WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal-backed unicompartmental knee

  1. [Medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis for patients with unicompartmental gonarthrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, N.P.; Deutman, R.; Raay, J.J. van; Horn, J.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The function and survival time of unicompartmental knee prostheses for patients with severe gonarthrosis have been improved the past few years by developments in their design, the instrumentarium and the surgical technique. A medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis may be indicated in patients with

  2. Conversion of failed modern unicompartmental arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, W N; Ozuna, R M; Scott, R D; Thornhill, T S

    1996-10-01

    Between January 1983 and January 1991, 29 patients (31 knees) with a failed Robert Brigham metal-backed knee arthroplasty (Johnson & Johnson, Raynham, MA) underwent revision to a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-five patients had osteoarthritis, three avascular necrosis, and one rheumatoid arthritis. The average patient age was 72.3 years (range, 49-88 years), and the average weight was 179 lb. (range, 112-242 lb.). The interval between the primary and secondary index procedures averaged 62 months (range, 7-106 months), and mean postrevision follow-up period was 45 months (range, 24-104 months). The primary mechanism of failure of the UKA was tibial polyethylene wear in 21 knees and opposite compartment progression of arthritis in 10 knees. Sixteen knees had particulate synovitis with dense metallic staining of the synovium. At revision, the posterior cruciate ligament was spared in 30 knees and substituted in 1 knee. Restoration of bony deficiency at revision required cancellous bone-graft for contained defects in seven knees, tibial wedges in four knees, and femoral wedges in two knees. No defects received structural allografts. The data suggest that failed, modern unicompartmental knee arthroplasty can successfully be converted to TKA. In most cases, the posterior cruciate ligament can be spared and bone defects corrected with simple wedges or cancellous grafts. Moreover, the results of revision of failed unicompartmental knee arthroplasty are superior to those of failed TKA and failed high tibial osteotomy and comparable to the authors' results of primary TKA with similar-length follow-up periods. Although these results are encouraging, longer-term follow-up evaluation is required to determine survivorship of these revision arthroplasties.

  3. Low implant migration of the SIGMA® medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppens, Daan; Stilling, Maiken; Munk, Stig

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate implant migration of the fixed-bearing Sigma® medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). UKA is a regularly used treatment for patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. UKA has a higher revision rate than total knee arthroplasty. Implant...... migration can be used as a predictor of implant loosening....

  4. Medial vs lateral unicompartmental knee arthrroplasty: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Andrea; Condello, Vincenzo; Madonna, Vincenzo; Bonomo, M; Zorzi, Claudio

    2017-06-07

    Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) is a common procedure for the management of isolated osteoarthritis. UKA is considered less invasive compared to total knee arthroplasty, associated with less operative time, blood loss and faster recovery. Isolated lateral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon clinical problem, with an incidence about ten times lower than the medial compartment. In fact, lateral UKA are about 5-10% of the total amount of the UKAs. In addition, it's historically considered more challenging and with poorer results. The aim of this paper was to compare current indications, modes of failure, survivorship and clinical results of medial and lateral UKA by a narrative review of the latest literature.

  5. Robotic-Assisted Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: State-of-the Art and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Alexander B; Pearle, Andrew D; Mayman, David J; Haas, Steven B

    2018-03-16

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is a successful treatment for unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis that has lower complication rates, faster recovery, and a more natural feeling knee compared to total knee arthroplasty. However, long-term survival has been a persistent concern. As more surgeon-controlled variables have been linked to survival, interest in robotic-assisted surgery has continued to grow. A review and synthesis of the literature on the subject of robotic-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed. We present the driving factors behind the development of robotic-assisted techniques in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and the current state-of-the art. The ability of surgeons to achieve intraoperative targets with robotic assistance and the outcomes of robotic-assisted surgery are also described. Robotic-assisted surgery has become increasingly popular in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, as it allows surgeons to more accurately and reproducibly plan and achieve operative targets during surgery. Cost remains a concern, and it remains to be seen whether robotic-assisted surgery will improve long-term survivorship after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outpatient surgery for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is effective and safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Nanne P; Bemelmans, Yoeri F L; Schotanus, Martijn G M

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing interest in accelerated programs for knee arthroplasty. We examined the efficacy and safety of an outpatient surgery (OS) pathway in patients undergoing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). This case-controlled study evaluates patients operated for UKA in an OS pathway (n = 20) compared to rapid recovery (RR), the current standard (n = 20). We investigated whether patients could be discharged on the day of surgery, resulting in comparable or better outcome by means of adverse events (AEs) in terms of pain (numerical rating scale, NRS), incidences of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and opiate use ( 5) was the most common reason for prolonged hospital stay in the OS pathway. Eighty-five per cent of the patients were discharged on the day of surgery, whereas 95 % of the patients were discharged on postoperative day 3 in the RR pathway. Overall, median pain scores in both pathways did not exceed a NRS score of 5, without significant differences (RR vs. OS) in the number of patients with PONV (4 vs. 2) and opiate use (11 vs. 9) change in mindset for both the patient and the multidisciplinary team are the key factors for the implementation of an OS pathway. Case-control study, Level III.

  7. What Percentage of Patients is a Candidate for Unicompartmental Knee Replacement at a Chinese Arthroplasty Center?

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yong; Xiao, Lianbo; Zhai, Weitao; Kasparek, Maximilian F.; Ouyang, Guilin; Boettner, Friedrich

    2018-01-01

    Background: Data on indication of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) in the Asian population are currently not available. The current paper evaluates patients undergoing knee replacement at a Chinese Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital to report the percentage of patients who meet radiographic and clinical indication criteria for UKA. Methods: Over a one-year period 463 consecutive patients (515 knees) underwent primary knee replacement surgery. Clinical data were recorded and preoperative r...

  8. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddine, Hussein; Aird, Jaimes; Latimer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation. PMID:23259116

  9. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Noureddine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation.

  10. Proprioception after bicruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty is comparable to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Florian; Bahadin, Özkan; Krutsch, Werner; Zellner, Johannes; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter; Tibesku, Carsten Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Rising expectations in functional performance of total knee joints are inciting further improvement of knee arthroplasty implants. From a patient-centred view, bicruciate-retaining models provide a more natural feeling knee. However, there is no evidence of functional advantage for these implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate balance ability as a measure of proprioception in patients with a bicruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, controlled trial was conducted to compare balance ability in 60 patients after arthroplasty of the knee for osteoarthritis. We compared patients with a bicruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty (BCR group) to a control group of patients with a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA group) and another control group of patients with a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty (PS group). The patient population comprised 30 women (50.0 %) and 30 men in three cohorts of 20 each. The mean age was 62.1 ± 8.0 years (range 43-78). Patients were evaluated preoperatively and 9 months post-operatively. The evaluation included clinical, radiological, and balance testing-a single-leg stance with eyes closed compared to eyes open. The difference in area of sway between eyes closed and eyes open represents static balance ability after knee arthroplasty. Perioperative data showed that there was no intra-operative fracture of the intercondylar eminence. There was a decreased post-operative knee extension 9 months post-operative in the BCR group, which was not clinically relevant in any case. We recorded a lower difference in the area of sway between eyes closed and eyes open (ΔA (ec-eo) ) for the BCR group (p = 0.01) and the UKA group (p = 0.04) compared to the PS group. This study found superior static balance ability after preservation of both cruciate ligaments in arthroplasty of the knee, indicating superior proprioceptive function. Hence, BCR implants could provide improved functional properties

  11. No difference in anterior knee pain after medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients with or without patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun-Kyoo; Park, Ju-Kwon; Park, Chan-Hee; Kim, Min-Cheol; Agrawal, Pranav R; Seon, Jong Keun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare functional outcomes of medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PF OA) and those without PF OA and to evaluate the effect of PF OA on functional outcomes after UKA. The outcomes of 48 knees in patients without PF OA who underwent medial UKA (non-PF OA group) were compared to the outcomes of 57 knees in patients with PF OA [Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade ≤ 2] who underwent medial UKA (PF OA group) with a median follow-up of 5.4 years (range 3.1-10.2 years). Clinical outcomes including anterior knee pain, HSS scores, radiological parameters, and the progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis were compared, and their effects on functional outcomes were evaluated at the final follow-up visits. At final follow-up visits, no significant inter-group difference was found in terms of anterior knee pain (1.9 vs. 1.9 in non-PF OA and PF OA groups, respectively), HSS score, or range of motion. Preoperative anterior knee pain and patellofemoral joint degeneration were found to be unrelated to poor outcome in patients that underwent medial UKA. Furthermore, no correlation was found between any functional outcome variable and chondral lesion pattern. The result of UKA for medial unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis was excellent regardless of PF OA (K-L grade ≤ 2). Hence, the patients with medial unicompartmental OA combined with a moderate degree of anterior knee pain or patellofemoral arthritis should be viewed as appropriate candidates for medial UKA. III.

  12. New Instrumentation Reduces Operative Time in Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Using the Oxford Mobile Bearing Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Berend

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Redesigned instrumentation has become available for implantation of the Oxford Mobile Bearing Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. To assess the benefit of these changes, we compared operative time of 200 Phase III and 176 Microplasty UKA done 2008-2011. An average time savings of 8.6 minutes was seen with the Microplasty design.  Additionally, the standard deviation in operative times, minimum and maximum operatives were lower in knees in which Microplasty instrumentation was utilized.  A 15% savings in operative time was seen with the new Microplasty instrumentation.

  13. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a knee joint. The device limits...

  14. Biomechanical Effects of Different Varus and Valgus Alignments in Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Bernardo; Pianigiani, Silvia; Ramundo, Gaetano; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Medial unicompartmental tibial components are not always positioned following neutral mechanical alignment and a tibial varus alignment of 3° has been suggested based on several clinical follow-up studies. However, no biomechanical justification is currently available to confirm the suitability of different alignment positions. This study aims at quantifying the effects on bone stresses, load distribution, ligament strains, and polyethylene insert stress distribution induced by a possible varus/valgus alignment in medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, ranging from 6° of varus to 6° of valgus, developing and using a validated patient-specific finite element model. Results demonstrate that both neutral mechanical and 3° of varus alignment induce lower stress distributions than valgus or a higher varus alignment for which higher values, up to 40%, are achieved for the polyethylene stress. When a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is implanted, a mismatch in the stiffness of the joint is introduced, changing the load distribution from medial to lateral for all configurations with respect to the native configuration. However, slight differences are noticeable among the different configurations with a maximum of 190 N and 90 N for the lateral and the medial side, respectively. Neutral mechanical or 3° of varus alignment present similar biomechanical outputs in the bone, collateral ligament strain, and on the polyethylene insert. A 6° varus alignment or changes in valgus alignment were always associated with more detrimental effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF MEDIAL OPENING WEDGE HIGH TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY FOR UNICOMPARTMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS VARUS KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Bakki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis commonly affects the medial compartment of knee giving rise to varus deformity in majority of cases. Significant varus deformity further aggravates the pathology due to medialisation of the weight bearing line osteotomy of the proximal tibia realigns this weight bearing axis, thereby relieving pressure on the damaged medial compartment. OWHTO is a promising option in this scenario because it is associated with high accuracy in correcting the deformity and less number of complications when compared to lateral closing wedge HTO or UKA. In this study, we evaluate the functional outcome of HTO in patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study of patients who attended the orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Government Hospital, Kakinada, between August 2013 to August 2015. The patients were evaluated by clinical examination and weight bearing radiographs. The patients who were found to have unicompartmental osteoarthritis with knee pain not relieved by conservative management and who satisfy the inclusion criteria were selected. RESULTS Excellent results can be achieved by appropriate selection criteria and planning with long limb weight bearing radiographs. There is an excellent relief of pain, which can be achieved within first few months postoperatively, which is assessed by VAS score. The KSS- knee score is excellent in 35%, good in 40%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. The KSS- function score is excellent in 30%, good in 45%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. There is significant improvement in the range of movement of the knee joint postoperatively. CONCLUSION In this study, we conclude that medial OWHTO is the preferred modality for unicompartmental OA in those aged <60 years and in developing nations like India where squatting is an important function, it has major role as it can restore near normal knee function without disturbing anatomy.

  16. A survival analysis of 1084 knees of the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, N.; Jones, L. D.; Rout, R.; Alvand, A.; Rombach, I.; Evans, T.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Beard, D. J.; Price, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this to study was to compare the previously unreported long-term survival outcome of the Oxford medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) performed by trainee surgeons and consultants. Patients and Methods We therefore identified a previously unreported cohort of 1084 knees in 947 patients who had a UKA inserted for anteromedial knee arthritis by consultants and surgeons in training, at a tertiary arthroplasty centre and performed survival analysis on the group with revision as the endpoint. Results The ten-year cumulative survival rate for revision or exchange of any part of the prosthetic components was 93.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 86.1 to 100, number at risk 45). Consultant surgeons had a nine-year cumulative survival rate of 93.9% (95% CI 90.2 to 97.6, number at risk 16). Trainee surgeons had a cumulative nine-year survival rate of 93.0% (95% CI 90.3 to 95.7, number at risk 35). Although there was no differences in implant survival between consultants and trainees (p = 0.30), there was a difference in failure pattern whereby all re-operations performed for bearing dislocation (n = 7), occurred in the trainee group. This accounted for 0.6% of the entire cohort and 15% of the re-operations. Conclusion This is the largest single series of the Oxford UKA ever reported and demonstrates that good results can be achieved by a heterogeneous group of surgeons, including trainees, if performed within a high-volume centre with considerable experience with the procedure. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;(10 Suppl B):22–7. PMID:27694512

  17. The use of MRI in the investigation of lateral meniscal tear post medial unicompartmental knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil H. Ajwani, MBChB, BSc (Hons, MRCS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of lateral knee pain in patients with a medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR is complex. The native lateral compartment structures are prone to the same injuries as patients with normal knees. Historical reports of lateral meniscal injury post medial UKR have argued MRI evaluation is obsolete due to artefact caused by the prosthesis. We report a case of lateral meniscal injury in a patient two years after successful medial UKR. We identified the offending pathology via utilization of MRI scanners adopting metal artefact reduction sequences (MARS. The MARS MRI protocol helps clinicians accurately and non-invasively evaluate soft tissue structures in knees with metal prostheses. It also allows surgeons to accurately counsel patients and provides a higher degree of certainty in treating the pathology.

  18. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Dalsgaard, Jesper; Bjerggaard, Karin

    2012-01-01

    trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery...... together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional...... supervision in the first month after discharge. Interpretation Fast-track MIS Oxford UKA with discharge on the day after surgery is safe and leads to early recovery of knee motion and strength even when no physiotherapy is used....

  19. Evaluation of a Patient Decision Aid for Unicompartmental or Total Knee Arthroplasty for Medial Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Christopher; Stacey, Dawn; Dervin, Geoffrey F

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis are candidates for either unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A novel patient decision aid (PDA) was developed to educate patients on both interventions and prepare them for making the decision with their surgeon. The study objective was to evaluate the acceptability and usefulness of a PDA for informing and helping patients reach a surgical preference without increasing decisional conflict. A PDA was developed in accordance with the criteria listed by Ottawa Decision Support Framework and prospectively tested in UKA and TKA patients, who were mailed the PDAs to complete at home along with outcome measures before surgeon consultation. Of 50 patients who consented to participate, 45 patients (26 men, 19 women) used the PDA. Quantitative analysis of acceptability, decisional conflict, knowledge, and preferred surgical option was then performed. Mean patient age was 64.6 years (range, 50-80 years). Patients rated the PDA as acceptable: 84.4% indicated balanced presentation of information and 77.8% asserted that PDA helped them to make decisions between UKA and TKA. Mean knowledge score was 86.6% and total decisional conflict was 19.7 out of 100. Of 45, 33 stated a preferred option (24 UKA; 9 TKA; 12 unsure). Patients understood the majority of the benefits and risks for each surgical option without increasing decisional conflict. The decision aid for advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis is shown to be acceptable and useful for choosing between UKA and TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Artroplastia unicompartimental no tratamento da artrose medial do joelho The unicompartmental arthroplasty in knee arthrosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Luís Camanho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a evolução de um grupo de pacientes submetido a artroplastia unicompartimental de joelho para tratamento das artroses e nas osteonecroses que comprometem exclusivamente o comportamento medial. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 49 pacientes portadores de artrose unicompartimental de joelho com idade variando entre 47 e 88 anos de idade, sendo 12 homens e 37 mulheres. Todos foram submetidos à artroplastia unicompartimental do tipo Miller-Galante. Após seguimento mínimo de quatro anos, os pacientes foram avaliados subjetivamente pelo exame ortopédico e objetivamente pelo sistema Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS. RESULTADOS: Apenas uma paciente necessitou de revisão para artroplastia total; quatro apresentaram dor não incapacitante; e três, queixas de instabilidade esporádica não incapacitante. Na avaliação do HSS, 30 pacientes apresentaram resultados excelentes; 18, resultados bons; e um, resultado regular. CONCLUSÃO: A artroplastia unicompartimental é uma boa opção para casos de artrose e osteonecrose do compartimento medial do joelho.OBJECTIVE:To analyze the evolution of a group of patients submitted to unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee to treat arthrosis and in osteonecrosis that involve only the medial compartment. METHODS: 49 patients with unicompartmental knee arthrosis were evaluated. Ages ranged between 47 and 88 years, 12 of them male, and 37 female. All were submitted to the Miller-Galante type unicompartmental arthroplasty. After a minimum follow-up of four years the patients were evaluated objectively by the orthopedic exam and subjectively by the HSS system. RESULTS: Only one patient required a revision for total arthroplasty, four patients presented non-disabling pain, and three complained of sporadic instability, though not disabling. In the HSS evaluation, 30 patients had excellent results, 18 had good results, and one had a regular result. CONCLUSION: Unicompartmental arthroplasty is a good

  1. Radiological difficulty in identifying unicompartmental knee replacement dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr Oruaro Adebayo Onibere, MBBS, MRCS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unicondylar knee replacement is a relatively common elective orthopedic procedure but is not often seen in the Emergency Department setting. Familiarity with normal clinical and radiological appearances is difficult to gain. Dislocation of the mobile bearing component “spacer” is a known complication of unicondylar knee replacements, and these patients will initially present to the accident and Emergency Department. In this setting, an accurate and prompt diagnosis is necessary to appropriately manage the patient's condition. There is normally a radiological challenge in identifying dislocated mobile bearings on plain radiographs. These patients may need to have further imaging, such as a computer tomographic scan to identify the dislocated mobile bearing.

  2. Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Diagnosis and Treatment of Malalignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common medical condition that is often seen in general practice and causes considerable pain and immobility. In the United States, approximately 6% of the population aged 30 years and older and 12% of the population aged 65 years and older suffer

  3. Increase in the Tibial Slope Reduces Wear after Medial Unicompartmental Fixed-Bearing Arthroplasty of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Weber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee in patients with isolated medial osteoarthritis gives good results, but survival is inferior to that of total knee prosthesis. Knees may fail because positioning of the prosthesis has been suboptimal. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the tibial slope on the rate of wear of a medial fixed-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. We simulated wear on a medial fixed-bearing unicompartmental knee prosthesis (Univation in vitro with a customised, four-station, and servohydraulic knee wear simulator, which exactly reproduced the walking cycle (International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO 14243-1:2002(E. The medial prostheses were inserted with 3 different posterior tibial slopes: 0°, 4°, and 8° (n = 3 in each group. Results. The wear rate decreased significantly between 0° and 4° slope from 10.4 (SD 0.62 mg/million cycles to 3.22 (SD 1.71 mg/million cycles. Increasing the tibial slope to 8° did not significantly change the wear rate. Discussion. As an increase in the tibial slope reduced the wear rate in a fixed-bearing prosthesis, a higher tibial slope should be recommended. However, other factors that are influenced by the tibial slope (e.g., the tension of the ligament must also be considered.

  4. [Influence of patellofemoral joint degeneration on outcome of medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B Y; Ji, B C; Guo, W T; Mu, W B; Cao, L

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of patellofemoral joint degeneration and pre-operative pain location on the outcome of medial Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Methods: A total of 58 patients (58 knees) with medial Oxford UKA had been performed for medial osteoarthritis from March 2013 to July 2014 in Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at First Teaching Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University were retrospective reviewed. There were 24 males and 34 females, the age from 43 to 87 years with the mean age was 68.5 years. The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m(2) ranging from 19.7 to 31.5 kg/m(2). Patients were divided into anterior-medial pain group (35 knees), anterior knee pain group (17 knees) and general knee pain group (6 knees) according to pre-operative pain location. Pre-operative radiological statuses of the patellefemoral joint were defined by Ahlback system and divided into patellofemoral joint degeneration group (16 knees) and normal group (42 knees). Patients were also divided into medial patellofemoral degeneration group (20 knees), lateral patellofemoral degeneration group (12 knees) and normal group (26 knees) according to Altman scoring system. Outerbridge system was used intraoperatively and the patients were divided into patellofemoral joint degeneration group (21 knees) and normal group (37 knees). Pre- and post-operative outcomes were evaluated with Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Western Ontario and MacMaster (WOMAC) and patellofemoral score system of Lonner. T test and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The average duration of follow-up was 33 months (from 26 to 42 months). There were no patients had complications of infection, deep vein thrombosis, dislocation or loosing at the last follow-up. Compared to pre-operation, OKS (18.9±3.5 vs . 38.9±4.7, 19.3±4.2 vs . 39.6±4.6, 18.1±3.2 vs . 38.1±3.7)( t =5.64 to 7.08, all P anterior-medial pain group, anterior knee pain group and general knee pain group. According to

  5. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  6. Influence of consciousness, muscle action and activity on medial condyle translation after Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, E C; Baré, J; Gill, H S; Pandit, H G; O'Connor, J J; Murray, D W; Price, A J

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of the in vivo position of the medial condyle throughout flexion is important for knee replacement design, and understanding knee pathology. The influence of consciousness, muscle action, and activity type on condyle translation was examined in patients who had undergone medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) using lateral video fluoroscopy. The position of the centre of the femoral component relative to the tibial component was measured for nine patients under different conditions. The following activities were assessed; passive flexion and extension when anaesthetised, passive flexion and extension when conscious, and active flexion, extension and step-up. The position of the centre of the femoral component relative to the tibial component was highly patient dependent. The greatest average translation range (14.9 mm) was observed in anaesthetised patients, and the condyle was significantly more anterior near to extension. Furthermore, when conscious but being moved passively, the femoral condyle translated a greater range (8.9 mm) than when moving actively (5.2mm). When ascending stairs, the femoral condyle was more posterior at 20-30° of flexion than during flexion/extension. The similarity between these results and published data suggest that knee kinematics following mobile-bearing UKR is relatively normal. The results show that in the normal knee and after UKR, knee kinematics is variable and is influenced by the patient, consciousness, muscle action, and activity type. It is therefore essential that all these factors are considered during knee replacement design, if the aim is to achieve more normal knee kinematics. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduced Bearing Excursion After Mobile-Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty is Associated With Poor Functional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahal, Naman; Gaba, Sahil; Malhotra, Rajesh; Kumar, Vijay; Pegg, Elise C; Pandit, Hemant

    2018-02-01

    A small proportion of patients with mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) report poor functional outcomes in spite of optimal component alignment on postoperative radiographs. The purpose of this study is to assess whether there is a correlation between functional outcome and knee kinematics. From a cohort of consecutive cases of 150 Oxford medial UKA, patients with fair/poor functional outcome at 1-year postsurgery (Oxford Knee Score [OKS] bearing position with knee flexion angle. Mean OKS in the fair/poor group was 29.9 and the mean OKS in the good/excellent group was 41.1. The tibial slope, time taken to complete the exercises, and patellar tendon angle trend over the flexion range were similar in both the groups; however, bearing position and the extent of bearing excursion differed significantly. The total bearing excursion in the OKS bearing was positioned 1.7 mm more posterior on the tibia in the OKS bearing excursion and positioning, are associated with worse functional outcomes after mobile UKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Is tibiofemoral subluxation correctable in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Khamaisy, Saker; Gladnick, Brian P; Paul, Sophia; Pearle, Andrew D

    2013-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe a method for measuring tibiofemoral subluxation in UKA, and to report the mean amount of tibiofemoral subluxation seen both preoperatively and postoperatively in a cohort of patients undergoing UKA. Two hundred thirty-five patients who received a medial UKA, and 39 patients who received a lateral UKA, were reviewed. In the medial UKA cohort, the mechanical alignment was corrected from 7.7° ± 5.9° preoperatively, to 2.9° ± 2.5° postoperatively, while the tibiofemoral subluxation was corrected from 4.5 mm ± 3.0 mm preoperatively, to 2.3 mm ± 2.7 mm postoperatively. In the lateral UKA cohort, the mechanical alignment was corrected from -5.5° ± 3.8° to -1.6° ± 3.4°, while the tibiofemoral subluxation was corrected from 4.3 mm ± 2.7 mm to 2.8 mm ± 2.5mm. This study presents a novel method for measurement of tibiofemoral subluxation, the mean amount of tibiofemoral subluxation present preoperatively, and the amount of correction that can be expected during both medial and lateral unicondylar knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Twice cutting method reduces tibial cutting error in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Hiroshi; Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Sanada, Takaki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Bone cutting error can be one of the causes of malalignment in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The amount of cutting error in total knee arthroplasty has been reported. However, none have investigated cutting error in UKA. The purpose of this study was to reveal the amount of cutting error in UKA when open cutting guide was used and clarify whether cutting the tibia horizontally twice using the same cutting guide reduced the cutting errors in UKA. We measured the alignment of the tibial cutting guides, the first-cut cutting surfaces and the second cut cutting surfaces using the navigation system in 50 UKAs. Cutting error was defined as the angular difference between the cutting guide and cutting surface. The mean absolute first-cut cutting error was 1.9° (1.1° varus) in the coronal plane and 1.1° (0.6° anterior slope) in the sagittal plane, whereas the mean absolute second-cut cutting error was 1.1° (0.6° varus) in the coronal plane and 1.1° (0.4° anterior slope) in the sagittal plane. Cutting the tibia horizontally twice reduced the cutting errors in the coronal plane significantly (Pcutting the tibia horizontally twice using the same cutting guide reduced cutting error in the coronal plane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mobile Versus Fixed Bearing Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Series of 375 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Murphy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to compare outcomes, complications and survival between mobile and fixed bearing medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA in a large multi-surgeon group. Methods: Medical records of patients who underwent a medial UKA were queried between March 2003 and August 2012. Variables investigated included final range of motion (ROM, type of complication, and overall survivorship.  Results: 375 medial UKAs were analyzed (308 mobile bearing and 67 fixed bearing. Average time to follow-up was 47 months. Final ROM was comparable (mobile: 1-122°, fixed: 1-120°, p = 0.34. Complications occurred in 20/308 (6.6% mobile bearing UKA and 5/67 (7.5% fixed bearing UKA (p = 0.77. The most common complications in mobile bearing implants were progression of lateral compartment disease and component loosening. The complications in fixed bearing implants were arthrofibrosis and tibial plateau fracture. Overall survivorship differed, but not significantly (mobile: 94.8%, fixed: 96.9%, p = 0.44.  Discussion: In this largest reported cohort series comparing mobile versus fixed bearing UKA, we found no significant difference in final clinical knee range of motion, rates of complications, and survivorship between the two bearing types.

  11. Clinical Outcomes and Survivorship of Lateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Does Surgical Approach Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Tori A; Manista, Gregory C; Courtney, P Maxwell; Sporer, Scott M; Della Valle, Craig J; Levine, Brett R

    2018-02-01

    Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been shown to be an effective procedure to treat isolated lateral compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term survivorship. Whether a medial parapatellar approach or a lateral parapatellar approach is superior in lateral UKA is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference in intermediate-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing lateral UKA through a lateral vs medial parapatellar approach. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 65 patients who underwent lateral UKA with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Fifty-two patients (80%) had a lateral approach and 13 (20%) a medial parapatellar approach. Patient demographics, preoperative and postoperative radiographic findings, need for revision surgery, Knee Society Score, and range of motion were assessed. Overall survivorship was 94% at a mean of 82 months; with the sample size available for study, there was no difference in survivorship between the groups. There was no difference in Knee Society Score or revision to total knee arthroplasty (5% vs 7%, P = 1.000) between the medial and lateral approach groups. Comparatively, the lateral approach group did have significantly greater postoperative flexion (123.6° vs 116.5°, P = .006) and greater improvement in flexion from preoperative measurements (3.0 vs -8.0°, P = .010). Although our sample size was small, we could not demonstrate a difference in revision rates or clinical outcome scores when comparing a lateral or a medial approach with lateral UKA at intermediate-term follow-up. A lateral approach did have greater postoperative flexion, but its clinical significance remains undetermined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative Patellofemoral Chondromalacia is Not a Contraindication for Fixed-Bearing Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alexander J; Kazarian, Gregory S; Lonner, Jess H

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral chondromalacia (PFCM) has historically been considered a contraindication for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), but there is limited data assessing PFCM's impact on the results of fixed-bearing UKA. Our objective was to assess the impact of medial patellar and/or medial trochlear PFCM on overall and patellofemoral-specific 2-year outcomes after fixed-bearing medial UKA. Intraoperative notes defined the presence and location of PFCM during fixed bearing medial UKA. Outcome measures included the New Knee Society Score (NKSS), Kneeling Ability Score (KAS) and Forgotten Joint Score (FJS-12). Thirty-one knees with PFCM (PFCM group), and 52 knees without PFCM (N-PFCM group) were included for analysis. Mann-Whitney U tests assessed the statistical significance of observed differences, and a Bonferroni correction was applied, adjusting threshold for significance to P = .005. At minimum follow-up of 2 years, no statistical differences were detected between the N-PFCM and PFCM groups in the postoperative NKSS (159 vs 157, P = .731), preoperative to postoperative NKSS change (P = .447), FJS-12 (70.5 vs 67.6, P = .471), or KAS (71% vs 65%, P = .217). Patients with isolated patellar chondromalacia (n = 13) demonstrated trends toward worse outcomes according to NKSS (147, P = .198), FJS-12 (58, P = .094), and KAS (46%, P = .018), but were statistically insignificant. No failures occurred in either group. Functional outcomes of fixed-bearing medial UKA are not adversely impacted by the presence of PFCM involving the medial patellar facet and/or medial or central trochlea. Further follow-up is needed to determine longer-term implications of fixed-bearing medial UKA in patients with PFCM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Oxford medial unicompartmental knee replacement using the minimally invasive technique in patients aged 60 and above : an independent prospective series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne P.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Cheung, John; Jolink, Casper; Deutman, Robbie

    2007-01-01

    We present the outcome of an independent prospective series of phase-3 Oxford medial mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee replacement surgery. Eight surgeons performed the 154 procedures in a community-based hospital between 1998 and 2003 for patients aged 60 and above. Seventeen knees were revised;

  14. Robotic arm-assistedversusconventional unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: Exploratory secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, M J G; Anthony, I; Rowe, P; Banger, M S; MacLean, A; Jones, B

    2017-11-01

    This study reports on a secondary exploratory analysis of the early clinical outcomes of a randomised clinical trial comparing robotic arm-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee with manual UKA performed using traditional surgical jigs. This follows reporting of the primary outcomes of implant accuracy and gait analysis that showed significant advantages in the robotic arm-assisted group. A total of 139 patients were recruited from a single centre. Patients were randomised to receive either a manual UKA implanted with the aid of traditional surgical jigs, or a UKA implanted with the aid of a tactile guided robotic arm-assisted system. Outcome measures included the American Knee Society Score (AKSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Forgotten Joint Score, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale, Short Form-12, Pain Catastrophising Scale, somatic disease (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders Score), Pain visual analogue scale, analgesic use, patient satisfaction, complications relating to surgery, 90-day pain diaries and the requirement for revision surgery. From the first post-operative day through to week 8 post-operatively, the median pain scores for the robotic arm-assisted group were 55.4% lower than those observed in the manual surgery group (p = 0.040).At three months post-operatively, the robotic arm-assisted group had better AKSS (robotic median 164, interquartile range (IQR) 131 to 178, manual median 143, IQR 132 to 166), although no difference was noted with the OKS.At one year post-operatively, the observed differences with the AKSS had narrowed from a median of 21 points to a median of seven points (p = 0.106) (robotic median 171, IQR 153 to 179; manual median 164, IQR 144 to 182). No difference was observed with the OKS, and almost half of each group reached the ceiling limit of the score (OKS > 43). A greater proportion of patients

  15. Deviation between navigated and final 3-dimensional implant position in mini-invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an established method of treating isolated gonartrosis. Modern techniques such as computer-assisted surgery (CAS) and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are attractive complementary methods to UKA. However, the positioning of the components remains a concern. Thus, we performed a prospective study to assess whether there was deviation between the navigated implant position and the final implant position. Patients and methods We performed UKA with MIS and CAS in 13 patients. By comparing intraoperative navigation data with postoperative computed tomography (CT) measurements, we calculated the deviation between the computer-assisted implant position and the final 3-D implant position of the femoral and tibial components. Results The computer-assisted placement of the femoral and tibial component showed adequate position and consistent results regarding flexion-extension and varus-valgus. However, regarding rotation there was a large variation and 6 of 10 patients were outside the target range for both the femoral component and the tibial component. Interpretation Difficulties in assessing anatomical landmarks with the CAS in combination with MIS might be a reason for the poor rotational alignment of the components. PMID:23043273

  16. Oxford medial unicompartmental knees display contact-loss during step-cycle motion and bicycle motion: A dynamic radiostereometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Kristian; Kaptein, Bart L; Jørgensen, Peter B; Jepsen, Claus F; Stilling, Maiken

    2018-01-01

    The Oxford medial unicompartmental knee is designed fully congruent, with the purpose of maintaining a large contact-area throughout motion and minimize wear. No other study has investigated this design feature in-vivo. We aimed to evaluate if contact-loss was introduced between the articulating surfaces of the Oxford medial unicompartmental knee during bicycle- and step-cycle motion, and whether this correlated with essential implant parameters, such as polyethylene (PE) wear, knee-loadings, and clinical outcome. To study contact-loss, 15 patients (12 males, mean age 69 years) with an Oxford medial unicompartmental knee (7 cemented, mean follow-up 4.4 years) were examined with use of dynamic radiostereometry (RSA) (10 frames/s). PE wear was measured from static RSA and clinical outcome was evaluated with American Knee Society Score (AKSS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS). Data on knee-loadings were acquired from the literature. Contact-loss was deteced in all patients during both exercises, and the trend of contact-loss correlated with the knee-loadings. Median contact-loss was 0.8 mm (95%PI: 0.3; 1.5) for bicycle motion and 0.3 mm (95%PI: 0.24; 0.35) for step-cycle motion, and did not correlate with the PE wear rate of mean 0.06 mm/year. Possible in-congruency was seen in three patients. Clinical outcome scores correlated with contact-loss during step-cycle motion. In conclusion, contact-loss was seen in all patients indicating a clinical tolerance during load. Contact-loss followed the knee-loadings, which could explain why no correlation was seen with PE wear, as an increase in load was acommadated by an increase in contact-area (contact-loss reduction). The size of contact-loss may reflect clinical outcome. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:357-364, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Predicting the Feasibility of Correcting Mechanical Axis in Large Varus Deformities With Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeblad, Laura J; van der List, Jelle P; Pearle, Andrew D; Fragomen, Austin T; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2018-02-01

    Due to disappointing historical outcomes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), Kozinn and Scott proposed strict selection criteria, including preoperative varus alignment of ≤15°, to improve the outcomes of UKA. No studies to date, however, have assessed the feasibility of correcting large preoperative varus deformities with UKA surgery. The study goals were therefore to (1) assess to what extent patients with large varus deformities could be corrected and (2) determine radiographic parameters to predict sufficient correction. In 200 consecutive robotic-arm assisted medial UKA patients with large preoperative varus deformities (≥7°), the mechanical axis angle (MAA) and joint line convergence angle (JLCA) were measured on hip-knee-ankle radiographs. It was assessed what number of patients were corrected to optimal (≤4°) and acceptable (5°-7°) alignment, and whether the feasibility of this correction could be predicted using an estimated MAA (eMAA, preoperative MAA-JLCA) using regression analyses. Mean preoperative MAA was 10° of varus (range, 7°-18°), JLCA was 5° (1°-12°), postoperative MAA was 4° of varus (-3° to 8°), and correction was 6° (1°-14°). Postoperative optimal alignment was achieved in 62% and acceptable alignment in 36%. The eMAA was a significant predictor for optimal postoperative alignment, when corrected for age and gender (P varus deformities (7°-18°) could be considered candidates for medial UKA, as 98% was corrected to optimal or acceptable alignment, although cautious approach is needed in deformities >15°. Furthermore, it was noted that the feasibility of achieving optimal alignment could be predicted using the preoperative MAA, JLCA, and age. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Combined unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in knees with osteoarthritis and deficient anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaoqi; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yuanhe; Ha, Chengzhi; Liu, Lun; Sun, Kang

    2016-08-05

    Relative young and more active patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the isolated medial femorotibial compartment in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency are difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to explore the early clinical outcomes of combined Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and ACL reconstruction for the patients presenting ACL deficiency and isolated OA of the medial compartment. Twenty-eight patients were included into the study. All patients were treated by combined Oxford UKA and ACL reconstruction. Plain radiographs in the antero-posterior and lateral view and long-leg standing radiographs were routinely performed prior to and after surgery. Stress radiographs in valgus were additionally available in order to verify the well-preserved lateral compartment. The varus deformity of the knee prior to surgery and the valgus degree after surgery, the posterior slope of the tibial component and the range of motion (ROM) of the knee after surgery were measured and recorded. Clinical evaluations include Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Knee Society Score (KSS-clinical score; KSS-function score) and Tegner activity score. All the patients were followed up for 52 ± 8 months. The leg alignment showed 3.1 ± 0.6° of varus deformity prior to surgery and 4.0 ± 0.7° of valgus after surgery. The OKS, KSS and Tegner activity score improved significantly after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean ROM of the operated knee was 123.5 ± 2.8° at the last follow-up. The posterior slope of the tibial component was 3.9 ± 1.2°. A significant correlation was found between them according to the Pearson's correlation (r = 0.39, P = 0.03). There were 2 patients (7 %) with the complication of mobile bearing dislocation, and a second operation of replacing a thicker mobile bearing was performed for them. The early clinical data have shown that combined surgery of UKA and ACL reconstruction has revealed promising

  19. Outcome of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in octogenarians with tricompartmental osteoarthritis: A longer followup of previously published report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv KS Marya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA has specific indications, producing excellent results. It, however, has a limited lifespan and needs eventual conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA. It is, therefore, a temporizing procedure in select active young patients with advanced unicompartmental osteoarthritis (UCOA. Being a less morbid procedure it is suggested as an alternative in the very elderly patients with tricompartmental osteoarthritis (TCOA. We performed UKA in a series of 45 octogenarians with TCOA predominant medial compartment osteoarthritis (MCOA and analyzed the results. Materials and Methods: Forty five octogenarian patients with TCOA predominant MCOA underwent UKA (19 bilateral from January 2002 to January 2012. All had similar preoperative work-up, surgical approach, procedure, implants and postoperative protocol. Clinicoradiological assessment was done at 3-monthly intervals for the first year, then yearly till the last followup (average 72 months, range 8-128 months. Results were evaluated using the knee society scores (KSS, satisfaction index [using the visual analogue scale (VAS] and orthogonal radiographs (for loosening, subsidence, lysis or implant wear. Resurgery for any cause was considered failure. Results: Four patients (six knees died due to medical conditions, two patients (three knees were lost to followup, and these were excluded from the final analysis. Barring two failures, all the remaining patients were pain-free and performing well at the final followup. Indications for resurgery were: medial femoral condyle fracture needing fixation subsequent conversion to TKA at 2 years (n=1 and progression of arthritis and pain leading to revision TKA at 6 years (n=1. Conclusion: UKA has shown successful outcomes with regards to pain relief and function with 96.4% implant survival and 94.9% good or excellent outcomes. Due to lower demands, early rehabilitation, less morbidity, and relative short life

  20. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affatato, S.; Spinelli, M.; Zavalloni, M.; Carmignato, S.; Lopomo, N.; Marcacci, M.; Viceconti, M.

    2008-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high Rt values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower Rt and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour.

  1. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Viceconti, M [Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano, 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Carmignato, S [Laboratorio di Metrologia Geometrica e Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padova (Italy); Lopomo, N; Marcacci, M [Laboratorio di Biomeccanica, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: affatato@tecno.ior.it

    2008-10-07

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high R{sub t} values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower R{sub t} and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour.

  2. Unicompartmental knee prostheses: in vitro wear assessment of the menisci tibial insert after two different fixation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Viceconti, M; Carmignato, S; Lopomo, N; Marcacci, M

    2008-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a complex clinical scenario where many biological and mechanical factors influence the severity of articular degenerative changes. Minimally invasive knee prosthetic surgery, with only a compartment replacement (unicompartmental knee replacement), might be a good compromise between osteotomy and total knee prosthesis. The focus of this study was to develop and validate a protocol to assess the fixation method of the femoral components in mechanical simulation, for pre-clinical validation; the wear behaviour of two different fixation frames was quantified and compared. In particular, two different wear tests were conducted using the same knee simulator, the same load profiles and the same kinematics; two different fixation methods were applied to the femoral sleds (synthetic femur and metal block). Surface characterization on both articulating bearings was performed by a roughness measuring machine and coordinate measuring machine. The wear produced by the tibial inserts using the synthetic femur was considerably higher than the wear registered by the metal-block holder. Roughness measurements on femoral sleds showed a limited number of scratches with high R t values for the metal-block set-up; the damaged surface broadened in the case of femoral condyles and tibial inserts mounted on composite bone, but lower R t and linear penetration values were measured. The two holding frames showed different wear activities as a consequence of dissimilar dynamic performance. Further observations should be made in vivo to prove the actual importance of synthetic bone simulations and specific material behaviour

  3. Non-Sagittal Knee Joint Kinematics and Kinetics during Gait on Level and Sloped Grounds with Unicompartmental and Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnik, Igor; David, Sina; Weiss, Stefan; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    After knee arthroplasty (KA) surgery, patients experience abnormal kinematics and kinetics during numerous activities of daily living. Biomechanical investigations have focused primarily on level walking, whereas walking on sloped surfaces, which is stated to affect knee kinematics and kinetics considerably, has been neglected to this day. This study aimed to analyze over-ground walking on level and sloped surfaces with a special focus on transverse and frontal plane knee kinematics and kinetics in patients with KA. A three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis was performed by means of optoelectronic stereophogrammetry 1.8 ± 0.4 years following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and unicompartmental arthroplasty surgery (UKA). AnyBody™ Modeling System was used to conduct inverse dynamics. The TKA group negotiated the decline walking task with reduced peak knee internal rotation angles compared with a healthy control group (CG). First-peak knee adduction moments were diminished by 27% (TKA group) and 22% (UKA group) compared with the CG during decline walking. No significant differences were detected between the TKA and UKA groups, regardless of the locomotion task. Decline walking exposed apparently more abnormal knee frontal and transverse plane adjustments in KA patients than level walking compared with the CG. Hence, walking on sloped surfaces should be included in further motion analysis studies investigating KA patients in order to detect potential deficits that might be not obvious during level walking. PMID:28002437

  4. Mobile bearing medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients whose lifestyles involve high degrees of knee flexion: A 10-14year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Won Sik; Lee, Kwang Won; Kim, Ha Yong; Kim, Kap Jung; Chun, Young Sub; Yang, Dae Suk

    2017-08-01

    Because Asian populations have different lifestyles, such as squatting and sitting on the floor, from those of Western populations, it is possible that the clinical results and survival rate of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for Asian patients may be different. This study described outcomes of mobile bearing medial UKA for Korean patients. A total of the 164 knees treated with mobile bearing UKAs in 147 patients (14 males and 133 females) were reviewed. The mean follow-up period was 12.1years (range 10.1-14). The clinical outcomes, such as the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee score, the Oxford Knee Score and the Knee Society rating system, showed statistically significant improvement from pre-operative to final follow-up (Pbearing dislocation. The 95% confidence interval of survival rate at 12years was 84.1%, with revision for any reason as the end point. Minimally invasive mobile bearing UKA in Asian patients who required high degrees of knee flexion showed rapid recovery and good clinical outcome. However, they also showed relatively high rates of bearing dislocation and aseptic loosening. Therefore, mobile bearing UKA should only be performed in patients whose lifestyle involves high flexions after carefully considering these risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of Mobile-bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: The Influence of Tibial Component Coronal Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Duo Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controversies about the rational positioning of the tibial component in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA still exist. Previous finite element (FE studies were rare, and the results varied. This FE study aimed to analyze the influence of the tibial component coronal alignment on knee biomechanics in mobile-bearing UKA and find a ration range of inclination angles. Methods: A three-dimensional FE model of the intact knee was constructed from image data of one normal subject. A 1000 N compressive load was applied to the intact knee model for validating. Then a set of eleven UKA FE models was developed with the coronal inclination angles of the tibial tray ranging from 10° valgus to 10° varus. Tibial bone stresses and strains, contact pressures and load distribution in all UKA models were calculated and analyzed under the unified loading and boundary conditions. Results: Load distribution, contact pressures, and contact areas in intact knee model were validated. In UKA models, von Mises stress and compressive strain at proximal medial cortical bone increased significantly as the tibial tray was in valgus inclination >4°, which may increase the risk of residual pain. Compressive strains at tibial keel slot were above the high threshold with varus inclination >4°, which may result in greater risk of component migration. Tibial bone resection corner acted as a strain-raiser regardless of the inclination angles. Compressive strains at the resected surface slightly changed with the varying inclinations and were not supposed to induce bone resorption and component loosening. Contact pressures and load percentage in lateral compartment increased with the more varus inclination, which may lead to osteoarthritis progression. Conclusions: Static knee biomechanics after UKA can be greatly affected by tibial component coronal alignment. A range from 4° valgus to 4° varus inclination of tibial component can be recommended in mobile

  6. Diagnostic efficacy of standard knee magnetic resonance imaging and radiography in evaluating integrity of anterior cruciate ligament before unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınel, Levent; Er, Mehmet Serhan; Kaçar, Emre; Erten, Recep Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain radiographs in determining the status of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) for surgical decision-making processes in cases of medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). A total of 59 knees of 36 consecutive patients who underwent knee replacement surgery were analyzed retrospectively. MRI scans were assessed independently by 3 observers (radiologists), while the plain radiographs were evaluated by an independent radiologist. Results were compared with the intraoperative ACL status. Cross tabulation was used for descriptive statistics to analyze sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI and plain radiographs. When the same observer assessed and classified the MRI twice, the reproducibility of the classification system varied from moderate to excellent. However, the interobserver concordance was moderate. The sensitivity of MRI was 73% and the specificity was 81%, while the sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographs was 36% and 79%, respectively. The accuracy of MRI was 80%, while that of the radiographs was 71%. Detection of intact ACL may be possible on available plain radiographs without necessity for additional means such as MRI, which may cause increase costs and loss of time. In cases where there is uncertainty regarding ACL integrity in degenerative knees, although standard MRI provides additional information on ACL status, it is not of sufficient diagnostic value.

  7. Does a mixed training course on the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty improve non-technical skills of orthopaedic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvand, Abtin; Gill, Harinderjit S; Price, Andrew J; Dodd, Christopher A F; Murray, David W; Rees, Jonathan L

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether a mixed course on the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) could improve the non-technical (cognitive) skills of performing UKA. 120 delegates consisting of consultant orthopaedic surgeons and advanced surgical trainees attended a 2-day course. 104 (87%) of the delegates had performed total knee arthroplasties, whereas 79 (66%) had performed UKAs. The course consisted of didactic lectures, interactive surgical demonstrations, and practical dry-bone skills workshops. Cognitive skills were assessed at the start (day 1) and end (day 2) of the course using 10 multiple-choice questions. The maximum test score was 10. Multilevel modelling was used to compare the pre- and post-course test scores. The pairings of pre- and post-course scores were not known because of a confidentiality clause. Of the 120 delegates, 71 (59%) took the pre-course test and 120 (100%) took the post-course test. The median score improved significantly from 2 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.5-3.5) to 6 (IQR, 4.5- 7.5) [bootstrap ptechnical (cognitive) skills for UKA.

  8. Unicondylar knee prosthesis: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Roberto; De Fabrizio, Giovanni; Piovan, Gianluca; Stasi, Alessandro

    2014-07-28

    To compare unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with "all poly" tibial component and "metal back" from a clinical and functional point of view. We evaluated prospectively 50 patients who underwent unicompartmental knee replacement at the Orthopedic Clinic of the University of Trieste. Patients were split into two groups (A and B); in patients from group A has been implanted a Mitus prosthesis (Link) with "all poly" tibial component, in patients from Group B has been implanted an Allegretto prosthesis (Zimmer) with a "metal back" tibial component. The mean follow-up was 36 months. All patients were evaluated using the Knee Society Score. The mean preoperative Knee Society Score (objective and functional) was found to be respectively 48 and 49 or the group A and group B; post-operative score was found to be of 95 and 94 respectively for Group A and group B. The average post-operative ROM was 125 degrees (range, 85-140 degrees) for group A and 130° (range 90°-145°) for group B. No differences were found between implants with "all poly" tibial component (thickness to be used must be greater than 6 mm) and those with the "metal back". We believe that to achieve positive results over time is important the carefully selection of the patients and the accurate positioning of components.

  9. The Interaction of Caseload and Usage in Determining Outcomes of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas W; Rizkalla, James M; Kontochristos, Leonidas; Marks, Barbara E; Mellon, Stephen J; Dodd, Christopher A F; Pandit, Hemant G; Murray, David W

    2017-10-01

    Outcomes after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) are variable and influenced by caseload (UKA/y) and usage (percentage of knee arthroplasty that are UKA), which relates to indications. This meta-analysis assesses the relative importance of these factors. MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), and Web of Science (ISI) were searched for consecutive series of cemented Phase 3 Oxford medial UKA. The primary outcome was revision rate/100 observed component years (% pa) with subgroup analysis based on caseload and usage. Forty-six studies (12,520 knees) with an annual revision-rate ranging from 0% to 4.35% pa, mean 1.21% pa (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.47), were identified. In series with mean follow-up of 10-years, the revision-rate was 0.63% pa (95% CI, 0.46-0.83), equating to a 94% (95% CI, 92%-95%) 10-year survival. Aseptic loosening, lateral arthritis, bearing dislocation, and unexplained pain were the predominant failure mechanisms with revision for patellofemoral problems and polyethylene wear exceedingly rare. The lowest revision-rates were achieved with caseload >24 UKA/y (0.88% pa; 95% CI, 0.63-1.61) and usage >30% (0.69% pa; 95% CI, 0.50-0.90). Usage was more important than caseload; with high usage (≥20%), the revision-rate was low, whether the caseload was high (>12 UKA/y) or low (≤12 UKA/y; (0.94% pa; 95% CI, 0.69-1.23 and 0.85% pa; 95% CI, 0.65-1.08), respectively); with low usage (30% of their knee arthroplasties are UKA. If they do this, then they can expect to achieve results similar to those of the long-term series, which all had high usage (>20%) and an average 10-year survival of 94%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Using Patient-Specific Instrumentation - Accuracy of Preoperative Planning, Time Saving and Cost Efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, G H; Kolbow, K; Maus, U; Kluge, A; Lazovic, D

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) in knee endoprosthetics has been energetically marketed. PSI can enhance the accuracy of the size and alignment of the prosthesis components. It should also be possible to reduce hospital costs and operating time. It remains unclear whether these putative advantages are achieved in medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Data from 22 patients (24 knees) were analysed retrospectively. The focus was on the reliability of preoperative surgical planning - particularly with regards to the level of experience of the five surgeons involved, who were split into two groups depending on their level of experience, as defined by EndoCert®. Another focus was on the evaluation of actual surgical time and cost effectiveness using PSI. In order to achieve an optimal outcome, preoperative surgical planning had to be modified intraoperatively to a great extent. The femoral component had to be adjusted intraoperatively in 41.7 % of all cases, the tibial component in 58.3 % and the polyethylene insert in 87.5 %. Surgeons equipped with less experience had to change preoperative planning more often than the more experienced surgeons. Utilising PSI increased the operating time of both the less experienced and the more experienced surgeons. PSI planning and lack of surgical experience were the main predictors of increased surgical time. Instead of lowering costs, utilizing PSI increased surgical costs by nearly 1300 $ per case. This was due to increased operating time, license fees and extraordinary expenditure for MRI scans. The advertised advantages of PSI were not supported by the data analysed. On the contrary, this technology leads to additional costs, greater operating time and insufficient accuracy in preoperative planning. As not a single study has yet demonstrated better outcomes in terms of alignment and/or function with PSI than with standard instrumentation, additional data are required before PSI

  11. Tratamento da artrose unicompartimental medial do joelho com artroplastia unicompartimental tipo Repicci II: relato preliminar de 42 casos Treatment of medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee with Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty: preliminary report of 42 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Sanches Vaz

    2008-04-01

    que técnica cirúrgica aprimorada, escolha correta dos implantes e rigorosa seleção dos pacientes sejam empregadas.OBJECTIVE:To report the evolution with medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee submitted to Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty in order to evaluate the validity of the procedure. METHODS: 36 patients with unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee were included in the study, six of them with bilateral involvement, in a total of 42 knees. Age ranged from 54 to 82, with a mean of 67 years. Thirty-two patients were female, and 10 male. Clinical section criteria were: patients had to be older than 50, with light/moderate level activity, joint amplitude of at least 90º of flexion and -10º of extension, varus deformity of less than or equal to 5º, no anterior ligament instability, and pain restricted to the medial compartment. Radiographic selection criteria were: arthrosis confined to the medial compartment, with none or minimal patellofemoral arthrosis. The Ahlbäck classification was used to quantify the degree of extension of the arthrosis, surgery being indicated for grades II, III, and IV. The Knee International Society scale was used to follow results. RESULTS: The mean follow-up period was 36 months. There were no cases of post-operative infection, deep venous thrombosis, or embolism. Two patients developed major pain with no improvement in the follow-up, and a revision with total knee prosthesis was required. No cases of aseptic loosening or early polyethylene wear were seen. The mean pre-operative score was 45 for the knee and 57 for the overall function of the patient. The post-operative score was 76 and 90, respectively. CONCLUSION: Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty is a good option of the treatment of medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee, and it achieves consistent results leading to high patient satisfaction provided that an improved surgical technique, the right choice of implants, and a strict selection of patients

  12. Return to Sports after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Reality or Utopia? A 48-Month Follow-Up Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Mirco; Costa, Giuseppe Gianluca; Cialdella, Sergio; Agrò, Giuseppe; Grassi, Alberto; Caravelli, Silvio; Mosca, Massimiliano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2018-02-28

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has increased in popularity in the last years, also in younger and more active patients with great expectancies. The purpose of our study was to investigate the change in sports activities before and after medial UKA. We surveyed 53 athletic patients; all underwent cemented medial UKA, to determine not only their subjective and objective evaluation of clinical status with Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and visual analog score (VAS) score, but also their sporting and recreational activities at a mean follow-up of 48 ± 6 months (range, 18-56 months). At the last follow-up, 48 of 53 patients were engaged in sports and recreational disciplines, resulting in a return to activity rate of 90%. No early failure and no cases of revision were reported. The frequency of activities (sessions per week) and the time session remained constant at the time of survey. The most common activities after surgery were hiking, cycling, and swimming. Several high-impact activities, as well as skiing and football, had a significant decrease in participating patients. There were no gender-, age- and body mass index (BMI)-related differences. UKA can be considered a viable alternative in relatively young patients with high functional requirements and the correct indications, however, warning the patients about the risks of polyethylene wear and early loosening of the prosthetic components as a result of the resumption of sporting activities in high impact.  Prospective case series, level 4. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Knee Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a man-made surface of metal and plastic. In a partial knee replacement, the surgeon only ... survivorship of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for isolated... Article: Usage of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Article: Effectiveness of liposome ...

  14. Return to sport after total or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: An informative guide for residents to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagneaux, Louis; Bourlez, Julien; Degeorge, Benjamin; Canovas, François

    2017-12-01

    Knee arthroplasty survival rate - either UKA or TKA - is currently 95%, greater than it was ten years ago, but has not been specifically evaluated in very active patients practicing sport at a high intensity.The terms and conditions of return to physical activities are decided by the surgeon, the rehabilitation or Sports Medicine doctor, who needs to make sure that postoperative rehabilitation has been conducted optimally. Specifically, range of movement must be complete, muscular strengthening has to be sufficient and balance must be recovered by proprioception. Only after this stage (i.e. three to six months after surgery) can physical activities be resumed.Return to sport must be gentle and progressive, with moderate activities limited to short sessions. Progressively the patient will be able to return to intermediate activities, provided that he/she possesses the adequate level of technique for the sport.This up-to-date review for young surgeons and residents aims to provide an informative guide for patients regarding sport following knee arthroplasty. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:496-501. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.170037.

  15. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan de Paula Mozella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO in the period between January 1990 and January 2013.METHODS: a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting.RESULTS: in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK.CONCLUSION: in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability.

  16. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; Borges Gonçalves, Felipe; Osterno Vasconcelos, Jansen; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO) in the period between January 1990 and January 2013. Methods a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting. Results in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK. Conclusion in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability. PMID:26229792

  17. Comparative Fixation and Subsidence Profiles of Cementless Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Gokce; Gopalakrishnan, Ananthkrishnan; Davignon, Robert A; Parker, John W; Chawla, Harshvardhan; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of failure for both cemented and cementless unicondylar knee replacements (UKRs). Micromotion and subsidence of tibial baseplate are two causes of failure, due to poor fixation and misalignment, respectively. Stair ascent activity profiles from Bergmann et al and Li et al were used. Biphasic Sawbones models were prepared according to the surgical techniques of traditional and novel cementless UKRs. Implants were tested for 10,000 cycles representing post-operative bone interdigitation period, and micromotion was observed using speckle pattern measurements, which demonstrated sufficient resolution. Additionally, the test method proposed by Liddle et al was used to measure subsidence with pressure sensors under increasingly lateralized loading. Mean displacement due to micromotion for mediolateral and anteroposterior plane was consistently greater for traditional cementless UKR. Mean displacement for axial micromotion was significantly higher for traditional UKR at the anterior aspect of the implant; however, values were lower for the medial periphery of the implant. Subsidence was significantly lower for the novel design with increasingly lateralized loading, and indentation was not observed on the test substrate, when compared to the traditional design. Our findings demonstrate that the novel cementless design is capable of fixation and elimination of subsidence in laboratory test settings. Both designs limit micromotion to below the established loosening micromotion value of 150 μm. The L-shaped keel design resists both micromotion and subsidence and may prevent failure modes that can lead to aseptic loosening for UKRs. These findings are highly relevant for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor for use in a mobile unicompartmental knee replacement bearing: An in vitro proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M J A; Van Duren, B H; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2017-08-01

    Instrumented knee replacements can provide in vivo data quantifying physiological loads acting on the knee. To date instrumented mobile unicompartmental knee replacements (UKR) have not been realised. Ideally instrumentation would be embedded within the polyethylene bearing. This study investigated the feasibility of an embedded flexible capacitive load sensor. A novel flexible capacitive load sensor was developed which could be incorporated into standard manufacturing of compression moulded polyethylene bearings. Dynamic experiments were performed to determine the characteristics of the sensor on a uniaxial servo-hydraulic material testing machine. The instrumented bearing was measured at sinusoidal frequencies between 0.1 and 10Hz, allowing for measurement of typical gait load magnitudes and frequencies. These correspond to frequencies of interest in physiological loading. The loads that were applied were a static load of 390N, corresponding to an equivalent body weight load for UKR, and a dynamic load of ±293N. The frequency transfer response of the sensor suggests a low pass filter response with a -3dB frequency of 10Hz. The proposed embedded capacitive load sensor was shown to be applicable for measuring in vivo loads within a polyethylene mobile UKR bearing. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The coronal alignment after medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty can be predicted: usefulness of full-length valgus stress radiography for evaluating correctability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yasutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi; Okazaki, Ken; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Kuwashima, Umito; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to clarify whether the coronal alignment after medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is predictable using preoperative full-length valgus stress radiography. Thirty-seven consecutive patients with a mean age of 71.5 ± 7.0 years awaiting medial UKA were recruited. Full-length weight-bearing radiographs of the lower limbs were obtained pre- and postoperatively. Preoperative full-length valgus stress radiography in the supine position was also performed, and the transition of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKAA) and the weight-bearing ratio were assessed. The tibia first cut technique was used, and the distal femur was cut parallel to the cutting surface of the proximal tibia during surgery. The mean postoperative HKAA was 2.0° ± 2.1° varus, and the mean weight-bearing ratio was 43.1 ± 7.7 %; each of these parameters demonstrated significantly strong correlations with the values on the preoperative valgus stress radiographs (p radiography is useful for evaluating the correctability of varus deformities and predicting the postoperative coronal alignment. For clinical relevance, performing preoperative valgus stress radiography would help to more precisely select patients and, when combined with the tibia first cut technique, aid in achieving the expected knee alignment and avoid severe undercorrection or overcorrection. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  20. Deviation between navigated and final 3-dimensional implant position in mini-invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a pilot study in 13 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Carranza, Nicolas; Weidenhielm, Lars; Crafoord, Joakim; Hedström, Margareta

    2012-12-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an established method of treating isolated gonartrosis. Modern techniques such as computer-assisted surgery (CAS) and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are attractive complementary methods to UKA. However, the positioning of the components remains a concern. Thus, we performed a prospective study to assess whether there was deviation between the navigated implant position and the final implant position. We performed UKA with MIS and CAS in 13 patients. By comparing intraoperative navigation data with postoperative computed tomography (CT) measurements, we calculated the deviation between the computer-assisted implant position and the final 3-D implant position of the femoral and tibial components. The computer-assisted placement of the femoral and tibial component showed adequate position and consistent results regarding flexion-extension and varus-valgus. However, regarding rotation there was a large variation and 6 of 10 patients were outside the target range for both the femoral component and the tibial component. Difficulties in assessing anatomical landmarks with the CAS in combination with MIS might be a reason for the poor rotational alignment of the components.

  1. Anterior knee pain and evidence of osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint should not be considered contraindications to mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a 15-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T W; Pandit, H G; Maurer, D G; Ostlere, S J; Jenkins, C; Mellon, S J; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W

    2017-05-01

    It is not clear whether anterior knee pain and osteoarthritis (OA) of the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) are contraindications to medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Our aim was to investigate the long-term outcome of a consecutive series of patients, some of whom had anterior knee pain and PFJ OA managed with UKA. We assessed the ten-year functional outcomes and 15-year implant survival of 805 knees (677 patients) following medial mobile-bearing UKA. The intra-operative status of the PFJ was documented and, with the exception of bone loss with grooving to the lateral side, neither the clinical or radiological state of the PFJ nor the presence of anterior knee pain were considered a contraindication. The impact of radiographic findings and anterior knee pain was studied in a subgroup of 100 knees (91 patients). There was no relationship between functional outcomes, at a mean of ten years, or 15-year implant survival, and pre-operative anterior knee pain, or the presence or degree of cartilage loss documented intra-operatively at the medial patella or trochlea, or radiographic evidence of OA in the medial side of the PFJ. In 6% of cases there was full thickness cartilage loss on the lateral side of the patella. In these cases, the overall ten-year function and 15-year survival was similar to those without cartilage loss; however they had slightly more difficulty with descending stairs. Radiographic signs of OA seen in the lateral part of the PFJ were not associated with a definite compromise in functional outcome or implant survival. Severe damage to the lateral side of the PFJ with bone loss and grooving remains a contraindication to mobile-bearing UKA. Less severe damage to the lateral side of the PFJ and damage to the medial side, however severe, does not compromise the overall function or survival, so should not be considered to be a contraindication. However, if a patient does have full thickness cartilage loss on the lateral side of the PFJ they may

  2. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology Department, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Grande, Filippo del [Regional Hospital, Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Balgrist University Hospital, Orthopedics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 37.7 cm{sup 2}) and PD (16.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 18.9 cm{sup 2}), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  3. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... candidate for partial knee replacement and what the success rate is for your condition. Alternative Names Unicompartmental ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  4. Análise comparativa das alterações nos fluxos de tensão do joelho nas próteses totais e unicompartimentais cimentadas: estudo experimental em dez cadáveres humanos Comparative analisys of changes in knee strain transfer flow in total and unicompartmental cemented prostheses: a trial in ten human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Pécora

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Análise comparativa das alterações nos fluxos de tensão do joelho nas próteses totais e unicompartimentais cimentadas. Estudo experimental em dez cadáveres humanos. Os autores comparam as alterações nos fluxos de tensão do fêmur distal e da tíbia proximal provocadas pelas próteses total e unicompartimental cimentadas do joelho, por meio de extensometria elétrica em 10 cadáveres humanos. Utilizam um dispositivo mecânico para adaptação das peças anatômicas à máquina de ensaios mecânicos Kratos 5002. Concluem: 1 A prótese total do joelho mantém o padrão de distribuição das cargas no terço distal do fêmur; 2 A prótese unicompartimental aumenta as tensões de compressão na cortical medial e as tensões de tração na cortical lateral do terço distal do fêmur; 3 Os componentes tibiais (parcial medial e total aumentam, da mesma forma, as tensões de compressão na cortical póstero-medial da tíbia.Load transfer changes on cemented total and unicompartmental knee prosthesis. Experimental study on ten human cadavers. The authors compare the load transfer changes on the distal femur and proximal tibia due to cemented total and unicompartmental knee prosthesis under compressive load-bearing on ten human cadavers employing strain gauges and a Kratos 5002 stress-testing system. The conclusions were: 1 The Total knee prosthesis does not alter the load transfer on the distal femur; 2 The unicompartmental knee prosthesis increases the compression load on the femoral medial cortex and increases the strain tension loads on the femoral lateral cortex; 3 The tibial components (partial medial and total increase the compression strain tension on the postero-medial cortex of the tibia.

  5. Ten-year survival and patient-reported outcomes of a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chloe E H; Wade, Frazer A; MacDonald, Deborah; Nutton, Richard W

    2018-05-01

    Biomechanical studies have suggested that proximal tibial strain is elevated in UKAs incorporating all-polyethylene tibial components with concern that this leads to premature failure. This study reports minimum 10-year outcomes for a UKA incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component to determine whether these concerns were realised. 109 fixed bearing UKAs (97 patients, mean age 68 (range 48-87), 54/97 (56%) female) with all-polyethylene tibial components were followed up for ≥ 10 years with Oxford Knee Scores, Forgotten Joint Scores and Kaplan-Meier analysis. 106/109 implants were 7 mm, 3 were 9.5 mm. Ten-year survival was 85.5% (78.6-92.4 95% CI) with the end-point failure for any reason. Unexplained pain was the commonest mode of failure (6/17) followed by lateral compartment osteoarthritis (5/17) and tibial subsidence/loosening (4/17). Revision rate was highest at 2-5 years due to revisions for unexplained pain. Ten-year survival was worse in patients  30 (p = 0.017) and in those with postoperative increases in medial tibial sclerosis (p  30 was 2.9 (1.2-6.9 95% CI). In those with intact UKAs at 10 years, mean Oxford Knee Score was 34.8 ± 10.7, Forgotten Joint Score was 37.9 ± 26.7 and 96% were satisfied with their knee. The high rate of early failure between 2 and 5 years in this all-polyethylene tibial component UKA did not persist in the long term. Though medial proximal tibial metabolic changes appear to persist they are not necessarily symptomatic. BMI > 30 and age < 65 years were significant risk factors for revision.

  6. High Rates of Return to Sports Activities and Work After Osteotomies Around the Knee: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorntje, Alexander; Witjes, Suzanne; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Koenraadt, Koen L. M.; van Geenen, Rutger C. I.; Daams, Joost G.; Getgood, Alan; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knee osteotomies are proven treatment options, especially in younger patients with unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis, for certain cases of chronic knee instability, or as concomitant treatment for meniscal repair or transplantation surgery. Presumably, these patients wish to stay

  7. Dutch translation of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale and validation in patients after knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, Arthur J.; Breugem, Stefan J. M.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Heesterbeek, Petra J. C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A. W.; Kremers, Keetie C. A. L. C.; Koëter, Sander; Haverkamp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    To translate and validate the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and evaluate the internal consistency, construct validity and ceiling or floor effect. After standard forward and backward

  8. Cement retrieval in minimally invasive knee surgery: the 90 degrees ball probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Gregory C R; Jeer, Parminder J S

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive knee surgery has many potential advantages as well as disadvantages. One such disadvantage in both unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty is the inability to visualize or retrieve extruded cement. We describe the use of a new instrument, a 90 degrees ball probe, which we have used in more than 300 minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty cases. It provides a simple, consistent, and safe method of cement retrieval.

  9. Economics of All-Polyethylene Versus Metal-Backed Tibial Prosthesis Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Sayeed, Zain; Anoushiravani, Afshin; Schnur, Anne-Kathrin; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-05-01

    With the large number of total knee arthroplasties being performed and expectations that these numbers will be on the rise over the coming decades, efforts to provide cost-efficient care are of greater interest. The preferred design of knee arthroplasty implants has changed over time, with the original all-polyethylene tibial (APT) design being replaced by metal-backed tibial (MBT) components, as well as more recent considerations of newer APT designs. Modern APT components have been shown to have similar or superior outcomes than MBT components. Despite their limitations, APT components can be used to reduce the economic burden to the provider, medical institution, and health care system as a whole. There is a paucity of evidence-based literature directly comparing the cost associated with APT and MBT components. The purpose of this report is to review the literature to assess the available data regarding direct and indirect costs of both designs so that orthopedic surgeons can account for economic differences in everyday practice. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):S61-S66.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Feasibility of the Atlas Unicompartmental Knee System Load Absorber in Improving Pain Relief and Function in Patients Needing Unloading of the Medial Compartment of the Knee: 1-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective, Multicenter, Single-Arm Pilot Study (PHANTOM High Flex Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slynarski, Konrad; Walawski, Jacek; Smigielski, Robert; van der Merwe, Willem

    2017-01-01

    In young patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA), surgical intervention may not be desirable due to preferences to avoid bone cutting procedures, return to high activity levels, and prolong implant survival. The Atlas Knee System was designed to fill the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and invasive surgery. This single-arm study included 26 patients, aged 25 to 65 years, who completed 12 months of follow-up. All dimensions of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Knee Society Score significantly improved from baseline to 12 months. About 96.2% and 92.3% of patients experienced a ⩾20% improvement in their KOOS pain and WOMAC pain scores, respectively, at 12 months. This study highlights the potential benefit of a joint unloading device in the management of young patients with medial knee OA. The trial is still ongoing and another analysis is planned at 24 months.

  11. Feasibility of the Atlas Unicompartmental Knee System Load Absorber in Improving Pain Relief and Function in Patients Needing Unloading of the Medial Compartment of the Knee: 1-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective, Multicenter, Single-Arm Pilot Study (PHANTOM High Flex Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Slynarski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In young patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA, surgical intervention may not be desirable due to preferences to avoid bone cutting procedures, return to high activity levels, and prolong implant survival. The Atlas Knee System was designed to fill the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and invasive surgery. This single-arm study included 26 patients, aged 25 to 65 years, who completed 12 months of follow-up. All dimensions of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, and Knee Society Score significantly improved from baseline to 12 months. About 96.2% and 92.3% of patients experienced a ⩾20% improvement in their KOOS pain and WOMAC pain scores, respectively, at 12 months. This study highlights the potential benefit of a joint unloading device in the management of young patients with medial knee OA. The trial is still ongoing and another analysis is planned at 24 months.

  12. Fabrication of Polymer Solar Cells Using Aqueous Processing for All Layers Including the Metal Back Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Helgesen, Martin; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent ...... (water). The photograph here was taken just before screen printing of the aqueous silver ink.......The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent...

  13. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty combined to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Alberto; Legnani, Claudio; Terzaghi, Clara; Iori, Stefano; Borgo, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent combined medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The hypothesis was that this procedure would lead to a high success rate in patients affected by isolated medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL deficiency. Fourteen patients with primary ACL lesion and concomitant medial compartment symptomatic osteoarthritis treated from 2006 to 2010 were followed up for an average time of 26.7 months (SD 4.2). Assessment included KOOS score, Oxford Knee score, American Knee Society scores, WOMAC index of osteoarthritis, Tegner activity level and objective examination including instrumented laxity test with KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiological assessment was done with standard simple radiographs in order to get information about any presence of loosening of the components. KOOS score, OKS, WOMAC index and the AKSS improved significantly after surgery (p reconstruction is a valid therapeutic option for the treatment of combined medial unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis and ACL deficiency in young and active patients and confirms subjective and objective clinical improvement 2 years after surgery. The use of a fixed-bearing prosthesis represents a reliable feature as it allows to overcome problems of improper ligament tensioning during the implantation of the components. IV.

  14. The iDuo Bi-compartmental Knee Replacement: Our Early Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jemmett

    2016-12-01

    Our early results suggest that the iDuo knee is a good option for those with isolated bi-compartmental disease and outcome scores are comparable with those reported for the BKA. This bi-compartmental design may bridge the gap between the uni-compartmental and total knee replacement. The choice between monolithic or modular designs remains in debate. We will continue to use this prosthesis for a carefully selected group of patients.

  15. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin Rönn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoathritis (OA of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence.

  16. OCCURRENCE OF EARLY KNEE ARTHROSIS FOLLOWING TOTAL MENISCECTOMIES IN YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Milenkovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of early knee arthrosis following early total meniscectomy is a significant orthopedic, social and economical problem. Arthroscopic surgery shows the role and significance of the menisci for normal knee functioning. The outcome of 19 knee arthroscopies are presented; patients are of male sex, average age 39 (from 34 to 45. All patients underwent knee arthrotomy and total medial and lateral meniscectomy before the age of 25. All patients were active sportsmen. 12 arthroscopies of the right knee and 7 arthroscopies of the left one were done. In 13 patients, medial knee arthrosis following medial meniscectomy was found. One patient had lateral knee arthrosis and degeneration of the medial meniscus following lateral meniscectomy . The same patient had the total rupture of LCA. The remaining 5 patients had lateral knee arthrosis following lateral meniscectomy. One or more loose bodies of cartilaginous origin were found in 8 patients. All the operated patients had evident early signs of initial or progressive knee arthrosis confirmed or diagnosed arthroscopically. Knee arthroscopy in early arthroses following knee meniscectomies in youth can relieve the pain and slow down disease progression. A permanent solution to the problem is possible only with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

  17. Flexible Aperture Tuning Solution for Cellular Main Antenna in Metallic Back Cover Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Choon Mark Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal housing has been used extensively on portable communication devices such as on mobile phones and tablets. The choice of metal housing ranges from metallic rim to metallic back cover. This metal housing tends to improve the outlook appearance of the mobile devices, and add mechanical strength towards the mobile devices. However, from the aspect of the communication antenna, the metal housing often posts great challenges towards the flexibility in antenna design and reduction in antenna performance. This paper presents an approach to overcome the challenges by integrating the metal housing of the mobile phone as part of the antenna, along with the introduction of tunable antenna concept to provide different forms of Aperture Tuning to the Cellular Main Antenna, to satisfy its wide frequency band coverages for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Generation (2G, 3G and 4G mobile network.

  18. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  19. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total knee replacement; Knee arthroplasty; Knee replacement - total; Tricompartmental knee replacement; Subvastus knee replacement; Knee replacement - minimally invasive; Knee arthroplasty - minimally ...

  20. Printed metal back electrodes for R2R fabricated polymer solar cells studied using the LBIC technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Søndergaard, Roar; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The performance of printable metal back electrodes for polymer solar cells were investigated using light beam induced current (LBIC) mapping of the final solar cell device after preparation to identify the causes of poor performance. Three different types of silver based printable metal inks were...

  1. Aperiodic and randomized dielectric mirrors: alternatives to metallic back reflectors for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Albert; Zhong, Yan-Kai; Fu, Sze-Ming; Tseng, Chi Wei; Yan, Sheng Lun

    2014-05-05

    Dielectric mirrors have recently emerged for solar cells due to the advantages of lower cost, lower temperature processing, higher throughput, and zero plasmonic absorption as compared to conventional metallic counterparts. Nonetheless, in the past, efforts for incorporating dielectric mirrors into photovoltaics were not successful due to limited bandwidth and insufficient light scattering that prevented their wide usage. In this work, it is shown that the key for ultra-broadband dielectric mirrors is aperiodicity, or randomization. In addition, it has been proven that dielectric mirrors can be widely applicable to thin-film and thick wafer-based solar cells to provide for light trapping comparable to conventional metallic back reflectors at their respective optimal geometries. Finally, the near-field angular emission plot of Poynting vectors is conducted, and it further confirms the superior light-scattering property of dielectric mirrors, especially for diffuse medium reflectors, despite the absence of surface plasmon excitation. The preliminary experimental results also confirm the high feasibility of dielectric mirrors for photovoltaics.

  2. Knee Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent falls on the knee — such as wrestling, football and volleyball — can increase your risk of knee ... or repetitious bending of your knees increases the force on your knee joints. Achieve and maintain a ...

  3. Minimally invasive surgery of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2007-11-01

    Minimally invasive knee replacement surgery has been developed in an attempt to lessen the impact of operations on the patient's quality of life, in the same way as arthroscopy, the forefather of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), revolutionised cartilage and ligament surgery three decades earlier. The technique is based on minimising soft tissue and muscle trauma, skin incision length, and capsular disruption while trying to maintain the ultimate goal of a well-aligned, well-fixed knee replacement. Short-term advantages including accelerated recovery and reduction in blood loss have been demonstrated, but it remains to be investigated whether MIS is able to provide sustainable benefits and long-term outcome equivalent to conventional surgery. Successful application of MIS techniques have been confirmed in conjunction with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKR) implantation, while its use with total knee arthroplasty remains experimental. Critics have expressed concern that reduced visibility may compromise implant positioning and leg alignment which could have a negative effect on prosthetic long-term survival. MIS clearly represents a unique and more technically demanding procedure, but the learning curve may perhaps overshadow the benefits. Computer navigation may help to avoid such problems but so far scientific evidence regarding definitive outcomes is lacking, and some of the MIS techniques are still in the early phases of development.

  4. What Factors Drive Inpatient Satisfaction After Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Kleeman, Lindsay T; Wellman, Samuel S; Green, Cynthia L; Attarian, David E; Bolognesi, Michael P; Seyler, Thorsten M

    2017-06-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, developed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, is directly tied to hospital reimbursement. The purpose of this study is to analyze survey responses from patients who underwent primary knee arthroplasty in order to identify factors that drive patient dissatisfaction in the inpatient setting. HCAHPS responses received from patients undergoing elective total and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty at our institution between January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2016 were obtained and expressed as a percentage of overall satisfaction. Satisfaction scores were correlated to patient demographics. Overall, responses from 580 patients were obtained (554 total knee arthroplasties, 26 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties). There was a statistically significant difference in overall satisfaction when comparing sex (P = .034), race (P = .030), and socioeconomic status (P = .001). Men reported a higher average satisfaction score than women (77.8% vs 74.2%). Patients in the 1st quartile of socioeconomic status reported a higher average satisfaction than those in the 4th quartile (81.3% vs 71.3%). African American patients reported a higher satisfaction than Caucasian and other races (81.6% vs 75.3% vs 66.3%, respectively). There was an inverse relationship between increased length of stay and reported satisfaction (r = -0.113, P = .006). Our data indicate that patients who are likely to report higher levels of inpatient satisfaction after knee arthroplasty are male, African American, of lower socioeconomic status, and with shorter length of stay. To our knowledge, this is the first reported analysis of the HCAHPS survey in relation to total joint arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Native rotational knee kinematics is restored after lateral UKA but not after medial UKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keizo; Hamada, Daisuke; Takasago, Tomoya; Nitta, Akihiro; Goto, Tomohiro; Tonogai, Ichiro; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-03-26

    The aim of this study was to compare the intraoperative kinematics of medial and lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those of the native knee using a navigation system. Six fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were included in the study. Medial UKA was performed in all right knees and lateral UKA was performed in all left knees. All UKA procedures were performed with a computerised navigation system. The tibial internal rotation angle and coronal alignment of the mechanical axis during passive knee flexion were assessed as rotational and varus/valgus kinematics before and after surgery using the navigation system. The rotation angles of the tibia in the early flexion phase of medial UKA were significantly larger than those of native knees (p = 0.008 at minimum knee flexion, p = 0.008 at 0° knee flexion). The rotational kinematics of lateral UKA was similar to those of the native knees throughout knee flexion. There were no significant differences in varus/valgus kinematics between native and UKA knees. The rotational kinematics of the native knee was not restored after medial UKA but was preserved after lateral UKA. There were no significant differences in the varus/valgus kinematics after either medial or lateral UKA when compared with those of the native knees. Thus, the geometry of the medial tibial articular surface is a determinant of the ability to restore the rotational kinematics of the native knee. Surgeons and implant designers should be aware that the anatomical medial articular geometry is an important factor in restoration of the native knee kinematics after knee arthroplasty.

  6. Inaccurate rotational component position in image-free navigated unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Toda

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In both coronal and sagittal alignments, there were a definite proportion of outliers. The ratio of outliers in rotational alignment was especially higher than that in coronal and sagittal alignments. In UKA, the identification of bony landmarks is difficult because of the small operation field. Therefore, careful surface mapping of particular bony landmarks is necessary, and it is not enough to use image-free navigation system in UKA.

  7. Clinical and Economic Burden of Revision Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is indicated for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA when conservative measures are unsuccessful. High tibial osteotomy (HTO, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA are surgical options intended to relieve knee OA pain and dysfunction. The choice of surgical intervention is dependent on several factors such as disease location, patient age, comorbidities, and activity levels. Regardless of surgical treatment, complications such as infection, loosening or lysis, periprosthetic fracture, and postoperative pain are known risks and are indications for revision surgery. The clinical and economic implications for revision surgery are underappreciated. Over 55,000 revision surgeries were performed in 2010 in the US, with 48% of these revisions in patients under 65 years. Total costs associated with each revision TKA surgery have been estimated to be in excess of $49,000. The current annual economic burden of revision knee OA surgery is $2.7 billion for hospital charges alone. By 2030, assuming a 5-fold increase in the number of revision procedures, this economic burden will exceed $13 billion annually. It is appealing to envision a therapy that could delay or obviate the need for arthroplasty. From an actuarial standpoint, this would have the theoretical downstream effect of substantially reducing the number of revision procedures. Although no known therapies currently meet these criteria, such a breakthrough would have a tremendous impact in lessening the clinical and economic burden of knee OA revision surgery.

  8. Timing of rehabilitation on length of stay and cost in patients with hip or knee joint arthroplasty: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Masaracchio

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of early initiation of rehabilitation on length of stay (LOS and cost following total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.Electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, Pedro, Embase, AMED, and the Cochrane Library were searched in July 2016. Five additional trials were identified through reference list scanning.Eligible studies were published in English language peer-reviewed journals; included participants that had undergone total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty reported clearly defined timing of rehabilitation onset for at least two groups; and reported at least one measure of LOS or cost. Inclusion criteria were applied by 2 independent authors, with disagreements being determined by a third author. Searching identified 1,029 potential articles, of which 17 studies with 26,614 participants met the inclusion criteria.Data was extracted independently by 2 authors, with disagreements being determined by a third author. Methodological quality of each study was evaluated independently by 2 authors using the Downs and Black checklist. Pooled analyses were analyzed using a random-effects model with inverse variance methods to calculate standardized mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals for LOS.When compared with standard care, early initiation of physical therapy demonstrated a decrease in length of stay for the 4 randomized clinical trials (SMD = -1.90; 95% CI -2.76 to -1.05; I2 = 93% and for the quasi-experimental and 5 prospective studies (SMD = -1.47; 95% CI -1.85 to -1.10; I2 = 88%.Early initiation of rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is associated with a shorter LOS, a lower overall cost, with no evidence of an increased number of adverse reactions. Additional high quality studies with standardized methodology are needed to further examine the

  9. Dutch translation of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale and validation in patients after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit, Arthur J; Breugem, Stefan J M; Sierevelt, Inger N; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A W; Kremers, Keetie C A L C; Koëter, Sander; Haverkamp, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    To translate and validate the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and evaluate the internal consistency, construct validity and ceiling or floor effect. After standard forward and backward translation was performed, 302 patients who have received a TKA or UKA filled out the AKPS together with Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) patella score, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain, the Oxford 12-item questionnaire and the SF-36 at follow-up. The internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's α coefficient. The construct validity was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation (R) to test for correlations between the AKPS and VAS HSS, HSS patella score, VAS month, Oxford 12-item questionnaire and SF-36 subscales. Ceiling or floor effects are given in percentage of patients giving a maximum or minimum score. The internal reliability of the AKPS is acceptable with a Cronbach's α of 0.81 in patients after TKA or UKA. A high correlation was found between the AKPS and the Oxford 12-item questionnaire (R = 0.81). Moderate correlations were found with the VAS month (R = 0.63), HSS patella score (R = 0.51) and SF-36 subscales physical functioning (R = 0.59), role-physical (R = 0.59), bodily pain (R = 0.57). Other correlations were poor, therefore indicating a good convergent and divergent validity. Ceiling effects were observed for the HSS patella score (31 %), VAS HSS (51 %), VAS pain (19 %), SF36-RP (46 %), SF36-RE (80 %) and SF36-BP (24 %). No ceiling or floor effect was found for the AKPS, Oxford 12-item and the other SF36 domains. The AKPS appears to be reliable and valid in patients after knee arthroplasty, with no ceiling and floor effects, and can be used to assess anterior knee pain in patient who underwent joint replacement surgery.

  10. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-02-16

    presently being studied. The goal of developing new treatment strategies for knee OA is to prolong the need for total knee arthroplasty which should be utilized only if other strategies have failed. High tibial osteotomy and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty are potential alternatives if only a single compartment is involved with more data supporting unicompartmental knee arthroplasty as a good treatment option in this scenario. Arthroscopy has been commonly used for many years to treat knee OA to address degenerative articular cartilage and menisci, however, several high-quality studies have shown that it is not a very effective treatment for the majority of cases and should generally not be considered when managing knee OA. Improving the management of knee OA requires a multi-faceted treatment approach along with continuing to broaden our understanding of this complex disease so that therapeutic advancements can continue to be developed with the goal of preventing further disease progression and even potentially reversing the degenerative process.

  11. Assessment of patient functional performance in different knee arthroplasty designs during unconstrained squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, Federica; Zara, Claudio; Leo, Tommaso; Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, squat named by Authors unconstrained because performed without constrains related to feet position, speed, knee maximum angle to be reached, was tested as motor task revealing differences in functional performance after knee arthroplasty. It involves large joints ranges of motion, does not compromise joint safety and requires accurate control strategies to maintain balance. Motion capture techniques were used to study squat on a healthy control group (CTR) and on three groups, each characterised by a specific knee arthroplasty design: a Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), a Mobile Bearing and a Fixed Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (respectively MBUA and FBUA). Squat was analysed during descent, maintenance and ascent phase and described by speed, angular kinematics of lower and upper body, the Center of Pressure (CoP) trajectory and muscle activation timing of quadriceps and biceps femoris. Compared to CTR, for TKA and MBUA knee maximum flexion was lower, vertical speed during descent and ascent reduced and the duration of whole movement was longer. CoP mean distance was higher for all arthroplasty groups during descent as higher was, CoP mean velocity for MBUA and TKA during ascent and descent. Unconstrained squat is able to reveal differences in the functional performance among control and arthroplasty groups and between different arthroplasty designs. Considering the similarity index calculated for the variables showing statistically significance, FBUA performance appears to be closest to that of the CTR group. III a.

  12. Assessment of patient functional performance in different knee arthroplasty designs during unconstrained squat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, Federica; Zara, Claudio; Leo, Tommaso; Mengarelli, Alessandro; Cardarelli, Stefano; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background In this paper, squat named by Authors unconstrained because performed without constrains related to feet position, speed, knee maximum angle to be reached, was tested as motor task revealing differences in functional performance after knee arthroplasty. It involves large joints ranges of motion, does not compromise joint safety and requires accurate control strategies to maintain balance. Methods Motion capture techniques were used to study squat on a healthy control group (CTR) and on three groups, each characterised by a specific knee arthroplasty design: a Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), a Mobile Bearing and a Fixed Bearing Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (respectively MBUA and FBUA). Squat was analysed during descent, maintenance and ascent phase and described by speed, angular kinematics of lower and upper body, the Center of Pressure (CoP) trajectory and muscle activation timing of quadriceps and biceps femoris. Results Compared to CTR, for TKA and MBUA knee maximum flexion was lower, vertical speed during descent and ascent reduced and the duration of whole movement was longer. CoP mean distance was higher for all arthroplasty groups during descent as higher was, CoP mean velocity for MBUA and TKA during ascent and descent. Conclusions Unconstrained squat is able to reveal differences in the functional performance among control and arthroplasty groups and between different arthroplasty designs. Considering the similarity index calculated for the variables showing statistically significance, FBUA performance appears to be closest to that of the CTR group. Level of evidence III a. PMID:29387646

  13. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  14. Knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the other cuts. The surgeon will then fix or remove the problem in your knee. At the end of your surgery, the saline will be drained from your knee. The surgeon will close your cuts with sutures (stitches) and cover them with a dressing. Many surgeons ...

  15. Comparison of Low-, Moderate-, and High-Molecular-Weight Hyaluronic Acid Injections in Delaying Time to Knee Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewale, Anand R; Barnes, Charles L; Fischbach, Lori A; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T; Painter, Jacob T; Martin, Bradley C

    2017-10-01

    We compared the effectiveness of low-molecular-weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA) injections (LMWHA), moderate-MW HA injections (MMWHA), and high-MW HA injections (HMWHA) for prevention or delay of knee surgery in patients with knee osteoarthritis. An observational cohort study using LifeLink Plus claims (2006-2015) was used. The primary outcome measure of the study included all surgical interventions of the knee. The secondary outcome measures were the following: (1) unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty and (2) total knee arthroplasty only. A high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS) using 1:1 matching was used to adjust for confounding. The likelihood of each outcome was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models. A cohort of 30,417 incident HA users with knee osteoarthritis met our inclusion-exclusion criteria. There was no difference in the likelihood of composite surgical events between LMWHA users (hazard ratio, 0.939; 95% confidence interval, 0.870-1.013) and MMWHA users (hazard ratio, 1.032; 95% confidence interval, 0.952-1.119) when compared with HMWHA users in a matched hdPS analysis. However, a significantly lower likelihood for all outcome measures was demonstrated in LMWHA and MMWHA users compared with HMWHA users when hdPS was not used. There was no significant difference in the likelihood of surgical interventions between LMWHA, MMWHA, and HMWHA users after accounting for empirically derived confounders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Individualized unicondylar knee replacement : Use of patient-specific implants and instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnholdt, J; Holzapfel, B M; Sefrin, L; Rudert, M; Beckmann, J; Steinert, A F

    2017-02-01

    Unicompartmental knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the medial compartment. Individualized instruments and implants with a planning protocol for optimal fit. The individualized instruments and implants (ConforMIS Inc.; Burlington, MA, USA) are manufactured based on a computed tomography scan of the affected lower extremity and are provided together with a planning protocol (iView®) of the surgery. Unicompartmental OA of the knee (Kellgren & Lawrence stage IV) or Morbus Ahlbäck after unsuccessful conservative or joint preserving surgery. Bi- or tricompartmental OA, knee ligament instabilities, knee deformities >15° (varus, valgus, extension deficit). Relative contraindication: body mass index >40. Limited medial arthrotomy, identification of mechanical contact zone of the femoral condyle (linea terminalis); removal of remaining cartilage and all osteophytes that may interfere with the correct placement of the individually designed instruments. Balancing of knee in extension using patient-specific balancing chips of incremental heights. Resection of tibia with a fitted individualized tibial cutting block; confirmation of axial alignment with an extramedullary alignment tower; balancing flexion gap using spacer blocks in 90° flexion. Final femur preparation with the individual cutting instruments. Final tibial preparation with an individual drill jig for the placement of cavities fitting the cement pegs of the prosthesis. Lavage, cementing of implants in 45° of knee flexion, removal of excess cement, and wound closure. Sterile wound dressing, compressive bandage. Unlimited active/passive range of motion. Functional rehabilitation with partial weight bearing first 2 weeks, then transition to full weight bearing. Clinical/radiographic follow-up directly after surgery, at 12 and 52 weeks, then every 1-2 years. In all, 31 patients with medial OA (27 medial knee osteoarthritis, 4 osteonecrosis) were treated. Mean age 60

  17. Clinical, roentgenographic, and scintigraphic results after interruption of the superior lateral genicular artery during total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, M.A.; Keating, E.M.; Faris, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-eight patients treated by primary bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty, in which one knee had a lateral release and the other did not, were evaluated clinically and roentgenographically from one to 12 years postoperatively. Thirty of these patients also had a technetium-99 bone scan. Mean clinical scores at the last follow-up examination were 90 for both groups. Roentgenographically, there were no subluxations, dislocations, or fractures in either group. There were two metal-backed patellae (one in each group) with signs of polyethylene wear and developed debris. Bone scans showed no difference between the two groups and no signs of osteonecrosis of the patella

  18. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up stairs or hills. Treatment may involve surgery. Bursitis A bursa is a sac filled with fluid ... friction, it can develop into a condition called bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, ...

  19. Knee disarticulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antun Muljačić

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we presented three patients withknee disarticulation performed according toBaumgartner. The Baumgartner tehnique and theapplication of knee disarticulation prosthesis appearedto be superior in comparisson with othermethods.

  20. Coronal Alignment of the Lower Limb and the Incidence of Constitutional Varus Knee in Korean Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Moo-Ho; Kang, Suk-Woong; Kim, Yeong-Joon; Park, Gyu-Taek; Pyeun, Yong-Seon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), it is important to restore neutral mechanical alignment. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the lower limb alignment is neutral in healthy Korean females and investigate the incidence of constitutional varus knees among them. Materials and Methods Weight-bearing full-leg standing radiographs were obtained from 118 healthy females between the ages of 20 to 39 years. One radiologist and two orthopaedic surgeons measured the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKAA), medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA), and femoral anatomic mechanical angle (FAMA) on the radiographs and compared with the traditional gold standard HKAA of 0°, MPTA of 3° varus, and FAMA of 6°. Results The interobserver reliability of the three independent observers was high (pvarus alignment was 20.34%. Conclusions In Korean females, the mechanical axis of the lower limb was not neutral and the incidence of constitutional varus alignment was slightly higher than that in Western females. We believe that these findings should be taken into consideration in planning reconstructive surgery of the knee, such as TKA, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and high tibial osteotomy. PMID:25750894

  1. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Della Vale

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A user- friendly reference for decision making in complicated cases of knee arthroplasty desingned in a question and answers format composed of articles containing current concepts and preferences of experts in total knee replacement surgery, enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a casual advice by Craig J. Della Vale, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of knee arthroplasty, the editor and the contributors have aimed providing straightforward and brief answers, evidence-based advices, their preference and opinions containing current concepts for unanswered questions about complicated cases in total knee replacement surgery which are often controversial and not addressed clearly in traditional knee arthroplasty references. FEATURES There are 49 subjects each written by a different expert designed in 4 sections in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected including indications, unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee, patient with vascular problems, donating blood, bilateral arthroplasty, patellar resurfacing, range of motion, bearing surface, contraindications, teaching class for patients prior surgery. The second section is about intraoperative questions including skin incision, patella femoral maltracking, femoral component rotation, tibial component rotation, lateral release, femoral component sizing, flexion instability, varus deformity, and valgus deformity, tightness in extension, iatrogenic MCL injury, antibiotic-loaded cement, and perioperative pain. The third section subjects postoperative questions including wound drainage, preventing tromboembolic events, vascular complications, foot drop, manipulation under anesthesia, patella fractures, supracondylar femur fractures, acute extensor mechanism disruptions. In the fourth

  2. Swollen Knee (Water on the Knee)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to experience the types of knee injuries that cause swelling. Obesity. Excess weight puts added stress on the knee ... degeneration that can lead to a swollen knee. Obesity increases your risk of osteoarthritis, one of the more frequent causes of knee swelling. Complications Complications of a swollen ...

  3. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you're used to only running a mile or so, don't try to go out and suddenly run 5 miles. Work up to it with a series of ... supporting structures. Surgery is only used as a last resort, though. Most cases of runner's knee get ...

  4. An inexpensive and innovative correction of medial compartmental osteoarthritis knee joint by high tibial lateral closed wedge osteotomy in a rural set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad DV, Arun AA, Tushar Chaudhari, Sagar Jawale, Shakthi Panda, Abhinav Jadhav, Deepak Dathrange

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis of Knee joint with Varus deformity causes considerable disability. Operative treatment aims at shifting the mechanical load bearing axis to the less affected compartment of the knee to relieve the symptoms. Exclusion Criteria: Non-walkers due to generalized arthropathies / medical comorbidities, Flexion deformity > 10 degrees, Range of motion 1cm lateral subluxation in standing A-P X rays of both knees. Methodology: 32 (12 Males and 20 Females cases of Medial compartment osteoarthritis presenting in our OPD between 2008-2012 were treated by HTOand cortical screw and SS wire fixation (TBW Technique. Results: Evaluation of results was done based on knee rating scale by Japanese orthopaedic association. 22 cases were Excellent, 8 cases were good. One case of failure, an iatrogenic intracondylar fracture of Tibia, and another secondary haematoma under the suture line, aspirated and complete healing was achieved. Patients had good range of motion, were able to squat and sit cross legged comfortably. Conclusion: HTO by Closed Medial wedge osteotomy and fixation with cortical screw and SS wire provides a good alternative to unicompartmental knee Arthroplasty and even Total knee Arthroplasty (may be up to 10-15 years in patients with Medial compartmental osteoarthritis. It is a cost effective technique with the use of minimum hardware and early postoperative mobilization in patients who cannot afford Knee Arthroplasty in a Rural set up.

  5. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  6. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes may be the result of ... occur in childhood sports, but with any knee injury in a growing child there is a possibility of a fracture related ...

  7. Knee joint replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Knee replacement - total - discharge; Tricompartmental knee replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - knee replacement discharge ... such as downhill skiing or contact sports like football and soccer. But, you should be able to ...

  8. Comparison of Fast Roll-to-Roll Flexographic, Inkjet, Flatbed, and Rotary Screen Printing of Metal Back Electrodes for Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Søndergaard, Roar R.; Angmo, Dechan

    2013-01-01

    The majority of polymer solar cells reported today employs processing under high vacuum for one or more of the layers in the solar cell stack. Most notably the highly conducting metal back electrode is almost exclusively applied by evaporation of the pure metal. While it is not impossible...... to envisage mass production of polymer solar cells using vacuum processing it does present some drawbacks in terms of both processing speed, capital investment in processing equipment technical yield and direct process energy. From this point of view it is clear that vacuum processed electrodes should...... be avoided and electrodes should be printable using methods that provide a high degree of accuracy and high technical yield. When considering large area polymer solar cells (i.e., not laboratory devices) a few reports have employed printable back electrodes mostly by use of silver formulations[1–4] but also...

  9. The knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, J.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of infection is difficult on the basis of radiographs. A clinical history suggestive of infection, such as excessive prolonged pain, drainage, fever, or a postoperative hematoma, is helpful in assessment. Radiographs may reveal periosteal new bone formation in long-standing cases of infection. Aspiration of the knee may or may not be helpful. Differential Tc-99m and gallium bone scans may be a useful adjunct in difficult cases. The gallium scan should show increased uptake relative to the Tc-99m scan to be considered positive. Bone scanning is not a useful criterion by itself for assessment of loosening

  10. Adolescent knee pain and patellar dislocations are associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis in adulthood: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchie, Henry; Clark, Damian; Metcalfe, Andrew; Eldridge, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Michael

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of information about the association between patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) and both adolescent anterior knee pain (AKP) and previous patellar dislocations. This case-control study involved 222 participants from our knee arthroplasty database answering a questionnaire. One hundred and eleven patients suffering from PFOA were 1:1 matched by gender with a unicompartmental tibiofemoral arthritis control group. Multivariate correlation and binary logistic regression analysis were performed, with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) calculated. An individual is 7.5 times more likely to develop PFOA if they have suffered from adolescent AKP (OR 7.5, 95% CIs 1.51 to 36.94). Additionally, experiencing a patellar dislocation increases the likelihood of development of PFOA, with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CIs 1.25 to 8.18). A 44-year difference in median age of first dislocation was also observed between the groups. This should bring into question the traditional belief that adolescent anterior knee pain is a benign pathology. Patellar dislocation is also a significant risk factor. These patients merit investigation, we encourage clinical acknowledgement of the potential consequences when encountering patients suffering from anterior knee pain or patellar dislocation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Technological Innovation in Knee Arthroplasty: Using Patent and Publication Metrics to Identify Developments and Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, David M; Burke, Thomas P; Kelly, Enda G; Curtin, Paul D

    2016-06-01

    Surgery is in a constant continuum of innovation with refinement of technique and instrumentation. Arthroplasty surgery potentially represents an area with highly innovative process. This study highlights key area of innovation in knee arthroplasty over the past 35 years using patent and publication metrics. Growth rates and patterns are analyzed. Patents are correlated to publications as a measure of scientific support. Electronic patent and publication databases were searched over the interval 1980-2014 for "knee arthroplasty" OR "knee replacement." The resulting patent codes were allocated into technology clusters. Citation analysis was performed to identify any important developments missed on initial analysis. The technology clusters identified were further analyzed, individual repeat searches performed, and growth curves plotted. The initial search revealed 3574 patents and 16,552 publications. The largest technology clusters identified were Unicompartmental, Patient-Specific Instrumentation (PSI), Navigation, and Robotic knee arthroplasties. The growth in patent activity correlated strongly with publication activity (Pearson correlation value 0.892, P technology in the last 5 years, is currently in a period of exponential growth that began a decade ago. Established technologies in the study have double s-shaped patent curves. Identifying trends in emerging technologies is possible using patent metrics and is useful information for training and regulatory bodies. The decline in ratio of publications to patents and the uninterrupted growth of PSI are developments that may warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Huang, Guo-Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Hsu, Shu-Mei [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Tamkang University, Department of Mathematics, Taipei County (China); Ho, Wei-Pin [Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (China)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  13. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Wing P.; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  14. Management of an Infected Nonunion of an Opening-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy with 2-Stage Implantation of Rotating Hinge Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Mariaux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High tibial osteotomy (HTO is a frequent and effective treatment for unicompartmental gonarthritis. Only a few articles are focused on the treatment of infected nonunion. Patient and Method. A 50-year-old obese patient was operated on by medial opening-wedge HTO. She developed a painful nonunion treated by hardware removal, allograft, and plate fixation. However, the nonunion persisted. 2 years later, cellulitis appeared with an abscess adjacent to the HTO plate. Despite surgical debridement and antibiotics, septic knee arthritis occurred. In a situation of infected nonunion and septic arthritis with chondrolysis, she was scheduled for a 2-stage total knee replacement (TKR. The infected tibial articular block was first resected and replaced by a cement spacer. After a short interval, the TKR was implanted. After 2 years, the patient walked pain-free with good knee function. Discussion. In the literature, different efficient treatments exist for infected nonunion after HTO, but comprehensive studies are missing for a consensus treatment. Current data are mostly based on case reports, since this pathology is quite rare. Conclusion. In a difficult situation of infected nonunion with septic knee arthritis, we performed a 2-stage knee prosthesis implantation. This led to an early mobilization and fast recovery.

  15. The Impact of Osseous Malalignment and Realignment Procedures in Knee Ligament Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Thomas; Paul, Jochen; Pape, Dietrich; Hirschmann, Michael T.; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Feucht, Matthias J.

    2017-01-01

    anterior tibial translation after slope-decreasing high tibial osteotomy in ACL-deficient knees. Correcting varus malalignment in PCL/PLC/LCL instability also showed increased stability and better outcomes. Conclusion: In cases of complex knee instability, the 3-dimensional osseous alignment of the knee should be considered (eg, mechanical weightbearing line and tibial slope). In cases of failed ACL reconstruction, the tibial slope should be considered, and slope-reducing osteotomies are often helpful in the patient revised multiple times. In cases of chronic PCL and/or PLC instability, osseous correction of the varus alignment may reduce the failure rate and is often the first step in treatment. Changes in the mechanical axis should be considered in all cases of instability accompanied by early unicompartmental osteoarthritis. PMID:28451605

  16. Knee Arthrodesis After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty in a nati......BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...

  17. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cartilage in the knee gradually wears away, causing pain and swelling. Injuries to ligaments and tendons also cause knee problems. A common injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). You usually injure your ACL ...

  18. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  19. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  20. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  1. What Are Knee Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stand on it. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments are usually injured by a blow to ... This can help your knee(s) without increasing the risk of injury or further damage. As a general ...

  2. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  3. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...

  4. UCI knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanski, P M; Waugh, T R; Orofino, C F; Anzel, S H

    1976-10-01

    Between March 9, 1972 and December 31, 1973, a total of 103 UCI knee replacements were performed. Follow-up data are available on 83 knees with an average follow-up of 33 months. Patient evaluation of the end results indicates that 78.3 per cent were better, 9.6 per cent unchanged, and 12.1 per cent worse. Patient evaluation of their own knee function averaged 55 per cent preoperatively and 79 per cent postoperatively. Patients were also evaluated on a 100 point Modified Larson Analysis Form. The average preoperative score was 46, and the average postoperative score was 70. There were six (5.8%) biological complications in the 103 knee replacement. Biological complications included infections, wound healing problems and unexplained pain. Mechanical complications were seen in 18 (17.4%) knees, and included knee instability, tibial component loosening or deformation, and patellar problems. Additional surgery was required in 18 (17.4%) knees. Failure of the procedure eventually requiring removal of the prosthesis and fusion or amputation occurred in 4 (3.9%) knees. The intermediate-term results of UCI knee replacement have been clinically satisfactory. We currently recommend consideration of this procedure for patients with disabling arthritis of the knee.

  5. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...... surgeon seems to positively influence the rate of surgical complications and implant survival. The painful TKA knee should be thoroughly evaluated, but not revised except if a relevant indication can be established. The most frequent indications for revision are: aseptic loosening, instability, infection...

  7. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness, Exercise Basics, First Aid and Injury Prevention, Injury Rehabilitation, Prevention and Wellness, Sports SafetyTags: Knee Pain, Pain Management September 1, 2005 Copyright © American ...

  8. Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty: down the boulevard of broken dreams - affirms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranawat, C S; Meftah, M; Windsor, E N; Ranawat, A S

    2012-11-01

    There has been a recent increase in interest for non-cemented fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), however the superiority of cement fixation is an ongoing debate. Whereas the results based on Level III and IV evidence show similar survivorship rates between the two types of fixation, Level I and II evidence strongly support cemented fixation. United Kingdom, Australia, Sweden, and New Zealand registry data show lower failure rates and greater usage of cemented than non-cemented fixation. Case series studies have also indicated greater functional outcomes and lower revision rates among cemented TKAs. Non-cemented fixation involves more patellofemoral complications, including increased susceptibility to wear due to a thinner polyethylene bearing on the cementless metal-backed component. The combination of results from registry data, prospective randomised studies, and meta-analyses support the current superiority of cemented fixation in TKAs.

  9. [Knee disarticulation and through-knee amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    A knee disarticulation or a through-knee stump is superior compared to a transfemoral stump. The thigh muscles are all preserved, and the muscle balance remains undisturbed. The range of motion of the hip joint is not limited. The bulbous shape of the stump allows full weight bearing at the stump end and can easily be fitted with a prosthesis. An amputee with a bilateral knee disarticulation is able to walk "barefoot". A more distal amputation level, e.g., an ultra-short transtibial amputation, is not possible. Important alternative to transfemoral amputations. Possible for any etiology except for Buerger-Winiwarter's disease. New indications are infected and loosened total knee replacements. Preservation of the knee joint is possible. Knee disarticulation is a very atraumatic procedure, compared to transfemoral amputations. Neither bones nor muscles have to be severed, just skin, ligaments, vessels, and nerves. Even the meniscal cartilages may be left in place to act as axial shock absorbers. The cartilage of the femur is not resected, but only bevelled in case of osteoarthritis. There are no tendon attachments or myoplastic procedures necessary. The patella remains in place and is held in position only by the retinacula. Skin closure must be performed without the slightest tension, and if possible not in the weight-bearing area. Transcondylar amputations across the femoral condyles only are indicated when there are not sufficient soft tissues for wound closure of a knee disarticulation. Alternatives as the techniques of Gritti, Klaes, and Eigler, the shortening of the femur and the Sauerbruch's rotation plasty [14] are presented and discussed. The risk of decubital ulcers is rather high. Correct bandaging of the stump is, therefore, particularly important. Prosthetic fitting is possible 3-6 weeks after surgery. The type of prosthesis depends on the amputee's activity level. The superior performance of amputees with knee disarticulations in sports prove the

  10. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... between the femur and the tibia in the knee joint. The anterior cruciate ligament, the posterior cruciate ligament, and the ... Several small punctures are made into the knee joint while the patient ... and pain-free (regional anesthesia or spinal anesthesia).

  11. Knee injuries in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collateral ligament. Fortunately the majority of knee injuries are strains involving the ligaments. The medial collateral ligament (MCL), which resists valgus and internal rotation, is susceptible to contact and non-contact loads. The MCL is the most commonly injured ligament in the knee.13 In an audit of soccer injuries in ...

  12. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  13. Does knee awareness differ between different knee arthroplasty prostheses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more n...... a standard CR TKA, indicating that the use of this newer prosthetic design facilitate less knee awareness and better function after TKA.......BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more...

  14. Hospital volume and the risk of revision in Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries -an observational study of 14,496 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawy, Mona; Fenstad, Anne M.; Bartz-Johannessen, Christoffer A.

    2017-01-01

    ). The outcome was revision risk after 2 and 10 years calculated using Kaplan Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the Hazard Ratio (HR) of any revision due to specific reasons with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The implant survival was 80% at 10 years in the volume...

  15. The protective effect of pulsed lavage against implant subsidence and micromotion for cemented tibial unicompartmental knee components: an experimental cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Sebastian; Rieger, Johannes S; Bruckner, Thomas; Kretzer, J Philippe; Clarius, Michael; Bitsch, Rudi G

    2014-04-01

    Cemented UKAs were performed in 12 pairs of human cadaver legs and the bone bed was cleansed using pulsed lavage (group A) and conventional syringe lavage (group B). Subsidence and micromotion of the loaded tibial trays were measured. There was a significant effect of BMD on subsidence (P = 0.043) but not on micromotion. Cement penetration of group A was significantly increased (P = 0.005). Group A showed a reduced implant subsidence (P = 0.025) and micromotion (P = 0.026) compared to group B. The group differences in micromotion and implant subsidence of UKA tibial components were statistically significant but rather small and might clinically be of minor importance. Nevertheless a worse bone quality adversely affected implant subsidence and pulsed lavage had a protective effect in these specimens. © 2014.

  16. Similar clinical outcome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty using a conventional or accelerated care program: a randomized, controlled study of 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lotte; Zerahn, Bo; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    within 3 months, contact with a general physician or nurse, and level of satisfaction were registered. Patients in the A group attended an information meeting. An intraarticular infiltration with Marcaine and adrenaline was used peroperatively. Patients in the C group had an epidural pump for 2 or 3 days....... Patients in the A program were treated with NSAID and paracetamol postoperatively. Opiates were used in both groups in the case of breakthrough pain. The patients were considered ready for discharge when they were able to climb stairs to the second floor within 5 min. RESULTS: The median length of stay...

  17. Evaluating anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Engene; Kraft, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints account for about 20% to 30% of all primary care office visits; of these visits, discomfort in the knee, shoulder, and back are the most prevalent musculoskeletal symptoms. Having pain or dysfunction in the front part of the knee is a common presentation and reason for a patient to see a health care provider. There are a number of pathophysiological etiologies to anterior knee pain. This article describes some of the common and less common causes, and includes sections on diagnosis and treatment for each condition as well as key points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pillows. Place the pillows under your foot or calf muscle. This helps control swelling in your knee. For ... time. You have swelling or pain in your calf muscle. Your foot or toes look darker than normal ...

  19. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thighbone where the kneecap normally rests is too shallow. You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  20. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms.

  1. Taking care of your new knee joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  2. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  3. How to quantify knee function after total knee arthroplasty?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.C.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is being undertaken in a younger population than before and as a result the functional demands on the knee are likely to be increasing. As a consequence, it is important to define quantitative functional knee tests that can monitor any increase. A valuable functional

  4. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  5. Knee arthrography today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Kallenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The role of knee arthrography today is demonstrated and technical problems are discussed. Among a lot of variants the position of the patient and the choice of contrast media play a great part concerning the result of the examination. Mild complications occur in 0.25% of the examinations, severe and live threatening complications are extremely rare. Diagnosis of meniscal lesions is most important for knee arthrography; arthroscopy and arthrography are complementary examinations and not mutually exclusive, they achieve combined an accuracy of 97-98%. In the same way arthrography is able to evaluate the condropathy of the femoro-tibial joint, whereas accuracy of arthroscopy in the diagnosis of patellar chondropathy is much higher. There is a great reliability of arthrography regarding the evaluation of lesions of the capsule, but accuracy in lesions of the cruciate ligaments is low. Arthrography is very suitable for evaluation of Baker-cysts, since indications for almost occuring internal derangement of the knee are even available. Knee arthrography is a complex and safe procedure with very less discomfort for the patient; it has a central position in the evaluation of lesions of the knee. (orig.) [de

  6. Bouncy knee in a semi-automatic knee lock prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, L D; Lord, M

    1986-04-01

    The Bouncy Knee concept has previously proved of value when fitted to stabilised knee units of active amputees. The stance phase flex-extend action afforded by a Bouncy Knee increased the symmetry of gait and also gave better tolerance to slopes and uneven ground. A bouncy function has now been incorporated into a knee of the semi-automatic knee lock design in a pilot laboratory trial involving six patients. These less active patients did not show consistent changes in symmetry of gait, but demonstrated an improved ability to walk on slopes and increased their walking range. Subjective response was positive, as noted in the previous trials.

  7. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    . Evaluating MRI, all grade-3 meniscal lesions were considered able to cause a mechanical block as well as acute partial or total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-ruptures. ACL-ruptures with an old appearance were not considered able to cause locking. Assuming that arthroscopy was the gold standard......, the following results were calculated for the overall appearance of a lesion able to cause locking: Positive predictive value = 0.85, negative predictive value = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.53. Two knees were erroneously evaluated with no mechanical locking at MRI (one bucket-handle lesion and one...

  8. Meta-Review of the Quantity and Quality of Evidence for Knee Arthroplasty Devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R Gagliardi

    Full Text Available Some cardiovascular devices are licensed based on limited evidence, potentially exposing patients to devices that are not safe or effective. Research is needed to ascertain if the same is true of other types of medical devices. Knee arthroplasty is a widely-used surgical procedure yet implant failures are not uncommon. The purpose of this study was to characterize available evidence on the safety and effectiveness of knee implants.A review of primary studies included in health technology assessments (HTA on total (TKA and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA was conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Biotechnology & BioEngineering Abstracts were searched from 2005 to 2014, plus journal tables of contents and 32 HTA web sites. Patients were aged 18 and older who underwent primary TKA or UKA assessed in cohort or randomized controlled studies. Summary statistics were used to report study characteristics.A total of 265 eligible primary studies published between 1986 and 2014 involving 59,217 patients were identified in 10 HTAs (2 low, 7 moderate, 1 high risk of bias. Most evaluated TKA (198, 74.5%. The quality of evidence in primary studies was limited. Most studies were industry-funded (23.8% or offered no declaration of funding or conflict of interest (44.9%; based on uncontrolled single cohorts (58.5%, enrolled fewer than 100 patients (66.4%, and followed patients for 2 years or less (UKA: single cohort 29.8%, comparative cohort 16.7%, randomized trial 25.0%; TKA: single cohort 25.0%, comparative cohort 31.4%, randomized trial 48.6%. Furthermore, most devices were evaluated in only one study (55.3% TKA implants, 61.1% UKA implants.Patients, physicians, hospitals and payers rely on poor-quality evidence to support decisions about knee implants. Further research is needed to explore how decisions about the use of devices are currently made, and how the evidence base for device safety and effectiveness can be strengthened.

  9. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  10. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and physical function....... RESULTS: The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  11. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  12. The floating knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz Vives, Josep; Bel, Jean-Christophe; Capel Agundez, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Blake and McBryde established the concept of 'floating knee' to describe ipsilateral fractures of the femur and tibia.1This combination is much more than a bone lesion; the mechanism is usually a high-energy trauma in a patient with multiple injuries and a myriad of other lesions...

  13. The floating knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz Vives, Josep; Bel, Jean-Christophe; Capel Agundez, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    fixation when both fractures (femoral and tibial) are extra-articular.Plates are the 'standard of care' in cases with articular fractures.A combination of implants are required by 40% of floating knees.Associated ligamentous and meniscal lesions are common, but may be irrelevant in the case of an intra...

  14. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty.Design: A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study.Setting: A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital...... in knee pain at rest (P = 0.475), or knee pain during the knee extension strength measurements (P = 0.422) were not different between treatments.Conclusions: In contrast to observations in experimental knee effusion models and inflamed knee joints, knee joint icing for 30 minutes shortly after total knee.......Participants: Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty.Interventions: The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30...

  16. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fred A. de Laat, MD, PhD; Mark J. van der Pluijm, CPO; Annette A. van Kuijk, MD, PhD; Jan H. Geertzen, MD, PhD; Leo D. Roorda, MD, PT, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengtheni...

  17. Eccrine Spiradenoma in Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccrine spiradenoma is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor of the eccrine sweat glands. Although it can occur at any age, it is most common in young adults without any sex predilection. Malignant transformation is rare, presenting as rapid increase in size of a long-standing lesion. Here, we report a case of eccrine spiradenoma in a 35-year-old man who presented with swelling over the right knee, with cytological atypia but no recurrence until date.

  18. Prevalent knee pain and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1998-01-01

    and with weekly hours of participation in competitive gymnastics but negatively with weekly hours of tennis. Constant or recurrent knee pain was positively associated with years of swimming. Absence from sport due to knee pain was positively associated with weekly hours of soccer participation. CONCLUSIONS: Knee...... pain is a common symptom in athletes. The prevalence is associated with the type, amount and duration of sports participation....

  19. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    OpenAIRE

    Huri, Gazi; Biçer, Omer Sunkar

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization) in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30??90??ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popli...

  20. Knee Dislocations in Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Rao, Nandan N; Anand, Karthik; Raut, Alhad

    2017-01-01

    Knee dislocations are devastating when they occur on the athletic field or secondary to motor sports. The complexity of presentation and spectrum of treatment options makes these injuries unique and extremely challenging to even the most experienced knee surgeons. An astute appreciation of the treatment algorithm is essential to plan individualized management since no two complex knee dislocations are ever the same. Moreover, attention to detail and finesse of surgical technique are required to obtain a good functional result and ensure return to play. Over the past 10 years, our service has treated 43 competitive sportsmen with knee dislocations, and this experience forms the basis for this narrative review. PMID:28966379

  1. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de laat, Fred A.; van der Pluijm, Mark J.; van Kuijk, Annette A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The

  2. Arthroscopic lavage and debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS LEVEL 1B EVIDENCE THAT: Arthroscopic lavage gives rise to a statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful effect in improving pain (WOMAC pain and VAS pain) up to 12 months following surgery. The effect on joint function (WOMAC function) and the primary outcome (WOMAC aggregate) was neither statistically nor clinically significant. IN MODERATE OR SEVERE OA OF THE KNEE WITH PAIN REFRACTORY TO MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS: Level 1b evidence that the effect on pain and function of arthroscopic lavage (10 L saline) and debridement (with 10 L saline lavage) is not statistically significant up to 24 months following surgery.Level 2 evidence that arthroscopic debridement (with 3 L saline lavage) is effective in the control of pain in severe OA of the medial femoral condyle for up to 5 years.For debridement in combination with meniscectomy, there is level 4 evidence that the procedure, as appropriate, might be effective in earlier stages, unicompartmental disease, shorter symptom duration, sudden onset of mechanical symptoms, and preoperative full range of motion. However, as these findings are derived from very poor quality evidence, the identification of subsets of patients that may benefit from this procedure requires further testing.In patients with pain due to a meniscal tear, of the medial compartment in particular, repair of the meniscus results in better pain control at 2 years following surgery than if the pain is attributable to other causes. There is insufficient evidence to comment on the effectiveness of lateral meniscus repair on pain control. Arthroscopic debridement of the knee has thus far only been found to be effective for medial compartmental OA. All other indications should be reviewed with a view to reducing arthroscopic debridement as an effective therapy. Arthroscopic lavage of the knee is not indicated for any stage of OA. There is very poor quality evidence on the effectiveness of debridement with partial

  3. Magnification bone scan of knees for knee pain evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Park, Chan H.; Yoon, Seok Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Knee pain is one of the common complaints of patients seen in our orthopedic clinic. Routine anterior and posterior views of whole body bone scan (WBBS) is often not sufficient in the evaluation of these patients. An ideal bone scan using pinhole collimator or single photon emission tomography (SPECT), however, is impractical and time consuming in busy nuclear medicine department with limited resources. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess limited bone scan of knees with magnification (LNSKM) for knee pain evaluation. Technical aspect of LBSKM and diagnostic efficacy are discussed on this poster. Adult patients with knee pain were reffered for LBSKM from an orthopedic surgen specializing knees. Four hundred fifteen LBSKMs were performed since 1999. patients were given 740 MBq (20mCi) Tc-99m MDP intravenously and 3 hours later LBSKM was performed using a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator and Siemens Orbitor camera. (Simens medical systems. Inc., Hoffman Estates, III., USA). Anterior view of the knees was taken for 5 min, without magnification and both lateral views of symptomatic knees were obtained with electronic magnification (1.25, upto 2.0) for 8 min each. Disease processes such as DJD, traumatic arthritis, P-F tendonitis, SONK, meniscus tear are detected and illustrated along with normal knee scan finding. We believe LBSKM may not be as good as SPECT or pinhole imaging of the knees in the evaluation of knee pain but superior to routine WBBS in the nuclear medicine department with limited resources of instrumentation and manpower.

  4. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  5. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  6. Recruitment of knee joint ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, R.; de Lange, A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of earlier reported data on the in vitro kinematics of passive knee-joint motions of four knee specimens, the length changes of ligament fiber bundles were determined by using the points of insertion on the tibia and femur. The kinematic data and the insertions of the ligaments were

  7. Anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  8. Knees Lifted High

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Knees Lifted High gives children fun ideas for active outdoor play.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  9. MR findings in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Taouli, Bachir; Genant, Harry K.; Zaim, Souhil; Miaux, Yves; Peterfy, Charles G.

    2003-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability. Recent advances in drug discovery techniques and improvements in understanding the pathophysiology of osteoarthritic disorders have resulted in an unprecedented number of new therapeutic agents. Of all imaging modalities, radiography has been the most widely used for the diagnosis and management of the progression of knee OA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively recent technique and its applications to osteoarthritis have been limited. Compared with conventional radiography, MR imaging offers unparalleled discrimination among articular soft tissues by directly visualizing all components of the knee joint simultaneously and therefore allowing the knee joint to be evaluated as a whole organ. In this article we present the MR findings in knee OA including cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes, bone edema, subarticular cysts, bone attrition, meniscal tears, ligament abnormalities, synovial thickening, joint effusion, intra-articular loose bodies, and periarticular cysts. (orig.)

  10. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  11. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Fred A; van der Pluijm, Mark J; van Kuijk, Annette A; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank.

  12. Evaluation and management of knee pain in young athletes: overuse injuries of the knee

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Dilip R.; Villalobos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent or chronic activity related knee pain is common in young athletes. Numerous intrinsic conditions affecting the knee can cause such pain. In addition, knee pain can be referred pain from low back, hip or pelvic pathology. The most common cause of knee pain in young athletes is patellofemoral pain syndrome, or more appropriately termed idiopathic anterior knee pain. Although, numerous anatomical and biomechanical factors have been postulated to contribute the knee pain in young athlet...

  13. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  14. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  15. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Huri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30∘–90∘ ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  16. Intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Machhindra Morey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondromas are usually extra articular and grow away from the joint towards the diaphysis. Intraarticular osteochondromas are very rare and often misdiagnosed. We report a case of 16-year-old boy who presented with pain and clicking sound in the right knee for last 6 months. On examination, click was felt at the terminal flexion of the knee. The lateral radiograph of the right knee showed a radio opaque shadow at the posterior aspect of the distal end of femur, which was further evaluated with an MRI. Arthroscopy showed a hard lesion arising from the roof of the intercondylar notch of femur. It was excised arthroscopically. Histopathology revealed it to be an osteochondroma. Thus, intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee can be considered as a rare cause of pain in young patients.

  17. Unusual cause of knee locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Gazi; Biçer, Omer Sunkar

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization) in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30°-90° ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  18. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  19. Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Wolf; Rembitzki, Ingo Volker; Brüggemann, Gerd-Peter; Ellermann, Andree; Best, Raymond; Koppenburg, Andreas Gösele-; Liebau, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common causes of persistent problems after implantation of a total knee replacement. It can occur in patients with or without patellar resurfacing. As a result of the surgical procedure itself many changes can occur which may affect the delicate interplay of the joint partners in the patello-femoral joint. Functional causes of anterior knee pain can be distinguished from mechanical causes. The functional causes concern disorders of inter- and intramuscular coordination, which can be attributed to preoperative osteoarthritis. Research about anterior knee pain has shown that not only the thigh muscles but also the hip and trunk stabilising muscles may be responsible for the development of a dynamic valgus malalignment. Dynamic valgus may be a causative factor for patellar maltracking. The mechanical causes of patello-femoral problems after knee replacement can be distinguished according to whether they increase instability in the joint, increase joint pressure or whether they affect the muscular lever arms. These causes include offset errors, oversizing, rotational errors of femoral or tibial component, instability, maltracking and chondrolysis, patella baja and aseptic loosening. In these cases, reoperation or revision is often necessary.

  20. Early knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. 888.3580 Section 888.3580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3590 Section 888.3590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  3. KNEE PROPRIOCEPTION FOLLOWING MENISCAL REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytsko A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that meniscectomy leads to osteoarthritis of the knee and proprioception impairment. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the joint position sense after meniscal suture and partial medial meniscal resection and to estimate the patients’ satisfaction with knee function. Material and Methods. We evaluated the outcomes of 27 patients after meniscal repair and compared them to those of 24 patients after partial meniscal resection. We estimated the joint position sense at 30°, 45° and 60° of flexion using the Biodex system 4 Pro. All patients were assessed with the IKDC 2000 subjective knee score. Results. A statistically significant worsening in reproducing the injured joint position in comparison to the healthy limb in both groups was observed. These impairments were mostly expressed at 45° and 60° of knee flexion, and were worsening over time in the group of patients who had undergone medial meniscal resection. An average value by the IKDC 2000 scale after 24 months in the meniscorrhaphy group was 76.73 ± 11.17% and 68.93 ± 14.76% after partial medial meniscal resection. Сonclusion. The control over position of the knee is not impaired after meniscal repair. An overall satisfaction with joint function is higher in patients who undergo meniscal suture in comparison to the partial medial meniscal resection group.

  4. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sports Injuries Knee Injuries Bones, Muscles, and Joints Osgood-Schlatter Disease Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Word! Joints Your Bones Osgood-Schlatter Disease Knee Injury: Caroline's Story Meniscus Tears Runner's ...

  5. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Vestergaard, E

    1999-01-01

    was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly......The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension...... hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Apr...

  6. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  7. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  8. Anatomy and arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The pertinent anatomy of the knee and the use of double-contrast knee arthrography is presented. Various types of meniscal lesions as well as extrameniscal abnormalities such as ligamentous abnormalities, synovial diseases, and abnormalities of articular cartilage are illustrated

  9. Keys to Recovery after Knee Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shares her knee pain journey Photo: Courtesy of Melanie Modlin Melanie Modlin, 62, had total knee replacement last June. ... feel normal again?” The answer came slowly. For Melanie, feeling normal involved more than just becoming pain- ...

  10. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  11. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  12. Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZANON, GIACOMO; DI VICO, GIOVANNI; MARULLO, MATTEO

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a common cause of knee pain and dysfunction among skeletally immature and young adult patients. OCD is increasingly frequently seen in pediatric, adolescent and young adult athletes. If it is not recognized and treated appropriately, it can lead to secondary osteoarthritis with pain and functional limitation. Stable lesions in skeletally immature patients should initially be managed non-operatively. Unstable juvenile lesions and stable juvenile lesions that fail to heal with non-operative treatment require a surgical treatment. By contrast, adult OCD of the knee rarely responds to conservative measures because of limited healing potential. Operative treatment depends on the lesion stage, and there exist several surgical options. PMID:25606539

  13. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; van der Leeden, M.; van der Esch, M.; Thorstensson, C.A.; Roorda, L.D.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature:

  14. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattapuram, Taj M. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Kattapuram, Susan V. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)], E-mail: skattapuram@partners.org

    2008-07-15

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee presents with acute onset of severe, pain in elderly patients, usually female and usually without a history of trauma. Originally described as idiopathic osteonecrosis, the exact etiology is still debated. Evidence suggests that an acute fracture occurs as a result of chronic stress or minor trauma to a weakened subchondral bone plate. The imaging characteristics on MR reflect the age of the lesion and the symptoms. More appropriate terminology may be ' subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee' or 'focal subchondral osteonecrosis'.

  15. RELIABILITY AND RESPONSIVENESS OF THE DANISH MODIFIED INTERNATIONAL KNEE DOCUMENTATION COMMITTEE SUBJECTIVE KNEE FORM FOR CHILDREN WITH KNEE DISORDERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Knudsen, Pernille; Fynbo, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The modified international Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (Pedi-IKDC) is a widely used patient-reported tool applicable for children with knee disorders ranging on a scale from 0-100. We aimed to translate the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form into Danish......, and furthermore to assess its reliability and responsiveness. Material and Methods The Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee Form was translated to Danish according to international guidelines. Reliability was assessed with Bland Altman plots, standard error of measurement (SEM), Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) and the Intra....... Reliability and responsiveness were assessed in 50 children (median 15 years) referred to hospital due to different knee disorders. Results The SEM was 4.2 points and the MDC was 11.5 points. The ICC was 0.91 (0.9-1.0). The change score of the Pedi-IKDC Subjective Knee form was correlated to the external...

  16. [Overuse injury syndromes of the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, M; Bojanić, I; Haspl, M

    2001-12-01

    Overuse injuries are frequent in the knee joint. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in all sports activities. Furthermore, the joint area has numerous attachment points for muscles and tendons and numerous bursae. Another reason is that the specific joint between the patella and femur (patellofemoral joint) constitutes a part of the knee joint. Speaking in general terms, all overuse injuries in the knee joint can be divided in four groups according to the aspect: anterior aspect--patellofemoral pain syndrome, patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee), Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding Larson Johanson disease, stress fracture of the patella, fat pad syndrome; medial aspect--plica syndrome, semimembranosus tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis (bursitis), breaststroker's knee, medial retinaculitis; lateral aspect--Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), Popliteal Tendinitis, Bicipital tendinitis; posterior aspect--fabellitis, medial gastrocnemius strain. There are numerous possible reasons for pain caused by overuse injuries around the knee joint, but two are the most frequent: patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee) and Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee). This paper gives a brief overview of overuse injuries of the knee joint including their definition, anatomy, aetiology, clinical symptoms and signs, and non-operative and surgical treatment.

  17. Evaluation and management of knee pain in young athletes: overuse injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Villalobos, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent or chronic activity related knee pain is common in young athletes. Numerous intrinsic conditions affecting the knee can cause such pain. In addition, knee pain can be referred pain from low back, hip or pelvic pathology. The most common cause of knee pain in young athletes is patellofemoral pain syndrome, or more appropriately termed idiopathic anterior knee pain. Although, numerous anatomical and biomechanical factors have been postulated to contribute the knee pain in young athletes, the most common underlying reason is overuse injury. In this paper, we have reviewed selected conditions that case knee pain in athletes, including anterior knee pain syndrome, Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johanssen syndrome, juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD), bipartite patella, plica syndrome, and tendonitis around the knee.

  18. Knee Confidence as It Relates to Self-reported and Objective Correlates of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Rasmussen, Sten; Simonsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    confidence, assessed using item Q3 of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, as the dependent variable and self-reported (pain on walking, general health, fear of movement, self-efficacy, function, and previous serious injury) and objective measures (muscle strength, 20-m walk time...... osteoarthritis (OA). Background Lack of knee confidence is a frequent symptom in patients with knee OA, but little is known of associations between knee confidence and other common correlates of knee OA. Methods Baseline data from 220 patients with knee OA were applied in ordinal regression analyses, with knee.......21; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.34), and general health (OR = 0.024; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.259) explained 19% of the variance in knee confidence (Pcorrelate of knee confidence, whereas...

  19. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sadigursky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  20. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  1. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (pknee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  2. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, PTechnology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Knee injury and obesity in patients undergoing total knee replacement: a retrospective study in 115 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Rofail, S

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and previous knee injury was assessed in a retrospective study of 115 patients under-going total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis. Obesity was considered a contributing factor in the development of osteoarthritis in 37% of the patients, and 33% of the patients had...... had an injury to the knee in question. Unilateral osteoarthritis was significantly more frequent than bilateral osteoarthritis among patients with a history of previous knee injury. The association of previous injury to the knee and unilateral osteoarthritis was stronger in men than women. Aggressive...... treatment of patients with knee injuries seems warranted....

  4. Association between knee alignment and knee pain in patients surgically treated for medial knee osteoarthritis by high tibial osteotomy. A one year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W-Dahl, Annette; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Roos, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    including the hip and ankle joints. Knee pain was measured by the subscale pain (0 - 100, worst to best scale) of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) preoperatively and at one year follow-up. To estimate the association between knee alignment and knee pain multivariate regression...... on for knee OA by high tibial osteotomy. METHODS: 182 patients (68% men) mean age 53 years (34 - 69) with varus alignment having tibial osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique for medial knee OA were consecutively included. Knee alignment was assessed by the Hip-Knee-Ankle (HKA) angle from radiographs...

  5. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  6. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.

    2010-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  7. Are varus knees contracted? Reconciling the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Michael J; Vakili, Ali; Garg, Gautam; Roe, John; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Crawford, Ross

    2017-01-01

    There is direct literature conflict regarding coronal plane contracture or laxity in the end-stage varus osteoarthritic knee. Understanding the preoperative soft tissue status is important for optimizing the soft tissue envelope during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The lower limb was manipulated using computer navigation, prior to surgical releases, to allow the limb weight-bearing axis to pass through the knee centre in maximum extension and 20° of flexion. Coronal plane laxity was measured in 78 varus (-7.7° ± 2.8°) knees as medial and lateral displacement from this point and compared to published values for healthy subjects. Medial contracture was present in 12.8% (10/78) of the knees. Of these 10 knees, 5 displayed abnormal lateral laxity. Knees with a contracture in maximum extension also displayed a significant decrease ( p varus deformity. Medial laxity did not significantly decrease when comparing varus deformity of 5-10° versus >10°. The majority of varus knees with deformity of up to 15° have neither a medial contracture nor abnormal lateral laxity when referenced to the individualized neutral axis of the knee. Surgical releases during TKA should be uncommon. Medial contracture when present is influenced by both posterior and medial structures. Lateral laxity is a more consistent feature of the varus knee. The patterns of contracture and laxity are variable with limited correlation to deformity.

  8. 3D intersegmental knee loading in below-knee amputees across steady-state walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Nicholas P; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-05-01

    Unilateral below-knee amputees often develop comorbidities that include knee joint disorders (e.g., intact leg knee osteoarthritis), with the mechanisms leading to these comorbidities being poorly understood. Mechanical knee loading of non-amputees has been associated with joint disorders and shown to be influenced by walking speed. However, the relationships between amputee knee loading and speed have not been identified. This study examined three-dimensional mechanical knee loading of amputees across a wide range of steady-state walking speeds. Fourteen amputees and 10 non-amputee control subjects were analyzed at four overground walking speeds. At each speed, intersegmental joint moment and force impulses (i.e., time-integrals over the stance phase) were compared between the control, intact and residual knees using repeated-measures ANOVAs. There were no differences in joint force impulses between the intact and control knees. The intact knee abduction moment impulse was lower than the non-amputees at 0.6 and 0.9 m/s. The intact knee flexion moment impulses at 0.6, 1.2 and 1.5m/s and knee external rotation moment impulses at all speeds were greater than the residual knee. The residual knee extension moment and posterior force impulses were insensitive to speed increases, while these quantities increased in intact and control knees. These results suggest the intact knees of asymptomatic and relatively new amputees are not overloaded during walking compared to non-amputees. Increased knee loads may develop in response to prolonged prosthesis usage or joint disorder onset. Further study is needed to determine if the identified bilateral loading asymmetries across speeds lead to diminished knee joint health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  10. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  11. Self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Knoop, J.; van der Leeden, M.; Voorneman, R.; Gerritsen, M.; Reiding, D.; Romviel, S.; Knol, D.L.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. A cohort of 248 patients diagnosed with knee OA was examined. Self-reported knee

  12. Effect of compression therapy on knee swelling and pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Jensen, Niels J F; Andersen, Ida

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty may impair postoperative mobilisation and training, and as medical elastic compression stockings are well tolerated and effective to prevent oedema, haematoma and postoperative pain after venous surgery, we wanted to study whether this effect...... could be transferred to total knee arthroplasty surgery reducing postoperative swelling and pain and thereby facilitating mobilisation and improving patient-reported knee function. METHODS: In a randomised controlled study, 88 patients were randomised to use either a medical elastic compression stocking...... or no stocking from the first postoperative day and the following 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Outcome measures were knee, calf and ankle swelling, knee flexion, pain and patient-reported knee function. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of the swelling had occurred before application of the stocking the day...

  13. MRI of anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Mohammad; Smitaman, Edward; Lawrence, David; Moukaddam, Hicham

    2014-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is the most common knee complaint. It may be due to a variety of soft tissue or osseous abnormalities. Knowledge of the radiologic appearance of the abnormalities allows more accurate diagnosis of the cause of the pain including chondral abnormalities, patellar instability and dislocation, femoral trochlear dysplasia, abnormal patellar location, bipartite patella, various tendinopathies, bursal inflammation, traction apophysitis in pediatric and adolescent patients, and miscellaneous diseases including mediopatellar plica syndrome and Hoffa's disease. Radiographs are often obtained to exclude acute osseous abnormalities, such as fractures. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast resolution and allows for more accurate evaluation of the underlying etiology and therefore may improve treatment and possible surgical planning.

  14. Hemophilic arthropathy of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idy-Peretti, I.; LeBalch, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper classifies the subchondral cysts of the knee joint in young hemophiliacs and studies the evolution of the cyst. Both knees of 64 patients with severe hemophilia A (mean age, 16 years) were assessed with MR imaging (1.5-T Signa, General Electric). Twenty-five patients underwent MR follow-up for 1-4 years. The 258 cysts observed were classified into four types. The LL cysts were seen as areas of low (L) signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The LH cysts demonstrated a decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a high (H) signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The HH cysts showed an intermediate to high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The C cysts were complex, showing variable intensity spread out irregularly over the cyst

  15. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  16. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Corrado, L.; Monteleone, V.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  17. Imaging strategies for the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeurer, J.

    2006-01-01

    The human knee, with its complex anatomy and frequent disorders, undergoes radiologic examination more than any other joint. Imaging Strategies for the Knee organizes all of the relevant information clinicians need to help them reach a sound diagnosis, accurately and efficiently. Features include: - More than 400 illustrations that show vividly how to recognize and compare morphological details - Complete coverage of all examination techniques including MRI, ultrasound, and CT - Clinical background information for every finding - An innovative layout: three columns of text, additional information in the margins, and images provide essential information at a glance - Keywords and concise text boxes in the margins on disease, pathology, clinical manifestations, first-line examination methods, imaging requirements, and treatment options - Helpful summaries at the end of each chapter to facilitate rapid review - Comprehensive coverage of all disorders, logically grouped according to disease classification. An ideal introduction for residents, Imaging Strategies for the Knee is also a convenient, durable resource that radiologists, orthopedists, and trauma surgeons will reach for again and again in their daily practice. (orig.)

  18. [Progress on prevention for anterior knee pain after primary total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yao-Zu; Chen, Chong-Wei; Wei, Xiao-Chun

    2014-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) identified as an effective treatment for ultimate knee joint disease can effectively relieve pain, correct deformity, improve knee function and enhance the quality of life of patients. Patient satisfaction has been increasingly considered as an important factor in evaluating the success of primary TKA. Anterior knee pain that usually appears in the region of the anterior knee is a recognized complaint for primary TKA and has a strong impact on the improvement of knee function and patient satisfaction of primary TKA. Accordingly, the relief of anterior knee pain has become one of the primary goals of primary TKA. At present, soft tissue lesions around the patellar caused by patellar maltracking and the elevation of internal pressure in subchondral bone because of the high contact stress of patellofemoral joint are both considered as the mechanism of anterior knee pain. For the past few years,on increasing number of studies have focused on the prevention of anterior knee pain following primary TKA. However, none of the past treatment such as patellar resurfacing, patellar denervation without patellar resurfacing or a mobile-bearing prosthesis has a good and affirmative effect on it. The prevention and treatment of anterior knee pain following primary TKA still is a difficult solved problem. To address this problem, we need further researches about the cause of anterior knee pain, knee joint prosthesis and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint, as well as lots of randomized controlled trials.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  20. Recovery of knee mobility after a static or mobile spacer in total knee infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Hannink, G.; Mde, W. Malefijt

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the recovery of knee mobility after two-stage revision of an infected total knee arthroplasty using a static or mobile spacer. At 12 months follow-up, none of the patients had a recurrent infection of their new prosthesis. Knee flexion was lower in the static

  1. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Knee Pain in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brandon Q; Covey, Carlton J; Sineath, Marvin H

    2015-11-15

    The role of the family physician in managing knee pain is expanding as recent literature supports nonsurgical management for many patients. Effective treatment depends on the etiology of knee pain. Oral analgesics-most commonly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen-are used initially in combination with physical therapy to manage the most typical causes of chronic knee pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommends against glucosamine/chondroitin supplementation for osteoarthritis. In patients who are not candidates for surgery, opioid analgesics should be used only if conservative pharmacotherapy is ineffective. Exercise-based therapy is the foundation for treating knee osteoarthritis and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Weight loss should be encouraged for all patients with osteoarthritis and a body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2. Aside from stabilizing traumatic knee ligament and tendon tears, the effectiveness of knee braces for chronic knee pain is uncertain, and the use of braces should not replace physical therapy. Foot orthoses can be helpful for anterior knee pain. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain relief in patients with osteoarthritis. The benefit of hyaluronic acid injections is controversial, and recommendations vary; recent systematic reviews do not support a clinically significant benefit. Small studies suggest that regenerative injections can improve pain and function in patients with chronic knee tendinopathies and osteoarthritis.

  3. [Assessment of concomitant floating knees injuries severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eone, Daniel Handy; Lamah, Léopold; Bayiha, Jean Emile; Ondoa, Danielle Larissa Essomba; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Ibrahima, Farikou; Bahebeck, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Floating knee is caused by high-energy trauma, whose genesis is suggestive of extensive locoregional and general damages. Referring to multiple trauma. The aim of our study was to collect data on all concomitant floating knee injuries in our practice environment and to evaluate their severity. We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study over a period of 14 years and 9 months. Our sample consisted of 75 floating knees, the average age was 35 years. Sixty six patients had an ISS≥16 (classified as polytrauma). Head traumas, chest and abdominal injuries associated with floating knee injuries require adequate resuscitation.

  4. Knee Joint Stabilization Therapy in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Knee Instability: Subgroup Analyses in A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; van der Leeden, M.; Roorda, L.D.; Thorstensson, C.A.; van der Esch, M.; Peter, W.F.; de Rooij, M.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.; Steultjens, M.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test whether knee stabilization therapy, prior to strength/functional training, may have added value in reducing activity limitations only in patients with knee osteoarthritis who have knee instability and (i) low upper leg muscle strength, (ii) impaired knee proprioception, (iii) high

  5. Varus thrust and knee frontal plane dynamic motion in persons with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A H; Chmiel, J S; Moisio, K C; Almagor, O; Zhang, Y; Cahue, S; Sharma, L

    2013-11-01

    Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee load and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about how varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic data. We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation was captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, we used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), gait speed, and knee static alignment. 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m(2) (standard deviation (SD) 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/s, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K

    2015-01-01

    as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P 

  7. Below Knee Impact Responses using Cadaveric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Beillas, Philippe; Belwadi, Aditya; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    Knee injuries represent about 10% of all injuries suffered during car crashes. Efforts to assess the injury risk to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) have been based on a study available in the literature (Viano et al., 1978), in which only two of the five knees tested had PCL ruptures. The aims of the current study were to repeat the study with a higher number of samples, study the effects of other soft tissues on knee response, and assess the adequacy of the experimental setup for the identification of a PCL tolerance. A total of 14 knees were tested using a high-speed materials testing machine. Eight were intact knees (with the patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures), three were PCL-only knees (patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures other than the PCL removed), and the last three were PCL-only knees with the tibia protected from bending fracture. Of the eight intact knees tested, only one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had a partial articular fracture of the tibia below the plateau, and six had simple transverse fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL-only knees without tibial protection, one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had avulsion at the posterior intercondylar attachment point, and the last one had a simple oblique fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL only knees with tibia protection, two had PCL mid-substance ruptures and the third one had an avulsion at the tibial insertion site with partial articular fracture of the lateral plateau. Overall, the results of the current study were similar to those observed by Viano et al. (1978). The average displacement at failure for all PCL related injuries was 17.2+/-2.8 mm for the current study (n=6) and 16.2+/-3.9 mm for Viano et al. (1978) (n=4). This value is higher than the Injury Assessment Reference Value of 15 mm proposed by Mertz (1984) and used in various regulations. Both studies suggest that the existence of the soft tissues other

  8. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase...... agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which...... rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...

  9. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which......BACKGROUND: Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase...... rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...

  10. Rapid knee-extensions to increase quadriceps muscle activity in patients with total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which......BACKGROUND: Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase...... rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...

  11. Design improvements in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barink, M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis deals with three questions concerning the knee joint and total knee arthroplasty. 1. Are there parameters which can be changed to reduce bone resorption, caused by TKA, without affecting other relevant parameters? A debonded anterior flange of the femoral TKA component reduces bone

  12. Hyperextended Knee: Cause of Serious Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Knee and lower leg. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 24, 2015. Brooks GP, et al. Treatment of knee injuries in the young athlete. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  13. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint.

  14. Knee Braces to Prevent Injuries in Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Five physicians discuss the use of knee braces to prevent injuries in football players. Questions are raised regarding the strength and design of the braces, whether they prestress the knee in some cases, and whether they actually reduce injuries. More clinical and biomechanical research is called for. (MT)

  15. Innovations in revision total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marrigje

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is thought to be the gold standard for the surgical treatment of end-stage OA. Despite good results, a significant proportion of patients need to have their knee prosthesis replaced, and an increase

  16. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  17. Improved knee flexion following high-flexion total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of new techniques and materials in total knee arthroplasty (TKA continue to be a primary focus in orthopedic surgery. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate post TKA total range of motion (ROM among a group of patients who received a gender specific high-flexion design modification implant compared to a control group of patients who received non-gender specific implants. Methods and results The control group was comprised of 39 TKAs that were recruited pre-operatively and received the non-gender specific implant while the study group consisted of 39 TKAs who received gender specific implants. The study group yielded an improvement in mean post-operative ROM of 21° at 12 months, whereas the mean improvement in ROM among the control group was 11°. Thus, the study group had a 10° increased ROM improvement (91% over the control group (p = 0.00060. In addition, 100% of the subjects with gender specific high-flexion implants achieved greater or equal ROM post-operatively compared to 82% for the control cohort. Lastly, women who exhibited greater pre-operative ROM and lower body mass index (BMI were found to benefit the most with the gender specific prosthesis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that among subjects with a normal BMI, the gender specific high-flexion knee implant is associated with increased ROM as compared to the non-gender specific non-high-flexion implant designs.

  18. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  19. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    . DATA SOURCES: Systematic searches for benefits and harms were carried out in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2014. Only studies published in 2000 or later were included for harms. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  20. Pediatric Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aristides I; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can cause knee pain and dysfunction in children. The etiology of OCD remains unclear; theories on causes include inflammation, ischemia, ossification abnormalities, genetic factors, and repetitive microtrauma. Most OCD lesions in skeletally immature patients will heal with nonoperative treatment. The success of nonoperative treatment decreases once patients reach skeletal maturity. The goals of surgical treatment include maintenance of articular cartilage congruity, rigid fixation of unstable fragments, and repair of osteochondral defects with cells or tissues that can adequately replace lost or deficient cartilage. Unsalvageable OCD lesions can be treated with various surgical techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of radiographic projections of knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockshott, W.P.; Burrows, D.A.; Ferrier, M.; Racoveanu, N.T.

    1985-02-01

    A study to determine the routine radiography practice for the investigation of acute trauma cases and those with suspected arthritis of the knee was carried out by questionnaires sent to radiologists in 41 countries. The role of radiology in the investigation of chondromalacia patellae was also ascertained. Some of the reasons for the diversities of practice are discussed. The necessity for further views of the knee to supplement the two standard projections was assessed for various diagnostic entities. It became clear that if occult fractures were not to be missed, patients with knee effusions following acute trauma required additional views if a lesion was not shown by the anteroposterior (AP) and lateral views. In contrast, two views of the knee sufficed for examination of most entities affecting the knee.

  2. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...... Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or worse. RESULTS: At assessment A, we found tibiofemoral radiographic OA in 107 subjects' index knee (48%) of which 41 subjects (38%) had bilateral tibiofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 151 (68%) and 71 (32%). At assessment A, we found...... patellofemoral OA in 32 subjects' index knee (14%) of which 11 (34%) had bilateral patellofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 51 (23%) and 19 (37%). There was an increase of the sum of joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte grades in the tibiofemoral joint of 144 subjects' index knee...

  3. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    in participants with knee injuries and/or osteoarthritis (OA). Methodological quality was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Where possible, meta-analysis of extracted data was conducted for all studies and stratified by age and knee condition; otherwise narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: KOOS has...... adequate internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity in young and old adults with knee injuries and/or OA. The ADL subscale has better content validity for older patients and Sport/Rec for younger patients with knee injuries, while the Pain subscale is more relevant for painful......OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties...

  4. Differences in gait pattern parameters between medial and anterior knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debi, Ronen; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Debbi, Eytan M; Cohen, Marc S; Igolnikov, Ilya; Bar Ziv, Yaron; Benkovich, Vadim; Bernfeld, Benjamin; Rozen, Nimrod; Elbaz, Avi

    2012-07-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee have unique spatiotemporal gait alterations. These gait changes have not yet been differentiated according to the location of knee pain. The purpose of this study was to compare the gait patterns of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis that exhibit either anterior or medial joint pain. 240 Patients with knee osteoarthritis were evaluated at one therapy center. Patients were divided into two groups according to the location of greatest pain in their worse knee. Patients underwent a computerized spatiotemporal gait analysis. Differences in gait patterns between the two knee pain locations were also examined within each gender. Compared with patients with pain in the anterior knee compartment, those with pain in the medial knee compartment exhibited a significantly slower walking speed (Panterior knee pain. Furthermore, gender differences in gait may exist between patients with medial knee pain compared to patients with anterior knee pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tibial Tubercle in Valgus Osteoarthritic Knees Is More Laterally Positioned Than in Varus Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Terauchi, Masanori; Saito, Kenichi; Hagiwara, Keiichi; Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    The tibial tubercle (TT) is the most reliable landmark of the tibial component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. However, there is no report comparing the position of the TT between valgus and varus osteoarthritic knees. Using preoperative computed tomography, we measured the TT-posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) distance representing the degree of lateralization of the TT and the angle between Akagi's anteroposterior (AP) axis and the dorsal condylar line (DCL) of the tibia in 36 valgus and 40 varus osteoarthritic knees and compared them. The mean TT-PCL distances in valgus and varus knees were 26.1 (18.2-36.8) and 17.2 mm (10.3-22.6), respectively, with a significant difference (P 24 mm). The mean AP-DCL angles in valgus and varus knees were 103° (95.8°-114.8°) and 93.2° (85.3°-99.6°), respectively, with a significant difference (P varus knees. Also, Akagi's AP axis in valgus knees was significantly more externally rotated relative to the DCL of the tibia than in varus knees. Attention is necessary to correct rotational alignment without posterolateral overhang of the tibial component during total knee arthroplasty, particularly for valgus knees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Higher dynamic medial knee load predicts greater cartilage loss over 12 months in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Davies-Tuck, Miranda; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical factors, in particular increased medial knee joint load, are believed to be important in the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the relationship of medial knee load during walking to indices of structural disease progression, measured on MRI, in people with medial knee osteoarthritis. A longitudinal cohort design utilising a subset of participants (n=144, 72%) enrolled in a randomised controlled trial of lateral wedge insoles was employed. Medial knee load parameters including the peak knee adduction moment (KAM) and the KAM impulse were measured at baseline using three-dimensional gait analysis during walking. MRI at baseline and at 12 months was used to assess structural indices. Multiple regression with adjustment for covariates assessed the relationship between medial knee load parameters and the annual change in medial tibial cartilage volume. Binary logistic regression was used for the dichotomous variables of progression of medial tibiofemoral cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BML). A higher KAM impulse, but not peak KAM, at baseline was independently associated with greater loss of medial tibial cartilage volume over 12 months (β=29.9, 95% CI 6.3 to 53.5, p=0.01). No significant relationships were seen between medial knee load parameters and the progression of medial tibiofemoral cartilage defects or BML. This study suggests knee loading, in particular the KAM impulse, may be a risk factor for loss of medial tibial cartilage volume. As knee load is modifiable, load-modifying treatments may potentially slow disease progression.

  7. The effect of knee orthoses on gait parameters in medial knee compartment osteoarthritis: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Maryam; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Joghtaei, Mahmoud; Hutchins, Stephen W; Aboutorabi, Atefeh; Pouyan, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a musculoskeletal condition which is most prevalent in the medial compartment. This injury causes considerable pain, disability, and negative changes in kinetic and kinematic parameters. The efficiency of unloader valgus brace as a conservative treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis is not well documented. The aim of this study was to review the previous research regarding the biomechanical effects of knee valgus braces on walking in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis patients. Literature review According to the population intervention comparison outcome measure methods and based on selected keywords, 12 studies were chosen according to (met) the inclusion criteria. The results indicated that treatment with knee braces was effective in decreasing pain, improving function, ameliorating improvement in range of motion, and increasing speed of walking and step length in conjunction with a reduction in the adduction moment applied to the knee. Osteoarthritis knee braces may be considered for improvement of walking and treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Knee braces are an orthotic intervention that could potentially be significant in assisting in improving the walking parameters and treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  8. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  9. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  10. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI...... is used in clinical trials a biomechanical analysis identifying the respective contributions of the knee moments derived from the three planes is needed. Aim The purpose of this study was therefor to investigate how the frontal, sagittal and transversal moments contribute to KI, a novel biomechanical...... index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee...

  11. Association of bone scintigraphic abnormalities with knee malalignment and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; McDaniel, G; Worrell, T W; Feng, S; Vail, T P; Varju, G; Coleman, R E

    2009-11-01

    The information content of knee bone scintigraphy was evaluated, including pattern, localisation and intensity of retention relative to radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis, knee alignment and knee symptoms. A total of 308 knees (159 subjects) with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis of at least one knee was assessed by late-phase (99m)Technetium methylene disphosphonate bone scintigraph, fixed-flexion knee radiograph, full limb radiograph for knee alignment and for self-reported knee symptom severity. Generalised linear models were used to control for within-subject correlation of knee data. The compartmental localisation (medial vs lateral) and intensity of knee bone scan retention were associated with the pattern (varus vs valgus) (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of knee malalignment and localisation and severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). Bone scan agent retention in the tibiofemoral, but not patellofemoral, compartment was associated with severity of knee symptoms (p<0.001) and persisted after adjusting for radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study describing a relationship between knee malalignment, joint symptom severity and compartment-specific abnormalities by bone scintigraphy. This work demonstrates that bone scintigraphy is a sensitive and quantitative indicator of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Used selectively, bone scintigraphy is a dynamic imaging modality that holds great promise as a clinical trial screening tool and outcome measure.

  12. Chronic anterior knee pain in athletes: Common causes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior knee pain is a very common clinical presentation. In this article, the classification of anterior knee pain syndromes according to the anatomy of the knee extensor mechanism is described. The clinical diagnosis, special investigations, and principles of management of the more common causes of anterior knee pain ...

  13. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  14. Knee extension range of motion and self-report physical function in total knee arthroplasty: mediating effects of knee extensor strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pua Yong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee extensor strength and knee extension range of motion (ROM are important predictors of physical function in patients with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA. However, the relationship between the two knee measures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in knee extensor strength mediate the association between changes in knee extension ROM and self-report physical function. Methods Data from 441 patients with a TKA were collected preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. Self-report measure of physical function was assessed by the Short Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire. Knee extensor strength was measured by handheld dynamometry and knee extension ROM by goniometry. A bootstrapped cross product of coefficients approach was used to evaluate mediation effects. Results Mediation analyses, adjusted for clinicodemographic measures, revealed that the association between changes in knee extension ROM and SF-36 physical function was mediated by changes in knee extensor strength. Conclusions In patients with TKA, knee extensor strength mediated the influence of knee extension ROM on physical function. These results suggest that interventions to improve the range of knee extension may be useful in improving knee extensor performance.

  15. Clinically assessed mediolateral knee motion: impact on gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigat...... if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position....

  16. Composite artificial semi-knee joint system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, S-F; Li, D-C; Sun, Z; Zhang, T; Lu, J-X; Wang, Z

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the clinical implantation protocol of custom-made artificial semi-knee joint based on computer-aided design so as to improve the limb salvage efficiency. The custom-made artificial semi-knee joint was designed and manufactured based on rapid prototyping technology. The repeated modifications were carried out in the design and manufacture of the semi-knee joint, together with the operation protocol. Clinical trial was conducted on 2 cases of osteosarcoma, one receiving allograft prosthesis composite transplantation, and the other receiving synthetic bone graft prosthesis composite transplantation. The clinical outcomes of the 2 patients were evaluated. The custom-made artificial semi-knee joint met the clinical customization needs. In clinical trial, 18-month follow-up demonstrated the satisfactory knee joint function recovery in near future. The custom-made artificial semi-knee joint based on computer-aided design can afford satisfactory knee joint function recovery following allograft bone transplantation.

  17. Effects of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loading in obese adults with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, J; Bliddal, H; Messier, S P

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).......To determine the effect of an intensive weight loss program on knee joint loads during walking in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)....

  18. Can a finite set of knee extension in supine position be used for a knee functional examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F; Sangeux, M; Charleux, F; Ho Ba Tho, M-C; Dürselen, L

    2006-01-01

    The kinematic magnetic resonance imaging technique has been developed to provide a functional examination of the knee. Technical limitations require this examination to be performed in supine position, and the knee motion is represented by an assembly of static positions at different knee angles. However, the main knee function is to support the body weight and perform continuous motion, e.g. parallel squat. Our study quantified the knee kinematics of 20 healthy subjects in different motion conditions (finite and continuous) and in different mechanical conditions (continuous unloaded and continuous loaded). We evaluated the angular and localisation difference of a finite helical axis of the knee motion for parallel squat, continuous knee extension in supine position and the finite set of knee extension in supine position. We found large inter-individual dispersion. The majority of subjects had equivalent knee kinematics between continuous knee extension and the finite set of knee extension in supine position, but not between continuous knee extension in supine position and the parallel squat. Therefore, results from a functional examination of a finite set of knee extensions in supine position do not represent the knee motion in a parallel squat. Our results suggest that functional examination of the knee from magnetic resonance imaging do not necessarily reflect the physiological kinematics of the knee. Further investigation should focus on a new magnetic resonance imaging acquisition protocol that allows image acquisition during weight bearing or includes a special device which reproduces the loaded condition.

  19. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-02-01

    In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties.

  20. CRPS Knee: How frequently encountered in differential diagnosis of Knee pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Aakanksha; Agarwal, Anil

    2018-04-13

    We have read with great interest the paper by Catelijne M. van Bussel [1] recently published in Pain Practice. I wish to congratulate the authors for their valuable contributions. In the said article, 12 patients who had complex regional pain syndrome confined to the knee have been included. Though reports have been published involving primarily the knee after total knee arthroplasty [2,3] the incidence of CRPS knee following trauma or otherwise is not well appreciated. We would have appreciated if presence or absence of any inciting event for the development CRPS knee in these 12 patients could be mentioned, which could be helpful in a better diagnosis and management of the patients with CRPS knee. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Proprioception and Knee Arthroplasty: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodowski, Andrew J; Swigler, Colin W; Liu, Hongchao; Nord, Keith M; Toy, Patrick C; Mihalko, William M

    2016-04-01

    Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors provide neural feedback for position in space and are critical for three-dimensional interaction. Proprioception is decreased with osteoarthritis of the knees, which leads to increased risk of falling. As the prevalence of osteoarthritis increases so does the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and knowing the effect of TKA on proprioception is essential. This article reviews the literature regarding proprioception and its relationship to balance, aging, osteoarthritis, and the effect of TKA on proprioception. Knee arthroplasty involving retention of the cruciate ligaments is also reviewed, as well the evidence of proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament after TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Knee joint vibroarthrographic signal processing and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the cutting-edge technologies of knee joint vibroarthrographic signal analysis for the screening and detection of knee joint injuries. It describes a number of effective computer-aided methods for analysis of the nonlinear and nonstationary biomedical signals generated by complex physiological mechanics. This book also introduces several popular machine learning and pattern recognition algorithms for biomedical signal classifications. The book is well-suited for all researchers looking to better understand knee joint biomechanics and the advanced technology for vibration arthrometry. Dr. Yunfeng Wu is an Associate Professor at the School of Information Science and Technology, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, China.

  3. Effect of knee position on hip and knee torques during the barbell squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew C; Smith, J Chadwick; Schilling, Brian K

    2003-11-01

    Some recommendations suggest keeping the shank as vertical as possible during the barbell squat, thus keeping the knees from moving past the toes. This study examined joint kinetics occurring when forward displacement of the knees is restricted vs. when such movement is not restricted. Seven weight-trained men (mean +/- SD; age = 27.9 +/- 5.2 years) were videotaped while performing 2 variations of parallel barbell squats (barbell load = body weight). Either the knees were permitted to move anteriorly past the toes (unrestricted) or a wooden barrier prevented the knees from moving anteriorly past the toes (restricted). Differences resulted between static knee and hip torques for both types of squat as well as when both squat variations were compared with each other (p < 0.05). For the unrestricted squat, knee torque (N.m; mean +/- SD) = 150.1 +/- 50.8 and hip torque = 28.2 +/- 65.0. For the restricted squat, knee torque = 117.3 +/- 34.2 and hip torque = 302.7 +/- 71.2. Restricted squats also produced more anterior lean of the trunk and shank and a greater internal angle at the knees and ankles. The squat technique used can affect the distribution of forces between the knees and hips and on the kinematic properties of the exercise. Although restricting forward movement of the knees may minimize stress on the knees, it is likely that forces are inappropriately transferred to the hips and low-back region. Thus, appropriate joint loading during this exercise may require the knees to move slightly past the toes.

  4. Kissing knees - factors behind the attraction. Knee abduction in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Cronström, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and patellofemoral pain (PFP) are common sports-related knee injuries. Their consequences include compromised health of the effected individual and substantial financial costs for society. Increased knee abduction or a knee medial to foot position (KMFP), so called “kissing knees”, during weight-bearing activities is reported to be more common in patients with ACL injury or PFP than in non-injured individuals and is also reported to be associated with g...

  5. The Impact of Bone Deformity on Osteoarthritic Varus Knee Correctability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovigi, Andrea; Zambianchi, Francesco; Giorgini, Andrea; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Catani, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Bone deformities in the varus osteoarthritic knee may influence soft-tissue balancing and therefore knee correctability. The hypothesis of the present study was that the grade of coronal plane knee deformity may influence directly knee correctability along the entire range of motion from 0° to 90°. Tibial and femoral epiphyseal bone deformities were also analyzed to determine which kind had the greater impact on knee correctability. A coronal plane deformity radiographic assessment and an intraoperative correctability assessment using computer-assisted surgery were performed on 118 varus osteoarthritic knees undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Knees were divided into groups taking into account the kind of bone deformity (tibial, femoral, and combined). A significant inverse correlation was found between coronal plane deformity and knee correctability at every 10 degrees of flexion. Correlation was strong at 0° and progressively got weaker at further flexion angles. According to literature, knees with a varus deformity >10° were rarely correctable in full extension, but often correctable in flexion, whereas knees with varus deformity >15° showed to be almost never correctable. Combined deformity group had a significantly lower rate of correctability along the entire range of motion. The severity of varus knee malalignment always influenced knee correctability with the knee in full extension, in further flexion (20°-60°), correctability was mildly affected. Isolated tibial epiphyseal deformity and combined epiphyseal deformity have the greatest impact on knee correctability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevention and management of knee osteoarthritis and knee cartilage injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Takumi; Nakamura, Kozo; Engebretsen, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Articular cartilage defects in the knee of young or active individuals remain a problem in orthopaedic practice. These defects have limited ability to heal and may progress to osteoarthritis. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis among athletes is higher than in the non-athletic population. The clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis are joint pain, limitation of range of motion and joint stiffness. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is confirmed by the symptoms and the radiological findings (narrowing joint space, osteophyte formation and subchondral sclerosis). There is no strong correlation between symptoms and radiographic findings. The aetiology of knee osteoarthritis is multifactorial. Excessive musculoskeletal loading (at work or in sports), high body mass index, previous knee injury, female gender and muscle weakness are well-known risk factors. The high-level athlete with a major knee injury has a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis. Cartilage injuries are frequently observed in young and middle-aged active athletes. Often this injury precedes osteoarthritis. Reducing risk factors can decrease the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. The prevention of knee injury, especially anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injury in sports, is important to avoid progression of knee osteoarthritis.

  7. Total knee arthroplasty in a rheumatoid arthritic knee with large geode: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, H N; Hsu, K Y; Tan, C F; Hsueh, S; Hsu, R W

    1997-09-01

    Geodes (subchondral cysts) are a well-known manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Solitary cysts or cysts larger than 2 cm are not generally found in the knee joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of RA involving both knees with a giant geode over the right proximal tibia. Surgical treatment was performed including synovectomy, cyst enucleation and packing of autogenous bone chips followed by primary total knee arthroplasty. The postsurgical result was excellent with the knee restored to good function and complete healing of the cystic lesion.

  8. Knee orthoses for treating patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Drew, Benjamin T; Meek, Toby H; Clark, Allan B

    2015-12-08

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a painful musculoskeletal condition, which is characterised by knee pain located in the anterior aspect (front) and retropatellar region (behind) of the knee joint. Various non-operative interventions are suggested for the treatment of this condition. Knee orthoses (knee braces, sleeves, straps or bandages) are worn over the knee and are thought to help reduce knee pain. They can be used in isolation or in addition to other treatments such as exercise or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of knee orthoses (knee braces, sleeves, straps or bandages) for treating PFPS. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (11 May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015 Issue 5), MEDLINE (1946 to 8 May 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 2015 Week 18), SPORTDiscus (1985 to 11 May 2015), AMED (1985 to 8 May 2015), CINAHL (1937 to 11 May 2015), PEDro (1929 to June 2015), trial registries and conference proceedings. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials evaluating knee orthoses for treating people with PFPS. Our primary outcomes were pain and function. Two review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility, assessed study risk of bias and extracted data. We calculated mean differences (MD) or, where pooling data from different scales, standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) with 95% CIs for binary outcomes. We pooled data using the fixed-effect model. We included five trials (one of which was quasi-randomised) that reported results for 368 people who had PFPS. Participants were recruited from health clinics in three trials and were military recruits undergoing training in the other two trials. Although no trials recruited participants who were categorised as elite or professional athletes, military training

  9. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  10. Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    thromboembolic complications in particular (V); feasibility studies showing excellent outcomes following fast-track bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty (VI) and non-septic revision knee arthroplasty (VII); how acute pain relief in total hip arthroplasty is not enhanced by the use of local infiltration......Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty aims at giving the patients the best available treatment at all times, being a dynamic entity. Fast-track combines evidence-based, clinical features with organizational optimization including a revision of traditions resulting in a streamlined pathway from...... on clinical and organizational aspects of fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty (I–IX). A detailed description of the fast-track set-up and its components is provided. Major results include identification of patient characteristics to predict length of stay and satisfaction with different aspects...

  11. Imaging patellar complications after knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melloni, Pietro [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: pmelloni@cspt.es; Valls, Rafael; Veintemillas, Maite [Unitat de Imatge d' Alta Tecnologia, Centre Diagnostic, Corporacio Parc Tauli, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Sabadell (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe complications affecting the patella in patients with total or partial knee arthroplasty. We respectively analysed plain-film radiographs, as well as ultrasound images when acquired, in a consecutive series of 1272 patients. The mean interval from knee replacement to patellar complications was 5 years and 7 months (range, 5 months to 14 years). The complications described include fracture, instability, dislocation or luxation, necrosis of the patella, infection of the patella, erosion of the patella, patellar impingement on the prosthesis and patellar or quadricipital tendon tear. We discuss the pathological imaging findings in the patella and their differential diagnosis after knee arthroplasty. Patellar complications after knee arthroplasty are uncommon but often potentially serious.

  12. Knee tuberculosis masquerading as pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Meena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence, which is attributable to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and immigration from endemic areas. Tuberculous arthritis is difficult to diagnose early because of its atypical insidious clinical manifestations and nonspecific imaging findings. TB is also known as the ′great mimicker′. Specifically, monoarticular tuberculosis of the knee may mimic pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS. The present report describes a young patient with tuberculous arthritis of knee joint. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate management was delayed due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, such as, hemosiderin deposits and a nodular mass around the knee joint, suggestive of a diffuse type of PVNS. Our findings suggest that the first step in the diagnosis of tuberculous knee arthritis is to have a high index of suspicion.

  13. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundu Z

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods : 22 male patients (age range 20-45 years with posttraumatic knee stiffness following distal femoral fractures underwent Thompson′s quadricepsplasty where knee flexion range was less than 45°. The index injury in these patients was treated with plaster cast (n=5, plates (n=3, intramedullary nailing (n=3 and external fixator for open fractures (n=9. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty was performed in all the patients using anterior approach, with incision extending from upper thigh to tibial tubercle. Release of rectus femoris from underlying vastus intermedius and release of intraarticular adhesions were performed. After surgery the patients needed parentral analgesia for three days and then oral analgesics for three weeks. Active assisted knee mobilization exercises were started on the first post-operative day. Continous passive motion machine was used from the same day. Supervised physiotherapy was continued in hospital for six weeks followed by intensive knee flexion and extension exercise including cycling at home for atleast another six months. Results : Out of 22 patients, 20 had excellent to good results and two patients had poor results using criteria devised by Judet. One poor result was due to peroperative fracture of patella which was then internally fixed and hence the flexion of knee could not be started immediately. There was peroperative avulsion of tibial tuberosity in another patient who finally gained less than 50° knee flexion and hence a poor result. Conclusion : Thompsons quadricepsplasty followed by a strict and rigourous

  14. MRI EVALUATION OF SPORTS RELATED KNEE INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Basu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To investigate the accuracy of MRI in evaluation of sports related knee injuries. MATERIALS AND METHODS From June 2015 to 1 st week of July 2016. Thirty patients referred for sports related knee pain have been included in this study. Patients were subjected to a dedicated MR knee study (GE HD XT 1.5T MR System and correlated knee arthroscopy and surgery. RESULTS The study included Thirty patients complaining of sports related knee pain, only 5 patients (16.67 % were with normal MRI findings and 25 patients (83.33% were with abnormal MRI findings. Among the 25 patients who had injuries of their knees, 15 patients (60% had ACL injuries, 6 patients (24% had PCL injuries, 10 patients (40% had meniscal injuries, 8 patients (32% had collateral ligament injuries, 5 patients (20% had bone injuries and 2 patients (8% had muscular injuries. Only 5 patients (20% were represented with isolated injury and 20 patients (80% were represented with combined injuries. In correlation with arthroscopies and surgeries, morphological analysis was true-positive in 23 (92% patients of the 25 injured patients, and true-negative in 1 (60% patient of the 2 normal patients. Morphological analysis revealed overall 92% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Regarding the 15 patients who had ACL injuries, 13 patients (86.6% were true-positive and 8 patients (80% of the 10 patients who had meniscal injuries were true-positive. CONCLUSION MRI represents the optimal imaging modalities in the evaluation of the sports related knee injuries, which has been shown to be an accurate and non-invasive method of diagnosing ligament, meniscal, cartilage and muscular knee injuries.

  15. Stiffness Analysis of Above Knee Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ege, Mücahit; Küçük, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    While a healthy human walks, his or her legs mutually perform good repeatabilitywith high accuracy. This provides an esthetical movement and balance. Peoplewith above knee prosthesis want to perform walking as esthetical as a healthyhuman. Therefore, to achieve a healthy walking, the above knee prosthesis mustprovide a good stiffness performance. Especially stiffness values are requiredwhen adding a second axis movement to the ankle for eversion and inversion. Inthis paper, stiffness analysis...

  16. Synovial Hemangioma in the Knee: MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial hemangiomas are rare benign tumors of vascular origin. A 23-year-old boy presented with knee pain and swelling. The boy had developed symptoms 18-months earlier. He was diagnosed with synovial hemangioma based on magnetic resonnance imaging examination and histopathologic findings of the arthroscopic biopsy tissue. We present the magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic findings of synovial hemangioma of the knee.

  17. Constraint choice in revision knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasso, Michele; Beaufils, Philippe; Schiavone Panni, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Along with the increase in primary total knee arthroplasty, there has been an increase in the number of revisions. The aim of this study was to propose a selection algorithm for the knee revision constraint according to the state of ligaments and to the bone defects Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute Classification [AORI] classification. The hypothesis was that this algorithm would facilitate the appropriate choice of prosthesis constraint, thus providing stable components and a good long-term survivorship of the knee revisions. Sixty consecutive revision knee arthroplasties in 57 patients were prospectively evaluated. Prostheses implanted at revision included postero-stabilised, condylar constrained and rotating hinged, relative to the state of the ligaments and of the bone loss around the knee. The median follow-up was nine years (range, 4-12). The median IKS knee and function scores and HSS score were 41 (15-62), 21.5 (12-43) and 34 (23-65) points, respectively, before the operation, and 81 (48-97), 79 (56-92) and 83.5 (62-98) points (p < 0.001) at the latest follow-up evaluation. The median ROM increased from 74° (29-110°) preoperatively to 121° (98-132°) (p < 0.01) at the final follow-up. Re-revision was necessary in five (8.3%) patients. A selection algorithm for the revision implant constraint based on the state of ligaments and the bone loss AORI classification could provide stable knee reconstructions and long-term success of knee revisions.

  18. Overuse Knee Injuries in Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S J

    1991-12-01

    In brief Because of their skeletal immaturity, children and adolescents are subject to a somewhat different set of overuse knee injuries than are adults. Described here are the diagnosis and treatment for the most common growth-related causes of knee pain in active young people: Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease, osteochondritis dissecans, bipartite patella, medial plica syndrome, and discoid meniscus. In most cases these conditions respond to conservative treatment.

  19. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF KNEE: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran; Shobha; Gopinath; Manjunath; Paramanand S

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans refers to a focal area of subchondral bone that undergoes necrosis with or without detachment due to lack of vascularity. Osteochondritis dissecans is most common cause of loose bodies in knee joint and the symptoms vary from continuous dull aching pain to locking of the joint. We present a case of Osteochondritis dissecans of knee in a female adult patient. She underwent an arthrotomy for removal of the fairly large loose fragment ever reported in ...

  20. The effect of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training in the ACL-injured knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Massimo G; Morrissey, Matthew C; Milligan, Peter; Clinton, Melissa; Amis, Andrew A

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of different loads of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training on anterior knee laxity and function in the ACL-injured (ACLI) knee. Fifty-eight ACLI subjects were randomised to one of three (12-week duration) training groups. The STAND group trained according to a standardised rehabilitation protocol. Subjects in the LOW and HIGH group trained as did the STAND group but with the addition of seated knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20 repetition maximum (RM) and 20 sets of 2RM, respectively. Anterior knee laxity and measurements of physical and subjective function were performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Thirty-six subjects were tested at both baseline and 12 weeks (STAND n = 13, LOW n = 11, HIGH n = 12). The LOW group demonstrated a reduction in 133 N anterior knee laxity between baseline and 12 weeks testing when compared to the HIGH and the STAND groups (p = 0.009). Specifically, the trained-untrained knee laxity decreased an average of approximately 5 mm in the LOW group while remaining the same in the other two groups. Twelve weeks of knee extensor open kinetic chain resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20RM led to a reduction in anterior knee laxity in the ACLI knee. This reduction in laxity does not appear to offer any significant short-term functional advantages when compared to a standard rehabilitation protocol. These results indicate that knee laxity can be decreased with resistance training of the thigh muscles. Randomised controlled trial, Level II.

  1. Focal knee lesions in knee pairs of asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects with OA risk factors—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Renu, E-mail: renu.chundru@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thbaum@gmx.de [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nardo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.nardo@ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Nevitt, Michael C., E-mail: MNevitt@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Lynch, John, E-mail: JLynch@psg.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); McCulloch, Charles E., E-mail: CMcCulloch@epi.ucsf.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Link, Thomas M., E-mail: tmlink@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Suite 350, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Objective: To better understand the relationship between knee pain and bilateral knee lesions, we compared focal knee lesions in knee pairs of subjects with no, unilateral, and bilateral knee pain, and risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no radiographic knee OA. Materials and methods: We examined both knees of 120 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. We randomly selected 60 subjects aged 45–55 years with OA risk factors, no knee pain (WOMAC pain score = 0) and no radiographic OA (KL-score ≤1) in both knees. We also selected two comparison groups with OA risk factors and no radiographic OA in both knees, but with knee pain (WOMAC pain score ≥5): 30 subjects with right only knee pain and 30 subjects with bilateral knee pain. All subjects underwent 3T MRI of both knees and focal knee lesions were assessed. Results: Statistically significant associations between prevalence of focal lesions in the right and left knee with odds ratios up to 13.5 were found in all three subject groups. Focal knee lesions were generally not associated with pain in analyses comparing knee pairs of subjects with unilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). The prevalence and severity of focal knee lesions were not significantly different in knee pairs of subjects with no knee pain and those with bilateral knee pain (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Focal knee lesions in the right and left knee of subjects with OA risk factors were positively associated with each other independent of knee pain status, and were not statistically significant different between knees in subjects with unilateral knee pain.

  2. The association between submaximal quadriceps force steadiness and the knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Langberg, Henning; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    , and knee pain was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain subscale and a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Regression analyses showed that quadriceps force steadiness did not predict the peak knee adduction moment (adjusted R2 = 0.05, P = .41). Inclusion of covariates did......STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between quadriceps force steadiness and knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that quadriceps force steadiness is impaired in patients with knee...... OA. Furthermore, patients with knee OA, compared to healthy controls, have also demonstrated a significantly higher external knee adduction moment during walking. However, no studies have examined the relationship between quadriceps force steadiness and the peak knee adduction moment during walking...

  3. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbrands, T. A.; Pisters, M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/317999303; Theeven, P. J R; Verschueren, S.; Vanwanseele, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics.

  4. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Pisters; Drs. Ing. Tim Gerbrands; B. Vanwanseele; P.J.R. Theeven; S. Verschueren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip

  5. Opinions among Danish knee surgeons about indications to perform total knee replacement showed considerable variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Schrøder, Henrik; Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, the incidence of primary total knee replacement (TKA) surgery in Denmark has approximately doubled. This increase could be due to weakened indications to perform TKA surgery. We aimed to investigate variation in opinions about indications to perform TKA among Danish knee...

  6. Correlation between subcutaneous knee fat thickness and chondromalacia patellae on magnetic resonance imaging of the knee.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-08-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a common cause of anterior knee pain in young patients and can be detected noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the correlation between subcutaneous fat thickness around the knee joint on axial MRIs as a surrogate marker of obesity, with the presence or absence of chondromalacia patellae.

  7. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Endo, H.; Ikeda, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  8. Lateral trunk motion and knee pain in osteoarthritis of the knee: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Harlaar, J.; van den Noort, J.C.; Knol, D.L.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee may change their gait in an attempt to reduce loading of the affected knee, thereby reducing pain. Especially changes in lateral trunk motion may be potentially effective, since these will affect the position of the centre of mass relative to the

  9. Knee awareness and functionality after simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latifi, Roshan; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate knee awareness and functional outcomes in patients treated with simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Through a database search, we identified 210 patients who had undergone unilateral TKA (UTKA) and 65 patients who had undergone simultan...

  10. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  11. [Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty : Causes, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, R; Rath, B; Springorum, H-R; Lüring, C; Tingart, M

    2016-05-01

    Anterior knee pain is one of the most common complications after total knee arthroplasty. An incidence of up to 30 % has been reported in peer-reviewed studies. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature and to identify determinants that have been analyzed with regard to anterior knee pain. Patient- and knee-specific characteristics, prosthetic designs and operative techniques are addressed as well as functional and neurologic determinants. Instability, increased contact pressure in the patellofemoral joint and patella maltracking due to malrotation of components, offset errors, ligament insufficiencies or patella baja are mechanical reasons for anterior knee pain. Functional causes include pathologic gait patterns, quadriceps imbalance and dynamic valgus. They have to be differentiated from infectious and inflammatory causes as well as soft tissue impingement, arthrofibrosis and neurologic diseases. A differentiated treatment algorithm is recommended. Often conservative treatment options exist, however, particularly with most mechanical causes revision surgery is necessary.

  12. Knee extensor strength and risk of structural, symptomatic and functional decline in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Ruhdorfer, Anja; Juhl, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -analysis revealed that lower knee extensor strength was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic (WOMAC-Pain: odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.67) and functional decline (WOMAC-Function: OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.00, 1.89; chair-stand task: OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.03, 1.04), but not increased risk......OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor strength and the risk of structural, symptomatic, or functional deterioration in individuals with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). METHODS: We systematically identified and methodologically...... appraised all longitudinal studies (≥1-year follow-up) reporting an association between knee extensor strength and structural (tibiofemoral, patellofemoral), symptomatic (self-reported, knee replacement), or functional (subjective, objective) decline in individuals with or at risk of radiographic...

  13. Socioeconomic inequalities in knee pain, knee osteoarthritis, and health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine socioeconomic inequalities in frequent knee pain (FKP), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and associated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Sweden. Method: In 2007 a postal questionnaire about knee pain was sent to a random sample of 10 000 residents of Malmö, Sweden (7402...... individuals responded). Subjects reporting pain with duration ≥ 4 weeks in one or both knees in the past 12 months were classified as having FKP. A random sample of 1527 subjects with and without FKP attended a clinical and radiographic knee examination and responded to generic and disease-specific HRQo......L questionnaires. We used the individuals’ level of education and occupation as socioeconomic status (SES) measures, and we calculated the relative index of inequality (RII) using Poisson regression with robust standard errors adjusted for age and gender. We applied weighting to account for a possible selection...

  14. The effect of knee brace and knee sleeve on the proprioception of the knee in young non-professional healthy sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, G; Herten, A; Kofler, P; Hasler, M; Nachbauer, W

    2013-12-01

    Proprioception has been defined as the capacity to feel the position of a joint in space as sensed by the central nervous system. Prophylactic knee braces are supposed to help in knee injury prevention not just with a mechanical support of the joint but also improving proprioception. The main aim of this study was to determine the effects of a knee brace and a knee sleeve on knee proprioception. The secondary aim was to determine if different starting angles of the knee and different movement directions influence knee proprioception. We tested a group of twenty healthy male sport students without knee injuries. They were tested with the brace, with the sleeve and without support. The threshold of detection of passive knee movement with a starting knee angle of 30° and 60°, both in flexion and extension was determined. We did not find any statistically significant change in the threshold of detection of passive knee movement wearing the brace or the sleeve compared to the unsupported condition (p=0.462, α=0.05). We found a significantly lower proprioceptive sensitivity starting at the more flexed knee angle (p=0.005, α=0.05) and moving in extension than in the other test situations (p=0.001, α=0.05). Movement direction and starting position appear to influence the threshold of detection of passive knee movement. The results of this study also suggest that knee supports do not influence either positively or negatively knee proprioception of uninjured active subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Autograft reconstructions for bone defects in primary total knee replacement in severe varus knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatinder Kharbanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large posteromedial defects encountered in severe varus knees during primary total knee arthroplasty can be treated by cementoplasty, structural bone grafts or metallic wedges. The option is selected depending upon the size of the defect. We studied the outcome of autograft (structural and impaction bone grafting reconstruction of medial tibial bone defects encountered during primary total knee replacement in severe varus knees. Materials and Methods: Out of 675 primary varus knees operated, bone defects in proximal tibia were encountered in 54 knees. Posteromedial defects involving 25-40% of the tibial condyle cut surface and measuring more than 5 mm in depth were grafted using a structural graft obtained from cut distal femur or proximal tibia in 48 knees. For larger, peripheral uncontained vertical defects in six cases, measuring >25 mm in depth and involving >40% cut surface of proximal tibial condyle, impaction bone grafting with a mesh support was used. Results: Bone grafts incorporated in 54 knees in 6 months. There was no graft collapse or stress fractures, loosening or nonunion. The average followup period was 7.8 years (range 5-10 years. We observed an average postoperative increase in the Knee Society Score from 40 to 90 points. There was improvement in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scores in terms of pain, stiffness and physical function during activities of daily living. Conclusion: Bone grafting for defects in primary total knee is justified as it is biological, available then and is cost effective besides preserving bone stock for future revisions. Structural grafts should be used in defects >5 mm deep and involving 25-40% of the cut proximal tibial condyle surface. For larger peripheral vertical defects, impaction bone grafting contained in a mesh should be done.

  16. Association of frontal plane knee alignment with foot posture in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Hiroshi; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kaneda, Eishi; Ohi, Kazuko; Abe, Kaoru

    2017-06-07

    To examine the association of radiographic frontal plane knee alignment with three-dimensional foot posture in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Participants in orthopedic clinics with Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade ≥1 (88 patients and 88 knees; age, 61-91 years; 65.9% female) were enrolled. An anteroposterior radiographic view was used to assess the anatomical axis angle (AAA) after subtracting a sex-specific correction factor. The three-dimensional foot posture was also evaluated. Multiple regression analyses showed that increased corrected AAA (i.e., valgus direction) was independently associated with a decrease in the hallux valgus angle (regression coefficient: -0.40 per degree, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.72, -0.09; P = 0.013) and increase in the pronation angle of the calcaneus relative to floor (regression coefficient: 0.33 per degree, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.56; P = 0.005) adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. The relationship between the corrected AAA and hallux valgus angle strengthened (regression coefficient: -0.60 per degree, 95% CI: -1.08, -0.13; P = 0.014) in varus-aligned knees examined separately (63 knees). The other foot postures (navicular height, navicular height/foot length, and rearfoot angle) were not significantly associated with corrected AAA. Radiographic frontal plane knee alignment was associated with hallux valgus angle and calcaneus angle relative to the floor in patients with medial knee OA, particularly in varus-aligned knees. These results indicate a connection between altered frontal knee alignment and foot posture, which may be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of altered foot posture observed in patients with knee OA.

  17. Nocturnal knee pain increases with the severity of knee osteoarthritis, disturbing patient sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eiji; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Maeda, Shugo; Inoue, Ryo; Chiba, Daisuke; Okubo, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Sleep disturbances frequently accompany chronic pain from osteoarthritis (OA). Effective management of sleep disturbances may require successful treatment of chronic pain, a key factor in the clinical evaluation of knee OA. However, the relationship between the severity of knee OA and sleep quality is unclear. Our purpose was to correlate the prevalence of nocturnal knee pain with different OA severity levels and to determine its influence on sleep quality. Subjects included 1,214 local volunteers with mean ± SD age 58.1 ± 13.0 years. The existence and severity of knee OA were determined by the Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade, and joint space widths were measured. The presence of nocturnal knee pain and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) were assessed by self-completed questionnaires. Sleep quality was evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Knee-related factors affecting sleep quality were detected using statistical methods. The prevalence of nocturnal knee pain was 3.6%, 6.9%, 19.4%, 32.7%, and 75.0% in K/L grades 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Also, prevalence significantly increased with OA severity (P Sleep problems also increased with K/L grade (P = 0.038), and KOOS quality of life (QOL) was significantly lower in those with OA and sleep problems. Logistic regression showed that sleep problems were related to joint space narrowing (P = 0.016) and nocturnal knee pain (P = 0.039). Severe OA also disturbed onset and maintenance of sleep. The prevalence of nocturnal knee pain and sleep problems increased with the severity of OA, impacting QOL. These results suggest the necessity of appropriate nocturnal pain control. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Cartilage Thickening in Early Radiographic Human Knee Osteoarthritis –Within-Person, Between-Knee Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Buck, Robert; Wirth, Wolfgang; Roemer, Frank; Duryea, Jeff; Nevitt, Michael; Eckstein, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the presence of definite osteophytes (in absence of joint space narrowing [JSN]) by radiograph is associated with (subregional) increases in cartilage thickness, in a within-person, between-knee cross-sectional comparison of participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Based on previous results, external medial (ecMF) and external lateral weight-bearing femoral (ecLF) subregions were selected as primary endpoints. Methods Both knees of 61 (of 4798) OAI participants displayed definite tibial or femoral marginal osteophytes and no JSN in one knee, and no signs of radiographic OA in the contra-lateral knee; this being confirmed by an expert central reader. In these participants, cartilage thickness was measured in 16 femorotibial subregions of each knee, based on sagittal DESSwe magnetic resonance images. Location-specific joint space width from fixed flexion radiographs was determined using dedicated software. Location-specific associations of osteophytes with cartilage thickness were evaluated using paired t-tests and mixed effect models. Results Of the 61 participants, 48% had only medial, 36% only lateral, and 16% bi-compartmental osteophytes. Osteophyte knees had significantly thicker cartilage than contra-lateral non-osteophyte knees in the ecMF (+71±223μm, equivalent to +5.5%, p=0.015) and ecLF (+64±195μm, +4.1%, p=0.013). No significant differences between knees were noted in other subregions, nor in joint space width. Cartilage thickness in ecMF and ecLF was significantly associated with tibial osteophytes in the same (medial or lateral) compartment (p=0.003). Conclusion Knees with early radiographic OA display thicker cartilage than (contra-lateral) knees without radiographic findings of OA, specifically in the external femoral subregions of compartments with marginal osteophytes. PMID:22556039

  19. A prospective study on knee pain and its risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, H; Viikari-Juntura, E; Martikainen, R; Riihimäki, H

    2002-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of work-related and individual factors as well as physical activity and sports on the incidence and persistence of knee pain among a working population. Employees of a large Finnish forestry company replied to a questionnaire (a modified version of the Nordic Questionnaire) on musculoskeletal pain and its possible risk factors at the baseline of this study. A cohort of 2122 workers free of knee pain and another cohort of 333 workers with severe knee pain were followed up for one year. The effects of the risk factors on the incidence and persistence of knee pain were studied using multivariable logistic regression models. A total of 214 (10%) workers developed knee pain during the follow-up. Significant predictors of incident knee pain in the multivariable model were higher age, overweight, smoking, and previous knee injuries. Also, working with the trunk forward flexed in kneeling or standing position and physically strenuous work were non-significant predictors of incident knee pain. Of those 333 workers with severe knee pain at baseline, 220 (66%) still reported severe knee pain after one year. Higher age and job dissatisfaction increased the risk of persistent symptoms. General physical exercise and different sports activities did not predict the incidence or persistence of knee pain. In this large prospective study, the risk factors for self-reported knee pain seemed to be highly similar to the risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) reported in other papers. Age, previous knee injuries, overweight, and knee-straining work were those risk factors, which contributed to the incidence of knee pain. Psychosocial elements of work were more involved in the persistence of the symptoms in the knee.

  20. Varus thrust in women with early medial knee osteoarthritis and its relation with the external knee adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Armaghan; van Dieen, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Baert, Isabel Ac; Faber, Gert S; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Sabine Mp

    2016-11-01

    Varus thrust, defined as an abrupt increase of the knee varus angle during weight-bearing in gait, has been shown to be present in patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis and is considered to be one of the risk factors for progression of symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis. We evaluated the presence and magnitude of varus thrust and its relation with the Knee Adduction Moment in women with early medial knee osteoarthritis, and compared it to that in a group of controls and in a group of subjects with established medial knee osteoarthritis. Twenty-seven women with early medial knee osteoarthritis, 20 women with established medial knee osteoarthritis and 24 asymptomatic controls were evaluated. Varus thrust was estimated as an increase of the knee varus angle during the weight-bearing phase of gait at self-selected speed, assessed by 3D motion analysis. Varus thrust was significantly higher in both early and established osteoarthritis groups compared to the control group (Pvarus thrust was significantly correlated with the second peak knee adduction moment. Higher varus thrust was found both in early and established stages of knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that problems with dynamic stabilization of the knee are present early in the development of knee osteoarthritis. This highlights the necessity of considering dynamic alignment in rehabilitation already in the early stages of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laterality of radiographic osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Daigo; Ikeuchi, Kazuma; Kojima, Toshihisa; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Amano, Takafumi; Tsuboi, Masaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2017-05-01

    There are few reports of the laterality in radiological knee osteoarthritis (ROA). This study aimed to evaluate laterality in terms of the minimum joint space width (mJSW) and osteophyte areas (OFs) in a cross-sectorial general population screen and elucidate the association between laterality and risk of osteoarthritis. We enrolled 330 participants (mean age 64.6 years) and examined the presence of ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≧ 2) laterality in terms of the mJSW and OF on the medial tibia using auto-measuring software. Moreover, we examined the association between laterality and leg dominance. The right and left medial mJSWs were 4.02 ± 0.98 mm and 4.05 ± 1.01 mm, respectively, showing no laterality; the laterals were also similar. The participants who had osteophytes ≥1 mm 2 in the right, left, and bilateral knees were 15, 37, and 57 respectively, with osteophytes being significantly more common in the left knee. The OF was significantly larger in the left knee. Conversely, the medial and lateral mJSWs and OF did not differ according to leg dominance. The prevalence of ROA was higher and the OF was more pronounced in the left knee. However, the mJSW showed no laterality. Additionally, the mJSW and OF showed no differences according to leg dominance.

  2. [Guidelines for wise utilization of knee imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Eshed, Iris; Freedman, Yehuda; Beer, Yiftah; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kots, Yavvgeni; Adar, Eliyahu; Mann, Gideon

    2012-02-01

    The knee is a complex structure afflicted with diverse pathologies. Correct management of knee complaints demands wise utilization of imaging modalities, considering their accuracy in the specific clinical situation, the patient's safety and availability and financial issues. Some of these considerations are universal, while others are local, depending on medical and insurance systems. There is controversy and unclearness regarding the best imaging modality in different clinical situations. To develop clinical guidelines for utilizing knee imaging. Leading physicians in specialties associated with knee disease and imaging were invited to participate in a panel on the guidelines. Controversies were settled in the main panel or in sub-panels. The panel agreed on the principles in choosing from the various modalities, primarily medical accuracy, followed by patient safety, availability and cost. There was agreement that the physician is responsible to choose the most appropriate diagnostic tool, consulting, when necessary, on the advantages, limitations and risks of the various imaging modalities. A comprehensive table was compiled with the importance of the different imaging modalities in various clinical situations. For the first time, Israeli guidelines on wise utilization of knee imaging are presented. They take into consideration the clinical situations and also availability and financial issues specific to Israel. These guidelines will serve physicians of several disciplines and medical insurers to improve patient management efficiently.

  3. Selected isokinetic tests in knee injury prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pilis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ensuing from isokinetic measurements, the conventional Hcon/Qcon ratio of muscle balance is used as an index for comparing proper relations between the values of strength of knee flexors and extensor muscle. Its abnormal values might indicate pathology of the musculotendinous complex. The aim of the study was to present the possibility of using this ratio as one of the objective identifiers enabling the assessment of knee injury risk in sports. All participants (n=48 were divided into 3 groups: group A (n=16, healthy competitors, group B (n=16, athletes with minor injuries, group C (n=16, competitors with serious injuries, depending on the degree of knee injury. All subjects performed an isokinetic test for knee extensors and flexors at angular velocities of 60°/s and 120°/s. Average peak torque (APT value of knee flexors and extensors, and the value of Hcon/Qcon ratio was analyzed. Both values were calculated in relation to body mass (Nm/kg. Bilateral comparison of isokinetic test parameters confirmed the decrease of quadriceps muscle strength values for the injured extremity in groups B and C. Statistically significant difference was noted for Hcon/Qcon ratio between group A and C, as well as B and C. Hence, the value of conventional Hcon/Qcon ratio can be used for the prevention of sports related injuries.

  4. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Safe Care to Knee Injuries in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Águila Tejeda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the guarantee of sporting success lies in the appropriate functioning of the musculoskeletal system, given that its vulnerability hinders the performance of each athlete. Being timely is critical to provide safe care to the affections of knee; late diagnosis in this system may lead to the development of complications and hinder sport practice. Objective: to characterize knee injuries in athletes of the sport system in the province of Cienfuegos.Methods: an observational, quantitative and qualitative, longitudinal and retrospective study was conducted. It included 104 athletes who attended the Traumatology Consultation from 2009 to 2011, presenting different types of knee injuries in various stages of training. Variables such as age, sex, sport, site of injury, stage of training, kilocalories consumed, type of training, quality of equipment and diagnosis were analyzed. The procedure used consists of a comprehensive review of case notes and medical records of all patients that attended consultation during the period analyzed, from which the necessary data was collected. Interviews with coaches and technical staff were carried out as well. Results: knee injuries occur in all ages of athletes, with a slight predominance of males. Highest frequencies are those of the ligament and meniscus, with the highest incidence in athletics, volleyball and judo. Conservative treatment predominated.Conclusions: knee injuries require a timely treatment in order to achieve athlete's success and safety.

  6. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  7. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  8. Prevalence of knee instability in relation to sports activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Hansen, Thorsten Ingemann

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to estimate the prevalence of knee instability among active athletes and to investigate potential associations to type, amount and duration of sports participation. Based on a questionnaire, 339 athletes provided information about different features of occupation, sports activity...... and knee instability. The 12-month period prevalence of knee instability and constant or recurrent knee instability, and absence from sport and absence from work due to knee instability, was 22%, 14%, 5% and 1%, respectively. Knee instability as such, and constant or recurrent knee instability were found...... to be positively associated with female gender and different features of occupational work. In conclusion, knee instability is a commonly reported phenomenon among active athletes. It was found to be independent of the type and the amount of sports activity but highly dependent on female gender, type and amount...

  9. The Optimal Analgesic Block for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Thomas Fichtner; Moriggl, Bernhard; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve block for total knee arthroplasty is ideally motor sparing while providing effective postoperative analgesia. To achieve these goals, one must understand surgical dissection techniques, distribution of nociceptive generators, sensory innervation of the knee, and nerve topography...

  10. Rivaroxaban to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism after Hip or Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent Pulmonary Embolism After Hip or Knee Replacement Deborah Cios , John Fanikos Download PDF https://doi. ... Rivaroxaban to Prevent Clots After Hip or Knee Replacement Many different medications are used to prevent blood ...

  11. Taping reduces pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, E. van den

    2004-01-01

    Question: Is taping of the knee effective in improving pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee? Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University and private practices in Melbourne, Australia. Patients: Volunteers who responded to advertisements in local newspapers.

  12. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrands, T A; Pisters, M F; Theeven, P J R; Verschueren, S; Vanwanseele, B

    2017-01-01

    To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics. Thirty patients with symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Participants received verbal instructions on two gait strategies (Trunk Lean and Medial Thrust) in randomized order after comfortable walking was recorded. The peaks and impulse of the EKAM and strategy-specific kinematic and kinetic variables were calculated for all conditions. Early stance EKAM peak was significantly reduced during Medial Thrust (-29%). During Trunk Lean, early and late stance EKAM peak and EKAM impulse reduced significantly (38%, 21% and -25%, respectively). In 79% of the subjects, the Trunk Lean condition was significantly more effective in reducing EKAM peak than Medial Thrust. Peak ankle dorsi and plantar flexion, knee flexion and hip extension and adduction moments were not significantly increased. Medial Thrust and Trunk Lean reduced the EKAM during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Individual selection of the most effective gait modification strategy seems vital to optimally reduce dynamic knee loading during gait. No detrimental effects on external ankle and hip moments or knee flexion moments were found for these conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic knee alignment and collateral knee laxity and its variations in normal humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal eDeep

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of normal, arthritic and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non weight bearing position to standing weight bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees.

  14. Closed Reduction of ?Irreducible? Posterolateral Knee Dislocation - A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tateda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Umehara, Jutaro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Posterolateral rotary knee dislocation is a rare orthopedic injury that is considered to be irreducible by closed reduction because of soft tissue incarceration. Here, we present a case of posterolateral rotary knee dislocation, which was reduced by closed manipulation. Case report: The patientwas a 33-year-old man who sustained a twisting injury to his right knee that was diagnosed as posterolateral rotary knee dislocation by plain radiographs and the characteristic physical fi...

  15. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    OpenAIRE

    Sinsurin; Vachalathiti; Jalayondeja; Limroongreungrat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direct...

  16. The use of adaptive equipment following total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    McNaught, Jamie; Paul, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluates the need for adaptive equipment following total knee replacement. There are no recent studies to guide occupational therapists in the optimum time adaptive equipment is required following total knee replacement.\\ud \\ud Method: A non-experimental, concurrent mixed methods approach was used. The study population was patients attending for total knee replacement at a large general hospital. Outcome measures were the Oxford Knee Score, the United Kingdom Functio...

  17. Analysis of the factors that correlate with increased knee adduction moment during gait in the early postoperative period following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Takeo; Niki, Yasuo; Harato, Kengo; Mochizuki, Takeshi; Kiriyama, Yoshimori

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of dynamic knee loading during gait is essential to prevent mechanical failures following total knee arthroplasty. External knee adduction moment during gait is the primary factor producing medial joint reaction force, and an increase in the moment is directly related to an increase in the medial compartment load on the knee. Knee adduction moment during gait in 39 knees of 32 female patients following a posterior stabilized knee replacement with a single surgeon was evaluated at 1.3months following surgery. A cut-off moment was determined as mean+1 standard deviation (SD) of the moment from 10 healthy subjects, and patients' knees were divided into high- and normal-moment groups. Significant differences in clinical assessments and gait parameters between the two groups were assessed. Based on the cut-off moment, 23 knees were grouped into normal knees and 16 knees were grouped into high-moment knees. High-moment knees showed identical femorotibial angles and knee society scores but had greater toe-out angles and medially directed ground reaction forces compared to normal-moment knees. High-moment knees showed strong correlations between peak moment and knee adduction angle, and frontal plain moment arm. The clinical significance of a high knee adduction moment following total knee arthroplasty remains unclear, but dynamic frontal alignment during gait is one of the key factors for residual high-moment knees following surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in hindfoot alignment after total knee arthroplasty in knee osteoarthritic patients with varus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woo-Shin; Cho, Hun-Sik; Byun, Seong-Eun

    2017-11-01

    Hindfoot alignment can affect the weight-bearing kinematics of the knee joint in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study evaluated the change in hindfoot alignment after TKA by prospectively analysing the correlation between the knee joint and the hindfoot deformity, the post-operative improvement in the hindfoot deformity, and the long-term post-operative changes in hindfoot alignment. This study included 195 knees from 117 patients with osteoarthritis who underwent TKA between 2012 and 2013. The mechanical alignment angle of the knee joint and the hindfoot alignment angle were measured preoperatively and 6 weeks, 1, and 2 years post-operatively. The patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of the preoperative knee joint deformity: varus (group 1, N = 81) and ≥10° varus (group 2, N = 114). The preoperative and post-operative radiologic parameters of the axis of the knee joint and hindfoot were evaluated, and the results were compared. A Spearman correlation analysis was used to assess the differences in both the mechanical alignment and the hindfoot alignment pre- and post-operatively. After TKA, the hindfoot valgus deformity improved from 5.2° (±3.8) valgus to 2.1° (±3.9) valgus. At 6 weeks post-operatively, the hindfoot alignment angle was 1.4° (±3.5) valgus and 2.5° (±4.1) valgus in group 1 and group 2, respectively; the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Hindfoot alignment showed greater valgus with increasing varus of the mechanical alignment of the knee joint preoperatively (-0.484, p varus knee joint deformity does not require preoperative correction. In patients with a residual hindfoot deformity and pain 6 weeks after TKA, active treatment should be considered because no further improvement can be expected. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  19. Reproducibility of the measurements of knee joint proprioception in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and healthy subject

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, E.; van der Esch, M.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Knol, D.L.; Dekker, J; Steultjens, M

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the inter- and intrarater reliability and agreement of instrumented knee joint proprioception measurement in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy subjects; to assess the effect of variations in the measurement procedure on agreement parameters. Methods.

  20. Transfemoral Amputation After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Schrøder, Henrik M; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    complications in 9 (8%). In 92 (80%) of the cases, there were ≥2 indications for amputation. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative incidence of amputation within 15 years after primary knee arthroplasty was 0.32%, with a tendency toward a decreasing incidence in the last part of the study period. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE......BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... were followed by amputation. Hospital records of all identified cases were reviewed. A competing-risk model was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of amputation. Differences in cumulative incidences were analyzed with use of the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 115 amputations were performed...

  1. Congenital fibrous hamartoma of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioni, Cesare; Bellini, Carlo; Risso, Francesco Maria; Scopesi, Fabio; Serra, Giovanni; Oddone, Mauro; Toma, Paolo; Nozza, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    A full-term male infant presented at birth with a hard swelling of the left knee. The lemon-sized lesion was fixed to the underlying knee muscles, while the overlying skin was stretched and shiny; there was no bruit. Radiography, sonography and MRI suggested a soft-tissue tumour. After surgical excision, histology showed the presence of fibrous and mesenchymal tissue, with mature adipose tissue. Fibrous hamartoma of infancy was diagnosed. Among soft-tissue tumours, fibrous hamartoma of infancy is a rare and benign lesion, occurring in the first 2 years of life. The tumour mainly affects the trunk, axilla, and upper extremities. This infant had unique involvement of the knee. The treatment of choice is local excision. (orig.)

  2. Biometric identification using knee X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior; Ling, Shari; Rahimi, Salim; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2009-01-01

    Identification of people often makes use of unique features of the face, fingerprints and retina. Beyond this, a similar identifying process can be applied to internal parts of the body that are not visible to the unaided eye. Here we show that knee X-rays can be used for the identification of individual persons. The image analysis method is based on the wnd-charm algorithm, which has been found effective for the diagnosis of clinical conditions of knee joints. Experimental results show that the rank-10 identification accuracy using a dataset of 425 individuals is ~56%, and the rank-1 accuracy is ~34%. The dataset contained knee X-rays taken several years apart from each other, showing that the identifiable features correspond to specific persons, rather than the present clinical condition of the joint.

  3. Severe Heterotopic Ossification following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Dodds

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the incidence of minor heterotopic ossification is probably higher than what is usually expected, severe heterotopic ossification (HO is an extremely rare event following total knee replacement surgery. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who initially had achieved an excellent range of motion following bilateral uncemented rotating platform total knee replacement, before presenting with pain and loss of range of motion at 2 months after surgery. Severe HO was diagnosed on X-rays. Treatment consisted of nonoperative measures only, including physiotherapy with hydrotherapy and anti-inflammatories. She eventually regained her range of motion when seen at 8 months after operation. This case illustrates that nonoperative treatment without the use of radiotherapy or surgery can be used to safely resolve stiffness caused by HO after total knee replacement.

  4. Generalised joint hypermobility and knee joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Henriksen, Peter; Hansen, Sebrina

    2017-01-01

    (GJHk) is unknown for a general population. Therefore, the objectives were to report the prevalence of self-reported GJHk and KJH, as well as the association of these conditions to knee joint symptoms, severity and duration of symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a Danish adult...... population. METHOD: This study is a cross-sectional population-based survey of 2056 Danish adults. Respondents received online questionnaires of GJHk and KJH, knee joint symptoms, the severity and duration of these, as well as HRQoL. RESULTS: Total response rate was 49% (n = 1006). The prevalence of self...... HRQoL. The impact of these conditions on HRQoL is comparable with knee osteoarthritis....

  5. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); A. Furlan (Alessandro); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee

  6. Magnitude of knee osteoarthritis and associated risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The point prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 11.5%. Increasing age, female gender, marital status, low educational status, financial dependency, poor income, obesity, previous knee injury, epigastric pain, peptic ulcer disease, varus deformity of the knee, and poor health status were significantly associated with ...

  7. Nontraumatic Knee Complaints in Adults in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Belo (Janneke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn general practice, knee complaints (traumatic and nontraumatic) take second place after back pain in the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (19/1000 patients per year), mostly presented as knee pain or functional loss of the knee joint. Of these complaints, approximately 20% are

  8. Wearable Vector Electrical Bioimpedance System to Assess Knee Joint Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersek, Sinan; Toreyin, Hakan; Teague, Caitlin N; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Jeong, Hyeon-Ki; Bavare, Miheer M; Wolkoff, Paul; Sawka, Michael N; Inan, Omer T

    2017-10-01

    We designed and validated a portable electrical bioimpedance (EBI) system to quantify knee joint health. Five separate experiments were performed to demonstrate the: 1) ability of the EBI system to assess knee injury and recovery; 2) interday variability of knee EBI measurements; 3) sensitivity of the system to small changes in interstitial fluid volume; 4) reducing the error of EBI measurements using acceleration signals; and 5) use of the system with dry electrodes integrated to a wearable knee wrap. 1) The absolute difference in resistance ( R) and reactance (X) from the left to the right knee was able to distinguish injured and healthy knees (p knee R was 2.5 Ω and for X was 1.2 Ω. 3) Local heating/cooling resulted in a significant decrease/increase in knee R (p knee R and X measured using the wet electrodes and the designed wearable knee wrap were highly correlated ( R 2 = 0.8 and 0.9, respectively). This study demonstrates the use of wearable EBI measurements in monitoring knee joint health. The proposed wearable system has the potential for assessing knee joint health outside the clinic/lab and help guide rehabilitation.

  9. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  10. Material properties of the human posterior knee capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H. H.; Janssen, D.; Verkerke, G. J.; Diercks, R. L.; Verdonschot, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest to develop accurate subject-specific biomechanical models of the knee. Most of the existing models currently do not include a representation of the posterior knee capsule. In order to incorporate the posterior capsule in knee models, data is needed on its

  11. Material properties of the human posterior knee capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmat, H.H.; Janssen, D.W.; van Tienen, T.; Diercks, R.L.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Fernandes, Paulo; Folgado, Joao; Silva, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest to develop accurate subject-specific biomechanical models of the knee. Most of the existing models currently do not include a representation of the posterior knee capsule. In order to incorporate the posterior capsule in knee models, data is needed on its

  12. Obesity and disability in the symptomatic Irish knee osteoarthritis population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common disorder with significant social and financial implications. Obesity is the strongest modifiable risk factor of knee OA. There is little data on obesity in Irish knee OA populations and its relationship to other measures of disease severity.

  13. Quadriceps strength and anterior knee pain following tibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tension generated on extension of the knee against a resistance using tensiometer was measured in Newton. ... There was no statistically significant relationship between the force of tension (N) generated in the extensor in patients with anterior knee pain compared with those without knee pain (158.43 ± 49.35, 189.54 ...

  14. associated injuries and complications in floating knee management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Associated injuries, complications, Floating knee, Management. INTRODUCTION. Floating knee refers to ipsilateral fractures of femur and tibia. Road accidents with high-energy trauma are the most frequent aetiology leading to that type of injury. In the management of floating knee, the lower limb deformation ...

  15. Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Ramm, Heiko; Fu, Chun Kit Jack; Miller, Stephen; Zachow, Stefan; Anglin, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty can affect patients in numerous important ways: pain, function, stability, range of motion, and kinematics. Quantitative data concerning these changes have not been previously available, to our knowledge, yet are essential to understand individual experiences of total knee arthroplasty and thereby improve outcomes for all patients. The limiting factor has been the challenge of accurately measuring these changes. Our study objective was to develop a conceptual framework and analysis method to investigate changes in knee shape and geometry, and prospectively apply it to a sample total knee arthroplasty population. Using clinically available computed tomography and radiography imaging systems, the three-dimensional knee shape and geometry of nine patients (eight varus and one valgus) were compared before and after total knee arthroplasty. All patients had largely good outcomes after their total knee arthroplasty. Knee shape changed both visually and numerically. On average, the distal condyles were slightly higher medially and lower laterally (range: +4.5 mm to -4.4 mm), the posterior condyles extended farther out medially but not laterally (range: +1.8 to -6.4 mm), patellofemoral distance increased throughout flexion by 1.8-3.5 mm, and patellar thickness alone increased by 2.9 mm (range: 0.7-5.2 mm). External femoral rotation differed preop and postop. Joint line distance, taking cartilage into account, changed by +0.7 to -1.5 mm on average throughout flexion. Important differences in shape and geometry were seen between pre-total knee arthroplasty and post-total knee arthroplasty knees. While this is qualitatively known, this is the first study to report it quantitatively, an important precursor to identifying the reasons for the poor outcome of some patients. Using the developed protocol and visualization techniques to compare patients with good versus poor clinical outcomes could

  16. Total condylar prosthesis placement in knee arthroplasty. Biomechanic analysis of human knee preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, J T; Boe, S; Vang, P S

    1983-10-01

    Knee replacement using the Total Condylar Prosthesis was carried out on six large cadaveric knees. Tibiofemoral articulation was studied radiographically with the tibial component placed anteriorly as well as posteriorly on the tibial plateau. It is concluded that, in this model, when using the Total Condylar Prosthesis for big-sized knees, a tall, posteriorly placed tibial component gave the best placement of the femoral component and the most central tibio-femoral articulation, entailing optimal distribution of the load on the trabecular bone beneath the tibial component.

  17. Functional outcomes of uni-knee arthroplasty for medial compartment knee arthropathy in asian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To Wong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uni-knee arthroplasty (UKA has shown better knee kinematics and motion that may better suit the activities of daily living in Eastern countries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of UKA for medial compartment knee arthropathy in Asian patients. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 48 patients with 51 UK A knees. Only one type of prosthesis was used and all components were cemented. Postoperative management included ambulation with weight bearing, range of motion, and muscle strengthening exercises as tolerated until full recovery. The average follow-up was 52.0 ± 24.0 (range 12-92 months. The evaluation included functional assessment, the Knee Society knee and functional scores, the International Knee Document Committee (IKDC subjective and objective scores, and radiographs of the knee. Results: The overall clinical outcomes of the knee showed the functional outcome of the knee to be normal in 51%, nearly normal in 37%, abnormal in 8%, and severely abnormal in 4%. The functional activities included stair climbing in 96%, squatting in 76%, jogging in 71% and kneeling in 47%. Three-quarters of the patients were able to kneel for daily activities. Approximately 98% of the patients were satisfied with the operation. The survivorship of the prosthesis was 98% with one revision pending. Radiographic evaluations revealed the components were centered in 82% and off-centered in 18%. Osteoarthritis was 22% preoperative and 27% postoperative for the patellofemoral compartment, and 0% before and 4% after surgery for the lateral compartment. The functional outcomes showed no difference between patients with and without patellofemoral arthritis. The complications included one component malposition and one knee pain of undetermined origin. Conclusions: UKA provides excellent pain relief and restoration of knee function including kneeling, squatting, and sit-to-stand activities that perfectly fit the oriental

  18. Coronal tibiofemoral subluxation in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaisy, Saker; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Thein, Ran; Gladnick, Brian P; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    To analyze knees in varying stages of osteoarthritis (OA) for the presence of coronal tibiofemoral (CTF) subluxation and to determine if CTF subluxation severity is related to knee OA worsening. We retrospectively evaluated CTF subluxation and limb alignment in 113 patients with different stages of knee OA who were being considered for an arthroplasty procedure. Knee OA was classified as "mild" or "severe" according to Kellgren-Lawrence scale. CTF subluxation was measured in the study groups and in 40 knees of healthy controls using software developed specifically on the basis of Iterative Closest Point mathematical algorithm. Mean CTF subluxation in "mild OA" and "severe OA" groups was 3.5% (±2) and 3.5 % (±5) of the tibial plateau, respectively. For both the mild and severe OA groups, CTF subluxation was significantly increased compared to the 1.4% (±1) CTF subluxation in the control group, (p < 0.0001) and (p = 0.012), respectively. However, there was no significant difference in CTF subluxation between the mild OA and severe OA groups (p = 0.75). Limb varus malalignment in mild OA and severe OA groups was 3.6° (±2.2) and 5.3° (±2.6), respectively. Both significantly increased comparing to the 1° (±0.7) control group alignment (p < 0.0001). Varus malalignment in the severe OA group was significantly increased comparing to the mild OA group (p = 0.0003). CTF subluxation is a radiographic finding related to knee OA which occurs mainly in the early stages of the osteoarthritic process and stagnates as OA progresses.

  19. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  20. Knee and Ankle Arthroplasty in Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piero Solimeno

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Today, major surgical procedures can be safely performed in hemophilic patients with chronic arthropathy, using available factor concentrates. In this setting, total knee replacement is considered the “gold standard”, while the use of total ankle replacement is still debated. Indeed, the unsatisfactory results obtained with the previous available design of implants did not raise enthusiasm as knee or hip replacement. Recently, the introduction of new implant designs and better reported outcomes have renewed the interest in total ankle replacement in people with hemophilia. In this review, the role of replacement surgery in the treatment of chronic hemophilic arthropathy will be described.

  1. Imaging of postoperative knee extensor mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-57, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hame, Sharon L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Box 956902, 76-143 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Disorders of the anterior knee are common and include patellofemoral syndrome, patella instability, patella fracture, and patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures. Depending on the operative procedure performed, the post-operative imaging appearance of these knees may be confusing. It is crucial for the radiologist to be familiar with the procedures performed in order to recognize the postoperative findings. Radiologists must be able to interpret hardware (anchors, screw and wires) and disruptions in soft tissue planes that may persist with these types of procedures.

  2. Safety of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium - 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempińska, M.; Lass, P.; Ćwikła, J. B.; Żbikowski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Radioisotope knee synovectomy is based on an Yttrium - 90 citrate injection (185 - 222 MBq) into the knee joint cavity. The performance of procedure needs participation of a nuclear medicine specialist as well as an orthopedist or a rheumatologist and a technologist, who prepares radiopharmaceuticals. The ionization doses for patients and personnel depend not only on the injected activity, but also on the method and process of injection and the radioactivity measurement procedure used. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the degree of radiation exposure of patients and medical personnel during the performance of therapy with 90Y.

  3. Interactive videodisk atlas of knee anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnery, K.W.; Woods, J.W.; Glenn, W.F.; Rauschning, W.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive, computer-assisted atlas of knee anatomy has been developed. MR and CT images from normal volunteers and cryomicrotomed anatomic images were recorded on a laser viodeodisk. Computer software allows movement through the knee and correlation of radiographic images in the coronal, axial, and sagittal planes. Computer graphics are superimposed on the videodisk images. A high-resolution color graphics, touch-screen monitor is included in the computer system. Learning modules allow for rapid identification of specific structure by touching their location on the screen. Computer-created testing modules are available that provide for self-assessment

  4. MRI of osteonecrosis involving the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaki, Shiro; Mitsumori, Amahito; Yamamoto, Michinori

    1992-01-01

    MRI was performed in 13 patients with osteonecrosis involving the knee. We analyzed the MR images, distribution of the lesions, involvement of other sites, and chronological changes. The lesions tended to be multiple, and the marginal double line sign was thought mainly due to chemical shift misregistration. The lesions often involved medial and lateral femoral condyle. In the light of chronological change, the lesions became smaller or migrated toward the epiphyseal end. It was suggested that MRI was useful for the evaluation of osteonecrosis involving the knee. (author)

  5. Secondary knee instability caused by fracture of the stabilizing insert in a dual-articular total knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Morten P; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard; Husted, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    A case of a fractured polyethylene stabilizing insert causing secondary knee instability in a Dual-articular total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is presented. A 65-year-old woman who underwent surgery with a Dual-articular TKA 4 years earlier had a well-functioning prosthesis until a fall, after which......-articular knee....

  6. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  7. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  8. Study of proton beam induced gamma background in metallic backings

    CERN Document Server

    Gyuerky, G; Somorjai, E

    2003-01-01

    A low mass star burns H in the center via the pp chain. The central temperature (and the density) increases and the H-burning switches from the pp-chain to the more efficient CNO-burning. The escape of the star from the Main Sequence is powered by the onset of the CNO burning, whose bottleneck is the sup 1 sup 4 N(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 5 O reaction. Thus direct measurements of the sup 1 sup 4 N(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 5 O reaction at very low energies are needed. (R.P.)

  9. Knee disorders in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR knee cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Heintjes (Edith); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Knee complaints are a frequent reason for consultation in general practice. These patients constitute a specific population compared to secondary care patients. However, information to base treatment decisions on is generally derived from specialistic settings. Our cohort

  10. Synovial Plica Syndrome of the Knee: A Commonly Overlooked Cause of Anterior Knee Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Paul Yuh Feng; Nixion, Amy; Chandratreya, Amit; Murray, Judith M.

    2017-01-01

    Synovial plica syndrome (SPS) occurs in the knee, when an otherwise normal structure becomes a source of pain due to injury or overuse. Patients may present to general practitioners, physiotherapists, or surgeons with anterior knee pain with or without mechanical symptoms, and the diagnosis can sometimes be difficult. Several studies have examined the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of SPS. We review these resources to provide an evidence-based guide to the diagnosis and treatment of S...

  11. Effect of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of knee joint load in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Elizabeth G; Kean, Crystal O; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of the knee adduction moment (KAM) and pain in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 30 individuals (mean (SD): age, 61 (7) yr; 15 (50%) male) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA under three walking conditions in a randomized order: i) wearing rocker-soled shoes (Skechers Shape-ups), ii) wearing non-rocker-soled shoes (ASICS walking shoes), and iii) barefoot. Peak KAM and KAM angular impulse were measured as primary indicators of knee load distribution. Secondary measures included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and knee pain during walking. Peak KAM was significantly lower when wearing the rocker-soled shoes compared with that when wearing the non-rocker-soled shoes (mean difference (95% confidence interval), -0.27 (-0.42 to -0.12) N·m/BW × Ht%; P shoe conditions (P = 0.13). Both peak KAM and KAM impulse were significantly higher during both shoe conditions compared with those during the barefoot condition (P shoes significantly reduced peak KAM when compared with non-rocker-soled shoes, without a concomitant change in KFM, and thus may potentially reduce medial knee joint loading. However, KAM parameters in the rocker-soled shoes remained significantly higher than those during barefoot walking. Wearing rocker-soled shoes did not have a significant immediate effect on walking pain. Further research is required to evaluate whether rocker-soled shoes can influence symptoms and progression of knee OA with prolonged wear.

  12. An Elderly Man with a Swollen Knee,Significant Ecchymosis, and Minimal Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, David; Serou, Michael; Neitschman, Harold

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presents with left knee pain and swelling over several days. The pain and swelling started after he felt a "pop" when bending to pick up an object off the floor. His past medical history is significant for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Physical exam revealed significant ecchymosis on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. There was a minimal amount pain upon knee flexion.

  13. Assessment of knee laxity using a robotic testing device: a comparison to the manual clinical knee examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, T P; Stinton, S K; Siebold, R; Freedberg, H I; Jacobs, C A; Hutton, W C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect knee laxity data using a robotic testing device. The data collected were then compared to the results obtained from manual clinical examination. Two human cadavers were studied. A medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear was simulated in the left knee of cadaver 1, and a posterolateral corner (PLC) injury was simulated in the right knee of cadaver 2. Contralateral knees were left intact. Five blinded examiners carried out manual clinical examination on the knees. Laxity grades and a diagnosis were recorded. Using a robotic knee device which can measure knee laxity in three planes of motion: anterior-posterior, internal-external tibia rotation, and varus-valgus, quantitative data were obtained to document tibial motion relative to the femur. One of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the MCL injury. Robotic testing showed a 1.7° larger valgus angle, 3° greater tibial internal rotation, and lower endpoint stiffness (11.1 vs. 24.6 Nm/°) in the MCL-injured knee during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee and 4.9 mm greater medial tibial translation during rotational testing. Two of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the PLC injury, while the other examiners diagnosed an MCL tear. The PLC-injured knee demonstrated 4.1 mm more lateral tibial translation and 2.2 mm more posterior tibial translation during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee. The robotic testing device was able to provide objective numerical data that reflected differences between the injured knees and the uninjured knees in both cadavers. The examiners that performed the manual clinical examination on the cadaver knees proved to be poor at diagnosing the injuries. Robotic testing could act as an adjunct to the manual clinical examination by supplying numbers that could improve diagnosis of knee injury. Level II.

  14. Clinical application of different operative approach of total knee replacement in knee valgus patients. Retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chong-Jun; Liu, Jun; Niu, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Jun; Kou, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Jiao; Xu, Shao-Wei; Mu, Xiao-Di; Yang, Lv-Lin; Zhang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    According to the severity of knee valgus, different operative approaches were applied in total knee replacement. Hence, we assessed the safety and efficacy of different operative approaches in the level IV study. From May 2011 to March 2014, a retrospectively analysis was conducted among 31 patients with knee valgus (mild in 10 cases, moderate in 8 cases and severe in 13 cases based on Keblish grade). Medial approach trip knee replacement was performed in mild and moderate patients, which were assigned as medial approach group. Lateral approach was performed in severe patients, which was assigned as lateral approach group. Relevant results were compared between medial approach group and lateral approach group, including valgus corrected angle, postoperative knee joint activity and Kss score. Furthermore, operative time, postoperative blood loss, patellar trajectory and anterior knee pain were also compared between the two groups. All operations were successful without obvious complications. In medial approach group, postoperative knee valgus angle was (7 ± 1)°. Three months after operation, degree of knee joint activity was (85.2 ± 5.2)°, and KSS score of knee joint was (80.1 ± 5.2). Significant differences were detected in these compared with preoperative data (all P approach group with postoperative knee valgus angle as (8.2 ± 2.3)°, degree of knee joint activity three months after operation as (85.2 ± 5.3)°, and KSS score of knee joint as (80.3 ± 3.2). However, no significant differences were found among these three groups in operative time, postoperative blood loss, patellar trajectory or anterior knee pain. Different operative approaches in total knee replacement according to the severity of knee valgus were proved as effective and safe procedures, which deserved further application. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Different Kinematics of Knees with Varus and Valgus Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, C; Benditz, A; Koeck, F; Keshmiri, A; Grifka, J; Maderbacher, G

    2018-03-01

    Few data exist of kinematics of knees with varus and valgus deformities combined with osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to reveal different (1) tibiofemoral kinematics, (2) medial and lateral gaps, and (3) condylar liftoff of osteoarthritic knees with either varus or valgus deformity before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). For this purpose, 40 patients for TKA were included in this study, 23 knees with varus deformity and 17 knees with valgus deformity. All patients underwent computer navigation, and kinematics was assessed before making any cuts or releases and after implantation. Osteoarthritic knees with valgus deformity showed a significant difference in tibia rotation relative to the femur with flexion before and after TKA, whereas knees with varus deformity did not. Knees with a valgus deformity showed femoral external rotation in extension and femoral internal rotation in flexion, whereas knees with a varus deformity revealed femoral internal rotation in extension and femoral external rotation in flexion. In both groups, gaps increased after TKA. Condylar liftoff was not observed in the varus deformity group after TKA. In the valgus deformity group, condylar liftoff was detected after TKA at knee flexion of 50 degrees and more. This study revealed significant differences in tibiofemoral kinematics between osteoarthritic knees with a varus or valgus deformity before and after TKA. Valgus deformities showed a paradoxic movement pattern. These in vivo intraoperative results need to be confirmed using fluoroscopic or radiographic three-dimensional matching before and after TKA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Mechanical and physiological factors in knee joint contact mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten

    Numerous biomechanical studies have provided evidence that laterally wedged insoles reduce the knee adduction moment during walking in healthy controls as well as patients with knee osteoarthritis potentially reducing the contact stress of medial tibial and femoral condyles. The knee adduction...... moment has been recognized as a suitable biomechanical marker for progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, recent clinical trials have not been able to confirm this potentially favourable effect. With the increasing prevalence of knee osteoarthritis and knee replacement surgery the demand for early...... healthy subjects, and 3) to identify the acute effect of laterally wedged insoles on biomechanical markers in patients after an medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. The results showed that shoe design and lateral wedges are equally important factors for changing the knee adduction moment...

  17. [Knee pain and associated occupational factors: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzensa da Silva, Marcelo; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Rodrigues Domingues, Marlos; Kriebel, David

    2007-08-01

    In order to collect information on knee pain and associated occupational factors, a systematic review was conducted using the MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, and Free Medical Journals databases, from 1990 to 2006. Key words were: gonalgia, knee, knee pain, knee joint, knee dislocation, knee injuries, work, workplace, workload, employment, occupations, industry, occupational, workers, arthrosis, and osteoarthritis. Equivalent terms in Portuguese and Spanish were also used. From the initial 2,263 studies gathered, only 26 met the review's inclusion criteria. Knee pain prevalence in the previous 12 months ranged from 11.2% to 60.9%. The main associated factors were: female gender, older age, high body mass index, kneeling working position, and lifting at work.

  18. Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients With Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhi-Wei Jonathan; Pang, Hee Nee

    2016-11-01

    We report our experience with outcomes of poliomyelitis in the Asian population. Sixteen total knee replacements in 14 patients with polio-affected knees were followed up for at least 18 months. Follow-up assessment included scoring with the American Knee Society Score (AKSS), Oxford knee score, and Short Form 36 Health Survey scores. The mean AKSS improved from 25.59 preoperatively to 82.94 at 24 months, with greater improvement in the knee score. The mean Oxford knee score improved from 40.82 preoperatively to 20.53 at 24 months. The mean AKSS pain score rose from 2.35 to 47.66 at 24 months. The Short Form 36 Health Survey physical functioning and bodily pain scores improved for all patients. Primary total knee arthroplasty of poliomyelitis-affected limbs shows good outcomes, improving quality of life, and decreasing pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  20. Self-reported knee joint instability is related to passive mechanical stiffness in medial knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee joint instability compromises function in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis and may be related to impaired joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported instability and the passive varus-valgus mechanical behaviour of the medial osteoarthritis knee. Methods Passive varus-valgus angular laxity and stiffness were assessed using a modified isokinetic dynamometer in 73 participants with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. All participants self-reported the absence or presence of knee instability symptoms and the degree to which instability affected daily activity on a 6-point likert scale. Results Forward linear regression modelling identified a significant inverse relationship between passive mid-range knee stiffness and symptoms of knee instability (r = 0.27; P  0.05). Conclusions Conceivably, a stiffer passive system may contribute toward greater joint stability during functional activities. Importantly however, net joint stiffness is influenced by both active and passive stiffness, and thus the active neuromuscular system may compensate for reduced passive stiffness in order to maintain joint stability. Future work is merited to examine the role of active stiffness in symptomatic joint stability. PMID:24252592

  1. Effects of strength exercise on the knee and ankle proprioception of individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhangqi; Zhang, Yu; Lee, Seullee; Wang, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of 8-week strength exercise on knee and ankle proprioception of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Forty participants were randomly divided into control and strength exercise groups. Strength exercise group underwent squat training of three times a week for 8 weeks, while control group received an education programme. Threshold for detection of passive movement of knee and ankle joint was tested using an electrically driven movable frame. Between- and within-group differences were evaluated through repeated-measurement analysis of variance. After intervention, passive motion sense in knee flexion of participants in strength exercise group significantly improved (p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval of mean difference: 0.019-1.478) with significant difference between groups. No significant differences of passive motion senses were found in knee extension and ankle between strength exercise and control groups. Eight-week squat training significantly improves the motion sense of knee flexion in patients with KOA.

  2. Variability of TKR Knee Kinematics and Relationship with Gait Kinetics: Implications for Total Knee Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Ngai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors, including compressive load and knee kinematics, have been shown to influence wear. External knee moments (a surrogate for load have recently been correlated with the medial and lateral wear scar areas of an unconstrained, PCL retaining knee design. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in kinetics during level walking are accompanied by specific differences in relative knee kinematics. Thirty TKR patients were gait tested using the point cluster technique to obtain 3D motions of the knee. External knee moments were calculated from ground reaction forces recorded with a multicomponent force plate. The subjects were separated into two distinct anteroposterior (AP motion categories: a low motion group and a high motion group. Similarly, the low and high motion groups for internal-external (IE rotation were also identified. For the IE motion, there was no significant difference between the transverse internal rotation moments between the two IE motion groups. However for the AP motion groups, a higher external peak flexion moment was found for the group displaying less AP motion. These observations suggest that subjects with higher joint moments execute smaller ranges of AP motion and thus are likely to incur less wear.

  3. Decreased extension gap and valgus alignment after implantation of total knee prosthesis in primary varus knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Yukihide; Nakagawa, Shigeru; Sugama, Ryo; Ikawa, Tessyu; Noguchi, Takahiro; Hirakawa, Masashi; Matsui, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    It was hypothesised that implantation of a total knee prosthesis may change the size and shape of the joint gap. To test this hypothesis, a tensor device was used which was specifically designed to reproduce the conditions before and after implantation, including attachment of the polyethylene insert trial. This study aimed to compare the joint gaps before and after implantation of a total knee prosthesis using this new tensor device. A total of 259 primary varus knees were included in this study. Knees were exposed using a medial parapatellar approach, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were resected. After the trial reduction, the intraoperative joint gap kinematics was measured using the tensor device. Implantation of a total knee prosthesis decreased the size of the extension joint gap and made it valgus, but did not influence the size or shape of the flexion joint gap. The present findings suggest that the classical gap technique, which creates equal and rectangular extension and flexion joint gaps in the bone cutting surface, results in an imbalance between the extension and flexion joint gaps after implantation. To achieve equal and rectangular extension and flexion joint gaps after implantation, the prepared extension joint gap should be about 2 mm larger than the flexion joint gap and slightly varus before implantation in primary varus knees. Therapeutic study, Level II.

  4. The influence of below-knee compression garments on knee-joint proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Shashank; Driller, Matthew W; Masters, Rich S W

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of below-knee compression garments on proprioception accuracy under, information processing constraints designed to cause high or low conscious attention to the task. In a counterbalanced, single-blinded, crossover trial, 44 healthy participants (26 male/18 female) with a mean age of 22.7±6.9 years performed an active joint repositioning task using their nondominant and their dominant leg, with and without below-knee compression and with and without conducting a secondary task. Analysis of variance revealed no main effect of leg dominance and no interactions (p's>0.05). However, a main effect was evident for both compression (F 1, 43 =84.23, pknee proprioception under differential information processing constraints. We conclude that proprioception accuracy of the knee joint is significantly enhanced post application of below-knee compression garments and when a secondary task is conducted concurrently with active joint repositioning. The findings suggest that below-knee compression garments may improve proprioception of the knee, regardless of leg dominance, and that secondary tasks that direct attention away from proprioceptive judgments may also improve proprioception, regardless of the presence of compression. Clinical implications are discussed with respect to proprioception in modern.sports and rehabilitation settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders Peder Højer; Wetterslev, Mik; Hansen, Signe Elisa

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this systematic review was to document efficacy, safety and quality of evidence of analgesic interventions after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes all-language randomized controlled trials of medication-b...... of an optimal procedure-specific analgesic regimen after TKA....

  6. The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahr-Wagner L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lene Rahr-Wagner, Martin Lind Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry was established in 2005 as a web-based nationwide clinical database with the purpose of improving the monitoring and quality of both primary and revision knee ligament reconstructions in Denmark. All primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions as well as collateral ligament and multiligament reconstructions are recorded. Main variables include sex, age, cause of injury, objective ligament instability, and surgical data, such as affected ligament, graft- and implant choice, operation technique among other things. The operating surgeon prospectively collects the data. Hence, detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and 1-year follow-up data are recorded by the operating surgeon using a standardized form and a secured Internet portal. The number of procedures registered in the database each year is ~2,500 and the first 9 years, in total, 22,775 procedures have been registered. Since the beginning of the database multiple papers have been published in international peer-reviewed journals, improving the knowledge of patients treated with knee ligament reconstruction surgery. This paper reviews the content, organization, and published research from the Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry. Keywords: ligament reconstruction, anterior cruciate ligament, operation technique, database, graft choice, femoral tunnel drilling, patient-reported outcome measure

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas; Endel, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  9. Value and limits of knee arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischedick, O.

    1981-09-01

    In the view of modern knowledges of biomechanic of the knee and the introduce of arthroscopy, the possibilities of arthrography will be discussed. The value of arthrography is not reduced, especially for the cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy should follow arthrography in uncertain cases.

  10. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery...

  11. Does post-operative knee awareness differ between knees in bilateral simultaneous total knee arthroplasty? Predictors of high or low knee awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine Abildgaard; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Latifi, Roshan

    2016-01-01

    within each patient was calculated. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify factors affecting FJS. RESULTS: The difference between knees was 1 point (CI 0-5) for the FJS and 1 point (CI 0-2) for the OKS. The FJS for females increased (decreasing awareness) with increasing age. Males had...

  12. Cysts about the knee: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Drew; Cantlon, Matthew; Mackay, Brendan; Hoelscher, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Popliteal (Baker) cysts, meniscal cysts, proximal tibiofibular joint cysts, and cruciate ligament ganglion cysts are cystic masses commonly found about the knee. Popliteal cysts form when a bursa swells with synovial fluid, with or without a clear inciting etiology. Presentation ranges from asymptomatic to painful, limited knee motion. Management varies based on symptomatology and etiology. Meniscal cysts form within or adjacent to the menisci. These collections of synovial fluid are thought to develop from translocation of synovial cells or extravasation of synovial fluid into the meniscus through a tear. Joint-line pain and swelling are common symptoms. Management entails partial meniscectomy with cyst decompression or excision. Proximal tibiofibular joint cysts are rare, and their etiology remains unclear. Pain and swelling secondary to local tissue invasion is common, and management consists of surgical excision. Cruciate ligament ganglion cysts have no clear etiology but are associated with mucoid degeneration of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, knee trauma, and synovial translocation into these ligaments. Knee pain and limited range of motion, especially with exercise, are common presenting symptoms. In symptomatic cases, arthroscopic excision is commonly performed.

  13. A comedy of errors: the bad knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Hugh U

    2005-06-01

    A review of 241 consecutive total knee revisions has been carried out. Other than loosening, wear, and stiffness, at present, a commoner reason is an unsatisfactory result due to minor errors of tibial and femoral placement. Currently, about 16% of femoral components required derotation during revision.

  14. Knee Arthroplasty: With or Without Patellar Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád Sólyom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arthroplasty is used when there is irreversible damage to the articular cartilage of the knee. It involves implanting a bicompartimental (femoral and tibial components or a tricompartimental (femoral, tibial and patellar components prosthesis. It is a very invasive and costly operation, so our objective was to evaluate the necessity of the patellar component.

  15. Cemented or cementless total knee arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudhon Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since 1996 we have been using cementless fixation with hydroxyapatite (HA coating. The purpose of this paper is to compare survivorship of a series of 100 cemented Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA to a similar series of 100 cementless with a follow up of 11–16 years. Material methods: Both TKA are mobile bearing total knee postero-stabilized. They can be used with cement or without cement. Among 1030 New Wave TKATM implanted from 2002 to 2015 we have identified 100 cemented TKAs and 100 cementless TKAs. All these cases were primary replacement. Differences in survival probability were determined using log-rank test. Results: Survival probabilities at 11 years of follow-up were: Cemented group: 90.2% CI95% [81.9–94.8]; Cementless group: 95.4% CI95% [88.1–98.2]. Comparison between both group showed significant difference, p = 0.32. Discussion: The advantages of cementless TKA are bone stock preservation, cement debris protection and the potential to achieve biologic fixation. Cementless implants rely on a porous or roughened surface to facilitate bone formation. HA has been shown to accelerate bone integration and to decrease micro motion of the components and to increase fixation. With a survival probability of 90.2% (cemented version and 95.4% (cementless version, this total knee prosthesis performs as intended in primary total knee arthroplasty. No statistical differences could be found between cemented and cementless implants.

  16. Reconstructive vascular surgery below the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, L B; Jelnes, R; Sager, P

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 38 consecutive patients with advanced peripheral vascular disease (i.e. rest pain) reconstructive vascular surgery was performed with the distal anastomosis below the knee. Ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) was 0.28 (0.11-0.47) preoperatively; accumulated graft patency rate was 0.47 (SD...

  17. Prevalence and pattern of knee osteoarthritis in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muiruri

    knee OA and their health-care seeking behaviour. Design: Cross ... in the elderly (1). It is a leading cause of disability, little could be done. Therefore, people with 0A in this affecting 60-70% of the population older than 60 years. category may elude ..... refused in some households for fear of being screened for Human ...

  18. Effects of an unloader knee brace on knee-related symptoms and function in people with post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Harvi F; Crossley, Kay M; Ackland, David C; Cowan, Sallie M; Collins, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the immediate and four-week effects of an unloader knee brace on knee-related symptoms and performance-based function in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Individuals with knee OA, five to 20years post-ACLR, were recruited for two within-subject randomized studies: immediate effects (n=18) and four-week effects (n=11). Patient-reported knee-related symptoms (knee pain, perceived task difficulty, confidence, stability) were assessed during hop for distance and step-down tests, while performance-based function was assessed with hopping distance under three conditions: i) no brace; ii) unadjusted brace (sagittal plane support); and iii) adjusted brace (sagittal plane support with varus/valgus readjustment). Participants in the four-week brace effect study were randomized to wear the unadjusted or adjusted brace for four weeks after baseline (no brace) testing, and repeated tests in their allocated brace at four-week follow-up. Friedman tests evaluated differences between the three brace conditions for each variable for the immediate brace effect study (pknee confidence during hop for distance, and knee pain during step-down. Following the four-week brace intervention, the allocated brace improved knee confidence, perceived task difficulty and stability during hop for distance; and knee pain, perceived task difficulty, confidence, and stability during step-down. The unloader knee brace, adjusted or unadjusted, has the potential to improve knee-related symptoms associated with knee OA after ACLR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Noninjured Knees of Patients With Noncontact ACL Injuries Display Higher Average Anterior and Internal Rotational Knee Laxity Compared With Healthy Knees of a Noninjured Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Caroline; Theisen, Daniel; Meyer, Tim; Agostinis, Hélène; Nührenbörger, Christian; Pape, Dietrich; Seil, Romain

    2015-08-01

    Excessive physiological anterior and rotational knee laxity is thought to be a risk factor for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and inferior reconstruction outcomes, but no thresholds have been established to identify patients with increased laxity. (1) To determine if the healthy contralateral knees of ACL-injured patients have greater anterior and rotational knee laxity, leading to different laxity profiles (combination of laxities), compared with healthy control knees and (2) to set a threshold to help discriminate anterior and rotational knee laxity between these groups. Case-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 healthy contralateral knees of noncontact ACL-injured patients (ACL-H group) and 104 healthy knees of control participants (CTL group) were tested for anterior and rotational laxity. Laxity scores (measurements corrected for sex and body mass) were used to classify knees as hypolax (score 1). Proportions of patients in each group were compared using χ(2) tests. Receiver operating characteristic curves were computed to discriminate laxity between the groups. Odds ratios were calculated to determine the probability of being in the ACL-H group. The ACL-H group displayed greater laxity scores for anterior displacement and internal rotation in their uninjured knee compared with the CTL group (P knees of patients with noncontact ACL injuries display different laxity values both for internal rotation and anterior displacement compared with healthy control knees. The identification of knee laxity profiles may be of relevance for primary and secondary prevention programs of noncontact ACL injuries. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Simultaneous bilateral-knee MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Feliks; Levine, Evan; Chaudhari, Akshay S; Monu, Uchechukwuka D; Epperson, Kevin; Oei, Edwin H G; Gold, Garry E; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2017-12-17

    To demonstrate and evaluate the scan time and quantitative accuracy of simultaneous bilateral-knee imaging compared with single-knee acquisitions. Hardware modifications and safety testing was performed to enable MR imaging with two 16-channel flexible coil arrays. Noise covariance and sensitivity-encoding g-factor maps for the dual-coil-array configuration were computed to evaluate coil cross-talk and noise amplification. Ten healthy volunteers were imaged on a 3T MRI scanner with both dual-coil-array bilateral-knee and single-coil-array single-knee configurations. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists compared the relative image quality between blinded image pairs acquired with each configuration. Differences in T 2 relaxation time measurements between dual-coil-array and single-coil-array acquisitions were compared with the standard repeatability of single-coil-array measurements using a Bland-Altman analysis. The mean g-factors for the dual-coil-array configuration were low for accelerations up to 6 in the right-left direction, and minimal cross-talk was observed between the two coil arrays. Image quality ratings of various joint tissues showed no difference in 89% (95% confidence interval: 85-93%) of rated image pairs, with only small differences ("slightly better" or "slightly worse") in image quality observed. The T 2 relaxation time measurements between the dual-coil-array configuration and the single-coil configuration showed similar limits of agreement and concordance correlation coefficients (limits of agreement: -0.93 to 1.99 ms; CCC: 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-0.98)), to the repeatability of single-coil-array measurements (limits of agreement: -2.07 to 1.96 ms; CCC: 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.95-0.98)). A bilateral coil-array setup can image both knees simultaneously in similar scan times as conventional unilateral knee scans, with comparable image quality and quantitative accuracy. This has the potential to improve the value of

  1. Prevention of infection after knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Man-made joints (joint endoprostheses, including knee endoprostheses, are used in some irreversible diseases of the human joints. The implantation of joint endoprostheses (arthroplasty is associated with an increased risk for infection. To prevent infections, different interventions without and with the use of antibiotics (hygiene procedures and antibiotic prophylaxis are used. The benefits of these interventions are not clear yet. Research questions: The presented report addresses the questions regarding the medical effectiveness, the cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal aspects related to the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. Methods: A systematic literature search is conducted in the medical electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciSearch etc. in June 2009 and has been completed by a hand search. The analysis includes publications which describe and/or evaluate clinical data from randomized controlled trials (RCT, systematic reviews of RCT, registers of endoprostheses or databases concerning interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The conducted literature search also aims to identify health-economic studies and publications dealing explicitly with ethical, social or legal aspects in the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The synthesis of information from different publications has been performed qualitatively. Results: The systematic literature search yields 1,030 hits. Based on the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria a total of ten publications is included in the analysis. The presented report does not find evidence of the effectiveness of different hygiene interventions with a high evidence level. Most of the unspecific interventions are recommended on the basis of results from non-RCT, from studies for other clinical indications and/or for clinically not relevant endpoints, as well as on the basis of

  2. Risk factors of knee osteoarthritis, WHO-ILAR-COPCORD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barghamdi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To evaluate the association between age, sex, BMI, waist/hip ratio, smoking, religion, ethnicity, education and knee osteoarthritis. "nMethods: Eligible subjects were randomly included from participants of Tehran COPCORD study, of whom 480 subjects with knee osteoarthritis were compared to 490 subjects without (case-control study. Using a questionnaire developed by COPCORD group (Asia & Oceania, we enquired about the risk factors of knee osteoarthritis i.e. age, sex, BMI, Waist/Hip ratio, religion, ethnicity, education and smoking. Knee osteoarthritis was defined using ACR criteria. Each knee was unit of analysis using GEE technique to evaluate these associations. "nResults: Age (OR; 1.096; CI95%: 1.091-1.1; P: 0.00 and sex (OR; 2.85; CI95%: 2.49-3.28; P: 0.00 showed significant association with knee osteoarthritis. Overweight (OR; 1.81; CI95%: 1.28-2.55; P: 0.00 and obesity (OR; 3.3; CI95%: 2.34-4.66; P: 0.00 both showed higher risk for knee osteoarthritis. The association between waist/hip ratio and knee osteoarthritis showed an OR of 5.28, CI95%: 0.89-31.44; P: 0.07. However, this association was only borderline significant. People with different religion or ethnicity and smokers had no extra risks for knee osteoarthritis. Higher education is a protective factor for knee osteoarthritis as people who had university education compared to people with no/primary education showed a lower risk for knee osteoarthritis (OR; 0.54; CI95%: 0.38-0.78; P: 0.00. "nConclusions: Our study confirmed that elderly, females, overweight and obese people are at higher risk to develop knee osteoarthritis as found in western societies. Higher education is a protective factor against knee osteoarthritis. Ethnicity, religion and smoking showed no extra risk of knee osteoarthritis.

  3. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0-135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee′s kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, "rollback" compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis.

  4. Psychosocial determinants of outcomes in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Edelstein, David; Pak, Chong; Kallen, Michael A; Stanley, Melinda; Zhang, Hong; Robinson, Kausha C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2011-10-01

    To identify potential psychosocial and educational barriers to clinical success following knee replacement. The authors evaluated 241 patients undergoing total knee replacement, preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. Outcomes included the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) scale and the Knee Society rating system (KSRS). Independent variables included: the medical outcome study-social support scale; depression, anxiety and stress scale; brief COPE inventory; health locus of control; arthritis self-efficacy scale and the life orientation test-revised. Multiple regression models evaluated associations of baseline demographic and psychosocial variables with outcomes at 6 months, controlling for body mass index, comorbidities and baseline outcome scores. Patients' mean age was 65 ± 9 years; 65% were women. Most patients improved outcomes after surgery. Several psychosocial variables were associated with outcomes. Regression analyses indicated lower education, less tangible support, depression, less problem-solving coping, more dysfunctional coping, lower internal locus of control were associated with worse WOMAC scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables for pain 0.07; for function, 0.14). Older age, lower education, depression and less problem-solving coping were associated with poorer total KSRS scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables to total KSRS model 0.09). Psychosocial variables as a set contributed from 25% to 74% of total explained variance across the models tested. Patients' level of education, tangible support, depression, problem-solving coping, dysfunctional coping and internal locus of control were associated with pain and functional outcomes after knee replacement. The findings suggest that, in addition to medical management, perioperative psychosocial evaluation and intervention are crucial in enhancing knee replacement outcomes.

  5. Total knee arthroplasty in elderly osteoporotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinarelli, Antonio; Petrera, Massimo; Vicenti, Giovanni; Pesce, Vito; Patella, Vittorio

    2011-04-01

    Often in daily practice the choice of a prosthesis does not rise out of considerations about literature evidences, but it seems to be related to the personal experience and "surgical philosophy" of surgeon. The choice of prosthesis in total joint replacement is usually justified by biological and mechanical parameters that the surgeon considers before surgery. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by a reduced bone mass and a degeneration of the bone tissue; it leads to bone fragility, so to a higher risk of fractures. Bone resistance, as all the changes in the microarchitecture of the bone tissue, is linked to bone density. Because of the bone density variation and/or the changes in the bone micro-architecture, as the bone strength decreases, the risk of fractures increases. It is important to understand all the factors taking part in both normal and abnormal bone remodelling. Osteoporosis does not imply a concrete bone loss, but a change of the bone micro-architecture itself. In these cases the choice of the patient and implant design are very important. In the period between March 1997-July 2002, we implanted 100 consecutive TKA (total knee arthroplasty) Genesis II in 97 subjects (79 female); mean age was 77.1 years old. All TKA were performed because of primary osteoarthritis of the knee. All patients had complete pain relief and excellent knee score. The surgical and medical complications were in accordance with the published literature. We must consider all existing medical conditions, the state of the knee and local needs of the elderly patient. Thus, within these limits, the total knee can improve the ability of patients to manage the activities of daily living and improve their quality of life.

  6. Incidence of MRI intensity changes in the knee meniscus. Comparing asymptomatic and symptomatic knees without meniscal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Iso, Yoshinori; Furufu, Teruo; Suguro, Toru

    2004-01-01

    MRI has become the most frequently used imaging technique in diagnosing knee joint diseases. However, a number of factors may change the intensity of the meniscus on MR images, even in normal knees. The question remains when and to what degree the change in intensity appears with age, how aging is related to MR image grades, and how the development of symptoms is related to a change in intensity. To answer these questions, the present study investigated MR images of the menisci of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with knee diseases other than meniscal lesions to determine intrameniscal intensity changes. 163 knees in 133 subjects who underwent MRI for the knee joint (s) were examined. The coronal and the sagittal planes were imaged with T1 weighted imaging and GE slice thickness of 5 mm. MR images were classified as Grade 0 to 4. In knees of patients under 40 years of age, a change in intensity was only rarely observed in the menisci of normal knees, though it was frequently observed in those of symptomatic knees. By contrast, in the knees of patients 40 years or older, a change in intensity was frequently observed in the menisci of both normal and symptomatic knees. MRI is useful because of its convenience, low invasiveness, and high diagnostic ability. However, MR images of the meniscus should be read carefully, because the incidence of changes in intensity increases with aging or inflammation, and in symptomatic knees, the intensity change is occasionally exaggerated resulting in incorrect diagnosis. (author)

  7. Data Collection and Analysis Using Wearable Sensors for Monitoring Knee Range of Motion after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yen Chiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is the most common treatment for degenerative osteoarthritis of that articulation. However, either in rehabilitation clinics or in hospital wards, the knee range of motion (ROM can currently only be assessed using a goniometer. In order to provide continuous and objective measurements of knee ROM, we propose the use of wearable inertial sensors to record the knee ROM during the recovery progress. Digitalized and objective data can assist the surgeons to control the recovery status and flexibly adjust rehabilitation programs during the early acute inpatient stage. The more knee flexion ROM regained during the early inpatient period, the better the long-term knee recovery will be and the sooner early discharge can be achieved. The results of this work show that the proposed wearable sensor approach can provide an alternative for continuous monitoring and objective assessment of knee ROM recovery progress for TKA patients compared to the traditional goniometer measurements.

  8. Primary total knee arthroplasty in the management of epiphyseal fracture around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratte, S; Bonnevialle, P; Pietu, G; Saragaglia, D; Cherrier, B; Lafosse, J M

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years the use of arthroplasty was broadened to treating complex epiphyseal fractures at the shoulder and elbow joints. Similar trends to treat this type of fractures at the knee are less documented. Based on a multicenter retrospective series study, the aims of this work is to evaluate the short term clinical results of total knee prostheses in the management of comminuted epiphyseal fractures around the knee, to identify the technical issues and fine tune the indications. Following the initiative of the French Hip and Knee Society (SFHG) and the Traumatology Study Group (GETRAUM), 26 charts from eight different centers in France were included in this multicenter retrospective series. Inclusion criteria were: primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the management of complex articular fractures involving the proximal end of the tibia or distal end of the femur. Surgical features were identified and complications were analyzed. The assessment protocol at last follow-up was standardized and included patient demographic data, analysis of the Parker and IKS scores. During the immediate postoperative period, six patients (23%) reported a general complication and four patients (15%) a local arthroplasty-related complication. At last follow-up (mean 16.2 months), the overall final Parker score was 6.3 (a mean decrease of 1.7) and the mean IKS knee score was 82 points for a mean function score of 54 points. Primary TKA is a suitable management option for complex fractures in autonomous elderly patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis. The key technical details of this procedure should be respected and meticulously planned to achieve optimal results and limit the risk of complications. This risk in these acute complex fractures remains higher than after conventional TKA but comparable to that observed after TKA for post-traumatic arthritis. IV; retrospective cohort study. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  10. Outcome of total knee arthroplasty with insall burstein-11 prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.Z.; Qayum, H.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with severe degenerative knee joint disease often require knee arthroplasty to reduce pain, improve stability and restore function. Insall Burstein II prosthesis is posteriorly stabilized condylar prosthesis, which provide posterior cruciate ligament substitution. It was designed to improve range of motion, stair climbing ability and to prevent posterior subluxation. Evaluate the functional outcome of total knee arthroplasty with IB II prosthesis and Evaluate the alignment of prosthetic components by radiological parameters and its correlation with functional outcome. Sixty knees of sixty patients were replaced by using Insall Burstein II prosthesis. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated for alignment of knee and prosthetic components by criteria selected from knee society roentogenographic evaluation system. Functional outcome was evaluated by rationale of knee society knee rating system. Prosthetic component was aligned in 93% and mal-alignment in 7% of the cases. There was significant improvement in functions core from mean score 33.83 +-15.5 to 59.5+-17.7 and knee score from 37 +- 12.5 to 76.4 +-2.2. Postoperative functional score was found correlated with alignment significantly. Conclusion: Total knee arthroplasty with I-B-II prosthesis is a safe durable and predictable procedure with proper surgical technique and expertise good alignment and satisfactory functional out come can be achieved. (author)

  11. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  12. Anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty: does it correlate with patellar blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Sandro; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Hartel, Maximilian; Kohlhof, Hendrik; Roeder, Christoph; Eggli, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) disturbs patellar blood flow, an unintended accompaniment to TKA that may be a cause of postoperative anterior knee pain. We examine whether disrupted patellar blood flow correlates with anterior knee pain following TKA. In 50 patients (21 men, 29 women) undergoing TKA, we compared patellar blood flow at flexions 0° to 30°, 60°, 90°, and 110° before and after medial parapatellar arthrotomy to pre- and postoperative anterior knee pain scores by means of a laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) probe. Anterior knee pain was assessed using the pain intensity numeric rating scale (NRS) of 0-10 (0-no, 10-worst pain). Based on the NRS pain values, patients were divided into two main groups: group A (n = 34) with no pain or discomfort (NRS range 0-4) and group B (n = 16) with anterior knee pain (NRS range 5-10). Patients of group B demonstrated a significant decrease in blood flow before arthrotomy at flexions from 0° to 90°, and 110° and from 0° to 60°, 90°, and 110° after arthrotomy. For group A, a significant decrease in blood flow was detected at flexions from 0° to 90°, and 110° before and after arthrotomy. For both groups, medial arthrotomy did not have a statistically significant influence on patellar blood flow (margin of significance P anterior knee pain (mean NRS 7.1 ± 1.7). At 2-year follow-up, pain significantly decreased (NRS 3.1 ± 2.1) and only 4 of the 16 patients (25%) complained of moderate anterior pain (average NRS 5.7 ± 0.5), while 8 of 16 (50%) patients reported discomfort (mean NRS 3.5 ± 1.8) around the patella. Patients in group A also demonstrated a significant decrease in pain intensity (from NRS 1.5 ± 1.4 preoperatively to NRS 0.4 ± 1.5 at 2-year follow-up). Statistical analysis demonstrated no statistically significant correlation between pre-arthrotomy/post-arthrotomy patellar blood flow and the presence of preoperative and postoperative anterior knee pain. Only the degree of flexion had an influence on

  13. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isome......OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data...... on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using...... multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional regression model. To assess the influence of adult knee injury and occupation, we performed a formal mediation analysis. RESULTS: The mean (SD) knee extensor strength was 234 (47) Nm, the mean (SD) weight was 66 (9.3) kg. During 24 years (median) of follow-up starting...

  14. Effect of Weekly Alendronate on Knee Symptoms in Patients with Osteoporosis and Knee Osteoarthritis Coexistence - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ediz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alendronate 70 mg weekly on knee symptoms in elderly women with osteoporosis and knee OA coexistence. Material and Methods: Elderly women who diagnosed as osteoporosis between 60-75 years old, underwent radiography of the knee if they reported symptoms of knee OA. Radiographs were read for Kellgren and Lawrence grade and individual features of OA. Osteoporotic patients with Knee OA treated with 70 mg alendronate once weekly for one year. Knee symptoms were assessed by interview before the treatment and 6 and 12 months after the treatment, and knee pain severity was evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, Lequense index, VAS at rest and at movement. Results: Alendronate 70 mg once weekly use was associated with less severity of knee pain as assessed by WOMAC scores, Lequense index, VAS at rest and at movement at 6th and 12th month assessments. Conclusion: This current study has shown that Alendronate 70 mg once weekly use was associated with less severity of knee symptoms in elderly women with osteoporosis and knee OA coexistence. Additional long-term randomised, placebo controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm this effect of weekly Alendronate. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2010;16:17-21

  15. Mechanical contributors to sex differences in idiopathic knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolella Daniel P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of knee osteoarthritis (OA increases with age and is more common in women compared with men, especially after the age of 50 years. Recent work suggests that contact stress in the knee cartilage is a significant predictor of the risk for developing knee OA. Significant gaps in knowledge remain, however, as to how changes in musculoskeletal traits disturb the normal mechanical environment of the knee and contribute to sex differences in the initiation and progression of idiopathic knee OA. To illustrate this knowledge deficit, we summarize what is known about the influence of limb alignment, muscle function, and obesity on sex differences in knee OA. Observational data suggest that limb alignment can predict the development of radiographic signs of knee OA, potentially due to increased stresses and strains within the joint. However, these data do not indicate how limb alignment could contribute to sex differences in either the development or worsening of knee OA. Similarly, the strength of the knee extensor muscles is compromised in women who develop radiographic and symptomatic signs of knee OA, but the extent to which the decline in muscle function precedes the development of the disease is uncertain. Even less is known about how changes in muscle function might contribute to the worsening of knee OA. Conversely, obesity is a stronger predictor of developing knee OA symptoms in women than in men. The influence of obesity on developing knee OA symptoms is not associated with deviation in limb alignment, but BMI predicts the worsening of the symptoms only in individuals with neutral and valgus (knock-kneed knees. It is more likely, however, that obesity modulates OA through a combination of systemic effects, particularly an increase in inflammatory cytokines, and mechanical factors within the joint. The absence of strong associations of these surrogate measures of the mechanical environment in the knee joint with sex

  16. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (pknee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  17. The relationship between knee joint angle and knee flexor and extensor muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between joint angle and muscular strength. In particular, this research investigated the differences in maximum muscular strength and average muscular strength at the knee-joint posture. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised eight female students in their 20s attending S University in Busan. None of the subjects had functional disabilities or had experienced damage to the lower extremities in terms of measurement of muscular strength. A BIODEX system III model (Biodex medical system, USA) was used to measure joint angles and muscular strength. The axis of the dynamometer was consistent with the axis of motion, and measurements were made at 25° and 67° to examine differences in maximum muscular strength according to joint angle. [Results] The maximum muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. The average muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. [Conclusion] The results of this study reveal that muscular strength does not reach maximum at particular range angles, such as the knee-joint resting posture angle or the knee-joint middle range angle. Rather, a stretched muscle is stronger than a contracted muscle. Therefore, it is considered that it will be necessary to study the effects of the joint change ratio on muscular strength on the basis of the maximum stretched muscle.

  18. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ssu-Yu; Lin, Yi-Jia; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Lin, Yuan-Hsiang; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai; Chen, Li-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons.

  19. Can Diagnostic and Therapeutic Arthrocentesis Be Successfully Performed in the Flexed Knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub, Sabeen; Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Band, Philip A; Bennett, James F; Emil, N Suzanne; Fangtham, Monthida; Fields, Roderick A; Hayward, William A; Kettwich, Scarlett K; Roldan, Luis P; Bankhurst, Arthur D

    2018-02-07

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the extended or flexed knee positioning was superior for arthrocentesis and whether the flexed knee positioning could be improved by mechanical compression. Fifty-five clinically effusive knees underwent arthrocentesis in a quality improvement intervention: 20 consecutive knees in the extended knee position using the superolateral approach, followed by 35 consecutive knees in the flexed knee position with and without an external compression brace placed on the suprapatellar bursa. Arthrocentesis success and fluid yield in milliliters were measured. Fluid yield for the extended knee was greater (191% greater) than the flexed knee (extended knee, 16.9 ± 15.7 mL; flexed knee, 5.8 ± 6.3 mL; P < 0.007). Successful diagnostic arthrocentesis (≥2 mL) was 95% (19/20) in the extended knee and 77% (27/35) in the flexed knee (P = 0.08). After mechanical compression was applied to the suprapatellar bursa and patellofemoral joint of the flexed knee, fluid yields were essentially identical (extended knee, 16.9 ± 15.7 mL; flexed knee, 16.7 ± 11.3 mL; P = 0.73), as were successful diagnostic arthrocentesis (≥2 mL) (extended knee 95% vs. flexed knee 100%, P = 0.12). The extended knee superolateral approach is superior to the flexed knee for conventional arthrocentesis; however, the extended knee positioning and flexed knee positioning have identical arthrocentesis success when mechanical compression is applied to the superior knee. This new flexed knee technique for arthrocentesis is a useful alternative for patients who are in wheelchairs, have flexion contractures, cannot be supine, or cannot otherwise extend their knee.

  20. MR imaging of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Bohndorf, K.; Drobnitzky, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a new imaging protocol for knee joint disorders. The authors are using fast imaging with steady precession (FISP) and three-dimensional Fourier transformation. The imaging time is 8.1 minutes. Data are then transferred to an image processing system that allows secondary reconstruction in every desired plane for a more accurate display. The examination takes 10 minutes, and about 200 reconstructions are reviewed. Thirty patients with suspected meniscal or hyaline cartilage disorders were examined prospectively. All underwent subsequent arthroscopy. Magnetic resonance (MR) diagnosis of meniscal tears or cartilage disorders showed an accuracy of 92% compared with arthroscopic findings. Because of the short imaging time, the proposed procedure permits screening with MR imaging in knee joint disorders

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, L.W.; Grover, J.S.; Seeger, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of normal knee anatomy and the role of MRI in the evaluation of knee trauma. Images acquired in the sagittal plane are the most useful. A combination of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo pulse sequences is most commonly employed. A meniscal tear is identified by an intrameniscal signal which extends to the joint surface. MR and arthroscopic findings agree in more than 90% of patients. It is important to be familiar with the MRI appearance of normal anatomic variants that may be confused with meniscal tears: the transverse geniculate ligament, the hiatus of the popliteal tendon sheath, and the meniscofemoral ligaments. Tears in the anterior cruciate, posterior, cruciate, and collateral ligaments are also depicted. (orig.)

  2. Hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Mochizuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis (TC that occurred after total knee arthroplasty. A 64-year-old Japanese man presented with painful swellings in both shoulders, the left elbow, and the right hip that developed after he underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The pathology of the patient’s bone at the time of TKA included a thick osteoid seam with calcareous deposition at the margin of the trabecular bone, which is not generally seen in osteoarthritis. Computed tomography scans of the swollen joints demonstrated leaflet and amorphous calcification masses around the joints. We diagnosed the patient with TC. The present case highlights that TC lesions are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous soft and hard masses around the joint.

  3. Inherited knee disorders in the Medici family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Donatella; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Alburyc, W R; Weisz, George M

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing a medical condition which was existent centuries ago is limited by the lack of contemporaneous evidence-based descriptions in the accounts given by physicians and other observers. Despite these limitations modern paleopathological evidence, supplemented by techniques of historical investigation, have led to the conclusion that males in the Medici family typically suffered from a complex clinical entity with a triple pathology of stenotic spinal ankylosis, recurrent peripheral joint disease and erythematous skin disease; the Medici Syndrome. Examination of the knee joint is illustrative of recurrent joint disease both in the primary and secondary lines of the family. Pictorial and sculptural representations, if used cautiously, can assist in this retrospective process. The six cases presented here illustrate the involvement of the knee joint where the joint destruction ultimately led to an ankylosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation.

  5. Overload syndromes of the knee in adolescents: Sonographic findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, F.; Danesino, G.M.; Coscia, D.; Precerutti, M.; Pagani, C.

    2008-01-01

    Overload syndromes are caused by repetitive microtrauma, and the knee joint is most frequently affected in adolescents. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in almost all sports activities. Pathologies related to the anterior aspect of the knee are: femoropatellar pain, jumper's knee syndromes, Osgood–Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen–Johansson syndrome and patellar stress fractures; to the medial aspect: semimembranous tendon enthesopathy and pes anserinus bursitis; to the lateral aspect: iliotibial band syndrome (runner's knee), popliteus and femoral biceps tendon enthesopathy; to the posterior aspect: fabella syndrome and medial gastrocnemius muscle tendon enthesopathy. Sonography plays a central role in the diagnosis and can also evaluate the evolution of diseases. This method is well accepted by the patients and by their parents, it does not involve exposure to X-rays and it is inexpensive. US imaging should, therefore, be considered a first-line imaging diagnostic technique in functional overuse syndromes of the knee. PMID:23396316

  6. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients.

  7. The Great Mimic Again? A Case of Tuberculosis Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo SH

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence due to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus infection and immigration from endemic areas. TB is also known as the ‘great mimicker’. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis affecting the knee is rare in all forms of TB (0.1-0.3%. Here, we report a case of isolated highly erosive TB knee in a previously fit Burmese migrant worker. He presented with after a history of fall into a drain. The patient also reported pain and swelling over his left knee for the previous three years. He had been treated for a bacterial infection of the knee in another hospital but defaulted due to financial constraints. Arthrotomy of the knee was performed including washout. Diagnosis of TB of the knee was made based on the synovial fluid and tissue culture. Treatment with anti- tuberculosis drugs was then initiated.

  8. Research in Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee: 2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Milewski, Matthew D; Shea, Kevin G

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee remains a relatively common and poorly understood pediatric and adolescent knee condition. Both conservative and surgical treatments have major impact on the lives of young active, athletic patients with knee OCD. OCD has been recently redefined as a "focal, idiopathic alteration of subchondral bone with risk for instability and disruption of adjacent articular cartilage that may result in premature osteoarthritis." The 2011 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines found limited evidence for all aspects of the treatment of knee OCD. The multicenter study group Research in Osteochondritis dissecans of the Knee (ROCK) was formed to advance the understanding and treatment of this condition. This article will review our current understanding of the pathophysiology, treatment options, and outcomes of OCD of the knee, with a focus on the past, present, and future research including the work of the ROCK study group. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Is knee pain during adolescence a self-limiting condition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S.; Rathleff, Camilla R.; Olesen, Jens L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of adolescent knee pain is 33%, and patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common diagnosis with a nontraumatic onset. The 2-year prognosis of adolescent PFP compared with other types of knee pain is unknown. PURPOSE: To investigate the 2-year prognosis of knee pain among...... adolescents with and without a diagnosis of PFP. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: In 2011, a cohort of 2200 adolescents aged 15 to 19 years answered an online questionnaire on musculoskeletal pain. Of these, 504 reported knee pain, and 153 of these were clinically diagnosed with PFP....... After 2 years, the 504 adolescents, as well as 252 randomly selected adolescents who did not report knee pain in 2011, were contacted again. Primary outcome at follow-up was the proportion of adolescents with knee pain during the last week prior to follow-up. RESULTS: Overall, 55.9% (95% CI, 50...

  10. Pathology of the region of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-01-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis. (orig.) [de

  11. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Ali Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6 th day; 9-11 th day and 14 th day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration.

  12. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asim Ali; Jahangir, Umar; Urooj, Shaista

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6(th) day; 9-11(th) day and 14(th) day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration.

  13. Efficacy of Magnetotherapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Rodríguez-Gallo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the most common of Artropathies, highly heterogeneous in their causes and clinical evolution which have a negative economical impact in terms of productivity in the presence of the problematic situation. An almost experimental prospective and longitudinal study was carried out with the objective of evaluating the efficacy of treatment with magnetic field in patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis in Rehabilitation Provincial Hospital Dr. Faustino Pérez Hernández in Sancti Spíritus. The universe is constituted by 126 patients who have knee osteoarthritis diagnosed from clinical and X-ray view by Rheumatology Services, so as orthopedics and Internal Medicine Services who attended the Rehabilitation Provincial Hospital. In order to work with statistical analysis, several variables were used such as: Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test (to determine the statistical differences using statistical significance levels (p=0.05. That’s why, as a conclusion knee Magneto therapy treatment is effective and better up the functional capacity and relief of pain.

  14. Periprosthetic fractures about the knee - an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-02-01

    Several factors are conspiring to cause a dramatic increase in the incidence of periprosthetic fractures. First, the incidence of arthroplasty is increasing as the population ages. Second, arthroplasty is being performed in younger, more active patients, who live longer after their arthroplasty and are more likely to have subsequent trauma to their previously operated limb. Third, following lower extremity surgery, disuse osteopenia of the limb often occurs, increasing the risk of subsequent fracture in that same limb. This increased risk of later fracture is further aggravated by the implant placed at the previous surgery, which often functions as a mechanical stress riser. Careful attention to detail during knee arthroplasty or during fracture repair in which fixation is placed close to the knee is beneficial for minimizing the risk of subsequent periprosthetic fracture. Intraoperative vigilance, judicious use of force when inserting implants, and meticulous technical execution of the procedure may all reduce fracture complications postoperatively. This article reviews the prevalence of periprosthetic fractures about knee arthroplasties and fracture fixation constructs, and also provides a description of common recommendations intended to reduce the risk of periprosthetic fracture. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Dynamic control of knee axial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Malyshev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have evaluated the clinical examination of the patients with axial malalignments in the knee by the original method and device which was named varovalgometer. The measurements were conducted by tension of the cord through the spina iliaca anterior superior and the middle of the lower pole of patella. The deviation of the center of the ankle estimated by metal ruler which was positioned perpendicular to the lower leg axis on the level of the ankle joint line. The results of comparison of our method and computer navigation in 53 patients during the TKA show no statistically significant varieties but they differ by average 5° of valgus in clinical examination in comparison with mechanical axis which was identified by computer navigation. The dynamic control of axial malalignment can be used in clinical practice for estimation of the results of treatment of pathology with axial deformities in the knee; for the control of reduction and secondary displacement of the fractures around the knee; for assessment of instability; in planning of correctional osteotomies and intraoperative control of deformity correction; for estimation of Q angle in subluxation and recurrent dislocation of patella; in planning of TKA; during the growth of child it allows to assess the progression of deformity.

  16. Early and late synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C M; Poulsen, S; Ostergren, M

    1991-01-01

    was reduced and range of motion was unchanged. Total knee alloplasty (TKA) was performed in one knee among the patients who underwent early synovectomy, while reoperation with TKA had been performed in 12 out of 28 knees after late synovectomy. It is concluded that early synovectomy is indicated when medical...... treatment has failed. Late synovectomy must be regarded as a palliative procedure in order to postpone TKA....

  17. Knee Injuries in American Football: An Epidemiological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Paul; Grau, Luis; Kaplan, Lee; Baraga, Michael G

    Football has the highest injury rate amongst popular American sports. Of those injuries that end seasons or careers, the knee is the most common culprit. This is of particular concern because knee injuries are most common in football. This article reviews 4 of the most common knee injuries in American football, with emphasis on epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment outcomes. The injuries reviewed are tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, medial patellofemoral ligament, and posterior cruciate ligament.

  18. [Severe knee sprain: which surgery and for whom?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschy, Daniel; Ménétrey, Jacques

    2009-08-05

    After a knee sprain, some anamnestic and clinical elements may suspect and eventually establish the diagnosis. The association of a crack, an hemarthrosis and a knee joint laxity correspond to a severe sprain. The initial management of a traumatic knee is essential because it leads to the good treatment option. Misdiagnosed lesions often do not heal optimally and induce new traumas synonymous of functional impairment and handicap.

  19. Utilization rates of knee-arthroplasty in OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabinger, C; Lothaller, H; Geissler, A

    2015-10-01

    The number of knee arthroplasties and the prevalence of obesity are increasing exponentially. To date there have been no published reviews on utilization rates of knee arthroplasty in OECD countries. We analysed economic, medical and population data relating to knee arthroplasty surgeries performed in OECD countries. Gross domestic product (GDP), health expenditures, obesity prevalence, knee arthroplasty utilization rates and growth in knee arthroplasty rates per 100,000 population were assessed for total population, for patients aged 65 years and over, and patients aged 64 years and younger. Obesity prevalence and utilization of knee arthroplasty have increased significantly in the past. The mean utilization rate of knee arthroplasty was 150 (22-235) cases per 100,000 total population in 2011. The strongest annual increase (7%) occurred in patients 64 years and under. Differences between individual countries can be explained by economic and medical patterns, with countries with higher medical expenditures and obesity prevalence having significantly higher utilization rates. Countries with lower utilization rates have significantly higher growth in utilization rates. The future demand for knee prostheses will increase x-fold by 2030, with exact rates dependant upon economic, social and medical factors. We observed a 10-fold variation in the utilization of knee arthroplasty among OECD countries. A significant and strong correlation of GDP, health expenditures and obesity prevalence with utilization of knee arthroplasty was found. Patients aged 64 years and younger show a two-fold higher growth rate in knee arthroplasty compared to the older population. This trend could result in a four-fold demand for knee arthroplasty in OECD countries by 2030. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The floating knee: epidemiology, prognostic indicators & outcome following surgical management

    OpenAIRE

    Yesupalan Rajam S; Rethnam Ulfin; Nair Rajagopalan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Floating Knee injuries are complex injuries. The type of fractures, soft tissue and associated injuries make this a challenging problem to manage. We present the outcome of these injuries after surgical management. Methods 29 patients with floating knee injuries were managed over a 3 year period. This was a prospective study were both fractures of the floating knee injury were surgically fixed using different modalities. The associated injuries were managed appropriately. ...

  1. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old...... strenuous tasks following APM, patients used less knee flexion, a strategy that may limit excessive patellar loads during forward lunge in the recently operated leg....

  2. Unusual lesions that distend the knee joint: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Luana T. Barros de, E-mail: luanatbl@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (HUPAA/UFAL), Maceio (Brazil). Hospital Universitario; Albuquerque Filho, Eolo Santana de; Batista, Laecio Leitao [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Moraes, Talita Peixoto de [Clinica Derbimagem, Recife, PE (Brazil); Pereira, Bruno Perez Guedes [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The high number of knee imaging exams at radiology clinics, together with the wide variety of knee disorders, calls for expanding the knowledge about the less common lesions seen in routine diagnostic practice. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to illustrate unusual lesions that distend the knee joint, selected by relevance and evaluated with multiple imaging modalities, including X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature. (author)

  3. Beyond Pain Relief: Total Knee Replacement Surgery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relief: Total Knee Replacement Surgery Follow us Beyond Pain Relief: Total Knee Replacement Surgery Photo: AdobeStock With total knee replacement surgery, researchers are looking beyond simply reducing pain. The hope is to return patients to the ...

  4. Preoperative methylprednisolone does not reduce loss of knee-extension strength after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria; Bandholm, Thomas Q; Zilmer, Camilla K

    2017-01-01

    tourniquet, and with a standardized multimodal analgesic regime. The primary outcome was change in knee-extension strength from baseline to 48 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were knee joint circumference, functional performance using the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, pain during the aforementioned...... tests, rescue analgesic requirements, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) changes. Results - 61 patients completed the follow-up. The loss in quadriceps muscle strength was similar between groups; group MP 1.04 (0.22-1.91) Nm/kg (-89%) vs. group C 1.02 (0.22-1.57) Nm/kg (-88%). Also between......-group differences were similar for knee circumference, TUG test, and pain scores. MP reduced the inflammatory response (CRP) at 24 hours postoperatively; group MP 33 (IQR 21-50) mg/L vs. group C 72 (IQR 58-92) mg/L (p

  5. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Skuldbøl, Sune Kjems; Rasch, Mads Nyhuus

    2013-01-01

    Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared...... to a "wait-and-see" approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated....

  6. Foreign body in the knee with no history of trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesudoss Prabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the knee joint are not uncommon. We report a case of sewing needle that migrated and embedded inside the knee with no history of trauma. Searching for any small foreign body in the knee joint is not easy in either open or arthroscopic procedures. In this case, the surgery was made by open method avoiding arthroscopy due to technical reasons. We emphasize careful history taking, clinical examination and, preferably, an open procedure for migrating tiny foreign bodies to facilitate accurate diagnosis, superior visualization and easier instrumentation to remove embedded foreign bodies in the knee.

  7. Radiological and clinical effect of prosthesis design in varus knees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isyar, Mehmet; Guler, Olcay; Cakmak, Selami; Kara, Adnan; Yalcin, Sercan; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of the prosthesis design used in total knee arthroplasty in patients with varus malalignment. Methods After exclusion criteria we classified 90 patients underwent total knee arthroplasty according to prosthesis used into two groups: posterior cruciate ligament substituting and retaining. Mean follow up period was 25–98 months. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative radiological and as well as clinical parameters such as pain, knee function, flexion deformity. Results We found statistically significant difference in both groups in terms of deformity correction (p = 0.000). Conclusion Prosthesis design affects radiological outcomes in varus knees. PMID:26566321

  8. Alignment Analyses in the Varus Osteoarthritic Knee Using Computer Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelvin G; Sathappan, Sathappan S; Teo, Yee Hong; Low, Wilson C J

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritic (OA) knees with severe extension varus deformity seem to have correspondingly more severe flexion varus, especially beyond a certain tibiofemoral angle. Clinical measurement of flexion varus and fixed flexion deformity (FFD), which had been difficult to perform because of the spatial alignment of the knee in flexion, was recently made possible with computer navigation. We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship of extension and flexion varus in OA knees and to determine whether severity of FFD in the sagittal plane correlates with severity of coronal plane varus deformity. The study included 317 consecutive cases of computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty performed on OA knees with varus deformities. Three sets of values were extracted from the navigation data: varus angle at maximal knee extension, 90° knee flexion, and maximal knee extension. Correlation analyses were performed for extension and flexion varus, FFD, and coronal plane deformity. OA knees with extension varus of more than 10° had an incremental likelihood of more severe flexion varus. When the extension varus angle exceeded 20°, probability became almost certainty. There was no correlation between FFD and coronal plane varus deformity.

  9. Neuromuscular activity and knee kinematics in adolescents with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens Lykkegaard

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS).......This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  10. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses during straight and bent knee cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandroukas, K; Angelopoulou, N; Christoulas, K; Vrabas, I S

    2000-06-01

    This study examined the influence of knee angle on the cardiorespiratory system loading during submaximal and maximal stationary cycle ergometry. Experimental design and participants: eighteen untrained women (age: 21+/-1.88 years, weight: 57+/-5.75 kg, height: 165+/-5.03 cm, values are mean+/-SD) volunteered as subjects and underwent two-cycle ergometer incremental (Jaeger ER900) tests: 1) straight knee (180 degrees), 2) bent knee (140 degrees). oxygen uptake (VO2), ventilation (VE) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were measured continuously during each test using an open circuit spirometry and blood lactate concentration was determined by means of an enzymatic method. Comparing cycling with "straight knee" to cycling with "bent knee" at 50 W, heart rate (HR), V(E) and VO2 were significantly higher (10.6%, 12.5%, 17.8%). At 100 W, blood lactate was significantly lower (10.8%) while VO2 and RER was higher (5.5%, 7.1%). During maximal exercise, the total exercise time was significantly longer (11.2%) and VE, VO2 and HR were significantly higher during cycling with "straight knee" compared to cycling with "bent knee". No significant difference in peak lactate was evident between the two sitting positions. The results of this study indicate that cycling with bent knee requires lower oxygen uptake while pedaling with straight knee is the only way to reach VO2max during cycle testing, since the cardiorespiratory system is fully taxed.

  11. Knee extensors kinetic chain training in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark C; Morrissey, Matthew C; Morrissey, Dylan; Knight, Philippa R; McAuliffe, Thomas B; King, John B

    2005-11-01

    Open kinetic chain (OKC) knee extensor resistance training has lost favour in rehabilitation of patients with knee ACLD due to concerns that this exercise is harmful to the remaining portion of the ACL and its secondary stabilizers, and will be less effective in improving function. In this randomized, single-blind clinical trial, closed and OKC knee extensor training were compared for their effects on knee laxity and function in patients with ACLD knees. Sixty-four patients with a diagnosis of knee ACLD (49 M, 15 F; mean age=30 years) were measured for knee laxity, using a ligament arthrometer, and function with the Hughston Clinic knee self-assessment questionnaire and maximal effort single leg jump testing. Between the above tests and identical tests carried out 6 weeks later, subjects trained using either open or closed kinetic chain resistance of their knee and hip extensors as part of formal physical therapy sessions three times per week for 6 weeks. The groups exhibited no statistically significant differences (pACL deficiency, and shows no superiority to CKC training.

  12. Knee symptoms among adults at risk for accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Julie; Eaton, Charles B; Lo, Grace H; Lu, Bing; Price, Lori Lyn; McAlindon, Timothy E; Barbe, Mary F; Driban, Jeffrey B

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if adults who develop accelerated knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have greater knee symptoms with certain activities than those with or without incident common KOA. We conducted a case-control study using data from baseline and the first four annual visits of the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Participants had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) = 1 knee developed advance-stage KOA (KL = 3 or 4) within 48 months, (2) common KOA: > = 1 knee increased in radiographic severity (excluding those with accelerated KOA), and (3) no KOA: no change in radiographic severity by 48 months. We focused on individual items from the WOMAC pain/function subscales and KOOS pain/symptoms subscales. The index visit was a year before a person met the definition for accelerated, common, or no KOA. To examine group difference in knee symptoms, we used ordinal logistic regression models for each symptom. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Individuals who developed accelerated KOA were more likely to report greater difficulty with lying down (OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 4.25), pain with straightening the knee fully (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.08, 3.85), and pain walking (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.38, 4.84) than adults who developed common KOA. Individuals who develop accelerated KOA report greater symptoms with certain activities than those with common KOA. Our results may help identify individuals at risk for accelerated KOA or with early-stage accelerated KOA.

  13. Epinephrine enhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesion and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtained and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine enhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine (+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine (-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologist. The results were as follows: 1. The differences of mean score of quality between epinephrine (+) group and epinephrine (-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (p value<0.01 at 2 minutes, p<0.001 at all other time interval). Epinephrine (+) group was superior to the epinephrine (-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine (+) group than epinephrine (-) group at every time interval. And the differences between two groups was highly significant statistically (p,0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine (-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine (+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times epinephrine (+) group. 4

  14. Epinephrine enhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesion and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtained and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine enhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine (+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine (-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologist. The results were as follows: 1. The differences of mean score of quality between epinephrine (+) group and epinephrine (-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (p value<0.01 at 2 minutes, p<0.001 at all other time interval). Epinephrine (+) group was superior to the epinephrine (-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine (+) group than epinephrine (-) group at every time interval. And the differences between two groups was highly significant statistically (p,0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine (-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine (+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times epinephrine (+) group. 4

  15. Epinephrine inhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesions and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtainable and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine inhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine(+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine(-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologists. The results were as follows: 1. The difference of mean score of quality between epinephrine(+) group and epinephrine(-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (ρ value < 0.01 at 2 minutes, ρ < 0.001 at all other time intervals). Epinephrine(+) group was superior to the epinephrine(-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine(+) group than epinephrine(-) group at every time interval. And the difference between two groups was highly significant statistically (ρ < 0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine(-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine(+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times in epinephrine(+) group

  16. Dimensionality of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES-ACL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comins, J D; Krogsgaard, M R; Kreiner, Svend

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been questioned based on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Valid interpretation of such results requires confirmation of the psychometric properties of the PROM. Rasch analysis is the gold standard for validation of PROMs......, yet PROMs used for ACL reconstruction have not been validated using Rasch analysis. We used Rasch analysis to investigate the psychometric properties of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES-ACL), a newly developed PROM for patients treated for ACL deficiency. Two-hundred forty-two patients...

  17. Stability of knee ligament complex of Thiel-embalmed cadaver compared to in vivo knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völlner, Florian; Pilsl, Ulrike; Craiovan, Benjamin; Zeman, Florian; Schneider, Michael; Wörner, Michael; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The first biomechanical evaluation of new implants is usually carried out with cadavers. Fixation of Thiel-embalmed cadavers is supposed to preserve the histological structure, colour and consistency of the tissue and has a low risk of infection and toxicity. However, the biomechanical properties of Thiel-fixated tissue are still unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the Thiel-embalming method on the elastic properties of the ligament complex of the knee compared to in vivo knees during total knee arthroplasty. The results of biomechanical tensile tests with 10 Thiel-embalmed knees were compared with the findings of 10 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty with a standardised knee balancer at our department. We reconstructed the force-elongation curves of the medial and lateral ligament complex and calculated the stiffness in direct correlation with overall soft tissue stability in full extension and in 90° of flexion. All curves consisted of a non-linear part at the beginning and a linear part from about 80N onwards. In full extension, median stiffness in the cadavers was 26.6N/mm for the medial compartment and 31.6N/mm for the lateral compartment. The values for in vivo were 25.7N/mm for the medial compartment and 25.3N/mm for the lateral compartment (p=0.684 for the medial compartment and p=0.247 for the lateral compartment). In 90° of flexion, median stiffness in the cadaver group was 24.7N/mm for the medial compartment and 22.2N/mm for the lateral compartment. In vivo, median stiffness was 30.3N/mm for the medial compartment and 29.2N/mm for the lateral compartment (p=0.009 for the medial compartment and p=0.143 for the lateral compartment). Stiffness of the medial and lateral ligament complex in the knee was comparable between Thiel-embalmed cadavers and in vivo patients during total knee arthroplasty. Thiel fixation seems to preserve the soft tissue properties similar to those in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. The efficacy of patellar decompression for improving anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Woo; Lee, Sun-Mi; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Anterior knee pain remains common following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of patellar decompression via drilling for the treatment of anterior knee pain following TKA without patellar resurfacing. A prospective cohort study was performed in 271 consecutive patients who underwent primary total knee replacement with patellar decompression (study group, n = 131) or without decompression (control group, n = 140). The patients were assessed according to the Knee Society rating, clinical anterior knee pain score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient-satisfaction score in each group. Each assessment was performed without the examiner knowing whether the patella had been decompressed. Radiographic evaluations were also performed according to the Knee Society scoring system for functional activity and our own severity grade system for patellofemoral articular change. There were no adverse events following patellar decompression. The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain was not significantly different between groups (p = 0.71). However, patients presenting pain over grade II after the operation in the study group were statistically low (p = 0.01). The overall postoperative knee scores were higher in the study group, but there were no significant differences between groups (p = 0.0731). Analyses of the radiographs revealed similar postoperative outcomes in both groups of knees. As we observed significantly lower rates of anterior knee pain and no patellar complications following patellar decompression via drilling in TKA without patellar resurfacing, we recommend performing patellar decompression in cases of total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing.

  19. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Dacron or PTFE for above-knee femoropopliteal bypass. a multicenter randomised study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Lepäntalo, M; Fossdal, J E

    2007-01-01

    To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass.......To compare polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and polyester grafts (Dacron) for above knee femoropopliteal bypass....

  1. Knee kinetic pattern during gait and anterior knee pain before and after rehabilitation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudon, B; Poussel, M; Billon-Grumillier, C; Beyaert, C; Paysant, J

    2012-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain is likely due to compressive force acting on the patella related in turn to knee extension moment. The latter variable was assumed to be (i) reduced during short-distance free walking in case of patellofemoral pain syndrome and (ii) increased after therapeutic pain reduction. Peak knee extension moment at beginning of stance phase was recorded by three-dimensional gait analysis in 22 controls and in 23 patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome before and after rehabilitation of knee extensors and flexors to reduce the pain. Pain would occur mainly in stressful activities such as stair negotiation or squatting and was quantified by the anterior knee pain scale. Peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced in all the patients before treatment (n=23) compared to controls, although no one had pain during free walking. In the 17 patients who experienced significant post-rehabilitation pain reduction in their stressful activities, the peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced before treatment compared to controls and significantly increased after treatment, reaching values similar to control values. The peak knee extension moment during free walking appears to be a good kinetic variable related to a compensatory mechanism limiting or avoiding anterior knee pain and may be of interest in assessing knee dynamics alteration in patients with PFPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Flexion and anterior knee pain after high flexion posterior stabilized or cruciate retaining knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Groes, Sebastiaan; van der Ven, Paul; Kremers-van de Hei, Keetie; Koëter, Sander; Verdonschot, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Special high-flexion prosthetic designs show a small increase in postoperative flexion compared to standard designs and some papers show increased anterior knee pain with these prosthesis. A prospective double blind randomized controlled trial investigates the difference in flexion and anterior knee pain between standard and high-flexion total knee arthroplasty. In total 47 patients were randomly allocated to a standard cruciate retaining fixed bearing design (CR) in 23 patients and to a high-flexion posterior stabilized mobile bearing design (HF-PS) in 24 patients. The HF-PS did show a significantly higher passive postoperative flexion; 120.8° (SD 10.3°) vs. 112.0° (SD 9.5°) for the CR group (p = 0.004). The active postoperative flexion, VAS-pain score and Feller score did not show significant differences between both groups. Sub analysis with the HF-PS group showed a higher VAS-pain for the patients achieving ≥130° of flexion; 30.5 (SD 32.2) vs. 12.2 (SD 12.5) (p = 0.16). The present study showed a significant higher passive flexion in the high-flexion prosthesis compared to the standard prosthesis. However this difference disappeared when comparing active flexion. No difference in anterior knee pain was found between both groups.

  3. Translation and validation of the Dutch version of the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniël; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Breugem, Stefan J. M.; Lohuis, Kim; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For knee-related surgery, there is a great demand for internationally useable subjective scoring systems. Before such measurements can be used, they should be translated and validated for the population they are used on. For the Dutch population, only the Western Ontario and McMaster

  4. Is there a causal link between knee loading and knee osteoarthritis progression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Creaby, Mark W; Lund, Hans

    2014-01-01

    on causation. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, AMED, CINAHL and SportsDiscus for prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1950 through October 2013. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: We selected cohort studies and RCTs in which estimates of knee joint loading during walking...

  5. Development of prosthetic knee joint technologies for children and youth with above-knee amputations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrysek, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mobility and participation in physical activity is of primary importance for children with limb absence or loss. A prosthetic knee joint is an essential facilitator of this, providing controlled articulation to enable sitting, standing, and natural, safe and efficient movements during mobility.

  6. Long-term trends in the Oxford knee score following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D P; Blakey, C M; Hadfield, S G; Murray, D W; Price, A J; Field, R E

    2013-01-01

    The Oxford knee score (OKS) is a validated and widely accepted disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure, but there is limited evidence regarding any long-term trends in the score. We reviewed 5600 individual OKS questionnaires (1547 patients) from a prospectively-collected knee replacement database, to determine the trends in OKS over a ten-year period following total knee replacement. The mean OKS pre-operatively was 19.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18.8 to 20.2). The maximum post-operative OKS was observed at two years (mean score 34.4 (95% CI 33.7 to 35.2)), following which a gradual but significant decline was observed through to the ten-year assessment (mean score 30.1 (95% CI 29.1 to 31.1)) (p trend was observed for most of the individual OKS components (p followed by rapid deterioration (p 35 kg/m(2) (p following knee replacement.

  7. French adaptation of the new Knee Society Scoring System for total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debette, C; Parratte, S; Maucort-Boulch, D; Blanc, G; Pauly, V; Lustig, S; Servien, E; Neyret, P; Argenson, J N

    2014-09-01

    In November 2011, the Knee Society published its new KSS score to evaluate objective clinical data and also patient expectations, satisfaction and knee function during various physical activities before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We undertook the French cross-cultural adaptation of this scoring system according to current recommendations. The French version of the new KSS score is a consistent, feasible, reliable and discriminating score. Eighty patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from two centers: one group of 40 patients had a TKA indication, while the other group of 40 patients had an indication for conservative treatment. After the new KSS score was translated and back-translated, it was compared to three other validated instruments (KOOS, AMIQUAL and SF-12) to determine construct validity, discriminating power, feasibility in terms of response rate and existence of floor or ceiling effect, internal consistency with Chronbach's alpha and reliability based on reproducibility and sensitivity to change (responsiveness). Due to missing data, two cases were eliminated. We found that the score could discriminate between groups; it had a nearly 100% response rate, a ceiling effect in the "expectations" domain, satisfactory Chronbach's alpha, excellent reproducibility and good responsiveness. These results confirm that the French version of the new KSS score is reliable, feasible, discriminating, consistent and responsive. The novelty of this scoring system resides in the "expectations" and "satisfaction" domains, its availability as a self-assessment questionnaire and the evaluation of function during various activities. Level III. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Flexibility of Knee Joint Muscles in Women with Knee Osteoarthritis and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Abolahrari Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases in synovial joints. Due to high loading forces during weight-bearing activities, the knee joint is prone to degenerative processes. This study aimed to compare the flexibility of muscles around the knee joint in patients with knee osteoarthritis with those of healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-three women with bilateral knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy women matched with the patient group for age, height and weight participated in this study. Flexibility of the quadriceps, hamstring, iliotibial band, adductor and gastrocnemius muscles was evaluated with a goniometric device. Pain intensity was assessed with a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed with independent t-tests to compare the two groups, and Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate muscle flexibility and pain intensity. Results: significant lower flexibility of the bilateral quadriceps muscles was found in patients compared to healthy women (P<0.05. No significant differences were detected between groups regarding other muscles. Quadriceps flexibility correlated significantly with pain intensity in patients (P<0.001. Conclusion: In patients with osteoarthritis, quadriceps flexibility may be decreased although other muscles may remain unaffected. Quadriceps stretching is thus a potentially important component of treatment, which may influence pain reduction in these patients.

  9. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt

    2014-01-01

    ). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark......), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0-10). RESULTS: Two patients were lost to follow...... up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, Pknee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2...

  10. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; Chen, Jian Sheng; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix; Hunter, David J

    2016-06-24

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)-a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation "case" period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m(2)). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee buckling was associated with experiencing a

  11. Influence of Elastic Bandage and Neoprene Sleeve on Knee Position Sense and Pain in Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Majdoleslami

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate whether a neoprene sleeve and elastic bandage around the knee joint of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA would , in short term (a reduce pain (b improve knee joint position sense and comparison of their effect with each other if they have. Materials & Methods: In a semi-experimental study, 30 subjects (11 men, 19 women, age between 33-75 with unilateral knee OA. Subjects had to have at least 2cm from 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS of knee pain for study entry.All patients were randomly assigned to either an elastic bandage or a neoprene sleeve. One week later they were assigned to the opposite selection. Joint position sense was assessed in the sitting position using an electrogoniometer and pain by VAS where 0cm equals no pain and 10 cm equals worst pain. Knee pain and JPS were assessed for each selection one week apart. During each visit assessment were performed at baseline and after 20 min of bandage/neoprene sleeve application. Results: the mean of scores for knee variables JPS and VAS was taken and paired-t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test was employed to calculate the different between two trails. Neoprene sleeve had significant effect on knee JPS (P=0.037. But elastic bandage had no effect (P=0.631. Both of them had significantly reduced knee pain. (P=0.000 Conclusion: In subjects with both neoprene sleeve and elastic bandage reduced knee pain with more effect of neoprene sleeve. Only the neoprene sleeve had effect on knee JPS.

  12. Correlation between dynamic postural stability and muscle strength, anterior instability, and knee scale in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Hah; Kim, Do-Kyung; Yoo, Jae Chul; Lee, Yong Seuk; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Chang, Moon Jong; Park, Yong Serk

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the correlations between dynamic postural stability and muscle strength, anterior instability, and knee scores in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient knees. We examined 40 male patients with ACL injury prior to surgery. Maximal torques of flexors and extensors of the injured knee at 60 and 180 degrees /s were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device. Anterior translations of the tibia were measured using a KT-2000 arthrometer, and dynamic postural stabilities were measured during single-leg stance using the Biodex Stability System (BSS). Knee statuses were evaluated using Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee scores. Correlations between dynamic postural stability and muscle strength, anterior instability, and knee scores were determined. Significant correlations were found between maximal torques of the extensor of injured knees at 60 and 180 degrees /s (r = -0.52, p = 0.048 and r = -0.46, p = 0.019, respectively) and dynamic postural stability, and maximal torques of flexors of injured knees showed similar relations (r = -0.51, p = 0.0048 and r = -0.47, p = 0.016, respectively). Lysholm and IKDC knee scores were also found to be correlated with dynamic postural stability (r = -0.49, p = 0.001 and r = -0.52, p = 0.005, respectively). However, no correlation was found between grade of anterior translation measured using the KT-2000 arthrometer and dynamic postural stability (p = 1.0). Dynamic postural stability determined using the BSS appears to be influenced by muscle strength, as determined by isokinetic testing, but not with grade of anterior translation measured using a KT-2000 arthrometer. Subjective knee scores appear to improve in parallel with dynamic postural stability.

  13. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkering, L.J.; Zengerink, M.; Kampen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases,

  14. Wear Behavior of an Unstable Knee: Stabilization via Implant Design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Reinders

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear-related failures and instabilities are frequent failure mechanisms of total knee replacements. High-conforming designs may provide additional stability for the joint. This study analyzes the effects of a ligamentous insufficiency on the stability and the wear behavior of a high-conforming knee design. Methods. Two simulator wear tests were performed on a high-conforming total knee replacement design. In the first, a ligamentous-stable knee replacement with a sacrificed anterior cruciate ligament was simulated. In the second, a ligamentous-unstable knee with additionally insufficient posterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament was simulated. Wear was determined gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. Implant kinematics was recorded during simulation. Results. Significantly higher wear rates (P≤0.001 were observed for the unstable knee (14.58±0.56 mg/106 cycles compared to the stable knee (7.97 ± 0.87 mg/106 cycles. A higher number of wear particles with only small differences in wear particle characteristics were observed. Under unstable knee conditions, kinematics increased significantly for translations and rotations (P≤0.01. This increase was mainly attributed to higher tibial posterior translation and internal rotations. Conclusion. Higher kinematics under unstable test conditions is a result of insufficient stabilization via implant design. Due to the higher kinematics, increased wear was observed in this study.

  15. Mid-term Results of Rotating Hinged Knee Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Buyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In surgeries on patients with advanced ligament instabilities or severe bone defects rotating hinged knee prostheses are one of a limited number of appropriate options. The objective of our study is to evaluate the mid-term functional results and complications of several surgeries using this form of prothesis. Material and Method: The rotating hinged knee prosthesis (RHKP was applied to 23 knees of 19 patients in primary or revision surgeries at our instution between February 2009 and December 2011. Following their operations, patients underwent several retrospective evaluations to assess surgical success. The average follow-up period for the patients was 54 months. The average age of the patients at their last follow-up was 75. Results: The average Special Surgery Knee Scores, Knee Society Knee Scores, and Knee Society Functional Scores were 44, 27, and 18, respectively, before the surgery; and 83, 92, and 70 in the final post-surgery follow-ups. In addition, the average range of motion increased from the pre-operative level of 76 to 101 degrees at the final evaluation. Two patients had per-operative rupture of the patellar tendon, and four patients had various complications after the surgery, including periprosthetic fracture, deep infection, aseptic loosening, and patellofemoral instability. Discussion: Primary or revision knee arthroplasty using RKHP can be successful in cases with advanced ligament instability or severe bone defects; however, increased complication rates should be kept in mind.

  16. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has suggested to asses pain after specific activities consistently in clinical trials on knee OA. The Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP) assesses pain during activity (30 s of performing repeated deep knee-bends from...... Coefficients. We hypothesized that no correlations would be excellent (

  17. UCI total knee replacement. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, L R

    1982-06-01

    Using the UCI (University of California at Irvine) total knee prosthesis, an arthroplasty was performed in ninety-seven patients (121 knees) from 1972 through 1977. I examined eighty of these patients (100 knees) at three to eight years after the operation and it was necessary to either perform or recommend further surgery in twenty-five of them (twenty-seven knees). These results were designated as failures. The knees in valgus angulation that failed typically did so within the first year because of medical instability and patellar dislocation. The knees in varus angulation that failed typically did so one to six years after operation because of loosening of the tibial component. When failure became established, each knee was found to have reverted to its preoperative angular deformity, indicating that deforming factors were still operative. I suspect that ligament imbalance may have contributed to many of these failures. The surface area and stiffness of the 5.0 and 7.5-millimeter-thick tibial components of the original UCI prosthesis were not sufficient to prevent loosening and subsidence. Constraint between the tibial and femoral components was not sufficient to prevent subluxation or dislocation if soft-tissue release was needed for correction of deformity. Prompted by this experience, total knee arthroplasty using the UCI device has been discontinued at the Ochsner Medical Institutions.

  18. Correlation between varus knee malalignment and patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Nakajima, Mikio; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Oda, Shuhei; Hoshiyama, Yoshiaki; Iida, Go; Neo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) and varus OA of the knee with a focus on the location of joint space narrowing. Eighty-five patients scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty caused by varus OA were enrolled in this study. The relationship between patellofemoral OA and varus knee malalignment was elucidated. To determine the alignment of the patellofemoral joint in varus knees, patellar tilt, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance were measured, and patellofemoral OA was classified using computed tomography. The femorotibial angles in patients with stage II-IV patellofemoral OA were significantly larger than those in patients with stage I patellofemoral OA, and the patellar tilt in patients with stage II-IV patellofemoral OA and the TT-TG distance in patients with stage IV patellofemoral OA were significantly larger than those in patients with stage I patellofemoral OA. The TT-TG distance was strongly correlated with patellar tilt (R(2) = 0.41, P Varus knee malalignment was induced by patellofemoral OA, especially at the lateral facet. Patellar tilt and the TT-TG distance are considered critical factors for the severity of patellofemoral OA. Understanding the critical factors for patellofemoral OA in varus knees such as the TT-TG distance and patellar will facilitate the prevention of patellofemoral OA using procedures such as high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty to correct knee malalignment. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  19. Normal values of knee angle, intercondylar and intermalleolar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is little data on the range of variation of knee angle, intermalleolar and intercondylar distances in African children. Such measurements are needed to assist determining whether a child legs are normal or not. Knee angle intermalleolar and intercondylar distances were measured in 2166 Nigerian children aged one ...

  20. Cosmic ray air showers in the knee energy region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The cosmic ray extensive air showers in the knee energy region have been studied by the. North Bengal University array. The differential size spectra at different atmospheric depths show a systematic shift of the knee towards smaller shower size with the increase in atmospheric depth. The measured values of ...

  1. Intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wambeek, N.; Munk, P.L.; Lee, M.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Meek, R.N. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver (Canada)

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of lntra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee in a 53-year-old man. The case demonstrates an unusual pattern of migration of the marrow edema within the knee joint. This phenomenon has received scant attention in the radiological literature. (orig.)

  2. A Novel Approach to the Dissection of the Human Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, F. Richard; Fabrizio, Philip A.; Shumaker, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The knee is one of the most frequently injured joints of the human body with injuries affecting the general population and the athletic population of many age groups. Dissection procedures for the knee joint typically do not allow unobstructed visualization of the anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments without sacrificing the collateral…

  3. Experience with ultrasound of the knee joint at Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The knee is prone to various pathology. Mulago Hospital records of 2001/2002 show that an average of 432 patients with knee joint disorders are seen in orthopaedic and rheumatology outpatient clinics out of a total of 5400 patients annually. For a long time the only mode of radiological investigation for these ...

  4. Synovial Hemangioma of the Knee: A Rare Pathology | Yalta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 77 year old female patient was admitted to our clinic with a history of swelling in the right knee. After surgical excision of the mass, the pathological examination was found to be consistent with the synovial hemangioma of the knee which has been rarely reported up till now. Pathologists and clinicians dealing with the ...

  5. Total Knee Replacement: a Preliminary Report Thirteen (13) Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This is a prospective report of 13 cases of primary Total Knee Replacement (TKR) at the National Orthopaedic Hospital Lagos between August, 2001 and September, 2005. There were a total of 13 knee replacement surgeries in 11 patients. Ten were females while 1 was male. Consecutive patients with severe ...

  6. Meta-analysis : Acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manheimer, Eric; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Bouter, Lex M.; Berman, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Data Sources: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases to January 2007. No language restrictions

  7. Perioperative blood saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstmann, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores and discusses different aspects of blood loss and blood-saving measures in total hip and knee arthroplasty. Background: Worldwide, approximately 1 million total hip and 1 million total knee prostheses are implanted each year. Total hip arthroplasty and total

  8. The effect of knee position on concentric isokinetic parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advances in isokinetic technology have allowed clinicians to objectively test the muscles of the knee joint in a variety of positions. It is well known that muscular force is influenced by joint position and muscle length, and the knee is no exception. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of seated and prone ...

  9. Bilateral Floating Hip and Floating Knee: a Rare Complex Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a rare complex injury of a 45-year-old man who sustained a bilateral floating hip and floating knee and hospitalised in our service six days after a traffic accident. The floating knees were open type III and II of Cauchoix score in phase of suppuration. He also presented with a floating ankle on the right side.

  10. The effect of prophylactic knee bracing on proprioception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    This has resulted in rugby becoming more professional especially at international level, in improved ... high school and college football injuries involve the knee. Well over 1 000 000 Americans participate in ... been devised because of the high incidence of injuries to this joint. Prophylactic knee braces are designed to ...

  11. Radiological Evaluation of Cystic Lesions Presenting as Painful Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajpal Yadav

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion:Painful knee can be a presenting symptom of many cystic lesions of knee. Ultrasound can show the cystic abnormality, but it is only the Magnetic Resonance Imaging which can demonstrate the complete entity. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 550-558

  12. Novel knee joint mechanism of transfemoral prosthesis for stair ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koh; Wada, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuchi; Tachiwana, Shinichi

    2013-06-01

    The stability of a transfemoral prosthesis when walking on flat ground has been established by recent advances in knee joint mechanisms and their control methods. It is, however, difficult for users of a transfemoral prosthesis to ascend stairs. This difficulty is mainly due to insufficient generation of extension moment around the knee joint of the prosthesis to lift the body to the next step on the staircase and prevent any unexpected flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase. Only a prosthesis with an actuator has facilitated stair ascent using a step-over-step gait (1 foot is placed per step). However, its use has issues associated with the durability, cost, maintenance, and usage environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a novel knee joint mechanism for a prosthesis that generates an extension moment around the knee joint in the stance phase during stair ascent, without the use of any actuators. The proposed mechanism is based on the knowledge that the ground reaction force increases during the stance phase when the knee flexion occurs. Stair ascent experiments with the prosthesis showed that the proposed prosthesis can realize stair ascent without any undesirable knee flexion. In addition, the prosthesis is able to generate a positive knee joint moment power in the stance phase even without any power source.

  13. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replace all or part of your hip or knee joint with an artificial device (a prosthesis). Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you prepare for your hip or knee replacement. Questions Is joint replacement the best treatment ...

  14. Functioning Before and After Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.B. de Groot (Ingrid)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee is a common locomotor disease characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In the Netherlands, in the year 2000 about 257,400 persons above the age of 55 years had hip OA and about 335,700 persons had knee OA. Because the prevalence of OA

  15. Treatment of Symptomatic Varus Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is the 6th leading cause of Years Lost to Disability (YLD) at global level, accounting for 3% of total global YLDs. Knee OA is the most common joint disorder, and in the Netherlands approximately 17% of the population aged 45 years and over suffer from knee OA. It

  16. Fast-track knee arthroplasty – status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Fast-track programs have been developed for different surgical procedures leading to higher patient satisfaction and lower morbidity. This concept has been extended to knee arthroplasty in recent years. The purpose of this narrative review was to discuss the different aspects of fast-track knee a...

  17. Effects of protective knee bracing on speed and agility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, D L; Hamson, K R; Bay, R C; Bryce, C D

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of prophylactic knee braces on athlete speed and agility, as well as brace tendency to migrate. Thirty college football players in full gear ran a 40-yard dash and a four-cone agility drill wearing braces on both knees or no brace (control). Braces included the DonJoy Legend, Breg Tradition, OMNI-AKS 101W, McDavid Knee Guard, and models 1 and 2 of the Air Armor Knee and Thigh Protection System. Brace migration and subjective measures were recorded after each trial. In the 40-yard dash, times using Air Armor 1 and OMNI did not differ significantly from control. Times with other braces were significantly slower. In the four-cone drill, only the Breg times were significantly slower than control. The Air Armor 1 and McDavid braces showed significantly less superior/inferior migration in the 40-yard dash than other braces. In the four-cone drill, the Air Armor 1 and 2 showed significantly less superior/inferior migration than other braces. These findings indicate that selected knee braces do not significantly reduce speed or agility. Braces showed a variable tendency to migrate, which could affect their protective function and athlete performance. This information will help athletes and coaches decide about knee-brace use during sports; studies are needed regarding whether braces protect against knee injury. This study does not constitute an endorsement of knee-brace use or efficacy.

  18. CHANGES IN HIP MUSCLES AFTER ABOVE-KNEE AMPUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAEGERS, SMHJ; ARENDZEN, JH; DEJONGH, HJ

    1995-01-01

    To learn about the changes appearing in hip muscles after an above-knee amputation, 3-dimensional reconstructions of the hip and thigh region of 12 patients with above-knee amputations were made based on transverse magnetic resonance images, In all patients, the amputations were done at least 2

  19. Ultrasonographic Findings in Hemiplegic Knees of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Pin Yang

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and radiologic asymmetric arthritic differences between paralyzed and nonparalyzed limbs of stroke patients have been reported. Arthritic pathology aggravates motor dysfunction and compromises rehabilitation. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography plays an important role in showing soft tissue and the articular cartilage of the knee. Fifty-nine patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke-induced right or left hemiplegia were recruited to evaluate soft-tissue and intra-articular cartilage changes in hemiplegic knees of stroke patients using ultrasonography. An additional 15 subjects (30 knees without knee disease or a history of knee trauma or surgery were used as controls. There were significant differences in suprapatellar effusion and patellar tendinitis between hemiplegic and nonhemiplegic knees. Suprapatellar effusion and pes anserinus tendinitis were correlated with Brunnstrom stage. The length of time since stroke onset was not significantly correlated with positive ultrasonographic findings in hemiplegic knees. In conclusion, ultrasonography is useful for detecting periarticular soft-tissue changes and intra-articular lesions in hemiplegic knees of stroke patients.

  20. Viscosupplementation in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Viscosupplementation is a recognised mode of management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, especially in patients who have failed treatment with NSAIDs. Objectives: To review the literature on viscosupplementation as well as assess its efficacy in Nigerians with OA of the knee. Methods: Patients presenting ...

  1. Body mass index, pain and function in individuals with knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity is a risk factor for progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and high body mass index (BMI) may interfere with treatment effectiveness on pain and function in individuals with knee OA. This study investigated the effects of BMI on pain and function during a four‑week exercise programme in patients with ...

  2. Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure: Process of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure (IKHOAM) was developed as a Nigerian-environment and culturefriendly instrument for the assessment of the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee and/or hip. This article outlines the steps involved in developing an ...

  3. Pattern of Motion Restriction in Nigerian Patients with Knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Motion Restriction in Nigerian Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis. ... African Journal of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences ... In the Western population, knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to present a characteristic passive motion restriction pattern, called the capsular pattern (extension restriction to ...

  4. Cosmic ray air showers in the knee energy region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The cosmic ray extensive air showers in the knee energy region have been studied by the North Bengal University array. The differential size spectra at different atmospheric depths show a systematic shift of the knee towards smaller shower size with the increase in atmospheric depth. The measured values of spectral ...

  5. Intrinsic properties of the knee extensor muscles after subacute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.M.H.; Gerrits, K.H.L.; Beltman, M.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Janssen, T.W.J.; de Haan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Horstman AM, Gerrits KH, Beltman MJ, Koppe PA, Janssen, TW, de Haan A. Intrinsic properties of the knee extensor muscles after subacute stroke. Objective: To characterize muscle properties of paretic lower-limb (PL) and nonparetic lower-limb (NL) knee extensors in patients with subacute stroke.

  6. Variation in joint stressing magnitudes during knee arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stunt, J. J.; Wulms, P. H. L. M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Sierevelt, I. N.; Schafroth, M. U.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When performing knee arthroscopy, joint stressing is essential to increase the operative joint space. Adequate training of joint stressing is important, since high stressing forces can damage knee ligaments, and low stressing might not give sufficient operative space. As forces are difficult to

  7. Translation of the Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure (IKHOAM), a Nigerian culture and environmentfriendly clinical tool was developed at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria for measuring end results of care in patients with knee or Hip Osteoarthritis OA. Translated and validated Yoruba and Hausa versions of IKHOAM are ...

  8. Detection of knee unlock during stance using accelerometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; Franken, Henry M.; Franken, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Detection of knee unlock is a crucial part of finite state artificial reflex control of paraplegic standing supported by functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS). This paper investigates knee unlock detection schemes using small uniaxial accelerometers mounted on the thigh and shank. Four single

  9. Standardized loads acting in knee implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Bergmann

    Full Text Available The loads acting in knee joints must be known for improving joint replacement, surgical procedures, physiotherapy, biomechanical computer simulations, and to advise patients with osteoarthritis or fractures about what activities to avoid. Such data would also allow verification of test standards for knee implants. This work analyzes data from 8 subjects with instrumented knee implants, which allowed measuring the contact forces and moments acting in the joint. The implants were powered inductively and the loads transmitted at radio frequency. The time courses of forces and moments during walking, stair climbing, and 6 more activities were averaged for subjects with I average body weight and average load levels and II high body weight and high load levels. During all investigated activities except jogging, the high force levels reached 3,372-4,218N. During slow jogging, they were up to 5,165N. The peak torque around the implant stem during walking was 10.5 Nm, which was higher than during all other activities including jogging. The transverse forces and the moments varied greatly between the subjects, especially during non-cyclic activities. The high load levels measured were mostly above those defined in the wear test ISO 14243. The loads defined in the ISO test standard should be adapted to the levels reported here. The new data will allow realistic investigations and improvements of joint replacement, surgical procedures for tendon repair, treatment of fractures, and others. Computer models of the load conditions in the lower extremities will become more realistic if the new data is used as a gold standard. However, due to the extreme individual variations of some load components, even the reported average load profiles can most likely not explain every failure of an implant or a surgical procedure.

  10. Hierarchical imaging of the human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Götz, Christian; Deyhle, Hans; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Khimchenko, Anna; Thalmann, Peter; Rack, Alexander; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) reaches the best spatial resolution. Sub-millimeter voxel sizes are regularly obtained. For investigations on true micrometer level lab-based μCT has become gold standard. The aim of the present study is the hierarchical investigation of a human knee post mortem using hard X-ray μCT. After the visualization of the entire knee using a clinical CT with a spatial resolution on the sub-millimeter range, a hierarchical imaging study was performed using a laboratory μCT system nanotom m. Due to the size of the whole knee the pixel length could not be reduced below 65 μm. These first two data sets were directly compared after a rigid registration using a cross-correlation algorithm. The μCT data set allowed an investigation of the trabecular structures of the bones. The further reduction of the pixel length down to 25 μm could be achieved by removing the skin and soft tissues and measuring the tibia and the femur separately. True micrometer resolution could be achieved after extracting cylinders of several millimeters diameters from the two bones. The high resolution scans revealed the mineralized cartilage zone including the tide mark line as well as individual calcified chondrocytes. The visualization of soft tissues including cartilage, was arranged by X-ray grating interferometry (XGI) at ESRF and Diamond Light Source. Whereas the high-energy measurements at ESRF allowed the simultaneous visualization of soft and hard tissues, the low-energy results from Diamond Light Source made individual chondrocytes within the cartilage visual.

  11. [Rating scale for osteoarthritis knee assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Rubén; Pérez-Correa, Jesús; Gaytán-Morales, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    We undertook this study to develop a grading scale to assess knee osteoarthritis using the Bristol Score. Between August and November 2004, a clinimetrical, prospective, group-controlled, observational, cross-sectional and analytical study was done. The study sample was comprised of 55 patients, 35 years old and over, with clinical-radiographic diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis following the American Academy of Rheumatology criteria. The Bristol Score was used in 25 patients by two standardized orthopedic surgeons. Sensitivity, consistency and validity of the Bristol Score were determined. The new grading scale to assess osteoarthritis Magdalena de las Salinas H-1(MSH1) was used in 30 patients. Sensitivity, consistency and validity of the MSH1 were also determined. Both indexes were compared in these terms. An osteoarthritis radiographic score was developed to assess the validity of the MSH1. Inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Bristol Score in its categories was total 0.62, function 0.84, pain 0.40 and movement 0.89. Inter-observer ICC for MSH1 in its categories was total 0.91, function 0.92, pain 0.79 and movement 0.86 (p Bristol Score was 0.51 (p = 0.002), with 80% agreement. The weighed kappa for the MSH1 was 0.81 (p Bristol Score and the osteoarthritis radiographic score was -0.29 (p = 0.049). Correlation between the MSH1 and the radiographic score of osteoarthritis was -0.62 (p Bristol Score and can be considered a reliable instrument to assess knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Radionuclide arthrogram to evaluate knee prostheses loosening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, U.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:This case is about a 78 year old lady who had 3TKRs on her left knee. The 2nd revision surgery was performed due to infection. After 6 weeks long procedure, that patient was discharged with satisfactory movement without sign of infection. 15 months after the surgery, the orthopaedic surgeon found that some pressure wave effects and pain with walking. There was no sign of infection clinically. Once X-ray could not confirm any micro-loosening, the surgeon wanted to investigate with radionuclide arthrogram for this difficult case. 40 MBq in 2mls of Calcium phytate colloid (from RADPHARM Australia) was injected into the knee joint space. 30 minutes static views revealed the tracer started to travel below the tibial component. 4 hours statics views clearly indicate the tibial component loosening also there was leakage of tracer through anterior tibial osteotomy screws into the level of ankle subcutaneously. Cobalt57 flood images provided the anatomical localisation. While the surgeon was planning new component for the 3rd revision surgery, the patient's pain disappeared with time. No more revision was considered with satisfactory level of movement. This was the first and only case of radio arthogram to our department, although we perform many bone scans with same reason. On published articles, overall sensitivity and specificity are variable from 85% to 100%. When we take look at other clinical experience, there are a number of reasons in the high accuracy and reliability of radionuclide arthrogram especially for knee prosthesis loosening. Therefore I want to emphasise the benefit of radionuclide arthrogram for both patient and surgeon as a reliable diagnosis with minimum discomfort.

  13. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  14. Computer assisted navigation in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Song, Sang Jun

    2011-12-01

    Computer assisted surgery (CAS) was used to improve the positioning of implants during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Most studies have reported that computer assisted navigation reduced the outliers of alignment and component malpositioning. However, additional sophisticated studies are necessary to determine if the improvement of alignment will improve long-term clinical results and increase the survival rate of the implant. Knowledge of CAS-TKA technology and understanding the advantages and limitations of navigation are crucial to the successful application of the CAS technique in TKA. In this article, we review the components of navigation, classification of the system, surgical method, potential error, clinical results, advantages, and disadvantages.

  15. [Knee pain: choosing the right imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potric, A; Mach, T; Pereira Miozzari, A C

    2013-09-25

    Gonalgia is a frequent reason for consultation of a primary care physician. The road leading to diagnosis is mainly clinical. A detailed medical history and physical examination are capital for establishing diagnostic hypotheses and choosing the most appropriate imaging test. Initially, a simple X-ray of the knee joint is the most common exam, even though it is not always needed, especially after a minor trauma. MRI and CT-scan allow a more detailed examination of the structures; however, they should only be ordered to answer a specific question. Most of the time, echography is reserved to extra-articular pathologies and for guiding an articular tap.

  16. [Generalised Form of Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee Joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vališ, P; Vyskočil, R

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm in a 53-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with a synovial chondromatosis of the knee joint extending to the popliteal fossa and soft tissues around the knee. Because of the presence of massive nodules, the patient was indicated for total synovectomy, with removal of pathologically changed cartilaginous tissue, performed by combined anterior and posterior approaches to the knee joint. Despite complete removal of the synovium and loose cartilage bodies and the patient's pain relief in the post-operative time, three years after the operation new problems appeared. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed a relapse of synovial chondromatosis and the patient was indicated for revision surgery of the knee joint. The results of physical examination and MRI scans, and intra-operative findings in the patient are reported. synovial chondromatosis, total synovectomy, direct anterior and posterior approaches to the knee joint.

  17. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  18. Haemodynamics in acute arthritis of the knee in puppies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, C; Hjermind, J; Harving, S

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the haemodynamic changes of the juvenile knee in acute arthritis, an experimental model was developed in puppies by unilateral intra-articular injections of Carragheenin solution into the knee. Tissue blood flow was studied by the tracer microsphere technique in eight dogs...... and simultaneous intra-articular and intraosseous pressure recordings were performed in seven other dogs. The intra-articular pressure was elevated in all arthritic knees. Hyperaemia was found in the knee-joint capsule and distal femoral metaphysis, whereas juxta-articular epiphyseal blood flow rates were...... not significantly changed. A decrease of femoral muscle blood flow was encountered. Intraosseous pressure recordings during venous tamponade of the knee-joint capsules suggested a qualitative change of bone vasculature in acute arthritis. The juxta-articular bone blood flow in arthritis appears to be influenced...

  19. Knee injuries in skiing. A prospective study from northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, G; Gedda, S; Hemborg, A

    1980-01-01

    This paper evaluates 420 ski injuries occurring in Northern Sweden in 1977. Our main aim was to correlate knee injuries with types of skiing and to note a change in incidence with evolution of equipment. Fifty-eight lesions (13.8%) affected the knee joint which is about the same frequency as 10 years earlier nor has introduction of high stiff boots in downhill skiing increased incidence of knee injuries. Cross-country and long-distance skiing produced more knee injuries (24.7%) than downhill skiing (11.4%). Cross-country skiers were older and more women in this group sustained knee injuries. The use of non-release type bindings is probably the main reason for this higher incidence but age and different skiing techniques seem to contribute.

  20. Knee joint laxity in a native Canadian Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Daniel K; Harvey, Edward J; Berry, Gregory K; Reindl, Rudolf; Correa, José A

    2005-01-01

    Clinical observation of increased laxity has been noted in native Canadians. Comparative studies support the possible relationship between joint hypermobility and the development of osteoarthritis or other joint ailments. If joint laxity predisposes to osteoarthritis, there may be far-reaching consequences to the general Native population. A cohort of 52 Native Canadians (NC) and 52 non-Native Canadians (NNC) were evaluated for knee laxity. All patients had no prior history of knee injury or complaints of symptoms related to knee pathology at the time of the examination. Bilateral knee examination was performed. Objective laxity was measured using the KT-1000 tensiometer. Subjective findings were also recorded. Comparison for instability between the groups (NC and NNC) revealed that the NC group had significantly greater laxity on both right and left sides for all knee ligament grading (p Native Canadian population.