WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal transport proteins

  1. Endocytic regulation of alkali metal transport proteins in mammals, yeast and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, José Miguel; Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Primo, Cecilia; Marqués, Ma Carmen; Yenush, Lynne

    2013-11-01

    The relative concentrations of ions and solutes inside cells are actively maintained by several classes of transport proteins, in many cases against their concentration gradient. These transport processes, which consume a large portion of cellular energy, must be constantly regulated. Many structurally distinct families of channels, carriers, and pumps have been characterized in considerable detail during the past decades and defects in the function of some of these proteins have been linked to a growing list of human diseases. The dynamic regulation of the transport proteins present at the cell surface is vital for both normal cellular function and for the successful adaptation to changing environments. The composition of proteins present at the cell surface is controlled on both the transcriptional and post-translational level. Post-translational regulation involves highly conserved mechanisms of phosphorylation- and ubiquitylation-dependent signal transduction routes used to modify the cohort of receptors and transport proteins present under any given circumstances. In this review, we will summarize what is currently known about one facet of this regulatory process: the endocytic regulation of alkali metal transport proteins. The physiological relevance, major contributors, parallels and missing pieces of the puzzle in mammals, yeast and plants will be discussed.

  2. Identification of a rice metal tolerance protein OsMTP11 as a manganese transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs are a gene family of cation efflux transporters that occur widely in plants and might serve an essential role in metal homeostasis and tolerance. Our research describes the identification, characterization, and localization of OsMTP11, a member of the MTP family from rice. OsMTP11 was expressed constitutively and universally in different tissues in rice plant. Heterologous expression in yeast showed that OsMTP11 complemented the hypersensitivity of mutant strains to Mn, and also complemented yeast mutants to other metals, including Co and Ni. Real time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated OsMTP11 expression was substantially enhanced following 4 h under Cd, Zn, Ni, and Mn treatments, suggesting possible roles of OsMTP11 involvement in heavy metal stress responses. Promoter analysis by transgenic assays with GUS as a reporter gene and mRNA in situ hybridization experiments showed that OsMTP11 was expressed specifically in conducting tissues in rice. DNA methylation assays of genomic DNA in rice treated with Cd, Zn, Ni, and Mn revealed that decreased DNA methylation levels were present in the OsMTP11 promoter region, which was consistent with OsMTP11 induced-expression patterns resulting from heavy metal stress. This result suggested that DNA methylation is one of major factors regulating expression of OsMTP11 through epigenetic mechanisms. OsMTP11 fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP localized to the entire onion epidermal cell cytoplasm, while vacuolar membrane exhibited increased GFP signals, consistent with an OsMTP11 function in cation sequestration. Our results indicated that OsMTP11 might play vital roles in Mn and other heavy metal transportation in rice.

  3. The New Role for an Old Kinase: Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Metal Ion Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Johnson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinase CK2 was the first kinase discovered. It is renowned for its role in cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. The complexity of this kinase is well reflected by the findings of past decades in terms of its heterotetrameric structure, subcellular location, constitutive activity and the extensive catalogue of substrates. With the advent of non-biased high-throughput functional genomics such as genome-wide deletion mutant screening, novel aspects of CK2 functionality have been revealed. Our recent discoveries using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells demonstrate that CK2 regulates metal toxicity. Extensive literature search reveals that there are few but elegant works on the role of CK2 in regulating the sodium and zinc channels. As both CK2 and metal ions are key players in cell biology and oncogenesis, understanding the details of CK2’s regulation of metal ion homeostasis has a direct bearing on cancer research. In this review, we aim to garner the recent data and gain insights into the role of CK2 in metal ion transport.

  4. Metal-binding thermodynamics of the histidine-rich sequence from the metal-transport protein IRT1 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas E; Akilesh, Shreeram; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Wilcox, Dean E

    2006-10-16

    The widespread ZIP family of transmembrane metal-transporting proteins is characterized by a large intracellular loop that contains a histidine-rich sequence whose biological role is unknown. To provide a chemical basis for this role, we prepared and studied a peptide corresponding to this sequence from the first iron-regulated transporter (IRT1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, which transports Fe2+ as well as Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements, which required novel experiments and data analysis, and supporting spectroscopic methods were used to quantify IRT1's metal-binding affinity and associated thermodynamics. The peptide, PHGHGHGHGP, binds metal ions with 1:1 stoichiometry and stabilities that are consistent with the Irving-Williams series. Comparison of the metal-binding thermodynamics of the peptide with those of trien provides new insight about enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability of the metal-peptide complex. Although Fe2+ and other IRT1-transported metal ions do not bind very tightly, this His-rich sequence has a very high entropy-driven affinity for Fe3+, which may have biological significance.

  5. Highly water-soluble ruthenium(II terpyridine coordination compounds form stable adducts with blood-borne metal transporting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Nišavić

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three coordination compounds of ruthenium(II, belonging to a recently synthesised series of water-soluble compounds of general formula mer-[Ru(L3(N-NCl]Cl, where L3 = 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (Cl-tpy, N-N = ethylenediamine (en, 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (dach or 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, have shown strong binding to calf thymus DNA and moderate in vitro cytotoxicity towards cancer cell lines. Knowing that serum proteins play a crucial role in the transport and deactivation of ruthenium drugs, we have conducted a detailed study of their interactions with two major metal-transporting serum proteins, albumin and transferrin, and it is presented herein. Ruthenated protein adducts were formed with various concentrations of the three compounds and then separated from the unbound portions by ultrafiltration through 10 kDa cut-off centrifugal filter units. The stoichiometry of binding was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. One mol of albumin bound up to 7, 8.5 and 1.5 mol of compound 1 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(enCl][Cl], 2 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(dachCl][Cl] and 3 ([Ru(Cl-tpy(bpyCl][Cl], respectively. One mol of transferrin bound up to 3, 3.5 and 0.4 mol of 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The affinity of albumin and transferrin for the three ruthenium compounds was evaluated using fluorescence quenching. The binding constants for 1 and 2 lay within the range 104–105 M−1, suggesting moderate-to-strong attachment to albumin. Both compounds showed much lower affinity for transferrin (102–103 M−1. Compound 3 bound weakly to each studied protein. High resolution ESI qTOF mass spectra of albumin before and after binding of 1 revealed the high stoichiometry of binding. Although the binding of the compounds 1–3 to albumin and transferrin did not affect proteins’ secondary structure much, their tertiary structures underwent some alterations, as deduced from the circular dichroism study. Changes in the stability of albumin, after

  6. Transport Properties of Liquid Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Transport properties of Pd, Ag pure metals and their binary alloys are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body potential is used to define the interactions between the atoms. The effects of temperature and concentration on the transport properties such as diffusion and viscosity of the metals are analysed. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental and theoretical values

  7. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  8. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  9. Metal transport across biomembranes: emerging models for a distinct chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, José M; Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2012-04-20

    Transition metals are essential components of important biomolecules, and their homeostasis is central to many life processes. Transmembrane transporters are key elements controlling the distribution of metals in various compartments. However, due to their chemical properties, transition elements require transporters with different structural-functional characteristics from those of alkali and alkali earth ions. Emerging structural information and functional studies have revealed distinctive features of metal transport. Among these are the relevance of multifaceted events involving metal transfer among participating proteins, the importance of coordination geometry at transmembrane transport sites, and the presence of the largely irreversible steps associated with vectorial transport. Here, we discuss how these characteristics shape novel transition metal ion transport models.

  10. Transport of Proteins through Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan

    In biological cells, a malfunctioned protein (such as misfolded or damaged) is degraded by a protease in which an unfoldase actively drags the protein into a nanopore-like structure and then a peptidase cuts the linearized protein into small fragments (i.e. a recycling process). Mimicking this biological process, many experimental studies have focused on the transport of proteins through a biological protein pore or a synthetic solid-state nanopore. Potentially, the nanopore-based sensors can provide a platform for interrogating proteins that might be disease-related or be targeted by a new drug molecule. The single-profile of a protein chain inside an extremely small nanopore might even permit the sequencing of the protein. Here, through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, I will show various types of protein transport through a nanopore and reveal the nanoscale mechanics/energetics that plays an important role governing the protein transport.

  11. Water-transporting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    . In the K(+)/Cl(-) and the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporters, water is entirely cotransported, while water transport in glucose uniporters and Na(+)-coupled transporters of nutrients and neurotransmitters takes place by both osmosis and cotransport. The molecular mechanism behind cotransport of water...... transport. Epithelial water transport is energized by the movements of ions, but how the coupling takes place is uncertain. All epithelia can transport water uphill against an osmotic gradient, which is hard to explain by simple osmosis. Furthermore, genetic removal of aquaporins has not given support...... to osmosis as the exclusive mode of transport. Water cotransport can explain the coupling between ion and water transport, a major fraction of transepithelial water transport and uphill water transport. Aquaporins enhance water transport by utilizing osmotic gradients and cause the osmolarity...

  12. [H(+)-coupled heavy metal transport in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migocka, Magdalena; Nowojska, Ewa; Kłobus, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    It has been recently well documented that metal transport systems play a crucial role in the uptake, distribution and detoxification of heavy metals throughout the plant. A range of gene families that are likely to be involved in essential and non-essential metal transport has been now identified and their plasma membrane and/or tonoplast localization in plant cells has been recently confirmed. These include the primary metal transporters, using ATP as the source of energy and H(+)-coupling transporters, utilizing the electrochemical gradient previously generated by plasma membrane and tonoplast proton pumps. As the presence of nucleotide binding domains in the protein sequence may indicate its ATP-hydrolytic activity, it is more difficult to determine the H(+)-coupling activity of protein on the base of its structure. Thus, the H(+)-coupling activity of protein may be only proved by functional analysis of the protein. In this work, we briefly review the structure, regulation and function of the metal transporters operating as H(+)/metal cotransporters.

  13. Metalloregulatory proteins: metal selectivity and allosteric switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Caballero, Hermes; Campanello, Gregory C; Giedroc, David P

    2011-07-01

    Prokaryotic organisms have evolved the capacity to quickly adapt to a changing and challenging microenvironment in which the availability of both biologically required and non-essential transition metal ions can vary dramatically. In all bacteria, a panel of metalloregulatory proteins controls the expression of genes encoding membrane transporters and metal trafficking proteins that collectively manage metal homeostasis and resistance. These "metal sensors" are specialized allosteric proteins, in which the direct binding of a specific or small number of "cognate" metal ion(s) drives a conformational change in the regulator that allosterically activates or inhibits operator DNA binding, or alternatively, distorts the promoter structure thereby converting a poor promoter to a strong one. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the features that control metal specificity of the allosteric response in these systems, and the role that structure, thermodynamics and conformational dynamics play in mediating allosteric activation or inhibition of DNA binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inositol transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sabine

    2015-04-28

    The cyclic polyol myo-inositol is a key molecule in many different metabolic pathways among all organisms; in addition, it is fundamental for osmotic balance in the mammalian brain. This review sums up inositol transporters from eukaryotic organisms, elucidating their vital role in regulating the intracellular distribution and uptake of inositol. They can be divided into two groups according to their transport mechanisms: (1) sodium ion coupled inositol transporters that belong to the Solute Carrier Families 5 and 6-like Superfamily and, (2) proton coupled inositol symporters that are members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily. Intriguingly members of both families offer promising targets for medical treatment of a variety of diseases. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  16. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO 2 , AsO 4 , Bi, Cd, Co, CrO 4 , Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO 3 , TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  17. Metallic insulation transport and strainer clogging tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvaerinen, J.; Hongisto, O.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments to probe the transport and clogging properties of metallic (metal reflective) insulation have been carried out in order to provide data for evaluation of their influence on the emergency core cooling and containment spray systems of the Finnish boiling water reactors in the event of a design basis accident. The specific metallic insulation tested was DARMET, provided by Darchem Engineering Ltd. The inner foils of Darmet are dimped. Available literature on the metallic insulation performance under design basis accident conditions has been reviewed. On the basis of the review a parametric approach has been chosen for the transport and clogging experiments. This approach involves testing a wide size range of various shapes of foil pieces. Five sets of experiments have been carried out. The first three sets investigate transport properties of the foil pieces, starting from sedimentation in stagnant waste pool and proceeding to transport in horizontal and vertically circulating flows. The clogging experiments have been addressed the differential pressures obtained due to accumulation of both pure and metallic and a mixture of metallic and fibrous (mineral wool) depris. (4 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.)

  18. Immunoglobulin classes, metal binding proteins, and trace metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , IgA and IgM), metal binding proteins (Transferrin, Caeruloplasmin, Alpha-2- Macroglobulin and Haptoglobin) and nutritionally essential trace metals/heavy metals (Zn, Fe, Se, Cu, Mg, Cd and Pb) in Nigerian cassava processors using single ...

  19. Electrical transport through a metal-molecule-metal junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kergueris, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the electrical transport through a very few molecules connected to metallic electrodes at room temperature. First, the state of the art in molecular electronics is outlined. We present the most convincing molecular devices reported so far in the literature and the theoretical tools available to analyze the electron transport mechanism through a molecular junction. Second, we describe the use of mechanically controllable break junctions to investigate the electron transport properties through a metal-molecule-metal junction. Two kinds of molecules were adsorbed on the two facing gold electrodes, dodecane-thiol (DT) and bis-thiol-ter-thiophene (α,ω T3), that are basically expected to behave as an insulator and as a molecular wire, respectively. In the latter case, we study the chemical reactivity of the molecule and show that α,ω T3 is chemically adsorbed on gold electrodes. Current-voltage characteristics of the junction were observed at room temperature. The Gold-DT-Gold junction behaves as a simple metal-insulator-metal junction. On the other hand, the electron transport through a Gold-α,ω T3-Gold junction explicitly involves the electronic structure of the molecule which gives rise to step-like features in the current-voltage characteristics. The measured zero bias conductance is interpreted using the scattering theory. At high bias, we discuss two different models: a coherent model where the electron has no time to be completely re-localized in the molecule and a sequential model where the electron is localized in the molecule during the transfer. Finally, we show that the mechanical action of decreasing the inter-electrodes spacing can be used to induce a strong modification of the current-voltage characteristics. (author)

  20. Drug transport proteins in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Muller, M.; Jansen, P.LM

    2003-01-01

    Together with drug metabolising enzymes, transmembrane transporters are important determinants of drug metabolism and drug clearance by the liver. Hepatic uptake of organic anions, cations, prostaglandins and bile salts is supported by dedicated transporter proteins in the basolateral (sinusoidal)

  1. Electrical transport through a metal-molecule-metal junction; Transport electrique a travers une jonction metal-molecule-metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kergueris, Ch

    1998-12-17

    We investigate the electrical transport through a very few molecules connected to metallic electrodes at room temperature. First, the state of the art in molecular electronics is outlined. We present the most convincing molecular devices reported so far in the literature and the theoretical tools available to analyze the electron transport mechanism through a molecular junction. Second, we describe the use of mechanically controllable break junctions to investigate the electron transport properties through a metal-molecule-metal junction. Two kindsof molecules were adsorbed on the two facing gold electrodes, dodecane-thiol (DT) and bis-thiol-ter-thiophene ({alpha},{omega} T3), that are basically expected to behave as an insulator and as a molecular wire, respectively. In the latter case, we study the chemical reactivity of the molecule and show that {alpha},{omega} T3 is chemically adsorbed on gold electrodes. Current-voltage characteristics of the junction were observed at room temperature. The Gold-DT-Gold junction behaves as a simple metal-insulator-metal junction. On the other hand, the electron transport through a Gold-{alpha},{omega} T3-Gold junction explicitly involves the electronic structure of the molecule which gives rise to step-like features in the current-voltage characteristics. The measured zero bias conductance is interpreted using the scattering theory. At high bias, we discuss two different models: a coherent model where the electron has no time to be completely re-localized in the molecule and a sequential model where the electron is localized in the molecule during the transfer. Finally, we show that the mechanical action of decreasing the inter-electrodes spacing can be used to induce a strong modification of the current-voltage characteristics. (author)

  2. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  3. Mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys we have developed indirect studies of diffusion based on electron irradiation and hydrostatic pressure effects upon crystallization. In a first part we present the models of crystallization which are used, then we give the experimental results. The main point is the first experimental measurement of the activation volume for diffusion in a metallic glass: the value of which is roughly one atomic volume. We show also recent quantitative results concerning radiation enhanced diffusion in metallic glasses (FeNi) 8 (PB) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 . In a last part we discuss the atomic model needed to explain our results

  4. Studies of Lanthanide Transport in Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Taylor, Christopher

    2018-04-02

    Metallic nuclear fuels were tested in fast reactor programs and performed well. However, metallic fuels have shown the phenomenon of FCCI that are due to deleterious reactions between lanthanide fission products and cladding material. As the burnup is increased, lanthanide fission products that contact with the cladding could react with cladding constituents such as iron and chrome. These reactions produce higher-melting intermetallic compounds and low-melting alloys, and weaken the mechanical integrity. The lanthanide interaction with clad in metallic fuels is recognized as a long-term, high-burnup cause of the clad failures. Therefore, one of the key concerns of using metallic fuels is the redistribution of lanthanide fission products and migration to the fuel surface. It is believed that lanthanide migration is in part due to the thermal gradient between the center and the fuel-cladding interface, but also largely in part due to the low solubility of lanthanides within the uranium-based metal fuel. PIE of EBR-II fuels shows that lanthanides precipitate directly and do not dissolve to an appreciable extent in the fuel matrix. Based on the PIE data from EBR-II, a recent study recommended a so-called “liquid-like” transport mechanism for lanthanides and certain other species. The liquid-like transport model readily accounts for redistribution of Ln, noble metal fission products, and cladding components in the fuel matrix. According to the novel mechanism, fission products can transport as solutes in liquid metals, such as liquid cesium or liquid cesium–sodium, and on pore surfaces and fracture surfaces for metals near their melting temperatures. Transport in such solutions is expected to be much more rapid than solid-state diffusion. The mechanism could explain the Ln migration to the fuel slug peripheral surface and their deposition with a sludge-like form. Lanthanides have high solubility in liquid cesium but have low solubility in liquid sodium. As a

  5. Metal-citrate complex transport in Kineococcus radiotolerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huta, Brian P; Miller, Nigel H; Robertson, Eleanor L; Doyle, Robert P

    2018-03-01

    The growth of an organism is highly dependent on the acquisition of carbon and metals, and availability of these nutrients in the environment affects its survival. Organisms can obtain both nutrients simultaneously through proteins of the CitMHS superfamily. Bioinformatic studies suggested a CitMHS gene (Accession number ABS03965.1) in Kineococcus radiotolerans. Radio flux assays following 14-C radiolabelled citrate, either free or complexed to a variety of metal ions, in K. radiotolerans demonstrated internalization of the citrate when bound to select metal ions only, primarily in the form of calcium-citrate. A pH response was also observed, consistent with a permease (ATP independent) mechanism as noted for other CitMHS family members, with greater uptake at pH 7 compared to pH 10. These results confirm the ability of K. radiotolerans to transport complexed citrate. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins - Function and Impact on Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Millán, Ana F; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today's cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field.

  7. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  8. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A

    2002-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have recently been associated with the accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the sterol storage disease sitosterolemia. These two 'half-transporters' are assumed to dimerize to form the complete sitosterol transporter which reduces the ab...

  9. Development of protein based bioremediation and drugs for heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2001-09-18

    Structural studies were performed on several proteins of the bacterial detoxification system. These proteins are responsible for binding (MerP) and transport of heavy metals, including mercury, across membranes. The structural information obtained from NMR experiments provides insight into the selectivity and sequestration processes towards heavy metal toxins.

  10. Regulation of cellular transport by klotho protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, Mentor; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Almilaji, Ahmad; Ahmeti, Salih; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane

    2014-01-01

    The antiaging protein of Klotho is a transmembrane protein mainly expressed in the kidney, parathyroid glands and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in two forms, a full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it acts as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho can be found in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and the urine of mammals. Klotho deficiency results in early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and premature death, whereas overexpression of Klotho exerts the opposite effect. Klotho may influence cellular transport processes across the cell membrane by inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH) (2)D(3)), formation or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, carriers and pumps. Accordingly, Klotho protein is a powerful regulator of transport mechanisms across the cell membrane. Klotho regulates diverse calcium and potassium ion channels, as well as several carriers including the Na(+)-coupled excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4, the Na(+)-coupled phosphate cotransporters, NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb, and a Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. All those cellular transport regulations contribute in the aging suppressor role of Klotho. Future studies will help to determine if the Klotho protein regulates cell-surface expression of other transport proteins and is affecting underlying mechanisms.

  11. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A

    2002-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have recently been associated with the accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the sterol storage disease sitosterolemia. These two 'half-transporters' are assumed to dimerize to form the complete sitosterol transporter which reduces...... the absorption of sitosterol and related molecules in the intestine by pumping them back into the lumen. Although mutations altering ABCG5 and ABCG8 are found in affected patients, no functional demonstration of sitosterol transport has been achieved. In this study, we investigated whether other ABC transporters......-specific ABC transporters have acquired specificity to exclude sitosterol and related sterols like cholesterol presumably because the abundance of cholesterol in the membrane would interfere with their action; in consequence, specific transporters have evolved to handle these sterols....

  12. ZIPCO, a putative metal ion transporter, is crucial for Plasmodium liver-stage development

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Tejram; Boisson, Bertrand; Lacroix, Céline; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Richier, Quentin; Formaglio, Pauline; Thiberge, Sabine; Dobrescu, Irina; Ménard, Robert; Baldacci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, requires iron for growth, but how it imports iron remains unknown. We characterize here a protein that belongs to the ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like Protein) family of metal ion transport proteins and have named ZIP domain-containing protein (ZIPCO). Inactivation of the ZIPCO-encoding gene in Plasmodium berghei, while not affecting the parasite's ability to multiply in mouse blood and to infect mosquitoes, greatly impairs its capacity to develop inside hepatocytes. Iron...

  13. Metals and Neuronal Metal Binding Proteins Implicated in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related dementia affecting millions of people worldwide. Its main pathological hallmark feature is the formation of insoluble protein deposits of amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau protein into extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, respectively. Many of the mechanistic details of this process remain unknown, but a well-established consequence of protein aggregation is synapse dysfunction and neuronal loss in the AD brain. Different pathways including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metal metabolism have been suggested to be implicated in this process. In particular, a body of evidence suggests that neuronal metal ions such as copper, zinc, and iron play important roles in brain function in health and disease states and altered homeostasis and distribution as a common feature across different neurodegenerative diseases and aging. In this focused review, we overview neuronal proteins that are involved in AD and whose metal binding properties may underlie important biochemical and regulatory processes occurring in the brain during the AD pathophysiological process. PMID:26881049

  14. ASSESSMENT OF HEAVY METALS AND CRUDE PROTEIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNICORN

    Heavy metals concentrations and protein content in snails. Tables 5 and 6 show the HMs concentrations in the two species (A. marginata and G. africana) of matured and baby snails from Lagos and Ibadan respectively. Cadmium was not detected in the snails. Levels of Cu and Zn in the snails were much lower than what.

  15. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  16. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant transporters involved in heavy metal homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dorina Podar

    2010-01-01

    Transition metal ions (predominately manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper and zinc) havean array of catalytic and regulatory roles in the growth and development of all living organisms.However, an excess of these metal ions can also be toxic to any life form and therefore every cell andwhole organism needs to maintain the concentration of these essential nutrient metals within a narrowrange: a process known as metal homeostasis. Heavy metal ions are taken up into cells by selectivetranspor...

  18. Soliton/exciton transport in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Zachariah

    2006-08-21

    The study of electron/proton transport in alpha-helix sections of proteins have illustrated the existence of soliton-like mechanisms. Recently, Ciblis and Cosic extended investigation to the existence of possible like soliton-type mechanisms in other parts of the protein. They used Quantum Hamiltonian analysis to investigate. In this paper, we investigate the same problem but we use Classical Hamiltonian analysis in our investigation.

  19. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    2016-01-01

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochem...

  20. Complement Activation by Ceramide Transporter Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, G.H.; Losen, M.; Buurman, W.A.; Veerhuis, R.; Molenaar, P.C.; Steinbusch, H.W.M.; De Baets, M.H.; Daha, MR; Martinez-Martinez, P.

    2014-01-01

    C1q is the initiator of the classical complement pathway and, as such, is essential for efficient opsonization and clearance of pathogens, altered self-structures, and apoptotic cells. The ceramide transporter protein (CERT) and its longer splicing isoform CERTL are known to interact with

  1. Transport properties of metal-metal and metal-insulator heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadlallah Elabd, Mohamed Mostafa

    2010-06-09

    In this study we present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for metallic and metal-insulator interfaces, based on density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. Starting from the electronic structure of bulk Al, Cu, Ag, and Au interfaces, we study the effects of different kinds of interface roughness on the transmission coefficient (T(E)) and the I-V characteristic. In particular, we compare prototypical interface distortions, including vacancies, metallic impurities, non-metallic impurities, interlayer, and interface alloy. We find that vacancy sites have a huge effect on transmission coefficient. The transmission coefficient of non-metallic impurity systems has the same behaviour as the transmission coefficient of vacancy system, since these systems do not contribute to the electronic states at the Fermi energy. We have also studied the transport properties of Au-MgO-Au tunnel junctions. In particular, we have investigated the influence of the thickness of the MgO interlayer, the interface termination, the interface spacing, and O vacancies. Additional interface states appear in the O-terminated configuration due to the formation of Au-O bonds. An increasing interface spacing suppresses the Au-O bonding. Enhancement of T(E) depends on the position and density of the vacancies (the number of vacancies per unit cell). (orig.)

  2. Functionalization of protein crystals with metal ions, complexes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoshi; Maity, Basudev; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Self-assembled proteins have specific functions in biology. With inspiration provided by natural protein systems, several artificial protein assemblies have been constructed via site-specific mutations or metal coordination, which have important applications in catalysis, material and bio-supramolecular chemistry. Similar to natural protein assemblies, protein crystals have been recognized as protein assemblies formed of densely-packed monomeric proteins. Protein crystals can be functionalized with metal ions, metal complexes or nanoparticles via soaking, co-crystallization, creating new metal binding sites by site-specific mutations. The field of protein crystal engineering with metal coordination is relatively new and has gained considerable attention for developing solid biomaterials as well as structural investigations of enzymatic reactions, growth of nanoparticles and catalysis. This review highlights recent and significant research on functionalization of protein crystals with metal coordination and future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Elevated expression of metal transporter genes in three accessions of the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonçalves Leite de Assunção, A.; Costa Martins, Da P.; Folter, de S.; Vooijs, R.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy metal hyperaccumulation in plants is an intriguing and poorly understood phenomenon. Transmembrane metal transporters are assumed to play a key role in this process. We describe the cloning and isolation of three zinc transporter cDNAs from the Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. The

  4. Elevated expression of metal transporter genes in three accessions of the metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assunção, A.G.L.; Da Costa Martins, P.; de Folter, S.; Schat, H.; Vooijs, H.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy metal hyperaccumulation in plants is an intriguing and poorly understood phenomenon. Transmembrane metal transporters are assumed to play a key role in this process. We describe the cloning and isolation of three zinc transporter cDNAs from the Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens. The

  5. [Application of UV spectroscopy in structural studies of metal centre of metal-protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Zhou, Y; Shen, P

    1997-02-01

    The principle of UV spectroscopy applied in structural studies of metal centre of complexes is introduced in this paper. Several examples prove that such spectroscopy is an effective technical method in structural studies of metal centre of metal-protein.

  6. Metal ion transport in eukaryotic microorganisms: insights from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, D J

    2000-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, copper, manganese, and zinc are essential nutrients for all eukaryotic microorganisms. Therefore, these organisms possess efficient uptake mechanisms to obtain these nutrients from their extracellular environment. Metal ions must also be transported into intracellular organelles where they function as catalytic and structural cofactors for compartmentalized enzymes. Thus, intracellular transport mechanisms are also present. When present in high levels, metal ions can also be toxic, so their uptake and intracellular transport is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to limit metal ion overaccumulation and facilitate storage and sequestration. Remarkable molecular insight into these processes has come from recent studies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism, which is the primary subject of this chapter, serves as a useful paradigm to understand metal ion metabolism in other eukaryotic microbes.

  7. The Tumor Suppressor, P53, Decreases the Metal Transporter, ZIP14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of p53’s proper function accounts for over half of identified human cancers. We identified the metal transporter ZIP14 (Zinc-regulated transporter (ZRT and Iron-regulated transporter (IRT-like Protein 14 as a p53-regulated protein. ZIP14 protein levels were upregulated by lack of p53 and downregulated by increased p53 expression. This regulation did not fully depend on the changes in ZIP14’s mRNA expression. Co-precipitation studies indicated that p53 interacts with ZIP14 and increases its ubiquitination and degradation. Moreover, knockdown of p53 resulted in higher non-transferrin-bound iron uptake, which was mediated by increased ZIP14 levels. Our study highlights a role for p53 in regulating nutrient metabolism and provides insight into how iron and possibly other metals such as zinc and manganese could be regulated in p53-inactivated tumor cells.

  8. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transporters; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mary Lou Geurinot; David Eide

    2002-01-01

    Metal ions are critical nutrients, yet overaccumulation of these same metals can also be toxic. To maintain appropriate intracellular levels, cells require specific metal uptake systems that are subject to precise homeostatic regulation. The long-range goal of our research is to define the molecular mechanism(s) and regulation of metal ion uptake in eukaryotic cells. Integrating genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches, we have examined these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both are proven model systems for studying fundamental cellular processes. Our work has focused on the ZIP family of metal transporters which we identified; this family has representatives in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. IRT, one of the founding members of the ZIP family, is an essential cation transporter that is expressed in the epidermal cells of iron deficient plant roots and is responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. We now know that there are 15 ZIP genes in the Arabidopsis and the similarities among their encoded gene products. The ZIP family members display different substrate specificities for metals and different tissue distributions in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the family members respond differentially to metal deficiencies. For example, IRT1, ZIP6 and ZIP9 mRNA are expressed mainly in the roots of iron deficient plants whereas ZIP4 responds to both iron and zinc deficiency. Work in both yeast and Arabidopsis has addressed substrate specificity as well as how these transporters are regulated in response to metal availability

  9. From the Soil to the Seed. Metal Transport in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, Mary Lou [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Deficiencies of micronutrients such as Fe, Mn, and Zn commonly limit plant growth and crop yields. The long-term goals of our program are to understand how plants acquire metal micronutrients from the soil and distribute them while protecting themselves from the potential redox damage metals can cause to living tissues. Metals serve as important co-factors for photosynthesis and respiration, yet we still know very little about metal transport. Our approach combines experimental and computational tools from the physical sciences with biochemistry and molecular biology. Specifically, we combine mutant analysis with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) spectroscopy, a technique that allows us to image the elemental composition of living plant material in 3-D. By analyzing the phenotypes of lines carrying mutations in various metal transporters, we have identified the genes responsible for uptake of zinc from the soil as well as genes involved in loading the seeds with metal micronutrients. Several of these transporters affect the localization of metals in the seed without affecting the overall metal content. Understanding how seeds obtain and store nutrients is key to developing crops with higher agronomic and nutritional value.

  10. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Lou Geurinot; David Eide

    2002-04-29

    Metal ions are critical nutrients, yet overaccumulation of these same metals can also be toxic. To maintain appropriate intracellular levels, cells require specific metal uptake systems that are subject to precise homeostatic regulation. The long-range goal of our research is to define the molecular mechanism(s) and regulation of metal ion uptake in eukaryotic cells. Integrating genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches, we have examined these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both are proven model systems for studying fundamental cellular processes. Our work has focused on the ZIP family of metal transporters which we identified; this family has representatives in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. IRT, one of the founding members of the ZIP family, is an essential cation transporter that is expressed in the epidermal cells of iron deficient plant roots and is responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. We now know that there are 15 ZIP genes in the Arabidopsis and the similarities among their encoded gene products. The ZIP family members display different substrate specificities for metals and different tissue distributions in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the family members respond differentially to metal deficiencies. For example, IRT1, ZIP6 and ZIP9 mRNA are expressed mainly in the roots of iron deficient plants whereas ZIP4 responds to both iron and zinc deficiency. Work in both yeast and Arabidopsis has addressed substrate specificity as well as how these transporters are regulated in response to metal availability

  11. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  12. Complement activation by ceramide transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Gerard H; Losen, Mario; Buurman, Wim A; Veerhuis, Robert; Molenaar, Peter C; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Baets, Marc H; Daha, Mohamed R; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2014-02-01

    C1q is the initiator of the classical complement pathway and, as such, is essential for efficient opsonization and clearance of pathogens, altered self-structures, and apoptotic cells. The ceramide transporter protein (CERT) and its longer splicing isoform CERTL are known to interact with extracellular matrix components, such as type IV collagen, and with the innate immune protein serum amyloid P. In this article, we report a novel function of CERT in the innate immune response. Both CERT isoforms, when immobilized, were found to bind the globular head region of C1q and to initiate the classical complement pathway, leading to activation of C4 and C3, as well as generation of the membrane attack complex C5b-9. In addition, C1q was shown to bind to endogenous CERTL on the surface of apoptotic cells. These results demonstrate the role of CERTs in innate immunity, especially in the clearance of apoptotic cells.

  13. Transport phenomena of aluminium oxide in metal halide lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S; Markus, T [Institute for Energy Research, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Niemann, U [Philips GmbH, Research Laboratories, PO Box 500145, Aachen, D-52085 (Germany)], E-mail: s.fischer@fz-juelich.de

    2008-07-21

    A better understanding of the transport phenomena observed in metal halide lamps can be achieved using computer-based model calculations. The chemical transport of aluminium oxide in advanced high-pressure discharge vessels was calculated as a function of temperature and composition of the salt mixture relevant to the lamp. Below 1773 K chemical transport is the prevailing process; above this temperature the vaporization and condensation of the envelope material-aluminium oxide-become more important. The results of the calculations show that the amount of transported alumina increases linearly with the number of iteration cycles and exponentially with the temperature gradient.

  14. Heavy metal emissions for Danish road transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M.; Slentoe, E.

    2010-04-15

    This report presents new heavy metal emission factors for cars, vans, trucks, buses, mopeds and motorcycles for each of the emission sources fuel consumption, engine oil, tyre wear, brake wear and road abrasion. The emission components covered are Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), Selenium (Se) and Zinc (Zn), all of them relevant for emission reporting to the UNECE CLRTAP (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Convention on Long Range Transboundary Pollutants) convention. The report also presents a new Danish inventory for the year 2007. The following emissions in total TSP (in brackets) are calculated for the year 2007: As (8 kg), Cd (48 kg), Cr (197 kg), Cu (51 779 kg), Hg (28 kg), Ni (158 kg), Pb (6 989 kg), Se (33 kg) and Zn (28 556 kg). Per vehicle type cars are the most important source of emission for all heavy metal species, followed by vans, trucks, buses and 2-wheelers. By using the detailed emission factors and inventory calculation methods established in the present project, estimates of heavy metal emissions can be made for other years than 2007. (author)

  15. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  16. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC(50) in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  17. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2014-09-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evaporation rates in arid regions, groundwater quality is not threatened and all soil contamination issues tend to be overlooked. But if soil contamination happens, where do contaminants go? This study tests the hypothesis of upward metal movement in soils when evaporation is the main transport mechanism. Laboratory evaporation tests were carried out with heavy metal spiked Saudi soil, using circulation of air as the driving force (Fig. 1). Main results show that loamy soil retains heavy metals quite well while evaporation drives heavy metals to the surface of a sandy soil. Evaporation transports heavy metals upward in sandy soils of arid regions, making them accumulate at the soil surface. Sand being the dominating type of soil in arid regions, soils can then be a potential source of contaminated aerosols and atmospheric pollution - a transboundary problem. Some other repercussions for this problem are foreseen, such as the public ingestion or inhalation of dust. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer...

  19. Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins In this thesis, I studied the intra- and intercellular transport of lipidic molecules, in particular glycosphingolipids and lipid-modified proteins. The first part focuses on the intracellular transport of

  20. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptive changes of duodenal iron transport proteins in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisani, Donatella; Parafioriti, Antonina; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Zoller, Heinz; Conte, Dario; Armiraglio, Elisabetta; Trovato, Cristina; Koch, Robert O; Weiss, Günter

    2004-05-19

    Iron deficiency is a manifestation of celiac disease (CD) usually attributed to a decreased absorptive surface, although no data on the regulation of iron transport under these conditions are currently available. Our aim was to evaluate divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), duodenal cytochrome b (Dcytb), ferroportin 1 (FP1), hephaestin, and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) expression, as well as iron regulatory protein (IRP) activity in duodenal biopsies from control, anemic, and CD patients. We studied 10 subjects with dyspepsia, 6 with iron-deficiency anemia, and 25 with CD. mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR, protein expression by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry, and IRP activity by gel shift assay. Our results showed that DMT1, FP1, hephaestin, and TfR1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in CD patients with reduced body iron stores compared with controls, similar to what was observed in anemic patients. Protein expression paralleled the mRNAs changes. DMT1 protein expression was localized in differentiated enterocytes at the villi tips in controls, whereas with iron deficiency it was observed throughout the villi. FP1 expression was localized on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes and increased with low iron stores. TfR1 was localized in the crypts in controls but also in the villi with iron deficiency. These changes were paralleled by IRP activity, which increased in all iron-deficient subjects. We conclude that duodenal DMT1, FP1, hephaestin, and TfR1 expression and IRP activity, thus the iron absorption capacity, are upregulated in CD patients as a consequence of iron deficiency, whereas the increased enterocyte proliferation observed in CD has no effect on iron uptake regulation.

  2. Colloid-facilitated metal transport in peat filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Rauch, Sebastien; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Morrison, Greg; Stolpe, Björn; Hasselliöv, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The effect of colloids on metal retention in peat columns was studied, with the focus on colloids from two sources-organic matter leached from peat, and introduced organic and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) colloids. A significant fraction of metals was found to be associated with peat-produced organic colloids; however the concentrations of organic colloids leached are low (trace concentrations) and temporal and have a limited effect on the efficiency of peat filters. In contrast, the presence of organic and HFO colloids in the input water causes a significant decrease in the performance of peat filters. Organic colloids were identified as the main vector of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc, while lead is transported by both organic and HFO colloids. The colloidal distribution of metals obtained in this study has important implications for the mobility of trace metals in porous media. The occurrence of colloids in the input waters and their characteristics must be considered when designing water treatment facilities.

  3. An overview of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B

    1995-12-01

    All eukaryotic cells contain a wide variety of proteins embedded in the plasma and internal membranes, which ensure transmembrane solute transport. It is now established that a large proportion of these transport proteins can be grouped into families apparently conserved throughout organisms. This article presents the data of an in silicio analysis aimed at establishing a preliminary classification of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was conducted at a time when about 65% of all yeast genes were available in public databases. In addition to approximately 60 transport proteins whose function was at least partially known, approximately 100 deduced protein sequences of unknown function display significant sequence similarity to membrane transport proteins characterized in yeast and/or other organisms. While some protein families have been well characterized by classical genetic experimental approaches, others have largely if not totally escaped characterization. The proteins revealed by this in silicio analysis also include a putative K+ channel, proteins similar to aquaporins of plant and animal origin, proteins similar to Na+-solute symporters, a protein very similar to electroneural cation-chloride cotransporters, and a putative Na+-H+ antiporter. A new research area is anticipated: the functional analysis of many transport proteins whose existence was revealed by genome sequencing.

  4. Transport properties of transition metal impurities on gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Renato B.; da Silva, Edison Z.; Fazzio, Adalberto; da Silva, Antônio J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Performing first principles density functional theory (DFT) we calculated the electronic and transport properties of a Au thin nanowire with transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Ni or Co) bridging the two sides of the Au nanowire. We will show that these systems have strong spin dependent transport properties and that the local symmetry can dramatically change them, leading to a significant spin polarized conductance. This spin dependent transport is also associated with the transition metal in the nanowire, in particular with the d-level positioning. Using Co, for example [1], when the symmetry permits the mixing between the wire s-orbitals with the transition metal d-states, there are interference effects that resemble Fano-like resonances with an anisotropy of 0.07 at the Fermi level. On the other hand, if this symmetry decouples such states, we simply have a sum of independent transmission channels and the calculated anisotropy was 0.23. The anisotropies for the other transition metals, as well as calculated transmittances for two Co impurities will also be presented [1] R. B. Pontes, E. Z. da Silva, A. Fazzio and Antônio J. R. da Silva, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (30), 9897-903, 2008

  5. Transport properties of a mesoscopic metallic loop connected to leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, L.

    2003-11-01

    We study the transport properties of a metallic ring threaded by a magnetic flux varying linearly in time Φ_M(t) = Φ t with a constriction and connected to two external particle reservoirs. This setup contains as limiting cases the experimental arrangements used to define Kubo and Landauer conductances. We employ a formalism based in Baym-Kadanoff-Keldysh non-equilibrium Green functions to calculate the conductance of the system and the dissipated power. We compare the transport behavior in different limits of the geometrical configuration.

  6. Charge Transport in Metal-Molecule-Metal Junctions Probed by Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Hyung; Song, Hyunwook

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a proof of intrinsic charge transport properties in alkanedithiol molecular junctions using a multiprobe approach combining a variety of transport techniques. The temperature-independent I(V) behavior and the correct exponential decay of conductance with respect to molecular length shows that the dominant charge transport mechanism is off-resonant tunneling. Length-dependent TVS measurements for the saturated alkane-dithiol series indicate that we did indeed probe a molecular system with CAFM. These results can provide stringent criteria to establish a valid molecular transport junction via a probabilistic measurement technique. In this study, we report a study of charge transport in alkanedithiol SAMs formed in metal-molecule-metal junctions using CAFM in combination with a variety of molecular transport techniques including temperature-and length-variable transport measurements and transition voltage spectroscopy. The main goal of this study is to probe the intrinsic transport properties of component molecules using CAFM, but not parasitic or defect-related effects

  7. Metal transfer within the Escherichia coli HypB-HypA complex of hydrogenase accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Colin D; Ngu, Thanh T; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Zamble, Deborah B

    2013-09-03

    The maturation of [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving many steps and multiple accessory proteins. The two accessory proteins HypA and HypB interact with each other and are thought to cooperate to insert nickel into the active site of the hydrogenase-3 precursor protein. Both of these accessory proteins bind metal individually, but little is known about the metal-binding activities of the proteins once they assemble together into a functional complex. In this study, we investigate how complex formation modulates metal binding to the E. coli proteins HypA and HypB. This work lead to a re-evaluation of the HypA nickel affinity, revealing a KD on the order of 10(-8) M. HypA can efficiently remove nickel, but not zinc, from the metal-binding site in the GTPase domain of HypB, a process that is less efficient when complex formation between HypA and HypB is disrupted. Furthermore, nickel release from HypB to HypA is specifically accelerated when HypB is loaded with GDP, but not GTP. These results are consistent with the HypA-HypB complex serving as a transfer step in the relay of nickel from membrane transporter to its final destination in the hydrogenase active site and suggest that this complex contributes to the metal fidelity of this pathway.

  8. Higher derivative corrections to incoherent metallic transport in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona,The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology,Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Goutéraux, Blaise [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Varian Laboratory of Physics, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Li, Wei-Jia [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology,Dalian University of Technology, 214 School of Physics,2 Linggong road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2017-03-31

    Transport in strongly-disordered, metallic systems is governed by diffusive processes. Based on quantum mechanics, it has been conjectured that these diffusivities obey a lower bound D/v{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, the saturation of which provides a mechanism for the T-linear resistivity of bad metals. This bound features a characteristic velocity v, which was later argued to be the butterfly velocity v{sub B}, based on holographic models of transport. This establishes a link between incoherent metallic transport, quantum chaos and Planckian timescales. Here we study higher derivative corrections to an effective holographic action of homogeneous disorder. The higher derivative terms involve only the charge and translation symmetry breaking sector. We show that they have a strong impact on the bound on charge diffusion D{sub c}/v{sub B}{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, by potentially making the coefficient of its right-hand side arbitrarily small. On the other hand, the bound on energy diffusion is not affected.

  9. Metal Oxides as Efficient Charge Transporters in Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, Mohammed

    2017-07-10

    Over the past few years, hybrid halide perovskites have emerged as a highly promising class of materials for photovoltaic technology, and the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has accelerated at an unprecedented pace, reaching a record value of over 22%. In the context of PSC research, wide-bandgap semiconducting metal oxides have been extensively studied because of their exceptional performance for injection and extraction of photo-generated carriers. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the synthesis and applications of metal oxides as electron and hole transporters in efficient PSCs with both mesoporous and planar architectures. Metal oxides and their doped variants with proper energy band alignment with halide perovskites, in the form of nanostructured layers and compact thin films, can not only assist with charge transport but also improve the stability of PSCs under ambient conditions. Strategies for the implementation of metal oxides with tailored compositions and structures, and for the engineering of their interfaces with perovskites will be critical for the future development and commercialization of PSCs.

  10. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal-binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion-binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium-resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high-resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high-resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0-2.5A) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found.

  11. urban dietary heavy metal intake from protein foods and vegetables

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    portions of pooled samples of the foodstuff. The results showed significant variation in heavy metal concentration among ... Urban dietary heavy metal intake from protein foods … 86 serve breakfast and lunch packages. In the ... portion of the food samples were homogenized, stored in pre-cleaned polythene containers and ...

  12. Transport and screen blockage characteristics of reflective metallic insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocard, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    In the event of a LOCA within a nuclear power plant, it is possible for insulation debris to be generated by the break jet. Such debris has the potential for PWR sump screen (or BWR RHR suction inlet) blockage and thus can affect the long-term recirculation capability. In addition to the variables of break jet location and orientation, the types and quantities of debris which could be generated are dependent on the insulation materials employed. This experimental investigation was limited to reflective metallic insulation and components thereof. The study was aimed at determining the flow velocities needed to transport the insulation debris to the sump screens and the resulting modes of screen blockage. The tests revealed that thin metallic foils (0.0025 in. and 0.004 in.) could transport at low flow velocities, 0.2 to 0.5 ft/sec. Thicker foils (0.008 in.) transported at higher velocities, 0.4 to 0.8 ft/sec, and as fabricated half cylinder insulation units required velocities in excess of 1.0 ft/sec for transport. The tests also provided information on screen blockage patterns that showed blockage could occur at the lower portion of the screen as foils readily flipped on the screen when reaching it

  13. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  14. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  15. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  16. Spin-transport-phenomena in metals, semiconductors, and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althammer, Matthias Klaus

    2012-07-19

    Assuming that one could deterministically inject, transport, manipulate, store and detect spin information in solid state devices, the well-established concepts of charge-based electronics could be transferred to the spin realm. This thesis explores the injection, transport, manipulation and storage of spin information in metallic conductors, semiconductors, as well as electrical insulators. On the one hand, we explore the spin-dependent properties of semiconducting zinc oxide thin films deposited via laser-molecular beam epitaxy (laser-MBE). After demonstrating that the zinc oxide films fabricated during this thesis have excellent structural, electrical, and optical properties, we investigate the spin-related properties by optical pump/probe, electrical injection/optical detection, and all electrical spin valve-based experiments. The two key results from these experiments are: (i) Long-lived spin states with spin dephasing times of 10 ns at 10 K related to donor bound excitons can be optically addressed. (ii) The spin dephasing times relevant for electrical transport-based experiments are {<=} 2 ns at 10 K and are correlated with structural quality. On the other hand we focus on two topics of current scientific interest: the comparison of the magnetoresistance to the magnetothermopower of conducting ferromagnets, and the investigation of pure spin currents generated in ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal hybrid structures. We investigate the magnetoresistance and magnetothermopower of gallium manganese arsenide and Heusler thin films as a function of external magnetic field orientation. Using a series expansion of the resistivity and Seebeck tensors and the inherent symmetry of the sample's crystal structure, we show that a full quantitative extraction of the transport tensors from such experiments is possible. Regarding the spin currents in ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal hybrid structures we studied the spin mixing conductance in yttrium iron garnet

  17. Parameters of Transportation of Tailings of Metals Lixiviating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golik Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows that the change in the situation in the metals market with a steady increase in production volumes is intensified against the tendency of the transition of mining production from underground mining to underground mining for a certain group of ores. The possibility of a non-waste metals extraction from not only standard, but also from substandard raw materials, is currently provided only by technology with the lixiviating of metals from developing ores. The regular dependences of the magnitude of hydraulic resistances on the hydro-mixture velocity and its density are determined. The correct values of the experimental data convergence with the calculated values of these parameters are obtained. It is shown that the optimization of the transportation parameters of lixiviating tailings allows reducing the level of chemically dangerous pollution of the environment by leachate products. The direction of obtaining the ecological and technological effect from the use of simultaneously environmental and resource-saving technology for the extraction of the disclosed metals is indicated.

  18. Parameters of Transportation of Tailings of Metals Lixiviating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golik, Vladimir; Dmitrak, Yury

    2017-11-01

    The article shows that the change in the situation in the metals market with a steady increase in production volumes is intensified against the tendency of the transition of mining production from underground mining to underground mining for a certain group of ores. The possibility of a non-waste metals extraction from not only standard, but also from substandard raw materials, is currently provided only by technology with the lixiviating of metals from developing ores. The regular dependences of the magnitude of hydraulic resistances on the hydro-mixture velocity and its density are determined. The correct values of the experimental data convergence with the calculated values of these parameters are obtained. It is shown that the optimization of the transportation parameters of lixiviating tailings allows reducing the level of chemically dangerous pollution of the environment by leachate products. The direction of obtaining the ecological and technological effect from the use of simultaneously environmental and resource-saving technology for the extraction of the disclosed metals is indicated.

  19. Role of adaptor proteins in motor regulation and membrane transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Schlager (Max)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Active transport along the cytoskeleton is a process essential for proper cellular function. Although much is known about the motor proteins that generate the necessary force and the cytoskeleton that provides the cellular infrastructure, many questions still

  20. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires

  1. Protein transport across the small intestine in food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Marit; Westerhout, Joost; Wichers, Harry J; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Verhoeckx, Kitty C M

    2014-01-01

    In view of the imminent deficiency of protein sources for human consumption in the near future, new protein sources need to be identified. However, safety issues such as the risk of allergenicity are often a bottleneck, due to the absence of predictive, validated and accepted methods for risk assessment. The current strategy to assess the allergenic potential of proteins focuses mainly on homology, stability and cross-reactivity, although other factors such as intestinal transport might be of added value too. In this review, we present an overview of the knowledge of protein transport across the intestinal wall and the methods currently being used to measure this. A literature study reveals that protein transport in sensitised persons occurs para-cellularly with the involvement of mast cells, and trans-cellularly via enterocytes, while in non-sensitised persons micro-fold cells and enterocytes are considered most important. However, there is a lack of comparable systematic studies on transport of allergenic proteins. Knowledge of the multiple protein transport pathways and which model system can be useful to study these processes may be of added value in the risk assessment of food allergenicity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Biomimetic materials for protein storage and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Millicent A [Elmhurst, IL; Laible, Philip D [Villa Park, IL

    2012-05-01

    The invention provides a method for the insertion of protein in storage vehicles and the recovery of the proteins from the vehicles, the method comprising supplying isolated protein; mixing the isolated protein with a fluid so as to form a mixture, the fluid comprising saturated phospholipids, lipopolymers, and a surfactant; cycling the mixture between a first temperature and a second temperature; maintaining the mixture as a solid for an indefinite period of time; diluting the mixture in detergent buffer so as to disrupt the composition of the mixture, and diluting to disrupt the fluid in its low viscosity state for removal of the guest molecules by, for example, dialysis, filtering or chromatography dialyzing/filtering the emulsified solid.

  3. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  4. Initiation of protein association in tofu formation by metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Takenaka, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium and calcium ions are important factors in making tofu. However, the molecular role of these ions remains unclear in tofu formation. We have previously shown that magnesium chloride concentration-dependent produced silken tofu-like (SP) and regular tofu-like (RP) precipitates, but was an inconsequential factor for the retention of tofu. We investigated in this present study, the effect of various metal chlorides on the metal chloride concentration-dependent changes in tofu formation. These changes occurred in a similar manner to that of the magnesium ion, in which SP formation was followed by RP formation. It is interesting that the midpoint concentration for the formation of SP and RP represented a good correlation with the stability constant of EDTA. This correlation demonstrated the possibility that metal ions would interact with the carboxyl groups of soy proteins. We consider from these results that metal ions were the initiators of protein association in tofu formation.

  5. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Placenta Copper Transport Proteins in Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placental insufficiency underlying preeclampsia (PE) is associated with impaired placental angiogenesis. As copper (Cu) is essential to angiogenesis, we investigated differences in the expression of placental Cu transporters Menkes (ATP7A), Wilsons (ATP7B) and the Cu chaperone (CCS) for superoxide d...

  7. Specific capture of uranyl protein targets by metal affinity chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basset, C.; Dedieu, A.; Guerin, P.; Quemeneur, E.; Meyer, D.; Vidaud, C. [CEA Valrho, DSV, IBEB, Serv Biochim et Toxicol Nucl, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    To improve general understanding of biochemical mechanisms in the field of uranium toxicology, the identification of protein targets needs to be intensified. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely developed as a powerful tool for capturing metal binding proteins from biological extracts. However uranyl cations (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) have particular physico-chemical characteristics which prevent them from being immobilized on classical metal chelating supports. We report here on the first development of an immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography method, based on the cation-exchange properties of amino-phosphonate groups for uranyl binding. The cation distribution coefficient and loading capacity on the support were determined. Then the stability of the uranyl-bonded phase under our chromatographic conditions was optimized to promote affinity mechanisms. The successful enrichment of uranyl binding proteins from human serum was then proven using proteomic and mass spectral analysis. (authors)

  8. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, Shyama Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  9. Mechanistic logic underlying the axonal transport of cytosolic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David A.; Das, Utpal; Tang, Yong; Roy, Subhojit

    2011-01-01

    Proteins vital to presynaptic function are synthesized in the neuronal perikarya and delivered into synapses via two modes of axonal transport. While membrane-anchoring proteins are conveyed in fast axonal transport via motor-driven vesicles, cytosolic proteins travel in slow axonal transport; via mechanisms that are poorly understood. We found that in cultured axons, populations of cytosolic proteins tagged to photoactivable-GFP (PA-GFP) move with a slow motor-dependent anterograde bias; distinct from vesicular-trafficking or diffusion of untagged PA-GFP. The overall bias is likely generated by an intricate particle-kinetics involving transient assembly and short-range vectorial spurts. In-vivo biochemical studies reveal that cytosolic proteins are organized into higher-order structures within axon-enriched fractions that are largely segregated from vesicles. Data-driven biophysical modeling best predicts a scenario where soluble molecules dynamically assemble into mobile supra-molecular structures. We propose a model where cytosolic proteins are transported by dynamically assembling into multi-protein complexes that are directly/indirectly conveyed by motors. PMID:21555071

  10. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecek, Pavel; Skupa, Petr; Libus, Jirí; Naramoto, Satoshi; Tejos, Ricardo; Friml, Jirí; Zazímalová, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies.

  11. Immune regulation of Rab proteins expression and intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Gang; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2012-07-01

    Compartmentalization in cells of the immune system, the focus of this review, facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses essential for specialized immune functions. In this process of compartment maintenance, Rab proteins are central regulators of protein-mediated transport and fusion of intracellular structures. It is widely believed that the intracellular concentration of proteins that regulate intracellular transport, including Rab proteins, is constitutively mantained. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that transcriptional rates of Rab proteins can be modified. This process is especially evident during immune activation and argues that after activation, these cells require higher levels of Rab proteins. The aim of this review is to discuss evidence showing the increasing links between Rab protein expression and intracellular transport, particularly in monocytes and macrophages. We highlight here biological processes in which the expression of Rab GTPases is selectively regulated, leading to the activation of specific intracellular routes. Further, we focus on the immune regulation of intracellular transport after cytokine activation and microbial infection, with an emphasis in mycobacterial infection.

  12. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  13. Metals transport in the Sacramento River, California, 1996-1997; Volume 2: Interpretation of metal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Metals transport in the Sacramento River, northern California, from July 1996 to June 1997 was evaluated in terms of metal loads from samples of water and suspended colloids that were collected on up to six occasions at 13 sites in the Sacramento River Basin. Four of the sampling periods (July, September, and November 1996; and May-June 1997) took place during relatively low-flow conditions and two sampling periods (December 1996 and January 1997) took place during high-flow and flooding conditions, respectively. This study focused primarily on loads of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, with secondary emphasis on loads of aluminum, iron, and mercury.Trace metals in acid mine drainage from abandoned and inactive base-metal mines, in the East and West Shasta mining districts, enter the Sacramento River system in predominantly dissolved form into both Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir. The proportion of trace metals that was dissolved (as opposed to colloidal) in samples collected at Shasta and Keswick dams decreased in the order zinc ≈ cadmium > copper > lead. At four sampling sites on the Sacramento River--71, 256, 360, and 412 kilometers downstream of Keswick Dam--trace-metal loads were predominantly colloidal during both high- and low-flow conditions. The proportion of total cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc loads transported to San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta estuary (referred to as the Bay-Delta) that is associated with mineralized areas was estimated by dividing loads at Keswick Dam by loads 412 kilometers downstream at Freeport and the Yolo Bypass. During moderately high flows in December 1996, mineralization-related total (dissolved + colloidal) trace-metal loads to the Bay-Delta (as a percentage of total loads measured downstream) were cadmium, 87 percent; copper, 35 percent; lead, 10 percent; and zinc, 51 percent. During flood conditions in January 1997 loads were cadmium, 22 percent; copper, 11 percent; lead, 2 percent; and zinc, 15

  14. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempe, J.M.; Cousins, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of zinc absorption has not been delineated, but kinetic studies show that both passive and carrier-mediated processes are involved. The authors have identified a low molecular mass zinc-binding protein in the soluble fraction of rat intestinal mucosa that could function as an intracellular zinc carrier. The protein was not detected in liver or pancreas, suggesting a role specific to the intestine. The protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport and shows signs of saturation at higher luminal zinc concentrations, characteristics consistent with a role in carrier-mediated zinc absorption. Microsequence analysis of the protein purified by gel-filtration HPCL and SDS/PAGE showed complete identity within the first 41 N-terminal amino acids with the deduced protein sequence of cysteine-rich intestinal protein. These investigators showed that the gene for this protein is developmentally regulated in neonates during the suckling period, conserved in many vertebrate species, and predominantly expressed in the small intestine. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein contains a recently identified conserved sequence of histidine and cysteine residues, the LIM motif, which our results suggest confers metal-binding properties that are important for zinc transport and/or functions of this micronutrient

  15. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  16. Position-dependent Effects of Polylysine on Sec Protein Transport*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or “pause sites,” were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport. PMID:22367204

  17. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  18. Test Report for Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATO) Prototype.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbe, Jeffery G.; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-06-01

    A prototype design for a plutonium air transport package capable of carrying 7.6 kg of plutonium oxide and surviving a ''worst-case'' plane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A series of impact tests were conducted on half-scale models of this design for side, end, and comer orientations at speeds close to 282 m/s onto a target designed to simulate weathered sandstone. These tests were designed to evaluate the performance of the overpack concept and impact-limiting materials in critical impact orientations. The impact tests of the Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP) prototypes were performed at SNL's 10,000-ft rocket sled track. This report describes test facilities calibration and environmental testing methods of the PMATP under specific test conditions. The tests were conducted according to the test plan and procedures that were written by the authors and approved by SNL management and quality assurance personnel. The result of these tests was that the half-scale PMATP survived the ''worst-case'' airplane crash conditions, and indicated that a full-scale PMATP, utilizing this overpack concept and these impact-limiting materials, would also survive these crash conditions.

  19. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Vidossich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu and main group (Mg metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions.

  20. Induction of Heavy-Metal-Transporting CPX-Type ATPases during Acid Adaptation in Lactobacillus bulgaricus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaud, S.; Fernandez, A.; Boudebbouze, S.; Ehrlich, S. D.; Maguin, E.; van de Guchte, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus is a lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that, through the production of lactic acid, gradually acidifies its environment during growth. In the course of this process, L. bulgaricus acquires an improved tolerance to acidity. A survey of the recently established genome sequence shows that this bacterium possesses few of the pH control functions that have been described in other LAB and raises the question of what other mechanisms could be involved in its adaptation to the decreasing environmental pH. In some bacteria other than LAB, ion transport systems have been implicated in acid adaptation. We therefore studied the expression of this type of transport system during acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus by reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR and mapped transcription start sites. Intriguingly, the most significantly induced were three ATPases carrying the CPX signature of heavy-metal transporters. Protein homology and the presence of a conserved sequence motif in the promoter regions of the genes encoding these proteins strongly suggest that they are involved in copper homeostasis. Induction of this system is thought to assist in avoiding indirect damage that could result from medium acidification. PMID:16997986

  1. Ion transport across the biological membrane by computational protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Gevorg

    The cellular membrane is impermeable to most of the chemicals the cell needs to take in or discard to survive. Therefore, transporters-a class of transmembrane proteins tasked with shuttling cargo chemicals in and out of the cell-are essential to all cellular life. From existing crystal structures, we know transporters to be complex machines, exquisitely tuned for specificity and controllability. But how could membrane-bound life have evolved if it needed such complex machines to exist first? To shed light onto this question, we considered the task of designing a transporter de novo. As our guiding principle, we took the ``alternating-access model''-a conceptual mechanism stating that transporters work by rocking between two conformations, each exposing the cargo-binding site to either the intra- or the extra-cellular environment. A computational design framework was developed to encode an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that rocked between two alternative states to orchestrate the movement of Zn(II) ions across the membrane. The ensemble nature of both states was accounted for using a free energy-based approach, and sequences were chosen based on predicted formation of the targeted topology in the membrane and bi-stability. A single sequence was prepared experimentally and shown to function as a Zn(II) transporter in lipid vesicles. Further, transport was specific to Zn(II) ions and several control peptides supported the underlying design principles. This included a mutant designed to retain all properties but with reduced rocking, which showed greatly depressed transport ability. These results suggest that early transporters could have evolved in the context of simple topologies, to be later tuned by evolution for improved properties and controllability. Our study also serves as an important advance in computational protein design, showing the feasibility of designing functional membrane proteins and of tuning conformational landscapes for desired function

  2. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagh D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dhananjay Wagh,* Venkata Raveendra Pothineni,* Mohammed Inayathullah, Song Liu, Kwang-Min Kim, Jayakumar Rajadas Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work  Abstract: Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA, a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 µg/mL (250 µM. Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia.  Keywords: Lyme disease, BmtA, Borrelia burgdorferi, desloratadine, Bac Titer-Glo assay

  3. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  4. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future

  5. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  6. Study of the transport of mercurial compounds by seric proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien-Saint Guily, Nicole

    1970-01-01

    A bond between the seric proteins and various mercurial compounds labeled with the radioisotopes 203 Hg and 197 Hg was demonstrated by means of research methods specific to radioactivity combined with protein separation techniques. In the course of this study it was shown how strongly the composition of the buffer during electrophoretic migration influences the transport of certain organo-mercurial compounds by the seric proteins. By means of a thioloprive: N - ethyl - maleimide, labeled with 14 C, it was proved that the bonding sites between the proteins and the mercurial compounds were the thiol groups of the proteins but that other bonding sites, in particular the amino groups, could also be involved. (author) [fr

  7. Development of thin film oxygen transport membranes on metallic supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Ye

    2012-04-25

    interlayer, though it comprised some cracks. The second interlayer had a crack-free and porous structure. The top membrane layer was deposited by physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering) with a thickness of 3.8 {mu}m improving the gastightness considerably but showing still reasonable air-leakage. Summarizing, the successful development of a metal-perovskite-composite could be shown, which acts as a basis for a further development of a gas-tight metal supported oxygen transport asymmetric membrane structure. (orig.)

  8. Environmental assessment of heavy metal transport and transformation in the Hangzhou Bay, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hongwei; Huang, Lei; Wang, Jingyu; He, Guojian; Reible, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated model of hydrodynamics, sediment and heavy metal transport. • Simulated heavy metal transport and transformation in the Hangzhou Bay. • Evaluated accidental discharge of 137 Cs from the QFNPP was assumed. • The sediment effects on the mobility of heavy metals were analyzed. - Abstract: The environmental impact of heavy metal (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, 90 Sr and 137 Cs) transport and transformation in the Hangzhou Bay (China) was assessed through a comprehensive model that integrates hydrodynamics, sediment and heavy metal transport. A mechanistic surface complexation model was used to estimate the adsorption and desorption of heavy metal by suspended sediment under different aqueous chemistry conditions. The dynamics of metal exchange to and from the seabed was also assessed. The primary processes regulating heavy metal distribution, i.e., convection–diffusion, adsorption–desorption, sedimentation–resuspension, as well as other physical and chemical processes related to mass exchange between adjacent sediment layers, were considered in detail. The accidental discharge of 137 Cs was simulated as an example and results showed that 137 Cs transported along the coast driven by tidal flow. Most 137 Cs distributed near the outfall and accumulated in the seabed sediment. The proposed model can be a useful tool for predicting heavy metal transport and fate and provide a theoretical basis to guide field sampling, assessment of risks and the design of remediation strategies.

  9. Benchmarking a computational design method for the incorporation of metal ion-binding sites at symmetric protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William A; Khare, Sagar D

    2017-08-01

    The design of novel metal-ion binding sites along symmetric axes in protein oligomers could provide new avenues for metalloenzyme design, construction of protein-based nanomaterials and novel ion transport systems. Here, we describe a computational design method, symmetric protein recursive ion-cofactor sampling (SyPRIS), for locating constellations of backbone positions within oligomeric protein structures that are capable of supporting desired symmetrically coordinated metal ion(s) chelated by sidechains (chelant model). Using SyPRIS on a curated benchmark set of protein structures with symmetric metal binding sites, we found high recovery of native metal coordinating rotamers: in 65 of the 67 (97.0%) cases, native rotamers featured in the best scoring model while in the remaining cases native rotamers were found within the top three scoring models. In a second test, chelant models were crossmatched against protein structures with identical cyclic symmetry. In addition to recovering all native placements, 10.4% (8939/86013) of the non-native placements, had acceptable geometric compatibility scores. Discrimination between native and non-native metal site placements was further enhanced upon constrained energy minimization using the Rosetta energy function. Upon sequence design of the surrounding first-shell residues, we found further stabilization of native placements and a small but significant (1.7%) number of non-native placement-based sites with favorable Rosetta energies, indicating their designability in existing protein interfaces. The generality of the SyPRIS approach allows design of novel symmetric metal sites including with non-natural amino acid sidechains, and should enable the predictive incorporation of a variety of metal-containing cofactors at symmetric protein interfaces. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. Charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Afzal

    2010-12-16

    In present work the charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures with low (N{sub D} = 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), medium (N{sub D}=1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) and high (N{sub D}=2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) doped n-Si as injecting electrode and the effect of air exposure of the vacuum evaporated metal-phthalocyanine film in these structures is investigated. The results obtained through temperature dependent electrical characterizations of the structures suggest that in terms of dominant conduction mechanism in the corresponding devices Schottky-type conduction mechanism dominates the charge transport in low-bias region of these devices up to 0.8 V, 0.302 V and 0.15 V in case of low, medium and high doped n-Silicon devices. For higher voltages, in each case of devices, the space-charge-limited conduction, controlled by exponential trap distribution, is found to dominate the charge transport properties of the devices. The interface density of states at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices are found to be lower in case of lower work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices. The results also suggest that the work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices causes charge transfer at the interface and these phenomena results in formation of interface dipole. The width of the Schottky depletion region at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices is found to be higher with higher work function difference at the interface. The investigation of charge transport properties of Al/ZnPc/medium n-Si and Au/ZnPc/ medium n-Si devices suggest that the Schottky depletion region formed at the ZnPc/n-Si interface of these devices determines the charge transport in the low-bias region of both the devices. Therefore, the Schottky-type (injection limited) and the space-charge-limited (bulk limited) conduction are observed in the low and the high bias regions of these devices, respectively. The determined width of the

  11. Myelin-associated proteins labelled by slow axonal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgi, P.P.; DuBois, H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of protein metabolism and provides evidence that the neuronal contribution to myelin metabolism may be restricted to lipids only. On the other hand this line of research led to the partial characterization of a group of neuronal proteins probably involved in axo-glial interactions subserving the onset of myelination and the structural maintenance of the mature myelin sheath. Intraocular injection of radioactive amino acids allows the study of the anterograde transport of labelled proteins along retinofugal fibres which are well myelinated. Myelin extracted from the optic nerve and tract under these conditions also contains labelled proteins. Three hypotheses are available to explain this phenomenon. To offer an explanation for this phenomenon the work was planned as follows. a) Characterization of the spatio-temporal pattern of labelling of myelin, in order to define the experimental conditions (survival time and region of the optic pathway to be studied) necessary to obtain maximal labelling. b) Characterization (by gel electrophoresis) of the myelin-associated proteins which become labelled by axonal transport, in order to work on a consistent pattern of labelling. c) Investigation of the possible mechanism responsible for the labelling of myelin-associated proteins. (Auth.)

  12. Convective-diffusive transport in protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Rosenberger, F.; Alexander, J. I. D.; Nadarajah, A.

    1995-05-01

    Particular interest in the role of convection in protein crystallization has arisen since some protein single crystals of improved structural quality have been obtained under reduced gravity conditions. We have numerically modeled the time-dependent diffusive-convective transport in an isothermal protein crystal growth system at standard and zero gravity (1 g and 0 g). In the 2D model used, a rectangular crystal of fixed dimensions 400 μm × 600 μm is positioned at the bottom of a 1 mm high and 6 mm wide growth cell. The aqueous solution contains protein and precipitant. For the dependence of the crystal growth rate on interfacial supersaturation, experimental data for lysozyme are used. The repartitioning of water and precipitant at the growing interface is based on experimental segregation data for lysozyme: NaCl, and on complete rejection for a fictitious system in which lysozyme and precipitant have the same diffusivity. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order of magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport enhances the growth rates. However, even when diffusion dominates mass transport, i.e. at 0 g, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. Irrespective of the diffusivity of the precipitant, due to the low growth rates, the precipitant distribution in the solution remains rather uniform even at 0 g, unless strong coupling between precipitant and protein fluxes is assumed. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1 g and 0 g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution.

  13. Expression and putative role of mitochondrial transport proteins in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2017-08-01

    Cancer cells undergo major changes in energy and biosynthetic metabolism. One of them is the Warburg effect, in which pyruvate is used for fermentation rather for oxidative phosphorylation. Another major one is their increased reliance on glutamine, which helps to replenish the pool of Krebs cycle metabolites used for other purposes, such as amino acid or lipid biosynthesis. Mitochondria are central to these alterations, as the biochemical pathways linking these processes run through these organelles. Two membranes, an outer and inner membrane, surround mitochondria, the latter being impermeable to most organic compounds. Therefore, a large number of transport proteins are needed to link the biochemical pathways of the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix. Since the transport steps are relatively slow, it is expected that many of these transport steps are altered when cells become cancerous. In this review, changes in expression and regulation of these transport proteins are discussed as well as the role of the transported substrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The Structure of a Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transport Protein, CmpA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-26

    Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of the food chain by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. To compensate for the low selectivity of Rubisco for CO₂ over O₂, Cyanobacteria have developed highly efficient CO₂concentrating machinery of which the ABC transport system CmpABCD from Synechocystis PCC 6803 is one component. Here we describe the structure of the bicarbonate binding protein, CmpA, in the absence and presence of bicarbonate and carbonic acid. CmpA is highly homologous to the nitrate transport protein, NrtA. CmpA binds carbonic acid at the entrance to the ligand-binding pocket whereas bicarbonate binds in nearly an identical location compared to nitrate binding to NrtA. Unexpectedly, bicarbonate binding is accompanied by a metal ion, identified as Ca²⁺ via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The binding of bicarbonate and metal is highly cooperative and suggests that CmpA co-transports bicarbonate and calcium.

  15. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pietribiasi

    Full Text Available The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters.The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio.The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value.The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and fluid balance.

  16. Exploitation of an iron transporter for bacterial protein antibiotic import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul; Joshi, Amar; Rassam, Patrice; Housden, Nicholas G; Kaminska, Renata; Goult, Jonathan D; Redfield, Christina; McCaughey, Laura C; Walker, Daniel; Mohammed, Shabaz; Kleanthous, Colin

    2017-11-07

    Unlike their descendants, mitochondria and plastids, bacteria do not have dedicated protein import systems. However, paradoxically, import of protein bacteriocins, the mechanisms of which are poorly understood, underpins competition among pathogenic and commensal bacteria alike. Here, using X-ray crystallography, isothermal titration calorimetry, confocal fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo photoactivatable cross-linking of stalled translocation intermediates, we demonstrate how the iron transporter FpvAI in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is hijacked to translocate the bacteriocin pyocin S2 (pyoS2) across the outer membrane (OM). FpvAI is a TonB-dependent transporter (TBDT) that actively imports the small siderophore ferripyoverdine (Fe-Pvd) by coupling to the proton motive force (PMF) via the inner membrane (IM) protein TonB1. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of pyoS2 (pyoS2 NTD ) bound to FpvAI ( K d = 240 pM) reveals that the pyocin mimics Fe-Pvd, inducing the same conformational changes in the receptor. Mimicry leads to fluorescently labeled pyoS2 NTD being imported into FpvAI-expressing P. aeruginosa cells by a process analogous to that used by bona fide TBDT ligands. PyoS2 NTD induces unfolding by TonB1 of a force-labile portion of the plug domain that normally occludes the central channel of FpvAI. The pyocin is then dragged through this narrow channel following delivery of its own TonB1-binding epitope to the periplasm. Hence, energized nutrient transporters in bacteria also serve as rudimentary protein import systems, which, in the case of FpvAI, results in a protein antibiotic 60-fold bigger than the transporter's natural substrate being translocated across the OM. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  17. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  18. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  19. Nanoscale Electron Transport Measurements of Immobilized Cytochrome P450 Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Christopher D.; Flora, Darcy R.; Gannett, Peter M.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Lederman, David

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanopillars, functionalized with an organic self-assembled monolayer, can be used to measure the electrical conductance properties of immobilized proteins without aggregation. Measurements of the conductance of nanopillars with cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) proteins using conducting probe atomic force microscopy demonstrate that a correlation exists between the energy barrier height between hopping sites and CYP2C9 metabolic activity. Measurements performed as a function of tip force indicate that, when subjected to a large force, the protein is more stable in the presence of a substrate. This agrees with the hypothesis that substrate entry into the active site helps to stabilize the enzyme. The relative distance between hopping sites also increases with increasing force, possibly because protein functional groups responsible for electron transport depend on the structure of the protein. The inhibitor sulfaphenazole, in addition to the previously studied aniline, increased the barrier height for electron transfer and thereby makes CYP2C9 reduction more difficult and inhibits metabolism. This suggests that P450 Type II binders may decrease the ease of electron transport processes in the enzyme, in addition to occupying the active site. PMID:25804257

  20. Transport of Proteins Dissolved in Organic Solvents Across Biomimetic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Lev E.; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1995-02-01

    Using lipid-impregnated porous cellulose membranes as biomimetic barriers, we tested the hypothesis that to afford effective transmembrane transfer of proteins and nucleic acids, the vehicle solvent should be able to dissolve both the biopolymers and the lipids. While the majority of solvents dissolve one or the other, ethanol and methanol were found to dissolve both, especially if the protein had been lyophilized from an aqueous solution of a pH remote from the protein's isoelectric point. A number of proteins, as well as RNA and DNA, dissolved in these alcohols readily crossed the lipidized membranes, whereas the same biopolymers placed in nondissolving solvents (e.g., hexane and ethyl acetate) or in those unable to dissolve lipids (e.g., water and dimethyl sulfoxide) exhibited little transmembrane transport. The solubility of biopolymers in ethanol and methanol was further enhanced by complexation with detergents and poly(ethylene glycol); significant protein and nucleic acid transport through the lipidized membranes was observed from these solvents but not from water.

  1. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work.

  2. A solute-binding protein for iron transport in Streptococcus iniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Anxing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus iniae (S. iniae is a major pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality in cultured fish worldwide. The pathogen's ability to adapt to the host affects the extent of infection, hence understanding the mechanisms by which S. iniae overcomes physiological stresses during infection will help to identify potential virulence determinants of streptococcal infection. Grow S. iniae under iron-restricted conditions is one approach for identifying host-specific protein expression. Iron plays an important role in many biological processes but it has low solubility under physiological condition. Many microorganisms have been shown to be able to circumvent this nutritional limitation by forming direct contacts with iron-containing proteins through ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. The ABC transporter superfamilies constitute many different systems that are widespread among living organisms with different functions, such as ligands translocation, mRNA translation, and DNA repair. Results An ABC transporter system, named as mtsABC (metal transport system was cloned from S. iniae HD-1, and was found to be involved in heme utilization. mtsABC is cotranscribed by three downstream genes, i.e., mtsA, mtsB, and mtsC. In this study, we cloned the first gene of the mtsABC transporter system (mtsA, and purified the corresponding recombinant protein MtsA. The analysis indicated that MtsA is a putative lipoprotein which binds to heme that can serve as an iron source for the microorganism, and is expressed in vivo during Kunming mice infection by S. iniae HD-1. Conclusions This is believed to be the first report on the cloning the ABC transporter lipoprotein from S. iniae genomic DNA. Together, our data suggested that MtsA is associated with heme, and is expressed in vivo during Kunming mice infection by S. iniae HD-1 which indicated that it can be a potential candidate for S. iniae subunit vaccine.

  3. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křeček, Pavel; Skůpa, Petr; Libus, Jiří; Naramoto, S.; Tejos, R.; Friml, J.; Zažímalová, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 12 (2009), s. 249.1-249.11 ISSN 1474-760X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA AV ČR KJB600380904; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA601630703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PIN protein family * auxin efflux carriers * auxin transport Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.626, year: 2009

  4. Heavy metals and metalloids as a cause for protein misfolding and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, Markus J; Sharma, Sandeep K; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-02-25

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  5. Heavy Metals and Metalloids As a Cause for Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus J. Tamás

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders.

  6. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins. IV. Protein adsorption capacity and transport in preparative mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Brian C S; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-01-21

    The adsorption isotherms of four model proteins (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, ovalbumin, and BSA) on eight commercial phenyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography media were measured. The isotherms were softer than those usually seen in ion-exchange chromatography of proteins, and the static capacities of the media were lower, ranging from 30 to 110 mg/mL, depending on the ammonium sulfate concentration and the protein and adsorbent types. The protein-accessible surface area appears to be the main factor determining the binding capacity, and little correlation was seen with the protein affinities of the adsorbents. Breakthrough experiments showed that the dynamic capacities of the adsorbents at 10% breakthrough were 20-80% of the static capacities, depending on adsorbent type. Protein diffusivities in the adsorbents were estimated from batch uptake experiments using the pore diffusion and homogeneous diffusion models. Protein transport was affected by the adsorbent pore structures. Apparent diffusivities were higher at lower salt concentrations and column loadings, suggesting that adsorbed proteins may retard intraparticle protein transport. The diffusivities estimated from the batch uptake experiments were used to predict column breakthrough behavior. Analytical solutions developed for ion-exchange systems were able to provide accurate predictions for lysozyme breakthrough but not for ovalbumin. Impurities in the ovalbumin solutions used for the breakthrough experiments may have affected the ovalbumin uptake and led to the discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of Metal Ion ­ Colloid Interaction: Impact On Colloid-facilitated Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, C. H.; Schmitt, D.; Kaulisch, E.-M.; Frimmel, F. H.

    It is generally accepted, that metal transport in natural aquatic systems strongly de- pends on the metal binding form. Besides complex formation with well defined inor- ganic and organic ligands, the interaction with colloidal particles and soil material is one of the most important reactions of metal ions in aquatic systems. Mobile colloids compete with the stationary soil matrix for binding of metal ions and might facili- tate their transport. Important representatives for mineral and organic colloids are clay minerals and natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. In this work, the interaction of metal ions with clay minerals and NOM is characterized by coupling of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation AF4 to inductively coupled plasma ­ mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A method for separating mineral from organic colloids is presented, which allows to quantify the amount of metals being bound to either colloid. For different metal ions (Cu, Zn, Pb, Pt) and a metalloid (As) a different extent of binding to either colloid was found.The information obtained from the AF4-ICPMS measurements was useful for the understanding of the observations from column experiments which were conducted to quantify the colloid-facilitated metal transport. In column experiments, the transport of the mineral colloids itself and the influence of NOM onto the colloid transport were investigated. Furthermore, the dependance of colloid transport from the ionic strength and the pH value was elucidated. In order to get information about the co-transport of metal ions by organic and mineral colloids, metal ions were adsorbed onto the colloidal material and a distribution coef- ficient of the metal ions between the colloidal phase and the solution was determined. The colloidal suspension containing both, "free" and adsorbed metal ions were then injected onto the column. The direct metal breakthrough caused by colloidal trans- port was detected at the column outlet. The results clearly

  8. Theory of Quantum Transport in Metallic and Hybrid Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Glatz, Andreas; Vinokur, Valerii M

    2006-01-01

    There is a major development emerging at the intersection of modern physics, computer science, and materials science, which struggles to squeeze more devices into a restricted volume and constitutes a central focus of modern nanotechnology. Utilizing the metal-based hybrid nanostructures may offer significant advantages over those exploiting purely semiconductor materials. First, the chemistry of metals is typically simpler than that of semiconductors. Second, the electric properties of metals are much less sensitive to the structural defects and impurities than those of semiconductors. Next, metallic devices allow better electric and thermal contacts. And, last but by no means least, the high electron velocity in metals promises to accelerate enormously operation rates with respect to those in semiconductor-based devices. The book reflects scientific developments in the physics of metallic compounds based nanodevices presented at the NATO-sponsored Workshop on nanophysics held in St. Petersburg, Russia in th...

  9. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  10. Metals on the move: zinc ions in cellular regulation and in the coordination dynamics of zinc proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Homeostatic control maintains essential transition metal ions at characteristic cellular concentrations to support their physiological functions and to avoid adverse effects. Zinc is especially widely used as a catalytic or structural cofactor in about 3000 human zinc proteins. In addition, the homeostatic control of zinc in eukaryotic cells permits functions of zinc(II) ions in regulation and in paracrine and intracrine signaling. Zinc ions are released from proteins through ligand-centered reactions in zinc/thiolate coordination environments, and from stores in cellular organelles, where zinc transporters participate in zinc loading and release. Muffling reactions allow zinc ions to serve as signaling ions (second messengers) in the cytosol that is buffered to picomolar zinc ion concentrations at steady-state. Muffling includes zinc ion binding to metallothioneins, cellular translocations of metallothioneins, delivery of zinc ions to transporter proteins, and zinc ion fluxes through cellular membranes with the result of removing the additional zinc ions from the cytosol and restoring the steady-state. Targets of regulatory zinc ions are proteins with sites for transient zinc binding, such as membrane receptors, enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and sensor proteins that control gene expression. The generation, transmission, targets, and termination of zinc ion signals involve proteins that use coordination dynamics in the inner and outer ligand spheres to control metal ion association and dissociation. These new findings establish critically important functions of zinc ions and zinc metalloproteins in cellular control.

  11. Distinct effect of xenobiotics on the metal-binding properties of protein molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Natalia; Kovalchuk, Mikhail; Stepina, Nina; Gaynutdinov, Radmir; Chukhrai, Elena; Yurieva, Eleonora

    2015-07-01

    The X-ray standing-wave method was applied to study the elemental composition and molecular organization of ordered protein films of alkaline phosphatase exposed to different xenobiotics (drug compounds, lead). Binding of metal ions from triply distilled water to protein molecules has been experimentally observed. Definite differences in the arrangement of impurity metal ions in the films have been established. The considerable enhancement of protein-metal interactions is attributed to partial rearrangement of the protein native structure, induced by xenobiotics.

  12. Induction of a multixenobiotic resistance protein (MXR) in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea after heavy metals exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achard, M.; Baudrimont, M.; Boudou, A.; Bourdineaud, J.P

    2004-05-12

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanisms (MXR) related to the mammalian P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter protein (P-gp) are known to occur in several marine invertebrates. In the present work, we report on the induction of an MXR protein by various heavy metals in the gills of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea. The evaluation of the MXR protein level was assessed by Western blot using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the human P-gp (C219). A field transplantation experiment, where clams were caged in a gradient relative to an industrial site, demonstrated a positive relationship between MXR levels and (a) metal pollution (Cd and Zn) in the environment and (b) metal bioaccumulation in the gills. To establish this correlative relationship, clams were exposed to different levels of cadmium (15-60 {mu}g l{sup -1}) for up to 15 days in a controlled laboratory experiment. MXR protein levels increased in time for all treatments (including the control). However, the highest levels of MXR protein titer were expressed in clams that had been exposed to the lowest dose of cadmium. The causes for this observed inverse relationship between the exposure dose and the MXR induction is discussed. MXR protein titer was also shown to be induced by other heavy metals (zinc, inorganic mercury, and copper)

  13. Protein selectivity with immobilized metal ion-tacn sorbents: chromatographic studies with human serum proteins and several other globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Graham, B; Spiccia, L; Hearn, M T

    1998-01-01

    The chromatographic selectivity of the immobilized chelate system, 1,4,7-triazocyclononane (tacn), complexed with the borderline metal ions Cu2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ has been investigated with hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart cytochrome c, and horse skeletal muscle myoglobin, as well as proteins present in partially fractionated preparations of human plasma. The effects of ionic strength and pH of the loading and elution buffers on protein selectivities of these new immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic (IMAC) systems have been examined. The results confirm that immobilized Mn;pl-tacn sorbents exhibit a novel type of IMAC behavior with proteins. In particular, the chromatographic properties of these immobilized M(n+)-tacn ligand systems were significantly different compared to the IMAC behavior observed with other types of immobilized tri- and tetradentate chelating ligands, such as iminodiacetic acid, O-phosphoserine, or nitrilotriacetic acid, when complexed with borderline metal ions. The experimental results have consequently been evaluated in terms of the additional contributions to the interactive processes mediated by effects other than solely the conventional lone pair Lewis soft acid-Lewis soft base coordination interactions, typically found for the IMAC of proteins with borderline and soft metal ions, such as Cu2+ or Ni2+.

  14. Soy-dairy protein blend and whey protein ingestion after resistance exercise increases amino acid transport and transporter expression in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, P. T.; Walker, D. K.; Dickinson, J. M.; Gundermann, D. M.; Drummond, M. J.; Timmerman, K. L.; Cope, M. B.; Mukherjea, R.; Jennings, K.; Volpi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing amino acid availability (via infusion or ingestion) at rest or postexercise enhances amino acid transport into human skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether alterations in amino acid availability, from ingesting different dietary proteins, can enhance amino acid transport rates and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA expression. We hypothesized that the prolonged hyperaminoacidemia from ingesting a blend of proteins with different digestion rates postexercise would enhance amino acid transport into muscle and AAT expression compared with the ingestion of a rapidly digested protein. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we studied 16 young adults at rest and after acute resistance exercise coupled with postexercise (1 h) ingestion of either a (soy-dairy) protein blend or whey protein. Phenylalanine net balance and transport rate into skeletal muscle were measured using stable isotopic methods in combination with femoral arteriovenous blood sampling and muscle biopsies obtained at rest and 3 and 5 h postexercise. Phenylalanine transport into muscle and mRNA expression of select AATs [system L amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, system A amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1] increased to a similar extent in both groups (P protein blend resulted in a prolonged and positive net phenylalanine balance during postexercise recovery compared with whey protein (P protein synthesis increased similarly between groups. We conclude that, while both protein sources enhanced postexercise AAT expression, transport into muscle, and myofibrillar protein synthesis, postexercise ingestion of a protein blend results in a slightly prolonged net amino acid balance across the leg compared with whey protein. PMID:24699854

  15. Effect of metals on β-actin and total protein synthesis in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, Anthony R; Gazarian, Dmitry I; Barile, Frank A

    2011-01-01

    As an important structural protein, β-actin is associated with anchoring of tight junctions (TJs) to the cell scaffold. Caco-2 cells, an immortal intestinal epithelial cell line, rely on β-actin to form intact monolayers with high transepithelial electrical resistance in cell culture inserts. We examined the effect of six metals on expression of β-actin mRNA and β-actin synthesis, on total and net production of newly synthesized proteins, on paracellular transport of TJ markers, and on cell viability in confluent monolayers. [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-tyrosine were used as indicators of newly synthesized proteins in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, manganese, mercury and nickel. The monolayers were exposed to 24-h single exposures as well as continuous daily repeated doses of metals for 48-h and 96-h. Results suggest that decreases in newly synthesized proteins, in which β-actin represents about 10%, correlated with 2- to 5-fold higher expression of β-actin mRNA for the higher concentrations of metals. Interestingly, IC(50)s calculated for each chemical for 24-h acute and 48- and 96-h repeated dosing experiments, using the MTT viability assay and paracellular permeability markers, decreased newly synthesized and total proteins to 10% and 40% of control, respectively. Overall, the results indicate that, at equivalent concentrations, the metals affect β-actin mRNA and newly synthesized proteins before cell viability and paracellular permeability are compromised. Consequently the results help in elucidating mechanisms of metal cytotoxicity that lead to understanding the relationship between tight junction integrity, paracellular transport, and cell viability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anomalous electron transport in metal/carbon multijunction devices by engineering of the carbon thickness and selecting metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Dhand, Chetna; Rawal, Ishpal; Kumar, Sushil; Malik, Hitendra K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2017-06-01

    A longstanding concern in the research of amorphous carbon films is their poor electrical conductivity at room temperature which constitutes a major barrier for the development of cost effective electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we propose metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices as a promising facile way to overcome room temperature electron transport issues in amorphous carbon films. By the tuning of carbon thickness and swapping metal layers, we observe giant (upto ˜7 orders) reduction of electrical resistance in metal/carbon multijunction devices with respect to monolithic amorphous carbon device. We engineer the maximum current (electrical resistance) from about 10-7 to 10-3 A (˜107 to 103 Ω) in metal (Cu or Ti)/carbon hybrid multijunction devices with a total number of 10 junctions. The introduction of thin metal layers breaks the continuity of relatively higher resistance carbon layer as well as promotes the nanostructuring of carbon. These contribute to low electrical resistance of metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices, with respect to monolithic carbon device, which is further reduced by decreasing the thickness of carbon layers. We also propose and discuss equivalent circuit model to explain electrical resistance in monolithic carbon and metal/carbon multijunction devices. Cu/carbon multijunction devices display relatively better electrical transport than Ti/carbon devices owing to low affinity of Cu with carbon that restricts carbide formation. We also observe that in metal/carbon multijunction devices, the transport mechanism changes from Poole-Frenkel/Schottky model to the hopping model with a decrease in carbon thickness. Our approach opens a new route to develop carbon-based inexpensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Leachability of protein and metals incorporated into aquatic invertebrates: are species and metals-exposure history important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.S.; Suedkamp, M.J.; Morris, J.M.; Farag, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    To partially simulate conditions in fish intestinal tracts, we leached six groups of metals-contaminated invertebrates at pH 2 and pH 7, and analyzed the concentrations of four metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) and total protein in the leachates. Four of the groups of invertebrates were benthic macroinvertebrates collected from metals-contaminated rivers (the Clark Fork River in Montana and the Coeur d’Alene River in Idaho, USA); the other two groups of invertebrates (one of which was exposed to metals in the laboratory) were laboratory-reared brine shrimp (Artemia sp.). Additionally, we fractionated the pH 2 leachates using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Protein content was 1.3 to 1.4× higher in Artemia than in the benthic macroinvertebrates, and leachability of metals and protein differed considerably among several of the groups of invertebrates. In SEC fractions of the pH 2 leachates from both groups of Artemia, Cu and protein co-eluted; however, Cu and protein did not co-elute in SEC fractions of the leachates from any of the benthic macroinvertebrate groups. Although none of the other three metals co-eluted with protein in any of the pH 2 leachates, one or more of the metals co-eluted with lower-molecular-weight molecules in the leachates from all of the groups of invertebrates. These results suggest fundamental differences in metal-binding properties and protein leachability among some invertebrates. Thus, different invertebrates and different histories of metals exposure might lead to different availability of metals and protein to predators.

  18. Functional characterization of a transition metal ion transporter, OsZIP6 from rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    P G, Kavitha; Kuruvilla, Sam; Mathew, M K

    2015-12-01

    Micronutrients are important for the growth and development of plants, which deploy families of transporters for their uptake and distribution. We have functionally characterized a novel transition metal ion transporter from rice, OsZIP6 (Oryza sativa zinc regulated transporter, iron regulated transporter-like protein 6). The transporter was found to be transcriptionally activated in shoot and root tissues in response to deficiency in Fe(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+). OsZIP6 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, where currents were observed on addition of Co(2+), Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) but not Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). This substrate range for OsZIP6, identified using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ion transport by OsZIP6 was found to be pH dependent and enhanced transport was observed at acidic pH. Radioisotope uptake suggested that Co(2+) competitively inhibits Fe(2+) uptake by OsZIP6. Identification and characterization of ZIP family members from crop plants will contribute to an understanding of nutrient mineral homeostasis in these plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Translocation of metal phosphate via the phosphate inorganic transport system of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.W; Abee, T.; Kortstee, G.J J; Konings, W.N; Zehnder, A.J B

    1994-01-01

    P-i transport via the phosphate inorganic transport system (Pit) of Escherichia coil was studied in natural and artificial membranes. P-i uptake via Pit is dependent on the presence of divalent cations, like Mg2+, Ca2+, Co2+, or Mn2+, which form a soluble, neutral metal phosphate (MeHPO(4)) complex.

  20. Water-mediated energy transport and structure across a protein-protein interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, David

    2010-03-01

    Water molecules embedded within proteins or at the interface between globules play a central role in folding and function. We discuss the influence of interfacial water molecules on energy transport and structure, specifically the role of water at the interface between the two globules of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis, which binds oxygen cooperatively. We have studied the water-mediated energy transport in this protein with communication maps and nonequilibrium molecular simulations of energy flow, which reveal the disproportionate amount of energy carried by the water molecules, particularly across the interface, i.e., a larger thermal conductivity of the interfacial waters compared with other parts of the protein, promoting hydrogen bond rearrangements at the interface.

  1. Drosophila divalent metal ion transporter Malvolio is required in dopaminergic neurons for feeding decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søvik, E; LaMora, A; Seehra, G; Barron, A B; Duncan, J G; Ben-Shahar, Y

    2017-06-01

    Members of the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) family are evolutionarily conserved metal ion transporters that play an essential role in regulating intracellular divalent cation homeostasis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Malvolio (Mvl), the sole NRAMP family member in insects, plays a role in food choice behaviors in Drosophila and other species. However, the specific physiological and cellular processes that require the action of Mvl for appropriate feeding decisions remain elusive. Here, we show that normal food choice requires Mvl function specifically in the dopaminergic system, and can be rescued by supplementing food with manganese. Collectively, our data indicate that the action of the Mvl transporter affects food choice behavior via the regulation of dopaminergic innervation of the mushroom bodies, a principle brain region associated with decision-making in insects. Our studies suggest that the homeostatic regulation of the intraneuronal levels of divalent cations plays an important role in the development and function of the dopaminergic system and associated behaviors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  2. Can the propensity of protein crystallization be increased by using systematic screening with metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Raghurama P; Pavithra, Gowribidanur C; Dey, Debayan; Almo, Steven C; Ramakumar, S; Ramagopal, Udupi A

    2017-09-01

    Protein crystallization is one of the major bottlenecks in protein structure elucidation with new strategies being constantly developed to improve the chances of crystallization. Generally, well-ordered epitopes possessing complementary surface and capable of producing stable inter-protein interactions generate a regular three-dimensional arrangement of protein molecules which eventually results in a crystal lattice. Metals, when used for crystallization, with their various coordination numbers and geometries, can generate such epitopes mediating protein oligomerization and/or establish crystal contacts. Some examples of metal-mediated oligomerization and crystallization together with our experience on metal-mediated crystallization of a putative rRNA methyltransferase from Sinorhizobium meliloti are presented. Analysis of crystal structures from protein data bank (PDB) using a non-redundant data set with a 90% identity cutoff, reveals that around 67% of proteins contain at least one metal ion, with ∼14% containing combination of metal ions. Interestingly, metal containing conditions in most commercially available and popular crystallization kits generally contain only a single metal ion, with combinations of metals only in a very few conditions. Based on the results presented in this review, it appears that the crystallization screens need expansion with systematic screening of metal ions that could be crucial for stabilizing the protein structure or for establishing crystal contact and thereby aiding protein crystallization. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Molecule-induced interface states dominate charge transport in Si-alkyl-metal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lam H; Gergel-Hackett, Nadine; Zangmeister, Christopher D; Hacker, Christina A; Richter, Curt A; Kushmerick, James G [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: james.kushmerick@nist.gov

    2008-09-17

    Semiconductor-molecule-metal junctions consisting of alkanethiol monolayers self-assembled on both p{sup +} and n{sup -} type highly doped Si(111) wires contacted with a 10 {mu}m Au wire in a crossed-wire geometry are examined. Low temperature transport measurements reveal that molecule-induced semiconductor interface states control charge transport across these systems. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy also highlights the strong contribution of the induced interface states to the observed charge transport.

  4. Molecule-induced interface states dominate charge transport in Si-alkyl-metal junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lam H; Gergel-Hackett, Nadine; Zangmeister, Christopher D; Hacker, Christina A; Richter, Curt A; Kushmerick, James G

    2008-09-17

    Semiconductor-molecule-metal junctions consisting of alkanethiol monolayers self-assembled on both p(+) and n(-) type highly doped Si(111) wires contacted with a 10 µm Au wire in a crossed-wire geometry are examined. Low temperature transport measurements reveal that molecule-induced semiconductor interface states control charge transport across these systems. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy also highlights the strong contribution of the induced interface states to the observed charge transport.

  5. Sensitizing curium luminescence through an antenna protein to investigate biological actinide transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Goujon, Christophe; Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-02-20

    Worldwide stocks of actinides and lanthanide fission products produced through conventional nuclear spent fuel are increasing continuously, resulting in a growing risk of environmental and human exposure to these toxic radioactive metal ions. Understanding the biomolecular pathways involved in mammalian uptake, transport and storage of these f-elements is crucial to the development of new decontamination strategies and could also be beneficial to the design of new containment and separation processes. To start unraveling these pathways, our approach takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of trivalent curium. We clearly show that the human iron transporter transferrin acts as an antenna that sensitizes curium luminescence through intramolecular energy transfer. This behavior has been used to describe the coordination of curium within the two binding sites of the protein and to investigate the recognition of curium-transferrin complexes by the cognate transferrin receptor. In addition to providing the first protein-curium spectroscopic characterization, these studies prove that transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is a viable mechanism of intracellular entry for trivalent actinides such as curium and provide a new tool utilizing the specific luminescence of curium for the determination of other biological actinide transport mechanisms.

  6. Multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins mediate cellular transport of cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Guo, Dong; Obianom, Obinna N; Su, Tong; Polli, James E; Shu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmentally prevalent toxicant posing increasing risk to human health worldwide. As compared to the extensive research in Cd tissue accumulation, little was known about the elimination of Cd, particularly its toxic form, Cd ion (Cd 2+ ). In this study, we aimed to examine whether Cd 2+ is a substrate of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) that are important in renal xenobiotic elimination. HEK-293 cells overexpressing the human MATE1 (HEK-hMATE1), human MATE2-K (HEK-hMATE2-K) and mouse Mate1 (HEK-mMate1) were used to study the cellular transport and toxicity of Cd 2+ . The cells overexpressing MATEs showed a 2-4 fold increase of Cd 2+ uptake that could be blocked by the MATE inhibitor cimetidine. A saturable transport profile was observed with the Michaelis-Menten constant (K m ) of 130±15.8μM for HEK-hMATE1; 139±21.3μM for HEK-hMATE2-K; and 88.7±13.5μM for HEK-mMate1, respectively. Cd 2+ could inhibit the uptake of metformin, a substrate of MATE transporters, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 97.5±6.0μM, 20.2±2.6μM, and 49.9±6.9μM in HEK-hMATE1, HEK-hMATE2-K, and HEK-mMate1 cells, respectively. In addition, hMATE1 could transport preloaded Cd 2+ out of the HEK-hMATE1 cells, thus resulting in a significant decrease of Cd 2+ -induced cytotoxicity. The present study has provided the first evidence supporting that MATEs transport Cd 2+ and may function as cellular elimination machinery in Cd intoxication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phytochelatin-metal(loid) transport into vacuoles shows different substrate preferences in barley and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Lee, Youngsook; Schroeder, Julian I; Ahn, Sang-Nag; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Wicker, Thomas; Martinoia, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) are toxic to all living organisms, including plants and humans. In plants, Cd and As are detoxified by phytochelatins (PCs) and metal(loid)-chelating peptides and by sequestering PC-metal(loid) complexes in vacuoles. Consistent differences have been observed between As and Cd detoxification. Whereas chelation of Cd by PCs is largely sufficient to detoxify Cd, As-PC complexes must be sequestered into vacuoles to be fully detoxified. It is not clear whether this difference in detoxification pathways is ubiquitous among plants or varies across species. Here, we have conducted a PC transport study using vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis and barley. Arabidopsis vacuoles accumulated low levels of PC2 -Cd, and vesicles from yeast cells expressing either AtABCC1 or AtABCC2 exhibited negligible PC2 -Cd transport activity compared with PC2 -As. In contrast, barley vacuoles readily accumulated comparable levels of PC2 -Cd and PC2 -As. PC transport in barley vacuoles was inhibited by vanadate, but not by ammonium, suggesting the involvement of ABC-type transporters. Interestingly, barley vacuoles exhibited enhanced PC2 transport activity when essential metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Mn(II), were added to the transport assay, suggesting that PCs might contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and detoxification of non-essential toxic metal(loid)s. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Phytochelatin–metal(loid) transport into vacuoles shows different substrate preferences in barley and Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Lee, Youngsook; Schroeder, Julian I.; Ahn, Sang-Nag; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Wicker, Thomas; Martinoia, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) are toxic to all living organisms, including plants and humans. In plants, Cd and As are detoxified by phytochelatins (PCs) and metal(loid)-chelating peptides and by sequestering PC–metal(loid) complexes in vacuoles. Consistent differences have been observed between As and Cd detoxification. Whereas chelation of Cd by PCs is largely sufficient to detoxify Cd, As–PC complexes must be sequestered into vacuoles to be fully detoxified. It is not clear whether this difference in detoxification pathways is ubiquitous among plants or varies across species. Here, we have conducted a PC transport study using vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis and barley. Arabidopsis vacuoles accumulated low levels of PC2–Cd, and vesicles from yeast cells expressing either AtABCC1 or AtABCC2 exhibited negligible PC2–Cd transport activity compared with PC2–As. In contrast, barley vacuoles readily accumulated comparable levels of PC2–Cd and PC2–As. PC transport in barley vacuoles was inhibited by vanadate, but not by ammonium, suggesting the involvement of ABC-type transporters. Interestingly, barley vacuoles exhibited enhanced PC2 transport activity when essential metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Mn(II), were added to the transport assay, suggesting that PCs might contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and detoxification of non-essential toxic metal(loid)s. PMID:24313707

  9. Metal ion interaction of an oligopeptide fragment representing the regulatory metal binding site of a CueR protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szokolai, Hajnalka; Roszahegyi, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Metalloregulatory proteins of the MerR family are transcriptional activators that sense/control the concentration of various metal ions inside bacteria.1 The Cu+ efflux regulator CueR, similarly to other MerR proteins, possesses a short multiple Cys-containing metal binding loop close to the C......-terminus. CueR has a high selectivity for Cu+, Ag+ and Au+, but exhibits no transcriptional activity for the divalent ions Hg2+ and Zn2+.2 The two Cys- residues of the metal binding loop were shown to settle M+ ions into a linear coordination environment but other factors may also play a role in the recognition...... of cognate metal ions.2 Nevertheless, it is an interesting question whether the same sequence, when removed from the protein, shows a flexibility to adopt different coordination environments and may efficiently bind metal ions having preferences for larger coordination numbers....

  10. Protein-based microhydraulic transport for controllable actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-03-01

    Plants have the ability to develop large mechanical force from chemical energy available with bio-fuels. The energy released by the cleavage of a terminal phosphate ion during the hydrolysis of a bio- fuel assists the transport of ions and fluids in cellular homeostasis. Materials that develop pressure and hence strain similar to the response of plants to an external stimuli are classified as nastic materials. Calculations for controlled actuation of an active material inspired by biological transport mechanism demonstrated the feasibility of developing such a material with actuation energy densities on the order of 100 kJ/m 3. The mathematical model for a simplified proof of concept actuator referred to as micro hydraulic actuator uses ion transporters extracted from plants reconstituted on a synthetic bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). Thermodynamic model of the concept actuator predicted the ability to develop 5 percent normalized deformation in thickness of the micro- hydraulic actuator. Controlled fluid transport through AtSUT4 (Proton-sucrose co-transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana) reconstituted on a 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L- Serine] (Sodium Salt) (POPS), 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3- Phosphoethanolamine (POPE) BLM on a porous lead silicate glass plate (50μm with 61μm pitch) was driven by proton gradient. Bulk fluid flux of 1.2 μl/min was observed for each microliter of AtSUT4 transporter suspension (16.6 mg/ml in pH7.0 medium) reconstituted on the BLM. The flux rate is observed to be dependent on the concentration of sucrose present in pH4 buffer. Flux rate of 10 μl/min is observed for 5 mM sucrose in the first 10 minutes. The observed flux scales linearly with BLM area and the amount of proteins reconstituted on the lipid membrane. This article details the next step in the development of the micro hydraulic actuator - fluid transport driven by exergonic Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction in the presence of ATP

  11. Urea transporter proteins as targets for small-molecule diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-02-01

    Conventional diuretics such as furosemide and thiazides target salt transporters in kidney tubules, but urea transporters (UTs) have emerged as alternative targets. UTs are a family of transmembrane channels expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, in particular the kidney. UT knockout mice and humans with UT mutations exhibit reduced maximal urinary osmolality, demonstrating that UTs are necessary for the concentration of urine. Small-molecule screening has identified potent and selective inhibitors of UT-A, the UT protein expressed in renal tubule epithelial cells, and UT-B, the UT protein expressed in vasa recta endothelial cells. Data from UT knockout mice and from rodents administered UT inhibitors support the diuretic action of UT inhibition. The kidney-specific expression of UT-A1, together with high selectivity of the small-molecule inhibitors, means that off-target effects of such small-molecule drugs should be minimal. This Review summarizes the structure, expression and function of UTs, and looks at the evidence supporting the validity of UTs as targets for the development of salt-sparing diuretics with a unique mechanism of action. UT-targeted inhibitors may be useful alone or in combination with conventional diuretics for therapy of various oedemas and hyponatraemias, potentially including those refractory to treatment with current diuretics.

  12. Golgi localized barley MTP8 proteins facilitate Mn transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedas, Pai Rosager; Schiller, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 , which encode membrane-bound pro......Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 , which encode membrane...... in yeast, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 were found to be Mn transporters catalysing Mn efflux in a similar manner as the Golgi localized endogenous yeast protein Pmr1p. The level of MTP8.1 transcripts in barley roots increased with external Mn supply ranging from deficiency to toxicity, while MTP8.2 transcripts......8 proteins are involved in Mn loading to the Golgi apparatus and play a role in Mn homeostasis by delivering Mn to Mn-dependent enzymes and/or by facilitating Mn efflux via secretory vesicles. This study highlights the importance of MTP transporters in Mn homeostasis and is the first report of Golgi...

  13. [Glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Nakken, Karl O

    2011-05-06

    Glucose is the brain's main source of energy. To pass the blood-brain barrier, glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) is essential. Mutations in the SLC2A1 gene which codes for GLUT-1 may therefore compromise the supply of glucose to the brain. The aim of this review is to describe the clinical consequences of such mutations, with special emphasis on GLUT-1 encephalopathy. This review is based on a non-systematic literature search in PubMed and the authors' experience within the field. Epileptic or epilepsy-like are usually the first symptom in children with the GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome. Later on these children suffer delayed psychomotor development, microcephaly, ataxia, spasticity or movement disorders. EEG abnormalities may develop. GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome should be suspected in children with epilepsy-like seizures and delayed development combined with a low content of glucose in spinal fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by genetic testing. Treatment is a ketogenic diet, as ketone bodies pass the blood-brain barrier using other transport proteins than GLUT-1. GLUT-1-deficiency syndrome is a rare metabolic encephalopathy which is not well known and probably underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis and early start of a ketogenic diet may give these children a normal or nearly normal life.

  14. Export of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using ABC transporter with an attached lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter secretes the protein through inner and outer membranes simultaneously in gram negative bacteria. Thermostable lipase (TliA of Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 is secreted through the ABC transporter. TliA has four glycine-rich repeats (GGXGXD in its C-terminus, which appear in many ABC transporter-secreted proteins. From a homology model of TliA derived from the structure of P. aeruginosa alkaline protease (AprA, lipase ABC transporter domains (LARDs were designed for the secretion of fusion proteins. Results The LARDs included four glycine-rich repeats comprising a β-roll structure, and were added to the C-terminus of test proteins. Either Pro-Gly linker or Factor Xa site was added between fusion proteins and LARDs. We attached different length of LARDs such as LARD0, LARD1 or whole TliA (the longest LARD to three types of proteins; green fluorescent protein (GFP, epidermal growth factor (EGF and cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP. These fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli together with ABC transporter of either P. fluorescens or Erwinia chrysanthemi. Export of fusion proteins with the whole TliA through the ABC transporter was evident on the basis of lipase enzymatic activity. Upon supplementation of E. coli with ABC transporter, GFP-LARDs and EGF-LARDs were excreted into the culture supernatant. Conclusion The LARDs or whole TliA were attached to C-termini of model proteins and enabled the export of the model proteins such as GFP and EGF in E. coli supplemented with ABC transporter. These results open the possibility for the extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas using LARDs or TliA as a C-terminal signal sequence.

  15. A hydro-geochemical study of Nahr-Ibrahim catchment area: Fluvial metal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korfali, Samira

    2004-01-01

    Author.Metals enter water bodies geological weathering, soil erosion, industrial and domestic waste discharges, as well as atmospheric deposition. The metal content in sediments is a reflection of the nature of their background whether of geologic and/or anthropogenic origin. The depositional process of metals in sediment are controlled by river discharge, turbulence of river, morphology and river geometry, as well as the geochemical phases of sediment and soils. Thus a study of metal content in river and /or metal transport with a water body should include a hydrological study of the river, types of minerals in sediment and soil, sediment and soil textures, and metal speciation in the different geochemical phases of sediment, bank and soils. A contaminated flood plain is a temporary storage system for pollutants and an understanding of soil-sediment-interactions is important prerequisite for modeling fluvial pollutant transport. The determination of metal speciation in sediment and soil chemical fraction can provide information on the way in which these metals are bound to sediment and soil, their mobilization potential, bioavailability and possible mechanism of fluvial pollutant transport. Sequential extraction techniques yielding operationally defined chemical pools have been used by many workers to examine the partitioning of metals among the various geochemical phases of sediment or soil. The sequential extraction method specifies metals in sediment fractions as: exchangeable, specifically sorbed, easily reducible, moderately reducible, organic, residual. Previously, I have conducted a study on speciation of metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd) in the dry season bed-load sediments only at five sites 13 km stretch upstream from the mouth of Nahr Ibrahim. The reported data revealed that the specifically sorbed sediment fraction was the prime fraction for deposition of Mn, Z, CU, Pb and Cd metals in sediments. X-ray diffraction analysis of bed sediments showed

  16. Regulation of dopamine transporter function by protein-protein interactions: new discoveries and methodological challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Gether, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a key role in regulating dopaminergic signalling in the brain by mediating rapid clearance of dopamine from the synaptic clefts. The psychostimulatory actions of cocaine and amphetamine are primarily the result of a direct interaction of these compounds with DAT...... cells have also recently become available such as fluorescently tagged cocaine analogues and fluorescent substrates. Here we review the current knowledge about the role of protein-protein interactions in DAT regulation as well as we describe the most recent methodological developments that have been...

  17. History of heavy metal accumulation in the Svalbard area: Distribution, origin and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborska, Agata; Beszczyńska-Möller, Agnieszka; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria

    2017-12-01

    In this study temporal changes of Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu concentrations were studied in 19 dated sediment cores collected from Svalbard fjords and the Barents Sea. The main aim was to study spatial and historical variations in heavy metal concentrations, deposition rates and sources in the context of different metal transport pathways. Metal concentrations ranged from 5.7 to 45.8 mg kg -1 for Pb, from 13.4 to 54.5 mg kg -1 for Cu, from 0.01 to 0.90 mg kg -1 for Cd and from 55.6 to 130.4 mg kg -1 for Zn. Some fjords were unpolluted by heavy metals while in others a clear signal of metal enrichment was found (outer Kongsfjorden, Hornsund, Adventfjorden). Large-scale processes such as atmospheric and oceanic transport were found to be important drivers of heavy metal contaminant distribution. The significance of global drivers varied among the fjords, due to coupling with local processes. Outer fjord parts, the most impacted by oceanic transport, were characterized by the excess 206 Pb/ 207 Pb values of ∼1.17, while the inner basins were characterized by the excess 206 Pb/ 207 Pb of ∼1.14 suggesting possible different importance of Pb sources (marine currents and atmospheric transport). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ecotoxicology of Metals - Sources, Transport, and Effects on the Ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Poul; Andersen, Christian B. I.; Andersen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    . In the environment, the most adverse impacts of metals (on populations) have been caused by organic tin compounds used in antifouling paints and aluminum mobilized by acid rain. High concentrations of organic mercury and cadmium in certain organisms may cause concerns for the health of human populations that rely...

  19. Rhenium: a rare metal critical in modern transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Rhenium is a silvery-white, metallic element with an extremely high melting point (3,180 degrees Celsius) and a heat-stable crystalline structure, making it exceptionally resistant to heat and wear. Since the late 1980s, rhenium has been critical for superalloys used in turbine blades and in catalysts used to produce lead-free gasoline.

  20. Airborne heavy metals over Europe: emissions, long-range transport and deposition fluxes to natural ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the processes by which airborne heavy metals are transported from the main emission areas in Europe and become subject to deposition and absorption into terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with subsequent transport and transformation within the biotic and abiotic media that comprise these ecosystems. Results from numerical simulation models capable of simulating long-range transport of heavy metals over Europe together with measurement data of heavy metal concentrations in air and precipitation and the corresponding dry and wet deposition fluxes are reported. European wide inventories of anthropogenic heavy metal emissions based on location and capacity of their dominating source categories such as fossil fuel burning in power plants, industrial and residential combustion, waste incineration and road traffic are briefly described. Emission reduction scenarios with respect to introduction of lead free gasoline are outlined. The critical gaps of knowledge on heavy metals in the atmosphere are identified focusing on uncertainties associated with emission fluxes in Eastern Europe and the scarcity of measurement data in that area. Future research is needed to estimate the effects of emission reductions on deposition fluxes of heavy metals to sensitive ecosystems such as forested areas in Europe is recommended. Special emphasis is placed on mercury, lead and cadmium which have been defined within the European convention on long-range transboundary air pollution of the United Nations-Economic Commission Europe (UN-ECE) to be the priority heavy metals of concern. (orig.)

  1. Spin transport in metal and oxide devices at the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parui, Subir; Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2012-01-01

    Here we discuss a non-destructive technique that characterizes spin and charge transport at the nanometer scale, across buried layers and interfaces, in magnetic memory elements as used in spin transfer torque based Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM). While probing in the

  2. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, A.T.; Safar, Z.; Loch, J.P.G.

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high

  3. Ionic Transport Through Metal-Rich Organic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    1 (2009): pp 1012-1013. 9. X. Zhang, F.Wang, Y. Du, “Effect of Nano-Sized Titanium Powder Addition on Corrosion Performance of Epoxy Coatings...choosing a coating is the substrate in question, the desired end use for the final product , and the environment in which the final product will be... product . Herein, we discuss the performance of one type of organic coating – metal-rich organic primer – as an ionic and electronic barrier for

  4. Separation of some metal ions using coupled transport supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid membrane extraction processes has become very popular due to their superiority in many ways over other separation techniques. In coupled transport membranes the metal ions can be transported across the membrane against their concentration gradient under the influence of chemical potential difference. Liquid membranes consisting of a carrier-cum-diluent, supported in microporous polymeric hydrophobic films have been studied for transport of metal ions like U(VI), Cr(VI), Be(II), V(V), Ti(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hf(IV), W(VI), and Co(II). The present paper presents basic data with respect to flux and permeabilities of these metal ions across membranes based on experimental results and theoretical equations, using different carriers and diluents and provides a brief reference to possibility of such membranes for large scale applications. (author)

  5. Cortical concentrations of metals and protein in the brain of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metal pollution and exposure is an increasing global problem. One of the best ways to assess the impact of this problem on the brain is by using animals raised in such environments. As a prelude to this, the goat was used in this study to determine its normal metal and protein level in the brain. Ten metals and total crude ...

  6. The twin arginine protein transport pathway exports multiple virulence proteins in the plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhumita V; Mann, Stefan G; Antelmann, Haike; Widdick, David A; Fyans, Joanna K; Chandra, Govind; Hutchings, Matthew I; Toth, Ian; Hecker, Michael; Loria, Rosemary; Palmer, Tracy

    2010-07-01

    Summary Streptomyces scabies is one of a group of organisms that causes the economically important disease potato scab. Analysis of the S. scabies genome sequence indicates that it is likely to secrete many proteins via the twin arginine protein transport (Tat) pathway, including several proteins whose coding sequences may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer and share a common ancestor with proteins in other plant pathogens. Inactivation of the S. scabies Tat pathway resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes including slower growth rate and increased permeability of the cell envelope. Comparison of the extracellular proteome of the wild type and DeltatatC strains identified 73 predicted secretory proteins that were present in reduced amounts in the tatC mutant strain, and 47 Tat substrates were verified using a Tat reporter assay. The DeltatatC strain was almost completely avirulent on Arabidopsis seedlings and was delayed in attaching to the root tip relative to the wild-type strain. Genes encoding 14 candidate Tat substrates were individually inactivated, and seven of these mutants were reduced in virulence compared with the wild-type strain. We conclude that the Tat pathway secretes multiple proteins that are required for full virulence.

  7. Phase-coherent electron transport through metallic atomic-sized contacts and organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, F.

    2007-02-02

    This work is concerned with the theoretical description of systems at the nanoscale, in particular the electric current through atomic-sized metallic contacts and organic molecules. In the first part, the characteristic peak structure in conductance histograms of different metals is analyzed within a tight-binding model. In the second part, an ab-initio method for quantum transport is developed and applied to single-atom and single-molecule contacts. (orig.)

  8. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kish, Stephen J.; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Chang Lijan; Tong Junchao; Ginovart, Nathalie; Wilson, Alan; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met

  9. Transport Properties of the Metallic State of TMTSF-DMTCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Andersen, Jan Rud; Andrieux, A.

    1979-01-01

    The authors report the transport properties (longitudinal and transverse conductivity, magnetoresistance and thermopower) of TMTSF-DMTCNQ for pressures up to 13 kbar and temperatures down to 1.2K together with the phase diagram which results from these measurements. The most striking results...... at any temperature (σ∥≳105 (Ωcm)-1) and an enormous magnetoresistance Δρ/ρ≈15) is found for a field of 75 kOe perpendicular to the conducting chains...

  10. Size-dependent interaction of gold nanoparticles with transport protein: A spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramanik, Smritimoy; Banerjee, Paltu; Sarkar, Arindam; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different sizes have been synthesized using sodium citrate as a reducing agent for tetrachloroauric (III) acid. The formed gold nanoparticles have been characterized by the UV-visible and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The different sized gold nanoparticles have been used to study the interaction with model transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Experimental results reveal that BSA molecules adsorbed on the metallic surfaces, suffer strong quenching of their fluorescence and the rate of quenching efficiency is different for different particle size. The analysis of the quenching results has been performed in terms of the Stern-Volmer equation. The mechanism of quenching of fluorescence has been explained. The extent of adsorption of BSA on the gold nanoparticles has been estimated

  11. pH-dependent transport of metals through a reactive porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present a study on the effect of pH-dependent adsorption and hydrodynamic dispersion on metal transport through a reactive porous medium with hydrophilic surface. We investigate how the migration of a certain fraction of a metal can be facilitated by its competitive adsorption with protons. We performed laboratory experiments using a chromatographic column filled with silica beads coated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and flooded initially with an acidic solution (pH 3) and then with an alkaline solution (pH > 7) containing either sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, strontium, or barium cations. Concentrations were chosen for which nonclassical transport is predicted. Highly resolved breakthrough curves measured with inline ion chromatography allowed us to observe in all cases the formation of a fast wave/pulse traveling at the interstitial fluid velocity and a retarded front. Classical theory of reactive transport through porous media predicts the formation of only the retarded front and assumes that hydrodynamic dispersion only smooths it without introducing an additional wave. Therefore, the fast wave is a notable exception to this theory. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is due to the interplay between hydrodynamic dispersion and pH-dependent adsorption. Hydrodynamic dispersion broadens the metal concentration front at the inlet of the column and creates a mixing zone where the high-pH solution containing the metal mixes with the low-pH solution initially present in the system. The resulting pH of the mixing zone spans a range where both the adsorption and the retardation of the metal are negligible. This leads to the formation of a metal plume, which then separates from the retarded front traveling at the interstitial fluid velocity as an isolated pulse. This fast transport phenomenon operates independently of other modes of rapid transport, such as colloid-facilitated transport and flow in fractures. A one

  12. Heavy Metals and Metalloids As a Cause for Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Tamás, Markus J.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional...

  13. A finite element model for protein transport in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montas Hubert J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological mass transport processes determine the behavior and function of cells, regulate interactions between synthetic agents and recipient targets, and are key elements in the design and use of biosensors. Accurately predicting the outcomes of such processes is crucial to both enhancing our understanding of how these systems function, enabling the design of effective strategies to control their function, and verifying that engineered solutions perform according to plan. Methods A Galerkin-based finite element model was developed and implemented to solve a system of two coupled partial differential equations governing biomolecule transport and reaction in live cells. The simulator was coupled, in the framework of an inverse modeling strategy, with an optimization algorithm and an experimental time series, obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP technique, to estimate biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters. In the inverse algorithm, an adaptive method was implemented to calculate sensitivity matrix. A multi-criteria termination rule was developed to stop the inverse code at the solution. The applicability of the model was illustrated by simulating the mobility and binding of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor in the nucleoplasm of mouse adenocarcinoma. Results The numerical simulator shows excellent agreement with the analytic solutions and experimental FRAP data. Detailed residual analysis indicates that residuals have zero mean and constant variance and are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Therefore, the necessary and sufficient criteria for least square parameter optimization, which was used in this study, were met. Conclusion The developed strategy is an efficient approach to extract as much physiochemical information from the FRAP protocol as possible. Well-posedness analysis of the inverse problem, however, indicates that the FRAP protocol provides insufficient

  14. Artificial membranes with selective nanochannels for protein transport

    KAUST Repository

    Sutisna, B.

    2016-09-05

    A poly(styrene-b-tert-butoxystyrene-b-styrene) copolymer was synthesized by anionic polymerization and hydrolyzed to poly(styrene-b-4-hydroxystyrene-b-styrene). Lamellar morphology was confirmed in the bulk after annealing. Membranes were fabricated by self-assembly of the hydrolyzed copolymer in solution, followed by water induced phase separation. A high density of pores of 4 to 5 nm diameter led to a water permeance of 40 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 and molecular weight cut-off around 8 kg mol−1. The morphology was controlled by tuning the polymer concentration, evaporation time, and the addition of imidazole and pyridine to stabilize the terpolymer micelles in the casting solution via hydrogen bond complexes. Transmission electron microscopy of the membrane cross-sections confirmed the formation of channels with hydroxyl groups beneficial for hydrogen-bond forming sites. The morphology evolution was investigated by time-resolved grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering experiments. The membrane channels reject polyethylene glycol with a molecular size of 10 kg mol−1, but are permeable to proteins, such as lysozyme (14.3 kg mol−1) and cytochrome c (12.4 kg mol−1), due to the right balance of hydrogen bond interactions along the channels, electrostatic attraction, as well as the right pore sizes. Our results demonstrate that artificial channels can be designed for protein transport via block copolymer self-assembly using classical methods of membrane preparation.

  15. Transport and storage of heavy metals in the Sava river basin in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Dubravka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selected heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd in Sava River water and sediment in Serbia were investigated on three locations in the vicinity of industrial and urban settlements (Šabac, Obrenovac, Beograd during the period spring 2007-autumn 2011. The fluxes of heavy metals from river water to sediment due to sedimentation and heavy metal re-suspension fluxes due to sediment re-suspension at a high flow were determined, by applying the model for assessment of the transport the pollutants through rivers. Those fluxes were attributed mainly to natural processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43009

  16. Electron-phonon interaction and transport properties of metallic bulk and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Sommer Thygesen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as promising two-dimensional materials with intriguing electronic properties. Existing calculations of intrinsic phonon-limited electronic transport so far have concentrated on the semicondcucting members of this family. In this paper we extend these studies by investigating the influence of electron-phonon coupling on the electronic transport properties and band renormalization of prototype inherent metallic bulk and monolayer TaS2. Based on density functional perturbation theory and semi-classical Boltzmann transport calculations, promising room temperature mobilities and sheet conductances are found, which can compete with other established 2D materials, leaving TaS2 as promising material candidate for transparent conductors or as atomically thin interconnects. Throughout the paper, the electronic and transport properties of TaS2 are compared to those of its isoelectronic counterpart TaSe2 and additional informations to the latter are given. We furthermore comment on the conventional superconductivity in TaS2, where no phonon-mediated enhancement of T C in the monolayer compared to the bulk state was found.

  17. Metal transports and enrichments in iron depositions hosted in basaltic rocks. II: Metal rich fluids and Fe origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Xuetong; Hu, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on revealing the mechanism of metal transport, enrichment and Fe origin of iron deposition during water basalt interactions occurred in basaltic rocks. Observations of the iron deposits (anhydrite-magnetite-pyroxene type deposits) hosted in K-rich basaltic rocks in the Mesozoic volcanic area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River valley, China, indicate that the mechanism of metal transport and enrichment for those deposits are significant objective to scientists, and the Fe origin problem is not well resolved. Here the metal transport, enrichment and iron origin have been investigated in high temperature experiments of water basaltic interactions. These deposits were accompanying a wide zone with metal alteration. The effects of hydrothermal alteration on major rock-forming element concentrations in basaltic rock were investigated by systematically comparing the chemical compositions of altered rocks with those of fresh rocks. In the deposits, these metals are distributed throughout altered rocks that exhibit vertical zoning from the deeper to the shallow. Then, combined with the investigations of the metal-alterations, we performed kinetic experiments of water-basaltic rock interactions using flow-through reactors in open systems at temperatures from 20 °C to 550 °C, 23-34 MPa. Release rates for the rock-forming elements from the rocks have been measured. Experiments provide the release rates for various elements at a large temperature range, and indicate that the dissolution rates (release rates) for various elements vary with temperature. Si, Al, and K have high release rates at temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C; the maximum release rates (RMX) for Si are reached at temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C. The RMXs for Ca, Mg, and Fe are at low temperatures from 20 °C to 300 °C. Results demonstrate that Fe is not released from 400 °C to 550 °C, and indicate that when deep circling fluids passed through basaltic rocks, Fe was not mobile, and

  18. Effects of piezoelectric potential on the transport characteristics of metal-ZnO nanowire-metal field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhiyuan

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of piezoelectric potential in a ZnO nanowire on the transport characteristics of the nanowire based field effect transistor through numerical calculations and experimental observations. Under different straining conditions including stretching, compressing, twisting, and their combination, a piezoelectric potential is created throughout the nanowire to modulatealternate the transport property of the metal-ZnO nanowire contacts, resulting in a switch between symmetric and asymmetric contacts at the two ends, or even turning an Ohmic contact type into a diode. The commonly observed natural rectifying behavior of the as-fabricated ZnO nanowire can be attributed to the strain that was unpurposely created in the nanowire during device fabrication and material handling. This work provides further evidence on piezopotential governed electronic transport and devices, e.g., piezotronics.

  19. TRANSITION METAL TRANSPORT IN PLANTS AND ASSOCIATED ENDOSYMBIONTS: ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI AND RHIZOBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Guerrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transition metals such as iron, copper, zinc, or molybdenum, are essential nutrients for plants. These elements are involved in almost every biological process, including photosynthesis, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress, or symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, plants often grow in soils with limiting metallic oligonutrient bioavailability. Consequently, to ensure the proper metal levels, plants have developed a complex metal uptake and distribution system, that not only involves the plant itself, but also its associated microorganisms. These microorganisms can simply increase metal solubility in soils and making them more accessible to the host plant, as well as induce the plant metal deficiency response, or deliver directly transition elements to cortical cells. Other, instead of providing metals can act as metal sinks, such as endosymbiotic rhizobia in legume nodules that requires relatively large amounts to carry out nitrogen fixation. In this review, we propose to do an overview of metal transport mechanisms in the plant-microbe system, emphasizing the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endosymbiotic rhizobia.

  20. Ion conductivity and transport by porous coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horike, Satoshi; Umeyama, Daiki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2013-11-19

    Ion conduction and transport in solids are both interesting and useful and are found in widely distinct materials, from those in battery-related technologies to those in biological systems. Scientists have approached the synthesis of ion-conductive compounds in a variety of ways, in the areas of organic and inorganic chemistry. Recently, based on their ion-conducting behavior, porous coordination polymers (PCPs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been recognized for their easy design and the dynamic behavior of the ionic components in the structures. These PCP/MOFs consist of metal ions (or clusters) and organic ligands structured via coordination bonds. They could have highly concentrated mobile ions with dynamic behavior, and their characteristics have inspired the design of a new class of ion conductors and transporters. In this Account, we describe the state-of-the-art of studies of ion conductivity by PCP/MOFs and nonporous coordination polymers (CPs) and offer future perspectives. PCP/MOF structures tend to have high hydrophilicity and guest-accessible voids, and scientists have reported many water-mediated proton (H(+)) conductivities. Chemical modification of organic ligands can change the hydrated H(+) conductivity over a wide range. On the other hand, the designable structures also permit water-free (anhydrous) H(+) conductivity. The incorporation of protic guests such as imidazole and 1,2,4-triazole into the microchannels of PCP/MOFs promotes the dynamic motion of guest molecules, resulting in high H(+) conduction without water. Not only the host-guest systems, but the embedding of protic organic groups on CPs also results in inherent H(+) conductivity. We have observed high H(+) conductivities under anhydrous conditions and in the intermediate temperature region of organic and inorganic conductors. The keys to successful construction are highly mobile ionic species and appropriate intervals of ion-hopping sites in the structures. Lithium (Li

  1. Identifying sugarcane expressed sequences associated with nutrient transporters and peptide metal chelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Figueira

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant nutrient uptake is an active process, requiring energy to accumulate essential elements at higher levels in plant tissues than in the soil solution, while the presence of toxic metals or excess of nutrients requires mechanisms to modulate the accumulation of ions. Genes encoding ion transporters isolated from plants and yeast were used to identify sugarcane putative homologues in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database. Five cluster consensi with sequence homology to plant high-affinity phosphate transporter genes were identified. One cluster consensus allowed the prediction of a full-length protein containing 541 amino acids, with 81% amino acid identity to the Nicotiana tabacum NtPT1 gene, consisting of 12 membrane-spanning domains divided by a large hydrophilic charged region. Putative homologues to Arabidopsis thaliana micronutrient transporter genes were also detected in some of the SUCEST libraries. Iron uptake in grasses involves the release of the phytosiderophore mugeneic acid (MA which chelate Fe3+ which is then absorbed by a specific transporter. Sugarcane expressed sequence tag (EST homologous to genes coding for three enzymes of the mugeneic acid biosynthetic pathway [nicotianamine synthase; nicotianamine transferase; and putative mugeneic acid synthetase (ids3] and a putative Fe3+-phytosiderophore transporter were detected. Seven sugarcane sequence clusters were identified with strong homology to members of the ZIP gene family (ZIP1, ZIP3, ZIP4, IRT1 and ZNT1, while four clusters homologous to ZIP2 and three to ZAT were found. Homologues to members of another gene family, Nramp, which code for broad-specificity transition metal transporters were also detected with constitutive expression. Partial transcripts homologous to genes encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, glutathione synthetase, and phytochelatin synthase (responsible for biosynthesis of the metal chelator phytochelatin and all four types of the

  2. Strategies for specifically directing metal functionalization of protein nanotubes: constructing protein coated silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Ascencio, Jorge A; Medina, Ariosto; Aguila, Sergio; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2013-06-14

    Biological molecules that self-assemble in the nanoscale range are useful multifunctional materials. Rotavirus VP6 protein self-assembles into tubular structures in the absence of other rotavirus proteins. Here, we present strategies for selectively directing metal functionalization to the lumen of VP6 nanotubes. The specific in situ metal reduction in the inner surface of nanotube walls was achieved by the simple modification of a method previously reported to functionalize the nanotube outer surface. Silver nanorods and nanowires as long as 1.5 μm were formed inside the nanotubes by coalescence of nanoparticles. Such one-dimensional structures were longer than others previously obtained using bioscaffolds. The interactions between silver ions and the nanotube were simulated to understand the conditions that allowed nanowire formation. Molecular docking showed that a naturally occurring arrangement of aspartate residues enabled the stabilization of silver ions on the internal surface of the VP6 nanotubes. This is the first time that such a spatial arrangement has been proposed for the nucleation of silver nanoparticles, opening the possibility of using such an array to direct functionalization of other biomolecules. These results demonstrate the natural capabilities of VP6 nanotubes to function as a versatile biotemplate for nanomaterials.

  3. Electrical Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor Heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proved to have promising applicability in various fields of science and technology. Their fascinating mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical properties have caught the attention of today’s world. We have discussed here the great possibility of using CNTs in electronic devices. CNTs can be both metallic and semiconducting depending on their chirality. When two CNTs of different chirality are joined together via topological defects, they may acquire rectifying diode property. We have joined two tubes of different chiralities through circumferential Stone-Wales defects and calculated their density of states by nearest neighbor tight binding approximation. Transmission function is also calculated to analyze whether the junctions can be used as electronic devices. Different heterojunctions are modeled and analyzed in this study. Internal stresses in the heterojunctions are also calculated by molecular dynamics simulation.

  4. Transport mechanisms in the laser alloying of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2003-10-01

    This article presents some investigations of a laser alloyed surface layer of nickel doped with gold and of copper doped with aluminum. The velocity of the convectino flow in the laser pool predicted by computation implies that there may exist good miscibility for the range of components different from those obtained by the conventional method. This indicates a predominant role of the Marangoni convection for mixing elements. Some metallurgical cross-sections of Ni-Au; Mo-Au; Cu-Al; Cu-Au layers, alloyed by an Nd-YAG laser, for different contents of doping elements are presented. They may be interesting information about miscibility of these metals during laser pulse τ1=4ms.

  5. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  6. Rupture mechanics of metallic alloys for hydrogen transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, I.; Briottet, L.; Lemoine, P.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim to establish a cheap hydrogen distribution system, the transport by pipelines is a solution particularly interesting. Among the high limit of elasticity steels, the X80 has been chosen for hydrogen transport. Its chemical composition and microstructure are given. Important microstructural changes have been revealed in the sheet thickness: the microstructure is thinner and richer in perlite in surface than in bulk. In parallel to this microstructural evolution, a microhardness gradient has been observed: the material microhardness is stronger in surface than in bulk of the sheet. The use of this material for hydrogen transport requires to study its resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The main aim of this work is to develop an easy rupture mechanics test allowing to qualify the studied material in a gaseous hydrogen environment, to determine the sensitivity of the studied material to the hydrogen embrittlement and to better understand the mechanisms of the hydrogen embrittlement for ferritic materials. Two experimental tests have been used for: the first one is a traction machine coupled to an autoclave; the second one allows to carry out disk rupture tests. The toughness of the material in a gaseous hydrogen environment has thus been determined. The resistance of the material to hydrogen embrittlement has been characterized and by simulation, it has been possible to identify the areas with a strong concentration in hydrogen. The second aim of this work is to study the influence of the steel microstructure on the hydrogen position in the material and on the resistance of the material to the hydrogen embrittlement. The preferential trapping sites on the material not mechanically loaded have at first been identified, as well as the hydrogen position on the different phases and at the ferrite/cementite interface. The interaction between the mechanical loads, the position and the trapping of the hydrogen have been studied then. At last, has been

  7. Genome-wide exploration of metal tolerance protein (MTP) genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum): insights into metal homeostasis and biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Recep; Filiz, Ertugrul; Eroglu, Seckin

    2017-04-01

    Metal transport process in plants is a determinant of quality and quantity of the harvest. Although it is among the most important of staple crops, knowledge about genes that encode for membrane-bound metal transporters is scarce in wheat. Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs) are involved in trace metal homeostasis at the sub-cellular level, usually by providing metal efflux out of the cytosol. Here, by using various bioinformatics approaches, genes that encode for MTPs in the hexaploid wheat genome (Triticum aestivum, abbreviated as Ta) were identified and characterized. Based on the comparison with known rice MTPs, the wheat genome contained 20 MTP sequences; named as TaMTP1-8A, B and D. All TaMTPs contained a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family domain and most members harbored a zinc transporter dimerization domain. Based on motif, phylogeny and alignment analysis, A, B and D genomes of TaMTP3-7 sequences demonstrated higher homology compared to TaMTP1, 2 and 8. With reference to their rice orthologs, TaMTP1s and TaMTP8s belonged to Zn-CDFs, TaMTP2s to Fe/Zn-CDFs and TaMTP3-7s to Mn-CDFs. Upstream regions of TaMTP genes included diverse cis-regulatory motifs, indicating regulation by developmental stage, tissue type and stresses. A scan of the coding sequences of 20 TaMTPs against published miRNAs predicted a total of 14 potential miRNAs, mainly targeting the members of most diverged groups. Expression analysis showed that several TaMTPs were temporally and spatially regulated during the developmental time-course. In grains, MTPs were preferentially expressed in the aleurone layer, which is known as a reservoir for high concentrations of iron and zinc. The work identified and characterized metal tolerance proteins in common wheat and revealed a potential involvement of MTPs in providing a sink for trace element storage in wheat grains.

  8. Influence of magnetic impurities on charge transport in diffusive-normal-metal/superconductor junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Inoue, J.; Asano, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport in the diffusive normal metal (DN)/insulator/s- and d-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of magnetic impurities in DN in the framework of the quasiclassical Usadel equations with the generalized boundary conditions. The cases of s- and d-wave superconducting

  9. Theory of charge transport in diffusive normal metal/unconventional singlet superconductor contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Kashiwaya, S.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the transport properties of contacts between unconventional superconductor and normal diffusive metal in the framework of the extended circuit theory. We obtain a general boundary condition for the Keldysh-Nambu Green's functions at the interface that is valid for arbitrary transparencies

  10. A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs

  11. Interfacial transport phenomena and stability in liquid-metal/water systems: scaling considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulla, S.; Liu, X.; Anderson, M.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.; Cho, D.

    2001-01-01

    One concept being considered for steam generation in innovative nuclear reactor applications, involves water coming into direct contact with a circulating molten metal. The vigorous agitation of the two fluids, the direct liquid-liquid contact and the consequent large interfacial area give rise to very high heat transfer coefficients and rapid steam generation. For an optimum design of such direct contact heat exchange and vaporization systems, detailed knowledge is necessary of the various flow regimes, interfacial transport phenomena, heat transfer and operational stability. In this paper we describe current results from the first year of this research that studies the transport phenomena involved with the injection of water into molten metals (e.g., lead alloys). In particular, this work discusses scaling considerations related to direct contact heat exchange, our experimental plans for investigation and a test plan for the important experimental parameters; i.e., the water and liquid metal mass flow rates, the liquid metal pool temperature and the ambient pressure of the direct contact heat exchanger. Past experimental work and initial scaling results suggest that our experiments can directly represent the proper liquid metal pool temperature and the water subcooling. The experimental variation in water and liquid metal flow rates and system pressure (1-10 bar), although smaller than the current conceptual system designs, is sufficient to verify the expected scale effects to demonstrate the phenomena. (authors)

  12. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choveaux David L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369, containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds.

  13. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  14. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitish K; Chang, Junil; Zhao, Patrick X

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task. Support vector machine (SVM)-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM), were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset. Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM) and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions for the

  15. Standard practice for evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals by an electrochemical technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This practice gives a procedure for the evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals using an electrochemical technique which was developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. While this practice is primarily intended for laboratory use, such measurements have been conducted in field or plant applications. Therefore, with proper adaptations, this practice can also be applied to such situations. 1.2 This practice describes calculation of an effective diffusivity of hydrogen atoms in a metal and for distinguishing reversible and irreversible trapping. 1.3 This practice specifies the method for evaluating hydrogen uptake in metals based on the steady-state hydrogen flux. 1.4 This practice gives guidance on preparation of specimens, control and monitoring of the environmental variables, test procedures, and possible analyses of results. 1.5 This practice can be applied in principle to all metals and alloys which have a high solubility for hydrogen, and for which the hydrogen permeation is ...

  16. Modelling of transport phenomena in 3D GMAW of thick metals with V groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT 06604 (United States); Tsai, H L [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2008-03-21

    This paper analyses the dynamic process of groove filling and the resulting weld pool fluid flow in gas metal arc welding of thick metals with V groove. Filler droplets carrying mass, momentum, thermal energy and sulfur species are periodically impinged onto the workpiece. The complex transport phenomena in the weld pool, caused by the combined effect of droplet impingement, gravity, electromagnetic force, surface tension and plasma arc pressure, were investigated to determine the transient weld pool shape and distributions of velocity, temperature and sulfur species in the weld pool. It was found that the groove provides a channel which can smooth the flow in the weld pool, leading to poor mixing between the filler metal and the base metal.

  17. The Ferroportin Metal Efflux Proteins Function in Iron and Cobalt Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relatively little is known about how metals such as iron are effluxed from cells, a necessary step for transport from the root to the shoot. Ferroportin is the sole iron efflux transporter in animals, and there are two closely related orthologs in Arabidopsis, FPN1 and FPN2. FPN1 localizes to the pl...

  18. Transport and noise properties of a normal metal-superconductor-normal metal junction with mixed singlet and chiral triplet pairings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ganesh C.; Dutta, Paramita; Saha, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    We study transport and zero frequency shot noise properties of a normal metal-superconductor-normal metal (NSN) junction, with the superconductor having mixed singlet and chiral triplet pairings. We show that in the subgapped regime when the chiral triplet pairing amplitude dominates over that of the singlet, a resonance phenomena emerges out at zero energy where all the quantum mechanical scattering probabilities acquire a value of 0.25. At the resonance, crossed Andreev reflection mediating through such junction, acquires a zero energy peak. This reflects as a zero energy peak in the conductance as well depending on the doping concentration. We also investigate shot noise for this system and show that shot noise cross-correlation is negative in the subgapped regime when the triplet pairing dominates over the singlet one. The latter is in sharp contrast to the positive shot noise obtained when the singlet pairing is the dominating one.

  19. On the carrier transport in metal-insulator-metal structures for CdTe thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.W.; Choi, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    According to the energy band model for the Al-CdTe-Ag sandwich structure, we have investigate to the mechanism of the current limited transport(CLT). As the bias voltage applied to the Alsup(+) and Agsup(+) electrode, the potential barrier difference for this structure was found 0.2eV. From what this results, we conclude that the mechanism of the current limited transport due to the potential barrier of the contact limited current. Not only this phenomena but also the annealing effect of thin film was shown that the distingushable for virgin film. (Author)

  20. Metal protein attenuating compounds for the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; Jenagaratnam, Lydia; McShane, Rupert

    2014-02-21

    Alzheimer's dementia (AD) may be caused by the formation of extracellular senile plaques comprised of beta-amyloid (Aß). In vitro and mouse model studies have demonstrated that metal protein attenuating compounds (MPACs) promote the solubilisation and clearance of Aß. To evaluate the efficacy of metal protein attenuating compounds (MPACs) for the treatment of cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's dementia. We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialized Register, on 29 July 2010 using the terms: Clioquinol OR PBT1 OR PBT2 OR "metal protein" OR MPACS OR MPAC. Randomised double-blind trials in which treatment with an MPAC was administered to participants with Alzheimer's dementia in a parallel group comparison with placebo were included. Three review authors (RM, LJ, ELS) independently assessed the quality of trials according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions.The primary outcome measure of interest was cognitive function (as measured by psychometric tests). The secondary outcome measures of interest were in the following areas: quality of life, functional performance, effect on carer, biomarkers, safety and adverse effects, and death. Two MPAC trials were identified. One trial compared clioquinol (PBT1) with placebo in 36 patients and 32 had sufficient data for per protocol analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in cognition (as measured on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognition (ADAS-Cog)) between the active treatment and placebo groups at 36 weeks. The difference in mean change from baseline ADAS-Cog score in the clioquinol arm compared with the placebo arm at weeks 24 and 36 was a difference of 7.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51 to 13.24) and 6.36 (95% CI -0.50 to 13.23), respectively.There was no significant impact on non-cognitive symptoms or clinical global impression. One participant in the active treatment group developed neurological symptoms

  1. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-12-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires elaborate signaling pathways, including genetic, epigenetic, nuclear receptor mediated, posttranscriptional gene regulation involving microRNAs, and non-genomic (kinases) pathways triggered by hormones and/or growth factors. This review discusses current knowledge on regulatory pathways for ABC transporters in kidney proximal tubules, with a main focus on P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance proteins 2 and 4, and breast cancer resistance protein. Insight in these processes is of importance because variations in transporter activity due to certain (disease) conditions could lead to significant changes in drug efficacy or toxicity.

  2. Analysis of Nanobody-Epitope Interactions in Living Cells via Quantitative Protein Transport Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früholz, Simone; Pimpl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades, quantitative protein transport analyses have been used to elucidate the sorting and transport of proteins in the endomembrane system of plants. Here, we have applied our knowledge about transport routes and the corresponding sorting signals to establish an in vivo system for testing specific interactions between soluble proteins.Here, we describe the use of quantitative protein transport assays in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts to test for interactions occurring between a GFP-binding nanobody and its GFP epitope. For this, we use a secreted GFP-tagged α-amylase as a reporter together with a vacuolar-targeted RFP-tagged nanobody. The interaction between these proteins is then revealed by a transport alteration of the secretory reporter due to the interaction-triggered attachment of the vacuolar sorting signal.

  3. A New Metal Binding Domain Involved in Cadmium, Cobalt and Zinc Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Aaron T. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Barupala, Dulmini [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Stemmler, Timothy L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Rosenzweig, Amy C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-07-20

    In the P1B-ATPases, which couple cation transport across membranes to ATP hydrolysis, are central to metal homeostasis in all organisms. An important feature of P1B-ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains (MBDs) that regulate transport activity. Only one type of MBD has been characterized extensively, but bioinformatics analyses indicate that a diversity of MBDs may exist in nature. Here we report the biochemical, structural and functional characterization of a new MBD from the Cupriavidus metallidurans P1B-4-ATPase CzcP (CzcP MBD). The CzcP MBD binds two Cd2+, Co2+ or Zn2+ ions in distinct and unique sites and adopts an unexpected fold consisting of two fused ferredoxin-like domains. Both in vitro and in vivo activity assays using full-length CzcP, truncated CzcP and several variants indicate a regulatory role for the MBD and distinct functions for the two metal binding sites. Moreover, these findings elucidate a previously unknown MBD and suggest new regulatory mechanisms for metal transport by P1B-ATPases.

  4. Anisotropic transport of normal metal-barrier-normal metal junctions in monolayer phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Agarwal, Amit; Sengupta, K.

    2017-07-01

    We study transport properties of a phosphorene monolayer in the presence of single and multiple potential barriers of height U 0 and width d, using both continuum and microscopic lattice models, and show that the nature of electron transport along its armchair edge (x direction) is qualitatively different from its counterpart in both conventional two-dimensional electron gas with Schrödinger-like quasiparticles and graphene or surfaces of topological insulators hosting massless Dirac quasiparticles. We show that the transport, mediated by massive Dirac electrons, allows one to achieve collimated quasiparticle motion along x and thus makes monolayer phosphorene an ideal experimental platform for studying Klein paradox in the context of gapped Dirac materials. We study the dependence of the tunneling conductance G\\equiv {{G}xx} as a function of d and U 0, and demonstrate that for a given applied voltage V its behavior changes from oscillatory to decaying function of d for a range of U 0 with finite non-zero upper and lower bounds, and provide analytical expression for these bounds within which G decays with d. We contrast such behavior of G with that of massless Dirac electrons in graphene and also with that along the zigzag edge (y direction) in phosphorene where the quasiparticles obey an effective Schrödinger equation at low energy. We also study transport through multiple barriers along x and demonstrate that these properties hold for transport through multiple barriers as well. Finally, we suggest concrete experiments which may verify our theoretical predictions.

  5. Carbon transport in a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, L.V.; Spalaris, C.N.; Roy, P.

    1980-04-01

    Carbon transport data from a bimetallic sodium loop simulating the intermediate heat transport system of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor are discussed. The results of bulk carbon analyses after 15,000 hours' exposure indicate a pattern of carburization of Type 304 stainless steel foils which is independent of loop sodium temperature. A model based on carbon activity gradients accounting for this behavior is proposed. Data also indicate that carburization of Type 304 stainless steel is a diffusion-controlled process; however, decarburization of the ferritic 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel is not. It is proposed that the decarburization of the ferritic steel is controlled by the dissolution of carbides in the steel matrix. The differences in the sodium decarburization behavior of electroslag remelted and vacuum-arc remelted 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel are also highlighted

  6. Characterization of protein degradation in serum-based lubricants during simulation wear testing of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskiewicz, Victoria K; Williams, Paul A; Prates, Sarah J; Bowsher, John G; Clarke, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    A size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC) method has been developed which is capable of separation and quantitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine serum globulin (BSG) components of serum-based lubricant (SBL) solutions. This allowed characterization of the stability profiles of these proteins when acting as lubricants during hip wear simulation, and identification of wear-specific mechanisms of degradation. Using cobalt-chromium metal-on-metal (MOM) hip joints, it was observed that BSA remained stable for up to 3 days (215K cycles) of wear testing after which the protein degraded in a fairly linear fashion. BSG on the other hand, began to degrade immediately and in a linear fashion with a rate constant of 5% per day. Loss of both proteins occurred via the formation of high molecular weight aggregates which precipitated out of solution. No fragmentation of the polypeptide backbone of either protein was observed. Data obtained suggest that protein degradation was not due to microbial contamination, denaturation at the air-water interface, or frictional heating of articulating joint surfaces in these studies. We conclude that the primary source of protein degradation during MOM simulation testing occurs via high shear rates experienced by SBL solutions at articulating surfaces, possibly coupled with metal-protein interactions occurring as new and reactive metal surfaces are generated during wear testing. The development of this analytical methodology will allow new studies to clarify the role of SBL solutions in wear simulation studies and the interactions and lubricating properties of serum proteins with prosthetic surfaces other than MOM.

  7. Monitoring transport and equilibrium of heavy metals in soil using induced polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalem, T.; Huisman, J. A.; Zimmermann, E.; Furman, A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution in general, and by heavy metals in particular, is a major threat to human health, and especially in rapidly developing regions, such as China. Fast, accurate and low-cost measurement of heavy metal contamination is of high desire. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) may be an alternative to the tedious sampling techniques typically used. In the SIP method, an alternating current at a range of low frequencies is injected into the soil and the resultant potential is measured along the current's path. SIP is a promising method for monitoring heavy metals, because it is sensitive to the chemical composition of both the absorbed ions on the soil minerals and the pore fluid and to the interface between the two. The high sorption affinity of heavy metals suggests that their electrical signature may be significant, even at relatively low concentrations. The goal of this research is to examine the electrical signature of soil contaminated by heavy metals and of the pollution transport and remediation processes, in a non-tomographic fashion. Specifically, we are looking at the SIP response of various heavy metals in several settings: 1) at equilibrium state in batch experiments; 2) following the progress of a pollution front along a soil column through flow experiments and 3) monitoring the extraction of the contaminant by a chelating agent. Using the results, we develop and calibrate a multi-Cole-Cole model to separate the electrochemical and the interfacial components of the polarization. Last, we compare our results to the electrical signature of contaminated soil from southern China. Results of single metals from both batch and flow experiments display a shift of the relaxation time and a decrease in the phase response of the soil with increase of the metal concentration, suggesting strong sorption of the metals on the stern layer. Preliminary results also show evidence of electrodic polarization, assuming to be related to the formation of

  8. SDS-assisted protein transport through solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Pérez, Laura; John, Shalini; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Joo, Chirlmin; Dekker, Cees

    2017-08-17

    Using nanopores for single-molecule sequencing of proteins - similar to nanopore-based sequencing of DNA - faces multiple challenges, including unfolding of the complex tertiary structure of the proteins and enforcing their unidirectional translocation through nanopores. Here, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single-molecule experiments to investigate the utility of SDS (Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate) to unfold proteins for solid-state nanopore translocation, while simultaneously endowing them with a stronger electrical charge. Our simulations and experiments prove that SDS-treated proteins show a considerable loss of the protein structure during the nanopore translocation. Moreover, SDS-treated proteins translocate through the nanopore in the direction prescribed by the electrophoretic force due to the negative charge impaired by SDS. In summary, our results suggest that SDS causes protein unfolding while facilitating protein translocation in the direction of the electrophoretic force; both characteristics being advantageous for future protein sequencing applications using solid-state nanopores.

  9. Multivariate analysis of protein profiles of metal hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens accessions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuomainen, M.H.; Nunan, N.; Lehesranta, S.J.; Tervahauta, A.I.; Hassinen, V.H.; Schat, H.; Koistinen, K.M.; Auriola, S.; McNicol, J.; Karenlampi, S.O.

    2006-01-01

    Thlaspi caerulescens is increasingly acknowledged as one of the best models for studying metal hyperaccumulation in plants. In order to study the mechanisms underlying metal hyper-accumulation, we used proteomic profiling to identify differences in protein intensities among three T caerulescens

  10. Intracellular transport of recombinant coronavirus spike proteins: implications for virus assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vennema, H.; Heijnen, L.; Zijderveld, A.; Spaan, W.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Coronavirus spike protein genes were expressed in vitro by using the recombinant vaccinia virus expression system. Recombinant spike proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced cell fusion in a host-cell-dependent fashion. The intracellular transport of recombinant spike proteins was

  11. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, E.; Magnúsdóttir, S.; Bruggeman, F.J.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is

  12. Required momentum, heat, and mass transport experiments for liquid-metal blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Sze, D.K.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Through the effects on fluid flow, many aspects of blanket behavior are affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, including pressure drop, heat transfer, mass transfer, and structural behavior. In this paper, a set of experiments is examined that could be performed in order to reduce the uncertainties in the highly related set of issues dealing with momentum, heat, and mass transport under the influence of a strong magnetic field (i.e., magnetic transport phenomena). By improving our basic understanding and by providing direct experimental data on blanket behavior, these experiments will lead to improved designs and an accurate assessment of the attractiveness of liquid-metal blankets

  13. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with a small metal-binding protein from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli is still the preferred organism for large-scale production of recombinant proteins. The use of fusion proteins has helped considerably in enhancing the solubility of heterologous proteins and their purification with affinity chromatography. Here, the use of a small metal-binding protein (SmbP) from Nitrosomonas europaea is described as a new fusion protein for protein expression and purification in E. coli. Fluorescent proteins tagged at the N-terminal with SmbP showed high levels of solubility, compared with those of maltose-binding protein and glutathione S-transferase, and low formation of inclusion bodies. Using commercially available IMAC resins charged with Ni(II), highly pure recombinant proteins were obtained after just one chromatography step. Proteins may be purified from the periplasm of E. coli if SmbP contains the signal sequence at the N-terminal. After removal of the SmbP tag from the protein of interest, high-yields are obtained since SmbP is a protein of just 9.9 kDa. The results here obtained suggest that SmbP is a good alternative as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fast axonal transport of labeled proteins in motoneurons of exercise-trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasmin, B.J.; Lavoie, P.A.; Gardiner, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the fast orthograde axonal transport of radiolabeled proteins was measured to determine the effects of endurance-running training on transport velocity and amounts of transported proteins in rat sciatic motoneurons. Female rats were subjected to a progressive running-training program for 10-12 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, rats underwent right L4-L5 dorsal root ganglionectomy. The next day, 20 microCi of [3H]leucine was injected bilaterally in the vicinity of the motoneuronal cell bodies supplying the sciatic nerve, to study axonal transport parameters. Results showed that peak and average transport velocities of labeled proteins were significantly (P less than 0.05) increased by 22 and 29%, respectively, in the deafferented nerves of the runners as compared with controls. Moreover, the amount of total transported protein-bound radioactivity was increased in both left (40%) and right (37%) sciatic nerves of the runners. An exhaustive exercise session reduced (P less than 0.05) peak displacement (8%) and total transported protein-bound radioactivity (36%) in the sciatic nerves of control rats, whereas no changes were noticed in trained animals. The data suggest that chronic endurance running induces significant adaptations in the fast axonal transport of labeled proteins

  16. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers

    KAUST Repository

    Satyawali, Yamini

    2011-04-01

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)3) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)3), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor

  18. Investigation of thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid transition metals using Wills-Harrison potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleque, M.A.; Bhuiyan, G.M.; Rashid, R.I.M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat capacity at constant pressure and isothermal compressibility have been calculated for liquid 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals near melting temperature. The hard sphere diameter for all such systems is estimated from the potential profile generated from the Wills and Harrison's prescription using linearized WCA theory of liquid. Evaluated values of entropy and specific heat capacity are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Transport property like shear viscosity for these liquid metals is obtained using the same potential profile. Lack of experimental data at melting temperatures hampers detailed comparison for all such systems. However, for the case of transport property, the results obtained are found to compare qualitatively well with the available experimental data. (author)

  19. Efficient retrograde transport of pseudorabies virus within neurons requires local protein synthesis in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Orkide O; Perlman, David H; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-01-16

    After replicating in epithelial cells, alphaherpesviruses such as pseudorabies virus (PRV) invade axons of peripheral nervous system neurons and undergo retrograde transport toward the distant cell bodies. Although several viral proteins engage molecular motors to facilitate transport, the initial steps and neuronal responses to infection are poorly understood. Using compartmented neuron cultures to physically separate axon infection from cell bodies, we found that PRV infection induces local protein synthesis in axons, including proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, intracellular trafficking, signaling, and metabolism. This rapid translation of axonal mRNAs is required for efficient PRV retrograde transport and infection of cell bodies. Furthermore, induction of axonal damage, which also induces local protein synthesis, prior to infection reduces virion trafficking, suggesting that host damage signals and virus particles compete for retrograde transport. Thus, similar to axonal damage, virus infection induces local protein translation in axons, and viruses likely exploit this response for invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Removing coordinated metal ions from proteins: a fast and mild method in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Charlotte; Stolz, Michael; Lewitzki, Erwin; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Kolbesen, Bernd O; Grell, Ernst

    2006-08-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of metal binding to proteins require the investigation of metal-free proteins, which are often difficult to obtain. We have developed a very fast and mild method to eliminate metal ions from proteins by column chromatography using a commercially available Ni-NTA-type stationary phase. This material, initially designed for protein purification purposes in biotechnology, acts as a strong cation chelator when Ni2+ ions are removed. We have tested this new method with Ca-ATPase, an integral membrane protein exhibiting a strong affinity for Ca2+. By eluting the protein over the Ni2+-free NTA gel, we could remove 95% of the total Ca2+ and obtain an essentially Ca2+-free protein. This method is efficient with only a small amount of NTA gel, and we suggest that it can be applied in general for removal of metal ions from proteins. Moreover, as this procedure can be carried out under mild conditions, the chosen protein kept its enzymatic activity.

  1. How Does Boiling in the Earth's Crust Influence Metal Speciation and Transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, K.; Lemke, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of large quantities of precious metals, such as gold and copper, near the Earth's surface (upper crust) is commonly attributed to transport in aqueous solution and precipitation upon variations in temperature and pressure. As a consequence, gold exploration is closely linked to solution chemistry, i.e. hydrothermal processes involving aqueous fluids with densities of around unity. However, as crustal fluids buoyantly ascend, boiling produces a coexisting low-density aqueous liquid with fundamentally different physical and chemical properties, and a, most importantly, a high affinity for coinage metals (Heinrich et al., Econ Geol., 1992, 87, 1566). From recent experimental studies of Au (Hurtig and Williams-Jones, 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,, 127, 304), we know that metal speciation in this low-density phase differs fundamentally from that observed in bulk solution, clearly, with important implications for Au, and metal speciation in general, transport and ore concentrations processes (these processes would also be operable in industrial geothermal plants given the quite special solvent properties of steam). In brief, this study focuses on the speciation of select metal halides in bulk solution as well as in water vapor, and is driven by our need to understand the solvent properties of around 2.0x109 cubic kilometers of free water (or 2,500 times as much water as stored in all lakes and rivers) present in the Earth's crust. The scope of this study has particular applications in the geothermal and oil industries, as both deal with high temperature low-density aqueous fluids. Understanding how metal halide species behave upon boiling can also provide insight into how metals, such as copper and silver, coat turbine equipment and steam piping in geothermal plants, ultimately rendering these components inoperable. This study will also provide preliminary results from mass spectrometric experiments of transition metal halides, and will be augmented with

  2. Crystal structures of the CusA efflux pump suggest methionine-mediated metal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Feng; Su, Chih-Chia; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Boyken, Scott E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Yu, Edward W. (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2010-09-23

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently use tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel various toxic compounds from the cell. The efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. No previous structural information was available for the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here we describe the crystal structures of the inner-membrane transporter CusA in the absence and presence of bound Cu(I) or Ag(I). These CusA structures provide new structural information about the HME subfamily of RND efflux pumps. The structures suggest that the metal-binding sites, formed by a three-methionine cluster, are located within the cleft region of the periplasmic domain. This cleft is closed in the apo-CusA form but open in the CusA-Cu(I) and CusA-Ag(I) structures, which directly suggests a plausible pathway for ion export. Binding of Cu(I) and Ag(I) triggers significant conformational changes in both the periplasmic and transmembrane domains. The crystal structure indicates that CusA has, in addition to the three-methionine metal-binding site, four methionine pairs - three located in the transmembrane region and one in the periplasmic domain. Genetic analysis and transport assays suggest that CusA is capable of actively picking up metal ions from the cytosol, using these methionine pairs or clusters to bind and export metal ions. These structures suggest a stepwise shuttle mechanism for transport between these sites.

  3. Atmospheric background levels and transport of heavy metals in the Balearic Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateu, J.; Forteza, R.; Colom-Altes, M.; Cerda, V.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium and seven minor inorganic components (iron, manganese, nickel, chromium, copper, cadmium and lead) were determined in aerosols collected at the Alfabia and Soller stations (Majorca, Spain), 1100 and 100 m above sea level, respectively. The results obtained reveal a marked influence of long-distance transport of natural and anthropogenic materials. A statistical study allowed the metals to be grouped according to their origin. 22 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Small polarons and c-axis transport in highly anisotropic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, A.F.; Schofield, A.J.

    2002-09-01

    Motivated by the anomalous c-axis transport properties of the quasi two-dimensional metal, Sr 2 RuO 4 , and some of its relatives, we have studied the interlayer hopping of single electrons that are coupled strongly to c-axis bosons. We find a c-axis resistivity that reflects the in-plane electronic scattering in the low and very high temperature limits (relative to the characteristic temperature of the boson T boson ). For temperatures near the T boson , a broad maximum in the resistivity can appear for sufficiently strong electron-boson coupling. This feature may account for the observed 'metallic to non-metallic crossover' seen in these layered oxides, where the boson may be a phonon. (author)

  5. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants...... deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid...... (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may...

  6. Temperature-dependent transport properties of graphene decorated by alkali metal adatoms (Li, K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, S.; Hemmatiyan, S.; Morrison, T. D.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Naugle, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    We report the electrical transport properties of graphene for dilute alkali metal decoration (n ˜ 2 × 1012 cm-2) at cryogenic temperatures. Upon deposition of K and Li atoms at T = 20 K, graphene devices are doped with electrons, and the charge carrier mobility is decreased. As temperature is increased, the number of electrons donated to the graphene and the number of charged scatterers are reduced, and the mobility of the metal decorated graphene is increased. This differs from the typical temperature-dependent transport in undecorated graphene, where the mobility decreases with increasing temperature. To investigate the kinetic behavior of adatoms on graphene, we estimate the hopping time of the Li and K adatoms on graphene based on the migration barrier in the low concentration regime of the metal adatoms by Density Functional Theory calculations. The calculations reveal that these adatoms are mobile even at cryogenic temperatures and become more mobile with increasing temperature, allowing for cluster formation of adatoms. This indicates that the dominant factor in the electron transport on warming is a cluster formation.

  7. Is there ballistic transport in metallic nano-objects? Ballistic versus diffusive contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N; Bai Ming; Lu Yonghua; Munoz, M; Cheng Hao; Levanyuk, A P

    2007-01-01

    When discussing the resistance of an atomic-or nanometre-size contact we should consider both its ballistic and its diffusive contributions. But there is a contribution of the leads to the resistance of the contact as well. In this context, the geometry and the roughness of the surfaces limiting the system will contribute to the resistance, and these contributions should be added to the ideal ballistic resistance of the nanocontact. We have calculated, for metallic materials, the serial resistance of the leads arising from the roughness, and our calculations show that the ohmic resistance is as important as the ballistic resistance of the constriction. The classical resistance is a lower limit to the quantum resistance of the leads. Many examples of earlier experiments show that the mean free path of the transport electrons is of the order of the size of the contacts or the leads. This is not compatible with the idea of ballistic transport. This result may put in serious difficulties the current, existing interpretation of experimental data in metals where only small serial resistances compared with the ballistic component of the total resistance have been taken into account. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is also discussed and the serial corrections appear to be smaller than for metals. Experiments with these last systems are proposed that may reveal new interesting aspects in the physics of ballistic and diffusive transport

  8. Is there ballistic transport in metallic nano-objects? Ballistic versus diffusive contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, N [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Bai Ming [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Lu Yonghua [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Munoz, M [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cheng Hao [Laboratorio de Fisica de Sistemas Pequenos y NanotecnologIa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Madrid 28006 (Spain); Levanyuk, A P [Fisintec Innovacion Tecnologica, Miraflores 65, Alcobendas, Madrid 28100 (Spain)

    2007-01-10

    When discussing the resistance of an atomic-or nanometre-size contact we should consider both its ballistic and its diffusive contributions. But there is a contribution of the leads to the resistance of the contact as well. In this context, the geometry and the roughness of the surfaces limiting the system will contribute to the resistance, and these contributions should be added to the ideal ballistic resistance of the nanocontact. We have calculated, for metallic materials, the serial resistance of the leads arising from the roughness, and our calculations show that the ohmic resistance is as important as the ballistic resistance of the constriction. The classical resistance is a lower limit to the quantum resistance of the leads. Many examples of earlier experiments show that the mean free path of the transport electrons is of the order of the size of the contacts or the leads. This is not compatible with the idea of ballistic transport. This result may put in serious difficulties the current, existing interpretation of experimental data in metals where only small serial resistances compared with the ballistic component of the total resistance have been taken into account. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is also discussed and the serial corrections appear to be smaller than for metals. Experiments with these last systems are proposed that may reveal new interesting aspects in the physics of ballistic and diffusive transport.

  9. Seasonal Drivers of Dissolved Metal Transport During Infiltration of Road Runoff in an Urban Roadside Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, A.; Bain, D.

    2017-12-01

    Infiltration-based green infrastructure (GI) is being increasingly applied in urban areas, systems characterized by substantial legacy contamination and complicated hydrology. However, it is not clear how the application of green infrastructure changes the geochemistry of urban roadside environments. Most current research on GI focuses on small sets of chemical parameters (e.g. road salt, nitrogen and phosphorous species) over relatively short time periods, limiting comprehensive understanding of geochemical function. This work measures changes in groundwater infiltration rate and dissolved metal concentrations in two infiltration trenches in Pittsburgh, PA to evaluate function and measure dissolved metal transport from the system over time. Two distinct geochemical regimes seem to be driven by seasonality: road de-icer exchange and microbial driven summer reducing conditions. Interactions between these geochemical regimes and variability in infiltration rate control the flux of different metals, varying with metal chemistry. These findings suggest the adoption of infiltration based green infrastructure will likely create complicated patterns of legacy contamination transport to downstream receptors.

  10. Solution-Processed Metal Oxides as Efficient Carrier Transport Layers for Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Wallace C H; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-27

    Carrier (electron and hole) transport layers (CTLs) are essential components for boosting the performance of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes. Considering the drawbacks of conventional CTLs (easily oxidized/unstable, demanding/costly fabrication, etc.), transition metal oxides with good carrier transport/extraction and superior stability have drawn extensive research interest as CTLs for next-generation devices. In recent years, many research efforts have been made toward the development of solution-based metal oxide CTLs with the focus on low- or even room-temperature processes, which can potentially be compatible with the deposition processes of organic materials and can significantly contribute to the low-cost and scale-up of organic devices. Here, the recent progress of different types of solution-processed metal oxide CTLs are systematically reviewed in the context of organic photovoltaics, from synthesis approaches to device performance. Different approaches for further enhancing the performance of solution-based metal oxide CTLs are also discussed, which may push the future development of this exciting field. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Electronic transport and dielectric properties of low-dimensional structures of layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok.1777@yahoo.com; Ahluwalia, P.K., E-mail: pk_ahluwalia7@yahoo.com

    2014-02-25

    Graphical abstract: We present electronic transport and dielectric response of layered transition metal dichalcogenides nanowires and nanoribbons. Illustration 1: Conductance (G) and corresponding local density of states(LDOS) for LTMDs wires at applied bias. I–V characterstics are shown in lowermost panels. Highlights: • The studied configurations show metallic/semiconducting nature. • States around the Fermi energy are mainly contributed by the d orbitals of metal atoms. • The studied configurations show non-linear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. • Additional plasmonic features at low energy have been observed for both wires and ribbons. • Dielectric functions for both wires and ribbons are anisotropic (isotropic) at low (high) energy range. -- Abstract: We present first principle study of the electronic transport and dielectric properties of nanowires and nanoribbons of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs), MX{sub 2} (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te). The studied configuration shows metallic/semiconducting nature and the states around the Fermi energy are mainly contributed by the d orbitals of metal atoms. Zero-bias transmission show 1G{sub 0} conductance for the ribbons of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2}; 2G{sub 0} conductance for MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, WSe{sub 2} wires, and ribbons of MoTe{sub 2} and WTe{sub 2}; and 3G{sub 0} conductance for WSe{sub 2} ribbon. The studied configurations show non-linear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. Negative differential conductance (NDC) has also been observed for the nanoribbons of the selenides and tellurides of both Mo and W. Furthermore, additional plasmonic features below 5 eV energy have been observed for both wires and ribbons as compared to the corresponding monolayers, which is found to be red-shifted on going from nanowires to nanoribbons.

  12. Isolation of Arabidopsis thylakoid membranes and their use for in vitro protein insertion or transport assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Thomas; Schünemann, Danja

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the techniques of chloroplast isolation; their fractionation into envelopes, stroma, and thylakoids; and their further use for in vitro protein transport assays. In addition to the isolation of thylakoids, this chapter also describes the experimental steps of both protein translocation across the thylakoid membrane and protein integration into the membrane. Protein translocation and integration can be analysed by the radioactive labelling of substrate proteins using an in vitro transcription and translation system. The translocated or integrated proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. Our protocol allows the analysis of these transport systems in wild-type Arabidopsis or mutants that lack or overexpress soluble or membrane transport factors that could be of potential interest.

  13. ABC Transport Proteins in Cardiovascular Disease-A Brief Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Toni; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2017-04-06

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases due to their involvement in cholesterol homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, endothelial function, vascular inflammation, as well as platelet production and aggregation. In this regard, ABC transporters, such as ABCA1, ABCG5 and ABCG8, were initially found to be responsible for genetically-inherited syndromes like Tangier diseases and sitosterolemia. These findings led to the understanding of those transporter's function in cellular cholesterol efflux and thereby also linked them to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Subsequently, further ABC transporters, i.e., ABCG1, ABCG4, ABCB6, ABCC1, ABCC6 or ABCC9, have been shown to directly or indirectly affect cellular cholesterol efflux, the inflammatory response in macrophages, megakaryocyte proliferation and thrombus formation, as well as vascular function and blood pressure, and may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of CVD and its complications. Furthermore, ABC transporters, such as ABCB1, ABCC2 or ABCG2, may affect the safety and efficacy of several drug classes currently in use for CVD treatment. This review will give a brief overview of ABC transporters involved in the process of atherogenesis and CVD pathology. It also aims to briefly summarize the role of ABC transporters in the pharmacokinetics and disposition of drugs frequently used to treat CVD and CVD-related complications.

  14. Active zone proteins are transported via distinct mechanisms regulated by Par-1 kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara R Barber

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of synapses underlies a plethora of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease. Presynaptic specialization called the active zone plays a critical role in the communication with postsynaptic neuron. While the role of many proteins at the active zones in synaptic communication is relatively well studied, very little is known about how these proteins are transported to the synapses. For example, are there distinct mechanisms for the transport of active zone components or are they all transported in the same transport vesicle? Is active zone protein transport regulated? In this report we show that overexpression of Par-1/MARK kinase, a protein whose misregulation has been implicated in Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs and neurodegenerative disorders, lead to a specific block in the transport of an active zone protein component- Bruchpilot at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions. Consistent with a block in axonal transport, we find a decrease in number of active zones and reduced neurotransmission in flies overexpressing Par-1 kinase. Interestingly, we find that Par-1 acts independently of Tau-one of the most well studied substrates of Par-1, revealing a presynaptic function for Par-1 that is independent of Tau. Thus, our study strongly suggests that there are distinct mechanisms that transport components of active zones and that they are tightly regulated.

  15. Cortical concentrations of metals and protein in the brain of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The male RS goats had significantly higher levels (P<0.05) of Mn than the females. While the male WAD goats had higher levels of total crude protein, the concentration between the sexes of the RS goats was the same. This study has given information on metal and protein concentration in the brain of goat for use in ...

  16. Understanding Dissolved and Colloidal Metal Transport and Transformation - Pathways for Aquatic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B. A.; Besser, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Hundreds of miles of streams in the western United States are affected by the release of metals from weathering of mineralized bedrock and mine wastes. In many cases, historical mining has accelerated these weathering processes and increased concentrations of metals in affected streams. Copper and zinc are two metals that affect aquatic health in such streams. Aquatic toxicity from copper and zinc is thought to be related principally to their dissolved concentrations. But there are alternative pathways that may lead to toxicity. Movement of many metals associated with mine drainage is affected by iron colloidal solids. The initial precipitation of iron hydroxides results in nanometer-sized colloids that subsequently aggregate to form a continuum of particle sizes from about one nanometer to greater than one micrometer. This behavior makes the popular or legal definition of dissolved metals at 0.45 micrometers meaningless in streams affected by mine drainage. Ultrafiltration, using tangential-flow across 10,000-Dalton membranes, provides a means to understand dissolved and colloidal metal concentrations. When ultrafiltration is combined with methods to determine mass loading, it is possible to quantify sources and chemical reactions affecting metals. For example, results from a mass-loading study in Mineral Creek, Colorado, indicate that copper and zinc are contributed to the stream from both mined and unmined sources. As the pH of Mineral Creek changes in response to both neutral and acidic inflows, copper was repeatedly transferred between dissolved and colloidal phases through sorption reactions. When the colloidal phase was dominant, the total load of copper consistently decreased because the colloids are entrained by algae on cobbles and strained by the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Zinc load also decreased during transport, but this was a result of the physical process of water exchange with the hyporheic zone, and not a result of colloidal

  17. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-09

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance.

  18. Spin dependent transport of hot electrons through ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindl, Emanuel

    2010-06-23

    In this work relaxation and transport of hot electrons in thin single crystalline metallic films is investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy. The electron mean free paths are determined in an energy interval of 1 to 2 eV above the Fermi level. While fcc Au-films appear to be quite transmissive for hot electrons, the scattering lengths are much shorter for the ferromagnetic alloy FeCo revealing, furthermore, a strong spin asymmetry in hot electron transport. Additional information is gained from temperature dependent studies in combination with golden rule approaches in order to disentangle the impact of several relaxation and transport properties. It is found that bcc Fe-films are much less effective in spin filtering than films made of the FeCo-alloy. (orig.)

  19. A cell-based method for screening RNA-protein interactions: identification of constitutive transport element-interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nakamura

    Full Text Available We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This "Tat-hybrid" screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV constitutive transport element (CTE, a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes.

  20. Study of casks shielded with heavy metal to transport highly radioactive substances; Estudo de embalados com blindagem em metal pesado para transporte de substancias altamente radioativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchesi, R.F.; Hara, D.H.S.; Martinez, L.G.; Mucsi, C.S.; Rossi, J.L., E-mail: rflguimaraes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, Brazil relies on casks produced abroad for transportation in its territory of substances that are sources of high radioactivity, especially the Mo-99. The product of the radioactive decay of the Mo-99 is the Tc-99m, which is used in nuclear medicine for administration to humans in the form of injectable radioactive drugs for the image diagnosis of numerous pathologies. This paper aims to study the existing casks in order to propose materials for the construction of the core part as shielding against gamma radiation. To this purpose, the existing literature on the subject was studied, as well as evaluation of existing and available casks. The study was focused on the core of which is made of heavy metals, especially depleted uranium for shielding the emitted radiation. (author)

  1. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L. during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakatsu Yoneyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn and iron (Fe are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synthesized information on the routes of metal transport and accumulation in rice plants by examining metal speciation, metal transporters, and the xylem-to-phloem transport system. At grain-filling, Zn and Cd ascending in xylem sap are transferred to the phloem by the xylem-to-phloem transport system operating at stem nodes. Grain Fe is largely derived from the leaves by remobilization. Zn and Fe concentrations in phloem-sap and grains are regulated within a small range, while Cd concentrations vary depending on xylem supply. Transgenic techniques to increase concentrations of the metal chelators (nicotianamine, 2′-deoxymugineic acid are useful in increasing grain Zn and Fe concentrations. The elimination of OsNRAMP5 Cd-uptake transporter and the enhancement of root cell vacuolar Cd sequestration reduce uptake and root-to-shoot transport, respectively, resulting in a reduction of grain Cd accumulation.

  2. Enhanced interfacial thermal transport in pnictogen tellurides metallized with a lead-free solder alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devender,; Ramanath, Ganpati, E-mail: Ramanath@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lofgreen, Kelly; Devasenathipathy, Shankar; Swan, Johanna; Mahajan, Ravi [Intel Corporation, Assembly Test and Technology Development, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian [Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Controlling thermal transport across metal–thermoelectric interfaces is essential for realizing high efficiency solid-state refrigeration and waste-heat harvesting power generation devices. Here, the authors report that pnictogen chalcogenides metallized with bilayers of Sn{sub 96.5}Ag{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5} solder and Ni barrier exhibit tenfold higher interfacial thermal conductance Γ{sub c} than that obtained with In/Ni bilayer metallization. X-ray diffraction and x-ray spectroscopy indicate that reduced interdiffusion and diminution of interfacial SnTe formation due to Ni layer correlates with the higher Γ{sub c}. Finite element modeling of thermoelectric coolers metallized with Sn{sub 96.5}Ag{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}/Ni bilayers presages a temperature drop ΔT ∼ 22 K that is 40% higher than that obtained with In/Ni metallization. Our results underscore the importance of controlling chemical intermixing at solder–metal–thermoelectric interfaces to increase the effective figure of merit, and hence, the thermoelectric cooling efficiency. These findings should facilitate the design and development of lead-free metallization for pnictogen chalcogenide-based thermoelectrics.

  3. Transport of soluble proteins through the Golgi occurs by diffusion via continuities across cisternae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Rizzo, Riccardo; Polishchuk, Roman; Martella, Oliviano; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Fusella, Aurora; Spaar, Alexander; Sallese, Michele; Capestrano, Maria Grazia; Pavelka, Margit; Vos, Matthijn R; Rikers, Yuri GM; Helms, Volkhard; Mironov, Alexandre A; Luini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of transport through the Golgi complex is not completely understood, insofar as no single transport mechanism appears to account for all of the observations. Here, we compare the transport of soluble secretory proteins (albumin and α1-antitrypsin) with that of supramolecular cargoes (e.g., procollagen) that are proposed to traverse the Golgi by compartment progression–maturation. We show that these soluble proteins traverse the Golgi much faster than procollagen while moving through the same stack. Moreover, we present kinetic and morphological observations that indicate that albumin transport occurs by diffusion via intercisternal continuities. These data provide evidence for a transport mechanism that applies to a major class of secretory proteins and indicate the co-existence of multiple intra-Golgi trafficking modes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02009.001 PMID:24867214

  4. SDS-assisted protein transport through solid-state nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restrepo Perez, L.; John, Shalini; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Joo, C.; Dekker, C.

    2017-01-01

    Using nanopores for single-molecule sequencing of proteins – similar to nanopore-based sequencing of DNA – faces multiple challenges, including unfolding of the complex tertiary structure of the proteins and enforcing their unidirectional translocation through nanopores. Here, we combine molecular

  5. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the

  6. Protein transport across the small intestine in food allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, M.; Westerhout, J.; Wichers, H.J.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Verhoeckx, K.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the imminent deficiency of protein sources for human consumption in the near future, new protein sources need to be identified. However, safety issues such as the risk of allergenicity are often a bottleneck, due to the absence of predictive, validated and accepted methods for risk

  7. Protein transport across the small intestine in food hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, M.; Westerhout, J.; Wichers, H.J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the imminent deficiency of protein sources for human consumption in the near future, new protein sources need to be identified. However, safety issues such as the risk of allergenicity are often a bottleneck, due to the absence of predictive, validated and accepted methods for risk

  8. Communication Maps: Exploring Energy Transport through Proteins and Water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agbo, J. K.; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Leitner, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, 8/9 (2014), s. 1065-1073 ISSN 0021-2148 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : energy transfer * heme proteins * hydrogen bonds * molecular modeling * protein models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.221, year: 2014

  9. Potassium-transporting proteins in skeletal muscle: cellular location and fiber-type differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Juel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    , but is suggested primarily to participate in K+ release to the interstitium. Because there is restricted diffusion of K+ to the interstitium, K+ released to the T-tubules during AP propagation will be removed primarily by reuptake mediated by transport proteins located in the T-tubule membrane. The most important....... The relative content of the different K+-transporting proteins differs in oxidative and glycolytic muscles, and might explain the different [K+]e tolerance observed....

  10. Enrichment of trace metals in water utilizing the coagulation of soybean protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musha, Soichiro; Takahashi, Yoshihisa.

    1975-01-01

    An enrichment of trace metals in water with a coagulated soybean protein and the complex-forming character of heavy metal ions with the soybean protein were investigated by means of emission spectrography. Fixed amounts of soybean milk (collector) and delta-gluconic lactone (coagulant) were added to a sample solution containing various metal ions, and then the mixture was heated to boiling in order to coagulate the protein. The coagulum (soybean curd) separated from the suspension with a centrifuge was burned to ashes with a low temperature plasma asher. Then metals enriched in the soybean curd were determined by means of emission spectrography. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 4.4--5.0 by adding suitable amounts of delta-gluconic lactone for the complete coagulation of the soybean protein. The proposed method can be applied to the collection and enrichment of various metal ions such as gold, silver, mercury, platinum, cadmium, beryllium, palladium, antimony, gallium, indium, cerium, lanthanum, thorium, yttrium, zirconium, etc. Those metals are not detectable in the original soybean. (auth.)

  11. Imaging metals in proteins by combining electrophoresis with rapid x-ray fluorescence mapping.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finney, L.; Chishti, Y.; Khare, T.; Giometti, C.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A.; Vogt, S.; Univ. of Sydney; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence points toward a very dynamic role for metals in biology. This suggests that physiological circumstance may mandate metal ion redistribution among ligands. This work addresses a critical need for technology that detects, identifies, and measures the metal-containing components of complex biological matrixes. We describe a direct, user-friendly approach for identifying and quantifying metal?protein adducts in complex samples using native- or SDS-PAGE, blotting, and rapid synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping with micro-XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) of entire blots. The identification and quantification of each metal bound to a protein spot has been demonstrated, and the technique has been applied in two exemplary cases. In the first, the speciation of the in vitro binding of exogenous chromium to blood serum proteins was influenced markedly by both the oxidation state of chromium exposed to the serum proteins and the treatment conditions, which is of relevance to the biochemistry of Cr dietary supplements. In the second case, in vivo changes in endogenous metal speciation were examined to probe the influence of oxygen depletion on iron speciation in Shewanella oneidensis.

  12. Protein scaffolds for selective enrichment of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan; Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Michael

    2016-02-09

    Polypeptides comprising high affinity for the uranyl ion are provided. Methods for binding uranyl using such proteins are likewise provided and can be used, for example, in methods for uranium purification or removal.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of reduced glutathione transport: role of the MRP/CFTR/ABCC and OATP/SLC21A families of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballatori, Nazzareno; Hammond, Christine L.; Cunningham, Jennifer B.; Krance, Suzanne M.; Marchan, Rosemarie

    2005-01-01

    The initial step in reduced glutathione (GSH) turnover in all mammalian cells is its transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space; however, the mechanisms of GSH transport are not clearly defined. GSH export is required for the delivery of its constituent amino acids to other tissues, detoxification of drugs, metals, and other reactive compounds of both endogenous and exogenous origin, protection against oxidant stress, and secretion of hepatic bile. Recent studies indicate that some members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/CFTR or ABCC) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, as well as some members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP or SLC21A) family of transporters contribute to this process. In particular, five of the 12 members of the MRP/CFTR family appear to mediate GSH export from cells namely, MRP1, MRP2, MRP4, MRP5, and CFTR. Additionally, two members of the OATP family, rat Oatp1 and Oatp2, have been identified as GSH transporters. For the Oatp1 transporter, efflux of GSH may provide the driving force for the uptake of extracellular substrates. In humans, OATP-B and OATP8 do not appear to transport GSH; however, other members of this family have yet to be characterized in regards to GSH transport. In yeast, the ABC proteins Ycf1p and Bpt1p transport GSH from the cytosol into the vacuole, whereas Hgt1p mediates GSH uptake across the plasma membrane. Because transport is a key step in GSH homeostasis and is intimately linked to its biological functions, GSH export proteins are likely to modulate essential cellular functions

  14. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M H

    1994-03-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed.

  15. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  16. Herpes viral proteins manipulating the peptide transporter TAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reits, E.; Griekspoor, A.; Neefjes, J.

    2002-01-01

    The peptide transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is crucial for class I-restricted antigen presentation because it transfers cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for class I binding. It is therefore not surprising that TAP is targeted for inactivation by many

  17. Retrograde transport of protein toxins through the Golgi apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Skotland, Tore; van Deurs, Bo

    2013-01-01

    at the cell surface, and they are endocytosed both by clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. Sorting to the Golgi and retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are common to these toxins, but the exact mechanisms turn out to be toxin and cell-type dependent. In the ER...

  18. Towards the role of metal ions in the structural variability of proteins: CdII speciation of a metal ion binding loop motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla

    2011-01-01

    A de novo designed dodecapeptide (HS), inspired by the metal binding loops of metal-responsive transcriptional activators, was synthesized. The aim was to create a model system for structurally promiscuous and intrinsically unstructured proteins, and explore the effect of metal ions on their stru...... the peptide is exchanging between a number of structures also in its metal ion bound state(s), as indicated by NMR and PAC data. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  19. Mechanical and Acoustic Characteristics of the Weld and the Base Metal Machine Part of Career Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexander N.; Knjaz'kov, Victor L.; Levashova, Elena E.; Ababkov, Nikolay V.; Pimonov, Maksim V.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, many industries use foreign-made machinery. There is no opportunity to purchase quality original spare parts for which machinery. Therefore, enterprises operating this equipment are looking for producers of analogues of various parts and assemblies. Quite often, the metal of such analog components turns out to be substandard, which leads to their breakdown at a much earlier date and the enterprises incur material losses. Due to the fact that the complex of performance characteristics and the resource of products are laid at the stage of their production, it is extremely important to control the quality of the raw materials. The structure, mechanical, acoustic and magnetic characteristics of metal samples of such destroyed details of quarry transport as hydraulic cylinders and detail “axis” of an excavator are investigated. A significant spread of data on the chemical composition of metal, hardness and characteristics of non-destructive testing is established, which gives grounds to recommend to manufacturers and suppliers of parts is more responsible to approach the incoming quality control. The results of the investigation of metal samples by destructive and non-destructive methods of control are compared, which showed that the spectral-acoustic method of nondestructive testing can be used to control the quality of the responsible machine parts under conditions of import substitution.

  20. Sensing of heavy metal ions by intrinsic TMV coat protein fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Serene S.; Green, Philippe; Blum, Amy Szuchmacher

    2018-04-01

    We propose the use of a cysteine mutant of TMV coat protein as a signal transducer for the selective sensing and quantification of the heavy metal ions, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ based on intrinsic tryptophan quenching. TMV coat protein is inexpensive, can be mass-produced since it is expressed and extracted from E-coli. It also displays several different functional groups, enabling a wide repertoire of bioconjugation chemistries; thus it can be easily integrated into functional devices. In addition, TMV-ion interactions have been widely reported and utilized for metallization to generate organic-inorganic hybrid composite novel materials. Building on these previous observations, we herein determine, for the first time, the TMV-ion binding constants assuming the static fluorescence quenching model. We also show that by comparing TMV-ion interactions between native and denatured coat protein, we can distinguish between chemically similar heavy metal ions such as cadmium and zinc ions.

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel Cut family cDNA that encodes human copper transporter protein CutC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jixi; Ji Chaoneng; Chen Jinzhong; Yang Zhenxing; Wang Yijing; Fei, Xiangwei; Zheng Mei; Gu Xing; Wen Ge; Xie Yi; Mao Yumin

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential heavy metal trace element that plays important roles in cell physiology. The Cut family was associated with the copper homeostasis and involved in several important metabolisms, such as uptake, storage, delivery, and efflux of copper. In this study, a novel Cut family cDNA was isolated from the human fetal brain library, which encodes a 273 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of about 29.3 kDa and a calculated pI of 8.17. It was named hCutC (human copper transporter protein CutC). The ORF of hCutC gene was cloned into pQE30 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The secreted hCutC protein was purified to a homogenicity of 95% by using the Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. RT-PCR analysis showed that the hCutC gene expressed extensively in human tissues. Subcellular location analysis of hCutC-EGFP fusion protein revealed that hCutC was distributed to cytoplasm of COS-7 cells, and both cytoplasm and nucleus of AD293 cells. The results suggest that hCutC may be one shuttle protein and play important roles in intracellular copper trafficking

  2. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, G. K.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  3. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Fischermeier, E. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Pospisil, P. [A.S.C. R., Prague (Czech Republic). J. Heyrovsky Inst. Physical Chemistry; Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-07-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P{sub 1B}-type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  4. Internal hydration of a metal-transporting ATPase is controlled by membrane lateral pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, Karim; Pospisil, P.; Sayed, A.; Hof, M.

    2017-01-01

    The active transport of ions across biological mem branes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P 1B -type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila (LpCopA) as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nano-discs (NDs). Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure.

  5. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  6. ATPase and GTPase Tangos Drive Intracellular Protein Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-Ou

    2016-12-01

    The GTPase superfamily of proteins provides molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The 'GTPase switch' paradigm, in which external regulatory factors control the switch of a GTPase between 'on' and 'off' states, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. However, recent work unveiled a class of nucleotide hydrolases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead, they use nucleotide-dependent dimerization cycles to regulate key cellular processes. In this review article, recent studies of dimeric GTPases and ATPases involved in intracellular protein targeting are summarized. It is suggested that these proteins can use the conformational plasticity at their dimer interface to generate multiple points of regulation, thereby providing the driving force and spatiotemporal coordination of complex cellular pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Engineering: Development of a Metal Ion Dependent Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Molecular Biology Biochemistry Royal Society of Chemistry Proteins: Structure , Function, and Bioinformatics Journal of Molecular Biology Biophysical... Society of Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry Biochemistry PNAS Escherichia coli Journal of Biotechnology Biochemistry Nature Protocols Journal of... Society A: Inorganic, Physical, Theoretical Trends in Biochemical Sciences Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Biochemistry PNAS PNAS

  8. The substrate-binding protein in bacterial ABC transporters: dissecting roles in the evolution of substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Horler, Richard S P; Muller, Axel; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, although being ubiquitous in biology, often feature a subunit that is limited primarily to bacteria and archaea. This subunit, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), is a key determinant of the substrate specificity and high affinity of ABC uptake systems in these organisms. Most prokaryotes have many SBP-dependent ABC transporters that recognize a broad range of ligands from metal ions to amino acids, sugars and peptides. Herein, we review the structure and function of a number of more unusual SBPs, including an ABC transporter involved in the transport of rare furanose forms of sugars and an SBP that has evolved to specifically recognize the bacterial cell wall-derived murein tripeptide (Mtp). Both these examples illustrate that subtle changes in binding-site architecture, including changes in side chains not directly involved in ligand co-ordination, can result in significant alteration of substrate range in novel and unpredictable ways. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  9. Food web transport of trace metals and radionuclides from the deep sea: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.S.

    1979-06-01

    This report summarizes aspects of the potential distribution pathways of metals and radionuclides, particularly Co and Ni, through a biological trophic framework after their deposition at 4000 to 5000 meters in the North Atlantic or North Pacific. It discusses (a) the basic, deep-sea trophic structure of eutrophic and oligotrophic regions; (b) the transport pathways of biologically available energy to and from the deep sea, pathways that may act as accumulators and vectors of radionuclide distribution, and (c) distribution routes that have come into question as potential carriers of radionuclides from the deep-sea bed to man

  10. Revealing thermal effects in the electronic transport through irradiated atomic metal point contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Kopp

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the electronic transport through nanoscopic metallic contacts under the influence of external light fields. Various processes can be of relevance here, whose underlying mechanisms can be studied by comparing different kinds of atomic contacts. For this purpose two kinds of contacts, which were established by electrochemical deposition, forming a gate-controlled quantum switch (GCQS, have been studied. We demonstrate that in these kinds of contacts thermal effects resulting from local heating due to the incident light, namely thermovoltage and the temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity and the electrochemical (Helmholtz double layer are the most prominent effects.

  11. The thermodynamics of protein interactions with essential first row transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Giffune, Thomas R

    2016-05-01

    The binding of metal ions to proteins is a crucial process required for their catalytic activity, structural stability and/or functional regulation. Isothermal titration calorimetry provides a wealth of fundamental information which when combined with structural data allow for a much deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism. A rigorous understanding of any molecular interaction requires in part an in-depth quantification of its thermodynamic properties. Here, we provide an overview of recent studies that have used ITC to quantify the interaction of essential first row transition metals with relevant proteins and highlight major findings from these thermodynamic studies. The thermodynamic characterization of metal ion-protein interactions is one important step to understanding the role that metal ions play in living systems. Such characterization has important implications not only to elucidating proteins' structure-function relationships and biological properties but also in the biotechnology sector, medicine and drug design particularly since a number of metal ions are involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements can provide complete thermodynamic profiles of any molecular interaction through the simultaneous determination of the reaction binding stoichiometry, binding affinity as well as the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy change thus enabling a more in-depth understanding of the nature of these interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlled formation of emissive silver nanoclusters using rationally designed metal-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Vasily A; Ogawa, Michael Y

    2013-08-19

    The metal-binding properties of rationally designed, synthetic proteins were used to prepare a series of emissive silver nanoclusters having predictable sizes and emission energies. Metal-binding α-helical coiled coils were designed to exist as peptide trimers, tetramers, and hexamers and found to uniquely bind 6, 8, and 12 Ag(+) ions, respectively. Subsequent treatment with a chemical reducing agent produced a series of peptide-bound Ag(0) nanoclusters that display a strong visible fluorescence whose emission energies depend on the number of bound metal ions in excellent agreement with theory.

  13. Non-destructive analysis of ancient metal alloys by in situ EDXRF transportable equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigante, G. E.; Cesareo, R.

    1998-01-01

    The availability of transportable equipment for in situ non-destructive analysis of works of art is considered to be very important. In situ non-destructive study is typically diagnostic, therefore requiring only qualitative or semiquantitative results. In the case of alloys, quantitative results can also be obtained. In Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis, portable instruments can now be assembled. For instance, miniaturised X-ray tubes with air cooling and high resolution semiconductor detectors thermoelectrically cooled are now available, allowing the construction of completely transportable apparatus for EDXRF analysis. In this work, aspects regarding methodology of analysis and discussion of the precision obtainable in analysis of ancient metals are presented

  14. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang (Michael); Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiOx and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiOx/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  15. Two metal-tolerance proteins, MTP1 and MTP4, are involved in Zn homeostasis and Cd sequestration in cucumber cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migocka, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Anna; Papierniak, Anna; Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Posyniak, Ewelina; Garbiec, Arnold; Filleur, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Metal-tolerance proteins (MTPs) are divalent cation transporters that have been shown to be essential for metal homeostasis and tolerance in model plants and hyperaccumulators. Due to the lack of genomic resources, studies on MTPs in cultivated crops are lacking. Here, we present the first functional characterization of genes encoding cucumber proteins homologous to MTP1 and MTP4 transporters. CsMTP1 expression was ubiquitous in cucumber plants, whereas CsMTP4 mRNA was less abundant and was not detected in the generative parts of the flowers. When expressed in yeast, CsMTP1 and CsMTP4 were able to complement the hypersensitivity of mutant strains to Zn and Cd through the increased sequestration of metals within vacuoles using the transmembrane electrochemical gradient. Both proteins formed oligomers at the vacuolar membranes of yeast and cucumber cells and localized in Arabidopsis protoplasts, consistent with their function in vacuolar Zn and Cd sequestration. Changes in the abundance of CsMTP1 and CsMTP4 transcripts and proteins in response to elevated Zn and Cd, or to Zn deprivation, suggested metal-induced transcriptional, translational, and post-translational modifications of protein activities. The differences in the organ expression and affinity of both proteins to Zn and Cd suggested that CsMTP1 and CsMTP4 may not be functionally redundant in cucumber cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. 9-Deazapurines as Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of the ABC Transport Proteins P-Glycoprotein, Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1, and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Katja; Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Wiese, Michael

    2017-11-09

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) are the three major ABC transport proteins conferring resistance to many structurally diverse anticancer agents, leading to the phenomenon called multidrug resistance (MDR). Much effort has been put into the development of clinically useful compounds to reverse MDR. Broad-spectrum inhibitors of ABC transport proteins can be of great use in cancers that simultaneously coexpress two or three transporters. In this work, we continued our effort to generate new, potent, nontoxic, and multiply effective inhibitors of the three major ABC transporters. The best compound was active in a very low micromolar concentration range against all three transporters and restored sensitivity toward daunorubicin (P-gp and MRP1) and SN-38 (BCRP) in A2780/ADR (P-gp), H69AR (MRP1), and MDCK II BCRP (BCRP) cells. Additionally, the compound is a noncompetitive inhibitor of daunorubicin (MRP1), calcein AM (P-gp), and pheophorbide A (BCRP) transport.

  17. The impact of metal transport processes on bioavailability of free and complex metal ions in methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Vergeldt, F.; Gerkema, E.; Maca, J.; As, van H.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2012-01-01

    Bioavailability of metals in anaerobic granular sludge has been extensively studied, because it can have a major effect on metal limitation and metal toxicity to microorganisms present in the sludge. Bioavailability of metals can be manipulated by bonding to complexing molecules such as

  18. Anomalous transport phenomena in Weyl metal beyond the Drude model for Landau's Fermi liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Kim, Heon-Jung; Sasaki, M; Wang, J-F; Li, L

    2014-12-01

    Landau's Fermi-liquid theory is the standard model for metals, characterized by the existence of electron quasiparticles near a Fermi surface as long as Landau's interaction parameters lie below critical values for instabilities. Recently this fundamental paradigm has been challenged by the physics of strong spin-orbit coupling, although the concept of electron quasiparticles remains valid near the Fermi surface, where Landau's Fermi-liquid theory fails to describe the electromagnetic properties of this novel metallic state, referred to as Weyl metal. A novel ingredient is that such a Fermi surface encloses a Weyl point with definite chirality, referred to as a chiral Fermi surface, which can arise from breaking of either time reversal or inversion symmetry in systems with strong spin-orbit coupling, responsible for both the Berry curvature and the chiral anomaly. As a result, electromagnetic properties of the Weyl metallic state are described not by conventional Maxwell equations but by axion electrodynamics, where Maxwell equations are modified with a topological-in-origin spatially modulated [Formula: see text] term. This novel metallic state was realized recently in Bi[Formula: see text]Sb x around [Formula: see text] under magnetic fields, where the Dirac spectrum appears around the critical point between the normal semiconducting ([Formula: see text]) and topological semiconducting phases ([Formula: see text]) and the time reversal symmetry breaking perturbation causes the Dirac point to split into a pair of Weyl points along the direction of the applied magnetic field for a very strong spin-orbit coupled system. In this review article, we discuss how the topological structure of both the Berry curvature and the chiral anomaly (axion electrodynamics) gives rise to anomalous transport phenomena in [Formula: see text]Sb x around [Formula: see text] under magnetic fields, thus modifying the Drude model of Landau's Fermi liquids.

  19. The role of Monosaccharide Transport Proteins in carbohydrate assimilation, distribution, metabolism and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Anthony J.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The facilitated diffusion of glucose, galactose, fructose, urate, myoinositol and dehydroascorbic acid in mammals is catalyzed by a family of 14 monosaccharide transport proteins called GLUTs. These transporters may be divided into 3 classes according to sequence similarity and function/substrate specificity. GLUT1 appears to be highly expressed in glycolytically active cells and has been co-opted in vitamin C auxotrophs to maintain the redox state of the blood through transport of dehydroascorbate. Several GLUTs are definitive glucose/galactose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5 are physiologically important fructose transporters, GLUT9 appears to be a urate transporter while GLUT13 (HMIT1) is a proton/myoinositol co-transporter. The physiologic substrates of some GLUTs remain to be established. The GLUTs are expressed in a tissue specific manner where affinity, specificity and capacity for substrate transport are paramount for tissue function. Although great strides have been made in characterizing GLUT-catalyzed monosaccharide transport and mapping GLUT membrane topography and determinants of substrate specificity, a unifying model for GLUT structure and function remains elusive. The GLUTs play a major role in carbohydrate homeostasis and the redistribution of sugar-derived carbons among the various organ systems. This is accomplished through a multiplicity of GLUT-dependent glucose sensing and effector mechanisms that regulate monosaccharide ingestion, absorption, distribution, cellular transport and metabolism and recovery/retention. Glucose transport and metabolism have co-evolved in mammals to support cerebral glucose utilization. PMID:22943001

  20. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Choline transport via choline transporter-like protein 1 in conditionally immortalized rat syncytiotrophoblast cell lines TR-TBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N-Y; Choi, H-M; Kang, Y-S

    2009-04-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for phospholipids and acetylcholine biosynthesis in normal development of fetus. In the present study, we investigated the functional characteristics of choline transport system and inhibitory effect of cationic drugs on choline transport in rat conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT). Choline transport was weakly Na(+) dependent and significantly influenced by extracellular pH and by membrane depolarization. The transport process of choline is saturable with Michaelis-Menten constants (K(m)) of 68microM and 130microM in TR-TBT 18d-1 and TR-TBT 18d-2 respectively. Choline uptake in the cells was inhibited by unlabeled choline and hemicholinium-3 as well as various organic cations including guanidine, amiloride and acetylcholine. However, the prototypical organic cation tetraethylammonium and cimetidine showed very little inhibitory effect of choline uptake in TR-TBT cells. RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) are expressed in TR-TBT cells. The transport properties of choline in TR-TBT cells were similar or identical to that of CTL1 but not OCT2. CTL1 was also detected in human placenta. In addition, several cationic drugs such as diphenhydramine and verapamil competitively inhibited choline uptake in TR-TBT 18d-1 with K(i) of 115microM and 55microM, respectively. Our results suggest that choline transport system, which has intermediate affinity and weakly Na(+) dependent, in TR-TBT seems to occur through a CTL1 and this system may have relevance with the uptake of pharmacologically important organic cation drugs.

  2. Migration and transformation rule of heavy metals in sludge during hydrolysis for protein extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Xue, Fei; Li, Jiebing; Xu, Shi Hong; Li, Dengxin

    2016-03-01

    The content and speciation of heavy metals can fundamentally affect the hydrolysis of sludge. This research study investigates the migration and transformation rule of heavy metals during the hydrolysis process by measuring the content of exchangeables (F1), bound to carbonates (F2), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (F3), bound to organic matter (F4), and residuals (F5) under different periods of time undergoing hydrolysis. The results show that the hydrolysis process generally stabilized Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and As by transforming the unstable states into structurally stable states. Such transformations and stabilization were primarily caused by the changes in local metal ion environment and bonding structure, oxidation of sulfides, pyrolyzation of organic matter, and evaporation of resulting volatile materials. An X-ray diffractometry (XRD) of the residuals conducted after hydrolysis indicated that hydrolysis did have a significant influence on the transportation and transformation of heavy metals.

  3. Heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport show dependence of cadmium pollution history in the liver of female zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Ling; Guo, Sai-Nan; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Xia, Hu

    2017-10-01

    Environmental stressors such as high temperature and metal exposure may occur sequentially, simultaneously, previously in aquatic ecosystems. However, information about whether responses to high temperature depend on Cd exposure history is still unknown in fish. Zebrafish were exposed to 0 (group 1), 2.5 (group 2) and 5μg/L (group 3) cadmium (Cd) for 10 weeks, and then each group was subjected to Cd-free water maintained at 26°C and 32°C for 7days respectively. 26 indicators were used to compare differences between 26°C and 32°C in the liver of female zebrafish, including 5 biochemical indicators (activity of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and iNOS; LPO; MT protein), 8 molecular indicators of oxidative stress (mRNA levels of Nrf2, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, HSF1, HSF2, HSP70, MTF-1 and MT), 5 molecular indicators of inflammation (mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS and NF-κB), 8 molecular indicators of metal transport (mRNA levels of, ZnT1, ZnT5, ZIP8, ZIP10, ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1). All biochemical indicators were unchanged in group 1 and changed in group 2 and 3. Contrarily, differences were observed in almost all of molecular indicators of inflammation and metal transport in group 1, about half in group 2, and few in group 3. We also found that all molecular indicators of oxidative stress in group 2 and fewer in group 1 and 3 were significantly affected by heat. Our data indicated that heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport showed dependence of previous cadmium exposure in the liver of zebrafish, emphasizing metal pollution history should be carefully considered when evaluating heat stress in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Pak-Yan P; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  5. Which metal or ion? Identification of metals and ions in protein structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, Supplement /August/ (2014), C1484 ISSN 0108-7673. [Congress and General Assembly of the International Union of Crystallography /23./ - IUCr 2014. 05.08.2014-12.08.2014, Montreal] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : metal s * ions * structure validation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  6. The Thermodynamics of Proteins Interactions with Essential First Raw Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Giffune, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The binding of metal ions to proteins is a crucial process required for their catalytic activity, structural stability and/or functional regulation. Isothermal titration calorimetry provides a wealth of fundamental information which when combined with structural data allow for a much deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism. Scope of review A rigorous understanding of any molecular interaction requires in part an in-depth quantification of its thermodynamic properties. Here, we provide an overview of recent studies that have used ITC to quantify the interaction of essential first raw transition metals with relevant proteins and highlight major findings from these thermodynamic studies. General significance The thermodynamic characterization of metal ions-proteins interactions is one important step to understanding the role that metal ions play in living systems. Such characterization has important implications not only to elucidating proteins’ structure-function relationships and biological properties but also in the biotechnology sector, medicine and drug design particularly since a number of metal ions are involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. Major conclusions Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements can provide complete thermodynamic profiles of any molecular interaction through the simultaneous determination of the reaction binding stoichiometry, binding affinity as well as the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy change thus enabling a more in-depth understanding of the nature of these interactions. PMID:26569121

  7. Assessment of heavy metal releases from the use phase of road transport in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Ulrike; Pacyna, Jozef; Pacyna, Elisabeth; Friedrich, Rainer

    An emission inventory was compiled for heavy metal air emissions from road transport in Europe (EU-40). For the database, country-specific data was taken such as the diesel and gasoline fuel consumption per country, the content of Pb in gasoline and diesel fuel and the share of different vehicle types. For tyre and brake wear emissions, average wear rates and heavy metal contents of different materials were used to develop emission factors for tyre and brake wear. It covers exhaust emissions (Pb from gasoline and diesel) as well as non-exhaust emissions (As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb from the wear of brake linings and vehicle tyres). The base year is 2000, and two scenarios were developed for 2010, a business as usual (BAU) scenario and a maximum feasible technical reduction (MFTR) scenario. Both result in a remarkable decrease in Pb exhaust emissions and a rising share of non-exhaust emissions. To assess the results, the inventory is (a) compared to an inventory compiled with a top-down approach that covers the same area and years but only emissions from combustion processes and (b) added to an inventory covering all sectors for heavy metal air emissions.

  8. Phenomena of the ionic transport in the stress corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravano, S.M.

    1986-07-01

    For the study of electrochemical conditions of propagation, a model which calculates the concentrations and potential profiles inside cracks or localized corrosion cavities, was developed. Considering transport by difussion and migration it was applied to pure metals (Zn, Fe) in solutions where pitting occurs (NaCl or Na2SO4, with borate buffer), and also extended to systems where stress corrosion cracking is present, such as Cu and yellow brass in NaNO2. Physical bases of the 'constant intermediate elongation rate technique' to predict stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was analized, studying by mathematical models: 1) dissolution current, that should be the result of superposition of repassivation transients on the fresh metal, exposed to corrosive medium by strain, with the same rate of that of a static specimen; 2) ohmic drop, that in some systems could be quite important and it must be considered in the overpotential evaluation; and 3) metallic ion concentration that, instead of what happens in a crack, never attains saturation in the analized cases. For repassivation transient according to the crak propagation models proposed by Scully and Ford it was found that, at the tip of the crack, it is unlikely that the same repassivation transients occur as in the constant intermediate elongation rate experiments. (M.E.L.)

  9. Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zysk, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the atmospheric heavy metals contamination and its deposition to ecosystems. The increasing attention to mercury pollution has been mainly driven by the growing evidence of its negative impacts on wildlife, ecosystems and particularly human health. Lead and cadmium are also toxics which are being emitted into the atmosphere by anthropogenic as well as natural sources. The harmful influence of these three heavy metals was underlined in the Aarhus Protocol on Heavy Metals of 1998. The Parties of this protocol (including Poland) are obligated to reduce emissions, observe the transport and the amounts of lead, mercury and cadmium in the environment. Poland is one of the biggest emitter of mercury, lead and cadmium in Europe mainly due to emission from coal combustion processes. Therefore in Poland, research efforts to study the heavy metals emission, atmospheric transport, concentration and deposition are extremely important. The objectives of this work were twofold: - The practical objective was to develop and run a model to represent the atmospheric dispersion of mercury and to implement it in the air quality modelling platform Polyphemus.- The scientific objective was to perform heavy metals dispersion studies over Europe and detailed studies of the impact of the polish power sector on the air quality regarding mercury, cadmium and lead. To meet the declared aim, a new mercury chemical model was implemented into the Polyphemus air quality system. The scientific literature was reviewed regarding mercury chemistry and mercury chemical models. It can be concluded that the chemistry of mercury is still not well known. The models also differ in the way of calculating the dry and wet deposition of mercury. The elemental gaseous mercury ambient concentrations are evenly distributed, on the contrary, high variations in the spatial gradients of

  10. The human synaptic vesicle protein, SV2A, functions as a galactose transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Marianna; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2014-11-28

    SV2A is a synaptic vesicle membrane protein expressed in neurons and endocrine cells and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. Although the exact function of SV2A still remains elusive, it was identified as the specific binding site for levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug. Our sequence analysis demonstrates that SV2A has significant homology with several yeast transport proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Many of these transporters are involved in sugar transport into yeast cells. Here we present evidence showing, for the first time, that SV2A is a galactose transporter. We expressed human SV2A in hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells and demonstrated that these cells are able to grow on galactose-containing medium but not on other fermentable carbon sources. Furthermore, the addition of the SV2A-binding antiepileptic drug levetiracetam to the medium inhibited the galactose-dependent growth of hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells expressing human SV2A. Most importantly, direct measurement of galactose uptake in the same strain verified that SV2A is able to transport extracellular galactose inside the cells. The newly identified galactose transport capability of SV2A may have an important role in regulating/modulating synaptic function. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, G.; Malínský, Jan; Stahlschmidt, W.; Loibl, M.; Weig-Meckl, I.; Frommer, W.B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 6 (2008), s. 1075-1088 ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/0009; GA ČR GA204/07/0133; GA ČR GC204/08/J024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Lithium acetate * Membrane compartment of Can1 * Monomeric red fluorescent protein Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 9.120, year: 2008

  12. Solute carrier transporters: Pharmacogenomics research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghogho

    2010-12-27

    -binding cassette) transporters, which include MDR1, a protein that pumps xenobiotics from cells, and the SLC (solute carrier) trans- porters, which take up neurotransmitters, nutrients, heavy metals, and other substrates into ...

  13. Resveratrol Inhibits Porcine Intestinal Glucose and Alanine Transport: Potential Roles of Na+/K+-ATPase Activity, Protein Kinase A, AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and the Association of Selected Nutrient Transport Proteins with Detergent Resistant Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Klinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beneficial effects of Resveratrol (RSV have been demonstrated, including effects on transporters and channels. However, little is known about how RSV influences intestinal transport. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effects of RSV on intestinal transport and the respective mechanisms. Methods: Porcine jejunum and ileum were incubated with RSV (300 µM, 30 min in Ussing chambers (functional studies and tissue bathes (detection of protein expression, phosphorylation, association with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs. Results: RSV reduced alanine and glucose-induced short circuit currents (ΔIsc and influenced forskolin-induced ΔIsc. The phosphorylation of sodium–glucose-linked transporter 1 (SGLT1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, protein kinase A substrates (PKA-S and liver kinase B1 (LKB1 increased but a causative relation to the inhibitory effects could not directly be established. The DRM association of SGLT1, peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1 and (phosphorylated Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3 did not change. Conclusion: RSV influences the intestinal transport of glucose, alanine and chloride and is likely to affect other transport processes. As the effects of protein kinase activation vary between the intestinal localizations, it would appear that increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels are part of the mechanism. Nonetheless, the physiological responses depend on cell type-specific structures.

  14. Effect of physical training on glucose transporter protein and mRNA levels in rat adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Andersen, P H; Vinten, J

    1993-01-01

    Physical training increases insulin-stimulated glucose transport and the number of glucose transporters in adipocytes measured by cytochalasin B binding. In the present study we used immunoblotting to measure the abundance of two glucose transporters (GLUT-4, GLUT-1) in white adipocytes from...... trained rats. Furthermore, the abundance of the mRNAs for these proteins and glucose transport was measured. Rats were swim-trained for 10 wk, and adipocytes were isolated from epididymal fat pads. The amount of GLUT-4/adipocyte volume unit was significantly higher in trained animals compared with both...... age- and cell size-matched animals. The amount of GLUT-4 mRNA was also increased by training and it decreased with increasing age. Furthermore, young age as well as training was accompanied by relatively low GLUT-4 protein/mRNA and relatively high overall GLUT-4 efficiency (recruitability and...

  15. Major intrinsic proteins and arsenic transport in plants: new players and their potential role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Jahn, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic and highly abundant metalloid that endangers human health through drinking water and the food chain. The most common forms of As in the environment re arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]. As(V) is a nonfunctional phosphate analog that enters the food chain via plant phosphate transporters. Recently, evidence was provided that uptake of As(III)--the second most abundant As species in soils--is mediated by plant nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), a subfamily of plant major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Specific NIPs are also essential for the uptake of the metalloids boron and silicon and aquaglyceroporins from microbes and mammals were shown to be the major routes of As uptake. Therefore As(III) transport through MIPs is a conserved and ancient feature. In this chapter we summarize the current view on As transport in plants and address the potential physiological significance of As(III) transport through NIPs.

  16. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICENTE ePALLAS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaption to various environmental conditions. Long distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signalling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defence proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs and miRNAs. How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RNA-binding proteins in the phloem, which act as potential components of long distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem.

  17. Transportation of volatile elements in thermally evolving planetesimals: An important role of metallic iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, K.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Ordinary chondrites are considered to have experienced thermal metamorphism in small bodies. We are interested in behaviors of volatile elements in such a kind of thermally evolving planetesimals. Volatile elements generally have high vapor pressures at high temperature. In porous bodies, with a high gas permeability, volatile elements are transported efficiently over a long range. Behavior of volatile elements transported by permeable gas flow can be handled by an equation whose form is similar to that of the equation of thermal diffusion. We can follow transportation of heats and volatile elements in planetesimals, when parameters in these equations, initial conditions and chemical behavior of volatile elements are given. Recently, we discovered that nitrogen in equilibrated H-chondrites is mainly trapped in taenite (f.c.c. Fe-Ni), probably dissolved in interstitial sites. Fegley suggests that metallic iron cannot trap nitrogen in the solar nebula gas due to its very low nitrogen partial pressure. Approximately 1 bar of nitrogen pressure is required to explain the nitrogen content in taenite. We may expect high nitrogen gas partial pressure (possibly produced by vaporization of nitrogen-bearing solids such as organic materials) at the interior of thermally evolving planetesimals. Kinetic behavior of nitrogen in taenite suggests that it can easily be equilibrated with the ambient nitrogen gas at temperatures of approximately 500 C or higher. We consider that nitrogen is trapped in taenite through a nitrogen redistribution process occurred during the thermal metamorphic event.

  18. Development of assessment methods for transport and storage containers with higher content of metallic recycling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencker, U.; Qiao Linan; Droste, B.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of transport and storage containers made of ductile cast iron melted with higher content of metallic recycling material from decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations is investigated. With drop tests of cubic container-like models, the influence of different real targets on the stresses in the cask body and the fracture behaviour is examined. A test stand foundation is suggested, which can be manufactured simply and improves the reproducibility of the test results strongly. The test objects are partially equipped with artificial cracklike defects. Dynamic fracture mechanics analyses of these defects were performed by means of finite element calculations to uncover safety margins. Numerous test results show depending on the requirements that containers for final disposal can be built by means of a ductile cast iron with fracture toughness more than half under the lower bound value for the licensed material qualities yet. The application limits of the material are determined also by the opportunities of the safety assessment methods. This project supports the application of brittle fracture safe transport and storage packages for radioactive materials as recommended in App. VI of the Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (IAEA No. TS-G-1.1)

  19. Charge transport and mobility engineering in two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals semiconductors represent the thinnest, air stable semiconducting materials known. Their unique optical, electronic and mechanical properties hold great potential for harnessing them as key components in novel applications for electronics and optoelectronics. However, the charge transport behavior in 2D semiconductors is more susceptible to external surroundings (e.g. gaseous adsorbates from air and trapped charges in substrates) and their electronic performance is generally lower than corresponding bulk materials due to the fact that the surface and bulk coincide. In this article, we review recent progress on the charge transport properties and carrier mobility engineering of 2D transition metal chalcogenides, with a particular focus on the markedly high dependence of carrier mobility on thickness. We unveil the origin of this unique thickness dependence and elaborate the devised strategies to master it for carrier mobility optimization. Specifically, physical and chemical methods towards the optimization of the major factors influencing the extrinsic transport such as electrode/semiconductor contacts, interfacial Coulomb impurities and atomic defects are discussed. In particular, the use of ad hoc molecules makes it possible to engineer the interface with the dielectric and heal the vacancies in such materials. By casting fresh light on the theoretical and experimental studies, we provide a guide for improving the electronic performance of 2D semiconductors, with the ultimate goal of achieving technologically viable atomically thin (opto)electronics.

  20. Comparative genomic analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Leptospira species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H

    2015-11-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc str. 'Patoc 1 (Ames)'. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity was accompanied by progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Leptospira species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H

    2016-09-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc str. 'Patoc 1 (Ames)'. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they all have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity arose in Leptospira correlating to progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A conserved mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter exports glutathione polysulfide for cytosolic metal cofactor assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Theresia A; Thornton, Jeremy D; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J; van Veen, Hendrik W; Balk, Janneke

    2014-08-22

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe(2+) alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Interaction between the glutamate transporter GLT1b and the synaptic PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassan, Merav; Liu, Hongguang; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is implemented by the interaction of glutamate receptors with PDZ domain proteins. Glutamate transporters provide the only known mechanism of clearance of glutamate from excitatory synapses, and GLT1 is the major glutamate transporter. We show here that GLT1 interacts...... expressing PICK1 and GLT1b. In addition, expression of GLT1b in COS7 cells changed the distribution of PICK1, bringing it to the surface. GLT1b and PICK1 co-localized with each other and with synaptic markers in hippocampal neurons in culture. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a known...

  4. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Kowald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II, Cd(II, or Cu(I in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II and Zn(II. Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II, expressions in the presence of Zn(II yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II or Zn(II are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo.

  5. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the methods used for high-throughput cloning and protein-expression screening of SSGCID hexahistidine recombinant proteins is provided. It is demonstrated that screening for recombinant proteins that are highly recoverable from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography improves the likelihood that a protein will produce a structure. The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure

  6. Frog oocytes to unveil the structure and supramolecular organization of human transport proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Bergeron

    Full Text Available Structural analyses of heterologously expressed mammalian membrane proteins remain a great challenge given that microgram to milligram amounts of correctly folded and highly purified proteins are required. Here, we present a novel method for the expression and affinity purification of recombinant mammalian and in particular human transport proteins in Xenopus laevis frog oocytes. The method was validated for four human and one murine transporter. Negative stain transmission electron microscopy (TEM and single particle analysis (SPA of two of these transporters, i.e., the potassium-chloride cotransporter 4 (KCC4 and the aquaporin-1 (AQP1 water channel, revealed the expected quaternary structures within homogeneous preparations, and thus correct protein folding and assembly. This is the first time a cation-chloride cotransporter (SLC12 family member is isolated, and its shape, dimensions, low-resolution structure and oligomeric state determined by TEM, i.e., by a direct method. Finally, we were able to grow 2D crystals of human AQP1. The ability of AQP1 to crystallize was a strong indicator for the structural integrity of the purified recombinant protein. This approach will open the way for the structure determination of many human membrane transporters taking full advantage of the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that generally yields robust functional expression.

  7. Complementary metal ion specificity of the metal-citrate transporters CitM and CitH of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, BP; Warner, JB; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS; Warner, Jessica B.

    2000-01-01

    Citrate uptake in Bacillus subtilis is stimulated by a wide range of divalent metal ions. The metal ions were separated into two groups based on the expression pattern of the uptake system. The two groups correlated with the metal ion specificity of two homologous B, subtilis secondary citrate

  8. Informal E-waste recycling in developing countries: review of metal(loid)s pollution, environmental impacts and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackah, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Crude or primitive recycling practices are often adopted in material resource recovery from E-waste in developing nations. Significant human health and environmental impacts may occur because of such practices. Literature on metal(loid)s pollution during E-waste processing is fragmented. Here, I review the health and environmental impacts of E-waste recycling operations and transport pathways of metal(loid)s, dispersed during operations. This paper is organised into five sections. Section 1 relates to the background of global E-waste generation and legal/illegal trade, citing specific cases from Ghana and other developing nations. Section 2 provides a brief information on sources of metal(loid)s in E-waste. Section 3 describes characteristics of informal E-waste recycling operations in developing nations. Section 4 examines the health and environmental impacts in E-waste recycling while section 5 evaluates major transport pathways of metal(loid)s contaminants.

  9. Versatile Tool for the Analysis of Metal-Protein Interactions Reveals the Promiscuity of Metallodrug-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ronald F S; Menin, Laure; Patiny, Luc; Ortiz, Daniel; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-11-21

    Metallodrug-protein interactions contribute to their therapeutic effect (even when DNA is the dominant target), side-effects and are implicit in drug resistance. Here, we provide mass spectrometric-based evidence to show that metallodrug interactions with proteins are considerably more complex than current literature would suggest. Using native-like incubation and electrospray conditions together with an automated tool we designed for exhaustive mass spectra matching, the promiscuity of binding of cisplatin to ubiquitin is revealed, with 14 different binding sites observed. There is a binding preference to negatively charged sites on the protein, consistent with the cationic nature of the cisplatin adduct following aquation. These results have implications in metallodrug development and beyond to the toxicological effects of metal ions more generally.

  10. Evolutionary Implications of Metal Binding Features in Different Species’ Prion Protein: An Inorganic Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego La Mendola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion disorders are a group of fatal neurodegenerative conditions of mammals. The key molecular event in the pathogenesis of such diseases is the conformational conversion of prion protein, PrPC, into a misfolded form rich in β-sheet structure, PrPSc, but the detailed mechanistic aspects of prion protein conversion remain enigmatic. There is uncertainty on the precise physiological function of PrPC in healthy individuals. Several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ mainly through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. In addition to mammals, PrP homologues have also been identified in birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The globular domain of protein is retained in the different species, suggesting that the protein carries out an essential common function. However, the comparison of amino acid sequences indicates that prion protein has evolved differently in each vertebrate class. The primary sequences are strongly conserved in each group, but these exhibit a low similarity with those of mammals. The N-terminal domain of different prions shows tandem amino acid repeats with an increasing amount of histidine residues going from amphibians to mammals. The difference in the sequence affects the number of copper binding sites, the affinity and the coordination environment of metal ions, suggesting that the involvement of prion in metal homeostasis may be a specific characteristic of mammalian prion protein. In this review, we describe the similarities and the differences in the metal binding of different species’ prion protein, as revealed by studies carried out on the entire protein and related peptide fragments.

  11. RECOVERY ACT - Thylakoid Assembly and Folded Protein Transport by the Tat Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabney-Smith, Carole [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Assembly of functional photosystems complete with necessary intrinsic (membrane-bound) and extrinsic proteins requires the function of at least 3 protein transport pathways in thylakoid membranes. Our research focuses on one of those pathways, a unique and essential protein transport pathway found in the chloroplasts of plants, bacteria, and some archaebacteria, the Twin arginine translocation (Tat) system. The chloroplast Tat (cpTat) system is thought to be responsible for the proper location of ~50% of thylakoid lumen proteins, several of which are necessary for proper photosystem assembly, maintenance, and function. Specifically, cpTat systems are unique because they transport fully folded and assembled proteins across ion tight membranes using only three membrane components, Tha4, Hcf106, and cpTatC, and the protonmotive force generated by photosynthesis. Despite the importance of the cpTat system in plants, the mechanism of transport of a folded precursor is not well known. Our long-term goal is to investigate the role protein transport systems have on organelle biogenesis, particularly the assembly of membrane protein complexes in thylakoids of chloroplasts. The objective of this proposal is to correlate structural changes in the membrane-bound cpTat component, Tha4, to the mechanism of translocation of folded-precursor substrates across the membrane bilayer by using a cysteine accessibility and crosslinking approach. Our central hypothesis is that the precursor passes through a proteinaceous pore of assembled Tha4 protomers that have undergone a conformational or topological change in response to transport. This research is predicated upon the observations that Tha4 exists in molar excess in the membrane relative to the other cpTat components; its regulated assembly to the precursor-bound receptor; and our data showing oligomerization of Tha4 into very large complexes in response to transport. Our rationale for these studies is that understanding cp

  12. Regorafenib is transported by the organic anion transporter 1B1 and the multidrug resistance protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Hiroki; Shibayama, Yoshihiko; Ogura, Jiro; Narumi, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Iseki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Regorafenib is a small molecule inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, and has been shown to improve the outcomes of patients with advanced colorectal cancer and advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The transport profiles of regorafenib by various transporters were evaluated. HEK293/organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) cells exhibited increased drug sensitivity to regorafenib. Regorafenib inhibited the uptake of 3H-estrone sulfate by HEK293/OATP1B1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect its elimination by P-glycoproteins. The concentration of regorafenib was significantly lower in LLC-PK1/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) cells than in LLC-PK1 cells treated with the MRP2 inhibitor, MK571. MK571 abolished the inhibitory effects of regorafenib on intracellular accumulation in LLC-PK1/MRP2 cells. The uptake of regorafenib was significantly higher in HEK293/OATP1B1 cells than in OATP1B1-mock cells. Transport kinetics values were estimated to be Km=15.9 µM and Vmax=1.24 nmol/mg/min. No significant difference was observed in regorafenib concentrations between HEK293/OATP1B3 and OATP1B3-mock cells. These results indicated that regorafenib is a substrate for MRP2 and OATP1B1, and also suggest that the substrate preference of regorafenib may implicate the pharmacokinetic profiles of regorafenib.

  13. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, R.G.; Frazão, N.F.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  14. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64800-000 Floriano, PI (Brazil); Frazão, N.F. [Centro de Educação e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 581750-000 Cuité, PB (Brazil); Macedo-Filho, A., E-mail: amfilho@gmail.com [Campus Prof. Antonio Geovanne Alves de Sousa, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri, PI (Brazil)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  15. Structure-Functional Basis of Ion Transport in Sodium–Calcium Exchanger (NCX Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Giladi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The membrane-bound sodium–calcium exchanger (NCX proteins shape Ca2+ homeostasis in many cell types, thus participating in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Determination of the crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj paved the way for a thorough and systematic investigation of ion transport mechanisms in NCX proteins. Here, we review the data gathered from the X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry (HDX-MS, and ion-flux analyses of mutants. Strikingly, the apo NCX_Mj protein exhibits characteristic patterns in the local backbone dynamics at particular helix segments, thereby possessing characteristic HDX profiles, suggesting structure-dynamic preorganization (geometric arrangements of catalytic residues before the transition state of conserved α1 and α2 repeats at ion-coordinating residues involved in transport activities. Moreover, dynamic preorganization of local structural entities in the apo protein predefines the status of ion-occlusion and transition states, even though Na+ or Ca2+ binding modifies the preceding backbone dynamics nearby functionally important residues. Future challenges include resolving the structural-dynamic determinants governing the ion selectivity, functional asymmetry and ion-induced alternating access. Taking into account the structural similarities of NCX_Mj with the other proteins belonging to the Ca2+/cation exchanger superfamily, the recent findings can significantly improve our understanding of ion transport mechanisms in NCX and similar proteins.

  16. Hybrid graphene-metal oxide solution processed electron transport layers for large area high-performance organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliatis, Michail J; Gandhi, Keyur K; Rozanski, Lynn J; Rhodes, Rhys; McCafferty, Liam; Alenezi, Mohammad R; Alshammari, Abdullah S; Mills, Christopher A; Jayawardena, K D G Imalka; Henley, Simon J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2014-04-02

    Solution processed core-shell nano-structures of metal oxide-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are used as improved electron transport layers (ETL), leading to an enhancement in photocurrent charge transport in PCDTBT:PC70 BM for both single cell and module photovoltaic devices. As a result, the power conversion efficiency for the devices with RGO-metal oxides for ETL increases 8% in single cells and 20% in module devices. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Integrated Translatomics with Proteomics to Identify Novel Iron–Transporting Proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan eYang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae is a major human pathogen causing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efficiently acquiring iron from the environment is critical for S. pneumoniae to sustain growth and cause infection. There are only three known iron-uptake systems in Streptococcal species responsible for iron acquisition from the host, including ABC transporters PiaABC, PiuABC and PitABC. Besides, no other iron-transporting system has been suggested. In this work, we employed our newly established translating mRNA analysis integrated with proteomics to evaluate the possible existence of novel iron transporters in the bacterium. We simultaneously deleted the iron-binding protein genes of the three iron-uptake systems to construct a piaA/piuA/pitA triple mutant (Tri-Mut of S. pneumoniae D39, in which genes and proteins related to iron transport should be regulated in response to the deletion. With ribosome associated mRNA sequencing-based translatomics focusing on translating mRNA and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics based on the covalent labeling of peptides with tags of varying mass, we indeed observed a large number of genes and proteins representing various coordinated biological pathways with significantly altered expression levels in the Tri-Mut mutant. Highlighted in this observation is the identification of several new potential iron-uptake ABC transporters participating in iron metabolism of Streptococcus. In particular, putative protein SPD_1609 in operon 804 was verified to be a novel iron-binding protein with similar function to PitA in S. pneumoniae. These data derived from the integrative translatomics and proteomics analyses provided rich information and insightful clues for further investigations on iron-transporting mechanism in bacteria and the interplay between Streptococcal iron availability and the biological metabolic pathways.

  18. The Effect of Salts in Promoting Specific and Competitive Interactions between Zinc Finger Proteins and Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongyu; Yuan, Siming; Zheng, Shihui; Chen, Yuting; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Yangzhong; Huang, Guangming

    2017-12-01

    Specific protein-metal interactions (PMIs) fulfill essential functions in cells and organic bodies, and activation of these functions in vivo are mostly modulated by the complex environmental factors, including pH value, small biomolecules, and salts. Specifically, the role of salts in promoting specific PMIs and their competition among various metals has remained untapped mainly due to the difficulty to distinguish nonspecific PMIs from specific PMIs by classic spectroscopic techniques. Herein, we report Hofmeister salts differentially promote the specific PMIs by combining nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry and spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence measurement and circular dichroism). Furthermore, to explore the influence of salts in competitive binding between metalloproteins and various metals, we designed a series of competitive experiments and applied to a well-defined model system, the competitive binding of zinc (II) and arsenic (III) to holo-promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML). These experiments not only provided new insights at the molecular scale as complementary to previous NMR and spectroscopic results, but also deduced the relative binding ability between zinc finger proteins and metals at the molecular scale, which avoids the mass spectrometric titration-based determination of binding constants that is frequently affected and often degraded by variable solution conditions including salt contents. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Inhibition of retrograde transport modulates misfolded protein accumulation and clearance in motoneuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofani, Riccardo; Crippa, Valeria; Rusmini, Paola; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Licata, Nausicaa V; Sala, Gessica; Giorgetti, Elisa; Grunseich, Christopher; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2017-08-03

    Motoneuron diseases, like spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are associated with proteins that because of gene mutation or peculiar structures, acquire aberrant (misfolded) conformations toxic to cells. To prevent misfolded protein toxicity, cells activate a protein quality control (PQC) system composed of chaperones and degradative pathways (proteasome and autophagy). Inefficient activation of the PQC system results in misfolded protein accumulation that ultimately leads to neuronal cell death, while efficient macroautophagy/autophagy-mediated degradation of aggregating proteins is beneficial. The latter relies on an active retrograde transport, mediated by dynein and specific chaperones, such as the HSPB8-BAG3-HSPA8 complex. Here, using cellular models expressing aggregate-prone proteins involved in SBMA and ALS, we demonstrate that inhibition of dynein-mediated retrograde transport, which impairs the targeting to autophagy of misfolded species, does not increase their aggregation. Rather, dynein inhibition correlates with a reduced accumulation and an increased clearance of mutant ARpolyQ, SOD1, truncated TARDBP/TDP-43 and expanded polyGP C9ORF72 products. The enhanced misfolded protein clearance is mediated by the proteasome, rather than by autophagy and correlates with the upregulation of the HSPA8 cochaperone BAG1. In line, overexpression of BAG1 increases the proteasome-mediated clearance of these misfolded proteins. Our data suggest that when the misfolded proteins cannot be efficiently transported toward the perinuclear region of the cells, where they are either degraded by autophagy or stored into the aggresome, the cells activate a compensatory mechanism that relies on the induction of BAG1 to target the HSPA8-bound cargo to the proteasome in a dynein-independent manner.

  20. Synthesis and structural, magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of several transition metal oxides and aresnides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Supriyo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Oxide compounds containing the transition metal vanadium (V) have attracted a lot of attention in the field of condensed matter physics owing to their exhibition of interesting properties including metal-insulator transitons, structural transitions, ferromagnetic and an- tiferromagnetic orderings, and heavy fermion behavior. Binary vanadium oxides VnO2n-1 where 2 ≤ n ≤ 9 have triclinic structures and exhibit metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic transitions.[1–6] The only exception is V7O13 which remains metallic down to 4 K.[7] The ternary vanadium oxide LiV2O4 has the normal spinel structure, is metallic, does not un- dergo magnetic ordering and exhibits heavy fermion behavior below 10 K.[8] CaV2O4 has an orthorhombic structure[9, 10] with the vanadium spins forming zigzag chains and has been suggested to be a model system to study the gapless chiral phase.[11, 12] These provide great motivation for further investigation of some known vanadium compounds as well as to ex- plore new vanadium compounds in search of new physics. This thesis consists, in part, of experimental studies involving sample preparation and magnetic, transport, thermal, and x- ray measurements on some strongly correlated eletron systems containing the transition metal vanadium. The compounds studied are LiV2O4, YV4O8, and YbV4O8. The recent discovery of superconductivity in RFeAsO1-xFx (R = La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Dy, Sm, and Nd), and AFe2As2 (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, and Eu) doped with K, Na, or Cs at the A site with relatively high Tc has sparked tremendous activities in the condensed matter physics community and a renewed interest in the area of superconductivity as occurred following the discovery of the layered cuprate high Tc superconductors in 1986. To discover more supercon- ductors

  1. Magneto-transport phenomena in metal/SiO2/n(p)-Si hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, N. V.; Tarasov, A. S.; Rautskii, M. V.; Lukyanenko, A. V.; Bondarev, I. A.; Varnakov, S. N.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    Present review touches upon a subject of magnetotransport phenomena in hybrid structures which consist of ferromagnetic or nonmagnetic metal layer, layer of silicon oxide and silicon substrate with n- or p-type conductivity. Main attention will be paid to a number gigantic magnetotransport effects discovered in the devices fabricated on the base of the M/SiO2/n(p)-Si (M is ferromagnetic or paramagnetic metal) hybrid structures. These effects include bias induced dc magnetoresistance, gigantic magnetoimpedance, dc magnetoresistance induced by an optical irradiation and lateral magneto-photo-voltaic effect. The magnetoresistance ratio in ac and dc modes for some of our devices can exceed 106% in a magnetic field below 1 T. For lateral magneto-photo-voltaic effect, the relative change of photo-voltage in magnetic field can reach 103% at low temperature. Two types of mechanisms are responsible for sensitivity of the transport properties of the silicon based hybrid structures to magnetic field. One is related to transformation of the energy structure of the (donor) acceptor states including states near SiO2/n(p)-Si interface in magnetic field. Other mechanism is caused by the Lorentz force action. The features in behaviour of magnetotransport effects in concrete device depend on composition of the used structure, device topology and experimental conditions (bias voltage, optical radiation and others). Obtained results can be base for design of some electronic devices driven by a magnetic field. They can also provide an enhancement of the functionality for existing sensors.

  2. Thermal and electrical transport in metals and superconductors across antiferromagnetic and topological quantum transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shubhayu; Sachdev, Subir; Eberlein, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    We study thermal and electrical transport in metals and superconductors near a quantum phase transition where antiferromagnetic order disappears. The same theory can also be applied to quantum phase transitions involving the loss of certain classes of intrinsic topological order. For a clean superconductor, we recover and extend well-known universal results. The heat conductivity for commensurate and incommensurate antiferromagnetism coexisting with superconductivity shows a markedly different doping dependence near the quantum critical point, thus allowing us to distinguish between these states. In the dirty limit, the results for the conductivities are qualitatively similar for the metal and the superconductor. In this regime, the geometric properties of the Fermi surface allow for a very good phenomenological understanding of the numerical results on the conductivities. In the simplest model, we find that the conductivities do not track the doping evolution of the Hall coefficient, in contrast to recent experimental findings. We propose a doping dependent scattering rate, possibly due to quenched short-range charge fluctuations below optimal doping, to consistently describe both the Hall data and the longitudinal conductivities.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF A BINDING PROTEIN-DEPENDENT GLUTAMATE TRANSPORT-SYSTEM OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (K-t of 1.2 mu M), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein

  4. Characterization of a Binding Protein-Dependent Glutamate Transport System of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (Kt of 1.2 µM), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein was

  5. Characterization of drug transport by the human multidrug resistance protein 3 (ABCC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelcer, N.; Saeki, T.; Reid, G.; Beijnen, J. H.; Borst, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized the substrate specificity and mechanism of transport of the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3). A murine fibroblast-like cell line generated from the kidneys of mice that lack Mdr1a/b and Mrp1 was retrovirally transduced with MRP3 cDNA. Stable clones

  6. Acid-base status determines the renal expression of Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, T.; Renkema, K.Y.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis results in renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ wasting, whereas chronic metabolic alkalosis is known to exert the reverse effects. It was hypothesized that these adaptations are mediated at least in part by the renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins. The aim of this study, therefore, was

  7. Lipid Raft-Based Membrane Compartmentation of a Plant Transport Protein Expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, Q.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Nováková, L.; Stolz, J.; Tanner, W.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2006), s. 945-953 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae * plant transport protein * hup1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.707, year: 2006

  8. Disparate effects of p24alpha and p24delta on secretory protein transport and processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R P M Strating

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p24 family is thought to be somehow involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi protein transport. A subset of the p24 proteins (p24alpha(3, -beta(1, -gamma(3 and -delta(2 is upregulated when Xenopus laevis intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells are physiologically activated to produce vast amounts of their major secretory cargo, the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we find that transgene expression of p24alpha(3 or p24delta(2 specifically in the Xenopus melanotrope cells in both cases causes an effective displacement of the endogenous p24 proteins, resulting in severely distorted p24 systems and disparate melanotrope cell phenotypes. Transgene expression of p24alpha(3 greatly reduces POMC transport and leads to accumulation of the prohormone in large, ER-localized electron-dense structures, whereas p24delta(2-transgenesis does not influence the overall ultrastructure of the cells nor POMC transport and cleavage, but affects the Golgi-based processes of POMC glycomaturation and sulfation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transgenic expression of two distinct p24 family members has disparate effects on secretory pathway functioning, illustrating the specificity and non-redundancy of our transgenic approach. We conclude that members of the p24 family furnish subcompartments of the secretory pathway with specific sets of machinery cargo to provide the proper microenvironments for efficient and correct secretory protein transport and processing.

  9. Metal cask RT-5000 for the dry storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A.I.; Kazeev, V.G.; Krayev, V.S.; Shcherbina, A.N.; Churikov, Y.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    Presentation of new-type cask, developed at RFNC-VNIITF, is in the article. The prototype model of the shipping cask was subjected to tests imitating normal shipment conditions (free fall, pressing, and impact) and to tests imitating emergency situation during shipment (a drop from the 9-m height onto a pin is replaced by acceleration of the shipping cask at a guide rail of the rocket-catapult installation (RCI), a 1-m drop onto a pin, heat tests a 30-minutes fire at the temperature of for 8500 C, submergence to the depth of 15 and 200 meters). After each test the hermeticity preservation is examined. Parallel with the real testing, a mathematical simulation of physical processes induced by the corresponding tests was conducted at the RFNC-VNIITF. The required parameters obtained from the tests are used to calibrate the calculation methods. As a result it has been possible to obtain a good agreement between the results of calculations and experiments; this will allow the mathematic simulation to be used wider. The advantage of the RT-5000 metal cask in comparison with metal-concrete analogs are as follows: SFA are placed into the RT-5000 entirely without cutting into two bunches of fuel elements; the expensive hot doom is not required for automatic cutting the SFA and for loading the bunches of fuel elements into intermediate cases; the possibility remains to transport the RT-5000 without reloading SFA after 50-year storage, although this is a problem for the metal-concrete casks.

  10. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  11. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  12. Divalent Metal Ion Transport across Large Biological Ion Channels and Their Effect on Conductance and Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-Giménez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological characterization of large protein channels, usually displaying multi-ionic transport and weak ion selectivity, is commonly performed at physiological conditions (moderate gradients of KCl solutions at decimolar concentrations buffered at neutral pH. We extend here the characterization of the OmpF porin, a wide channel of the outer membrane of E. coli, by studying the effect of salts of divalent cations on the transport properties of the channel. The regulation of divalent cations concentration is essential in cell metabolism and understanding their effects is of key importance, not only in the channels specifically designed to control their passage but also in other multiionic channels. In particular, in porin channels like OmpF, divalent cations modulate the efficiency of molecules having antimicrobial activity. Taking advantage of the fact that the OmpF channel atomic structure has been resolved both in water and in MgCl2 aqueous solutions, we analyze the single channel conductance and the channel selectivity inversion aiming to separate the role of the electrolyte itself, and the counterion accumulation induced by the protein channel charges and other factors (binding, steric effects, etc. that being of minor importance in salts of monovalent cations become crucial in the case of divalent cations.

  13. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals.

  14. Tubule urate and PAH transport: sensitivity and specificity of serum protein inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, J.J.; Kennedy, J.; Cowley, B.

    1987-01-01

    Macromolecules in rabbit serum inhibit the cellular uptake and transepithelial secretion of [ 14 C]urate and p-[ 3 H]aminohippurate ([ 3 H]PAH) in rabbit S 2 proximal tubule segments. To understand better the potential role these inhibitors may have in the regulation of renal organic anion excretion, the authors examined the specificity and relative inhibitory effects on tubule urate and PAH transport of albumin and γ-globulin, the major inhibitory proteins in rabbit serum. Native rabbit serum markedly inhibited the cellular accumulation or urate and PAH by isolated nonperfused segments. Urate and PAH transport was also inhibited by bovine serum, human serum, Cohn-fractionated rabbit albumin, and rabbit γ-globulin, but not by Cohn-fractionated bovine serum albumin. α-Lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, derived from milk, also inhibited urate and PAH transport, but to a lesser extent than albumin and γ-globulin. The transport inhibitory effects of proteins were independent of their binding to urate and PAH. Unidirectional influx and the steady-state intracellular accumulation of urate and PAH in suspensions of proximal tubules were decreased by rabbit serum proteins, suggesting that these inhibitors act on the external face of the cells to diminish the uptake of the organic anions. These studies indicate that the principal plasma proteins (albumin and γ-globulin) significantly inhibit urate and PAH transporters in the basolateral membranes of S 2 proximal tubules. They suggest that circulating plasma proteins that can penetrate the basement membrane of proximal tubules may directly modulate the renal excretion of urate and PAH

  15. Physical interaction and functional coupling between ACDP4 and the intracellular ion chaperone COX11, an implication of the role of ACDP4 in essential metal ion transport and homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jianguo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Divalent metal ions such as copper, manganese, and cobalt are essential for cell development, differentiation, function and survival. These essential metal ions are delivered into intracellular domains as cofactors for enzymes involved in neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis, superoxide metabolism, and other biological functions in a target specific fashion. Altering the homeostasis of these essential metal ions is known to connect to a number of human diseases including Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and pain. It remains unclear how these essential metal ions are delivered to intracellular targets in mammalian cells. Here we report that rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons express ACDP4, a member of Ancient Conserved Domain Protein family. By screening a pretransformed human fetal brain cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified that ACDP4 specifically interacts with COX11, an intracellular metal ion chaperone. Ectopic expression of ACDP4 in HEK293 cells resulted in enhanced toxicity to metal ions including copper, manganese, and cobalt. The metal ion toxicity became more pronounced when ACDP4 and COX11 were co-expressed ectopically in HEK293 cells, suggesting a functional coupling between them. Our results indicate a role of ACDP4 in metal ion homeostasis and toxicity. This is the first report revealing a functional aspect of this ancient conserved domain protein family. We propose that ACDP is a family of transporter protein or chaperone proteins for delivering essential metal ions in different mammalian tissues. The expression of ACDP4 on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons may have implications in sensory neuron functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Early-phase immunodetection of metallothionein and heat shock proteins in extruded earthworm coelomocytes after dermal exposure to metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, Joanna [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Olchawa, Ewa [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Stuerzenbaum, Stephen R. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, PO Box 915, Cardiff Wales CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); John Morgan, A. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, PO Box 915, Cardiff Wales CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Plytycz, Barbara [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: plyt@zuk.iz.uj.edu.pl

    2005-05-01

    This paper provides direct evidence that earthworm immune cells, coelomocytes, are exposed to bio-reactive quantities of metals within 3 days after dermal exposure, and that they respond by upregulating metallothionein (MT) and heat shock protein (HSP70, HSP72) expression. Indirect support for the hypothesis that coelomocytes are capable of trafficking metals was also obtained. Coelomocytes were expelled from adult individuals of Eisenia fetida after 3-day exposure either to metal ions (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) or to distilled water (controls) via filter papers. The number of coelomocytes was significantly decreased after Cu, Pb, or Cd treatment. Cytospin preparations of coelomocytes were subjected to immunoperoxidase staining with monoclonal antibodies against human heat shock proteins (HSP70 or HSP72), or rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against metallothionein 2 (w-MT2) of Lumbricus rubellus. Applied antibodies detected the respective proteins of E. fetida and revealed that the expression of HSP70, HSP72 and w-MT2 proteins was either induced or significantly enhanced in coelomocytes from metal-exposed animals. In conclusion, stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes may be used as sensitive biomarkers of metal contaminations. Further experimentation is needed for quantitative analysis of kinetics of metal-induced stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes. - Metals upregulate stress response proteins in earthworm coelomocytes.

  17. Early-phase immunodetection of metallothionein and heat shock proteins in extruded earthworm coelomocytes after dermal exposure to metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Joanna; Olchawa, Ewa; Stuerzenbaum, Stephen R.; John Morgan, A.; Plytycz, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides direct evidence that earthworm immune cells, coelomocytes, are exposed to bio-reactive quantities of metals within 3 days after dermal exposure, and that they respond by upregulating metallothionein (MT) and heat shock protein (HSP70, HSP72) expression. Indirect support for the hypothesis that coelomocytes are capable of trafficking metals was also obtained. Coelomocytes were expelled from adult individuals of Eisenia fetida after 3-day exposure either to metal ions (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) or to distilled water (controls) via filter papers. The number of coelomocytes was significantly decreased after Cu, Pb, or Cd treatment. Cytospin preparations of coelomocytes were subjected to immunoperoxidase staining with monoclonal antibodies against human heat shock proteins (HSP70 or HSP72), or rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against metallothionein 2 (w-MT2) of Lumbricus rubellus. Applied antibodies detected the respective proteins of E. fetida and revealed that the expression of HSP70, HSP72 and w-MT2 proteins was either induced or significantly enhanced in coelomocytes from metal-exposed animals. In conclusion, stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes may be used as sensitive biomarkers of metal contaminations. Further experimentation is needed for quantitative analysis of kinetics of metal-induced stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes. - Metals upregulate stress response proteins in earthworm coelomocytes

  18. Identification of membrane proteins associated with phenylpropanoid tolerance and transport in Escherichia coli BL21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingwen; Wang, Kui; Xu, Sha; Wu, Junjun; Liu, Peiran; Du, Guocheng; Li, Jianghua; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-15

    Phenylpropanoids are phytochemicals produced by some plants and possess a wide variety of biological activities. These compounds exist in plants in low amounts. Production of them in genetically engineered microorganisms has many advantages. A majority of functional phenylpropanoids are toxic to microbial hosts. Export of these compounds may relieve the cellular toxicity and increase the yield. However, proteins and mechanisms involved in phenylpropanoids transport and tolerance remain poorly understood. In this study, 16 membrane proteins that were differentially expressed in Escherichia coli in response to three typical phenylpropanoids (resveratrol, naringenin and rutin) were identified using a membrane proteomics approach. These proteins included outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpF, OmpW, FadL, TolC, LamB, and YaeT, peripheral membrane proteins AtpD, AtpH, YgaU, OppA, MalK, and MalE, and cytoplasmic membrane proteins OppD, PotG, and ManX. Functions of these proteins were determined by using gene overexpression and silencing. The results suggest that OmpA and FadL may play important roles in the transmembrane export of phenylpropanoids in E. coli. LamB, MalE, MalK and ManX may participate in phenylpropanoid uptake. The role of YgaU in enhancing the tolerance to phenylpropanoids remains to be determined. These results may assist the engineering of microorganisms with enhanced phenylpropanoid producing capabilities. Phenylpropanoids are phytochemicals produced by some plants and possess a wide variety of biological activities. Both the tolerance and the transport of phenylpropanoids play important roles in systematic metabolic engineering of microorganisms to produce these phytochemicals. Both specific and non-specific transporters are essential for these functions but remain poorly understood. This research utilized membrane proteomics to identify E. coli BL21 (DE3) membrane proteins that may be involved in phenylpropanoid transport and tolerance. These results

  19. Axonal transport of enzymes and labeled proteins in experimental axonopathy induced by p-bromophenylacetylurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Brimijoin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Axonal transport was studied by several techniques in the sciatic nerves of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with neuropathy induced by treatment with p-bromophenylacetylurea (BPAU) in dimethylsulfoxide solution. Control rats were treated with solvent alone. BPAU, 200 mg/kg, induced severe muscle weakness in the hindlimbs, beginning after a latent period of 1 week and progressing to near total paralysis by 2 weeks. Axonal transport of the endogenous transmitter enzymes, acetylcholinesterase, dopamine-β-hydroxylase and choline acetyltransferase, was normal at both 2 and 15 days after administration of BPAU, as judged by the accumulation of enzyme activity above and below a set of double ligatures on the sciatic nerve. The velocity of fast anterograde transport of [ 35 S]methionine labeled protein was also unaffected by BPAU. However, 4 abnormalities of transport were detected in BPAU treated rats. These abnormalities are discussed. (Auth.)

  20. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-09-01

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 OE ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 OE rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 OE rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  1. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces : A unique combination of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, F S L; Lietaert, K; Eftekhari, A A; Pouran, B; Ahmadi, S M; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-01-01

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different

  2. Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds: state of the science and USEPA workshop review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, B.S.; Cox, T.J.; Runkel, Robert L.; Velleux, M.L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Julien, P.Y.; Butler, B.A.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marion, A.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Metals pollution in surface waters from point and non-point sources (NPS) is a widespread problem in the United States and worldwide (Lofts et al., 2007; USEPA, 2007). In the western United States, metals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) from hardrock mines in mountainous areas impact aquatic ecosystems and human health (USEPA, 1997a; Caruso and Ward, 1998; Church et al., 2007). Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds is sometimes needed for assessment and restoration of surface waters, including mining-impacted streams (Runkel and Kimball, 2002; Caruso, 2003; Velleux et al., 2006). The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP; Wool et al., 2001), developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), is an example of a model used for such analyses. Other approaches exist and appropriate model selection depends on site characteristics, data availability and modelling objectives. However, there are a wide range of assumptions, input parameters, data requirements and gaps, and calibration and validation issues that must be addressed by model developers, users and decision makers. Despite substantial work on model development, their successful application has been more limited because they are not often used by decision makers for stream and watershed assessment and restoration. Bringing together scientists, model developers, users and decision makers should stimulate the development of appropriate models and improve the applicability of their results. To address these issues, the USEPA Office of Research and Development and Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming) hosted a workshop in Denver, Colorado on February 13–14, 2007. The workshop brought together approximately 35 experts from government, academia and consulting to address the state of the art for modelling metals fate and transport, knowledge gaps and future directions in metals modelling. It focused on modelling metals in high

  3. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  4. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  5. Detection of isolated protein-bound metal ions by single-particle cryo-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Nadav; Bellapadrona, Giuliano; Houben, Lothar; Sagi, Irit; Elbaum, Michael

    2017-10-17

    Metal ions play essential roles in many aspects of biological chemistry. Detecting their presence and location in proteins and cells is important for understanding biological function. Conventional structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-transmission electron microscopy can identify metal atoms on protein only if the protein structure is solved to atomic resolution. We demonstrate here the detection of isolated atoms of Zn and Fe on ferritin, using cryogenic annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (cryo-STEM) coupled with single-particle 3D reconstructions. Zn atoms are found in a pattern that matches precisely their location at the ferroxidase sites determined earlier by X-ray crystallography. By contrast, the Fe distribution is smeared along an arc corresponding to the proposed path from the ferroxidase sites to the mineral nucleation sites along the twofold axes. In this case the single-particle reconstruction is interpreted as a probability distribution function based on the average of individual locations. These results establish conditions for detection of isolated metal atoms in the broader context of electron cryo-microscopy and tomography.

  6. Sensing of heavy metal ions by intrinsic TMV coat protein fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Serene S; Green, Philippe; Blum, Amy Szuchmacher

    2018-04-15

    We propose the use of a cysteine mutant of TMV coat protein as a signal transducer for the selective sensing and quantification of the heavy metal ions, Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ based on intrinsic tryptophan quenching. TMV coat protein is inexpensive, can be mass-produced since it is expressed and extracted from E-coli. It also displays several different functional groups, enabling a wide repertoire of bioconjugation chemistries; thus it can be easily integrated into functional devices. In addition, TMV-ion interactions have been widely reported and utilized for metallization to generate organic-inorganic hybrid composite novel materials. Building on these previous observations, we herein determine, for the first time, the TMV-ion binding constants assuming the static fluorescence quenching model. We also show that by comparing TMV-ion interactions between native and denatured coat protein, we can distinguish between chemically similar heavy metal ions such as cadmium and zinc ions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of the Znt1 zinc transporter from the metal hyperaccumulator noccaea caerulescens confers enhanced zinc and cadmium tolerance and accumulation to arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ya Fen; Hassan, Zeshan; Talukdar, S.; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis.

  8. The role of carbon dioxide in the transport and fractionation of metals by geological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokh, Maria A.; Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Salvi, Stefano; Guillaume, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Although carbon dioxide is one of the major components of crustal fluids responsible for ore deposit formation, its effect on transport and precipitation of metals remains unknown, due to a lack of direct experimental data and physical-chemical models for CO2-rich fluids. To fill this gap, we combined laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling to systematically quantify the role played by CO2 for the solubility of economically important metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Au, Mo, Pt, Sn under hydrothermal conditions. Solubility measurements of common ore minerals of these metals (FeS2, CuFeS2, ZnS, Au, MoS2, PtS, SnO2) were performed, using a flexible-cell reactor equipped with a rapid sampling device, in a single-phase fluid (CO2-H2O-KCl) at 350-450 °C and 600-750 bar, buffered with iron sulfide and oxide and alkali-aluminosilicate mineral assemblages. In addition, another type of experiments was conducted to measure gold solubility in more sulfur-rich supercritical CO2-H2O-S-NaOH fluids at 450 °C and 700 bar using a batch reactor that allows fluid quenching. Our results show that the solubilities of Si, Au, Mo, Pt and Cu either decrease (within 1 log unit) with CO2 contents in the fluid increasing from 0 to 50 wt%. These data were interpreted using a simple model that does not require any new adjustable parameters, and is based on the dielectric constant of the H2O-CO2 solvent and on the Born solvation parameter for the dominant metal-bearing species in an aqueous fluid. Our predictions using this model suggest that in a supercritical CO2-H2O-S-salt fluid typical of metamorphic Au deposits, in equilibrium with pyrite and chalcopyrite, the Cu/Fe ratio decreases by up to 2 orders of magnitude with an increase of CO2 content from 0 to 70 wt%. This effect is due to the decrease of the fluid dielectric constant in the presence of CO2, which favors the stability of neutral species (FeCl20) compared to charged ones (CuCl2-). Our results explain the Fe enrichment and Cu

  9. Paraquat Resistant1, a Golgi-localized putative transporter protein, is involved in intracellular transport of paraquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-05-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops.

  10. Solitary BioY Proteins Mediate Biotin Transport into Recombinant Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Kirsch, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters form a large group of vitamin uptake systems in prokaryotes. They are composed of highly diverse, substrate-specific, transmembrane proteins (S units), a ubiquitous transmembrane protein (T unit), and homo- or hetero-oligomeric ABC ATPases. Biotin transporters represent a special case of ECF-type systems. The majority of the biotin-specific S units (BioY) is known or predicted to interact with T units and ABC ATPases. About one-third of BioY proteins, however, are encoded in organisms lacking any recognizable T unit. This finding raises the question of whether these BioYs function as transporters in a solitary state, a feature ascribed to certain BioYs in the past. To address this question in living cells, an Escherichia coli K-12 derivative deficient in biotin synthesis and devoid of its endogenous high-affinity biotin transporter was constructed as a reference strain. This organism is particularly suited for this purpose because components of ECF transporters do not naturally occur in E. coli K-12. The double mutant was viable in media containing either high levels of biotin or a precursor of the downstream biosynthetic path. Importantly, it was nonviable on trace levels of biotin. Eight solitary bioY genes of proteobacterial origin were individually expressed in the reference strain. Each of the BioYs conferred biotin uptake activity on the recombinants, which was inferred from uptake assays with [3H]biotin and growth of the cells on trace levels of biotin. The results underscore that solitary BioY transports biotin across the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:23836870

  11. Structural basis of nanobody-mediated blocking of BtuF, the cognate substrate-binding protein of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireku, S A; Sauer, M M; Glockshuber, R; Locher, K P

    2017-10-30

    Bacterial ABC importers catalyze the uptake of essential nutrients including transition metals and metal-containing co-factors. Recently, an IgG antibody targeting the external binding protein of the Staphylococcus aureus Mn(II) ABC importer was reported to inhibit transport activity and reduce bacterial cell growth. We here explored the possibility of using alpaca-derived nanobodies to inhibit the vitamin B12 transporter of Escherichia coli, BtuCD-F, as a model system by generating nanobodies against the periplasmic binding protein BtuF. We isolated six nanobodies that competed with B12 for binding to BtuF, with inhibition constants between 10 -6 and 10 -9  M. Kinetic characterization of the nanobody-BtuF interactions revealed dissociation half-lives between 1.6 and 6 minutes and fast association rates between 10 4 and 10 6  M -1 s -1 . For the tightest-binding nanobody, we observed a reduction of in vitro transport activity of BtuCD-F when an excess of nanobody over B12 was used. The structure of BtuF in complex with the most effective nanobody Nb9 revealed the molecular basis of its inhibitory function. The CDR3 loop of Nb9 reached into the substrate-binding pocket of BtuF, preventing both B12 binding and BtuCD-F complex formation. Our results suggest that nanobodies can mediate ABC importer inhibition, providing an opportunity for novel antibiotic strategies.

  12. Absorption of Vitamin A and Carotenoids by the Enterocyte: Focus on Transport Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Reboul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in most developing countries, especially in children and pregnant women. It is thus a priority in health policy to improve preformed vitamin A and/or provitamin A carotenoid status in these individuals. A more accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of intestinal vitamin A absorption is a key step in this direction. It was long thought that β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet, and thus all carotenoids, were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, and that preformed vitamin A (retinol absorption occurred via an unidentified energy-dependent transporter. The discovery of proteins able to facilitate carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte during the past decade has challenged established assumptions, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of retinol intestinal absorption is in progress. After an overview of vitamin A and carotenoid fate during gastro-duodenal digestion, our focus will be directed to the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal membrane and cellular transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte (i.e., Scavenger Receptors or Cellular Retinol Binding Proteins, among others. Further progress in the identification of the proteins involved in intestinal transport of vitamin A and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of major importance for optimizing their bioavailability.

  13. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Hewitt, Stephen Nakazawa; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure.

  14. The Small Protein SgrT Controls Transport Activity of the Glucose-Specific Phosphotransferase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Chelsea R; Park, Seongjin; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2017-06-01

    The bacterial small RNA (sRNA) SgrS has been a fruitful model for discovery of novel RNA-based regulatory mechanisms and new facets of bacterial physiology and metabolism. SgrS is one of only a few characterized dual-function sRNAs. SgrS can control gene expression posttranscriptionally via sRNA-mRNA base-pairing interactions. Its second function is coding for the small protein SgrT. Previous work demonstrated that both functions contribute to relief of growth inhibition caused by glucose-phosphate stress, a condition characterized by disrupted glycolytic flux and accumulation of sugar phosphates. The base-pairing activity of SgrS has been the subject of numerous studies, but the activity of SgrT is less well characterized. Here, we provide evidence that SgrT acts to specifically inhibit the transport activity of the major glucose permease PtsG. Superresolution microscopy demonstrated that SgrT localizes to the cell membrane in a PtsG-dependent manner. Mutational analysis determined that residues in the N-terminal domain of PtsG are important for conferring sensitivity to SgrT-mediated inhibition of transport activity. Growth assays support a model in which SgrT-mediated inhibition of PtsG transport activity reduces accumulation of nonmetabolizable sugar phosphates and promotes utilization of alternative carbon sources by modulating carbon catabolite repression. The results of this study expand our understanding of a basic and well-studied biological problem, namely, how cells coordinate carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Further, this work highlights the complex activities that can be carried out by sRNAs and small proteins in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Sequencing, annotation and investigation of hundreds of bacterial genomes have identified vast numbers of small RNAs and small proteins, the majority of which have no known function. In this study, we explore the function of a small protein that acts in tandem with a well-characterized small RNA during metabolic

  15. Inhibition of epithelial Na+ transport by atriopeptin, protein kinase c, and pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrmann, M.; Cantiello, H.F.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have recently shown the selective inhibition of an amiloride-sensitive, conductive pathway for Na + by atrial natriuretic peptide and 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK i . Using 22 Na + fluxes, they further investigated the modulation of Na + transport by atrial natriuretic peptide and by agents that increase cGMP production, activate protein kinase c, or modulate guanine nucleotide regulatory protein function. Sodium nitroprusside increases intracellular cGMP concentrations without affecting cAMP concentrations and completely inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na + uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, activators of protein kinase c, inhibit Na + uptake by 93 ± 13 and 51 ± 10%, respectively. Prolonged incubation with phorbol ester results in the downregulation of protein kinase c activity and reduces the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that the action of this peptide involves stimulation of protein kinase c. Pertussis toxin, which induces the ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in LLC-PK i cells, inhibits 22 Na + influx to the same extent as amiloride. Thus, increasing cGMP, activating protein kinase c, and ADP-ribosylating a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein all inhibit Na + uptake. These events may be sequentially involved in the action of atrial natriuretic peptide

  16. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  17. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  18. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  19. Response of soil microflora to impact of heavy metals in zones of influence of railway transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bobryk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring research on the areas intensively and continuously affected by technogenic loading has remained topical until nowadays. The soil as a basic component of many ecosystems, including the structure of its microbial cenoses, remains an informative index of a system’s overall stability. The areas affected by railway transport have been scarcely studied. Due to the above, the aim of this work has been to establish the transformation regularities of soil microbial cenoses of territories close to railways and to establish the groups of microorganisms that are a sensitive criterion of technogenic vehicular influence. For the purpose of microbiological research, soil samples were taken at different distances from the railway track (0, 25, 50, 100 and250 m within five monitoring sections of the Tchop – Uzhhorod – Sambor railway (in the territory of Zakarpatska oblast. The number of ecological trophic groups was identified by means of inoculation on nutrient media using the method of serial dilution of soil suspensions. The research showed that in all types of soils that were adjacent to railway tracks, the number of ammonifiers and spore microbiota was high due to the high content of heavy metals (beyond the background levels. Besides, the bacterial microflora on beef-extract agar was characterized by homogeneity with domination of enteric bacteria and spore bacteria. Simultaneously, the numbers of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, micromycetes, oligonitrophils, amylolytic and pedotrophic microflorae were shown to be low compared to the control. Farther from the railway track, pigmental species of bacteria appeared in the soil samples, attesting to the activity of self-purification processes. Correlation analysis of the data showed that the soil microbiota of the railway-side areas was undergoing changes as affected by heightened contents of heavy metals. Existence of medium and close connections was established between the number of

  20. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor.

  1. Beyond Competitive Inhibition: Regulation of ABC Transporters by Kinases and Protein-Protein Interactions as Potential Mechanisms of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Rebecca R; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Schuetz, Erin G; Schuetz, John D

    2018-03-07

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane efflux transporters mediating the extrusion of an array of substrates ranging from amino acids and lipids to xenobiotics, and many therapeutic compounds, including anticancer drugs. The ABC transporters are also recognized as important contributors to pharmacokinetics, especially in drug-drug interactions and adverse drug effects. Drugs and xenobiotics, as well as pathological conditions, can influence the transcription of ABC transporters, or modify their activity or intracellular localization. Kinases can affect the aforementioned processes for ABC transporters as do protein interactions. In this review, we focus on the ABC transporters ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC4 and ABCG2 and illustrate how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect these transporters. The clinical relevance of these factors is currently unknown, however these examples suggest that our understanding of drug-drug interactions will benefit from further knowledge of how kinases and protein-protein interactions affect ABC transporters. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. A Molecular Mechanism for Copper Transportation to Tyrosinase That Is Assisted by a Metallochaperone, Caddie Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Yasuyuki; Bando, Naohiko; Oda, Kosuke; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    The Cu(II)-soaked crystal structure of tyrosinase that is present in a complex with a protein, designated “caddie,” which we previously determined, possesses two copper ions at its catalytic center. We had identified two copper-binding sites in the caddie protein and speculated that copper bound to caddie may be transported to the tyrosinase catalytic center. In our present study, at a 1.16–1.58 Å resolution, we determined the crystal structures of tyrosinase complexed with caddie prepared by altering the soaking time of the copper ion and the structures of tyrosinase complexed with different caddie mutants that display little or no capacity to activate tyrosinase. Based on these structures, we propose a molecular mechanism by which two copper ions are transported to the tyrosinase catalytic center with the assistance of caddie acting as a metallochaperone. PMID:21730070

  3. Metal ion-dependent, reversible, protein filament formation by designed beta-roll polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotter, Andrew J; Guo, Meng; Tomczak, Melanie M; Daley, Margaret E; Campbell, Robert L; Oko, Richard J; Bateman, David A; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Sykes, Brian D; Davies, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Background A right-handed, calcium-dependent β-roll structure found in secreted proteases and repeat-in-toxin proteins was used as a template for the design of minimal, soluble, monomeric polypeptides that would fold in the presence of Ca2+. Two polypeptides were synthesised to contain two and four metal-binding sites, respectively, and exploit stacked tryptophan pairs to stabilise the fold and report on the conformational state of the polypeptide. Results Initial analysis of the two polypeptides in the presence of calcium suggested the polypeptides were disordered. The addition of lanthanum to these peptides caused aggregation. Upon further study by right angle light scattering and electron microscopy, the aggregates were identified as ordered protein filaments that required lanthanum to polymerize. These filaments could be disassembled by the addition of a chelating agent. A simple head-to-tail model is proposed for filament formation that explains the metal ion-dependency. The model is supported by the capping of one of the polypeptides with biotin, which disrupts filament formation and provides the ability to control the average length of the filaments. Conclusion Metal ion-dependent, reversible protein filament formation is demonstrated for two designed polypeptides. The polypeptides form filaments that are approximately 3 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length. They are not amyloid-like in nature as demonstrated by their behaviour in the presence of congo red and thioflavin T. A capping strategy allows for the control of filament length and for potential applications including the "decoration" of a protein filament with various functional moieties. PMID:17908326

  4. Improvement of paracellular transport in the Caco-2 drug screening model using protein-engineered substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Hunt, Daniel R; Dewi, Ruby E; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2017-06-01

    The Caco-2 assay has achieved wide popularity among pharmaceutical companies in the past two decades as an in vitro method for estimation of in vivo oral bioavailability of pharmaceutical compounds during preclinical characterization. Despite its popularity, this assay suffers from a severe underprediction of the transport of drugs which are absorbed paracellularly, that is, which pass through the cell-cell tight junctions of the absorptive cells of the small intestine. Here, we propose that simply replacing the collagen I matrix employed in the standard Caco-2 assay with an engineered matrix, we can control cell morphology and hence regulate the cell-cell junctions that dictate paracellular transport. Specifically, we use a biomimetic engineered extracellular matrix (eECM) that contains modular protein domains derived from two ECM proteins found in the small intestine, fibronectin and elastin. This eECM allows us to independently tune the density of cell-adhesive RGD ligands presented to Caco-2 cells as well as the mechanical stiffness of the eECM. We observe that lower amounts of RGD ligand presentation as well as decreased matrix stiffness results in Caco-2 morphologies that more closely resemble primary small intestinal epithelial cells than Caco-2 cells cultured on collagen. Additionally, these matrices result in Caco-2 monolayers with decreased recruitment of actin to the apical junctional complex and increased expression of claudin-2, a tight junction protein associated with higher paracellular permeability that is highly expressed throughout the small intestine. Consistent with these morphological differences, drugs known to be paracellularly transported in vivo exhibited significantly improved transport rates in this modified Caco-2 model. As expected, permeability of transcellularly transported drugs remained unaffected. Thus, we have demonstrated a method of improving the physiological accuracy of the Caco-2 assay that could be readily adopted by

  5. Cytoskeleton-centric protein transportation by exosomes transforms tumor-favorable macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yizhi; Zhou, Yanlong; Yin, Xingfeng; Guo, Jiahui; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The exosome is a key initiator of pre-metastatic niche in numerous cancers, where macrophages serve as primary inducers of tumor microenvironment. However, the proteome that can be exosomally transported from cancer cells to macrophages has not been sufficiently characterized so far. Here, we used colorectal cancer (CRC) exosomes to educate tumor-favorable macrophages. With a SILAC-based mass spectrometry strategy, we successfully traced the proteome transported from CRC exosomes to macrophages. Such a proteome primarily focused on promoting cytoskeleton rearrangement, which was biologically validated with multiple cell lines. We reproduced the exosomal transportation of functional vimentin as a proof-of-concept example. In addition, we found that some CRC exosomes could be recognized by macrophages via Fc receptors. Therefore, we revealed the active and necessary role of exosomes secreted from CRC cells to transform cancer-favorable macrophages, with the cytoskeleton-centric proteins serving as the top functional unit. PMID:27602764

  6. Maintenance of asymmetric cellular localization of an auxin transport protein through interaction with the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (that is, from the shoot apex toward the base) and is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. The focus of this article is to summarize the experiments that have examined how the asymmetric distribution of this protein complex is controlled and the significance of this polar distribution. Experimental evidence suggests that asymmetries in the auxin efflux carrier may be established through localized secretion of Golgi vesicles, whereas an attachment of a subunit of the efflux carrier to the actin cytoskeleton may maintain this localization. In addition, the idea that this localization of the efflux carrier may control both the polarity of auxin movement and more globally regulate developmental polarity is explored. Finally, evidence indicating that the gravity vector controls auxin transport polarity is summarized and possible mechanisms for the environmentally induced changes in auxin transport polarity are discussed.

  7. Transportation Stress and Expression of Heat Shock Protein Affecting Pork Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Tang, , , and

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between heat shock protein (Hsp expression and meat quality were assessed in pigs. Carcasses from 2 h- and 6 h-transported pigs had higher temperatures and lower pH and water holding capacity values in the longissimus dorsi and gluteus maximus superficialis muscles. Long journeys were associated with increased creatine kinase (CK levels. Higher CK levels are indicative of physical stress, as the enzyme is released from muscle fibers as a result of intense muscular exertion. These physiological and enzymatic changes were correlated with increased Hsp70 and decreased Hsp90 expression levels in both skeletal muscles. Animals whose cells contained high levels of Hsp may have had an advantage due to the protective role conferred by Hsp. Reduced Hsp levels were indicative of a higher meat quality and a good welfare of the transported pigs. The stress response declined over time in response to the same stress, such as a 6-h transport stress.

  8. Cytoskeleton-centric protein transportation by exosomes transforms tumor-favorable macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhipeng; Yang, Lijuan; Cui, Yizhi; Zhou, Yanlong; Yin, Xingfeng; Guo, Jiahui; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-10-11

    The exosome is a key initiator of pre-metastatic niche in numerous cancers, where macrophages serve as primary inducers of tumor microenvironment. However, the proteome that can be exosomally transported from cancer cells to macrophages has not been sufficiently characterized so far. Here, we used colorectal cancer (CRC) exosomes to educate tumor-favorable macrophages. With a SILAC-based mass spectrometry strategy, we successfully traced the proteome transported from CRC exosomes to macrophages. Such a proteome primarily focused on promoting cytoskeleton rearrangement, which was biologically validated with multiple cell lines. We reproduced the exosomal transportation of functional vimentin as a proof-of-concept example. In addition, we found that some CRC exosomes could be recognized by macrophages via Fc receptors. Therefore, we revealed the active and necessary role of exosomes secreted from CRC cells to transform cancer-favorable macrophages, with the cytoskeleton-centric proteins serving as the top functional unit.

  9. Specificity of the second binding protein of the peptide ABC-transporter (Dpp) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, Y; Toldra, F; Renault, P; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 revealed the presence of a putative peptide-binding protein-dependent ABC-transporter (Dpp). The genes for two peptide-binding proteins (dppA and dppP) precede the membrane components, which include two transmembrane protein genes (dppB and dppC) and

  10. Microtomography-based CFD analysis of transport in open-cell aluminum metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranut, Paola; Nobile, Enrico; Mancini, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the need for developing more effective heat exchange technologies and innovative materials, capable of increasing performances while keeping power consumption, size and cost at reasonable levels, is well recognized. Under this perspective, metal foams have a great potential for enhancing the thermal efficiency of heat transfer devices, while allowing for the use of smaller and lighter equipments. However, for practical applications, it is necessary to compromise between the augmented heat transfer rate and the increased pressure drop induced by the tortuous flow passages. For design purposes, the estimation of the flow permeability and the thermal conductivity of the foam is fundamental, but far from simple. From this perspective, besides classical transport models and correlations, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at the pore scale, although challenging, is becoming a promising approach, especially if coupled with a realistic description of the foam structure. For precisely recovering the microstructure of the foams, a 3D X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT) can be adopted. In this work, the results of μ-CT-based CFD simulations performed on different open-cell aluminum foams samples, for laminar flow regime, will be discussed. The results demonstrate that open-cell aluminum foams are effective means for enhancing heat transfer.

  11. Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of transition metal atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotoohi, Somayeh; Haji-Nasiri, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of single 3d transition metal (TM) atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons (α-AGyNR) are investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). It is found that all of the impurity atoms considered in this study (Fe, Co, Ni) prefer to occupy the sp-hybridized C atom site in α-AGyNR, and the obtained structures remain planar. The results show that highly localized impurity states are appeared around the Fermi level which correspond to the 3d orbitals of TM atoms, as can be derived from the projected density of states (PDOS). Moreover, Fe, Co, and Ni doped α-AGyNRs exhibit magnetic properties due to the strong spin splitting property of the energy levels. Also for each case, the calculated current-voltage characteristic per super-cell shows that the spin degeneracy in the system is obviously broken and the current becomes strongly spin dependent. Furthermore, a high spin-filtering effect around 90% is found under the certain bias voltages in Ni doped α-AGyNR. Additionally, the structure with Ni impurity reveals transfer characteristic that is suitable for designing a spin current switch. Our findings provide a high possibility to design the next generation spin nanodevices with novel functionalities.

  12. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of metal alloys in the space transportation system launch environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz

    1990-01-01

    AC impedance measurements were performed to investigate the corrosion resistance of 18 alloys under conditions similar to the Space Transportation System (STS) launch environment. The alloys were: (1) zirconium 702; (2) Hastelloy C-22, C-276, C-4, and B-2; (3) Inconel 600 and 825; (4) Ferralium 255; (5) Inco Alloy G-3; (6) 20Cb-3; (7) SS 904L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 304L; (8) ES 2205; and (9) Monel 400. AC impedance data were gathered for each alloy at various immersion times in 3.55 percent NaCl-0.1N HCl. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the Nyguist plots at each immersion time using the EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT software package available with the 388 electrochemical impedance software. Hastelloy C-22 showed the highest overall values for polarization resistance while Monel 400 and Inconel 600 had the lowest overall values. There was good general correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys at the beach corrosion testing site, and the expected rate of corrosion as predicted based on the polarization resistance values obtained. The data indicate that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy can be used to predict the corrosion performance of metal alloys.

  13. Protein transport into the human ER and related diseases, Sec61-channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haßdenteufel, Sarah; Klein, Marie-Christine; Melnyk, Armin; Zimmermann, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Protein transport into the human endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is relevant to the biogenesis of most soluble and membrane proteins of organelles, which are involved in endo- or exo-cytsosis. It involves amino-terminal signal peptides in the precursor polypeptides and various transport components in the cytosol plus the ER, and can occur co- or post-translationally. The two mechanisms merge at the level of the ER membrane, specifically at the level of the heterotrimeric Sec61 complex, which forms a dynamic polypeptide-conducting channel in the ER membrane. Since the mammalian ER is also the main intracellular calcium storage organelle, and the Sec61 complex is calcium permeable, the Sec61 complex is tightly regulated in its equilibrium between the closed and open conformations, or "gated", by ligands, such as signal peptides of the transport substrates and the ER lumenal Hsp70-type molecular chaperone BiP. Furthermore, BiP binding to the incoming polypeptide contributes to the efficiency and unidirectionality of transport. Recent insights into the structure and dynamic equilibrium of the Sec61 complex have various mechanistic as well as medical implications.

  14. UV Irradiation Accelerates Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Disrupts APP Axonal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Falzone, Tomas L.; Shen, Zhouxin; Lillo, Concepcion; Killian, Rhiannon L.; Arreola, Angela S.; Niederst, Emily D.; Ng, Kheng S.; Kim, Sonia N.; Briggs, Steven P.; Williams, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and/or abnormal cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) development and progression. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular levels of APP or its processing, and the physiological and pathological consequences of altered processing are not well understood. Here, using mouse and human cells, we found that neuronal damage induced by UV irradiation leads to specific APP, APLP1, and APLP2 decline by accelerating their secretase-dependent processing. Pharmacological inhibition of endosomal/lysosomal activity partially protects UV-induced APP processing implying contribution of the endosomal and/or lysosomal compartments in this process. We found that a biological consequence of UV-induced γ-secretase processing of APP is impairment of APP axonal transport. To probe the functional consequences of impaired APP axonal transport, we isolated and analyzed presumptive APP-containing axonal transport vesicles from mouse cortical synaptosomes using electron microscopy, biochemical, and mass spectrometry analyses. We identified a population of morphologically heterogeneous organelles that contains APP, the secretase machinery, molecular motors, and previously proposed and new residents of APP vesicles. These possible cargoes are enriched in proteins whose dysfunction could contribute to neuronal malfunction and diseases of the nervous system including AD. Together, these results suggest that damage-induced APP processing might impair APP axonal transport, which could result in failure of synaptic maintenance and neuronal dysfunction. PMID:24573290

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  16. Aquaporin-11: A channel protein lacking apparent transport function expressed in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunenari Takashi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aquaporins are a family of integral membrane proteins composed of two subfamilies: the orthodox aquaporins, which transport only water, and the aquaglyceroporins, which transport glycerol, urea, or other small solutes. Two recently described aquaporins, numbers 11 and 12, appear to be more distantly related to the other mammalian aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins. Results We report on the characterization of Aquaporin-11 (AQP11. AQP11 RNA and protein is found in multiple rat tissues, including kidney, liver, testes and brain. AQP11 has a unique distribution in brain, appearing in Purkinje cell dendrites, hippocampal neurons of CA1 and CA2, and cerebral cortical neurons. Immunofluorescent staining of Purkinje cells indicates that AQP11 is intracellular. Unlike other aquaporins, Xenopus oocytes expressing AQP11 in the plasma membrane failed to transport water, glycerol, urea, or ions. Conclusion AQP11 is functionally distinct from other proteins of the aquaporin superfamily and could represent a new aquaporin subfamily. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of AQP11 in the brain.

  17. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II.

  18. Enough is enough: TatA demand during Tat-dependent protein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, René Steffen; Schlesier, René; Heilmann, Kathleen; Dittmar, Julia; Jakob, Mario; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2013-05-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat(1)) pathway is unique with respect to its property to translocate proteins in a fully folded conformation across ion-tight membranes. In chloroplasts and Gram-negative bacteria, Tat translocase consists of the integral subunits TatB and TatC, which are assumed to constitute the membrane receptor, and TatA, a bitopic membrane protein being responsible in a yet unknown manner for the membrane translocation step. Antibody inhibition of intrinsic thylakoidal TatA activity and recovery of transport by heterologously expressed, purified TatA allowed to exactly quantify the amount of TatA required to catalyse membrane transport of the model Tat substrate 16/23. We can show that TatA concentrations in the 100nM range are sufficient to efficiently catalyse membrane transport of the protein, which corresponds well to the amount of TatA identified in thylakoids. Furthermore, TatA shows cooperativity in its catalytic activity suggesting that Tat translocase operates as an allosteric enzyme complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and engineering of a man-made diffusive electron-transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Bryan A; Solomon, Lee A; Leslie Dutton, P; Moser, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    Maquettes are man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences. Here we focus on water-soluble maquettes designed and engineered to perform diffusive electron transport of the kind typically carried out by cytochromes, ferredoxins and flavodoxins and other small proteins in photosynthetic and respiratory energy conversion and oxido-reductive metabolism. Our designs were tested by analysis of electron transfer between heme maquettes and the well-known natural electron transporter, cytochrome c. Electron-transfer kinetics were measured from seconds to milliseconds by stopped-flow, while sub-millisecond resolution was achieved through laser photolysis of the carbon monoxide maquette heme complex. These measurements demonstrate electron transfer from the maquette to cytochrome c, reproducing the timescales and charge complementarity modulation observed in natural systems. The ionic strength dependence of inter-protein electron transfer from 9.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) follows a simple Debye-Hückel model for attraction between +8 net charged oxidized cytochrome c and -19 net charged heme maquette, with no indication of significant protein dipole moment steering. Successfully recreating essential components of energy conversion and downstream metabolism in man-made proteins holds promise for in vivo clinical intervention and for the production of fuel or other industrial products. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Charged Amino Acids (R83, E567, D617, E625, R669, and K678) of CusA Are Required for Metal Ion Transport in the Cus Efflux System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Reddy Bolla, Jani; Do, Sylvia V.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W. (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2012-10-23

    Gram-negative bacteria expel various toxic chemicals via tripartite efflux pumps belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily. These pumps span both the inner and outer membranes of the cell. The three components of these tripartite systems are an inner-membrane, substrate-binding transporter (or pump); a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (or adaptor); and an outer-membrane-anchored channel. These three efflux proteins interact in the periplasmic space to form the three-part complexes. We previously presented the crystal structures of both the inner-membrane transporter CusA and membrane fusion protein CusB of the CusCBA tripartite efflux system from Escherichia coli. We also described the co-crystal structure of the CusBA adaptor-transporter, revealing that the trimeric CusA efflux pump assembles with six CusB protein molecules to form the complex CusB{sub 6}-CusA{sub 3}. We here report three different conformers of the crystal structures of CusBA-Cu(I), suggesting a mechanism on how Cu(I) binding initiates a sequence of conformational transitions in the transport cycle. Genetic analysis and transport assays indicate that charged residues, in addition to the methionine pairs and clusters, are essential for extruding metal ions out of the cell.

  1. Metal ions-binding T4 lysozyme as an intramolecular protein purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boura, Evzen; Baumlova, Adriana; Chalupska, Dominika; Dubankova, Anna; Klima, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Phage T4 lysozyme is a well folded and highly soluble protein that is widely used as an insertion tag to improve solubility and crystallization properties of poorly behaved recombinant proteins. It has been used in the fusion protein strategy to facilitate crystallization of various proteins including multiple G protein-coupled receptors, lipid kinases, or sterol binding proteins. Here, we present a structural and biochemical characterization of its novel, metal ions-binding mutant (mbT4L). We demonstrate that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag in the immobilized-metal affinity chromatography and that, in many respects, it is superior to the conventional hexahistidine tag. In addition, structural characterization of mbT4L suggests that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  2. Cytochemical characterization of gill and hepatopancreatic cells of the crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura validated by cell metal transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ortega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 is a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab possessing gills for respiratory and osmoregulatory processes, separated in anterior and posterior sections. They also have hepatopancreas, which is responsible for digestion and absorption of nutrients and detoxification of toxic metals. Each of these organs has specific cells that are important for in vitro studies in cell biology, ion and toxic metals transport. In order to study and characterize cells from gills and hepatopancreas, both were separated using a Sucrose Gradient (SG from 10 to 40% and cells in each gradient were characterized using the vital mitochondrial dye DASPEI (2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl-N- ethylpyridinium iodide and Trichrome Mallory's stain. Both in 20 and 40% SG for gill cells and 30% SG for hepatopancreatic cells, a greater number of cells were colored with DASPEI, indicating a larger number of mitochondria in these cells. It is concluded that the gill cells present in 20% and 40% SG are Thin cells, responsible for respiratory processes and Ionocytes responsible for ion transport, respectively. For hepatopancreatic cells, the 30% SG is composed of Fibrillar cells that possess larger number of membrane ion and nutrient transporters. Moreover, the transport of toxic metal cadmium (Cd by isolated hepatopancreatic cells was performed as a way of following cell physiological integrity after cell separation and to study differences in transport among the cells. All hepatopancreatic cells were able to transport Cd. These findings are the first step for further work on isolated cells of these important exchange epithelia of crabs, using a simple separation method and to further develop successful in vitro cell culture in crabs.

  3. Metalloido-porins: Essentiality of Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins in metalloid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Diehn, Till Arvid; Bienert, Gerd Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Metalloids are a group of physiologically important elements ranging from the essential to the highly toxic. Arsenic, antimony, germanium, and tellurium are highly toxic to plants themselves and to consumers of metalloid-contaminated plants. Boron, silicon, and selenium fulfill essential or beneficial functions in plants. However, when present at high concentrations, boron and selenium cause toxicity symptoms that are detrimental to plant fitness and yield. Consequently, all plants require efficient membrane transport systems to control the uptake and extrusion of metalloids into or out of the plant and their distribution within the plant body. Several Nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) that belong to the aquaporin plant water channel protein family facilitate the diffusion of uncharged metalloid species. Genetic, physiological, and molecular evidence is that NIPs from primitive to higher plants not only transport all environmentally important metalloids, but that these proteins have a major role in the uptake, translocation, and extrusion of metalloids in plants. As most of the metalloid-permeable NIP aquaporins are impermeable or are poorly permeable to water, these NIP channel proteins should be considered as physiologically essential metalloido-porins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of Drug Transfer into Milk Considering Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP)-Mediated Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Naoki; Ito, Kousei; Ikebuchi, Yuki; Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Hisaka, Akihiro; Oka, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Drug transfer into milk is of concern due to the unnecessary exposure of infants to drugs. Proposed prediction methods for such transfer assume only passive drug diffusion across the mammary epithelium. This study reorganized data from the literature to assess the contribution of carrier-mediated transport to drug transfer into milk, and to improve the predictability thereof. Milk-to-plasma drug concentration ratios (M/Ps) in humans were exhaustively collected from the literature and converted into observed unbound concentration ratios (M/Punbound,obs). The ratios were also predicted based on passive diffusion across the mammary epithelium (M/Punbound,pred). An in vitro transport assay was performed for selected drugs in breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-expressing cell monolayers. M/Punbound,obs and M/Punbound,pred values were compared for 166 drugs. M/Punbound,obs values were 1.5 times or more higher than M/Punbound,pred values for as many as 13 out of 16 known BCRP substrates, reconfirming BCRP as the predominant transporter contributing to secretory transfer of drugs into milk. Predictability of M/P values for selected BCRP substrates and non-substrates was improved by considering in vitro-evaluated BCRP-mediated transport relative to passive diffusion alone. The current analysis improved the predictability of drug transfer into milk, particularly for BCRP substrates, based on an exhaustive data overhaul followed by focused in vitro transport experimentation.

  5. Steric exclusion and protein conformation determine the localization of plasma membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Frans; Syga, Łukasz; Moiset, Gemma; Spakman, Dian; Schavemaker, Paul E; Punter, Christiaan M; Seinen, Anne-Bart; van Oijen, Antoine M; Robinson, Andrew; Poolman, Bert

    2018-02-05

    The plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains membrane compartments, MCC/eisosomes and MCPs, named after the protein residents Can1 and Pma1, respectively. Using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques we show that Can1 and the homologous transporter Lyp1 are able to diffuse into the MCC/eisosomes, where a limited number of proteins are conditionally trapped at the (outer) edge of the compartment. Upon addition of substrate, the immobilized proteins diffuse away from the MCC/eisosomes, presumably after taking a different conformation in the substrate-bound state. Our data indicate that the mobile fraction of all integral plasma membrane proteins tested shows extremely slow Brownian diffusion through most of the PM. We also show that proteins with large cytoplasmic domains, such as Pma1 and synthetic chimera of Can1 and Lyp1, are excluded from the MCC/eisosomes. We hypothesize that the distinct localization patterns found for these integral membrane proteins in S. cerevisiae arises from a combination of slow lateral diffusion, steric exclusion, and conditional trapping in membrane compartments.

  6. Binding-protein-dependent sugar transport by Agrobacterium radiobacter and A. tumefaciens grown in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, A; Greenwood, J A; Jones, C W

    1989-11-01

    Binding-protein-dependent sugar transport has been investigated in Agrobacterium radiobacter and A. tumefaciens. A. radiobacter contained two high-affinity glucose-binding proteins (GBP1 and GBP2) that additionally bound D-galactose (KD 0.26 microM) and D-xylose (KD 0.04 microM) respectively and were involved in the transport of these sugars. Partial sequencing of GBP1 and GBP2 showed that GBP2 exhibited significant homology with both the arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and the galactose-binding protein (GalBP) from Escherichia coli, whereas GBP1 exhibited significant homology only with ABP. Antiserum raised against GBP1 cross-reacted with GBP1 but not with GBP2, and vice versa. Anti-GBP1 and anti-GBP2 also cross-reacted with proteins corresponding to GBP1 and GBP2 respectively in A. tumefaciens, but little or no cross-reaction was observed with selected members of the Enterobacteriaceae, Rhizobiaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families grown under glucose limitation. GBP1 was less strongly repressed than GBP2 following batch growth of A. radiobacter on various carbon sources. The growth of A. radiobacter for more than approximately 10 generations in continuous culture under galactose or xylose limitation (D 0.045 h-1) led to the emergence of new strains which exhibited increased rates of glucose/galactose or glucose/xylose uptake, and which respectively hyperproduced GBP1 (strain AR18a) or GBP2 (strain AR9a). Similarly, growth of A. tumefaciens for more than approximately 15 generations under glucose or galactose limitation produced new strains which exhibited increased rates of glucose/xylose or glucose/galactose uptake and which respectively hyperproduced proteins analogous to GBP2 (strain AT9) or GBP1 (strain AT18a). It is concluded that growth of Agrobacterium species under carbon-limited conditions leads to the predictable emergence of new strains which specifically hyperproduce the transport system for the limiting nutrient. The GBP1-dependent system of A

  7. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D' Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  8. Secretagogue-induced protein phosphorylation and chloride transport in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, D.B.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1989-04-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (DMPGE2) and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (DBcAMP) on protein phosphorylation were studied in relation to stimulation of chloride transport in cell suspensions of the human colon epithelial cell line Caco-2. In /sup 36/Cl-loaded cells, VIP and DMPGE2 within 1 min decreased cellular chloride content 35-40%, with half-maximal effects being elicited at 1.0 and 85 nM concentration, respectively. A similar effect on chloride content occurred after 10 min of treatment with 0.5 mM DBcAMP. For all three secretagogues, decreases in cellular chloride content were associated with increases in membrane permeability to chloride. DMPGE2 and VIP within 1 min, and DBcAMP within 10 min, increased the phosphorylation of an unidentified soluble protein of Mr = 42,000 and pI = 6.1, and of a protein of Mr = 20,200 and pI = 4.9 identified as myosin regulatory light chain. Between 10 and 30 min of stimulation, however, phosphorylation of the Mr = 42,000 protein and chloride transport activity remained elevated in DMPGE2- and DBcAMP-treated cells, whereas light chain phosphorylation returned to control level. No effect of secretagogues on phosphorylation was detected in the total particulate fraction or an integral membrane protein fraction. It is concluded that increased membrane permeability to chloride induced by cAMP-mediated secretagogues in Caco-2 is temporally associated with the increased phosphorylation of a Mr = 42,000 soluble protein.

  9. Olfactory marker protein: turnover and transport in normal and regenerating neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kream, R.M.; Margolis, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    A 19,000-dalton acidic protein designated olfactory marker protein (OMP) is a cell-specific marker of mature olfactory chemosensory neurons. Intranasal irrigation of mouse olfactory epithelium with [ 35 S]methionine labeled OMP to high specific activity. Turnover and transport characteristics of 35 S-labeled OMP were compared to those of 35 S-labeled global cytosol protein in groups of young, adult, and Triton-treated adult mice. The latter contained primarily large numbers of regenerating olfactory neurons. In olfactory epithelium of young and Triton-treated mice, the specific activity of OMP was three times that of global cytosol protein, whereas in adults the two measures were equal. In all three groups, however, the rate of degradation of OMP was roughly equal to that of cytosol protein (T1/2 . 5 to 6 days). By contrast, differences in T1/2 for OMP decline in the bulb of adult, young, and Triton-treated adult mice were highly significant (T1/2's of 9.3, 6.1, and 4 to 5 days, respectively; p . 0.001). The specific activity of [35S]methionine incorporated in OMP exceeded that of the free amino acid 5-fold, indicating minimal precursor reutilization during the course of our experiments. Turnover data indicate that increased isotope incorporation into OMP in the epithelium is matched by an accelerated rate of degradation in the bulb. This may be correlated with the physiological state or developmental age of the primary neurons since in young and Triton-treated adult mice, rapidly maturing ''young'' olfactory neurons represent a larger proportion of the total population than in adults. Thus, OMP behaves as a typical, relatively slowly transported soluble protein (v . 2 to 4 mm/day, slow component b)

  10. Comparison of metal-binding strength between methionine and cysteine residues: Implications for the design of metal-binding motifs in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Deepak, R N V; Chandrakar, Brijesh; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2017-05-01

    Metals play vital role in various physiological processes and are bound to biomolecules. Although cysteine sulfur is more frequently found as metal-binding ligand, methionine prefers to occur in copper-binding motifs of some proteins. To address methionine's lower preference in copper-binding sites in comparison to cysteine, we have considered copper-binding motifs (His-Cys-His-Met) from seven different high-resolution protein structures. We performed quantum chemical calculations to find out the strength of interactions between sulfur and metal ion in both Met and Cys residues. In the case of Cys, both neutral (CysH) and the deprotonated form (Cys - ) were considered. We used two different levels of theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and the model compounds methyl propyl sulfide, ethanethiol and ethanethiolate were used to represent Met, CysH and Cys - respectively. To compare the metal-binding strength, we mutated Met in silico to CysH/Cys - and performed the calculations. We also carried out calculations with wild-type Cys present in the same metal-binding motif. On average, interactions of Met with copper ion are stronger by 13-35kcal/mol compared to CysH. However, Cys - interactions with copper is stronger than that of Met by ~250kcal/mol. We then considered the entire metal-binding motif with four residues and calculated the interaction energies with the copper ion. We also considered Met→Cys - mutation in the motif and repeated the calculations. Interaction of the wild-type motif with the copper ion is ~160kcal/mol weaker than that of mutated motif. Our studies suggest the factors that could explain why Met is not as frequently observed as Cys in the metal-binding motifs. Results of these studies will help in designing metal-binding motifs in proteins with varying interaction strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of two genes encoding metal tolerance proteins from Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima that confers manganese tolerance in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbasol, Isil; Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Koc, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient in plants. However increased Mn levels are toxic to plant cells. Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs), member of cation diffusion facilitator protein (CDF) family, have important roles in metal homeostatis in different plant species and catalyse efflux...... in planta localization and function as the Arabidopsis Mn-CDF homolog AtMTP11 and this conservation shows the evolutionary importance of these vesicular proteins in heavy metal homeostatis among plant species....... of excess metal ions. In this study, we identified and characterized two MTP genes from Beta vulgaris spp. maritima (B. v. ssp. maritima). Overexpression of these two genes provided Mn tolerance in yeast cells. Sequence analyses displayed BmMTP10 and BmMTP11as members of the Mn-CDF family. Functional...

  12. Detoxification of multiple heavy metals by a half-molecule ABC transporter, HMT-1, and coelomocytes of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc S Schwartz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing methods for protecting organisms in metal-polluted environments is contingent upon our understanding of cellular detoxification mechanisms. In this regard, half-molecule ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters of the HMT-1 subfamily are required for cadmium (Cd detoxification. HMTs have conserved structural architecture that distinguishes them from other ABC transporters and allows the identification of homologs in genomes of different species including humans. We recently discovered that HMT-1 from the simple, unicellular organism, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpHMT1, acts independently of phytochelatin synthase (PCS and detoxifies Cd, but not other heavy metals. Whether HMTs from multicellular organisms confer tolerance only to Cd or also to other heavy metals is not known.Using molecular genetics approaches and functional in vivo assays we showed that HMT-1 from a multicellular organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, functions distinctly from its S. pombe counterpart in that in addition to Cd it confers tolerance to arsenic (As and copper (Cu while acting independently of pcs-1. Further investigation of hmt-1 and pcs-1 revealed that these genes are expressed in different cell types, supporting the notion that hmt-1 and pcs-1 operate in distinct detoxification pathways. Interestingly, pcs-1 and hmt-1 are co-expressed in highly endocytic C. elegans cells with unknown function, the coelomocytes. By analyzing heavy metal and oxidative stress sensitivities of the coelomocyte-deficient C. elegans strain we discovered that coelomocytes are essential mainly for detoxification of heavy metals, but not of oxidative stress, a by-product of heavy metal toxicity.We established that HMT-1 from the multicellular organism confers tolerance to multiple heavy metals and is expressed in liver-like cells, the coelomocytes, as well as head neurons and intestinal cells, which are cell types that are affected by heavy metal poisoning in humans. We also showed

  13. RNA-seq analysis of the effect of kanamycin and the ABC transporter AtWBC19 on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings reveals changes in metal content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalew Mentewab

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to antibiotics produced by soil microorganisms, but little is known about their responses at the transcriptional level. Likewise, few endogenous mechanisms of antibiotic resistance have been reported. The Arabidopsis thaliana ATP Binding Cassette (ABC transporter AtWBC19 (ABCG19 is known to confer kanamycin resistance, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not well understood. Here we examined the transcriptomes of control seedlings and wbc19 mutant seedlings using RNA-seq analysis. Exposure to kanamycin indicated changes in the organization of the photosynthetic apparatus, metabolic fluxes and metal uptake. Elemental analysis showed a 60% and 80% reduction of iron uptake in control and wbc19 mutant seedlings respectively, upon exposure to kanamycin. The drop in iron content was accompanied by the upregulation of the gene encoding for FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 6 (FRO6 in mutant seedlings but not by the differential expression of other transport genes known to be induced by iron deficiency. In addition, wbc19 mutants displayed a distinct expression profile in the absence of kanamycin. Most notably the expression of several zinc ion binding proteins, including ZINC TRANSPORTER 1 PRECURSOR (ZIP1 was increased, suggesting abnormal zinc uptake. Elemental analysis confirmed a 50% decrease of zinc content in wbc19 mutants. Thus, the antibiotic resistance gene WBC19 appears to also have a role in zinc uptake.

  14. Modifying Surface Energy of Graphene via Plasma-Based Chemical Functionalization to Tune Thermal and Electrical Transport at Metal Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Brian M; Hernández, Sandra C; Duda, John C; Robinson, Jeremy T; Walton, Scott G; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2015-08-12

    The high mobility exhibited by both supported and suspended graphene, as well as its large in-plane thermal conductivity, has generated much excitement across a variety of applications. As exciting as these properties are, one of the principal issues inhibiting the development of graphene technologies pertains to difficulties in engineering high-quality metal contacts on graphene. As device dimensions decrease, the thermal and electrical resistance at the metal/graphene interface plays a dominant role in degrading overall performance. Here we demonstrate the use of a low energy, electron-beam plasma to functionalize graphene with oxygen, fluorine, and nitrogen groups, as a method to tune the thermal and electrical transport properties across gold-single layer graphene (Au/SLG) interfaces. We find that while oxygen and nitrogen groups improve the thermal boundary conductance (hK) at the interface, their presence impairs electrical transport leading to increased contact resistance (ρC). Conversely, functionalization with fluorine has no impact on hK, yet ρC decreases with increasing coverage densities. These findings indicate exciting possibilities using plasma-based chemical functionalization to tailor the thermal and electrical transport properties of metal/2D material contacts.

  15. The effects of railway transportation on the enrichment of heavy metals in the artificial soil on railway cut slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoqiong; Wang, KeXiu; Ai, Ying Wei; Li, Wei; Gao, Hongying; Fang, Chen

    2014-02-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the artificial soils on the railway cut slopes may have great influence on the revegetation of the cut slopes. The purpose of this study was to assess the variation of heavy metal contamination levels with railway operation time and analyze their possible resources. A total of 100 soil samples from four cut slopes, which were affected by railway transportation for different years, were analyzed for metal pollution (Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe). The concentrations of Cd, Pb showed increasing trend with increasing operation time of railways, while such trend was not found in Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe. According to the soil quality standard of China, Cd was considered to have considerable contamination, while Pb has less, but Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe have none. Moreover, cadmium exhibited remarkably higher levels rather than those reported in other studies. Enrichment factors and ecological index showed that Cd and Pb showed a moderate enrichment and a considerable ecological risk in most of the soil samples. The results of descriptive statistic, principal component analysis, cluster analysis and correlation analysis were totally consistent with each other. Their results revealed that Cr, Cu, Zn and Fe had common origins, and they may come from natural resources. While Cd and Pb were significantly influenced by railway transportation, leaked cargos, fuel combustion, the use of lubricate oils and sleeper impregnation oils during railway transportation may be their main resources.

  16. Colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in the sampling of soil solution from Duckum soil in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Ko, Il-Won; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2018-03-24

    Colloid mobilization is a significant process governing colloid-associated transport of heavy metals in subsurface environments. It has been studied for the last three decades to understand this process. However, colloid mobilization and heavy metal transport in soil solutions have rarely been studied using soils in South Korea. We investigated the colloid mobilization in a variety of flow rates during sampling soil solutions in sand columns. The colloid concentrations were increased at low flow rates and in saturated regimes. Colloid concentrations increased 1000-fold higher at pH 9.2 than at pH 7.3 in the absence of 10 mM NaCl solution. In addition, those were fourfold higher in the absence than in the presence of the NaCl solution at pH 9.2. It was suggested that the mobility of colloids should be enhanced in porous media under the basic conditions and the low ionic strength. In real field soils, the concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb in soil solutions increased with the increase in colloid concentrations at initial momentarily changed soil water pressure, whereas the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Al, and Co lagged behind the colloid release. Therefore, physicochemical changes and heavy metal characteristics have important implications for colloid-facilitated transport during sampling soil solutions.

  17. The Coupled Photothermal Reaction and Transport in a Laser Additive Metal Nanolayer Simultaneous Synthesis and Pattering for Flexible Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Ling Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Direct Synthesis and Patterning (LDSP technology has advantages in terms of processing time and cost compared to nanomaterials-based laser additive microfabrication processes. In LDSP, a scanning laser on the substrate surface induces chemical reactions in the reactive liquid solution and selectively deposits target material in a preselected pattern on the substrate. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of the processing parameters and type and concentration of the additive solvent on the properties and growth rate of the resulting metal film fabricated by this LDSP technology. It was shown that reactive metal ion solutions with substantial viscosity yield metal films with superior physical properties. A numerical analysis was also carried out the first time to investigate the coupled opto-thermo-fluidic transport phenomena and the effects on the metal film growth rate. To complete the simulation, the optical properties of the LDSP deposited metal film with a variety of thicknesses were measured. The characteristics of the temperature field and the thermally induced flow associated with the moving heat source are discussed. It was shown that the processing temperature range of the LDSP is from 330 to 390 K. A semi-empirical model for estimating the metal film growth rate using this process was developed based on these results. From the experimental and numerical results, it is seen that, owing to the increased reflectivity of the silver film as its thickness increases, the growth rate decreases gradually from about 40 nm at initial to 10 nm per laser scan after ten scans. This self-controlling effect of LDSP process controls the thickness and improves the uniformity of the fabricated metal film. The growth rate and resulting thickness of the metal film can also be regulated by adjustment of the processing parameters, and thus can be utilized for controllable additive nano/microfabrication.

  18. Theoretical study of the role of metallic contacts in probing transport features of pure and defected graphene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Magna Antonino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding the roles of disorder and metal/graphene interface on the electronic and transport properties of graphene-based systems is crucial for a consistent analysis of the data deriving from experimental measurements. The present work is devoted to the detailed study of graphene nanoribbon systems by means of self-consistent quantum transport calculations. The computational formalism is based on a coupled Schrödinger/Poisson approach that respects both chemistry and electrostatics, applied to pure/defected graphene nanoribbons (ideally or end-contacted by various fcc metals. We theoretically characterize the formation of metal-graphene junctions as well as the effects of backscattering due to the presence of vacancies and impurities. Our results evidence that disorder can infer significant alterations on the conduction process, giving rise to mobility gaps in the conductance distribution. Moreover, we show the importance of metal-graphene coupling that gives rise to doping-related phenomena and a degradation of conductance quantization characteristics.

  19. Lignans and norlignans inhibit multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Anna; Eklund, Patrik; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, Malgorzata; Hägerstrand, Henry

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is one of the drug efflux pumps mediating multidrug resistance in several cancer types. Efficient nontoxic inhibitors of MRP1-mediated transport are sought to potentially sensitise cancer cells to anticancer drugs. This study examined the potency of a series of plant lignans and norlignans of various structures to inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes. The occurrence of MRP1 in the human erythrocyte membrane makes this cell a useful model in searching for efficient MRP1inhibitors. The inhibition of 2',7'-bis-(carboxypropyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCPCF) transport from human erythrocytes was measured fluorymetrically. In order to study possible membrane-perturbing effects of lignans and norlignans, the potency of these compounds to induce haemolysis, erythrocyte shape change, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in the external layer of the erythrocyte membrane was examined. Nine compounds (six norlignans and three lignans) of the fourteen that were tested inhibited BCPCF transport from human erythrocytes. The most efficient inhibitor, the norlignan coded L1, had IC(50)=50 μM. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that the strongest inhibitors were found among lignans and norlignans bearing a carbonyl function at position C-9. The highly oxidised structures and the presence of an ionisable group such as the carboxylic acid function enhance activity. All compounds that significantly decreased BCPCF transport were non-haemolytic, did not cause PS exposure and did not have any effect on erythrocyte shapes up to 200 μM. Lignans and norlignans can inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes and should be further investigated as possible agents reversing multidrug resistance.

  20. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pikyee; Varela, Filipa; Magoch, Malgorzata; Silva, Ana Rita; Rosário, Ana Lúcia; Brito, José; Oliveira, Tânia Filipa; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Pessanha, Miguel; Stelter, Meike; Kletzin, Arnulf; Henderson, Peter J F; Archer, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential. Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT). These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+)-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf) and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3)). Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials. Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL) produced sufficient

  1. Dietary egg white protein inhibits lymphatic lipid transport in thoracic lymph duct-cannulated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Shirouchi, Bungo; Kawamura, Sayaka; Baba, Sanae; Shiratake, Sawako; Nagata, Kazuko; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Sato, Masao

    2014-11-05

    Dietary egg white protein (EWP) decreases serum cholesterol levels. We previously showed that EWP decreased cholesterol absorption in the intestine. Rats subjected to permanent lymph duct cannulation were used to investigate the effects of dietary EWP on lipid transport. They were fed diets with 20% EWP and casein, and their lymph was collected to quantify lymphatic lipid levels. Dietary EWP decreased lymphatic cholesterol transport compared with casein. It was previously shown that EWP excluded cholesterol from bile acid micelles. Therefore, pepsin-hydrolyzed EWP and casein were prepared. EWP was not completely digested. Ovalbumin, which is the most abundant protein in EWP, showed resistance to digestion by pepsin. This study investigated the effects of EWP pepsin hydrolysate (EWP-ph) on cholesterol micellar solubility, cholesterol transfer from the micellar to the oil phase, water-holding capacity (WHC), settling volume in water (SV), and relative viscosity and compared them with the effects of casein pepsin hydrolysate (C-ph). EWP-ph significantly decreased the micellar solubility and transfer rate and increased the WHC, SV, and relative viscosity compared with C-ph. Moreover, the pepsin hydrolysate of ovalbumin, a major protein in EWP, played a role in decreasing cholesterol micellar solubility, leading to the inhibition of cholesterol absorption. In conclusion, dietary EWP decreased cholesterol intestinal absorption by exerting combined effects of these physicochemical properties in the gut.

  2. Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Ehsan

    Transport phenomena in high porosity open-cell fibrous structures have been the focus of many recent industrial and academic investigations. Unique features of these structures such as relatively low cost, ultra-low density, high surface area to volume ratio, and the ability to mix the passing fluid make them excellent candidates for a variety of thermofluid applications including fuel cells, compact heat exchangers and cooling of microelectronics. This thesis contributes to improved understanding of thermal transport phenomena in fuel cell gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and metal foams and describes new experimental techniques and analytic models to characterize and predict effective transport properties. Heat transfer through the GDL is a key process in the design and operation of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The analysis of this process requires determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance (TCR) associated with the interface between the GDL and adjacent surfaces/ layers. The effective thermal conductivity significantly differs in through-plane and in-plane directions due to anisotropy of the GDL micro-structure. Also, the high porosity of GDLs makes the contribution of TCR against the heat flow through the medium more pronounced. A test bed was designed and built to measure the thermal contact resistance and effective thermal conductivity in both through-plane and in-plane directions under vacuum and ambient conditions. The developed experimental program allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. For GDLs, measurements are performed under a wide range of compressive loads using Toray carbon paper samples. To study the effect of cyclic compression, which may happen during the operation of a fuel cell stack, measurements are performed on the thermal and structural properties of GDL at different loading-unloading cycles. The static compression measurements are

  3. Template-directed covalent conjugation of DNA to native antibodies, transferrin and other metal-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Christian B.; Kodal, Anne L. B.; Nielsen, Jesper S.; Schaffert, David H.; Scavenius, Carsten; Okholm, Anders H.; Voigt, Niels V.; Enghild, Jan J.; Kjems, Jørgen; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V.

    2014-09-01

    DNA-protein conjugates are important in bioanalytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics and bionanotechnology, as the DNA provides a unique handle to identify, functionalize or otherwise manipulate proteins. To maintain protein activity, conjugation of a single DNA handle to a specific location on the protein is often needed. However, preparing such high-quality site-specific conjugates often requires genetically engineered proteins, which is a laborious and technically challenging approach. Here we demonstrate a simpler method to create site-selective DNA-protein conjugates. Using a guiding DNA strand modified with a metal-binding functionality, we directed a second DNA strand to the vicinity of a metal-binding site of His6-tagged or wild-type metal-binding proteins, such as serotransferrin, where it subsequently reacted with lysine residues at that site. This method, DNA-templated protein conjugation, facilitates the production of site-selective protein conjugates, and also conjugation to IgG1 antibodies via a histidine cluster in the constant domain.

  4. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  5. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 and breast cancer resistance protein interact in the transepithelial transport of steroid sulfates in human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Markus; Reuther, Sebastian; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Köck, Kathleen; Draber, Katrin; Ritter, Christoph A; Fusch, Christoph; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2007-01-01

    The human placenta has both protective and nurturing functions for the fetal organism. Uptake and elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous substances are facilitated by various transport proteins from the solute carrier (SLC) and ABC families, respectively. A functional interaction of uptake and elimination, which is a prerequisite for vectorial transport across cellular barriers, has not been described for placenta. In this study, we examined expression of organic anion transporter (OAT) 4 (SLC22A11), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1 (SLCO2B1, OATP-B), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) (ABCG2) in human placenta (n = 71) because all three proteins are involved in transmembranal transfer of estrone 3 sulfate (E3S; metabolic product) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS; precursor molecule). On the mRNA level, we found a significant correlation of OATP2B1 and BCRP (R(2) = 0.534; p 0.05). Localization studies confirmed basal expression of OATP2B1 and apical expression of BCRP. To study functional interactions between OATP2B1 and BCRP, we developed a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell model expressing both transport proteins simultaneously (OATP2B1 and BCRP in the basal and apical membrane, respectively). Using this cell model in a transwell system resulted in a significantly increased basal to apical transport of both E3S and DHEAS, when both transporters were expressed with no change of transfer in the apical to basal direction. Taken together, these data show the potential for a functional interaction of OATP2B1 and BCRP in transepithelial transport of steroid sulfates in human placenta.

  6. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  7. Prion protein and its interactions with metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ and metallothionein 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Ruttkay-Nedecky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of heavy metals (Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Cd2+ on Escherichia coli expressing either prion (hPrPC or metallothionein 3 (MT-3 brain proteins capable of binding these metals were investigated. The expression of hPrPC or MT-3 in E.coli was confirmed using western-blot and dot-blot methods. After analyzing growth curves, we found that bacteria expressing prion protein better tolerated the presence of Zn2+ in comparison with wild-type bacteria and bacteria expressing MT-3. The addition of Cd2+ and Cu2+ was well tolerated by bacteria expressing MT-3, whereas the bacteria expressing prion protein displayed slower growth when compared to the wild-type. We subsequently determined total content of the MT in bacteria using differential pulsed voltammetry (DPV, and depending on the treatment of the individual metals. MT expression in MT3 transformed cells as well as in control E.coli cells increased at the lowest metal concentration (25 µM, followed by a decrease at higher metal concentrations (50, 75, and 150 µM. The highest increase by Cd2+ were observed.  MT expression pattern in hPrPC transformed cells was different. After application of Cu2+ an increase in MT expression continued also at higher metal concentrations; and after application of Cd2+ and Zn2+ no decrease in MT expression at higher metal concentrations was observed.

  8. The breast cancer resistance protein transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the human kidney proximal tubule apical membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Brown, C.D.; Windass, A.S.; Sayer, R.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Heemskerk, S.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a transporter restricting absorption and enhancing excretion of many compounds including anticancer drugs. This transporter is highly expressed in many tissues; however, in human kidney, only the mRNA was found in contrast to the mouse kidney,

  9. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Vasenko, Andrey S.; Ozaeta, Asier; Bergeret, Sebastian F.; Hekking, Frank W.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits

  10. Interfacial microstructure and shear strength of reactive air brazed oxygen transport membrane ceramic-metal alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    FR, Wahid Muhamad; Yoon, Dang-Hyok; Raju, Kati; Kim, Seyoung; Song, Kwang-sup; Yu, Ji Haeng

    2018-01-01

    To fabricate a multi-layered structure for maximizing oxygen production, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) ceramics need to be joined or sealed hermetically metal supports for interfacing with the peripheral components of the system. Therefore, in this study, Ag-10 wt% CuO was evaluated as an effective filler material for the reactive air brazing of dense Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ-La0.7Sr0.3MnO3±δ (GDC-LSM) OTM ceramics. Thermal decomposition in air and wetting behavior of the braze filler was performed. Reactive air brazing was performed at 1050 °C for 30 min in air to join GDC-LSM with four different commercially available high temperature-resistant metal alloys, such as Crofer 22 APU, Inconel 600, Fecralloy, and AISI 310S. The microstructure and elemental distribution of the ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal interfaces were examined from polished cross-sections. The mechanical shear strength at room temperature for the as-brazed and isothermally aged (800 °C for 24 h) joints of all the samples was compared. The results showed that the strength of the ceramic-ceramic joints was decreased marginally by aging; however, in the case of metal-ceramic joints, different decreases in strengths were observed according to the metal alloy used, which was explained based on the formation of different oxide layers at the interfaces.

  11. Metal Evolution and TrAnsport in the Large Magellanic Cloud (METAL): Probing Dust Evolution in Star Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Duval

    2016-10-01

    METAL is a large spectroscopic and imaging program with HST dedicated to the study of dust evolution in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The program will obtain FUV and NUV medium-resolution spectra of 33 massive stars in the LMC with STIS and COS complementing existing archival data to measure gas-phase and dust-phase (depletion) elemental abundances. With these spectra, we will subsequently directly measure the dust composition and abundance as a function of environment (surface density, radiation field, dynamical conditions, such as the proximity of supernova remnants or expanding HI shells). The depletion information will be complemented with dust UV extinction curves (i.e., the UV opacity of dust grains as a function of wavelength) derived from either archival IUE, or new COS and low-resolution STIS spectra acquired as part of this program. Together, the depletions and extinction curves will constrain how the dust abundance and properties (composition, size distribution) vary with environment at Z=0.5Zo. In parallel to the spectroscopic observations, we will obtain WFC3 NUV-NIR imaging to map dust extinction parameters (AV, RV) in the vicinity of our targets and calibrate the far-infrared (FIR) emissivity of dust. Our observations we will improve the accuracy of dust mass and extinction estimates in the local and high-redshift universe by up to an order of magnitude.METAL will complement a Cycle 23 HST/STIS program (GO-13778) focused on dust evolution in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at Z=0.2Zo, and previously published depletion studies in the Milky Way (Jenkins et al. 2009) to provide a comprehensive view of dust evolution as a function of metallicity.

  12. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O......-(thio)triphosphate (GTP¿S). Moreover, the Npa3 mutant that binds GTP, but cannot hydrolyze it, binds RNAPII even in the absence of added GTP, whereas the mutant that cannot bind GTP is unable to bind the polymerase. Together, our data suggest that Npa3 defines an unconventional pathway for nuclear import of RNAPII, which...

  13. Immunodetection of the serotonin transporter protein is a more valid marker for serotonergic fibers than serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Brask, Dorthe; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2006-01-01

    transporter (SERT) protein, on the other hand, is less liable to metabolism and for that reason we hypothetized that SERT immunostaining is a more stable marker of serotonergic fibers. Rats were pretreated with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor and compared with placebo treated rats. Brains were double...... immunostained for serotonin and SERT protein and colocalization was quantified in several brain areas by confocal microscopy. In comparison with untreated rats, MAO inhibitor treated rats had a significantly higher number (almost 200% increase) of serotonin immunopositive fibers whereas no difference...... was observed in the number of the SERT positive fibers. Colocalization between serotonin and SERT positive fibers was close to 100% in MAO inhibitor treated animals but only 30% in untreated rats. We conclude that the rapid metabolism of serotonin leads to an underestimation of immunodetected serotonergic...

  14. Plasma membrane-located purine nucleotide transport proteins are key components for host exploitation by microsporidian intracellular parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes, consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

  15. Comparative genomics of transport proteins in probiotic and pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Jimmy; Zafar, Hassan; Saier, Milton H

    2017-06-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species that can be pathogenic, probiotic, commensal, or a harmless laboratory strain. Pathogenic strains of E. coli cause urinary tract infections, diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and pyelonephritis, while the two known probiotic E. coli strains combat inflammatory bowel disease and play a role in immunomodulation. Salmonella enterica, a close relative of E. coli, includes two important pathogenic serovars, Typhi and Typhimurium, causing typhoid fever and enterocolitis in humans, respectively, with the latter strain also causing a lethal typhoid fever-like disease in mice. In this study, we identify the transport systems and their substrates within seven E. coli strains: two probiotic strains, two extracellular pathogens, two intracellular pathogens, and K-12, as well as the two intracellular pathogenic S. enterica strains noted above. Transport systems characteristic of each probiotic or pathogenic species were thus identified, and the tabulated results obtained with all of these strains were compared. We found that the probiotic and pathogenic strains generally contain more iron-siderophore and sugar transporters than E. coli K-12. Pathogens have increased numbers of pore-forming toxins, protein secretion systems, decarboxylation-driven Na + exporters, electron flow-driven monovalent cation exporters, and putative transporters of unknown function compared to the probiotic strains. Both pathogens and probiotic strains encode metabolite transporters that reflect their intracellular versus extracellular environments. The results indicate that the probiotic strains live extracellularly. It seems that relatively few virulence factors can convert a beneficial or commensal microorganism into a pathogen. Taken together, the results reveal the distinguishing features of these strains and provide a starting point for future engineering of beneficial enteric bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Function and regulation of ATP-binding cassette transport proteins involved in hepatobiliary transport (vol 12, pg 13, 2000)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooiveld, GJEJ; van Montfoort, JE; Meijer, DKF; Muller, M

    Hepatobiliary transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds is mediated by the coordinated action of multiple transport systems present at the sinusoidal (basolateral) and canalicular (apical) membrane domains of hepatocytes. During the last few years many of these transporters have been cloned

  17. Projection Structure by Single-Particle Electron Microscopy of Secondary Transport Proteins GItT, Cits, and GltS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscicka, Katarzyna B.; Krupnik, Tomasz; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lolkema, Juke S.; Mościcka, Katarzyna B.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of three secondary transporter proteins, GltT of Bacillus stearothermophilus, CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and GltS of Escherichia coli, was studied. The proteins were purified to homogeneity ill detergent solution by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography, and the complexes were

  18. Functional modulation of the glutamate transporter variant GLT1b by the PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Borre, Lars; Braunstein, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    The dominant glutamate transporter isoform in the mammalian brain, GLT1, exists as at least three splice variants, GLT1a, GLT1b, and GLT1c. GLT1b interacts with the scaffold protein PICK1 (protein interacting with kinase C1), which is implicated in glutamatergic neurotransmission via its regulato...

  19. Selenium and zinc protect brain mitochondrial antioxidants and electron transport chain enzymes following postnatal protein malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Adenuga, Gbenga A; Sandhir, Rajat

    2016-05-01

    Selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) are trace elements required for optimal brain functions. Thus, the role of Se and Zn against protein malnutrition induced oxidative stress on mitochondrial antioxidants and electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes from rats' brain were investigated. Normal protein (NP) and low protein (LP) rats were fed with diets containing 16% and 5% casein respectively for a period of 10weeks. Then the rats were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15mgL(-1) and 227mgL(-1) in drinking water for 3weeks after which the rats were sacrificed. The results obtained from the study showed significant (p<0.05) increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO), ROS production, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels and mitochondrial swelling and significant (p<0.05) reductions in catalase (CAT) and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activities, glutathione (GSH) levels, GSH/GSSG ratio and MTT reduction as a result of LP ingestion. The activities of mitochondrial ETC enzymes were also significantly inhibited in both the cortex and cerebellum of LP-fed rats. Supplementation with either Se or Zn restored the alterations in all the parameters. The study showed that Se and Zn might be beneficial in protecting mitochondrial antioxidants and ETC enzymes against protein malnutrition induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polyacrylonitrile-based carbonized fibers and metal-carbonized fiber nanocomposites for thermal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochanda, Fredrick; Atkinson, Ariel; Fey, Edmond O; Andala, Dickson; Jones, Wayne E

    2010-12-01

    This work examines the fabrication and thermal analysis of metal-carbon composite fibers prepared via an electrospinning process. The metal-carbon composite fibers of silver, copper, gold, and nickel were prepared by electrospinning of a composite solution of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and metal precursor followed by heat treatment in air, nitrogen to 1000 degrees C and in 6% H2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) were applied to characterize the metal-carbon fibers. TEM analysis showed a relatively uniform, contact-free distribution of the nanoparticles on the surface of the carbon fibers with size range of 3 nm-10 nm. Thermal analysis data showed an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterials when compared with the model PAN-based carbonized fibers. This was attributed to the incorporation of metal nanoparticles in the fiber matrix and on the surface.

  1. Amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (slc6a19) and ancillary protein: impact on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheritis, Eleonora; Imperiali, Francesca Guia; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Vollero, Alessandra; Terova, Genciana; Rimoldi, Simona; Girardello, Rossana; Bossi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Amino acids play an important role in the metabolism of all organisms. Their epithelial re-absorption is due to specific transport proteins, such as B(0)AT1, a Na(+)-coupled neutral amino acid symporter belonging to the solute carrier 6 family. Here, a recently cloned fish orthologue, from the intestine of Salmo salar, was electrophysiologically characterized with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, in Xenopus laevis oocytes heterologously expressing the transporter. Substrate specificity, apparent affinities and the ionic dependence of the transport mechanism were determined in the presence of specific collectrin. Results demonstrated that like the human, but differently from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) orthologue, salmon B(0)AT1 needs to be associated with partner proteins to be correctly expressed at the oocyte plasma membrane. Cloning of sea bass collectrin and comparison of membrane expression and functionality of the B(0)AT1 orthologue transporters allowed a deeper investigation on the role of their interactions. The parameters acquired by electrophysiological and immunolocalization experiments in the mammalian and fish transporters contributed to highlight the dynamic of relations and impacts on transport function of the ancillary proteins. The comparative characterization of the physiological parameters of amino acid transporters with auxiliary proteins can help the comprehension of the regulatory mechanism of essential nutrient absorption.

  2. Global Structural Flexibility of Metalloproteins Regulates Reactivity of Transition Metal Ion in the Protein Core: An Experimental Study Using Thiol-subtilisin as a Model Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Takashi; Kono, Takamasa; Shobu, Isamu; Ishida, Masaya; Gonda, Katsuya; Hirota, Shun

    2018-02-21

    The functions of metal-containing proteins (metalloproteins) are determined by the reactivities of transition metal ions at their active sites. Because protein macromolecular structures have several molecular degrees of freedom, global structural flexibility may also regulate the properties of metalloproteins. However, the influence of this factor has not been fully delineated in mechanistic studies of metalloproteins. Accordingly, we have investigated the relationship between global protein flexibility and the characteristics of a transition metal ion in the protein core using thiol-subtilisin (tSTL) with a Cys-coordinated Cu 2+ ion as a model system. Although tSTL has two Ca 2+ -binding sites, the Ca 2+ -binding status hardly affects its secondary structure. Nevertheless, guanidinium-induced denaturation and amide H/D exchange indicated the increase in the structural flexibility of tSTL by the removal of bound Ca 2+ ions. Electron paramagnetic resonance and absorption spectral changes have revealed that the protein flexibility determines the characteristics of a Cu 2+ ion in tSTL. Therefore, global protein flexibility should be recognized as an important factor that regulates the properties of metalloproteins. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The potato sucrose transporter StSUT1 interacts with a DRM-associated protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krügel, Undine; He, Hong-Xia; Gier, Konstanze; Reins, Jana; Chincinska, Izabela; Grimm, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Kühn, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Organization of proteins into complexes is crucial for many cellular functions. Recently, the SUT1 protein was shown to form homodimeric complexes, to be associated with lipid raft-like microdomains in yeast as well as in plants and to undergo endocytosis in response to brefeldin A. We therefore aimed to identify SUT1-interacting proteins that might be involved in dimerization, endocytosis, or targeting of SUT1 to raft-like microdomains. Therefore, we identified potato membrane proteins, which are associated with the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction. Among the proteins identified, we clearly confirmed StSUT1 as part of DRM in potato source leaves. We used the yeast two-hybrid split ubiquitin system (SUS) to systematically screen for interaction between the sucrose transporter StSUT1 and other membrane-associated or soluble proteins in vivo. The SUS screen was followed by immunoprecipitation using affinity-purified StSUT1-specific peptide antibodies and mass spectrometric analysis of co-precipitated proteins. A large overlap was observed between the StSUT1-interacting proteins identified in the co-immunoprecipitation and the detergent-resistant membrane fraction. One of the SUT1-interacting proteins, a protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), interacts also with other sucrose transporter proteins. A potential role of the PDI as escort protein is discussed.

  4. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Claire Munday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (Berenil®, cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (MPXR is the result of loss of a separate High Affinity Pentamidine Transporter (HAPT1. A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the selectivity region of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a possible structural rationale for this

  5. A nu-space for ICS: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency ( ν , nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for STICS that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins ( α 6- and αLβ 2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and ICAM ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrinligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results.

  6. Modeling and design of light powered biomimicry micropump utilizing transporter proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    The creation of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. We present a mathematical model for a micropump utilizing Bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. This micropump utilizes transporter proteins as method to drive fluid flow by converting light energy into chemical potential. The fluid flow through a microchannel is simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Numerical results show that the micropump is capable of generating usable pressure. Designing parameters influencing the performance of the micropump are investigated including membrane fraction, lipid proton permeability, illumination, and channel height. The results show that there is a substantial membrane fraction region at which fluid flow is maximized. The use of lipids with low membrane proton permeability allows illumination to be used as a method to turn the pump on and off. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. This modeling work provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-sustained bio-mimic microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation Grant CBET-1250107.

  7. Colloid formation and metal transport through two mixing zones affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemel, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stream discharges and concentrations of dissolved and colloidal metals (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn), SO4, and dissolved silica were measured to identify chemical transformations and determine mass transports through two mixing zones in the Animas River that receive the inflows from Cement and Mineral Creeks. The creeks were the dominant sources of Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb, whereas the upstream Animas River supplied about half of the Zn. With the exception of Fe, which was present in dissolved and colloidal forms, the metals were dissolved in the acidic, high-SO4 waters of Cement Creek (pH 3.8). Mixing of Cement Creek with the Animas River increased pH to near-neutral values and transformed Al and some additional Fe into colloids which also contained Cu and Pb. Aluminium and Fe colloids had already formed in the mildly acidic conditions in Mineral Creek (pH 6.6) upstream of the confluence with the Animas River. Colloidal Fe continued to form downstream of both mixing zones. The Fe- and Al-rich colloids were important for transport of Cu, Pb, and Zn, which appeared to have sorbed to them. Partitioning of Zn between dissolved and colloidal phases was dependent on pH and colloid concentration. Mass balances showed conservative transports for Ca, Mg, Mn, SO4, and dissolved silica through the two mixing zones and small losses (water column.

  8. Particle-bound metal transport after removal of a small dam in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pawtuxet River in Rhode Island, USA, has a long history of industrial activity and pollutant discharges. Metal contamination of the river sediments is well documented and historically exceeded toxicity thresholds for a variety of organisms. The Pawtuxet River dam, a low-head dam at the mouth of the river, was removed in August 2011. The removal of the dam was part of an effort to restore the riverine ecosystem after centuries of anthropogenic impact. Sediment traps were deployed below the dam to assess changes in metal concentrations and fluxes (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from the river system into Pawtuxet Cove. Sediment traps were deployed for an average duration of 24 days each, and deployments continued for 15 months after the dam was removed. Metal concentrations in the trapped suspended particulate matter dropped after dam removal (e.g., 460 to 276 mg/kg for Zn) and remained below preremoval levels for most of the study. However, particle-bound metal fluxes increased immediately after dam removal (e.g., 1206 to 4248 g/day for Zn). Changes in flux rates during the study period indicated that river volumetric flow rates acted as the primary mechanism controlling the flux of metals into Pawtuxet Cove and ultimately upper Narragansett Bay. Even though suspended particulate matter metal concentrations initially dropped after removal of the dam, no discernable effect on the concentration or flux of the study metals exiting the river could be associa

  9. Electronic, magnetic and transport properties of transition metal-doped holely C2N-h2D nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing-Jing; Guo, Yan-Dong; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Zeng, Hong-Li

    2018-01-01

    A novel layered two-dimensional graphene-like material C2N-h2D with evenly distributed holes and nitrogen atoms has been synthesized via a bottom-up wet-chemical reaction [Nat. Commun. 6, 6486 (2015)]. The presence of holes provides a ground for further functionalization by doping. By performing a first-principles study, we have doped transition metals at the center of the holes of C2N-h2D nanoribbons and explored their doping effects on electronic, magnetic and transport properties. It is found that the doping can essentially regulate the electronic properties of C2N-h2D nanoribbons. The metallic zigzag ribbon is tuned into a semiconductor for Mn, Fe and Co-doped cases, but half-metal for Ni-doping. This transition is derived from the peculiar band morphology which has a big band gap between the edge state and the higher band, so when the energy of the edge state is reduced by the impurity state, the band gap falls too and crosses the Fermi level. In contrast, the pristine semiconducting armchair C2N-h2D nanoribbon is changed into metallic. Different from the zigzag case, its physical mechanism originates from the hybridization of 3 d orbitals of transition metal atoms and the p orbitals of carbon and nitrogen atoms which introduces several resonant peaks at the Fermi level in the density of states. Furthermore, the magnetic moments of all doped materials are enhanced compared to the pristine structures but decrease as the atomic number of the transition metal atom increases. And the spin polarization of armchair C2N-h2D nanoribbon is increased, while that of the zigzag structure is decreased except the Ni-doped one which is completely spin-polarized suggesting great prospects in the future of spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  10. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-03-21

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  11. Thermodynamic Studies of Cu(I) and Other d10 Metal Ions Binding to Proteins in the Copper Homeostasis Pathway and the Organomercurial Detoxification Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Michael James

    Copper(I) is the predominant oxidation state of this essential metal in living cells due to reducing intracellular conditions. Because of deleterious copper-mediated Fenton chemistry, intracellular copper trafficking pathways involve strict regulation by metallochaperone proteins. Previous studies of the 68-residue metallochaperone, HAH1, have shown that it coordinates Cu(I) with two cysteines for transport from Ctr1 in the cell membrane to ATPases in the Golgi network. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and methods to suppress oxidation and disproportionation of Cu(I), the thermodynamics of Cu(I), as well as other metal ions, binding to HAH1 have been accurately quantified. During the course of this study, the Cu(I) binding thermodynamics with the stabilizing ligand hexamethyltrien were determined in order to accurately quantify the Cu(I) binding thermodynamics with proteins, and revealed an unexpected Cu(I) coordination chemistry with this ligand. In addition, HAH1 binding the Cu(I) analogue Ag(I), the abundant cellular metal ion Zn(II), and the thiophilic toxic metal ion Hg(II), have been quantified. The binding thermodynamics of these metal ions were also determined in the presence of glutathione to more accurately model physiological conditions. HAH1 has a high affinity for Cu(I), which is both enthalpically and entropically favorable. It has a substantially lower affinity for Zn(II), which is entropically favored, suggesting that Zn(II) is not able to compete with Cu(I) for HAH1 in vivo. However, HAH1 has an exceptionally high affinity for Hg(II), with its larger thiophilicity, and it will displace Cu(I). Mercury(II) and particularly organomercurial compounds are very toxic, yet proteins from the bacterial mer operon provide resistance to this toxicity. In particular, the organomercurial lyase MerB, whose only known structural homologue is a putative copper metallochaperone, is responsible for cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of MeHg(II) and

  12. Alkylsulfonates as probes of uncoupling protein transport mechanism. Ion pair transport demonstrates that direct H(+) translocation by UCP1 is not necessary for uncoupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jabůrek, M.; Vařecha, M.; Ježek, Petr; Garlid, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 34 (2001), s. 31897-31905 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5011106 Grant - others:NIH(US) DK56273 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : mitochondrial uncoupling proteins * alkylsulfonates * ion pair transport Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 7.258, year: 2001

  13. Heavy metal transport by humic acid in underground water - investigations on europium; Untersuchungen zum huminstoffgetragenen Schwermetall-Transport im unterirdischen Wasser - durchgefuehrt am Beispiel des Europiums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, D. (ed.)

    2001-12-01

    Colloids, i.e. particulates of 1 nm to 1 {mu}m suspended in water, are found in all types of groundwater, either as organic colloids, inorganic colloids, or mixtures of both. Their concentration, chemical composition, structure and particle size varies with the geochemistry of the sediment-water system. Inorganic colloids are Al-Fe-Mn mixed oxides, clays and other complex minerals. Organic colloids consist of humic and fulvic acids which are the main constituent of the dissolved organic carbon. Humic acids are capable of forming metal humate complexes with metal ions via proton-exchanging groups. Radionuclides, too, are transported with humic acid, especially trivalent and multivalent metal ions of the lanthanides and actinides as well as radio-iodine. [German] In allen Grundwaessern werden Kolloide, d.h. im Wasser suspendierte Teilchen mit Durchmessern im Bereich 1 nm bis 1 {mu}m gefunden. Die Zusammensetzung der Kolloide kann sowohl organischer als auch anorganischer Natur sein, wobei in vielen Grundwaessern eine Mischung beider Kolloidarten auftritt. Die Konzentration, die chemische Zusammensetzung, die Struktur und die Teilchengroesse natuerlicher Kolloide variieren stark, sie sind abhaengig von der Geochemie des Sediment-Wasser-Systems. Anorganische Kolloide sind Al-Fe-Mn-Mischoxide, Tone and andere komplexe Mineralien. Organische Kolloide bestehen aus Humin- und Fulvinsaeuren; diese Huminstoffe bilden den Hauptbestandteil des geloesten organischen Kohlenstoffs. Eine wichtige Eigenschaft der Huminstoffe ist ihre Faehigkeit, mit Metallionen ueber protonenaustauschende Gruppen Komplexe - sog. Metall-Humate - zu bilden. Auch Radionuklide, insbesondere drei- und mehrwertige Metallionen der Lanthaniden und Actiniden sowie Radio-Iod werden an Huminstoffe gebunden. Damit koennen Radionuklide nicht nur in Form einfacher Spezies, sondern auch huminstoffgebunden transportiert werden. (orig.)

  14. Prion protein and its interactions with metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+) and metallothionein 3

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttkay - Nedecky, Branislav; Sedlackova, Eliska; Chudobova, Dagmar; Cihalova, Kristyna; Jimenez Jimenez, Ana Maria; Krizkova, Sona; Richtera, Lukas; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The effects of heavy metals (Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Cd2+) on Escherichia coli expressing either prion (hPrPC ) or metallothionein 3 (MT-3) brain proteins capable of binding these metals were investigated. The expression of hPrPC or MT-3 in E.coli was confirmed using western-blot and dot-blot methods. After analyzing growth curves, we found that bacteria expressing prion protein better tolerated the presence of Zn2+ in comparison with wild-type bacteria and bacteria expressing MT-3. The addition o...

  15. Uncovering Arabidopsis membrane protein interactome enriched in transporters using mating-based split ubiquitin assays and classification models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin eChen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput data are a double-edged sword; for the benefit of large amount of data, there is an associated cost of noise. To increase reliability and scalability of high-throughput protein interaction data generation, we tested the efficacy of classification to enrich potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs. We applied this method to identify interactions among Arabidopsis membrane proteins enriched in transporters. We validated our method with multiple retests. Classification improved the quality of the ensuing interaction network and was effective in reducing the search space and increasing true positive rate. The final network of 541 interactions among 239 proteins (of which 179 are transporters is the first protein interaction network enriched in membrane transporters reported for any organism. This network has similar topological attributes to other published protein interaction networks. It also extends and fills gaps in currently available biological networks in plants and allows building a number of hypotheses about processes and mechanisms involving signal-transduction and transport systems.

  16. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrapetov Marina K

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1 binds to ATP, and the other (M2 acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator.

  17. Metal-assisted and microwave accelerated-evaporative crystallization: Application to lysozyme protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauge-Lewis, Kevin

    In response to the growing need for new crystallization techniques that afford for rapid processing times along with control over crystal size and distribution, the Aslan Research Group has recently demonstrated the use of Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization MA-MAEC technique in conjunction with metal nanoparticles and nanostructures for the crystallization of amino acids and organic small molecules. In this study, we have employed the newly developed MA-MAEC technique to the accelerated crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme on circular crystallization platforms in order to demonstrate the proof-of-principle application of the method for protein crystallization. The circular crystallization platforms are constructed in-house from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and silver nanoparticle films (SNFs), indium tin oxide (ITO) and iron nano-columns. In this study, we prove the MA-MAEC method to be a more effective technique in the rapid crystallization of macromolecules in comparison to other conventional methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of the novel iCrystal system, which incorporates the use of continuous, low wattage heating to facilitate the rapid crystallization of the lysozyme while still retaining excellent crystal quality. With the incorporation of the iCrystal system, we observe crystallization times that are even shorter than those produced by the MA-MAEC technique using a conventional microwave oven in addition to significantly improved crystal quality.

  18. Metal-enhanced fluorescent detection for protein microarrays based on a silver plasmonic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Min; Qiang, Weibing; Hu, Hongting; Li, Wei; Xu, Danke

    2014-04-07

    This paper presents an ultrasensitive fluorescent detection method through fabricating a silver microarray substrate. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and Ag@Au core-shell nanoparticles with different sizes were first synthesized by a seed-mediated growth method and the metal-enhanced fluorescence of these nanoparticles on different fluorescent dyes was investigated. The results indicated that AgNPs could act as a versatile and effective metal-enhanced fluorescence material for various fluorophores, whereas the enhanced fluorescence from Ag@Au was limited only to certain fluorophores. When the AgNPs were functionalized with aptamers and fluorescent dyes, a good analytical performance for simultaneous detection of human IgE and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) could be obtained. AgNPs were not only used as detection tags but also used to fabricate the plasmonic microarray substrate to further enhance the sensitivity of fluorescent detection. As a result, a linear response to PDGF-BB concentration was obtained in the concentration range of 16 pg mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1), and the detection limit was 3.2 pg mL(-1). In addition, the AgNP modified plasmonic microarrays showed remarkable recovery and no significant interference from human serum when applied to 2 ng mL(-1) PDGF-BB concentration. The plasmonic microarray substrate demonstrated both high specificity and sensitivity for protein microarray detection and this novel approach has great potential for ultrasensitive detection of protein biomarkers in the bio-medical field.

  19. Electromagnetic control of heat transport within a rectangular channel filled with flowing liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestov, M.; Kolemen, E.; Fisher, A. E.; Hvasta, M. G.

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of free-surface, liquid-metal flows exposed to both magnetic fields and an injected electric current is investigated via experiment and numerical simulations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an experimental and theoretical proof-of-concept for enhanced thermal mixing within fast-flowing, free-surface, liquid-metal plasma facing components that could be used in next-generation fusion reactors. The enhanced hydrodynamic and thermal mixing induced by non-uniform current density near the electrodes appears to improve heat transfer through the thickness of the flowing metal. Also, the outflow heat flux profile is strongly affected by the impact of the J  ×  B forces on flow velocity. The experimental results are compared to COMSOL simulations in order to lay the groundwork for future liquid-metal research.

  20. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  1. Fate and transport of metals in H2S-rich waters at a treatment wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frandsen Angela K

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous geochemistry of Zn, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mn and As is discussed within the context of an anaerobic treatment wetland in Butte, Montana. The water being treated had a circum-neutral pH with high concentrations of trace metals and sulfate. Reducing conditions in the wetland substrate promoted bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR and precipitation of dissolved metal as sulfide minerals. ZnS was the most common sulfide phase found, and consisted of framboidal clusters of individual spheres with diameters in the submicron range. Some of the ZnS particles passed through the subsurface flow, anaerobic cells in suspended form. The concentration of "dissolved" trace metals (passing through a 0.45 μm filter was monitored as a function of H2S concentration, and compared to predicted solubilities based on experimental studies of aqueous metal complexation with dissolved sulfide. Whereas the theoretical predictions produce "U-shaped" solubility curves as a function of H2S, the field data show a flat dependence of metal concentration on H2S. Observed metal concentrations for Zn, Cu and Cd were greater than the predicted values, particularly at low H2S concentration, whereas Mn and As were undersaturated with their respective metal sulfides. Results from this study show that water treatment facilities employing BSR have the potential to mobilize arsenic out of mineral substrates at levels that may exceed regulatory criteria. Dissolved iron was close to equilibrium saturation with amorphous FeS at the higher range of sulfide concentrations observed (>0.1 mmol H2S, but was more likely constrained by goethite at lower H2S levels. Inconsistencies between our field results and theoretical predictions may be due to several problems, including: (i a lack of understanding of the form, valence, and thermodynamic stability of poorly crystalline metal sulfide precipitates; (ii the possible influence of metal sulfide colloids imparting an erroneously high "dissolved

  2. A comparative study of the proton transport properties of metal (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The transport of protons (H+) between relatively stationary host anions is termed the 'Grothus' or 'free-proton mechanism'. Transport by any of other species is termed as a 'vehicle mechanism'.3 In solids, vehicle mechanisms are usually restricted to materials with open structures (channels, layers) to allow passage of the ...

  3. Quantitative fluorescence loss in photobleaching for analysis of protein transport and aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüstner Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP is a widely used imaging technique, which provides information about protein dynamics in various cellular regions. In FLIP, a small cellular region is repeatedly illuminated by an intense laser pulse, while images are taken with reduced laser power with a time lag between the bleaches. Despite its popularity, tools are lacking for quantitative analysis of FLIP experiments. Typically, the user defines regions of interest (ROIs for further analysis which is subjective and does not allow for comparing different cells and experimental settings. Results We present two complementary methods to detect and quantify protein transport and aggregation in living cells from FLIP image series. In the first approach, a stretched exponential (StrExp function is fitted to fluorescence loss (FL inside and outside the bleached region. We show by reaction–diffusion simulations, that the StrExp function can describe both, binding/barrier–limited and diffusion-limited FL kinetics. By pixel-wise regression of that function to FL kinetics of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, we determined in a user-unbiased manner from which cellular regions eGFP can be replenished in the bleached area. Spatial variation in the parameters calculated from the StrExp function allow for detecting diffusion barriers for eGFP in the nucleus and cytoplasm of living cells. Polyglutamine (polyQ disease proteins like mutant huntingtin (mtHtt can form large aggregates called inclusion bodies (IB’s. The second method combines single particle tracking with multi-compartment modelling of FL kinetics in moving IB’s to determine exchange rates of eGFP-tagged mtHtt protein (eGFP-mtHtt between aggregates and the cytoplasm. This method is self-calibrating since it relates the FL inside and outside the bleached regions. It makes it therefore possible to compare release kinetics of eGFP-mtHtt between different cells and

  4. Specific, sensitive, high-resolution detection of protein molecules in eukaryotic cells using metal-tagging transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina; Sanmartín-Conesa, Eva; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.; Seybold, Volker; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary More than any other methodology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has contributed to our understanding of the architecture and organization of cells. With current detection limits approaching atomic resolution, it will ultimately become possible to ultrastructurally image intracellular macromolecular assemblies in situ. Presently, however, methods to unambiguously identify proteins within the crowded environment of the cell’s interior are lagging behind. We describe a novel approach, metal-tagging TEM (METTEM) that allows detection of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells with high specificity, exceptional sensitivity and at molecular scale resolution. In live cells treated with gold salts, proteins bearing a small metal-binding tag will form 1-nm gold nanoclusters, readily detectable in electron micrographs. The applicability and strength of METTEM is demonstrated by a study of Rubella virus replicase and capsid proteins, which revealed virus-induced cell structures not seen before. PMID:22579245

  5. Evaluation of the effect of divalent metal transporter 1 gene polymorphism on blood iron, lead and cadmium levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha, E-mail: kayaalti@ankara.edu.tr; Akyüzlü, Dilek Kaya; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-02-15

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a member of the proton-coupled metal ion transporter family, mediates transport of ferrous iron from the lumen of the intestine into the enterocyte and export of iron from endocytic vesicles. It has an affinity not only for iron but also for other divalent cations including manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc. DMT1 is encoded by the SLC11a2 gene that is located on chromosome 12q13 in humans and express four major mammalian isoforms (1A/+IRE, 1A/-IRE, 2/+IRE and 2/-IRE). Mutations or polymorphisms of DMT1 gene may have an impact on human health by disturbing metal trafficking. To study the possible association of DMT1 gene with the blood levels of some divalent cations such as iron, lead and cadmium, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (IVS4+44C/A) in DMT1 gene was investigated in 486 unrelated and healthy individuals in a Turkish population by method of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). The genotype frequencies were found as 49.8% homozygote typical (CC), 38.3% heterozygote (CA) and 11.9% homozygote atypical (AA). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system and the average levels of iron, lead and cadmium in the blood samples were 446.01±81.87 ppm, 35.59±17.72 ppb and 1.25±0.87 ppb, respectively. Individuals with the CC genotype had higher blood iron, lead and cadmium levels than those with AA and CA genotypes. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism in the DMT1 gene and iron and lead levels (p=0.001 and p=0.036, respectively), but no association was found with cadmium level (p=0.344). This study suggested that DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, lead and cadmium levels. - Highlights: • DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, cadmium and lead levels.

  6. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum-Ho Bin

    Full Text Available The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP. Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4. However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH.

  7. Vesicle amine transport protein-1 (VAT-1) is upregulated in glioblastomas and promotes migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, S; Becker, M; Lichota, A; Paulus, W; Senner, V

    2009-08-01

    Diffuse invasion of single-glioma cells is the main obstacle to successful therapy of these tumours. After identifying vesicle amine transport protein-1 (VAT-1) as being upregulated in invasive human gliomas, we study its possible function in glioblastoma cell migration. Based on data obtained from previous oligonucleotide arrays, we investigated expression of VAT-1 in glioblastoma tissue and cell lines on mRNA levels using reverse transcriptase PCR. Furthermore, we examined the amount and localization of VAT-1 protein using immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Using small interfering RNA technology we repressed VAT-1 expression in human glioma cell lines and analysed their migration using wound healing and transwell migration assays. Increased VAT-1 mRNA and protein levels were found in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines compared with normal human brain. Small interfering RNA-mediated VAT-1 knockdown led to significantly reduced migration of human glioma cells. VAT-1 is overexpressed in glioblastomas and functionally involved in glioma cell migration, representing a new component involved in glioma invasion

  8. Novel bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine ligand-bonded stationary phase with reduced leakage of metal ions in immobilized metal affinity chromatography of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Chunmiao; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-11-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been widely used for the specific separation of biopolymers. However, leakage of metal ions from IMAC adsorbents is of concern in IMAC. In this study, we designed a novel tridenate bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine (BMTA) to reduce the leakage of metal ions by improving the affinity to immobilized metal ions. The ligand was bonded onto silica via three-step reaction to prepare a high-performance IMAC stationary phase. The chromatographic behaviors of ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, and lysozyme on the Cu(II)-, Ni(II)-, and Zn(II)-chelated stationary phase were investigated with respect to pH effect and elution with an imidazole gradient. The retention times of these three proteins increased by increasing the pH of the mobile phase but decreased by increasing the concentration of the competitive displacer. The retaining strength of the three proteins on the chelated stationary phase were in the order Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Zn(II). The behavior of these three proteins was consistent with the properties of a typical IMAC. The BMTA ligand exhibited a much stronger affinity for Cu(II) and Ni(II) than iminodiacetic acid (IDA), which is often regarded as a standard tridentate IMAC ligand. Quantum mechanical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G level were used to image the coordination mode of the protein-metal ions-BMTA complex. In addition, a fused histidine-tagged cecropin b-human epidermal growth factor (CB-EGF) from Escherichia coli crude extract was purified by the Ni(II)-chelated stationary phase, and the purity of the CB-EGF was determined to be at least 90 %. These results suggest that the BMTA ligand may have potential applications in the preparation of therapeutics. Graphical Abstract A novel ligand of tridenate bis(5-methyltetrazolium)amine (BMTA) was designed to reduce the leakage of metal ions from the column in immobolized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC).

  9. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  10. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-06-01

    Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will require understanding the effects of carbon and electron flow through these environments. Important aspects of this flow include the physiological activity of cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microbial populations, as well as the subsequent activity of metal and radionuclide reducing bacteria. The activity of subsurface fermentative microbial populations is significantly understudied even though these organisms can affect contaminant migration by at least two mechanisms. In the first mechanism, products of the fermentation process can act as chelators for metals and radionuclides increasing their transport through underlying geological media. The second mechanism is the reduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides since some fermentative bacteria have been shown to directly reduce metals and radionuclides, while their fermentation products can provide carbon and energy for respiratory metal reducing bacteria that can also reduce oxidized metals and radionuclides.

  11. Divalent metal transporter 1 regulates iron-mediated ROS and pancreatic ß cell fate in response to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tonnesen, Morten Fog; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard

    2012-01-01

    knockout islets is defective, highlighting a physiological role of iron and ROS in the regulation of insulin secretion. Dmt1 knockout mice are protected against multiple low-dose streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Thus, ß cells......Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to target-cell damage in inflammatory and iron-overload diseases. Little is known about iron transport regulation during inflammatory attack. Through a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1ß induces...... divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression correlating with increased ß cell iron content and ROS production. Iron chelation and siRNA and genetic knockdown of DMT1 expression reduce cytokine-induced ROS formation and cell death. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the absence of cytokines in Dmt1...

  12. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  13. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  14. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-30

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  15. Metal diagenesis and transport in coastal sediments around Penang Island, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood; Zaharudin Ahmad; Noor Azhar Md Shazili; Rosnan Yaakob; Carpenter, R.

    2004-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in concentrations of several metals and isotopes in sediment cores from around Penang Island, an area with economically important biological resources off the northwest coast of peninsular Malaysia, are reported. Because of a typical, monazite rich mineralogy in surrounding drainage basins, sedimentary metal enrichment factors relative to global average materials, enrichment factors (EFs) of >1.0 do not always indicate significant anthropogenic metal inputs. Because of extensive metal solubilization in the hot, organic carbon rich area, EFs of < 1.0 may be observed for several metals despite significant anthropogenic contributions. Comparison of metal-Al relationships in Penang area surface sediments with those in nearby and presumed uncontaminated Strait of Malacca sediments more accurately correct for atypical regional solubilization and mineralogical effects than comparison to global average materials. Such comparisons show concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, As, Sb, Zn and V have changed by less than a factor of two by anthropogenic discharges. Sedimentary concentration profiles of Pb, Zn and Cu, ratioed to Sc to normalize for variations in grain size and mineralogy, have subsurface maxima suggestive of modest and recently reduced anthropogenic inputs. Mn, U, As and Sb have Sc-normalized concentration profiles clearly affected by digenetic processes. Sc-normalized profiles of Cr, Th, Ce and Sm show only small changes with depth, confirming insignificant anthropogenic inputs and undetectable post depositional digenetic mobility. Excess 210-Pb activities and fluxes in Penang area sediments are limited by supply of this radionuclide, in contrast to sediments of both the northwestern USA. and Amazon continental shelves, where they are limited by particle scavenging reactions. 210-Pb activities in sediments of the shallow, dynamic Penang area often show erratic or unconvincing changes with depth that cannot be reliably modeled by

  16. Effect of complete protein 4.1R deficiency on ion transport properties of murine erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Alicia; De Franceschi, Lucia; Peters, Luanne L.; Gascard, Philippe; Mohandas, Narla; Brugnara, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Moderate hemolytic anemia, abnormal erythrocyte morphology (spherocytosis), and decreased membrane stability are observed in mice with complete deficiency of all erythroid protein 4.1 protein isoforms (4.1-/-; Shi TS et al., J. Clin. Invest. 103:331,1999). We have examined the effects of erythroid protein 4.1 (4.1R) deficiency on erythrocyte cation transport and volume regulation. 4.1-/- mice exhibited erythrocyte dehydration that was associated with reduced cellular K and increased Na content. Increased Na permeability was observed in these mice, mostly mediated by Na/H exchange with normal Na-K pump and Na-K-2Cl cotransport activities. The Na/H exchange of 4.1-/- erythrocytes was markedly activated by exposure to hypertonic conditions (18.2+- 3.2 in 4.1 -/- vs.9.8 +- 1.3 mmol/1013 cell x h in control mice), with an abnormal dependence on osmolarity, (K0.5=417 +- 42 in 4.1 -/- vs. 460 +- 35 mOsmin control mice) suggestive of an up-regulated functional state. While the affinity for internal protons was not altered (K0.5= 489.7 +- 0.7 vs.537.0 +- 0.56 nM in control mice), the Vmax of the H-induced Na/H exchange activity was markedly elevated in 4.1-/- erythrocytes Vmax 91.47 Moderate hemolytic anemia, abnormal erythrocyte morphology (spherocytosis), and decreased membrane stability are observed in mice with complete deficiency of all erythroid protein 4.1 protein isoforms (4.1-/-; Shi TSet al., J. Clin. Invest. 103:331,1999). We have examined the effects of erythroid protein 4.1 (4.1R) deficiency on erythrocyte cation transport and volume regulation. 4.1-/- mice exhibited erythrocyte dehydration that was associated with reduced cellular K and increased Na content. Increased Na permeability was observed in these mice, mostly mediated by Na/H exchange with normal Na-K pump and Na-K-2Cl cotransport activities. The Na/H exchange of 4.1-/- erythrocytes was markedly activated by exposure to hypertonic conditions (18.2 +- 3.2 in 4.1 -/- vs. 9.8 +- 1.3mmol/1013 cell x h in

  17. Metal binding is critical for the folding and function of laminin binding protein, Lmb of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Ragunathan

    Full Text Available Lmb is a 34 kDa laminin binding surface adhesin of Streptococcus agalactiae. The structure of Lmb reported by us recently has shown that it consists of a metal binding crevice, in which a zinc ion is coordinated to three highly conserved histidines. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the metal ion in Lmb, these histidines have been mutated to alanine and single, double and triple mutants were generated. These mutations resulted in insolubility of the protein and revealed altered secondary and tertiary structures, as evidenced by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy studies. The mutations also significantly decreased the binding affinity of Lmb to laminin, implicating the role played by the metal binding residues in maintaining the correct conformation of the protein for its binding to laminin. A highly disordered loop, proposed to be crucial for metal acquisition in homologous structures, was deleted in Lmb by mutation (ΔLmb and its crystal structure was solved at 2.6 Å. The ΔLmb structure was identical to the native Lmb structure with a bound zinc ion and exhibited laminin binding activity similar to wild type protein, suggesting that the loop might not have an important role in metal acquisition or adhesion in Lmb. Targeted mutations of histidine residues confirmed the importance of the zinc binding crevice for the structure and function of the Lmb adhesin.

  18. Anomalous transport phenomena in Weyl metal beyond the Drude model for Landauʼs Fermi liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Kim, Heon-Jung; Sasaki, M.; Wang, J.-F.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Landau's Fermi-liquid theory is the standard model for metals, characterized by the existence of electron quasiparticles near a Fermi surface as long as Landau's interaction parameters lie below critical values for instabilities. Recently this fundamental paradigm has been challenged by the physics of strong spin-orbit coupling, although the concept of electron quasiparticles remains valid near the Fermi surface, where Landau's Fermi-liquid theory fails to describe the electromagnetic properties of this novel metallic state, referred to as Weyl metal. A novel ingredient is that such a Fermi surface encloses a Weyl point with definite chirality, referred to as a chiral Fermi surface, which can arise from breaking of either time reversal or inversion symmetry in systems with strong spin-orbit coupling, responsible for both the Berry curvature and the chiral anomaly. As a result, electromagnetic properties of the Weyl metallic state are described not by conventional Maxwell equations but by axion electrodynamics, where Maxwell equations are modified with a topological-in-origin spatially modulated θ ({\\boldsymbol{r}} ){\\boldsymbol{E}} \\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}} term. This novel metallic state was realized recently in Bi1-xSbx around x˜ 3% under magnetic fields, where the Dirac spectrum appears around the critical point between the normal semiconducting (x\\lt 3%) and topological semiconducting phases (x\\gt 3%) and the time reversal symmetry breaking perturbation causes the Dirac point to split into a pair of Weyl points along the direction of the applied magnetic field for a very strong spin-orbit coupled system. In this review article, we discuss how the topological structure of both the Berry curvature and the chiral anomaly (axion electrodynamics) gives rise to anomalous transport phenomena in B{{i}1-x}Sbx around x˜ 3% under magnetic fields, thus modifying the Drude model of Landau's Fermi liquids.

  19. Bioaccumulation of silver and the isolation of metal-binding protein from P.diminuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharah Ibrahim

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A silver uptake study by Pseudomonas diminuta was carried out by growing the bacteria in a chloride-free medium (CFM containing silver ions (50 muM in a batch culture. From the results, it was found that higher amounts of silver were accumulated inside the cell during early exponential phase compared to the amount bound at the cell surface. This suggested a possible mechanism for metal uptake during bacterial growth. In view of this, attempts were made to isolate proteins which might be associated with silver-binding properties from cultures of P.diminuta grown in the presence and absence of silver. The proteins were first extracted from the bacterial cultures by precipitation with ammonium sulfate followed by purification using isoelectric focussing and SDS-PAGE. Results of the experiment showed the presence of low molecular weight and high molecular weight proteins containing silver with pI values ranging from 2.0 to 9.0 for bacteria grown in the presence of silver.Um estudo sobre o crescimento de Pseudomonas diminuta em um meio contendo cloreto livre (CFM e íons de prata na concentração (50 µM em uma cultura em batelada. Os resultados demonstraram que grandes quantidades de prata foram acumuladas dentro da célula durante a fase exponencial de crescimento comparada à uma quantidade limitada na superfície da célula. Isto sugeriu um mecanismo captação do metal durante o crescimento bacteriano. Em vista disto, tentativas foram realizadas no sentido de isolar as proteínas relacionadas com a propriedade de se ligar a prata em cultura P.diminuta em um meio contendo ou não íons prata. As proteínas foram extraídas das culturas bacterianas pela precipitação com o sulfato do amônio seguido de sua purificação utilizando um focalizador isoelétrico e SDS-PAGE. Os resultados desta experiência mostraram a presença de proteínas de alto e baixo peso molecular contendo prata com pI variando entre 2,0 a 9,0 quando as bactérias crescem na

  20. Ischemic postconditioning influences electron transport chain protein turnover in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia postconditioning (IPo is a promising strategy in reducing myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury (MIRI, but its specific molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to global I/R and received IPo in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD. Myocardial mitochondria were extracted and mitochondrial comparative proteomics was analyzed. IPo significantly reduces post-ischemic myocardial infarction and improved cardiac function in I/R rat hearts, while 5-HD basically cancelled IPo’s myocardial protective effect. Joint application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE and MALDI-TOF MS identified eight differentially expressed proteins between groups. Expression of cardiac succinate dehydrogenase (ubiquinone flavoprotein subunit (SDHA increased more than two-fold after I/R, while IPo led to overexpression of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone flavoprotein 1 and isoform CRA_b (NDUFV1. When the mitoKATP was blocked, MICOS complex subunit Mic60 (IMMT and Stress-70 protein (Grp75 were over expressed, while DLDH, ATPase subunit A (ATPA and rCG44606 were decreased. Seven of the differential proteins belong to electron transport chain (ETC or metabolism regulating proteins, and five of them were induced by closing mitoKATP in I/R hearts. We thus conclude that IPo’s myocardial protective effect relies on energy homeostasis regulation. DLD, SDHA, NDUFV1, Grp75, ATPA and rCG44606 may contribute to IPo’s cardial protective effect.

  1. Ischemic postconditioning influences electron transport chain protein turnover in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Liu, Yun; Wang, Haiying; Mao, Xiaowen; Chen, Jincong; Liu, Jiming; Xia, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xingkui; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia postconditioning (IPo) is a promising strategy in reducing myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury (MIRI), but its specific molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to global I/R and received IPo in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD). Myocardial mitochondria were extracted and mitochondrial comparative proteomics was analyzed. IPo significantly reduces post-ischemic myocardial infarction and improved cardiac function in I/R rat hearts, while 5-HD basically cancelled IPo's myocardial protective effect. Joint application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) and MALDI-TOF MS identified eight differentially expressed proteins between groups. Expression of cardiac succinate dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein subunit (SDHA) increased more than two-fold after I/R, while IPo led to overexpression of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 1 and isoform CRA_b (NDUFV1). When the mitoKATP was blocked, MICOS complex subunit Mic60 (IMMT) and Stress-70 protein (Grp75) were over expressed, while DLDH, ATPase subunit A (ATPA) and rCG44606 were decreased. Seven of the differential proteins belong to electron transport chain (ETC) or metabolism regulating proteins, and five of them were induced by closing mitoKATP in I/R hearts. We thus conclude that IPo's myocardial protective effect relies on energy homeostasis regulation. DLD, SDHA, NDUFV1, Grp75, ATPA and rCG44606 may contribute to IPo's cardial protective effect.

  2. Size effects and charge transport in metals: Quantum theory of the resistivity of nanometric metallic structures arising from electron scattering by grain boundaries and by rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Raul C.; Arenas, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    We discuss recent progress regarding size effects and their incidence upon the coefficients describing charge transport (resistivity, magnetoresistance, and Hall effect) induced by electron scattering from disordered grain boundaries and from rough surfaces on metallic nanostructures; we review recent measurements of the magneto transport coefficients that elucidate the electron scattering mechanisms at work. We review as well theoretical developments regarding quantum transport theories that allow calculating the increase in resistivity induced by electron-rough surface scattering (in the absence of grain boundaries) from first principles—from the parameters that describe the surface roughness that can be measured with a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). We evaluate the predicting power of the quantum version of the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory and of the model proposed by Calecki, abandoning the method of parameter fitting used for decades, but comparing instead theoretical predictions with resistivity measured in thin films where surface roughness has also been measured with a STM, and where electron-grain boundary scattering can be neglected. We also review the theory of Mayadas and Shatzkes (MS) [Phys. Rev. B 1, 1382 (1970)] used for decades, and discuss its severe conceptual difficulties that arise out of the fact that: (i) MS employed plane waves to describe the electronic states within the metal sample having periodic grain boundaries, rather than the Bloch states known since the thirties to be the solutions of the Schrödinger equation describing electrons propagating through a Krönig-Penney [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 130, 499 (1931)] periodic potential; (ii) MS ignored the fact that the wave functions describing electrons propagating through a 1-D disordered potential are expected to decay exponentially with increasing distance, a fact known since the work of Anderson [Phys. Rev. 109, 1492 (1958)] in 1958 for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in

  3. The Human Synaptic Vesicle Protein, SV2A, Functions as a Galactose Transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae * ♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Marianna; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2014-01-01

    SV2A is a synaptic vesicle membrane protein expressed in neurons and endocrine cells and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. Although the exact function of SV2A still remains elusive, it was identified as the specific binding site for levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug. Our sequence analysis demonstrates that SV2A has significant homology with several yeast transport proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Many of these transporters are involved in sugar transport into yeast cells. Here we present evidence showing, for the first time, that SV2A is a galactose transporter. We expressed human SV2A in hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells and demonstrated that these cells are able to grow on galactose-containing medium but not on other fermentable carbon sources. Furthermore, the addition of the SV2A-binding antiepileptic drug levetiracetam to the medium inhibited the galactose-dependent growth of hexose transport-deficient EBY.VW4000 yeast cells expressing human SV2A. Most importantly, direct measurement of galactose uptake in the same strain verified that SV2A is able to transport extracellular galactose inside the cells. The newly identified galactose transport capability of SV2A may have an important role in regulating/modulating synaptic function. PMID:25326386

  4. Metallodynameric membranes--are metallic ions facilitating the transport of CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Macron, Thomas; Gilles, Arnaud; Charmette, Christophe; Sanchez, Jose; Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-12-07

    The concomitant operation of dynamic covalent frameworks and metallodynamers results in the formation of selective Zn(2+)-based dynameric membranes for restrictive facilitated and selective transport of CO(2).

  5. FY17 Progress in Modeling of Lanthanide Transport in Metallic Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-19

    A critical review of fuel-clad-chemical interactions along with modelling requirements is published. The mechanism of lanthanide transport is studied experimentally (NEUP collaboration) and using simulations and initial results are published in Refs.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions. Final report, September 1, 1975-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, R.H.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the effects of various factors on the intestinal absorption of cadmium, zinc, arsenate and lead as well as the toxic effects of cadmium and lead on the intestinal transport of calcium. Intestinal cadmium absorption was influenced by many of the same factors which influence calcium transport, although there was no direct evidence for a common transport pathway. Cadmium inhibited the intestinal absorption of calcium, primarily at the intestinal level, since no effect on the cholecalciferol endocrine system was observed. Many similarities and differences were documented for intestinal lead and calcium transport, suggesting that these two cations share some of the same transport components. The effect of dietary lead was far more severe under conditions of dietary calcium restriction, effectively eliminating the adaptation response via the cholecalciferol endocrine system. This effect was attributed partially to lead inhibition of renal production of the active hormone, although direct inhibition, at the intestinal level, was also suggested. Several members of the troponin C family of calcium-binding proteins were shown to bind lead in preference to calcium, suggesting that many of the toxic manifestations of lead may be related to perturbation of calcium-mediated cellular processes. 110 refs

  7. A Conserved Metal Binding Motif in the Bacillus subtilis Competence Protein ComFA Enhances Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Scott S; Falbel, Tanya G; Hromada, Susan; Burton, Briana M

    2017-08-01

    Genetic competence is a process in which cells are able to take up DNA from their environment, resulting in horizontal gene transfer, a major mechanism for generating diversity in bacteria. Many bacteria carry homologs of the central DNA uptake machinery that has been well characterized in Bacillus subtilis It has been postulated that the B. subtilis competence helicase ComFA belongs to the DEAD box family of helicases/translocases. Here, we made a series of mutants to analyze conserved amino acid motifs in several regions of B. subtilis ComFA. First, we confirmed that ComFA activity requires amino acid residues conserved among the DEAD box helicases, and second, we show that a zinc finger-like motif consisting of four cysteines is required for efficient transformation. Each cysteine in the motif is important, and mutation of at least two of the cysteines dramatically reduces transformation efficiency. Further, combining multiple cysteine mutations with the helicase mutations shows an additive phenotype. Our results suggest that the helicase and metal binding functions are two distinct activities important for ComFA function during transformation. IMPORTANCE ComFA is a highly conserved protein that has a role in DNA uptake during natural competence, a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer observed in many bacteria. Investigation of the details of the DNA uptake mechanism is important for understanding the ways in which bacteria gain new traits from their environment, such as drug resistance. To dissect the role of ComFA in the DNA uptake machinery, we introduced point mutations into several motifs in the protein sequence. We demonstrate that several amino acid motifs conserved among ComFA proteins are important for efficient transformation. This report is the first to demonstrate the functional requirement of an amino-terminal cysteine motif in ComFA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  9. Sugar regulation of SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1 (STP1) expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise Lizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Alma Fabiola; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Sugars regulate the expression of many genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, sugars induce or repress the expression of >1800 genes, including the STP1 (SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1) gene, which encodes an H+/monosaccharide cotransporter. STP1 transcript levels decrease more rapidly after the addition of low concentrations of sugars than the levels of other repressed genes, such as DIN6 (DARK-INDUCED 6). We found that this regulation is exerted at the transcriptional level and is initiated by phosphorylatable sugars. Interestingly, the sugar signal that modulates STP1 expression is transmitted through a HEXOKINASE 1-independent signalling pathway. Finally, analysis of the STP1 5′ regulatory region allowed us to delimit a region of 309bp that contains the cis elements implicated in the glucose regulation of STP1 expression. Putative cis-acting elements involved in this response were identified. PMID:25281700

  10. Retinoblastoma-binding Protein 4-regulated Classical Nuclear Transport Is Involved in Cellular Senescence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a fundamental cellular process in eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrated that retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 (RBBP4) functions as a novel regulatory factor to increase the efficiency of importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. RBBP4 accelerates the release of importin β1 from importin α via competitive binding to the importin β-binding domain of importin α in the presence of RanGTP. Therefore, it facilitates importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. We showed that the importin α/β pathway is down-regulated in replicative senescent cells, concomitant with a decrease in RBBP4 level. Knockdown of RBBP4 caused both suppression of nuclear transport and induction of cellular senescence. This is the first report to identify a factor that competes with importin β1 to bind to importin α, and it demonstrates that the loss of this factor can trigger cellular senescence. PMID:26491019

  11. Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, J.D.; Moya, J.L.; McClure, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.; Golliher, K.G.

    1992-01-01

    A new design concept for a Type B transport packaging for transporting plutonium and uranium has been developed by the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The new design came about following a review of current packagings, projected future transportation needs, and current and future regulatory requirements. United States packaging, regulations specified in Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations Parts 173.416 and 173.417 (for fissile materials) offer parallel paths under the heading of authorized Type B packages for the