretically, for an unlimited production of a specific binder. Nevertheless, polyclonal antibodies are widely used in research and diagnostics and there exists a need for robust methods to convert a polyclonal antibody with good binding performance into a renewable monoclonal with identical or similar binding specificity. Here we have used precise information regarding the functional recognition sequence (epitope) of a rabbit polyclonal antibody with attractive binding characteristics as the basis for generation of a renewable mouse monoclonal antibody. First, the original protein fragment antigen was used for immunisation and generation of mouse hybridoma, without obtaining binders to the same epitope region. Instead a peptide designed using the functional epitope and structural information was synthesised and used for hybridoma production. Several of the monoclonal antibodies generated were found to have similar binding characteristics to those of the original polyclonal antibody. These monoclonal antibodies detected native HER2 on cell lines and were also able to stain HER2 in immunohistochemistry using xenografted mice, as well as human normal and cancer tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel chimeric peptide binds MC3T3‑E1 cells to titanium and enhances their proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Liao, Xiaofu; Qin, Xu; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Bin

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the modification of the titanium (Ti) surface of an implant with RGD (Arg‑Gly‑Asp) promotes the activity of osteoblasts. A novel Ti‑binding peptide, minTBP‑1, and a chimeric peptide, minTBP‑1‑PRGDN, have been synthesized to assist the fixing of RGD to Ti. In our previous study, minTBP‑1‑PRGDN demonstrated favorable affinity for Ti surfaces and facilitated the adhesion of MC3T3‑E1 cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of this chimeric peptide on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3‑E1 cells. For this purpose, MC3T3‑E1 cells were cultured and differentiation was induced on Ti discs precoated with minTBP‑1‑PRGDN, minTBP‑1 or PRGDN. The MC3T3‑E1 cells on the minTBP‑1‑PRGDN‑precoated Ti disc were observed to exhibit the highest cell number after 24 h and alkaline phosphatase levels in all groups increased in a time‑dependent manner. In addition, marked expression of osteogenic marker genes [osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OC)] was detected on minTBP‑1‑PRGDN/Ti at day 14. Mineralized deposits on minTBP‑1‑PRGDN/Ti presented the maximal average area and the highest number of deposits was observed on PRGDN/Ti. The present study indicates that minTBP‑1‑PRGDN may enhance and accelerate the activities of MC3T3‑E1 cells on Ti, however, its role in vivo must be determined by further studies.

  14. MetalS2: a tool for the structural alignment of minimal functional sites in metal-binding proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Rosato, Antonio; Valasatava, Yana

    2013-11-25

    We developed a new software tool, MetalS(2), for the structural alignment of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs) in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. On our example data sets, MetalS(2) unveiled structural similarities that other programs for protein structure comparison do not consistently point out and overall identified a larger number of structurally similar MFSs. MetalS(2) supports the comparison of MFSs harboring different metals and/or with different nuclearity and is available both as a stand-alone program and a Web tool ( http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals2/).

  15. Cooperative binding of anti-tetanus toxin monoclonal antibodies: Implications for designing an efficient biclonal preparation to prevent tetanus toxin intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Ivana; Filipovic, Ana; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Marinkovic, Emilija; Miljkovic, Radmila; Stojanovic, Marijana

    2018-05-15

    Oligoclonal combinations of several monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are being considered for the treatment of various infectious pathologies. These combinations are less sensitive to antigen structural changes than individual MAbs; at the same time, their characteristics can be more efficiently controlled than those of polyclonal antibodies. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the binding characteristics of six biclonal equimolar preparations (BEP) of tetanus toxin (TeNT)-specific MAbs and to investigate how the MAb combination influences the BEPs' protective capacity. We show that a combination of TeNT-specific MAbs, which not only bind TeNT but also exert positive cooperative effects, results in a BEP with superior binding characteristics and protective capacity, when compared with the individual component MAbs. Furthermore, we show that a MAb with only partial protective capacity but positive effects on the binding of the other BEP component can be used as a valuable constituent of the BEP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A New Metal Binding Domain Involved in Cadmium, Cobalt and Zinc Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Aaron T. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Barupala, Dulmini [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Stemmler, Timothy L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Rosenzweig, Amy C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-07-20

    In the P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains (MBDs) that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+ or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full-length CzcP, truncated CzcP and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Moreover, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases.

  17. A Rational Engineering Strategy for Designing Protein A-Binding Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A.; Sulea, Traian; van Faassen, Henk; Hussack, Greg; Purisima, Enrico O.; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and streptococcal protein G (SpG) affinity chromatography are the gold standards for purifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapeutic applications. However, camelid VHH single-domain Abs (sdAbs or VHHs) are not bound by SpG and only sporadically bound by SpA. Currently, VHHs require affinity tag-based purification, which limits their therapeutic potential and adds considerable complexity and cost to their production. Here we describe a simple and rapid mutagenesis-based approach designed to confer SpA binding upon a priori non-SpA-binding VHHs. We show that SpA binding of VHHs is determined primarily by the same set of residues as in human mAbs, albeit with an unexpected degree of tolerance to substitutions at certain core and non-core positions and some limited dependence on at least one residue outside the SpA interface, and that SpA binding could be successfully introduced into five VHHs against three different targets with no adverse effects on expression yield or antigen binding. Next-generation sequencing of llama, alpaca and dromedary VHH repertoires suggested that species differences in SpA binding may result from frequency variation in specific deleterious polymorphisms, especially Ile57. Thus, the SpA binding phenotype of camelid VHHs can be easily modulated to take advantage of tag-less purification techniques, although the frequency with which this is required may depend on the source species. PMID:27631624

  18. Characterization of a novel theme C glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase and its CBM-chimeric enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Huang, Ming-Yue; Pang, Hao; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Chao-Xing; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2017-07-01

    In bacterial cellulase systems, glycoside hydrolase family 9 (GH9) cellulases are generally regarded as the major cellulose-degrading factors besides GH48 exoglucanase. In this study, umcel9A, which was cloned from uncultured microorganisms from compost, with the encoded protein being theme C GH9 cellulase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the biochemical properties of the purified enzyme were characterized. Hydrolysis of carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) by Umcel9A led to the decreased viscosity of CMC solution and production of reducing sugars. Interestingly, cellobiose was the major product when cellulosic materials were hydrolyzed by Umcel9A. Six representative carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from different CBM families (CBM1, CBM2, CBM3, CBM4, CBM10, and CBM72) were fused with Umcel9A at the natural terminal position, resulting in significant enhancement of the binding capacity of the chimeric enzymes toward four different insoluble celluloses as compared with that of Umcel9A. Catalytic activity of the chimeric enzymes against insoluble celluloses, including phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC), alkali-pretreated sugarcane bagasse (ASB), filter paper powder (FPP), and Avicel, was higher than that of Umcel9A, except for Umcel9A-CBM3. In these chimeric enzymes, CBM4-Umcel9A exhibited the highest activity toward the four tested insoluble celluloses and displayed 4.2-, 3.0-, 2.4-, and 6.6-fold enhanced activity toward PASC, ASB, FPP, and Avicel, respectively, when compared with that of Umcel9A. CBM4-Umcel9A also showed highest V max and catalytic efficiency (k cat /K M ) against PASC. Construction of chimeric enzymes may have potential applications in biocatalytic processes and provides insight into the evolution of the molecular architecture of catalytic module and CBM in GH9 cellulases.

  19. Binding of antibodies to dsDNA by UVB-irradiated spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollina, U; Schaarschmidt, H; Thiel, W; Knopf, B

    1986-08-01

    Human spermatozoa were exposed to monochromatic UVB light (300 nm) at a dosage range from 1-10/sup 3/ J/m/sup 2/ (xenon-mercury short-arc lamp) and 10/sup -2/-10/sup -1/ J/m/sup 2/ (xenon lamp). UVB irradiation >= 10 J/m/sup 2/ resulted in a subsequent binding of antibodies to double-stranded (ds) DNA. A strong homogeneous head fluorescence was visible. There was no immunoglobulin class restriction. The results were discussed in regards to lupus antigen expression by UV light.

  20. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Hexon and fiber of adenovirus type 14 and 55 are major targets of neutralizing antibody but only fiber-specific antibody contributes to cross-neutralizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Sun, Xikui; Ye, Xianmiao; Feng, Yupeng; Wang, Jinlin; Zheng, Xuehua; Liu, Xinglong; Yi, Changhua; Hao, Mingli; Wang, Qian; Li, Feng; Xu, Wei; Li, Liang; Li, Chufang; Zhou, Rong; Chen, Ling; Feng, Liqiang

    2018-05-01

    Re-emerging human adenoviruses type 14 (HAdV14) and 55 (HAdV55) represent two highly virulent adenoviruses. The neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses elicited by infection or immunization remain largely unknown. Herein, we generated hexon-chimeric HAdV14 viruses harboring each single or entire hexon hyper-variable-regions (HVR) from HAdV55, and determined the neutralizing epitopes of human and mouse nAbs. In human sera, hexon-targeting nAbs are type-specific and mainly recognize HVR2, 5, and 7. Fiber-targeting nAbs are only detectable in sera cross-neutralizing HAdV14 and HAdV55 and contribute substantially to cross-neutralization. Penton-binding antibodies, however, show no significant neutralizing activities. In mice immunized with HAdV14 or HAdV55, a single immunization mainly elicited hexon-specific nAbs, which recognized HAdV14 HVR1, 2, and 7 and HAdV55 HVR1 and 2, respectively. After a booster immunization, cross-neutralizing fiber-specific nAbs became detectable. These results indicated that hexon elicits type-specific nAbs whereas fiber induces cross-neutralizing nAbs to HAdV14 and HAdV55, which are of significance in vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 125I-Clq-binding and specific antibodies as indicators of pulmonary disease activity in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.B.; Hsu, Y.P.; Lewiston, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    We studied the incidence and levels of circulating immune complexes by the 125 I-Clq-binding assay in patients with cystic fibrosis in relation to clinical respiratory status and specific IgG and IgE antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida albicans. Overall prevalence of CIC was 43%, but 86% of serially studied patients had evidence of CIC at some time. Patients with acute respiratory exacerbations and deteriorating pulmonary function had a higher incidence of CIC (76%) as compared to stable patients (36%, P less than 0.01), as well as significantly higher levels of CIC. Acute exacerbations were also associated with significant increases in IgG antibody to Pseudomonas (P less than 0.005) but not in other antibodies. CIC did not correlate with Pseudomonas-specific IgG nor with any other specific antibody studied. A variety of age-related differences in specific antibody levels were seen. The episodic appearance of CIC is common in CF and is usually associated with exacerbation of lung disease

  3. Growth-inhibitory and metal-binding proteins in Chlorella vulgaris exposed to cadmium or zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Zhiyong [College of Bioengineering, Jimei University, Xiamen, 361021 (China)], E-mail: zhyhuang@jmu.edu.cn; Li Lianping; Huang Gaoling [College of Bioengineering, Jimei University, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Yan Qingpi [College of fisheries, Jimei University, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Shi Bing; Xu Xiaoqin [Xiamen Products Quality Inspection Institute, Xiamen, 361004 (China)

    2009-01-18

    Phytochelatins, with the general structure of ({gamma}-Glu-Cys)n-Gly (n = 2-11), are usually recognized as being strongly induced by metals in microalgae and play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals in environment. However, there have been few studies on metallothionein (MT) synthesis in Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) exposed to heavy metals. The present study describes the growth inhibition of C. vulgaris exposed to different concentrations of cadmium and zinc, and the induction of metal-binding MT-like proteins in the cells. The amounts of metal-binding proteins, induced in the alga exposed to different concentrations of Cd and Zn, were analyzed with a size-exclusion HPLC coupled to ICP-MS. After being purified with a gel filtration column (Sephadex G-75, 3.5 cm x 80 cm) and a desalting column (G-25, 1.5 cm x 30 cm), the isoforms and sub-isoforms of Zn-binding protein were characterized by a reverse phase-HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). In addition, the ultraviolet spectra of purified Zn-binding proteins were analyzed in media with different pH values. The results showed that the significant inhibitory effects (at p < 0.05) on the cell growth were observed when excessive metals such as 80 {mu}mol l{sup -1} of Cd, and 60 and 80 {mu}mol l{sup -1} of Zn were added. The Cd/Zn-binding proteins induced in C. vulgaris exposed to Cd and Zn were referred to as Cd/Zn-MT-like proteins in which the mean molecular mass of the apo-MT-like was 6152 Da. The induced Cd/Zn-MT-like proteins might be involved in the detoxification of heavy metals, such as cadmium and zinc, by the alga.

  4. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Chimeric Protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Cai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3, and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future.

  6. Decreased vaccine antibody titers following exposure to multiple metals and metalloids in e-waste-exposed preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinjiang; Xu, Xijin; Zeng, Xiang; Xu, Long; Zeng, Zhijun; Huo, Xia

    2017-01-01

    We explored acquired immunity resulting from vaccination in 3 to 7-year-old children, chronically exposed to multiple heavy metals and metalloids, in an e-waste recycling area (Guiyu, China). Child blood levels of ten heavy metals and metalloids, including lead (Pb), arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se), and seven vaccine antibodies (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, hepatitis B, Japanese encephalitis, polio, measles) were measured. The exposed group had higher levels of blood Pb, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cr compared to the reference group (P 10 μg/dL) and high blood Cu and Zn (upper median value of each group) to be inversely associated with seven antibody titers. Antibody titers increased with age, BMI, high blood Mn (>15 μg/L), and high blood Cd and Ni (upper median value of each group). Results suggest multiple heavy metal and metalloid exposure, especially to Pb, Zn and Cu, may be a risk factor inhibiting the development of child immunity, resulting in decreased child antibody levels against vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, C M

    2009-11-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.

  8. A chimeric protein composed of NuMA fused to the DNA binding domain of LANA is sufficient for the ori-P-dependent DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsaki, Eriko; Ueda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome is stably maintained in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines during cell division. We previously showed that accumulation of LANA in the nuclear matrix fraction could be important for the latent DNA replication, and that the functional significance of LANA should be its recruitment of ori-P to the nuclear matrix. Here, we investigated whether the forced localization of the LANA-DNA binding domain (DBD) to the nuclear matrix facilitated ori-P-containing plasmid replication. We demonstrated that chimeric proteins constructed by fusion of LANA DBD with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), which is one of the components of the nuclear matrix, could bind with ori-P and enhance replication of an ori-P-containing plasmid, compared with that in the presence of DBD alone. These results further suggested that the ori-P recruitment to the nuclear matrix through the binding with DBD is important for latent viral DNA replication. - Highlights: •KSHV replication in latency depends on LANA localization to the nuclear matrix. •LANA DBD was fused with NuMA, a nuclear matrix protein, at the N- and C-terminus. •NuMA-DBD was in the nuclear matrix and supported the ori-P dependent replication. •LANA in the nuclear matrix should be important for the KSHV replication in latency.

  9. A chimeric protein composed of NuMA fused to the DNA binding domain of LANA is sufficient for the ori-P-dependent DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsaki, Eriko; Ueda, Keiji, E-mail: kueda@virus.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2017-01-15

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome is stably maintained in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines during cell division. We previously showed that accumulation of LANA in the nuclear matrix fraction could be important for the latent DNA replication, and that the functional significance of LANA should be its recruitment of ori-P to the nuclear matrix. Here, we investigated whether the forced localization of the LANA-DNA binding domain (DBD) to the nuclear matrix facilitated ori-P-containing plasmid replication. We demonstrated that chimeric proteins constructed by fusion of LANA DBD with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), which is one of the components of the nuclear matrix, could bind with ori-P and enhance replication of an ori-P-containing plasmid, compared with that in the presence of DBD alone. These results further suggested that the ori-P recruitment to the nuclear matrix through the binding with DBD is important for latent viral DNA replication. - Highlights: •KSHV replication in latency depends on LANA localization to the nuclear matrix. •LANA DBD was fused with NuMA, a nuclear matrix protein, at the N- and C-terminus. •NuMA-DBD was in the nuclear matrix and supported the ori-P dependent replication. •LANA in the nuclear matrix should be important for the KSHV replication in latency.

  10. Vaccine-Elicited Tier 2 HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Bind to Quaternary Epitopes Involving Glycan-Deficient Patches Proximal to the CD4 Binding Site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema T Crooks

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eliciting broad tier 2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research. Here we investigated the ability of native, membrane-expressed JR-FL Env trimers to elicit nAbs. Unusually potent nAb titers developed in 2 of 8 rabbits immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs expressing trimers (trimer VLP sera and in 1 of 20 rabbits immunized with DNA expressing native Env trimer, followed by a protein boost (DNA trimer sera. All 3 sera neutralized via quaternary epitopes and exploited natural gaps in the glycan defenses of the second conserved region of JR-FL gp120. Specifically, trimer VLP sera took advantage of the unusual absence of a glycan at residue 197 (present in 98.7% of Envs. Intriguingly, removing the N197 glycan (with no loss of tier 2 phenotype rendered 50% or 16.7% (n = 18 of clade B tier 2 isolates sensitive to the two trimer VLP sera, showing broad neutralization via the surface masked by the N197 glycan. Neutralizing sera targeted epitopes that overlap with the CD4 binding site, consistent with the role of the N197 glycan in a putative "glycan fence" that limits access to this region. A bioinformatics analysis suggested shared features of one of the trimer VLP sera and monoclonal antibody PG9, consistent with its trimer-dependency. The neutralizing DNA trimer serum took advantage of the absence of a glycan at residue 230, also proximal to the CD4 binding site and suggesting an epitope similar to that of monoclonal antibody 8ANC195, albeit lacking tier 2 breadth. Taken together, our data show for the first time that strain-specific holes in the glycan fence can allow the development of tier 2 neutralizing antibodies to native spikes. Moreover, cross-neutralization can occur in the absence of protecting glycan. Overall, our observations provide new insights that may inform the future development of a neutralizing antibody vaccine.

  11. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, John T.; Keefer, Christopher J.; Slaughter, James C.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Schief, William R.; Crowe, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (K on ) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (K off ) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced K on with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased K on found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants. - Highlights: • The relationship of affinity to neutralization for virus antibodies is uncertain. • Palivizumab binds to RSV escape mutant fusion proteins, but with reduced affinity. • Association rate (K on ) correlated well with the potency of neutralization

  12. Escape from neutralization by the respiratory syncytial virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody palivizumab is driven by changes in on-rate of binding to the fusion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, John T. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Keefer, Christopher J. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Slaughter, James C. [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Biostatistics and Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Kulp, Daniel W. [IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center and Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Schief, William R. [IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center and Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Crowe, James E., E-mail: james.crowe@vanderbilt.edu [The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The role of binding kinetics in determining neutralizing potency for antiviral antibodies is poorly understood. While it is believed that increased steady-state affinity correlates positively with increased virus-neutralizing activity, the relationship between association or dissociation rate and neutralization potency is unclear. We investigated the effect of naturally-occurring antibody resistance mutations in the RSV F protein on the kinetics of binding to palivizumab. Escape from palivizumab-mediated neutralization of RSV occurred with reduced association rate (K{sub on}) for binding to RSV F protein, while alteration of dissociation rate (K{sub off}) did not significantly affect neutralizing activity. Interestingly, linkage of reduced K{sub on} with reduced potency mirrored the effect of increased K{sub on} found in a high-affinity enhanced potency palivizumab variant (motavizumab). These data suggest that association rate is the dominant factor driving neutralization potency for antibodies to RSV F protein antigenic site A and determines the potency of antibody somatic variants or efficiency of escape of viral glycoprotein variants. - Highlights: • The relationship of affinity to neutralization for virus antibodies is uncertain. • Palivizumab binds to RSV escape mutant fusion proteins, but with reduced affinity. • Association rate (K{sub on}) correlated well with the potency of neutralization.

  13. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar [Stephan Angelov Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Dimitrov, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.dimitrov@crc.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France)

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  15. The Antibody Response of Pregnant Cameroonian Women to VAR2CSA ID1-ID2a, a Small Recombinant Protein Containing the CSA-Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakhanyan, Anna; Leke, Rose G. F.; Salanti, Ali; Bobbili, Naveen; Gwanmesia, Philomina; Leke, Robert J. I.; Quakyi, Isabella A.; Chen, John J.; Taylor, Diane Wallace

    2014-01-01

    In pregnant women, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes expressing the VAR2CSA antigen bind to chondroitin sulfate A in the placenta causing placental malaria. The binding site of VAR2CSA is present in the ID1-ID2a region. This study sought to determine if pregnant Cameroonian women naturally acquire antibodies to ID1-ID2a and if antibodies to ID1-ID2a correlate with absence of placental malaria at delivery. Antibody levels to full-length VAR2CSA and ID1-ID2a were measured in plasma samples from 745 pregnant Cameroonian women, 144 Cameroonian men, and 66 US subjects. IgM levels and IgG avidity to ID1-ID2a were also determined. As expected, antibodies to ID1-ID2a were absent in US controls. Although pregnant Cameroonian women developed increasing levels of antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA during pregnancy, no increase in either IgM or IgG to ID1-ID2a was observed. Surprisingly, no differences in antibody levels to ID1-ID2a were detected between Cameroonian men and pregnant women. For example, in rural settings only 8–9% of males had antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA, but 90–96% had antibodies to ID1-ID2a. In addition, no significant difference in the avidity of IgG to ID1-ID2a was found between pregnant women and Cameroonian men, and no correlation between antibody levels at delivery and absence of placental malaria was found. Thus, the response to ID1-ID2a was not pregnancy specific, but predominantly against cross-reactivity epitopes, which may have been induced by other PfEMP1 antigens, malarial antigens, or microbes. Currently, ID1-ID2a is a leading vaccine candidate, since it binds to the CSA with the same affinity as the full-length molecule and elicits binding-inhibitory antibodies in animals. Further studies are needed to determine if the presence of naturally acquired cross-reactive antibodies in women living in malaria endemic countries will alter the response to ID1-ID2a following vaccination with ID1-ID2a. PMID:24505415

  16. The antibody response of pregnant Cameroonian women to VAR2CSA ID1-ID2a, a small recombinant protein containing the CSA-binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Babakhanyan

    Full Text Available In pregnant women, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes expressing the VAR2CSA antigen bind to chondroitin sulfate A in the placenta causing placental malaria. The binding site of VAR2CSA is present in the ID1-ID2a region. This study sought to determine if pregnant Cameroonian women naturally acquire antibodies to ID1-ID2a and if antibodies to ID1-ID2a correlate with absence of placental malaria at delivery. Antibody levels to full-length VAR2CSA and ID1-ID2a were measured in plasma samples from 745 pregnant Cameroonian women, 144 Cameroonian men, and 66 US subjects. IgM levels and IgG avidity to ID1-ID2a were also determined. As expected, antibodies to ID1-ID2a were absent in US controls. Although pregnant Cameroonian women developed increasing levels of antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA during pregnancy, no increase in either IgM or IgG to ID1-ID2a was observed. Surprisingly, no differences in antibody levels to ID1-ID2a were detected between Cameroonian men and pregnant women. For example, in rural settings only 8-9% of males had antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA, but 90-96% had antibodies to ID1-ID2a. In addition, no significant difference in the avidity of IgG to ID1-ID2a was found between pregnant women and Cameroonian men, and no correlation between antibody levels at delivery and absence of placental malaria was found. Thus, the response to ID1-ID2a was not pregnancy specific, but predominantly against cross-reactivity epitopes, which may have been induced by other PfEMP1 antigens, malarial antigens, or microbes. Currently, ID1-ID2a is a leading vaccine candidate, since it binds to the CSA with the same affinity as the full-length molecule and elicits binding-inhibitory antibodies in animals. Further studies are needed to determine if the presence of naturally acquired cross-reactive antibodies in women living in malaria endemic countries will alter the response to ID1-ID2a following vaccination with ID1-ID2a.

  17. Genotoxic effect and antigen binding characteristics of SLE auto-antibodies to peroxynitrite-modified human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Asad; Alam, Khursheed; Mehdi, Syed Hassan; Rizvi, M Moshahid A

    2017-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by auto-antibodies against native deoxyribonucleic acid after modification and is one of the reasons for the development of SLE. Here, we have evaluated the structural perturbations in human placental DNA by peroxynitrite using spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Peroxynitrite is a powerful potent bi-functional oxidative/nitrative agent that is produced both endogenously and exogenously. In experimental animals, the peroxynitrite-modified DNA was found to be highly immunogenic. The induced antibodies showed cross-reactions with different types of DNA and nitrogen bases that were modified with peroxynitrite by inhibition ELISA. The antibody activity was inhibited by approximately 89% with its immunogen as the inhibitor. The antigen-antibodies interaction between induced antibodies with peroxynitrite-modified DNA showed retarded mobility as compared to the native form. Furthermore, significantly increased binding was also observed in SLE autoantibodies with peroxynitrite-modified DNA than native form. Moreover, DNA isolated from lymphocyte of SLE patients revealed significant recognition of anti-peroxynitrite-modified DNA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Our data indicates that DNA modified with peroxynitrite presents unique antigenic determinants that may induce autoantibody response in SLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Laminin binding protein, 34/67 laminin receptor, carries stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 epitope defined by monoclonal antibody Raft.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Yohko U.; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Kyoko; Takenouchi, Hisami; Taguchi, Tomoko; Okita, Hajime; Umezawa, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2005-01-01

    We previously produced monoclonal antibodies against the detergent-insoluble microdomain, i.e., the raft microdomain, of the human renal cancer cell line ACHN. Raft.2, one of these monoclonal antibodies, recognizes sialosyl globopentaosylceramide, which has the stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 epitope. Although the mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line F9 does not express SSEA-4, some F9 cells stained with Raft.2. Western analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identified the Raft.2 binding molecule as laminin binding protein (LBP), i.e., 34/67 laminin receptor. Weak acid treatment or digestion with Clostridium perfringens sialidase reduced Raft.2 binding to LBP on nitrocellulose sheets and [ 14 C]galactose was incorporated into LBP, indicating LBP to have a sialylated carbohydrate moiety. Subcellular localization analysis by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and examination by confocal microscopy revealed LBP to be localized on the outer surface of the plasma membrane. An SSEA-4-positive human EC cell line, NCR-G3 cells, also expressed Raft.2-binding LBP

  19. Stimulation of chymosin secretion by simultaneous expression with chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Smits, C.B.; Geus, de B.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of coexpression of chymosin and chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) on the secretion of chymosin by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A VHH expression library containing chymosin-specific VHHs was obtained by immunization of a llama and coexpressed with

  20. Growth-inhibitory and metal-binding proteins in Chlorella vulgaris exposed to cadmium or zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhiyong; Li Lianping; Huang Gaoling; Yan Qingpi; Shi Bing; Xu Xiaoqin

    2009-01-01

    Phytochelatins, with the general structure of (γ-Glu-Cys)n-Gly (n = 2-11), are usually recognized as being strongly induced by metals in microalgae and play an important role in the detoxification of heavy metals in environment. However, there have been few studies on metallothionein (MT) synthesis in Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) exposed to heavy metals. The present study describes the growth inhibition of C. vulgaris exposed to different concentrations of cadmium and zinc, and the induction of metal-binding MT-like proteins in the cells. The amounts of metal-binding proteins, induced in the alga exposed to different concentrations of Cd and Zn, were analyzed with a size-exclusion HPLC coupled to ICP-MS. After being purified with a gel filtration column (Sephadex G-75, 3.5 cm x 80 cm) and a desalting column (G-25, 1.5 cm x 30 cm), the isoforms and sub-isoforms of Zn-binding protein were characterized by a reverse phase-HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). In addition, the ultraviolet spectra of purified Zn-binding proteins were analyzed in media with different pH values. The results showed that the significant inhibitory effects (at p -1 of Cd, and 60 and 80 μmol l -1 of Zn were added. The Cd/Zn-binding proteins induced in C. vulgaris exposed to Cd and Zn were referred to as Cd/Zn-MT-like proteins in which the mean molecular mass of the apo-MT-like was 6152 Da. The induced Cd/Zn-MT-like proteins might be involved in the detoxification of heavy metals, such as cadmium and zinc, by the alga

  1. Influence of the slags treatment on the heavy metals binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahová, L.; Navrátilová, Z.; Mucha, M.; Navrátilová, Eva; Neděla, Vilém

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2018), s. 697-706 ISSN 1735-1472 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : slag * binding * metal cations * slag modification Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.915, year: 2016

  2. Structural basis for the binding of the neutralizing antibody, 7D11, to the poxvirus L1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Golden, Joseph W.; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Hooper, Jay W.; Garboczi, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Medical countermeasures to prevent or treat smallpox are needed due to the potential use of poxviruses as biological weapons. Safety concerns with the currently available smallpox vaccine indicate a need for research on alternative poxvirus vaccine strategies. Molecular vaccines involving the use of proteins and/or genes and recombinant antibodies are among the strategies under current investigation. The poxvirus L1 protein, encoded by the L1R open reading frame, is the target of neutralizing antibodies and has been successfully used as a component of both protein subunit and DNA vaccines. L1-specific monoclonal antibodies (e.g., mouse monoclonal antibody mAb-7D11, mAb-10F5) with potent neutralizing activity bind L1 in a conformation-specific manner. This suggests that proper folding of the L1 protein used in molecular vaccines will affect the production of neutralizing antibodies and protection. Here, we co-crystallized the Fab fragment of mAb-7D11 with the L1 protein. The crystal structure of the complex between Fab-7D11 and L1 reveals the basis for the conformation-specific binding as recognition of a discontinuous epitope containing two loops that are held together by a disulfide bond. The structure of this important conformational epitope of L1 will contribute to the development of molecular poxvirus vaccines and also provides a novel target for anti-poxvirus drugs. In addition, the sequence and structure of Fab-7D11 will contribute to the development of L1-targeted immunotherapeutics

  3. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  4. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A.; Conti, F.; Chianelli, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2010-01-01

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-α, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with 99m Tc or 111 In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision-making and

  5. The 1.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain and binding analysis to anti-human C2 domain antibodies and phospholipid surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caileen M Brison

    Full Text Available The factor VIII C2 domain is essential for binding to activated platelet surfaces as well as the cofactor activity of factor VIII in blood coagulation. Inhibitory antibodies against the C2 domain commonly develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients, or they may spontaneously arise in cases of acquired hemophilia. Porcine factor VIII is an effective therapeutic for hemophilia patients with inhibitor due to its low cross-reactivity; however, the molecular basis for this behavior is poorly understood. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain was determined, and superposition of the human and porcine C2 domains demonstrates that most surface-exposed differences cluster on the face harboring the "non-classical" antibody epitopes. Furthermore, antibody-binding results illustrate that the "classical" 3E6 antibody can bind both the human and porcine C2 domains, although the inhibitory titer to human factor VIII is 41 Bethesda Units (BU/mg IgG versus 0.8 BU/mg IgG to porcine factor VIII, while the non-classical G99 antibody does not bind to the porcine C2 domain nor inhibit porcine factor VIII activity. Further structural analysis of differences between the electrostatic surface potentials suggest that the C2 domain binds to the negatively charged phospholipid surfaces of activated platelets primarily through the 3E6 epitope region. In contrast, the G99 face, which contains residue 2227, should be distal to the membrane surface. Phospholipid binding assays indicate that both porcine and human factor VIII C2 domains bind with comparable affinities, and the human K2227A and K2227E mutants bind to phospholipid surfaces with similar affinities as well. Lastly, the G99 IgG bound to PS-immobilized factor VIII C2 domain with an apparent dissociation constant of 15.5 nM, whereas 3E6 antibody binding to PS-bound C2 domain was not observed.

  6. Utilization of ICP/OES for the determination of trace metal binding to different humic fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, G; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2003-02-28

    In this study, the use of inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES) to determine multi-metal binding to three biomasses, Sphagnum peat moss, humin and humic acids is reported. All the investigations were performed under part per billion (ppb) concentrations. Batch pH profile experiments were performed using multi-metal solutions of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Ni(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI). The results showed that at pH 2 and 3, the metal affinity of the three biomasses exposed to the multi-metal solution that included Cr(III) presented the following order: Cu(II), Pb(II)>Ni(II)>Cr(III)>Cd(II). On the other hand, when Cr(VI) was in the heavy metal mixture, Sphagnum peat moss and humin showed the following affinity: Cu(II), Pb(II)>Ni(II)>Cr(VI)>Cd(II); however, the affinity of the humic acids was: Cu(II)>Pb(II), Cr(VI)>Ni(II)>Cd(II). The results demonstrated that pH values of 4 and 5 were the most favorable for the heavy metal binding process. At pH 5, all the metals, except for Cr(VI), were bound between 90 and 100% to the three biomasses. However, the binding capacity of humic acids decreased at pH 6 in the presence of Cr(VI). The results showed that the ICP/OES permits the determination of heavy metal binding to organic matter at ppb concentration. These results will be very useful in understanding the role of humic substances in the fate and transport of heavy metals, and thus could provide information to develop new methodologies for the removal of low concentrations of toxic heavy metals from contaminated waters.

  7. Rational design of a conformation-switchable Ca2+- and Tb3+-binding protein without the use of multiple coupled metal-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunyi; Yang, Wei; Maniccia, Anna W; Barrow, Doyle; Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Yang, Jenny J

    2008-10-01

    Ca2+, as a messenger of signal transduction, regulates numerous target molecules via Ca2+-induced conformational changes. Investigation into the determinants for Ca2+-induced conformational change is often impeded by cooperativity between multiple metal-binding sites or protein oligomerization in naturally occurring proteins. To dissect the relative contributions of key determinants for Ca2+-dependent conformational changes, we report the design of a single-site Ca2+-binding protein (CD2.trigger) created by altering charged residues at an electrostatically sensitive location on the surface of the host protein rat Cluster of Differentiation 2 (CD2).CD2.trigger binds to Tb3+ and Ca2+ with dissociation constants of 0.3 +/- 0.1 and 90 +/- 25 microM, respectively. This protein is largely unfolded in the absence of metal ions at physiological pH, but Tb3+ or Ca2+ binding results in folding of the native-like conformation. Neutralization of the charged coordination residues, either by mutation or protonation, similarly induces folding of the protein. The control of a major conformational change by a single Ca2+ ion, achieved on a protein designed without reliance on sequence similarity to known Ca2+-dependent proteins and coupled metal-binding sites, represents an important step in the design of trigger proteins.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Fusicoccin with Binding Characteristics Similar to the Putative Fusicoccin Receptor of Higher Plants 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Martin; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against fusicoccin. The toxin, linked to bovine serum albumin through its t-pentenyl moiety, served as immunogen. Hybridomas secreting anti-fusicoccin antibodies were screened by radioimmunoassay employing a novel radioactive derivative, [3H]-nor-fusicoccin-alcohol of high specific activity (1.5 × 1014Bq/mole). The two monoclonal antibodies reported here are of high apparent affinity for fusicoccin (0.71 × 10−9 molar and 1.85 × 10−9 molar). This is comparable to the apparent affinity of rabbit antiserum raised against the same type of conjugate (9.3 × 10−9 molar). A method for the single step purification of the monoclonal antibodies from ascites fluid is reported. A solid-phase immunoassay, using alkaline phosphatase as enzyme, exhibits a measuring range from 0.1 to 1.5 picomoles (about 70 picograms to 1 nanogram) of fusicoccin. The displacement of [3H]-nor-fusicoccin-alcohol from the antibodies by compounds structurally related to fusicoccin exhibits similar selectivity as a microsomal binding assay with the same tracer as radiolabeled probe. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16665786

  9. Modeling metal binding to soils: the role of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Pechová, Pavlina; Berggren, Dan

    2003-06-15

    The use of mechanistically based models to simulate the solution concentrations of heavy metals in soils is complicated by the presence of different sorbents that may bind metals. In this study, the binding of Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd by 14 different Swedish soil samples was investigated. For 10 of the soils, it was found that the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) was able to describe the acid-base characteristics, when using the concentrations of "active" humic substances and Al as fitting parameters. Two additional soils could be modeled when ion exchange to clay was also considered, using a component additivity approach. For dissolved Zn, Cd, Ca, and Mg reasonable model fits were produced when the metal-humic complexation parameters were identical for the 12 soils modeled. However, poor fits were obtained for Pb and Cu in Aquept B horizons. In two of the soil suspensions, the Lund A and Romfartuna Bhs, the calculated speciation agreed well with results obtained by using cation-exchange membranes. The results suggest that organic matter is an important sorbent for metals in many surface horizons of soils in temperate and boreal climates, and the necessity of properly accounting for the competition from Al in simulations of dissolved metal concentrations is stressed.

  10. A canine chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting PD-L1 and its clinical efficacy in canine oral malignant melanoma or undifferentiated sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Deguchi, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Chie; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Uemura, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-08-21

    Immunotherapy targeting immune checkpoint molecules, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), using therapeutic antibodies has been widely used for some human malignancies in the last 5 years. A costimulatory receptor, PD-1, is expressed on T cells and suppresses effector functions when it binds to its ligand, PD-L1. Aberrant PD-L1 expression is reported in various human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism. Antibodies blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 axis induce antitumour responses in patients with malignant melanoma and other cancers. In dogs, no such clinical studies have been performed to date because of the lack of therapeutic antibodies that can be used in dogs. In this study, the immunomodulatory effects of c4G12, a canine-chimerised anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in vitro, demonstrating significantly enhanced cytokine production and proliferation of dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A pilot clinical study was performed on seven dogs with oral malignant melanoma (OMM) and two with undifferentiated sarcoma. Objective antitumour responses were observed in one dog with OMM (14.3%, 1/7) and one with undifferentiated sarcoma (50.0%, 1/2) when c4G12 was given at 2 or 5 mg/kg, every 2 weeks. c4G12 could be a safe and effective treatment option for canine cancers.

  11. Effect of antibody charge and concentration on deposition of antibody to glomerular basement membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaio, M.P.; Salant, D.J.; Adler, S.; Darby, C.; Couser, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fixed anionic sites within the glomerular capillary wall influence the permeation of serum proteins, the localization of various antigens, and the deposition of antibody in the subepithelial space. In anti-GBM nephritis antibody deposition occurs very rapidly to antigenic sites located relatively proximal in the glomerular capillary wall. The authors examined the influence of the glomerular charge barrier on anti-GBM antibody deposition by comparing the rate of deposition of antibodies with cationic and anionic isoelectric points. Purified sheep anti-rat GBM IgG was isolated from acid eluates of kidneys obtained 24 hr after rats were injected with sheep antiserum to rat GBM. Anti-GBM IgG was separated into cationic (pI 6.4-8.5) and anionic (pI 4.2-6.8) fractions, which were radiolabelled with 131 I and 125 I, respectively, shown to have equal antibody contents measured by in vitro binding to normal glomeruli, mixed in equal amounts, and injected in incremental doses to ten rats. At 1 hr the glomerular antibody binding of each fraction was directly related to the blood level (r . 0.95, r . 0.97) and delivery of antibody (r . 0.98, r . 0.98). Glomerular binding of cationic antibody was four times greater than anionic antibody over the entire range of deliveries studied (P less than 0.001). The authors conclude that glomerular deposition of anti-GBM antibody is directly related to blood concentration and delivery of antibody. Furthermore, the deposition of cationic antibodies to GBM antigens was significantly greater than the deposition of anionic antibodies

  12. Optimization of the Small Glycan Presentation for Binding a Tumor-Associated Antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveton, Filip; Blšáková, Anna; Hushegyi, Andras

    2017-01-01

    on the immobilization of the Tn antigen on a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) (2D biosensor) and the third one utilizing a layer of a human serum albumin (HSA) for the immobilization of a glycan forming a 3D interface. Results showed that the 3D interface with the immobilized Tn antigen is the most effective...... bioreceptive surface for binding its analyte. The 3D impedimetric glycan biosensor exhibited a limit of detection of 1.4 aM, a wide linear range (6 orders of magnitude), and high assay reproducibility with an average relative standard deviation of 4%. The buildup of an interface was optimized using various...... techniques with the visualization of the glycans on the biosensor surface by atomic force microscopy. The study showed that the 3D biosensor is not only the most sensitive compared to other two biosensor platforms but that the Tn antigen on the 3D biosensor surface is more accessible for antibody binding...

  13. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugnière Martine

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. Methods XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Results Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g, close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g. At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g. At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of

  14. Characterization of Palytoxin Binding to HaCaT Cells Using a Monoclonal Anti-Palytoxin Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Florio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX is the reference compound for a group of potent marine biotoxins, for which the molecular target is Na+/K+-ATPase. Indeed, ouabain (OUA, a potent blocker of the pump, is used to inhibit some PLTX effects in vitro. However, in an effort to explain incomplete inhibition of PLTX cytotoxicity, some studies suggest the possibility of two different binding sites on Na+/K+-ATPase. Hence, this study was performed to characterize PLTX binding to intact HaCaT keratinocytes and to investigate the ability of OUA to compete for this binding. PLTX binding to HaCaT cells was demonstrated by immunocytochemical analysis after 10 min exposure. An anti-PLTX monoclonal antibody-based ELISA showed that the binding was saturable and reversible, with a Kd of 3 × 10−10 M. However, kinetic experiments revealed that PLTX binding dissociation was incomplete, suggesting an additional, OUA-insensitive, PLTX binding site. Competitive experiments suggested that OUA acts as a negative allosteric modulator against high PLTX concentrations (0.3–1.0 × 10−7 M and possibly as a non-competitive antagonist against low PLTX concentrations (0.1–3.0 × 10−9 M. Antagonism was supported by PLTX cytotoxicity inhibition at OUA concentrations that displaced PLTX binding (1 × 10−5 M. However, this inhibition was incomplete, supporting the existence of both OUA-sensitive and -insensitive PLTX binding sites.

  15. Antibody Binding Selectivity: Alternative Sets of Antigen Residues Entail High-Affinity Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Nominé

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and molecular recognition selectivity remains a major challenge. The antibody fragment scFv1F4 recognizes with sub nM affinity a decapeptide (sequence 6TAMFQDPQER15 derived from the N-terminal end of human papilloma virus E6 oncoprotein. Using this decapeptide as antigen, we had previously shown that only the wild type amino-acid or conservative replacements were allowed at positions 9 to 12 and 15 of the peptide, indicating a strong binding selectivity. Nevertheless phenylalanine (F was equally well tolerated as the wild type glutamine (Q at position 13, while all other amino acids led to weaker scFv binding. The interfaces of complexes involving either Q or F are expected to diverge, due to the different physico-chemistry of these residues. This would imply that high-affinity binding can be achieved through distinct interfacial geometries. In order to investigate this point, we disrupted the scFv-peptide interface by modifying one or several peptide positions. We then analyzed the effect on binding of amino acid changes at the remaining positions, an altered susceptibility being indicative of an altered role in complex formation. The 23 starting variants analyzed contained replacements whose effects on scFv1F4 binding ranged from minor to drastic. A permutation analysis (effect of replacing each peptide position by all other amino acids except cysteine was carried out on the 23 variants using the PEPperCHIP® Platform technology. A comparison of their permutation patterns with that of the wild type peptide indicated that starting replacements at position 11, 12 or 13 modified the tolerance to amino-acid changes at the other two positions. The interdependence between the three positions was confirmed by SPR (Biacore® technology. Our data demonstrate that binding selectivity does not preclude the existence of alternative high-affinity recognition modes.

  16. Biodistribution of 99mTc labelled anti TAG 72 chimeric McAb ccM4 in nude mice and preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qingjie; Zhao Jie; Zhang Yingnan; Gao Fengtong; Liu Shuqing

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric McAb ccM 4 was labelled with 99m Tc by direct method. The antibody was reduced by molar excess 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME; Ab, 1000:1). The reduced ccM 4 chimeric McAb was mixed with 99m Tc reduced by SnCl 2 and 99m Tc labelling efficiency was 98%. The immunoreactivity did not change after labelling. The biodistribution of 99m Tc-ccM 4 was performed in nude mice and patients with stomach carcinoma. There was significantly more radioactivity in tumor than in the rest of the body in nude mice. Radioimmunoimaging of ccM 4 in 10 patients of gastric cancer was also presented

  17. Chimerism and tolerance without GVHD or engraftment syndrome in HLA-mismatched combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Joseph; Abecassis, Michael; Miller, Joshua; Gallon, Lorenzo; Ravindra, Kadiyala; Tollerud, David J; King, Bradley; Elliott, Mary Jane; Herzig, Geoffrey; Herzig, Roger; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2012-03-07

    The toxicity of chronic immunosuppressive agents required for organ transplant maintenance has prompted investigators to pursue approaches to induce immune tolerance. We developed an approach using a bioengineered mobilized cellular product enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and tolerogenic graft facilitating cells (FCs) combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning; this approach resulted in engraftment, durable chimerism, and tolerance induction in recipients with highly mismatched related and unrelated donors. Eight recipients of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched kidney and FC/HSC transplants underwent conditioning with fludarabine, 200-centigray total body irradiation, and cyclophosphamide followed by posttransplant immunosuppression with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Subjects ranged in age from 29 to 56 years. HLA match ranged from five of six loci with related donors to one of six loci with unrelated donors. The absolute neutrophil counts reached a nadir about 1 week after transplant, with recovery by 2 weeks. Multilineage chimerism at 1 month ranged from 6 to 100%. The conditioning was well tolerated, with outpatient management after postoperative day 2. Two subjects exhibited transient chimerism and were maintained on low-dose tacrolimus monotherapy. One subject developed viral sepsis 2 months after transplant and experienced renal artery thrombosis. Five subjects experienced durable chimerism, demonstrated immunocompetence and donor-specific tolerance by in vitro proliferative assays, and were successfully weaned off all immunosuppression 1 year after transplant. None of the recipients produced anti-donor antibody or exhibited engraftment syndrome or graft-versus-host disease. These results suggest that manipulation of a mobilized stem cell graft and nonmyeloablative conditioning represents a safe, practical, and reproducible means of inducing durable chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplant recipients.

  18. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  19. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinck, J.S.; Green, W.W.; Mirza, R.S.; Nadella, S.R.; Chowdhury, M.J.; Wood, C.M.; Pyle, G.G.

    2007-01-01

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca 2+ , principally that elevated dietary Ca 2+ reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut

  20. Branchial cadmium and copper binding and intestinal cadmium uptake in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from clean and metal-contaminated lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinck, J.S. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: klinckjs@mcmaster.ca; Green, W.W.; Mirza, R.S. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Biology, Nipissing University, North Bay, Ont. P1B 8L7 (Canada); Nadella, S.R.; Chowdhury, M.J.; Wood, C.M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. L8S 4K1 (Canada); Pyle, G.G. [Department of Biology, Nipissing University, North Bay, Ont. P1B 8L7 (Canada)

    2007-08-30

    Branchial binding kinetics and gastro-intestinal uptake of copper and cadmium where examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a metal-contaminated lake (Hannah Lake, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada) and an uncontaminated lake (James Lake, North Bay, Ontario, Canada). An in vivo approach was taken for gill binding comparisons while an in vitro gut binding assay was employed for gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) uptake analysis. By investigating metal uptake at the gill and the gut we cover the two main routes of metal entry into fish. Comparisons of water and sediment chemistries, metal burdens in benthic invertebrate, and metal burdens in the livers of perch from the two study lakes clearly show that yellow perch from Hannah L. are chronically exposed to a highly metal-contaminated environment compared to a reference lake. We found that metal-contaminated yellow perch showed no significant difference in gill Cd binding compared to reference fish, but they did show significant decreases in new Cd binding and absorption in their GITs. The results show that gill Cd binding may involve low-capacity, high-affinity binding sites, while gastro-intestinal Cd uptake involves binding sites that are high-capacity, low-affinity. From this we infer that Cd may be more critically controlled at the gut rather than gills. Significant differences in branchial Cu binding (increased binding) were observed in metal-contaminated yellow perch. We suggest that chronic waterborne exposure to Cu (and/or other metals) may be the dominant influence in gill Cu binding rather than chronic exposure to high Cu diets. We give supporting evidence that Cd is taken up in the GIT, at least in part, by a similar pathway as Ca{sup 2+}, principally that elevated dietary Ca{sup 2+} reduces Cd binding and uptake. Overall our study reveals that metal pre-exposure via water and diet can alter uptake kinetics of Cu and Cd at the gill and/or the gut.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha binding capacity and anti-infliximab antibodies measured by fluid-phase radioimmunoassays as predictors of clinical efficacy of infliximab in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Mark A; Bendtzen, Klaus; Brynskov, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    To investigate if the combined assessment of anti-infliximab antibodies (Ab) and the degree of TNF-alpha binding capacity (TNF-alpha-BC) afforded by infliximab may predict the response to infliximab treatment in patients with Crohn's disease (CD).......To investigate if the combined assessment of anti-infliximab antibodies (Ab) and the degree of TNF-alpha binding capacity (TNF-alpha-BC) afforded by infliximab may predict the response to infliximab treatment in patients with Crohn's disease (CD)....

  2. Crystal structure of glucose isomerase in complex with xylitol inhibitor in one metal binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Eun; Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2017-11-04

    Glucose isomerase (GI) is an intramolecular oxidoreductase that interconverts aldoses and ketoses. These characteristics are widely used in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical industries. In order to obtain an efficient GI, identification of novel GI genes and substrate binding/inhibition have been studied. Xylitol is a well-known inhibitor of GI. In Streptomyces rubiginosus, two crystal structures have been reported for GI in complex with xylitol inhibitor. However, a structural comparison showed that xylitol can have variable conformation at the substrate binding site, e.g., a nonspecific binding mode. In this study, we report the crystal structure of S. rubiginosus GI in a complex with xylitol and glycerol. Our crystal structure showed one metal binding mode in GI, which we presumed to represent the inactive form of the GI. The metal ion was found only at the M1 site, which was involved in substrate binding, and was not present at the M2 site, which was involved in catalytic function. The O 2 and O 4 atoms of xylitol molecules contributed to the stable octahedral coordination of the metal in M1. Although there was no metal at the M2 site, no large conformational change was observed for the conserved residues coordinating M2. Our structural analysis showed that the metal at the M2 site was not important when a xylitol inhibitor was bound to the M1 site in GI. Thus, these findings provided important information for elucidation or engineering of GI functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  4. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data......In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  7. Binding of Industrial Deposits of Heavy Metals and Arsenic in the Soil by 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzesiak Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the research studies concerning binding of heavy metals and arsenic (HM+As, occurring in soils affected by emissions from Głogów Copper Smelter and Refinery, by silane nanomaterial have been described. The content of heavy metals and arsenic was determined by AAS and the effectiveness of heavy metals and arsenic binding by 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane was examined. The total leaching level of impurities in those fractions was 73.26% Cu, 74.7% – Pb, 79.5% Zn, 65.81% – Cd and 55.55% As. The studies demonstrated that the total binding of heavy metals and arsenic with nanomaterial in all fractions was about as follows: 20.5% Cu, 9.5% Pb, 7.1% Zn, 25.3% Cd and 10.89% As. The results presented how the safety of food can be cultivated around industrial area, as the currently used soil stabilization technique of HM by soil pH does not guarantee their stable blocking in a sorptive complex.

  8. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  9. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO 2 2+ was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab) 2 fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire κ light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab) 2 protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab) 2 fragments that bound to the UO 2 2+ -DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab) 2 fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the canonical structures method detailed by Morea

  10. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  11. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed with charged binding sites for an improved protein binding and its application in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M.H.; Noronha, João P.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: EF13-201, Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed with charged binding sites for an improved protein binding and its application in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction. - Abstract: This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomers around the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutral polymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed by preparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concept has been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice for screening prostate cancer throughout the population, with serum levels >10 ng/mL pointing out a high probability of associated cancer. Protein Imprinted Materials with charged binding sites (C/PIM) have been produced by surface imprinting over graphene layers to which the protein was first covalently attached. Vinylbenzyl(trimethylammonium chloride) and vinyl benzoate were introduced as charged monomers labelling the binding site and were allowed to self-organize around the protein. The subsequent polymerization was made by radical polymerization of vinylbenzene. Neutral PIM (N/PIM) prepared without oriented charges and non imprinted materials (NIM) obtained without template were used as controls. These materials were used to develop simple and inexpensive potentiometric sensor for PSA. They were included as ionophores in plasticized PVC membranes, and tested over electrodes of solid or liquid conductive contacts, made of conductive carbon over a syringe or of inner reference solution over micropipette tips. The electrodes with charged monomers showed a more stable and sensitive response, with an average slope of -44.2 mV/decade and a detection limit of 5.8 × 10 −11 mol/L (2 ng/mL). The corresponding non-imprinted sensors showed lower

  12. The Role of Metal Binding in the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-Related Aggregation of Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Sirangelo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding and conformational changes are common hallmarks in many neurodegenerative diseases involving formation and deposition of toxic protein aggregates. Although many players are involved in the in vivo protein aggregation, physiological factors such as labile metal ions within the cellular environment are likely to play a key role. In this review, we elucidate the role of metal binding in the aggregation process of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 associated to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. SOD1 is an extremely stable Cu-Zn metalloprotein in which metal binding is crucial for folding, enzymatic activity and maintenance of the native conformation. Indeed, demetalation in SOD1 is known to induce misfolding and aggregation in physiological conditions in vitro suggesting that metal binding could play a key role in the pathological aggregation of SOD1. In addition, this study includes recent advances on the role of aberrant metal coordination in promoting SOD1 aggregation, highlighting the influence of metal ion homeostasis in pathologic aggregation processes.

  13. ETMB-RBF: discrimination of metal-binding sites in electron transporters based on RBF networks with PSSM profiles and significant amino acid pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yu-Yen; Chen, Shu-An; Wu, Sheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Cellular respiration is the process by which cells obtain energy from glucose and is a very important biological process in living cell. As cells do cellular respiration, they need a pathway to store and transport electrons, the electron transport chain. The function of the electron transport chain is to produce a trans-membrane proton electrochemical gradient as a result of oxidation-reduction reactions. In these oxidation-reduction reactions in electron transport chains, metal ions play very important role as electron donor and acceptor. For example, Fe ions are in complex I and complex II, and Cu ions are in complex IV. Therefore, to identify metal-binding sites in electron transporters is an important issue in helping biologists better understand the workings of the electron transport chain. We propose a method based on Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) profiles and significant amino acid pairs to identify metal-binding residues in electron transport proteins. We have selected a non-redundant set of 55 metal-binding electron transport proteins as our dataset. The proposed method can predict metal-binding sites in electron transport proteins with an average 10-fold cross-validation accuracy of 93.2% and 93.1% for metal-binding cysteine and histidine, respectively. Compared with the general metal-binding predictor from A. Passerini et al., the proposed method can improve over 9% of sensitivity, and 14% specificity on the independent dataset in identifying metal-binding cysteines. The proposed method can also improve almost 76% sensitivity with same specificity in metal-binding histidine, and MCC is also improved from 0.28 to 0.88. We have developed a novel approach based on PSSM profiles and significant amino acid pairs for identifying metal-binding sites from electron transport proteins. The proposed approach achieved a significant improvement with independent test set of metal-binding electron transport proteins.

  14. At least two Fc Neu5Gc residues of monoclonal antibodies are required for binding to anti-Neu5Gc antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chuanfei; Gao, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Meng; Wormald, Mark R.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Wang, Junzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two non-human glycan epitopes, galactose-Į-1,3-galactose (Į-gal) and Neu5Gc-Į-2-6-galactose (Neu5Gc) have been shown to be antigenic when attached to Fab oligosaccharides of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) , while Į-gal attached to Fc glycans were not. However, the antigenicity of Neu5Gc on the Fc glycans remains unclear in the context that most mAbs carry only Fc glycans. After studying two clinical mAbs carrying significant amounts of Fc Neu5Gc, we show that their binding activity with anti-Ne...

  15. Antibody-Based Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The unmet need for improved multiple myeloma (MM therapy has stimulated clinical development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs targeting either MM cells or cells of the bone marrow (BM microenvironment. In contrast to small-molecule inhibitors, therapeutic mAbs present the potential to specifically target tumor cells and directly induce an immune response to lyse tumor cells. Unique immune-effector mechanisms are only triggered by therapeutic mAbs but not by small molecule targeting agents. Although therapeutic murine mAbs or chimeric mAbs can cause immunogenicity, the advancement of genetic recombination for humanizing rodent mAbs has allowed large-scale production and designation of mAbs with better affinities, efficient selection, decreasing immunogenicity, and improved effector functions. These advancements of antibody engineering technologies have largely overcome the critical obstacle of antibody immunogenicity and enabled the development and subsequent Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of therapeutic Abs for cancer and other diseases.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Michelle A; Younes, Anas

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutic approaches have had a significant impact in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab's development as an anti-CD20 antibody heralded a new era in treatment approaches for NHL. While rituximab was first shown to be effective in the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma, it is now standard monotherapy for front-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, and is also used in conjunction with chemotherapy for other indolent, intermediate and aggressive B-cell lymphomas. The development of rituximab has led to intense interest in this type of therapeutic approach and to development and approval of the radioimmunoconjugates of rituximab, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I-tositumomab, which have added to the repertoire of treatments for relapsed follicular lymphoma and increased interest in developing other conjugated antibodies. Since rituximab is a chimeric antibody, there is a need to develop fully humanised antibodies, such as IMMU-106 (hA20), in order to minimise infusion reactions and eliminate the development of human antibodies against the drug. Further clinical evaluation of antibodies has been based largely on our knowledge of antigen expression on the surface of lymphoma cells and has led to the development of antibodies against CD22 (unconjugated epratuzumab and calicheamicin conjugated CMC-544 [inotuzumab ozogamicin]), CD80 (galiximab), CD52 (alemtuzumab), CD2 (MEDI-507 [siplizumab]), CD30 (SGN-30 and MDX-060 [iratumumab]), and CD40 (SGN-40). Furthermore, the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitor bevacizumab, which was first approved for the treatment of colon cancer is currently under investigation in NHL, and agonists rather than antibodies to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) [rApo2L/TRAIL, HGS-ETR1{mapatumumab}, HGS-ETR2] are currently being investigated as treatments for both advanced solid tumours and NHL. Knowledge of the ability of cancer cells to become

  17. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  18. The metal binding potential of a dairy isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramyakrishna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Excess iron in water resources can lead to health hazards and problems. The ability of lactic acid bacteria to bind iron has not yet been widely studied. In the present study, sorption of iron ions from aqueous solutions onto lactic acid bacterium was determined. Elemental analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The kinetics of Fe(III biosorption was investigated at different initial concentrations of metal ion. The highest uptake capacity was found to be 16 mg of Fe(III per gram of adsorbent with a contact time of 24 hr and at initial metal ion concentration of 34 mg/L. The uptake capacity of Fe(III ion varied from 83.2 to 46.7% across the range of initial metal ion concentrations. The equilibrium data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and were found to fit better with the latter (R2 = 0.9999. The surface morphology of the biomass and percentage of metal was characterized by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The functional groups on the cell wall surface of biomass involved in biosorption of heavy metals were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum.

  19. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Larsen, Carsten Schade

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...

  20. Cetuximab in the management of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets the ligand-binding domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is active in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). As an IgG1 antibody, cetuximab may exert its antitumor efficacy through both EGFR antagonism and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Clinical trials established the role of cetuximab, particularly with irinotecan, in irinotecan-refractory/heavily pretreated patients. More recent studies show promising...

  1. An anti vimentin antibody promotes tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mathias Lindh; Møller, Carina Kjeldahl; Rasmussen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    antibody technology, promotes tube formation of endothelial cells in a 2D matrigel assay. By binding vimentin, the antibody increases the tube formation by 21% after 5 hours of incubation. Addition of the antibody directly to cultured endothelial cells does not influence endothelial cell migration...... or proliferation. The enhanced tube formation can be seen for up to 10 hours where after the effect decreases. It is shown that the antibody-binding site is located on the coil 2 domain of vimentin. To our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates an enhanced tube formation by binding vimentin in a 2D...

  2. Fatty Acid-Mediated Inhibition of Metal Binding to the Multi-Metal Site on Serum Albumin: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blindauer, Claudia A; Khazaipoul, Siavash; Yu, Ruitao; Stewart, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major protein in blood plasma and is responsible for circulatory transport of a range of small molecules including fatty acids, metal ions and drugs. We previously identified the major plasma Zn2+ transport site on HSA and revealed that fatty-acid binding (at a distinct site called the FA2 site) and Zn2+ binding are interdependent via an allosteric mechanism. Since binding affinities of long-chain fatty acids exceed those of plasma Zn2+, this means that under certain circumstances the binding of fatty acid molecules to HSA is likely to diminish HSA Zn2+-binding, and hence affects the control of circulatory and cellular Zn2+ dynamics. This relationship between circulatory fatty acid and Zn2+ dynamics is likely to have important physiological and pathological implications, especially since it has been recognised that Zn2+ acts as a signalling agent in many cell types. Fatty acid levels in the blood are dynamic, but most importantly, chronic elevation of plasma fatty acid levels is associated with some metabolic disorders and disease states - including myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review the metal-binding properties of albumin and highlight the importance of their interplay with fatty acid binding. We also consider the impact of this dynamic link upon levels and speciation of plasma Zn2+, its effect upon cellular Zn2+ homeostasis and its relevance to cardiovascular and circulatory processes in health and disease.

  3. In Vitro Methods for Comparing Target Binding and CDC Induction Between Therapeutic Antibodies: Applications in Biosimilarity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemi; González-González, Edith; Vásquez-Bochm, Luz X; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A

    2017-05-04

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are relevant to the treatment of different pathologies, including cancers. The development of biosimilar mAbs by pharmaceutical companies is a market opportunity, but it is also a strategy to increase drug accessibility and reduce therapy-associated costs. The protocols detailed here describe the evaluation of target binding and CDC induction by rituximab in Daudi cells. These two functions require different structural regions of the antibody and are relevant to the clinical effect induced by rituximab. The protocols allow the side-to-side comparison of a reference rituximab and a marketed rituximab biosimilar. The evaluated products showed differences both in target binding and CDC induction, suggesting that there are underlying physicochemical differences and highlighting the need to analyze the impact of those differences in the clinical setting. The methods reported here constitute simple and inexpensive in vitro models for the evaluation of the activity of rituximab biosimilars. Thus, they can be useful during biosimilar development, as well as for quality control in biosimilar production. Furthermore, the presented methods can be extrapolated to other therapeutic mAbs.

  4. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  5. A monoclonal antibody interferes with TIMP-2 binding and incapacitates the MMP-2-activating function of multifunctional, pro-tumorigenic MMP-14/MT1-MMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiryaev, S A; Remacle, A G; Golubkov, V S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and, especially membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP/MMP-14, are promising drug targets in malignancies. In contrast with multiple small-molecule and protein pan-inhibitors of MT1-MMP cleavage activity, the murine 9E8 monoclonal antibody targets the MMP-2-activating function...... of cellular MT1-MMP alone, rather than the general proteolytic activity and the pro-migratory function of MT1-MMP. Furthermore, the antibody does not interact in any detectable manner with other members of the membrane type (MT)-MMP family. The mechanism of this selectivity remained unknown. Using mutagenesis......, binding and activity assays, and modeling in silico, we have demonstrated that the 9E8 antibody recognizes the MT-loop structure, an eight residue insertion that is specific for MT-MMPs and that is distant from the MT1-MMP active site. The binding of the 9E8 antibody to the MT-loop, however, prevents...

  6. Competition effects in cation binding to humic acid: Conditional affinity spectra for fixed total metal concentration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Calin; Mongin, Sandrine; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarnació; Garcés, José Luis; Salvador, José; Puy, Jaume; Cecilia, Joan; Lodeiro, Pablo; Mas, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    Information on the Pb and Cd binding to a purified Aldrich humic acid (HA) is obtained from the influence of different fixed total metal concentrations on the acid-base titrations of this ligand. NICA (Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption) isotherm has been used for a global quantitative description of the binding, which has then been interpreted by plotting the Conditional Affinity Spectra of the H + binding at fixed total metal concentrations (CAScTM). This new physicochemical tool, here introduced, allows the interpretation of binding results in terms of distributions of proton binding energies. A large increase in the acidity of the phenolic sites as the total metal concentration increases, especially in presence of Pb, is revealed from the shift of the CAScTM towards lower affinities. The variance of the CAScTM distribution, which can be used as a direct measure of the heterogeneity, also shows a significant dependence on the total metal concentration. A discussion of the factors that influence the heterogeneity of the HA under the conditions of each experiment is provided, so that the smoothed pattern exhibited by the titration curves can be justified.

  7. Prolonged in vivo residence times of llama single-domain antibody fragments in pigs by binding to porcine immunoglobulins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Solt, van C.B.; Fijten, H.P.D.; Setten, van M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic parenteral application of llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) is hampered by their small size, resulting in a fast elimination from the body. Here we describe a method to increase the serum half-life of VHHs in pigs by fusion to another VHH binding to porcine immunoglobulin

  8. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery....... To better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  9. The original Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium monoclonal antibody recognizes a vascular endothelial growth factor binding site within neuropilin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaalouk, Diana E.; Ozawa, Nfichael G.; Sun, Jessica; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2007-01-01

    For two decades, the antigen recognized by the Pathologische Anatomie Leiden-Endothelium (PAL-E) monoclonal antibody, a standard vascular endothelial cell marker, has remained elusive. Here, we used a combinatorial phage display-based approach ("epitope mapping") to select peptides binding to the

  10. Synthesis of new water-soluble metal-binding polymers: Combinatorial chemistry approach. 1997 mid-year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    'The first objective of this research is to develop rapid discovery and optimization approaches to new water-soluble chelating polymers. A byproduct of the development approach will be the new, selective, and efficient metal-binding agents. The second objective is to evaluate the concept of using water and organic soluble polymers as new solid supports for combinatorial synthesis. The technology under development, Polymer Filtration (PF), is a technique to selectively remove or recover hazardous and valuable metal ions and radionuclides from various dilute aqueous streams. Not only can this technology be used to remediate contaminated soils and solid surfaces and treat aqueous wastes, it can also be incorporated into facilities as a pollution prevention and waste minimization technology. Polymer Filtration uses water-soluble metal-binding polymers to sequester metal ions in dilute solution. The water-soluble polymers have a sufficiently large molecular size that they can be separated and concentrated using commercial ultrafiltration technology. Water, small organic molecules, and unbound metals pass freely through the ultrafiltration membrane while concentrating the metal-binding polymer. The polymers can then be reused by changing the solution conditions to release the metal ions. The metal-ions are recovered in concentrated form for recycle or disposal using a diafiltration process. The water-soluble polymer can be recycled for further aqueous-stream processing. To advance Polymer Filtration technology to the selectivity levels required for DOE needs. fixture directions in Polymer Filtration must include rapid development, testing, and characterization of new metal-binding polymers. The development of new chelating molecules can be equated to the process of new drugs or new materials discovery. Thus, the authors want to build upon and adapt the combinatorial chemistry approaches developed for rapid molecule generation for the drug industry to the rapid

  11. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation

  12. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of 10 B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link 10 B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar trophozoites in the liver of hamsters: in vivo binding of antibodies and complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Maria A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human amoebiasis is caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica that lives in the large intestine of hosts, where can produce asymptomatic colonization until severe invasive infections with blood diarrhea and spreading to other organs. The amoebic abscesses in liver are the most frequent form of amoebiasis outside intestine and still there are doubts about the pathogenic mechanisms involved in their formation. In this study we evaluated the in situ binding of antibodies, C3 and C9 complement components on trophozoites, in livers of hamsters infected with E. histolytica or E. dispar. These parameters were correlated with the extension of the hepatic lesions observed in these animals and with trophozoites survivor. Methods Hamsters were inoculated intra-hepatically with 100,000 trophozoites of E. histolytica or E. dispar strain and necropsied 12, 24, 48, 72, 144 and 192 h after inoculation. Antibodies, C3 and C9 binding to trophozoites were detected by immunohistochemistry. The estimation of the necrosis area and the number of labeled trophozoites was performed using digital morphometry analysis. Results In the liver sections of animals inoculated with the amoebas, the binding of antibodies to E. histolytica trophozoites was significantly lower than to E. dispar trophozoites. Trophozoites of E. dispar were also more frequently vacuolated and high labeled cellular debris observed in the lesions. Positive diffuse reaction to C3 complement component was more intense in livers of animals inoculated with E. histolytica after 24 and 72 h of infection. C3(+ and C9(+ trophozoites were detected in the vascular lumen, granulomas and inside and in the border of necrotic areas of both infected group animals. C3(+ and C9(+ trophozoite debris immunostaining was higher in livers of E. dispar than in livers of E. histolytica. A positive correlation between necrotic areas and number of C9(+ trophozoites was observed in animals

  14. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N. (NIH); (Kyoto)

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  15. Effect of trastuzumab interchain disulfide bond cleavage on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent tumour cell phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mami; Yamanoi, Ayaka; Machino, Yusuke; Ootsubo, Michiko; Izawa, Ken-ichi; Kohroki, Junya; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The Fc domain of human IgG1 binds to Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) to induce effector functions such as phagocytosis. There are four interchain disulfide bonds between the H and L chains. In this study, the disulfide bonds within the IgG1 trastuzumab (TRA), which is specific for HER2, were cleaved by mild S-sulfonation or by mild reduction followed by S-alkylation with three different reagents. The cleavage did not change the binding activities of TRA to HER2-bearing SK-BR-3 cells. The binding activities of TRA to FcγRIIA and FcγRIIB were greatly enhanced by modification with mild reduction and S-alkylation with ICH2CONH2 or N-(4-aminophenyl) maleimide, while the binding activities of TRA to FcγRI and FcγRIIIA were decreased by any of the four modifications. However, the interchain disulfide bond cleavage by the different modifications did not change the antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of SK-BR-3 cells by activated THP-1 cells. The order of FcγR expression levels on the THP-1 cells was FcγRII > FcγRI > FcγRIII and ADCP was inhibited by blocking antibodies against FcγRI and FcγRII. These results imply that the effect of the interchain disulfide bond cleavage on FcγRs binding and ADCP is dependent on modifications of the cysteine residues and the FcγR isotypes. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  17. A Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Metal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M.; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo [Ewha; (Purdue); (Osaka)

    2013-05-29

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal–oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)–oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)–oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc3+ ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C–H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal–oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  18. A chimeric receptor of the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 (IGFR1) and a single chain antibody specific to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein activates the IGF1R signalling cascade in CG4 oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Alexander; Rigby, Anne; Amor, Sandra; Zhou, Dun; Yousaf, Nasim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Chernajovsky, Yuti

    2011-08-01

    In order to generate neural stem cells with increased ability to survive after transplantation in brain parenchyma we developed a chimeric receptor (ChR) that binds to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) via its ectodomain and activates the insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1 ‎‎(IGF1R) signalling cascade. Activation of this pro-survival pathway in response to ligand broadly available in the brain might increase neuroregenerative potential of transplanted precursors. The ChR was produced by fusing a MOG-specific single ‎chain antibody with the extracellular boundary of the IGF1R transmembrane segment. The ChR is expressed on the cellular surface, predominantly as a monomer, and is not N-glycosylated. To show MOG-dependent functionality of the ChR, neuroblastoma cells B104 expressing this ChR were stimulated with monolayers of cells expressing recombinant MOG. The ChR undergoes MOG-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and homodimerisation. It promotes insulin and IGF-independent growth of the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4. The proposed mode of the ChR activation is by MOG-induced dimerisation which promotes kinase domain transphosphorylation, by-passing the requirement of conformation changes known to be important for IGF1R activation. Another ChR, which contains a segment of the β-chain ectodomain, was produced in an attempt to recapitulate some of these conformational changes, but proved non-functional. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radioimmunological proof of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans by the use of a double antibody method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, V.

    1982-01-01

    Thyroid antibodies, especially thyroglobulin antibodies, allow themselves to be proven with the double antibody method, in competitive radio binding assays and with the solid phase technique. These methods offer advantages relative to sensitivity and quantifiability. In this work a sensitive radioimmunoassay as a double antibody method was worked out whereby a 125 I-thyroglobulin/thyroglobulin antibody immune complex was precipitated out using anti-human immunoglobulin. The measured results from the radioimmunoassay show a good correlation with the results of the immune histological findings. A high to very high Tg antibody level occurs with autoimmune thyroiditis (80%), primary hypothyroidism (74%) and hyperthyroidism (70%). The control values with healthy people came to less than 5% specific binding. In correlation with the results of other authors this method is advantageous relative to test start and evaluation procedures. (orig.) [de

  20. Chimeric polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogulis, Mark; Sweeney, Matthew; Heu, Tia

    2017-06-14

    The present invention relates to chimeric GH61 polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the chimeric GH61 polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the chimeric GH61 polypeptides.

  1. Functional evolution and structural conservation in chimeric cytochromes p450: calibrating a structure-guided approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otey, Christopher R; Silberg, Jonathan J; Voigt, Christopher A; Endelman, Jeffrey B; Bandara, Geethani; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Recombination generates chimeric proteins whose ability to fold depends on minimizing structural perturbations that result when portions of the sequence are inherited from different parents. These chimeric sequences can display functional properties characteristic of the parents or acquire entirely new functions. Seventeen chimeras were generated from two CYP102 members of the functionally diverse cytochrome p450 family. Chimeras predicted to have limited structural disruption, as defined by the SCHEMA algorithm, displayed CO binding spectra characteristic of folded p450s. Even this small population exhibited significant functional diversity: chimeras displayed altered substrate specificities, a wide range in thermostabilities, up to a 40-fold increase in peroxidase activity, and ability to hydroxylate a substrate toward which neither parent heme domain shows detectable activity. These results suggest that SCHEMA-guided recombination can be used to generate diverse p450s for exploring function evolution within the p450 structural framework.

  2. Determination of High-affinity Antibody-antigen Binding Kinetics Using Four Biosensor Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2017-04-17

    Label-free optical biosensors are powerful tools in drug discovery for the characterization of biomolecular interactions. In this study, we describe the use of four routinely used biosensor platforms in our laboratory to evaluate the binding affinity and kinetics of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9). While both Biacore T100 and ProteOn XPR36 are derived from the well-established Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology, the former has four flow cells connected by serial flow configuration, whereas the latter presents 36 reaction spots in parallel through an improvised 6 x 6 crisscross microfluidic channel configuration. The IBIS MX96 also operates based on the SPR sensor technology, with an additional imaging feature that provides detection in spatial orientation. This detection technique coupled with the Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM) expands the throughput significantly by enabling multiplex array printing and detection of 96 reaction sports simultaneously. In contrast, the Octet RED384 is based on the BioLayer Interferometry (BLI) optical principle, with fiber-optic probes acting as the biosensor to detect interference pattern changes upon binding interactions at the tip surface. Unlike the SPR-based platforms, the BLI system does not rely on continuous flow fluidics; instead, the sensor tips collect readings while they are immersed in analyte solutions of a 384-well microplate during orbital agitation. Each of these biosensor platforms has its own advantages and disadvantages. To provide a direct comparison of these instruments' ability to provide quality kinetic data, the described protocols illustrate experiments that use the same assay format and the same high-quality reagents to characterize antibody-antigen kinetics that fit the simple 1:1 molecular interaction model.

  3. Monoclonal antibody-dendrimer conjugates enable radiolabeling of antibody with markedly high specific activity with minimal loss of immunoreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, H.; Togashi, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, N.; Saga, T.; Nakamoto, Y.; Ishimori, T.; Konishi, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging, Kyoto Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Toyama, S. [Inst. for Virus Research, Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Brechbiel, M.W. [Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, Md. (United States)

    2000-09-01

    For the purpose of radioimmunotherapy, labelling of monoclonal antibody with high specific activity is often necessary, especially when using a radionuclide with a shorter half-life. Polyamine dendrimers (PAMAM) are novel synthetic polymeric molecules with large numbers of amine residues on their spherical surface. In order to bind large numbers of radiometals to single antibody molecules, the generation-4 PAMAM (G4), which has 64 amines, was conjugated with 43 molecules of 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyl-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (1B4M), a derivative of DTPA. This product [G4-(1B4M){sub 43}] was then conjugated with OST7, a murine monoclonal IgG{sub 1}. We evaluated the achievable specific activity for {sup 111}In labeling, immunore-activity, biodistribution, and tumor targeting in mice of the {sup 111}In- or {sup 153}Gd-OST7-G4-(1B4M){sub 43} as compared with radiolabeled OST7-1B4M or 56C-1B4M. The maximum specific activity of {sup 111}In-OST7-G4-(1B4M){sub 43} and {sup 111}In-OST7-1B4M was 470 and 8.7 GBq/mg (12,700 and 263 mCi/mg), respectively. Immunoreactivity of radiolabeled OST7-G4-(1B4M){sub 43} and OST7-1B4M, as determined by the binding to KT005 cells expressing the antigen, was respectively 91% and 84% of that of {sup 125}I-labelled OST7. Biodistribution studies for preparations with maximum specific activity in normal mice 3 h after injection showed that {sup 111}In- or {sup 153}Gd-OST7-G4-(1B4M){sub 43} cleared faster from the blood and accumulated more in the liver than did {sup 111}In- or {sup 153}Gd-OST7-1B4M. The dendrimer 1B4M [G4-(1B4M){sub 64}] itself showed similar saturation effects with metals. The radioactivity in all the other organs reflected the rapid clearance of radioactivity from the blood. {sup 153}Gd-OST7-G4-(1B4M){sub 43} showed specific accumulation in the KT005 tumor. In conclusion, we could successfully bind 49 times as many metal atoms to an antibody molecule as is possible with conventional metal labeling for

  4. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  5. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Vidossich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu and main group (Mg metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions.

  6. Optimization of exopolysaccharide production from Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22 and examination of its metal-binding abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalej, H; Hmidet, N; Boisset, C; Buon, L; Heyraud, A; Nasri, M

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of culture conditions and medium components on exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22 and to access the EPS performance as a metal-binding exopolysaccharide. The EPS production conditions of Ps. stutzeri AS22 in submerged culture were optimized using two approaches for EPS quantification, and its metal-binding capacity was evaluated using both single and mixed metal ions systems. Maximum EPS level was achieved after 24 h of incubation at 30°C with an initial pH of 8.0, 250 rev min(-1) stirring level and 10% inoculum size. 50 g l(-1) starch, 5 g l(-1) yeast extract, 0.5 g l(-1) NaCl, 1.4 g l(-1) K2 HPO4, 0.4 g l(-1) MgSO4, 0.4 g l(-1) CaCl2 and 1 g l(-1) mannose were found to be the most suitable carbon, nitrogen, mineral and additional carbohydrate sources, respectively. From metal-binding experiments, the crude EPS showed interesting metal adsorption capacity adopting the order Pb > Co > Fe > Cu > Cd. Lead was preferentially biosorbed with a maximal uptake of 460 mg g(-1) crude EPS. Under the optimal culture requirements, EPS level reached 10.2 g l(-1) after 24 h of fermentation, seven times more than the production under initial conditions. According to the metal-binding assay, the crude EPS has potential to be used as a novel biosorbent in the treatment of heavy metals-contaminated water. Our results are interesting in terms of yield as well as efficiency for the potential use of the Ps. stutzeri exopolysaccharide as a metal-absorbent polymer in the bioremediation field. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy Ann; Tam, Joshua; Steiglitz, Barry M; Bauer, Rebecca L; Peters, Noel R; Wang, Ying; Anderson, R Rox; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-08-01

    The ideal treatment for severe cutaneous injuries would eliminate the need for autografts and promote fully functional, aesthetically pleasing autologous skin regeneration. NIKS progenitor cell-based skin tissues have been developed to promote healing by providing barrier function and delivering wound healing factors. Independently, a device has recently been created to "copy" skin by harvesting full-thickness microscopic tissue columns (MTCs) in lieu of autografts traditionally harvested as sheets. We evaluated the feasibility of combining these two technologies by embedding MTCs in NIKS-based skin tissues to generate chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs. Chimeric constructs have the potential to provide immediate wound coverage, eliminate painful donor site wounds, and promote restoration of a pigmented skin tissue possessing hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. After MTC insertion, chimeric constructs and controls were reintroduced into air-interface culture and maintained in vitro for several weeks. Tissue viability, proliferative capacity, and morphology were evaluated after long-term culture. Our results confirmed successful MTC insertion and integration, and demonstrated the feasibility of generating chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs that preserved the viability, proliferative capacity, and structure of autologous pigmented skin. These feasibility studies established the proof-of-principle necessary to further develop chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for the treatment of complex skin defects. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Budkowski, Andrzej; Petrou, Panagiota; Pagkali, Varvara; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Bernasik, Andrzej; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2018-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm × 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  9. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    KAUST Repository

    Gajos, Katarzyna

    2018-03-05

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm x 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  10. Protein adsorption/desorption and antibody binding stoichiometry on silicon interferometric biosensors examined with TOF-SIMS

    KAUST Repository

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Budkowski, Andrzej; Petrou, Panagiota; Pagkali, Varvara; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Bernasik, Andrzej; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2018-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry has been employed to examine, with biomolecular discrimination, sensing arm areas (20 μm x 600 μm) of integrated onto silicon chips Mach-Zehnder interferometers aiming to optimize their biofunctionalization with regard to indirect immunochemical (competitive) detection of ochratoxin A. Sensing areas are examined after: modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, spotting of OTA-ovalbumin conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin, reaction with OTA-specific mouse monoclonal antibody followed by goat anti-mouse IgG secondary antibody. Component mass loadings of all proteins involved in immunodetection are determined from TOF-SIMS micro-analysis combined with ellipsometry of planar surfaces. These data show that partial desorption of surface-bound probe and blocking protein takes place upon primary immunoreaction to a degree that depends on probe concentration in spotting solution. Taking into account this desorption, apparent binding stoichiometry of both antibodies in immune complexes formed onto chip surface is determined more accurately than the respective evaluation based on real-time sensor response. In addition, mass loadings for probe and secondary antibody is observed to saturate for optimum probe concentrations. Also, principal component analysis of TOF-SIMS data could resolve both immunoreactions and biofunctionalization and discriminate surfaces prepared with optimum probe concentrations from those prepared using suboptimum ones.

  11. Toxic metals (Ni2+, Pb2+, Hg2+) binding affinity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from different ages municipal landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikta, S. Y.; Tareq, Shafi M.; Uddin, M. Khabir

    2018-03-01

    Solid waste production is rapidly increasing in Bangladesh and landfill leachate is the consequence of the decomposition of this waste. These leachates contain heavy metals and significant amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is known to have considerable role in heavy metals speciation. Hence, it is important to characterize DOM/leachate and evaluate toxic metals binding affinity of DOM. The objectives of this study were to characterize the DOM in landfill leachate through physico-chemical and optical analyses and to investigate the toxic metals (Ni2+, Pb2+ and Hg2+) binding affinity of three different ages (fresh sample L-1, young sample L-2 and mature sample L-3) DOM samples. Results suggested that leachate is a potential pollutant which contained very high organic pollutant load. Conditional stability constant (Log K) and percentages of fluorophores that correspond to metal binding (% f) values indicated that young DOM sample (L-2) had the highest binding affinity to all the three metals ions. In general, DOM samples showed the following order affinity to the metal ions; Ni2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-3 > L-1, Pb2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-3 > L-1 and Hg2+ binding affinity: L-2 > L-1 > L-3.

  12. A Large Size Chimeric Highly Immunogenic Peptide Presents Multistage Plasmodium Antigens as a Vaccine Candidate System against Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, José Manuel; Varela, Yahson; Silva, Yolanda; Ardila, Karen; Forero, Martha; Guasca, Laura; Guerrero, Yuly; Bermudez, Adriana; Alba, Patricia; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2017-11-01

    Rational strategies for obtaining malaria vaccine candidates should include not only a proper selection of target antigens for antibody stimulation, but also a versatile molecular design based on ordering the right pieces from the complex pathogen molecular puzzle towards more active and functional immunogens. Classical Plasmodium falciparum antigens regarded as vaccine candidates have been selected as model targets in this study. Among all possibilities we have chosen epitopes of Pf CSP, STARP; MSA1 and Pf 155/RESA from pre- and erythrocyte stages respectively for designing a large 82-residue chimeric immunogen. A number of options aimed at diminishing steric hindrance for synthetic procedures were assessed based on standard Fmoc chemistry such as building block orthogonal ligation; pseudo-proline and microwave-assisted procedures, therefore the large-chimeric target was produced, characterized and immunologically tested. Antigenicity and functional in vivo efficacy tests of the large-chimera formulations administered alone or as antigen mixtures have proven the stimulation of high antibody titers, showing strong correlation with protection and parasite clearance of vaccinated BALB/c mice after being lethally challenged with both P. berghei -ANKA and P. yoelii 17XL malaria strains. Besides, 3D structure features shown by the large-chimera encouraged as to propose using these rational designed large synthetic molecules as reliable vaccine candidate-presenting systems.

  13. A Large Size Chimeric Highly Immunogenic Peptide Presents Multistage Plasmodium Antigens as a Vaccine Candidate System against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Lozano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rational strategies for obtaining malaria vaccine candidates should include not only a proper selection of target antigens for antibody stimulation, but also a versatile molecular design based on ordering the right pieces from the complex pathogen molecular puzzle towards more active and functional immunogens. Classical Plasmodium falciparum antigens regarded as vaccine candidates have been selected as model targets in this study. Among all possibilities we have chosen epitopes of PfCSP, STARP; MSA1 and Pf155/RESA from pre- and erythrocyte stages respectively for designing a large 82-residue chimeric immunogen. A number of options aimed at diminishing steric hindrance for synthetic procedures were assessed based on standard Fmoc chemistry such as building block orthogonal ligation; pseudo-proline and microwave-assisted procedures, therefore the large-chimeric target was produced, characterized and immunologically tested. Antigenicity and functional in vivo efficacy tests of the large-chimera formulations administered alone or as antigen mixtures have proven the stimulation of high antibody titers, showing strong correlation with protection and parasite clearance of vaccinated BALB/c mice after being lethally challenged with both P. berghei-ANKA and P. yoelii 17XL malaria strains. Besides, 3D structure features shown by the large-chimera encouraged as to propose using these rational designed large synthetic molecules as reliable vaccine candidate-presenting systems.

  14. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assignment of C1q-binding HLA antibodies as unacceptable HLA antigens avoids positive CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation of deceased donor organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, David; Marget, Matthias; Hallensleben, Michael; Görg, Siegfried; Ziemann, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Soon, a virtual crossmatch shall replace the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) allocation crossmatch in the Eurotransplant region. To prevent positive CDC-crossmatches in the recipient centre, careful definition of unacceptable antigens is necessary. For highly sensitized patients, this is difficult by CDC alone. Assignment of all antibodies detected by sensitive assays, however, could prevent organ allocation. To assess the usefulness of the Luminex C1q-assay to prevent positive CDC-crossmatches, all CDC-crossmatches performed prior to deceased kidney transplantation in a 16-month-period were reviewed. Sera causing positive crossmatches were investigated by the C1q-assay. 31 out of 1432 crossmatches (2.2%) were positive. Sera involved in 26 positive crossmatches were available. C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies were detected in 19 sera (73.1%). The other sera were from recipients without any HLA antibodies detectable by CDC or common solid phase assays. Three patients had known Non-HLA antibodies causing positive CDC-results. Four crossmatches were only weak positive. Therefore, avoidance of donors with HLA antigens against whom C1q-binding antibodies were detected would have prevented all positive crossmatches due to HLA antibodies. Provided that all HLA specificities against which antibodies are detected by the Luminex C1q-assay are considered as unacceptable antigens, CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation might safely be omitted in many patients. They should be maintained in highly immunized patients, however, for whom assignment of all C1q-positive antibodies as unacceptable antigens could lead to a significant delay or even prevention of transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro characterization of 177Lu-radiolabelled chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and a preliminary dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrer, Flavio; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Chen, Jianhua; Fani, Melpomeni; Powell, Pia; Maecke, Helmut R.; Lohri, Andreas; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    131 I- and 90 Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibodies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of low-grade, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the most appropriate radionuclide in terms of high efficiency and low toxicity has not yet been established. In this study we evaluated an immunoconjugate formed by the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and the chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). DOTA-rituximab was prepared as a kit formulation and can be labelled in a short time ( 177 Lu or 90 Y. Immunoconjugates with different numbers of DOTA molecules per rituximab were prepared using p-SCN-Bz-DOTA. In vitro immunoreactivity and stability were tested and preliminary dosimetric results were acquired in two patients. The immunological binding properties of DOTA-rituximab to the CD20 antigen were found to be retained after conjugation with up to four chelators. The labelled product was stable against a 10 5 times excess of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, 37 C, 7 days). Two patients with relapsed NHL were treated with 740 MBq/m 2 body surface 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab. Scintigraphic images showed specific uptake at tumour sites and acceptable dosimetric results. The mean whole-body dose was found to be 314 mGy. The administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab was tolerated well. Our results show that DOTA-rituximab (4:1) can be labelled with 177 Lu with sufficient stability while the immunoconjugate retains its immunoreactivity. 177 Lu-DOTA-rituximab is an interesting, well-tolerated radiolabelled antibody with clinical activity in a low dose range, and provides an approach to the efficient treatment with few side effects for patients with relapsed NHL. (orig.)

  17. A monoclonal antibody against PDGF B-chain inhibits PDGF-induced DNA synthesis in C3H fibroblasts and prevents binding of PDGF to its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Langeland, N; Hagen, I; Holmsen, H

    1990-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb 6D11) against platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was studied. We found that the MAb 6D11 in concentrations equimolar to PDGF blocked the [3H]thymidine incorporation in C3H/10T1/2 C18 fibroblasts stimulated by PDGF B-B and PDGF A-B. This inhibition was overcome by high doses of PDGF. The [3H]thymidine incorporation stimulated by other growth factors (aFGF, bFGF and bombesin) was not inhibited by the antibody. The MAb 6D11 blocked receptor binding of PDGF B-B, but not PDGF A-A. These findings suggest that the MAb 6D11 abolishes PDGF-induced DNA synthesis by blocking PDGF receptor binding. In this communication we demonstrate an isoform-specific monoclonal antibody against PDGF.

  18. The use of isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of metal ion binding to low-cost sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsen, Vigdis; Heggset, Ellinor Baevre; Sorlie, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamics of Al 3+ , Cr 3+ , and Pb 2+ binding to the abundant biopolymer chitin have been determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared to what is observed for binding to activated carbon. The use of ITC enables the detection of two distinct binding sites on chitin for all three metal ions. For the relative strong binding sites, free energy changes ranges from -37.6 kJ/mol to -41.8 kJ/mol while the same values are from -30.1 kJ/mol to -31.8 kJ/mol for the relative weak binding sites. All binding reactions to chitin are entropically driven. Interactions of the metal ions to activated carbon are best fitted as a single-site binding with relative weak binding with free energy changes from -26.3 kJ/mol to -26.8 kJ/mol.

  19. Structural Determinants of Specific Lipid Binding to Potassium Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weingarth, M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330985655; Prokofyev, A.; van der Cruijsen, E.A.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330826743; Nand, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337731403; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Pongs, O.; Baldus, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410864

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated specific lipid binding to the pore domain of potassium channels KcsA and chimeric KcsAKv1.3 on the structural and functional level using extensive coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, solid-state NMR, and single channel measurements. We show that, while

  20. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup...

  1. Structural considerations for functional anti-EGFR × anti-CD3 bispecific diabodies in light of domain order and binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Ryutaro; Nagai, Keisuke; Makabe, Koki; Takahashi, Kento; Kumagai, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Hiroko; Ogata, Hiromi; Arai, Kyoko; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Kumagai, Izumi

    2018-03-02

    We previously reported a functional humanized bispecific diabody (bsDb) that targeted EGFR and CD3 (hEx3-Db) and enhancement of its cytotoxicity by rearranging the domain order in the V domain. Here, we further dissected the effect of domain order in bsDbs on their cross-linking ability and binding kinetics to elucidate general rules regarding the design of functional bsDbs. Using Ex3-Db as a model system, we first classified the four possible domain orders as anti-parallel (where both chimeric single-chain components are variable heavy domain (VH)-variable light domain (VL) or VL-VH order) and parallel types (both chimeric single-chain components are mixed with VH-VL and VL-VH order). Although anti-parallel Ex3-Dbs could cross-link the soluble target antigens, their cross-linking ability between soluble targets had no correlation with their growth inhibitory effects. In contrast, the binding affinity of one of the two constructs with a parallel-arrangement V domain was particularly low, and structural modeling supported this phenomenon. Similar results were observed with E2x3-Dbs, in which the V region of the anti-EGFR antibody clone in hEx3 was replaced with that of another anti-EGFR clone. Only anti-parallel types showed affinity-dependent cancer inhibitory effects in each molecule, and E2x3-LH (both components in VL-VH order) showed the most intense anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo . Our results showed that, in addition to rearranging the domain order of bsDbs, increasing their binding affinity may be an ideal strategy for enhancing the cytotoxicity of anti-parallel constructs and that E2x3-LH is particularly attractive as a candidate next-generation anti-cancer drug.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  3. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  6. Crystal structures reveal metal-binding plasticity at the metallo-β-lactamase active site of PqqB from Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xiongying; Latham, John A.; Klema, Valerie J.; Evans III, Robert L.; Li, Chao; Klinman, Judith P.; Wilmot, Carrie M. (UMM); (UCB)

    2017-08-19

    PqqB is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone and a distal member of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. PqqB lacks two residues in the conserved signature motif HxHxDH that makes up the key metal-chelating elements that can bind up to two metal ions at the active site of MBLs and other members of its superfamily. Here, we report crystal structures of PqqB bound to Mn2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+. These structures demonstrate that PqqB can still bind metal ions at the canonical MBL active site. The fact that PqqB can adapt its side chains to chelate a wide spectrum of metal ions with different coordination features on a uniform main chain scaffold demonstrates its metal-binding plasticity. This plasticity may provide insights into the structural basis of promiscuous activities found in ensembles of metal complexes within this superfamily. Furthermore, PqqB belongs to a small subclass of MBLs that contain an additional CxCxxC motif that binds a structural Zn2+. Our data support a key role for this motif in dimerization.

  7. Antibody phage display applications for nuclear medicine imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winthrop, M.D.; Denardo, G.L.; Denardo, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-based constructs genetically engineered from genes of diverse origin provide a remarkable opportunity to develop functional molecular imaging techniques and specific molecular targeted radionuclide therapies. Phage display libraries of antibody fragment genes can be used to select antibody-based constructs that bind any chosen epitope. A large naive human antibody-based library was used to illustrate binding of antibody constructs to a variety of common and unique antigens. Antibody-based libraries from hybridoma cells, lymphocytes from immunized humans or from mice and human antibody repertoires produced in transgenic mice have also been described. Several orders of magnitude of affinity enhancement can be achieved by random or site specific mutations of the selected binding peptide domains of the scFv. Affinities (K d ) as high as 10 - 11 M (10 pM) for affinity-matured scFv have been documented. Such gene libraries thus offer an almost limitless variety of antibody-based molecular binding peptide modules that can be used in creative ways for the construction of new targeting agents for functional or molecular imaging and therapy

  8. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkworth, J.B.; Antrim, L.A.; Sack, G.

    1986-01-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue

  9. Chimeras taking shape: Potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  10. IL-15 enhances cross-reactive antibody recall responses to seasonal H3 influenza viruses in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiong Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, several human monoclonal antibodies that target conserved epitopes on the stalk region of influenza hemagglutinin (HA have shown broad reactivity to influenza A subtypes. Also, vaccination with recombinant chimeric HA or stem fragments from H3 influenza viruses induce broad immune protection in mice and humans. However, it is unclear whether stalk-binding antibodies can be induced in human memory B cells by seasonal H3N2 viruses. Methods: In this study, we recruited 13 donors previously exposed to H3 viruses, the majority (12 of 13 of which had been immunized with seasonal influenza vaccines. We evaluated plasma baseline strain-specific and stalk-reactive anti-HA antibodies and B cell recall responses to inactivated H3N2 A/Victoria/361/2011 virus in vitro using a high throughput multiplex (mPlex-Flu assay. Results: Stalk-reactive IgG was detected in the plasma of 7 of the subjects. Inactivated H3 viral particles rapidly induced clade cross-reactive antibodies in B cell cultures derived from all 13 donors. In addition, H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in culture supernatants from 7 of the 13 donors (53.8%.  H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were also induced by H1 and H7 subtypes. Interestingly, broadly cross-reactive antibody recall responses to H3 strains were also enhanced by stimulating B cells in vitro with CpG2006 ODN in the presence of IL-15. H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in  CpG2006 ODN + IL-15 stimulated B cell cultures derived from 12 of the 13 donors (92.3%, with high levels detected in cultures from 7 of the 13 donors. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that stalk-reactive antibody recall responses induced by seasonal H3 viruses and CpG2006 ODN can be enhanced by IL-15.

  11. Chimeric TALE recombinases with programmable DNA sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Fuller, Roberta P; Barbas, Carlos F

    2012-11-01

    Site-specific recombinases are powerful tools for genome engineering. Hyperactivated variants of the resolvase/invertase family of serine recombinases function without accessory factors, and thus can be re-targeted to sequences of interest by replacing native DNA-binding domains (DBDs) with engineered zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs). However, imperfect modularity with particular domains, lack of high-affinity binding to all DNA triplets, and difficulty in construction has hindered the widespread adoption of ZFPs in unspecialized laboratories. The discovery of a novel type of DBD in transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas provides an alternative to ZFPs. Here we describe chimeric TALE recombinases (TALERs): engineered fusions between a hyperactivated catalytic domain from the DNA invertase Gin and an optimized TALE architecture. We use a library of incrementally truncated TALE variants to identify TALER fusions that modify DNA with efficiency and specificity comparable to zinc-finger recombinases in bacterial cells. We also show that TALERs recombine DNA in mammalian cells. The TALER architecture described herein provides a platform for insertion of customized TALE domains, thus significantly expanding the targeting capacity of engineered recombinases and their potential applications in biotechnology and medicine.

  12. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  14. A novel self-replicating chimeric lentivirus-like particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Christy K; Young, Kelly R; Madden, Victoria J; Johnson, Philip R; Johnston, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Successful live attenuated vaccines mimic natural exposure to pathogens without causing disease and have been successful against several viruses. However, safety concerns prevent the development of attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a vaccine candidate. If a safe, replicating virus vaccine could be developed, it might have the potential to offer significant protection against HIV infection and disease. Described here is the development of a novel self-replicating chimeric virus vaccine candidate that is designed to provide natural exposure to a lentivirus-like particle and to incorporate the properties of a live attenuated virus vaccine without the inherent safety issues associated with attenuated lentiviruses. The genome from the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was modified to express SHIV89.6P genes encoding the structural proteins Gag and Env. Expression of Gag and Env from VEE RNA in primate cells led to the assembly of particles that morphologically and functionally resembled lentivirus virions and that incorporated alphavirus RNA. Infection of CD4⁺ cells with chimeric lentivirus-like particles was specific and productive, resulting in RNA replication, expression of Gag and Env, and generation of progeny chimeric particles. Further genome modifications designed to enhance encapsidation of the chimeric virus genome and to express an attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protease for particle maturation improved the ability of chimeric lentivirus-like particles to propagate in cell culture. This study provides proof of concept for the feasibility of creating chimeric virus genomes that express lentivirus structural proteins and assemble into infectious particles for presentation of lentivirus immunogens in their native and functional conformation.

  15. Fc-Binding Ligands of Immunoglobulin G: An Overview of High Affinity Proteins and Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weonu Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing application of antibodies has inspired the development of several novel methods to isolate and target antibodies using smart biomaterials that mimic the binding of Fc-receptors to antibodies. The Fc-binding domain of antibodies is the primary binding site for e.g., effector proteins and secondary antibodies, whereas antigens bind to the Fab region. Protein A, G, and L, surface proteins expressed by pathogenic bacteria, are well known to bind immunoglobulin and have been widely exploited in antibody purification strategies. Several difficulties are encountered when bacterial proteins are used in antibody research and application. One of the major obstacles hampering the use of bacterial proteins is sample contamination with trace amounts of these proteins, which can invoke an immune response in the host. Many research groups actively develop synthetic ligands that are able to selectively and strongly bind to antibodies. Among the reported ligands, peptides that bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies are attractive tools in antibody research. Besides their use as high affinity ligands in antibody purification chromatography, Fc-binding peptides are applied e.g., to localize antibodies on nanomaterials and to increase the half-life of proteins in serum. In this review, recent developments of Fc-binding peptides are presented and their binding characteristics and diverse applications are discussed.

  16. Reduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 viremia by a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immunity after experimental PCV2 challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hwi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the present study was to elucidate the humoral and cellular immune response mechanisms by which a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine reduces the PCV2 viremia. Forty PCV2 seronegative 3-week-old pigs were randomly divided into the following four groups: vaccinated challenged (T01, vaccinated non-challenged (T02, non-vaccinated challenged (T03, and non-vaccinated non-challenged (T04 animals. The pigs in groups T01 and T02 were immunized with a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine (Fostera™ PCV; Pfizer Animal Health administered as a 2.0 ml dose at 21 days of age. At 35 days of age (0 days post-challenge, the pigs in groups T01 and T03 were inoculated intranasally with 2 ml each of PCV2b. Results A reduction of PCV2 viremia coincided with the appearance of both PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA and interferon-γ-secreting cells (IFN-γ-SCs in the vaccinated animals. However, the presence of anti-PCV2 IgG antibodies did not correlate with the reduction of PCV2 viremia. Lymphocyte subset analysis indicated that the numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased in vaccinated animals but the numbers of CD4+ cells decreased transiently in non-vaccinated animals. The observation of a delayed type hypersensitivity response in only the vaccinated animals also supports a CD4+ cell-associated protective cellular immune response induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine. Conclusions The induction of PCV2-specific NA and IFN-γ-SCs, and CD4+ cells by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine is the important protective immune response leading to reduction of the PCV2 viremia and control of the PCV2 infection. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of protective humoral and cellular immunity induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine and its effect on reduction of PCV2 viremia by vaccination.

  17. APPLICATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN-BINDING PROTEINS A, G, L IN THE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Sviatenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteins A, G and L are native or recombinant proteins of microbial origin that bind to mammalian immunoglobulins. Preferably recombinant variants of proteins A, G, L are used in biotechnology for affinity sorbents production. Сomparative characteristics of proteins A, G, L and affinity sorbents on the basis of them, advantages and disadvantages of these proteins application as ligands in the affinity chromatography are done. Analysis of proteins A, G, L properties is presented. Binding specificities and affinities of these proteins differ between species and antibody subclass. Protein А has high affinity to human IgG1, IgG2, IgG4, mouse IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3, goat and sheep IgG2, dog, cat, guinea pig, rabbit IgG. Protein G binds strongly to human, mouse, cow, goat, sheep and rabbit IgG. Protein L has ability of strong binding to immunoglobulin kappa-chains of human, mouse, rat and pig. Expediency of application of affinity chromatography with usage of sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are shown for isolation and purification of antibodies different classes. Previously mentioned method is used as an alternative to conventional methods of protein purification, such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interactions, metal affinity chromatography, ethanol precipitation due to simplicity in usage, possibility of one-step purification process, obtaining of proteins high level purity, multiuse at maintenance of proper storage and usage conditions. Affinity sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are used not only for antibodies purification, but also for extraction of different antibodies fractions from blood serum.

  18. Binding of cetuximab to the EGFRvIII deletion mutant and its biological consequences in malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Dubois, Ludwig; Li Younan; Aerts, Hugo; Wouters, Bradly G.; Lambin, Philippe; Theys, Jan; Lammering, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Despite the clinical use of cetuximab, a chimeric antibody against EGFR, little is known regarding its interaction with EGFRvIII, a frequently expressed deletion mutant of EGFR. Therefore, we investigated the interaction and the functional consequences of cetuximab treatment on glioma cells stably expressing EGFRvIII. Materials and methods: The human glioma cell line U373 genetically modified to express EGFRvIII was used to measure the binding of cetuximab and its internalization using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Proliferation and cell survival were analyzed by cell growth and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Cetuximab is able to bind to EGFRvIII and causes an internalization of the receptor and decreases its expression levels. Furthermore, in contrast to EGF, cetuximab was able to activate EGFRvIII which was evidenced by multiple phosphorylation sites and its downstream signaling targets. Despite this activation, the growth rate and the radiosensitivity of the EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells were not modulated. Conclusions: Cetuximab binds to EGFRvIII and leads to the initial activation, internalization and subsequent downregulation of EGFRvIII, but it does not seem to modulate the proliferation or radiosensitivity of EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells. Thus, approaches to treat EGFRvIII-expressing glioma cells should be evaluated more carefully.

  19. Chimeric OspA genes, proteins and methods of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Brian A.; Livey, Ian; O'Rourke, Maria; Schwendinger, Michael; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.

    2018-02-20

    The invention relates to the development of chimeric OspA molecules for use in a new Lyme vaccine. More specifically, the chimeric OspA molecules comprise the proximal portion from one OspA serotype, together with the distal portion from another OspA serotype, while retaining antigenic properties of both of the parent polypeptides. The chimeric OspA molecules are delivered alone or in combination to provide protection against a variety of Borrelia genospecies. The invention also provides methods for administering the chimeric OspA molecules to a subject in the prevention and treatment of Lyme disease or borreliosis.

  20. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  2. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi -specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti- T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania , a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi , showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Progress and Challenges in the Design and Clinical Development of Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Almagro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable progress in engineering and clinical development of therapeutic antibodies in the last 40 years, after the seminal work by Köhler and Milstein, has led to the approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA of 21 antibodies for cancer immunotherapy. We review here these approved antibodies, with emphasis on the methods used for their discovery, engineering, and optimization for therapeutic settings. These methods include antibody engineering via chimerization and humanization of non-human antibodies, as well as selection and further optimization of fully human antibodies isolated from human antibody phage-displayed libraries and immunization of transgenic mice capable of generating human antibodies. These technology platforms have progressively led to the development of therapeutic antibodies with higher human content and, thus, less immunogenicity. We also discuss the genetic engineering approaches that have allowed isotype switching and Fc modifications to modulate effector functions and bioavailability (half-life, which together with the technologies for engineering the Fv fragment, have been pivotal in generating more efficacious and better tolerated therapeutic antibodies to treat cancer.

  4. Substituent Effects on the Coordination Chemistry of Metal-Binding Pharmacophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Whitney R. [Department; Baker, Tessa W. [Department; Marts, Amy R. [Department; DeGenova, Daniel T. [Department; Martin, David P. [Department; Reed, Garrett C. [Department; McCarrick, Robert M. [Department; Crowder, Michael W. [Department; Cohen, Seth M. [Department; Tierney, David L. [Department

    2017-09-12

    A combination of XAS, UV–vis, NMR, and EPR was used to examine the binding of a series of α-hydroxythiones to CoCA. All three appear to bind preferentially in their neutral, protonated forms. Two of the three clearly bind in a monodentate fashion, through the thione sulfur alone. Thiomaltol (TM) appears to show some orientational preference, on the basis of the NMR, while it appears that thiopyromeconic acid (TPMA) retains rotational freedom. In contrast, allothiomaltol (ATM), after initially binding in its neutral form, presumably through the thione sulfur, forms a final complex that is five-coordinate via bidentate coordination of ATM. On the basis of optical titrations, we speculate that this may be due to the lower initial pKa of ATM (8.3) relative to those of TM (9.0) and TPMA (9.5). Binding through the thione is shown to reduce the hydroxyl pKa by ~0.7 pH unit on metal binding, bringing only ATM’s pKa close to the pH of the experiment, facilitating deprotonation and subsequent coordination of the hydroxyl. The data predict the presence of a solvent-exchangeable proton on TM and TPMA, and Q-band 2-pulse ESEEM experiments on CoCA + TM suggest that the proton is present. ESE-detected EPR also showed a surprising frequency dependence, giving only a subset of the expected resonances at X-band.

  5. A novel IgE antibody targeting the prostate-specific antigen as a potential prostate cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Nicodemus, Christopher F; Penichet, Manuel L; Helguera, Gustavo; Leuchter, Richard K; Quintero, Rafaela; Kozman, Maggie; Rodríguez, José A; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Schultes, Birgit C

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA), often found at high levels in the serum of PCa patients, has been used as a marker for PCa detection and as a target of immunotherapy. The murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody AR47.47, specific for human PSA, has been shown to enhance antigen presentation by human dendritic cells and induce both CD4 and CD8 T-cell activation when complexed with PSA. In this study, we explored the properties of a novel mouse/human chimeric anti-PSA IgE containing the variable regions of AR47.47 as a potential therapy for PCa. Our goal was to take advantage of the unique properties of IgE in order to trigger immune activation against PCa. Binding characteristics of the antibody were determined by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro degranulation was determined by the release of β-hexosaminidase from effector cells. In vivo degranulation was monitored in human FcεRIα transgenic mice using the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. These mice were also used for a vaccination study to determine the in vivo anti-cancer effects of this antibody. Significant differences in survival were determined using the Log Rank test. In vitro T-cell activation was studied using human dendritic cells and autologous T cells. The anti-PSA IgE, expressed in murine myeloma cells, is properly assembled and secreted, and binds the antigen and FcεRI. In addition, this antibody is capable of triggering effector cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo when artificially cross-linked, but not in the presence of the natural soluble antigen, suggesting that such an int