WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal tests

  1. Heavy Metal Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/heavymetalbloodtest.html Heavy Metal Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Heavy Metal Blood Test? A heavy metal blood test is a group ...

  2. LMET Mechanical testing in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    LMET is successfully developed to perform mechanical tests in heavy liquid metals up to 400 ° C. Fracture toughness tests and fatigue crack propagation tests are successfully performed. Tensile tests and fatigue tests applicability looks promising. With performing the precrack and the fracture toughness test in one sequence, wetting of the crack surface is assured. Data retrieved with LMET is reliable

  3. Methodology for testing metal detectors using variables test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, D.D.; Murray, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    By extracting and analyzing measurement (variables) data from portal metal detectors whenever possible instead of the more typical ``alarm``/``no-alarm`` (attributes or binomial) data, we can be more informed about metal detector health with fewer tests. This testing methodology discussed in this report is an alternative to the typical binomial testing and in many ways is far superior.

  4. Assembly for testing weldability of sheet metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S.A.; Woodhouse, J.J.

    A test assembly for determining the weldability of sheet metal includes (1) a circular plate having an annular groove in one side thereof, a counterbore being formed in the outer wall of said groove and the surface portion of said base circumscribed by the inner wall of said groove being coplanar with the bottom of said counterbore, (2) a test disk of sheet metal the periphery of which is positioned in said counterbore and the outer surface of which is coplanar with said one side of said base, and (3) means for holding the periphery of said test disk against the bottom of said counterbore.

  5. Recent metal fuel safety tests in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Lo, R.K.; Robinson, W.R.; Palm, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In-reactor safety tests have been performed on metal-alloy reactor fuel to study its response to transient-overpower conditions, in particular, the margin to cladding breach and the axial self-extrusion of fuel within intact cladding. Uranium-fissium EBR-II driver fuel elements of several burnups were tested, some to cladding breach and others to incipient breach. Transient fuel motions were monitored, and time and location of breach were measured. The test results and computations of fuel extrusion and cladding failure in metal-alloy fuel are described

  6. Metallic insulation transport and strainer clogging tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvaerinen, J.; Hongisto, O.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments to probe the transport and clogging properties of metallic (metal reflective) insulation have been carried out in order to provide data for evaluation of their influence on the emergency core cooling and containment spray systems of the Finnish boiling water reactors in the event of a design basis accident. The specific metallic insulation tested was DARMET, provided by Darchem Engineering Ltd. The inner foils of Darmet are dimped. Available literature on the metallic insulation performance under design basis accident conditions has been reviewed. On the basis of the review a parametric approach has been chosen for the transport and clogging experiments. This approach involves testing a wide size range of various shapes of foil pieces. Five sets of experiments have been carried out. The first three sets investigate transport properties of the foil pieces, starting from sedimentation in stagnant waste pool and proceeding to transport in horizontal and vertically circulating flows. The clogging experiments have been addressed the differential pressures obtained due to accumulation of both pure and metallic and a mixture of metallic and fibrous (mineral wool) depris. (4 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.)

  7. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  8. Lubricant Test Methods for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2008-01-01

    Sheet metal forming of tribologically difficult materials such as stainless steel, Al-alloys and Ti-alloys or forming in tribologically difficult operations like ironing, punching or deep drawing of thick plate requires often use of environmentally hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...... oils in order to avoid galling. The present paper describes a systematic research in the development of new, environmentally harmless lubricants focusing on the lubricant testing aspects. A system of laboratory tests has been developed to study the lubricant performance under the very varied conditions...... appearing in different sheet forming operations such as stretch forming, deep drawing, ironing and punching. The laboratory tests have been especially designed to model the conditions in industrial production. Application of the tests for evaluating new lubricants before introducing them in production has...

  9. Standard test method for instrumented impact testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This standard establishes the requirements for performing instrumented Charpy V-Notch (CVN) and instrumented Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) impact tests on metallic materials. This method, which is based on experience developed testing steels, provides further information (in addition to the total absorbed energy) on the fracture behavior of the tested materials. Minimum requirements are given for measurement and recording equipment such that similar sensitivity and comparable total absorbed energy measurements to those obtained in Test Methods E 23 and E 2248 are achieved. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  11. Standard test methods of tension testing of metallic foil

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1993-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the tension testing of metallic foil at room temperature in thicknesses less than 0.006 in. (0.150 mm). Note 1—Exception to these methods may be necessary in individual specifications or test methods for a particular material. 1.2 Units—The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Dynamic tests on metallic impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagartz, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Three different types of metallic impact limiters were tested; plain fins, laterally stiffened fins and tubes whose axes were aligned with the direction of impact. All specimens were made of 304 stainless steel and were annealed before testing. A heavy steel drop table of variable mass and moving at about 13.4 m/s (44 ft/s) was used to impact the specimens which were mounted on a stationary base. Impact velocity, drop table acceleration vs. time and force vs. time were measured on each test and were used to calculate the energy absorbed by the impact limiters. Results showed that the peak stress that a plain fin can transmit to the cask body can be several times the static yield stress of the fin. Also as buckling proceeds the load in a plain fin drops significantly and the rate at which it absorbs energy falls off dramatically, making the fin a rather inefficient energy absorber overall. The laterally stiffened fin and the cylinders did not exhibit this rapid decrease in load-carrying capacity with deformation and hence were able to absorb relatively more energy per unit volume of material

  13. Apparatus facilitates pressure-testing of metal tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    Burst-testing of refractory metal tubing is conducted in an apparatus in which tubular specimans are firmly gripped and test pressures and temperatures are applied. Porosity, flaw, and fatigue-stress rupture are also tested.

  14. Fast Flux Test Facility metal fuel pin fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benecke, M.W.; Dittmer, J.O.; Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1989-05-01

    A new initiative to develop, irradiate, and qualify a binary uranium/zirconium metal fuel system in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Metal fuel test assemblies have been designed and fabricated and are now being irradiated in FFTF to provide the data needed to support the potential use of binary fuels in FFTF and other liquid metal reactors. These development efforts support licensing activities for metal fuel use in near-term advanced liquid metal reactors. New metal fuel pin design features, fabrication development, and fabrication processes for three metal fuel tests will be described and their irradiation status reported in this paper. 11 figs

  15. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  16. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  17. Fatigue-Testing Apparatus for Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Leonard J.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical load cycling simulated in realistic fatigue tests. Efficient joining of metal matrix composite components to supporting structures is major concern facing users of these materials. Lewis Research Center designed and developed two thermal/mechancical fatigue test facilities, one to test metal matrix composite specimens and another to test compostite/metal attachment bond joints. Thermal/mechanical fatigue facility designed for testing metal matrix composites permits specimen-temperature excursions with controlled heating and loading rates. Second facility designed to test composite/metal attachment bond joints and to permit heating to maximum temperature of 1,400oC (760oC) within 10 min and cooling to 300oF (150oC) within 3 min. Facility has unique capabilities not found in other laboratories.

  18. [Should metal alloy discs be used for patch testing in suspected metal implant intolerance reaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Geier, J; Dickel, H; Diepgen, T; Hillen, U; Kreft, B; Schnuch, A; Szliska, C; Mahler, V

    2015-11-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, patch testing should not be done in a prophylactic-prophetic approach. Pre-implant patch testing should only be performed to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a reported respective history. In the case of implant-in particular arthroplasty-related complications like, for example, pain, effusion, skin changes, reduced range of motion, or loosening, orthopedic-surgical differential diagnostics should be performed first. Allergological workup of suspected metal implant allergy should be done with the DKG baseline series which contains nickel-, cobalt- and chromium-preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing proved that this approach does not give reliable information about metal allergy. Positive patch test reactions to the discs cannot be assigned to a specific metal within the disc alloy components. Furthermore, availability of such metal discs might be an invitation to uncritical testing. Accordingly, due to lack of benefit in comparison to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs.

  19. C-V Test Structures for Metal Gate CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bankras, R.G.; Tiggelman, M.P.J.; Negara, M. Adi; Sasse, G.T.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2006-01-01

    Gate leakage has complicated the layout and measurement of C-V test structures. In this paper the impact of metal gate introduction to C-V test structure design is discussed. The metal gate allows for wider-gate structures and for the application of n+-p+ diffusion edges. We show, both theoretically

  20. Testing of dissimilar metal welds according KTA 3201.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giersbeck, Kai; Huenies, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The amended German standard KTA 3201.4 from 2010 has triggered intensified requirements of the mechanized ultrasonic testing methodology. The report discusses the most important changes of KTA 3201.4 concerning the issues reference block, qualification of the testing methodology, testing of cladded surfaces, dissimilar metal joints, thermal conduits. The demonstration of dissimilar metal weld testing using intelligent NDT is demonstrated for the nozzles in German nuclear power plants.

  1. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal pipe weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeev, J.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Sharma, Govind K; Joseph, A.; Purnachandra Rao, B.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints made of stainless steel and ferritic steel is used in nuclear industries as well as oil and gas industries. These joints are prone to frequent failures which makes the non-destructive testing of dissimilar metal weld joints utmost important for reliable and safe operation of nuclear power plants and oil and gas industries. Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal weld joints is still challenging due to the inherent anisotropic and highly scattering nature. Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) is an advanced technique and its capability has not been fully explored for the inspection of dissimilar metal welds

  2. Evaluating Metal Probe Meters for Soil Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Inexpensive metal probe meters that are sold by garden stores can be evaluated by students for their accuracy in measuring soil pH, moisture, fertility, and salinity. The author concludes that the meters are inaccurate and cannot be calibrated in standard units. However, the student evaluations are useful in learning the methods of soil analysis…

  3. Experimental testing facilities for ultrasonic measurements in heavy liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, V.; Ionescu, V.; Nicolescu, D.; Nitu, A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-physical properties of Heavy Liquid Metals (HLM), like lead or its alloy, Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE), makes them attractive as coolant candidates in advanced nuclear systems. The opaqueness, that is common to all liquid metals, disables all optical methods. For this reason ultrasound waves are used in different applications in heavy liquid metal technology, for example for flow and velocity measurements and for inspection techniques. The practical use of ultrasound in heavy liquid metals still needs to be demonstrated by experiments. This goal requires heavy liquid metal technology facility especially adapted to this task. In this paper is presented an experimental testing facility for investigations of Heavy Liquid Metals acoustic properties, designed and constructed in RATEN ICN. (authors)

  4. Proficiency test for heavy metals in compound feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereboom, D.P.K.H.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Jong, de J.; Lee, van der M.K.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The here described proficiency test for heavy metals in compound feed was organised by RIKILT, Wageningen UR in accordance with ISO 17043. RIKILT Wageningen UR has an ISO/IEC 17043 accreditation for proficiency tests of residues in products of animal origin. However, this specific test is not part

  5. High-throughput metal susceptibility testing of microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2005-10-03

    Microbial biofilms exist all over the natural world, a distribution that is paralleled by metal cations and oxyanions. Despite this reality, very few studies have examined how biofilms withstand exposure to these toxic compounds. This article describes a batch culture technique for biofilm and planktonic cell metal susceptibility testing using the MBEC assay. This device is compatible with standard 96-well microtiter plate technology. As part of this method, a two part, metal specific neutralization protocol is summarized. This procedure minimizes residual biological toxicity arising from the carry-over of metals from challenge to recovery media. Neutralization consists of treating cultures with a chemical compound known to react with or to chelate the metal. Treated cultures are plated onto rich agar to allow metal complexes to diffuse into the recovery medium while bacteria remain on top to recover. Two difficulties associated with metal susceptibility testing were the focus of two applications of this technique. First, assays were calibrated to allow comparisons of the susceptibility of different organisms to metals. Second, the effects of exposure time and growth medium composition on the susceptibility of E. coli JM109 biofilms to metals were investigated. This high-throughput method generated 96-statistically equivalent biofilms in a single device and thus allowed for comparative and combinatorial experiments of media, microbial strains, exposure times and metals. By adjusting growth conditions, it was possible to examine biofilms of different microorganisms that had similar cell densities. In one example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was up to 80 times more resistant to heavy metalloid oxyanions than Escherichia coli TG1. Further, biofilms were up to 133 times more tolerant to tellurite (TeO3(2-)) than corresponding planktonic cultures. Regardless of the growth medium, the tolerance of biofilm and planktonic cell E. coli JM109 to metals was time

  6. Testing of environmentally friendly lubricants for sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    the authors have especially been involved in the development of a system of test methods for sheet metal forming and in testing of friction and limits of lubrication of new, environmentally friendly lubricants. An overview of the developed tests is presented together with selected results....... Kingdom, Finland, Poland, Slovenia, Spain and Denmark. Partners in the programmes represent lubricant developers, testing experts and industrial end users as well as numerical modelling experts simulating fundamental lubrication mechanisms and computing basic process parameters. In these programmes...

  7. Plan for metal barrier selection and testing for NNWSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a geological repository for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The Nuclear Waste Management Projects (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for design, testing, and performance analysis of the NNWSI waste packages. One portion of this work is the selection and testing of the material for container construction. The anticipated container design is for this material to be a corrosion resistant metal called the metal barrier. This document is the publication version of the Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) for the Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task. The SIP serves as a formal planning document for the investigation and is used to assign quality assurance levels to the activities of the task. This document is an informal version for information distribution and has the sections on ''Schedule and Milestones'' and the ''Quality Assurance Level Assignment Sheets'' removed

  8. Standard test method for dynamic tear testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the dynamic tear (DT) test using specimens that are 3/16 in. to 5/8 in. (5 mm to 16 mm) inclusive in thickness. 1.2 This test method is applicable to materials with a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. (5 mm). 1.3 The pressed-knife procedure described for sharpening the notch tip generally limits this test method to materials with a hardness level less than 36 HRC. Note 1—The designation 36 HRC is a Rockwell hardness number of 36 on Rockwell C scale as defined in Test Methods E 18. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. Ultrasonic creeping wave test technique for dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianzhong; Shang Junmin; Yan Zhi; Yuan Guanghua; Zhang Guofeng

    2009-01-01

    To solve the problem encountered in the defect inspection of the surface and near-surface of dissimilar metal weld effectively, a new ultrasonic creeping wave test technique is developed. In this paper, the test technique and its experimental verification are mainly described. The verification results show that linear defect, which is similar to the defect found in liquid penetrant test, on the surface and near-surface of dissimilar metal weld can be detected effectively, by using ultrasonic creeping wave test technique. And the depth, length and height of the defect can be determined easily. The effective covering depth of ultrasonic creeping wave test technique will reach 0-9 mm. Meanwhile, the planar defect, with equivalent area more than 3 mm 2 , existed in welds can be detected efficiently. So, accurate measurement, which self height dimension of planar defect is above 2 mm, will be realized. (authors)

  10. 78 FR 20695 - Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs [OJP (NIJ) Docket No. 1621] Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, DOJ... minimum performance standards for walk-through metal detectors and hand-held metal detectors. In order to...

  11. 1997 Performance Testing of Multi-Metal Continuous Emissions Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sky +, Inc.

    1998-09-01

    Five prototype and two commercially available multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in September 1997 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The seven CEMs were tested side by side in a long section of duct following the secondary combustion chamber of the RKIS. Two different concentrations of six toxic metals were introduced into the incinerator-approximately 15 and 75 µg/dscm of arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury (We also tested for antimony but we are not reporting on it here because EPA recently dropped antimony from the list of metals addressed by the draft MACT rule). These concentrations were chosen to be close to emission standards in the draft MACT rule and the estimated Method Detection Limit (MDL) required of a CEM for regulatory compliance purposes. Results from this test show that no CEMs currently meet the performance specifications in the EPA draft MACT rule for hazardous waste incinerators. Only one of the CEMs tested was able to measure all six metals at the concentrations tested. Even so, the relative accuracy of this CEM varied between 35% and 100%, not 20% or less as required in the EPA performance specification. As a result, we conclude that no CEM is ready for long-term performance validation for compliance monitoring applications. Because sampling and measuring Hg is a recurring problem for multi-metal CEMs as well as Hg CEMs, we recommended that developers participate in a 1998 DOE-sponsored workshop to solve these and other common CEM measurement issues.

  12. Wrinkling in Sheet metal Forming: Experimental Testing vs. numerical Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selman, A.; Atzema, Eisso H.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han

    2003-01-01

    Following a number of publications on numerical prediction of wrinkling in thin sheet metal forming, the present part of our work is devoted to the comparison of numerical results with those obtained through experimental testing. A number of hemispherical product samples have been used with various

  13. Melting tests for recycling of radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Kanazawa, Katsuo; Fujiki, Kazuo

    1995-01-01

    To allow the future recycling of decommissioning wastes to promote smoothly, melting tests were conducted using metal wastes and simulated wastes with radioisotopes. The test results indicate that the transfer behavior of radionuclides during melting is basically understood by considering the volatility and oxidizable tendency of each radionuclide. The partitioning of some radionuclides into products was influenced by the melting process of wastes. The radioactivity distribution in ingots was uniform regardless of the kinds of radionuclide. (author)

  14. Behavior of metallic fuel in treat transient overpower tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Wright, A.E.; Robinson, W.R.; Klickman, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Results and analyses are reported for TREAT in-pile transient overpower tests of margin to cladding failure and pre-failure axial expansion of metallic fuel. In all cases the power rise was exponential on an 8 s period until either incipient or actual cladding failure was achieved. Test fuel included EBR-II driver fuel and ternary alloy, the reference fuel of the Intergral Fast Reactor concept. Test pin burnup spanned the widest range available. The nature of the observed cladding failure and resultant fuel dispersals is described. Simple models are presented which describe observed cladding failures and pre-failure axial expansions yet are general enough to apply to all metal fuel types

  15. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  16. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  17. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  18. Testing of Lubricant Performance in Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Friis, Kasper Leth

    2008-01-01

    Increasing focus on environmental issues in industrial production has urged a number of sheet metal forming companies to look for new tribo-systems in order to substitute hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin oils. The problems are especially pronounced, when forming tribologically...... and testing environmentally friendly lubricants and tool materials and coatings inhibiting galling. Partners in the programmes come from Germany, United Kingdom, Finland, Poland, Slovenia, Spain and Denmark. They represent lubricant developers, testing experts and industrial end users as well as numerical...

  19. Evaluation of Accelerated Ageing Tests for Metallic and Non-Metallic Graffiti Paints Applied to Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sanmartín

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graffiti are increasingly observed on urban and peri-urban buildings and their removal requires a huge financial outlay by local governments and agencies. Graffiti are not usually removed immediately, but rather over the passage of time, viz. months or even years. In this study, which forms part of a wider research project on graffiti removal, different methods (gravimetric analysis, examination of digital images, colour and infrared measurements were used to evaluate the performance of accelerated ageing tests (involving exposure to humidity, freeze-thawing cycles and NaCl and Na2SO4 salts for graffiti painted on stone. Silver (metallic and black (non-metallic graffiti spray paints were applied to two types of igneous rock (granite and rhyolitic ignimbrite and one sedimentary rock (fossiliferous limestone, i.e., biocalcarenite. The metallic and non-metallic graffiti spray paints acted differently on the stone surfaces, both chemically and physically. Older graffiti were found to be more vulnerable to weathering agents. The ageing test with NaCl and particularly Na2SO4, both applied to granite, proved the most severe on the paints, yielding more detrimental and faster artificial ageing of the type of material under study.

  20. Inter-laboratory validation of bioaccessibility testing for metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rayetta G; Verougstraete, Violaine; Anderson, Kim; Arbildua, José J; Brock, Thomas O; Brouwers, Tony; Cappellini, Danielle; Delbeke, Katrien; Herting, Gunilla; Hixon, Greg; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Rodriguez, Patricio H; Van Assche, Frank; Wilrich, Peter; Oller, Adriana R

    2014-10-01

    Bioelution assays are fast, simple alternatives to in vivo testing. In this study, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability in bioaccessibility data generated by bioelution tests were evaluated in synthetic fluids relevant to oral, inhalation, and dermal exposure. Using one defined protocol, five laboratories measured metal release from cobalt oxide, cobalt powder, copper concentrate, Inconel alloy, leaded brass alloy, and nickel sulfate hexahydrate. Standard deviations of repeatability (sr) and reproducibility (sR) were used to evaluate the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, respectively. Examination of the sR:sr ratios demonstrated that, while gastric and lysosomal fluids had reasonably good reproducibility, other fluids did not show as good concordance between laboratories. Relative standard deviation (RSD) analysis showed more favorable reproducibility outcomes for some data sets; overall results varied more between- than within-laboratories. RSD analysis of sr showed good within-laboratory variability for all conditions except some metals in interstitial fluid. In general, these findings indicate that absolute bioaccessibility results in some biological fluids may vary between different laboratories. However, for most applications, measures of relative bioaccessibility are needed, diminishing the requirement for high inter-laboratory reproducibility in absolute metal releases. The inter-laboratory exercise suggests that the degrees of freedom within the protocol need to be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  2. Test Report for Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATO) Prototype.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbe, Jeffery G.; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-06-01

    A prototype design for a plutonium air transport package capable of carrying 7.6 kg of plutonium oxide and surviving a ''worst-case'' plane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A series of impact tests were conducted on half-scale models of this design for side, end, and comer orientations at speeds close to 282 m/s onto a target designed to simulate weathered sandstone. These tests were designed to evaluate the performance of the overpack concept and impact-limiting materials in critical impact orientations. The impact tests of the Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP) prototypes were performed at SNL's 10,000-ft rocket sled track. This report describes test facilities calibration and environmental testing methods of the PMATP under specific test conditions. The tests were conducted according to the test plan and procedures that were written by the authors and approved by SNL management and quality assurance personnel. The result of these tests was that the half-scale PMATP survived the ''worst-case'' airplane crash conditions, and indicated that a full-scale PMATP, utilizing this overpack concept and these impact-limiting materials, would also survive these crash conditions.

  3. Results of thermal test of metallic molybdenum disk target and fast-acting valve testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgo, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report describes the irradiation conditions for thermal testing of helium-cooled metallic disk targets that was conducted on March 9, 2016, at the Argonne National Laboratory electron linac. The four disks in this irradiation were pressed and sintered by Oak Ridge National Laboratory from molybdenum metal powder. Two of those disks were instrumented with thermocouples. Also reported are results of testing a fast-acting-valve system, which was designed to protect the accelerator in case of a target-window failure.

  4. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Life testing of metal-ceramic CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlen, T. S.; Radecki, D. J.; Reynolds, R. S.; Targ, R.

    1971-01-01

    The main purpose of this program was to determine the life characteristics of nine space-qualified, metal-ceramic CO2 lasers. Lifetimes ranged between about 400 hours to over 2000 hours (the limit of testing) with a high degree of consistency in like groups. In all cases the tubes which had failed could be restored to near their original power by doubling the cathode current for 30 minutes. Periodic rejuvenation allowed operation for the full 2000 hours on all tubes. The failure mechanism appears to involve formation of NiO and C on the nickel cathode emission surface with subsequent absorption of tube gases.

  6. DKG statement on the use of metal alloy discs for patch testing in suspected intolerance to metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Geier, Johannes; Dickel, Heinrich; Diepgen, Thomas; Hillen, Uwe; Kreft, Burkhard; Schnuch, Axel; Szliska, Christiane; Mahler, Vera

    2015-10-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, 'prophetic'/prophylactic patch testing should not be performed. Pre-implant patch testing should only be done to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a corresponding history. In case of implant-related complications - in particular following replacement arthroplasty - such as pain, effusion, skin lesions, reduced range of motion or implant loosening, orthopedic causes should be ruled out first. Workup of suspected metal implant allergy should then be done using the DKG standard series, which includes nickel, cobalt, and chromium preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing have shown this particular approach to be ineffective with respect to providing reliable information on metal allergy. Any positive reaction in such tests cannot be assigned to a specific metal contained within the alloy. Furthermore, there is a risk of broad and indiscriminate use of these readily available discs. Accordingly, given the lack of additional benefit compared to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Methodology for Life Testing of Refractory Metal / Sodium Heat Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This work establishes an approach to generate carefully controlled data to find heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. To accomplish this goal acceleration is required to compress 10 years of operational life into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. Specific test series have been identified, based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, to investigate long-term corrosion rates. The refractory metal selected for demonstration purposes is a molybdenum-44.5% rhenium alloy formed by powder metallurgy. The heat pipes each have an annular crescent wick formed by hot isostatic pressing of molybdenum-rhenium wire mesh. The heat pipes are filled by vacuum distillation with purity sampling of the completed assembly. Round-the-clock heat pipe tests with 6-month destructive and non-destructive inspection intervals are conducted to identify the onset and level of corrosion. Non-contact techniques are employed to provide power to the evaporator (radio frequency induction heating at 1 to 5 kW per heat pipe) and calorimetry at the condenser (static gas gap coupled water cooled calorimeter). The planned operating temperature range extends from 1123 to 1323 K. Accomplishments before project cancellation included successful development of the heat pipe wick fabrication technique, establishment of all engineering designs, baseline operational test requirements, and procurement/assembly of supporting test hardware systems. (authors)

  8. Bulk Mechanical Properties Testing of Metallic Marginal Glass Formers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Q. Phan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a unique three-point bend testing apparatus to measure bulk mechanical properties of a model metallic glass alloy (SAM2X5 with nominal composition Fe49.7Cr17.1Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 prepared by spark plasma sintering. The relatively large sample sizes in the present work allowed for the preparation of test specimens with a macroscale cross section (in the millimeter range with well-controlled sample dimensions closer to standardized tests. Wire saw cutting allowed for a relatively sharp notch radius (3x smaller than previous studies and minimal sample damage. We determined that Young’s modulus and notch fracture toughness measured by our three-point bending apparatus are 230 GPa and 4.9 MPa·m1/2. Also, Vickers indentation and flexure testing provided consistent results for Young’s modulus. Indentation fracture toughness measured by Vickers indentation produced values at least 50% lower than by flexure. The microscale mechanical properties testing technique presented in this work and subsequent analyses are applicable to specimens of other compositions or ones prepared by other methods.

  9. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  10. Testing metals and alloys for use in oxygen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    1986-01-01

    When oxygen is present in high concentrations or large quantities, as in oxygen-based life-support systems, the likelihood of combustion and the probable intensity of a conflagration increase, together with the severity of the damage caused. Even stainless steel will burn vigorously when ignited in a 1000-psi oxygen environment. The hazards involved in the use of oxygen increase with system operation at the elevated temperatures typical of propulsion systems. Fires in oxygen systems are generally catastrophic, causing a threat to life in manned vehicles. When mechanical components of a mechanism generate friction heat in the presence of oxygen, many commonly used metal alloys ignite and burn. Attention is presently given to frictional heating, particle impact, and flame propagation tests conducted in oxygen environments.

  11. Standard test method for macroetching metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These test procedures describe the methods of macro- etching metals and alloys to reveal their macrostructure. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The SI equivalents of inch-pound units may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific warning statements, see 6.2, 7.1, 8.1.3, 8.2.1, 8.8.3, 8.10.1.1, and 8.13.2.

  12. Standard test methods for notched bar impact testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 These test methods describe notched-bar impact testing of metallic materials by the Charpy (simple-beam) test and the Izod (cantilever-beam) test. They give the requirements for: test specimens, test procedures, test reports, test machines (see Annex A1) verifying Charpy impact machines (see Annex A2), optional test specimen configurations (see Annex A3), precracking Charpy V-notch specimens (see Annex A4), designation of test specimen orientation (see Annex A5), and determining the percent of shear fracture on the surface of broken impact specimens (see Annex A6). In addition, information is provided on the significance of notched-bar impact testing (see Appendix X2), methods of measuring the center of strike (see Appendix X2). 1.2 These test methods do not address the problems associated with impact testing at temperatures below -196 C (-320 F, 77 K). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. Inch-pound units are provided for information only. This standard does not purpor...

  13. The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha; Tellez, Alejandra; Molina, Luciana; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra; Barsoum, Wael; Taylor, James S

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of patch testing on surgical decision making and outcomes in patients evaluated for suspected metal hypersensitivity related to implants in bones or joints. Medical chart review. Tertiary care academic medical center. All patients who had patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis related to orthopedic implants. Patch testing. The surgeon's preoperative choice of metal implant alloy compared with patch testing results and the presence of hypersensitivity complications related to the metal implant on postsurgical follow-up. Patients with potential metal hypersensitivity from implanted devices (N = 72) were divided into 2 groups depending on timing of their patch testing: preimplantation (n = 31) and postimplantation (n = 41). History of hypersensitivity to metals was a predictor of positive patch test results to metals in both groups. Positive patch test results indicating metal hypersensitivity influenced the decision-making process of the referring surgeon in all preimplantation cases (n = 21). Patients with metal hypersensitivity who received an allergen-free implant had surgical outcomes free of hypersensitivity complications (n = 21). In patients who had positive patch test results to a metal in their implant after implantation, removal of the device led to resolution of associated symptoms (6 of 10 patients). The findings of this study support a role for patch testing in patients with a clinical history of metal hypersensitivity before prosthetic device implantation. The decision on whether to remove an implanted device after positive patch test results should be made on a case-by-case basis, as decided by the surgeon and patient.

  14. Refractory Metal Heat Pipe Life Test - Test Plan and Standard Operating Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Refractory metal heat pipes developed during this project shall be subjected to various operating conditions to evaluate life-limiting corrosion factors. To accomplish this objective, various parameters shall be investigated, including the effect of temperature and mass fluence on long-term corrosion rate. The test series will begin with a performance test of one module to evaluate its performance and to establish the temperature and power settings for the remaining modules. The performance test will be followed by round-the-clock testing of 16 heat pipes. All heat pipes shall be nondestructively inspected at 6-month intervals. At longer intervals, specific modules will be destructively evaluated. Both the nondestructive and destructive evaluations shall be coordinated with Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the processing, setup, and testing of the heat pipes, standard operating procedures shall be developed. Initial procedures are listed here and, as hardware is developed, will be updated, incorporating findings and lessons learned.

  15. Retrospective evaluation of patch testing before or after metal device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kurtis B; Davis, Mark D P; Nakamura, Krystal; Hanson, Linda; Richardson, Donna M

    2008-08-01

    To review the results of patch testing before or after metal device implantation. Retrospective medical chart review. Tertiary care academic medical center. All patients who underwent patch testing before or after metal device implantation. Patch testing. From January 1999 through March 2006, 44 patients underwent patch testing in conjunction with metal device implantation, 22 preoperatively and 22 postoperatively. The reason for preoperative patch testing was a history of allergy to metals. Five patients had positive results for a component of the proposed device. The reasons for postoperative patch testing were unexplained skin eruptions at the implantation site (13 patients), chronic joint pain (8 patients), and joint loosening (1 patient). None of the patients had positive patch test results to a component of the previously implanted device. Although the numbers of patients in this study were small, patch testing performed before metal device implantation was helpful in guiding the choice of device selected. Patch testing after implantation was of limited value.

  16. PA171 Containers on a Wood Pallet with Metal Top Adapter, Air Pressure Tests During MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ... (PM-MAS) to conduct Air Pressure Tests during MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" testing on the PA171 containers on a wood pallet with metal top adapter as manufactured by Alliant Tech...

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants-diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch...... testing. Those without a history of dermatitis should not be tested unless considerable concern exists. Regarding post-implant testing, a subset of patients with metal hypersensitivity may develop cutaneous or systemic reactions to implanted metals following implant. For symptomatic patients, a diagnostic......Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte...

  18. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  19. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  20. Performance Tests of a Permeation Sensor for Test Blanket Modules Using Liquid Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, E. H.; Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Shin, K. I.; Jin, H. G.

    2013-01-01

    The tritium extraction from a breeder is one of the key technologies and its methods have been investigated. For developing the tritium extraction methods and evaluating the amount of tritium in the system, a reliable and correct sensor is required to measure the hydrogen concentration in liquid metal breeder. There are several researches for developing the sensors in the ITER participants and especially, EU has developed the permeation sensors trying to selecting materials with low Serviette's constant (solubility) and high hydrogen diffusivity coefficient. However, EU's response time is still too long time about tens of minutes to measure the tritium concentration in the online system. We have been performing the preliminary tests with designed and fabricated sensors to solve the late response of sensor. However, we could not continue the tests because of the membrane's oxidation (pure Fe) and the difficulty of welding nonferrous metals. In present study, a permeation sensor made of vacuum flanges with a porous plate inside is proposed not only to eliminate the difficulty of the fabrication but to optimize the performance of sensor. The permeation sensor to measure the hydrogen isotopes in liquid metal breeder has been proposed and evaluated to overcome the limitation of a long response time for various shapes and materials. We found that the previous sensors have limitation; the oxidation problems (pure Fe) and the difficulty in welding (nonferrous metals). Therefore we proposed a permeation sensor with the vacuum flanges filled with porous disks to eliminate the problems. By using the CF flanges, the problem caused by welding is removed. But the permeable response time of sensors took a long time to reach the pressure equivalent

  1. Evaluating the suitability of Hydrobia ulvae as a test species for sediment metal toxicity testing applying a tissue residue approach to metal mixtures in laboratory and field exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Olivia; Rodríguez, Antonio; Blasco, Julián

    2013-05-01

    A major weakness in evaluating the suitability of a biomonitor organism is the poor ability to predict the variability of the bioavailability of metals from measured environmental concentrations. In this study, the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was used to evaluate its suitability as a test organism for assessing sediment metal toxicity. Toxicity tests were run with sediments spiked with copper, cadmium and zinc applied both as single metal and as a mixture to investigate toxicological interactions evaluating different lethal and sublethal effects. Dose-response relationships were constructed based both on tissue residue approach and particulate metal concentrations. Because metal-spiked sediments used in routine toxicity tests often do not exhibit the same adsorption/desorption kinetics as the natural sediments, the laboratory results were compared to 10-d bioassays conducted with natural field sediments collected from the Guadalete estuary (SW Spain). Highly significant correlations between tissue residue concentrations and particulate metal concentrations were found for all metal-spiked or field-collected and demonstrated that: (i) H. ulvae readily accumulated copper and cadmium in response to contamination and (ii) dietary uptake was determined to be the most significant route of metal exposure. The comparison of the modeled tissue residue-response curve developed from the mixture tests was in good agreement with the results from the bioassay conducted with field sediments and strongly demonstrated that H. ulvae is also a suitable test organism for assessing copper sediment toxicity. In contrast, the dose-response curve expressed as a function of total particulate metal concentrations would fail in predicting effect, erroneously assessing higher metal toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High gradient tests of metallic mm-wave accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; O'Shea, Brendan; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in high gradient mm-wave accelerating structures. We performed a series of experiments with 100 GHz and 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. This paper presents the experimental results of rf tests of 100 GHz travelling-wave accelerating structures, made of hard copper-silver alloy. The results are compared with pure hard copper structures. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultra-relativistic electron beam. The accelerating structures have open geometries, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated by a variable gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 90 GHz to 140 GHz. The measured frequency and pulse length are consistent with our simulations. When the beam travels off-axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the decelerating longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and used this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. We present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 100 GHz copper-silver accelerating structure, which was 10-3 per pulse, with peak electric field of 0.42 GV/m, an accelerating gradient of 127 MV/m, at a pulse length of 2.3 ns. The goal of our studies is to understand the physics of gradient limitations in order to increase the energy reach of future accelerators.

  3. Cycling fiber metal laminates : Considerations, test setup and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, B.; Teixeira De Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of fiber metal laminates to multi-functional materials by embedding heater elements in the laminate extends their field of application. Fiber metal laminates with embedded heater elements are likely to be used for the de- and anti-icing of leading edges in aircraft as they combine

  4. Thermal cycling fiber metal laminates : Considerations, test setup and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, B.; Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of fiber metal laminates to multi-functional materials by embedding heater elements in the laminate extends their field of application. Fiber metal laminates with embedded heater elements are likely to be used for the de- and anti-icing of leading edges in aircraft as they combine

  5. Patch Testing for Metal Allergy With Manufacturer-Supplied Materials Before Nuss Bar Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmiller, Kerry; French, Andrea; Alaish, Samuel M; Goldner, Ronald; Gaspari, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of metal implantable devices has raised awareness of nickel allergy. Preoperative patch testing for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) with a known metal allergy or history of atopy is an accepted practice before the Nuss procedure. The Nuss bar manufacturer offers a metal disc for preoperative testing for metal sensitivities. However, the efficacy of this disc is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the metal disc in detecting nickel allergy compared with that of standard patch testing. Two PE patients were referred for preoperative patch testing with the metal disc to screen for metal allergy before the Nuss procedure. Based on our initial findings, 7 patients without PE scheduled for patch testing for the evaluation of chronic dermatitis were additionally tested with the metal disc if they were found to have risk factors for nickel allergy. All patch testing was performed according to set standards. The metal disc may not be adequately sensitive to determine nickel allergy before the Nuss procedure. Patch testing alone with standard formulations of nickel sulfate in petrolatum may be more sensitive in diagnosing nickel allergy.

  6. High rates of metal allergy amongst Nuss procedure patients dictate broader pre-operative testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhairav; Cohee, Amy; Deyerle, Ashley; Kelly, Cynthia S; Frantz, Frazier; Kelly, Robert E; Kuhn, Marcia A; Lombardo, Michele; Obermeyer, Robert; Goretsky, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    A previous study from our group estimated that as few as 2.2% of pectus excavatum patients suffered from allergy to the implanted metal bar. We sought to assess recent changes in incidence of metal allergy and identify the benefit of metal allergy testing prior to surgery. A retrospective review was performed of all consenting patients undergoing pectus repair during the six years between 9/2004 and 12/2010 at our institution. Incidence was based on clinical symptoms and/or T.R.U.E.® patch testing. Demographic data, history of atopy and history of metal allergy were collected. Type and number of bars used, suture site infection, skin rash and wound infection rates were reviewed. Forty one of 639 patients (6.4%) had clinical or patch test evidence of metal allergy. Family history of metal allergy and pre-operative history of metal sensitivity were found to be statistically significant correlates. The rate of metal allergy in the pectus excavatum population may be higher than previously reported. Patient or family history of metal allergy or metal sensitization may indicate increased risk. Metal allergy testing should be performed before Nuss procedure. © 2014.

  7. Testing Efficiency of the London Metal Exchange: New Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehwan Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the market efficiency of the six base metals traded on the LME (London Metal Exchange using daily data from January 2000 to June 2016. The hypothesis that futures prices 3M (3-month are unbiased predictors of spot prices (cash in the LME is rejected based on the false premise that the financialization of commodities has been growing. For the robustness check, monthly data is analyzed using ordinary least squares (OLS and GARCH (1,1 models. We reject the null hypothesis for all metals except for zinc.

  8. ASTM Committee G-4 metals flammability test program - Data and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Homa, John M.; Williams, Ralph E.; Benz, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of metals flammability tests performed on twenty-six metals in the NASA/White Sands Test Facility are discussed together with the test systems. The promoted combustion and ignition characteristics of these metals are described, and the metals are ranked according to their suitability for use in oxygen systems. In general, alloys with high copper and nickel contents and low iron content were found to rank higher than those that had high iron content, while alloys that had high aluminum content were ranked the lowest.

  9. Benchmark physics tests in the metallic-fuelled assembly ZPPR-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H.F.; Brumbach, S.B.; Carpenter, S.G.; Collins, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the last two years a shift in emphasis to inherent safety and economic competitiveness has led to a resurgence in US interest in metallic-alloy fuels for LMRs. Argonne National Laboratory initiated an extensive testing program for metallic-fuelled LMR technology that has included benchmark physics as one component. The tests done in the ZPPR-15 Program produced the first physics results in over 20 years for a metal-composition LMR core

  10. Standard test method for pin-type bearing test of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1984-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a pin-type bearing test of metallic materials to determine bearing yield strength and bearing strength. Note 1—The presence of incidental lubricants on the bearing surfaces may significantly lower the value of bearing yield strength obtained by this method. 1.2 Units—The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Standard test methods for elevated temperature tension tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedure and equipment for the determination of tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area of metallic materials at elevated temperatures. 1.2 Determination of modulus of elasticity and proportional limit are not included. 1.3 Tension tests under conditions of rapid heating or rapid strain rates are not included. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. On Parameters Affecting Metal Flow and Friction in the Double Cup Extrusion Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    1998-01-01

    Friction and lubrication in metal-forming processes are usually evaluated by a process test with a friction-sensitive divided flow like the ring-compression test. Parameters affecting metal flow are not only friction, but also strain hardening, tool geometry etc. The current friction models appli...

  13. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  14. Standard test methods for bend testing of metallic flat materials for spring applications involving static loading

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This standard describes three test methods for determining the modulus of elasticity in bending and the bending strength of metallic strips or sheets intended for the use in flat springs: 1.1.1 Test Method A—a cantilever beam, 1.1.2 Test Method B—a three-point loaded beam (that is, a beam resting on two supports and centrally loaded), and 1.1.3 Test Method C—a four-point loaded beam (that is, a beam resting on two supports and loaded at two points equally spaced from each support). 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 6.1 This test me...

  15. Metal sensitivities among TJA patients with post-operative pain: indications for multi-metal LTT testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Marco S; Solver, Edward; Coleman, Latasha; Hallab, Nadim James

    2014-01-01

    Metal sensitivity testing is generally the diagnosis method of last resort for aseptic painful implants with elevated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between implant-related pain and implant-debris-related metal sensitization remains incompletely understood. Although a sensitivity to nickel alone has been used as a general measure of metal allergy, it may lack the specificity to correlate sensitivity to specific implant metals and thus to select a biologically appropriate implant material. In this retrospective study, we report the incidence of pain and nickel sensitivity in patients with total joint arthroplasties (TJAs) referred for metal sensitivity testing (n=2018). We also correlated the degree of nickel hypersensitivity to implant pain levels (none, mild, moderate, and high, using a scale of 0-10) and the incidence of sensitivity to alternative implant metals in highly nickel-reactive subjects. Most patients (>79%) reported pain levels that were moderate to high regardless of implant age, whereas patients with severely painful TJAs had a statistically greater incidence of nickel sensitivity over the short-term post-operative period (≤4 years). Patients with moderate pain scores (4-7) and high pain scores (≥8) also exhibited significantly higher sensitivity to nickel compared to patients with no pain and no implant (controls) (p8) also showed incidences of sensitization to alternative materials such as cobalt, chromium, or molybdenum (57%) or aluminum or vanadium alloy (52%). These data suggest that painful TJAs caused by metal sensitivity more likely occur relatively early in the post-operative period (≤4 years). The incidences of sensitivity to alternative implant metals in only a subset of nickel-reactive patients highlights the importance of testing for sensitization to all potential revision implant materials.

  16. Spent fuel metal storage cask performance testing and future spent fuel concrete module performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    REA-2023 Gesellshaft fur Nuklear Service (GNS) CASTOR-V/21, Transnuclear TN-24P, and Westinghouse MC-10 metal storage casks, have been performance tested under the guidance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine their thermal and shielding performance. The REA-2023 cask was tested under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship at General Electric's facilities in Morris, Illinois, using BWR spent fuel from the Cooper Reactor. The other three casks were tested under a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power Company and DOE at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EGandG Idaho, Inc., using intact spent PWR fuel from the Surry reactors. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made contributions to both programs. A summary of the various cask designs and the results of the performance tests is presented. The cask designs include: solid and liquid neutron shields; lead, steel, and nodular cast iron gamma shields; stainless steel, aluminum, and copper baskets; and borated materials for criticality control. 4 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants-diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological......Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte...... transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch...

  18. A System of Test Methods for Sheet Metal Forming Tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2007-01-01

    Sheet metal forming of tribologically difficult materials such as stainless steel, Al-alloys and Ti-alloys or forming in tribologically difficult operations like ironing, punching or deep drawing of thick plate requires often use of environmentally hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...

  19. Leaching characteristics of the metal waste form from the electrometallurgical treatment process: Product consistency testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S. G.; Keiser, D. D.; Frank, S. M.; DiSanto, T.; Noy, M.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent fuel from the experimental breeder reactor II. A product of this treatment process is a metal waste form that incorporates the stainless steel cladding hulls, zirconium from the fuel and the fission products that are noble to the process, i.e., Tc, Ru, Nb, Pd, Rh, Ag. The nominal composition of this waste form is stainless steel/15 wt% zirconium/1--4 wt% noble metal fission products/1--2 wt % U. Leaching results are presented from several tests and sample types: (1) 2 week monolithic immersion tests on actual metal waste forms produced from irradiated cladding hulls, (2) long term (>2 years) pulsed flow tests on samples containing technetium and uranium and (3) crushed sample immersion tests on cold simulated metal waste form samples. The test results will be compared and their relevance for waste form product consistency testing discussed

  20. Assessment of strength characteristics of Al2024 ECAP metal using small punch testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Young Wha; Choi, Jeong Woo; Yoon, Kee Bong; Kim, Seon Hwa

    2006-01-01

    When subjected to severe shear deformation by ECAP, microstructure of Al2024 becomes extremely refined. To measure the strength of that, Small Punch(SP) testing method was adopted as a substitute for the conventional uniaxial tensile testing because the size of material processed by ECAP were limited to ψ12 mm in transverse direction. SP tests were performed with specimens in longitudinal and transverse directions of Al2024 ECAP metal. For comparing the strength values with those assessed by SP tests, uniaxial tensile tests were also conducted with specimens in longitudinal direction. Failure surfaces of the tested SP specimens showed that failure mode was shear deformation and Al2024 ECAP metal has an anisotropy in strength. Thus, conventional equations proposed for assessing the strength characteristics were improper to assess those of Al2024 ECAP metal. In this paper a way of assessing the strength of Al2024 ECAP metal was proposed and was proven to be effective

  1. Metal hypersensitivity testing in patients undergoing joint replacement: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granchi, D; Cenni, E; Giunti, A; Baldini, N

    2012-08-01

    We report a systematic review and meta-analysis of the peer-reviewed literature focusing on metal sensitivity testing in patients undergoing total joint replacement (TJR). Our purpose was to assess the risk of developing metal hypersensitivity post-operatively and its relationship with outcome and to investigate the advantages of performing hypersensitivity testing. We undertook a comprehensive search of the citations quoted in PubMed and EMBASE: 22 articles (comprising 3634 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The frequency of positive tests increased after TJR, especially in patients with implant failure or a metal-on-metal coupling. The probability of developing a metal allergy was higher post-operatively (odds ratio (OR) 1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 to 2.31)), and the risk was further increased when failed implants were compared with stable TJRs (OR 2.76 (95% CI 1.14 to 6.70)). Hypersensitivity testing was not able to discriminate between stable and failed TJRs, as its predictive value was not statistically proven. However, it is generally thought that hypersensitivity testing should be performed in patients with a history of metal allergy and in failed TJRs, especially with metal-on-metal implants and when the cause of the loosening is doubtful.

  2. Liquid metal blanket module testing and design for ITER/TIBER II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Cha, Y.; Finn, P.A.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.; Stevens, H.; Turner, L.

    1988-05-01

    A major goal for ITER is the testing of nuclear components to demonstrate the integrated performance of the most attractive concepts that can lead to a commercial fusion reactor. As part of the ITER/TIBER II study, the test program and design of test models were examined for a number of blanket concepts. The work at Argonne National Laboratory focused on self-cooled liquid metal blankets. A test program for liquid metal blankets was developed based upon the ITER/TIBER II operating schedule and the specific data needs to resolve the key issues for liquid metals. Testing can begin early in reactor operation with liquid metal MHD tests to confirm predictive capability. Combined heat transfer/MHD tests can be performed during initial plasma operation. After acceptable heat transfer performance is verified, tests to determine the integrated high temperature performance in a neutron environment can begin. During the high availability phase operation, long term performance and reliability tests will be performed. It is envisioned that a companion test program will be conducted outside ITER to determine behavior under severe accident conditions and upper performance limits. A detailed design of a liquid metal test module and auxiliary equipment was also developed. The module followed the design of the TPSS blanket. Detailed analysis of the heat transfer and tritium systems were performed, and the overall layout of the systems was determined. In general, the blanket module appears to be capable of addressing most of the testing needs. 8 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Testing setup for automatic cycling of metal hydride composites

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In a future hydrogen community, metal hydrides can be used in several new applications. The most common application is as hydrogen storage material for stationary or mobile applications. However, there exist plenty of other applications like heat storage systems, thermal compressors, air conditioning systems, hydrogen purifying systems, etc. For all of these applications cycling stability is a major issue as it determines operational strategies as well as overall lifecycle cost. For pure m...

  4. Simulated Tip Rub Testing of Low-Density Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jones, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary acoustic studies have indicated that low-density, open-cell, metal foams may be suitable acoustic liner material for noise suppression in high by-pass engines. Metal foam response under simulated tip rub conditions was studied to assess whether its durability would be sufficient for the foam to serve both as a rub strip above the rotor as well as an acoustic treatment. Samples represented four metal alloys, nominal cell dimensions ranging from 60 to 120 cells per inch (cpi), and relative densities ranging from 3.4 to 10 percent. The resulting rubbed surfaces were relatively smooth and the open cell structure of the foam was not adversely affected. Sample relative density appeared to have significant influence on the forces induced by the rub event. Acoustic responses of various surface preparations were measured using a normal incidence tube. The results of this study indicate that the foam s open-cell structure was retained after rubbing and that the acoustic absorption spectra variation was minimal.

  5. Test methods for determining the suitability of metal alloys for use in oxygen-enriched environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gunaji, Mohan V.

    1991-01-01

    Materials are more flammable in oxygen rich environments than in air. When the structural elements of a system containing oxygen ignite and burn, the results are often catastrophic, causing loss of equipment and perhaps even human lives. Therefore, selection of the proper metallic and non-metallic materials for use in oxygen systems is extremely important. While test methods for the selection of non-metallic materials have been available for years, test methods for the selection of alloys have not been available until recently. Presented here are several test methods that were developed recently at NASA's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to study the ignition and combustion of alloys, including the supersonic and subsonic speed particle impact tests, the frictional heating and coefficient of friction tests, and the promoted combustion test. These test methods are available for commercial use.

  6. Eddy current testing device for metallic tubes at least locally curved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeon, Marcel; Vienot, Claude.

    1975-01-01

    Steam generators, condensers and heat exchangers generally consist of metallic tube bundles, the tubes having a complex geometry. The invention concerns an Eddy current testing device for metallic tubes at least locally curved, operating by translation of a probe inside the tubes [fr

  7. Effect of Jig Design and Assessment of Stress Distribution in Testing Metal-Ceramic Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki; Nishioka, Renato Sussumu; Mesquita, Alfredo Mikail Melo; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Filho, Gilberto Duarte

    2016-12-01

    In testing adhesion using shear bond test, a combination of shear and tensile forces occur at the interface, resulting in complex stresses. The jig designs used for this kind of test show variations in published studies, complicating direct comparison between studies. This study evaluated the effect of different jig designs on metal-ceramic bond strength and assessed the stress distribution at the interface using finite element analysis (FEA). Metal-ceramic (Metal: Ni-Cr, Wiron 99, Bego; Ceramic: Vita Omega 900, Vita) specimens (N = 36) (diameter: 4 mm, veneer thickness: 4 mm; base diameter: 5 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were fabricated and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12 per group) to be tested using one of the following jig designs: (a) chisel (CH) (ISO 11405), (b) steel strip (SS), (c) piston (PI). Metal-ceramic interfaces were loaded under shear until debonding in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Failure types were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FEA was used to study the stress distribution using different jigs. Metal-ceramic bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The jig type significantly affected the bond results (p = 0.0001). PI type of jig presented the highest results (MPa) (p Metal-ceramic bond strength was affected by the jig design. Accordingly, the results of in vitro studies on metal-ceramic adhesion should be evaluated with caution. When adhesion of ceramic materials to metals is evaluated in in vitro studies, it should be noted that the loading jig type affects the results. Clinical observations should report on the location and type of ceramic fractures in metal-ceramic reconstructions so that the most relevant test method can be identified. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. The benefit of pre- and post-challenge urine heavy metal testing: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    Measuring heavy metal levels in the urine is an accepted method for assessing the presence of a heavy metal burden in an individual. Random samples (without a flushing agent) are excellent for showing current exposures, as they reflect the level of heavy metals in the bloodstream during the hours immediately before bladder voiding. Samples taken after using a heavy metal mobilizing agent are a reflection of total body burden. Part 1 reviewed the benefits of doing pre-flush (baseline) testing utilizing the published Centers for Disease Control (CDC) heavy metal normal ranges for interpretation that allow the clinician to identify current exposures to lead and mercury and to identify cadmium toxicity. In part 2 the benefits of doing both pre- and post-challenge testing are reviewed. Information gleaned from performing both tests is unparalleled in allowing the clinician to identify which chelating agent will be most effective for the patient. If oral agents are employed, then possible absorption problems can be identified. Since none of these benefits are realized with only post-flush testing, it is recommended that clinicians do heavy metal testing both before and after a challenge with an effective and proven heavy metal mobilizing agent. The pitfalls of oral chelation in the case of malabsorption syndromes, such as gluten intolerance, are also discussed.

  9. Testing Single and Combinations of Amendments for Stabilization of Metals in Contrasting Extremely Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebielec G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Metals can be stabilized by soil amendments that increase metals adsorption or alter their chemical forms. Such treatments may limit the risk related to the contamination through reduction of metal transfer to the food chain (reduction of metal uptake by plants and its availability to soil organisms and metals migration within the environment. There is a need for experiments comparing various soil amendments available at reasonable amounts under similar environmental conditions. The other question is whether all components of soil environment or soil functions are similarly protected after remediation treatment. We conducted a series of pot studies to test some traditional and novel amendments and their combinations. The treatments were tested for several highly Zn/Cd/Pb contaminated soils. Among traditional amendments composts were the most effective – they ensured plant growth, increased soil microbial activity, reduced Cd in earthworms, reduced Pb bioaccessibility and increased share of unavailable forms of Cd and Pb.

  10. Installing a Test Tap on a Metal Battery Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Daniel R.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A mechanical fitting and relatively simple and safe method of installing it on the metal case of a battery have been devised to provide access to the interior of the battery to perform inspection and/or to measure such internal conditions as temperature and pressure. A metal boss or stud having an exterior thread is attached to the case by capacitor-discharge stud welding (CDSW), which takes only 3 to 6 milliseconds and in which the metallurgical bond (weld) and the heat-affected zone are limited to a depth of a few thousandths of an inch (a few hundredths of a millimeter). These characteristics of CDSW prevent distortion of the case and localized internal heating that could damage the chemical components inside of the battery. An access hole is then drilled through the stud and case, into the interior of the battery. A mechanical fitting having a matching thread is installed on the stud and the interior end of the fitting is sealed with a pressure-sealing washer/gasket. The exterior end of the fitting is configured for attachment of whatever instrumentation is required for the selected inspection or measurement.

  11. Reliability of nondestructive testing of metal strength properties for power equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaj, N.V.; Lebedev, A.A.; Sharko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic control which is a constituent part of a complex control system which includes specimen-free (by hardness) tests, random breaking tests and acoustic measurements is stUdied for its reliability with respect to strength properties of power-equipment metal. Quantitative and alternative criteria are developed to estimate quality of elements for power-equipment according to results of metal strength properties. Acoustic control results are presented for ultimate strength in 12Kh1MF-steel

  12. A report on the instrumented Charpy impact test for metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuka, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1988-12-01

    An instrumented testing method has been developed for Charpy impact test for steels, aluminum alloys and other materials. Using the instrumented Charpy testing machine developed, it is clearly estimated that the method is good enough to give us detailed information about the impact properties of these metallic materials. (author)

  13. Cell overcharge testing inside sodium metal halide battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutschy, Kris; Chatwin, Troy; Bull, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Testing was conducted to measure electrical performance and safety of the General Electric Durathon™ E620 battery module (600 V class 20 kWh) during cell overcharge. Data gathered from this test was consistent with SAE Electric Vehicle Battery Abuse Testing specification J2464 [1]. After cell overcharge failure and 24 A current flow for additional 60 minutes, battery was then discharged at 7.5 KW average power to 12% state of charge (SOC) and recharged back to 100% SOC. This overcharging test was performed on two cells. No hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas was detected during front cell (B1) test, and small amount (6.2 ppm peak) was measured outside the battery after center cell (F13) overcharge. An additional overcharge test was performed per UL Standard 1973 - Batteries for Use in Light Electric Rail (LER) Applications and Stationary Applications[2]. With the battery at 11% SOC and 280 °C float temperature, an individual cell near the front (D1) was deliberately imbalanced by charging it to 62% SOC. The battery was then recharged to 100% SOC. In all three tests, the battery cell pack was stable and individual cell failure did not propagate to other cells. Battery discharge performance, charge performance, and electrical isolation were normal after all three tests.

  14. Accelerated corrosion test for metal drainage pipes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    This study represents an attempt to develop an accelerated test which would assist the highway engineer in evaluating the usefulness of a new type of coated steel culvert. The test method was to be short in duration (in the order of days), and the re...

  15. ECLSS Sustaining Metal Materials Compatibility Final Report, Electrochemical and Crevice Corrosion Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical test results are presented for six noble metals evaluated in two acidic test solutions which are representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The two test solutions consisted of fresh waste liquid which had been modified with a proposed or alternate pretreatment formulation and its associated brine concentrate. The six test metals included three titanium grades, (Commercially Pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V Low Interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel® 625 and Hastelloy® C276), and one high tier stainless steel (Cronidur® 30).

  16. Post peel test assessment of metal-metal bonded interface using hyperspectral imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadakis, V.; Teixeira De Freitas, S.; Colijn, R.M.; Goedhart, J.J.; Poulis, J.A.; Groves, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion process of bonded structures is a very sensitive manufacturing process, namely to surface contaminations. Nowadays, the adhesion quality of bonded joints can only be detected by destructive testing such as peel tests. But, for actual structures destructive testing of every bonded part

  17. Prospective analysis of human leukocyte functional tests reveals metal sensitivity in patients with hip implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the reactivity of peripheral human leukocytes to various metal ions prior and following hip replacement in order to investigate implant-induced metal sensitivity. Methods Three patient groups were set up: (1) individuals without implants and no history of metal allergy (7 cases), (2) individuals without implants and known history of metal allergy (7 cases), and (3) patients undergoing cementless hip replacement (40 cases). Blood samples were taken in groups 1 and 2 at three different occasions; in group 3, prior and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery. Peripheral leukocytes were separated and left either untreated or challenged with Ti, NiCl2, CoCl2, CrCl3, and phytohemagglutinin. Cell proliferation, cytokine release, and leukocyte migration inhibition assays were performed. Metal-induced reactivity was considered when all three assays showed significant change. Skin patch tests were also carried out. Results Both skin patch tests and leukocyte functional tests were negative in group 1, and both were positive in group 2. In group 3, after 6 months, 12% of the patients showed reactivity to the tested metals except for NiCl2. Following the 36-month period, 18% of group three became sensitive to metals (including all the earlier 12%). In contrast, patch tests were negative at each time point in group 3. Conclusions Orthopedic implant material may induce metal reactivity after implantation in a manner where susceptibility is yet to be elucidated. Leukocyte triple assay technique might be a useful tool to test implant material-related sensitivity. PMID:23680415

  18. Anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Jianchao; Fan, Hai; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel approach for facile and rapid detection of heavy metal ions using anion-intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified test strips is demonstrated. By intercalating Fe(CN)6(4-) or S(2-) anions into the interlayers of LDHs on the filter paper, various heavy metal ions can be easily detected based on the color change before and after reaction between the anions and the heavy metal ions. Upon the dropping of heavy metal ions solutions to the test strips, the colors of the test strips changed instantly, which can be easily observed by naked eyes. With the decrease of the concentration, the color depth changed obviously. The lowest detection concentration can be up to 1×10(-6) mol L(-1). Due to the easily intercalation of anions into the interlayer of the LDHs on test trips, this procedure provides a general method for the construction of LDHs modified test strips for detection of heavy metal ions. The stability of the prepared test strips is investigated. Furthermore, all the results were highly reproducible. The test strips may have potential applications in environmental monitoring fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  20. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Refractory Metals and Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Cohron, Jon

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a technique with which refractory metal carbide samples can be exposed to hydrogen containing gases at high temperatures, and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate processes involved in hydrogen degradation in these materials. Five types of carbides were examined including WC, NbC, HfC, ZrC, and TaC. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. The temperature range investigated was from 850 to 1600 C with a hydrogen pressure of one atmosphere. Control experiments, in vacuum, were also conducted for comparison so that the net effects due to hydrogen could be isolated. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. Gas samples were collected in selected experiments and analyzed using gas chromography. Characterization of the resulting microstructure after exposure to hydrogen was conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. It was found that all samples lost weight after exposure, both in hydrogen and vacuum. Results from the microstructure analyses show that the degradation processes are different among the five types of ceramics involved. In addition, the apparent activation energy for the degradation process is a function of temperature even within the same material. This indicates that there are more than one mechanism involved in each material, and that the mechanisms are temperature dependent.

  1. Characterization of protein degradation in serum-based lubricants during simulation wear testing of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskiewicz, Victoria K; Williams, Paul A; Prates, Sarah J; Bowsher, John G; Clarke, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    A size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC) method has been developed which is capable of separation and quantitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine serum globulin (BSG) components of serum-based lubricant (SBL) solutions. This allowed characterization of the stability profiles of these proteins when acting as lubricants during hip wear simulation, and identification of wear-specific mechanisms of degradation. Using cobalt-chromium metal-on-metal (MOM) hip joints, it was observed that BSA remained stable for up to 3 days (215K cycles) of wear testing after which the protein degraded in a fairly linear fashion. BSG on the other hand, began to degrade immediately and in a linear fashion with a rate constant of 5% per day. Loss of both proteins occurred via the formation of high molecular weight aggregates which precipitated out of solution. No fragmentation of the polypeptide backbone of either protein was observed. Data obtained suggest that protein degradation was not due to microbial contamination, denaturation at the air-water interface, or frictional heating of articulating joint surfaces in these studies. We conclude that the primary source of protein degradation during MOM simulation testing occurs via high shear rates experienced by SBL solutions at articulating surfaces, possibly coupled with metal-protein interactions occurring as new and reactive metal surfaces are generated during wear testing. The development of this analytical methodology will allow new studies to clarify the role of SBL solutions in wear simulation studies and the interactions and lubricating properties of serum proteins with prosthetic surfaces other than MOM.

  2. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99 mTc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers. (author)

  3. Extraction, identification and quantification of heavy metals in Venice lagoon sediments using toxicity tests with microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarini, F.; Rampazzo, G.; Volpi Ghirardini, A.; Sperni, L.; Salizzato, M.; Pavoni, B. [Venice Univ., Venice (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali

    2000-02-01

    Sediments are the major sink for metal pollutants in the aquatic ecosystem but also an important source for the release of them in the water. In order to assess the contribution of heavy metals to the total sediment toxicity, a methodology that permits to integrate the chemical approach with a direct toxicological approach has been ste up. Toxicological results using Microtox test are compared with analytical results. [Italian] I sedimenti sono il principale deposito per contaminanti metalli nel''ecosistema acquatico, ma anche una fonte importnate di rilascio nell'acqua. Al fine di valutare il contributo dei metalli pesanti alla tossicita' totale del sedimento, e' stata messa a punto una metodologia che permette di integrare l'appoccio chimico con un approccio tossicologico diretto. I risultati dei test di tossicita' Microtox vengono confrontati con i risultati analitici.

  4. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99m Tc for medical purposes is currently produced form the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers

  5. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  6. Benchmark physics tests in the metallic-fuelled assembly ZPPR-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H.F.; Brumbach, S.B.; Carpenter, S.G.; Collins, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the first benchmark physics tests of a metallic-fueled, demonstration-size, liquid metal reactor are reported. A simple, two-zone, cylindrical conventional assembly was built with three distinctly different compositions to represent the stages of the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle. Experiments included criticality, control, power distribution, reaction rate ratios, reactivity coefficients, shielding, kinetics and spectrum. Analysis was done with 3-D nodal diffusion calculations and ENDFIB-V.2 cross sections. Predictions of the ZPPR-15 reactor physics parameters agreed sufficiently well with the measured values to justify confidence in design analyses for metallic-fueled LMRs

  7. Testing and modelling of industrial tribo-systems for sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Leth; Nielsen, Peter Søe; Bay, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Galling is a well-known problem in sheet metal forming of tribological difficult materials such as stainless steel. In this work new, environmentally friendly lubricants and wear resistant tool materials are tested in a laboratory environment using a strip reduction test as well as in a real prod...

  8. Standard practice for process compensated resonance testing via swept sine input for metallic and Non-Metallic parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a general procedure for using the process compensated resonance testing (PCRT) via swept sine input method to identify metallic and non-metallic parts’ resonant pattern differences that can be used to indentify parts with anomalies causing deficiencies in the expected performance of the part in service. This practice is intended for use with instruments capable of exciting, measuring, recording, and analyzing multiple whole body mechanical vibration resonant frequencies within parts exhibiting acoustical ringing in the audio, or ultrasonic, resonant frequency ranges, or both. PCRT is used in the presence of manufacturing process variance to distinguish acceptable parts from those containing significant anomalies in physical characteristics expected to significantly alter the performance. Such physical characteristics include, but are not limited to, cracks, voids, porosity, shrink, inclusions, discontinuities, grain and crystalline structure differences, density related anomalies...

  9. Study of the Fracture Mechanisms of Electroplated Metallization Systems Using In Situ Microtension Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msolli, Sabeur; Kim, Heung Soo

    2018-03-01

    This framework assesses the mechanical behavior of some potential thin/thick metallization systems in use as either ohmic contacts for diamond semi-conductors or for metallization on copper double bounded ceramic substrates present in the next-generation power electronics packaging. The interesting and unique characteristic of this packaging is the use of diamond as a semi-conductor material instead of silicon to increase the lifetime of embedded power converters for use in aeronautical applications. Theoretically, such packaging is able to withstand temperatures of up to 300 °C without breaking the semi-conductor, provided that the constitutive materials of the packaging are compatible. Metallization is very important to protect the chips and substrates. Therefore, we address this issue in the present work. The tested metallization systems are Ni/Au, Ni/Cr/Au and Ni/Cr. These specific systems were studied since they can be used in conjunction with existing bonding technologies, including AuGe soldering, Ag-In Transient liquid Phase Bonding and silver nanoparticle sintering. The metallization is achieved via electrodeposition, and a mechanical test, consisting of a microtension technique, is carried out at room temperature inside a scanning electron microscopy chamber. The technique permits observations the cracks initiation and growth in the metallization to locate the deformation zones and identify the fracture mechanisms. Different failure mechanisms were shown to occur depending on the metallic layers deposited on top of the copper substrate. The density of these cracks depends on the imposed load and the involved metallization. These observations will help choose the metallization that is compatible with the particular bonding material, and manage mechanical stress due to thermal cycling so that they can be used as a constitutive component for high-temperature power electronics packaging.

  10. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A

  11. Metal allergens of growing significance: epidemiology, immunotoxicology, strategies for testing and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Giovanni; Petrucci, Francesco; Bocca, Beatrice

    2008-09-01

    Metal-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is expressed in a wide range of cutaneous reactions following dermal and systemic exposure to products such as cosmetics and tattoos, detergents, jewellery and piercing, leather tanning, articular prostheses and dental implants. Apart from the well known significance of nickel in developing ACD, other metals such as aluminium, beryllium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iridium, mercury, palladium, platinum, rhodium and titanium represented emerging causes of skin hypersensitivity. Despite the European Union directives that limit the total nickel content in jewellery alloys, the water soluble chromium (VI) in cement, and metals banned in cosmetics, the diffusion of metal-induced ACD remained quite high. On this basis, a review on the epidemiology of metal allergens, the types of exposure, the skin penetration, the immune response, and the protein interaction is motivated. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro tests for the identification and potency of skin-sensitizing metals are here reviewed in a risk assessment framework for the protection of consumer's health. Avenues for ACD prevention and therapy such as observance of maximum allowable metal levels, optimization of metallurgic characteristics, efficacy of chelating agents and personal protection are also discussed.

  12. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Strader, Jay, E-mail: brodie@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  13. Comparative evaluation of short-term leach tests for heavy metal release from mineral processing waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abed, S. R.; Hageman, P.L.; Jegadeesan, G.; Madhavan, N.; Allen, D.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of metal leaching using a single leach test such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) is often questionable. The pH, redox potential (Eh), particle size and contact time are critical variables in controlling metal stability, not accounted for in the TCLP. This paper compares the leaching behavior of metals in mineral processing waste via short-term extraction tests such as TCLP, Field Leach Test (FLT) used by USGS and deionized water extraction tests. Variation in the extracted amounts was attributed to the use of different particle sizes, extraction fluid and contact time. In the controlled pH experiments, maximum metal extraction was obtained at acidic pH for cationic heavy metals such as Cu, Pb and Zn, while desorption of Se from the waste resulted in high extract concentrations in the alkaline region. Precipitation of iron, caused by a pH increase, probably resulted in co-precipitation and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn in the alkaline pH region. A sequential extraction procedure was performed on the original waste and the solid residue from the Eh-pH experiments to determine the chemical speciation and distribution of the heavy metals. In the as-received waste, Cu existed predominantly in water soluble or sulfidic phases, with no binding to carbonates or iron oxides. Similar characteristics were observed for Pb and Zn, while Se existed mostly associated with iron oxides or sulfides. Adsorption/co-precipitation of Cu, Se and Pb on precipitated iron hydroxides was observed in the experimental solid residues, resulting in metal immobilization above pH 7.

  14. Direct measurement of graphene contact resistivity to pre-deposited metal in buried contact test structure

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate a buried contact based novel test structure for direct contact resistivity measurement of graphene-metal interfaces. We also observe excellent contact resistivity 1 μO-cm2 without any additional surface modification suggesting that the intrinsic Au-graphene contact is sufficient for achieving devices with low contact resistance. The chemical mechanical polishing less test structure and data described herein highlights an ideal methodology for systematic screening and engineering of graphene-metal contact resistivity to enable low power high speed carbon electronics. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. FFTF [fast flux tests facility] metal fuel pin sodium bond quality verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Fast Flux Tests Facility (FFTF) Series III driver fuel design consists of U-10 Zr fuel slugs contained in a ferritic alloy cladding. A liquid-metal, sodium bond between the fuel and cladding is required to prevent unacceptable temperatures during operation. Excessive voiding or porosity in the sodium thermal bond could result in localized fuel melting during irradiation. It is therefore imperative that bond quality be verified during fabrication of these metal fuel pins prior to irradiation. Cladding stripping of two spare metal fuel pins was successfully performed to inspect the quality of the sodium thermal bond and to compare observed defects in the bond with eddy current measurements. Bond quality was found to be generally good, thereby confirming the fabrication process used to bond the fuel and cladding with liquid-metal sodium to be acceptable. Observed porosity distribution in the sodium bond correlated well with eddy current indications

  16. A Micro-Test Structure for the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An innovative micro-test structure for detecting the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC of metal materials is presented in this work. Throughout this method, a whole temperature sensing moveable structures are supported by four groups of cascaded chevrons beams and packed together. Thermal expansion of the metal material causes the deflection of the cascaded chevrons, which leads to the capacitance variation. By detecting the capacitance value at different temperatures, the TEC value of the metal materials can be calculated. A finite element model has been established to verify the relationship between the TEC of the material and the displacement of the structure on horizontal and vertical directions, thus a function of temperature for different values of TEC can be deduced. In order to verify the analytical model, a suspended-capacitive micro-test structure has been fabricated by MetalMUMPs process and tested in a climate chamber. Test results show that in the temperature range from 30 °C to 80 °C, the TEC of the test material is 13.4 × 10−6 °C−1 with a maximum relative error of 0.8% compared with the given curve of relationship between displacement and temperature.

  17. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release...

  18. Off-line testing of multifunctional surfaces for metal forming applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, A.; Grønbæk, J.; De Chiffre, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Bending-Under-Tension, an off-line test method simulating deep-drawing, is chosen for investigating the effectiveness of multifunctional (MUFU) surfaces in metal forming operations. Four different MUFU surfaces, characterized by a plateau bearing area and grooves for lubricant...... retention, are manufactured, together with two polished references. During the tests, surface texture is the only variable. The results show how MUFU surfaces perform better than the polished references, which produce severe galling, while MUFU surfaces with low bearing area display no clear evidence...... of galling. Metal-to-metal contact occurs anyway, but the strip material is pulverized and deposited onto the tool instead of cold-welding to it. The pockets create a discontinuity on the texture hindering pick-up propagation....

  19. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of metal halide ballasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... energy efficiency of metal halide ballasts. (b) Testing and Calculations. [Reserved] Energy Conservation... efficiency of metal halide ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and...

  20. Neutron radiography applied to qualitative and quantitative non-destructive testing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporte, A.; Bayon, G.; Thierry, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation-material interaction between X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons is compared. The different possibilities of image detection are enumerated. The industrial testing installations associated with the Triton experimental reactor of the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre is described. A high performance testing unit is presented -the use of an intense flux of cold neutrons in a special building designed for neutrons radiographic testing- which will enter service in the second half of 1980, in association with the Orphee basic physics reactor of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre. Concrete examples of manufacturing control on metal parts are given such as: testing of bonds between two metals of comparable density, testing of the homogeneity of high density alloys, testing of the homogeneity of low density alloys, testing of materials with high neutron contrast. Neutron radiographic testing not only achieves qualitative but also quantitative analysis of the films, on two levels, dimensional measurement and homogeneity and/or concentration measurement, by densitometry. Testing methods used for complete quantitative analysis of boronated aluminium plates used in the nuclear industry are examined. Perspectives concerning routine tests, by dealing with fundamental aspects of standardization and the knowledge of the phenomena involved in this testing technique are given [fr

  1. Connection for mass testing of long-term properties of metal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufek, F.; Walder, V.; Cech, V.; Rabinsky, L.

    1981-01-01

    The configuration is claimed of a loop for mass testing of long-term properties, mainly corrosion resistance, of metal tubes pressurized with inert gas and placed in liquid sodium or another coolant. The loop essentially consists of two vessels connected in series housing the tubes to be tested, of an equalizing vessel, a recuperator, a cooler, a corrosion product absorber, a circulating pump, a heater, and other auxiliary devices. (Ha)

  2. Direct testing of scale effects in metal forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Calaon, Matteo; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin

    2010-01-01

    Downscaling of metal forming operations from macro to micro scale implies significant changes caused by size effects, among these the friction increase, which has been reported by researchers using indirect test methods such as ring-compression test and double-cup-extrusion test. In the present...... work a new test equipment is developed for direct friction measurements in the range from macro to micro scale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the work pieces show this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  3. Analysis of the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Test System for Friction-Ignition of Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    Friction is a known ignition source for metals in oxygen-enriched atmospheres. The test system developed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility in response to ASTM G-94 has been used successfully to determine the relative ignition from friction of numerous metallic materials and metallic materials pairs. These results have been ranked in terms of a pressure-velocity product (PV) as measured under the prescribed test conditions. A high value of 4.1(exp 8) watts per square meter for Inconel MA 754 is used to imply resistance to friction ignition, whereas a low value of 1.04(exp 8) watts per square meter for stainless steel 304 is taken as indicating material susceptible to friction ignition. No attempt has been made to relate PV values to other material properties. This work reports the analysis of the WSTF friction-ignition test system for producing fundamental properties of metallic materials relating to ignition through friction. Three materials, aluminum, titanium, and nickel were tested in the WSTF frictional ignition instrument system under atmospheres of oxygen or nitrogen. Test conditions were modified to reach a steady state of operation, that is applied, the force was reduced and the rotational speed was reduced. Additional temperature measurements were made on the stator sample. The aluminum immediately galled on contact (reproducible) and the test was stopped. Titanium immediately ignited as a result of non-uniform contact of the stator and rotor. This was reproducible. A portion of the stator sampled burned, but the test continued. Temperature measurements on the stator were used to validate the mathematical model used for estimating the interface (stator/rotor) temperature. These interface temperature measurements and the associate thermal flux into the stator were used to distinguish material-phase transitions, chemical reaction, and mechanical work. The mechanical work was used to analyze surface asperities in the materials and to estimate a

  4. Thermal shock evaluation of metals in a simulated disruption test for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kny, E.; Kneringer, G.; Koizlik, K.; Nickel, H.

    1989-01-01

    Different metals have been tested with respect to their thermal shock behavior simulating the slow energy deposition regime of NET. The metals evaluated for grain growth phenomena, melting, crack formation, recrystallization and partly their tensile properties after testing were W, W26Re, Mo, TZM, Nb, Ta, 1.4311 steel, Cu, and Ti6Al4V. Thermal shock testing was performed using a 150 kV electron beam with a maximum input power density of 200 MW/m 2 and a pulse length of 10 to 2000 ms. The tendency for crack formation is highest for W followed by TZM and W26Re. Mo samples formed only a few cracks during testing. No cracks could be observed on Cu, Ti, Nb, Ta, and steel samples. The tendency for crack formation for refractory metals is strongly dependent on grain orientation. The substrate temperature affects the tendency for crack formation too. Above a certain temperature, crack formation was not observed on W and Mo and their alloys. Thermal shock testing of tensile specimens, according to the slow energy deposition regime of NET, changes only to a small extent the UTS and strain. However, tensile strain is more affected than UTS by thermal shock testing above the melting threshold line. (orig.)

  5. Testing an application of a biotic ligand model to predict acute toxicity of metal mixtures to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yuichi; Kamo, Masashi; Naito, Wataru

    2015-04-01

    The authors tested the applicability of a previously developed biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of single metals and metal mixtures (cadmium, lead, and zinc) to rainbow trout fry (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a single available dataset. The BLM used in the present study hypothesizes that metals inhibit an essential cation (calcium) and organisms die as a result of its deficiency, leading to an assumption that the proportion of metal-binding ligand (f) is responsible for the toxic effects of metals on the survival of rainbow trout. The f value is a function of free-ion concentrations of metals computed by a chemical speciation model, and the function has affinity constants as model parameters. First, the survival effects of single metals were statistically modeled separately (i.e., f-survival relationship) by using the generalized linear mixed model with binomial distribution. The modeled responses of survival rates to f overlapped reasonably irrespective of metals tested, supporting the theoretical prediction from the BLM that f-survival relationships are comparable regardless of metal species. The authors thus developed the generalized linear mixed model based on all data pooled across the single-metal tests. The best-fitted model well predicted the survival responses observed in mixture tests (r = 0.97), providing support for the applicability of the BLM to predict effects of metal mixtures. © 2014 SETAC.

  6. Patch Testing for Evaluation of Hypersensitivity to Implanted Metal Devices: A Perspective From the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Peter C; Crawford, Glen; Nedorost, Susan; Scheinman, Pamela L; Atwater, Amber Reck; Mowad, Christen; Brod, Bruce; Ehrlich, Alison; Watsky, Kalman L; Sasseville, Denis; Silvestri, Dianne; Worobec, Sophie M; Elliott, John F; Honari, Golara; Powell, Douglas L; Taylor, James; DeKoven, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society recognizes the interest in the evaluation and management of metal hypersensitivity reactions. Given the paucity of robust evidence with which to guide our practices, we provide reasonable evidence and expert opinion-based guidelines for clinicians with regard to metal hypersensitivity reaction testing and patient management. Routine preoperative evaluation in individuals with no history of adverse cutaneous reactions to metals or history of previous implant-related adverse events is not necessary. Patients with a clear self-reported history of metal reactions should be evaluated by patch testing before device implant. Patch testing is only 1 element in the assessment of causation in those with postimplantation morbidity. Metal exposure from the implanted device can cause sensitization, but a positive metal test does not prove symptom causality. The decision to replace an implanted device must include an assessment of all clinical factors and a thorough risk-benefit analysis by the treating physician(s) and patient.

  7. The update of resist outgas testing for metal containing resists at EIDEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiobara, Eishi; Mikami, Shinji

    2017-10-01

    The metal containing resist is one of the candidates for high sensitivity resists. EIDEC has prepared the infrastructure for outgas testing in hydrogen environment for metal containing resists at High Power EUV irradiation tool (HPEUV). We have experimentally obtained the preliminary results of the non-cleanable metal contamination on witness sample using model material by HPEUV [1]. The metal contamination was observed at only the condition of hydrogen environment. It suggested the generation of volatile metal hydrides by hydrogen radicals. Additionally, the metal contamination on a witness sample covered with Ru was not removed by hydrogen radical cleaning. The strong interaction between the metal hydride and Ru was confirmed by the absorption simulation. Recently, ASML announced a resist outgassing barrier technology using Dynamic Gas Lock (DGL) membrane located between projection optics and wafer stage [2], [3]. DGL membrane blocks the diffusion of all kinds of resist outgassing to the projection optics and prevents the reflectivity loss of EUV mirrors. The investigation of DGL membrane for high volume manufacturing is just going on. It extends the limitation of material design for EUV resists. However, the DGL membrane has an impact for the productivity of EUV scanners due to the transmission loss of EUV light and the necessity of periodic maintenance. The well understanding and control of the outgassing characteristics of metal containing resists may help to improve the productivity of EUV scanner. We consider the outgas evaluation for the resists still useful. For the improvement of resist outgas testing by HPEUV, there are some issues such as the contamination limited regime, the optimization of exposure dose to obtain the measurable contamination film thickness and the detection of minimum amount of metal related outgas species generated. The investigation and improvement for these issues are ongoing. The updates will be presented in the conference. This

  8. Tests and Analysis of Electromagnetic Models for Semiconductor-Metal Quantum-Well Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Meng-Mu

    2012-03-01

    This work tests the proposed electromagnetic models for quantum-well lasers by using several materials of semiconductors and metals. Different combinations of semiconductors and metals can generate various wavelengths and mode-couplings in such semiconductor waveguide structures with built-in metal-gratings. The numerical results of these models are computed by the photonic approach and verified by the optical approach. Even for the weak mode-coupling cases, the numerical results computed by both approaches have close values. Numerical results with post-analysis can summarize how the key parameters, such as grating geometry, well thickness, and layer thickness, affect the mode-couplings. The above results can be further interpreted by physics intuition and fundamental concepts so as to provide insights into the modeling and design of lasers for more applications.

  9. Cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics assessed by millipore filter, agar overlay, and MTT tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Sletten, G; Dahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Biocompatibility of dental materials is dependent on the release of elements from the materials. In addition, the composition, pretreatment, and handling of the materials influence the element release. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of dental alloys, metals, and ceramics, with specific emphasis on the effects of altering the composition and the pretreatment. By using cells from a mouse fibroblast cell line and the agar overlay test, Millipore filter test, and MTT test, cytotoxicity of various metals, metal alloys, and ceramics for dental restoration were studied. Effects of altering the composition of a high noble gold alloy and of pretreatment of a ceramic-bonding alloy were also studied. In addition, the release of elements into the cell culture medium by the materials studied was measured using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer. The results of the MTT test were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Scheffé test at a significance level of P cytotoxic" according to the agar overlay and Millipore filter tests. For the MTT test, no significant differences were observed between these materials and controls, with the exception of JS C-gold and unalloyed titanium. The modified materials were ranked from "mildly cytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the agar overlay and Millipore filter tests and from "noncytotoxic" to "moderately cytotoxic" in the MTT test. Thus, cytotoxicity was related to the alloy composition and treatment. The release of Cu and Zn seemed to be important for the cytotoxic effect. Alterations in the composition and the pretreatment can greatly influence the cytotoxicity, and the results stress the importance of carefully following the manufacturers' instructions when handling dental materials.

  10. Exposure to multiple metals from groundwater-a global crisis: geology, climate change, health effects, testing, and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Erika; Frisbie, Seth; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the global extent of naturally occurring toxic metals in groundwater. Adverse health effects attributed to the toxic metals most commonly found in groundwater are reviewed, as well as chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions between these metals. Synergistic and antagonistic effects that have been reported between the toxic metals found in groundwater and the dietary trace elements are highlighted, and common behavioural, cultural, and dietary practices that are likely to significantly modify health risks due to use of metal-contaminated groundwater are reviewed. Methods for analytical testing of samples containing multiple metals are discussed, with special attention to analytical interferences between metals and reagents. An overview is presented of approaches to providing safe water when groundwater contains multiple metallic toxins.

  11. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  12. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  13. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2013-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  14. Testing of dissimilar metal welds according KTA 3201.4; Pruefung von Mischnahtverbindungen nach KTA 3201.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giersbeck, Kai; Huenies, Gordon [intelligeNFT Systems und Services GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The amended German standard KTA 3201.4 from 2010 has triggered intensified requirements of the mechanized ultrasonic testing methodology. The report discusses the most important changes of KTA 3201.4 concerning the issues reference block, qualification of the testing methodology, testing of cladded surfaces, dissimilar metal joints, thermal conduits. The demonstration of dissimilar metal weld testing using intelligent NDT is demonstrated for the nozzles in German nuclear power plants.

  15. Standard test method for plane-strain (Chevron-Notch) fracture toughness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plane-strain (chevron-notch) fracture toughnesses, KIv or KIvM, of metallic materials. Fracture toughness by this method is relative to a slowly advancing steady state crack initiated at a chevron-shaped notch, and propagating in a chevron-shaped ligament (Fig. 1). Some metallic materials, when tested by this method, exhibit a sporadic crack growth in which the crack front remains nearly stationary until a critical load is reached. The crack then becomes unstable and suddenly advances at high speed to the next arrest point. For these materials, this test method covers the determination of the plane-strain fracture toughness, KIvj or KIvM, relative to the crack at the points of instability. Note 1—One difference between this test method and Test Method E 399 (which measures KIc) is that Test Method E 399 centers attention on the start of crack extension from a fatigue precrack. This test method makes use of either a steady state slowly propagating crack, or a...

  16. Development, validation and testing of a skin sampling method for assessment of metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Behnaz; Midander, Klara; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2017-07-01

    Nickel, cobalt and chromium are frequent skin sensitizers. Skin exposure results in eczema in sensitized individuals, the risk being related to the skin dose. To develop a self-sampling method for quantification of skin exposure to metals, to validate the method, and to assess its feasibility. Defined metal doses (0.01-5 µg) were applied to the fingers of 5 participants. Skin areas (2 cm 2 ) were sampled with 1% HNO 3 , either as 0.1 ml on a swab, or as 0.5 ml on a wipe. Furthermore, 17 participants performed self-sampling by swab after 2 h of leisure activity. Samples were extracted in 1% HNO 3 and analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The sampling efficiency by swab was 46%, as compared with 93% for acid wipe sampling, for all tested doses. Most metal from the skin dose was detected in the first swab (33-43%). Despite lower sampling efficiency by swab, skin doses of metals following 2 h of leisure activity without hand washing were quantified in all participants, and ranged from 0.0016 to 0.15 µg/cm 2 , from 0.00014 to -0.0020 µg/cm 2 and from 0.00048 to -0.027 µg/cm 2 for nickel, cobalt, and chromium, respectively. The results indicate a future potential of skin sampling by swab to detect and monitor metals on skin by self-sampling. This will contribute to better knowledge of metal skin exposure among dermatitis patients, workers, and the general population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The concept of virtual material testing and its application to sheet metal forming simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Butz, A.; Pagenkopf, J.; Baiker, M.; Helm, D.

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity based full-field microstructure simulation approach is used to virtually determine mechanical properties of sheet metals. Microstructural features like the specific grain morphology and the crystallographic texture are taken into account to predict the plastic anisotropy. A special focus is on the determination of the Lankford coefficients and on the yield surface under plane stress conditions. Compared to experimental procedures, virtual material testing allows to genera...

  18. ADIMEW: Fracture assessment and testing of an aged dissimilar metal weld pipe assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, J.B.; Hayes, B.; Goldthorpe, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    ADIMEW (Assessment of Aged Piping Dissimilar Metal Weld Integrity) was a three-year collaborative research programme carried out under the EC 5th Framework Programme. The objective of the study was to advance the understanding of the behaviour and safety assessment of defects in dissimilar metal welds between pipes representative of those found in nuclear power plant. ADIMEW studied and compared different methods for predicting the behaviour of defects located near the fusion boundaries of dissimilar metal welds typically used to join sections of austenitic and ferritic piping operating at high temperature. Assessment of such defects is complicated by issues that include: severe mis-match of yield strength of the constituent parent and weld metals, strong gradients of material properties, the presence of welding residual stresses and mixed mode loading of the defect. The study includes the measurement of material properties and residual stresses, predictive engineering analysis and validation by means of a large-scale test. The particular component studied was a 453mm diameter pipe that joins a section of type A508 Class 3 ferritic pipe to a section of type 316L austenitic pipe by means of a type 308 austenitic weld with type 308/309L buttering laid on the ferritic pipe. A circumferential, surface-breaking defect was cut using electro discharge machining into the 308L/309L weld buttering layer parallel to the fusion line. The test pipe was subjected to four-point bending to promote ductile tearing of the defect. This paper presents the results of TWI contributions to ADIMEW including: fracture toughness testing, residual stress measurements and assessments of the ADIMEW test using elastic-plastic, cracked body, finite element analysis. (orig.)

  19. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibility tests on polystyrene and metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraça-Huber, D C; Fille, M; Hausdorfer, J; Pfaller, K; Nogler, M

    2012-06-01

    We compared the MBEC™-HTP assay plates made of polystyrene with metal discs composed of TMZF(®) and CrCo as substrates for biofilm formation. Staphylococcus aureus was grown on polystyrene and on metal discs made of titanium and chrome-cobalt. Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed by examining the recovery of cells after antibiotic exposure and by measuring the biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was assessed with planktonic cells. Bacterial growth was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The antibiotic concentration for biofilm inhibition (BIC) was higher than the MIC for all antibiotics. Microscopic images showed the biofilm structure characterized by groups of cells covered by a film. All models allowed biofilm formation and testing with several antibiotics in vitro. Gentamicin and rifampicin are the most effective inhibitors of Staph. aureus biofilm-related infections. We recommend MBEC™-HTP assay for rapid testing of multiple substances and TMZF(®) and CrCo discs for low-throughput testing of antibiotic susceptibility and for microscopic analysis. In vitro assays can improve the understanding of biofilms and help developing methods to eliminate biofilms from implant surfaces. One advantage of the TMZF(®) and CrCo discs as biofilm in vitro assay is that these metals are commonly used for orthopaedic implants. These models are usable for future periprosthetic joint infection studies. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Test results from a helium gas-cooled porous metal heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, M.T.; Rosenfeld, J.H.; Youchison, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A helium-cooled porous metal heat exchanger was built and tested, which successfully absorbed heat fluxes exceeding all previously tested gas-cooled designs. Helium-cooled plasma-facing components are being evaluated for fusion applications. Helium is a favorable coolant for fusion devices because it is not a plasma contaminant, it is not easily activated, and it is easily removed from the device in the event of a leak. The main drawback of gas coolants is their relatively poor thermal transport properties. This limitation can be removed through use of a highly efficient heat exchanger design. A low flow resistance porous metal heat exchanger design was developed, based on the requirements for the Faraday shield for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device. High heat flux tests were conducted on two representative test articles at the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories. Absorbed heat fluxes as high as 40 MW/m 2 were successfully removed during these tests without failure of the devices. Commercial applications for electronics cooling and other high heat flux applications are being identified

  1. Standard practice for conducting force controlled constant amplitude axial fatigue tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the procedure for the performance of axial force controlled fatigue tests to obtain the fatigue strength of metallic materials in the fatigue regime where the strains are predominately elastic, both upon initial loading and throughout the test. This practice is limited to the fatigue testing of axial unnotched and notched specimens subjected to a constant amplitude, periodic forcing function in air at room temperature. This practice is not intended for application in axial fatigue tests of components or parts. Note 1-The following documents, although not directly referenced in the text, are considered important enough to be listed in this practice: E 739 Practice for Statistical Analysis of Linear or Linearized Stress-Life (S-N) and Strain-Life (-N) Fatigue Data STP 566 Handbook of Fatigue Testing STP 588 Manual on Statistical Planning and Analysis for Fatigue Experiments STP 731 Tables for Estimating Median Fatigue Limits

  2. Testing and Prediction of Limits of Lubrication in Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Increasing focus on environmental issues in industrial production has urged a number of sheet metal forming companies to look for new tribo-systems, here meaning the combination of tool_material/workpiece_material/lubricant, in order to substitute hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...... oils. Testing of new tribo-systems under production conditions is, however, very costly. For preliminary testing it is more feasible to introduce laboratory tests. In this paper a new methodology for testing new tribo-systems is presented. The methodology describes a series of investigations combining...... laboratory and production tests as well as numerical analyses in order to evaluate and compare performance of the new tribo-systems. A part is selected from industrial production and analyzed by this methodology in order to substitute the existing tribo-system with a new one....

  3. Influence of solid-liquid separation method parameters employed in soil leaching tests on apparent metal concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Yukari; Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Someya, Masayuki; Higashino, Kazuo

    2018-05-15

    Soil leaching tests are commonly used to evaluate the leachability of hazardous materials, such as heavy metals, from the soil. Batch leaching tests often enhance soil colloidal mobility and may require solid-liquid separation procedures to remove excess soil particles. However, batch leaching test results depend on particles that can pass through a 0.45μm membrane filter and are influenced by test parameters such as centrifugal intensity and filtration volume per filter. To evaluate these parameters, we conducted batch leaching experiments using metal-contaminated soils and focused on the centrifugal intensity and filtration volume per filter used in solid-liquid separation methods currently employed in standard leaching tests. Our experiments showed that both centrifugal intensity and filtration volume per filter affected the reproducibility of batch leaching tests for some soil types. The results demonstrated that metal concentrations in the filtrates significantly differed according to the centrifugal intensity when it was 3000 g for 2h or less. Increased filtration volume per filter led to significant decreases in filtrate metal concentrations when filter cakes formed during filtration. Comparison of the filtration tests using 0.10 and 0.45μm membrane filters showed statistically significant differences in turbidity and metal concentration. These findings suggest that colloidal particles were not adequately removed from the extract and contributed substantially to the apparent metal concentrations in the leaching test of soil containing colloidal metals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proposed Testing to Assess the Accuracy of Glass-To-Metal Seal Stress Analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.; Gibson, Cory S; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-09-01

    The material characterization tests conducted on 304L VAR stainless steel and Schott 8061 glass have provided higher fidelity data for calibration of material models used in Glass - T o - Metal (GTM) seal analyses. Specifically, a Thermo - Multi - Linear Elastic Plastic ( thermo - MLEP) material model has be en defined for S S304L and the Simplified Potential Energy Clock nonlinear visc oelastic model has been calibrated for the S8061 glass. To assess the accuracy of finite element stress analyses of GTM seals, a suite of tests are proposed to provide data for comparison to mo del predictions.

  5. Numerical simulation of non-standard tensile tests of thin metal foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzon, Gabriella; Shahmardani, Mahdieh

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of the fracture processes occurring in thin metal foils can be evidenced by tensile tests performed on samples of non-standard dimensions. The load versus displacement record of these experiments does not return directly the local stress-strain relationship and the fracture characteristics of the investigated material. In fact, the overall response of thin foils is sensitive to local imperfections, size and geometric effects. Simulation models of the performed tests can support the interpretation of the experimental results, provided that the most significant physical phenomena are captured. The present contribution focuses on the role of modelling details on the numerical output that can be obtained in this context.

  6. Testing and modelling of industrial tribo-systems for sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Leth; Nielsen, Peter Søe; Bay, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Galling is a well-known problem in sheet metal forming of tribological difficult materials such as stainless steel. In this work new, environmentally friendly lubricants and wear resistant tool materials are tested in a laboratory environment using a strip reduction test as well as in a real prod....... The backstroke force and tool surface temperature are found to be highly sensitive to the initiation of galling. Furthermore the results combined with numerical investigations indicates that the level of the interface temperature is a vital factor predicting the initiation of galling....

  7. Test module in NET for a self-cooled liquid metal blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Arheidt, K.; Fischer, U.

    1989-01-01

    The application of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket concept to the condition of a DEMO-reactor and its testing in NET is described. The neutronics analysis shows that tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved without beryllium multiplier if breeding blankets are arranged at both outboard and inboard side of the torus or, using beryllium as multiplier, with outboard breeding only. First estimates indicate that it should be possible to test all relevant features of the concept in one of the horizontal plug positions of NET. (author). 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Friction and wear in liquid-metal systems: comparability problems of test results obtained from different test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, E.; Mack, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    Operational induced relative movements take place between contacting components in the core region of sodium cooled reactors. To ensure reliable long term functioning of such friction loaded components, materials are needed with good sliding properties and high wear resistance. Therefore, tribological properties of material combinations in liquid metal have been investigated experimentally for many years at various research establishments. However, despite identical boundary conditions, the comparison of results published does not yield a satisfactory agreement. The cause must be seen in the individual design and concept of the test sections used. This discrepancy was investigated. The results show that the elasticity, mass movement, and relative motion characteristic to the system prove to be the most important criteria influencing the test results

  9. Preliminary Tuft Testing of Metallic Bristles Versus PS212, PS300, and HVOF300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenstein, James A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Turbine engine brush seals are designed with sacrificial brushes and hard shaft coatings to minimize shaft wear and reduce the cost of engine overhauls. Replacing a worm seal is more cost and time effective than refinishing an engine shaft. However, this tribological design causes excessive brush wear and reduces long term seal efficiency. An alternative approach is to coat the shaft with a solid lubricant and allow the bristles to wear into the shaft coating similar to traditional abradable labyrinth seals. This approach can result in reduced seal leakage by forcing the leakage to flow through the seal bristle pack or through a more tortuous shaft wear track. Key to this approach is limiting the shaft wear to an acceptable level were surface refinishing would not be required during every engine overhaul. Included in this paper are brush seal tuft test results for four metallic bristles (nickel-chrome or cobalt-chrome based superalloys) tested against three solid lubricant coatings (NASA's PS212, PS300, and HVOF300). These test results are also compared to previous baseline tests conducted with plasma sprayed chrome carbide. Compared to the baseline results, no tribological benefit was achieved with the metallic bristle/solid lubricant tribopairs tested. To improve the performance of the solid lubricant coatings, issues regarding lubricant phase sizes (homogeneity), and composition need to be addressed.

  10. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  11. Standard test method for ball punch deformation of metallic sheet material

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the procedure for conducting the ball punch deformation test for metallic sheet materials intended for forming applications. The test applies to specimens with thicknesses between 0.008 and 0.080 in. (0.20 and 2.00 mm). 1.2 The values stated in inch–pound units are to be regarded as the standard. Note 1—The ball punch deformation test is intended to replace the Olsen cup test by standardizing many of the test parameters that previously have been left to the discretion of the testing laboratory. Note 2—The modified Erichsen test has been standardized in Europe. The main differences between the ball punch deformation test and the Erichsen test are the diameters of the penetrator and the dies. Erichsen cup heights are given in SI units. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 This standard does...

  12. Oxide-metal corium-concrete interaction test in the Vulcano facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, Ch.; Piluso, P.; Haquet, J.F.; Saretta, S.; Boccaccio, E.; Bonnet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Corium is likely to melt through the vessel and interact with the reactor pit concrete. Corium is made of a UO 2 -rich oxidic part, in which most of the decay heat is dissipated, and of a metallic part, mainly molten steel. An experiment has been set up in the Vulcano facility in which oxidic and metallic mixtures are molten in separate furnaces and poured in a concrete cavity. Induction heating is provided to the pool upper part thanks to shielding coils, so that, in case of stratification, the lighter oxidic corium-concrete mixture receives most of the power. Pre-calculations with the TOLBIAC-ICB corium-concrete interaction code based on the phase segregation model have provided valuable information for the dimensioning of this test: a thick metallic layer (>10 kg or 4 cm) has been chosen in order to obtain significant cavity ablation profiles depending on the selected heat transfer and stratification models. Stratification of the two liquid phases is predicted to occur in less than 10 minutes. In September 2006, the experiment was performed in the Vulcano facility. The corium was made of about 15 kg of steel at 1700 C and 30 kg of oxides (70% UO 2 , 16 % ZrO 2 and 14% concrete load) above 2000 C. It was poured in a limestone-rich concrete. This concrete type was selected for the first test, since the ablation is isotropic except for the initial transient, during oxidic corium-concrete interaction tests. 32 kW of induction power have been provided to the pool during the 4-hour test. The destruction of in-concrete thermocouples indicates that ablation was first mainly radial then became isotropic. This is quite similar to the ablation progression observed during previous tests with oxidic corium interacting with this type of concrete. Important 'volcanic activity' has been observed at the corium pool surface, compared to the previous oxidic corium experiments at Vulcano. (authors)

  13. Noble-metal testing results for the West Valley vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowan, B.W.; Jain, V.

    1989-01-01

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the slurry-fed ceramic melter (SFCM) has been in test operation since December 1984 to vitrify simulated waste slurries. Over 4 yr, a moderate range of glass formulations, some containing RuO 2 , have been processed. Since these noble-metal oxides not only have a limited solubility in the melt, and are also electrically conductive, their accumulation in large amounts on the floor of the SFCM poses a potential electrical hazard to the joule-heated SFCM. The design of the WVDP melter cavity and electrode configuration is specifically intended to allow modest noble-metal accumulation without compromise to melter life or performance. In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate the amount of RuO 2 that has accumulated on the floor of the SFCM since initiation of the WVDP vitrification test program. The total amount of RuO 2 that has been processed in the SFCM to date is shown. This preliminary study indicates that the West Valley SFCM displays a good capability for sweeping insoluble noble metals through and for tolerating the remaining fraction on the floor without compromising melter life or performance over the course of the WVDP radioactive vitrification campaign

  14. Hard metals performance evaluation based on testing the transitions in their wear behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scieszka, S.F.; Filipowicz, K.

    2000-01-01

    Abrasive wear and brittle fracture lead to massive losses of function in drilling and mining equipment involving high replacement costs and extended downtime. In industrial processes involving direct impact and rubbing contact the main question remains unanswered - namely what is the optimal balance between wear resistance and fracture toughness of rock-bit hard metals. The apparatus and method presented in this paper might be able to fill this gap. During the course of this investigation the abrasive wear resistance and the fracture toughness of fifteen selected hard metals were evaluated. The apparatus used simulated the tribo-condition between drilling (mining) tools and the rock. The equation that enables calculation of the fracture toughness factor K WR , based on results from the carefully controlled repeated abrasion tests, is proposed (author)

  15. Metal/ceramic X-ray tubes for non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, W.; Peter, D.; Reiber, K.

    1984-01-01

    As a wall material for X-ray tubes, glass has a number of disadvantages. The tube is relatively fragile, charge builds up on the tube wall, and current poths may form due to ''hopping'' of electrons. These problems can be avoided by means of metal/ceramic technology and an improved tube geometry. In a new generation of X-ray tubes for macroscopic testing of materials it has been possible to halve the linear dimensions and to reduce the weight to a quarter of that of conventional tubes with a glass wall. The new tubes have an earthed metal wall, so that there was no need for insulating oil around the tube. Typical examples of applications of the new tubes are presented. (orig.) [de

  16. Usefulness of fibroblast culture for testing of cattle tissues polluted with heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weglarz, L.; Drozdz, M.Wa.; Wardas, M.; Kula, B.; Pawlaczyk-Szpilowa, M.

    1990-01-01

    Cattle tissues (liver, kidney, brain, and lung) that had been polluted with heavy metals were tested for their ability to alter fibroblast culture growth, cellular protein and DNA content, and fibroblast DNA synthesis. At 72 hr of incubation a significant increase in cellular DNA and [14C]thymidine incorporation was noted in the primary cultures as well as in the subcultures compared to controls. Fibroblast cultures also displayed growth inhibition and reduction in protein content. The measurement of basic biochemical parameters of the fibroblast culture may represent a sensitive means of assessing rapidly the activity of heavy metals deposited in the tissues of cattle as a result of their grazing on polluted soil

  17. Testing in artificial sweat - Is less more? Comparison of metal release in two different artificial sweat solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midander, Klara; Julander, Anneli; Kettelarij, Jolinde; Lidén, Carola

    2016-11-01

    Metal release from materials immersed in artificial sweat can function as a measure of potential skin exposure. Several artificial sweat models exist that, to various degree, mimic realistic conditions. Study objective was to evaluate metal release from previously examined and well characterized materials in two different artificial sweat solutions; a comprehensive sweat model intended for use within research, based on the composition of human sweat; and the artificial sweat, EN1811, intended for testing compliance with the nickel restriction in REACH. The aim was to better understand whether there are advantages using either of the sweat solutions in bio-elution testing of materials. Metal release in two different artificial sweat solutions was compared for discs of a white gold alloy and two hard metals, and a rock drilling insert of tungsten carbide at 1 h, 24 h, 1 week and 1 month. The released amount of metal was analysed by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Similar levels of released metals were measured from test materials in the two different artificial sweat solutions. For purposes in relation to legislations, it was concluded that a metal release test using a simple artificial sweat composition may provide results that sufficiently indicate the degree of metal release at skin contact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  19. Design, analysis, and testing of a metal matrix composite web/flange intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, S. B.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Moran, S. G.; Olliffe, R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program to study the local design details of a typical T-shaped web/flange intersection made from a metal matrix composite is described. Loads creating flange bending were applied to specimens having different designs and boundary conditions. Finite element analyses were conducted on models of the test specimens to predict the structural response. The analyses correctly predict failure load, mode, and location in the fillet material in the intersection region of the web and the flange when specimen quality is good. The test program shows the importance of fabrication quality in the intersection region. The full-scale test program that led to the investigation of this local detail is also described.

  20. Off-Line Testing of Tribo-Systems for Sheet Metal Forming Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Ceron, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    Off-line testing of new tribo-systems for sheet metal forming production is an important issue, when new, environmentally benign lubricants are to be introduced. To obtain useful results it is, however, vital to ensure similar conditions as in the production process regarding the main tribo......-parameters, which are tool/workpiece normal pressure, sliding length, sliding speed and interface contact temperature. The paper describes a generic methodology for such tests exemplified on an industrial, multistage deep drawing example, where deep drawing is followed by two successive re-drawing operations...... leading to very high tool/workpiece interface pressure and temperature in the second re-draw. Under such conditions only the best lubricant systems work satisfactory, and the paper shows how the performance of different tribo-systems in production may be predicted by off-line testing combined...

  1. Strain measurement technique for elevated temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a strain measurement technique suitable for elevated-temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals, using a modified commonly available mechanical extensometer in conjunction with a displacement transducer. The extensometer was modified by attaching to it a counterbalance (to reduce the effect of the extensometer weight on the total maximum test load) and by incorporating a conical tip/flat-edge design (to minimize induced stresses in the specimen resulting from extensometer attachment). Creep tests were performed on 0.102-mm-thick specimens of Ti-6Al-4V at temperatures of 427 and 538 C, at nominal applied stresses of 310.3 and 172.4 MPa, respectively. Examination of the resulting creep curves suggested that the strain measurement system provided actual creep strain values with good accuracy.

  2. Dissolution Behaviour of Metal Elements from Several Types of E-waste Using Leaching Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Amira Nordin, Nurul; Mohamad, Fariza; Jaibee, Shafizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Omar, Badrul; Fauzi Ahmad, Mohd; Rahim, Abd Khalil Abd; Kamaruddin, Muhamad Khalif Ikhwan Mohd; Turan, Faiz Mohd; Abu Bakar, Elmi; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    Rapid development of the electrical and electronic was increasing annually due to the demand by the human being. Increasing production of electrical and electronic product led to the increasing of electric and electronic waste or can be called as the e-waste. The UN Environment Programme estimates that the world generates 20-50 million tons of the e-waste each year and the amount is raising three times faster than other forms of municipal waste. This study is focusing on the investigation of the dissolution behaviour of metal element from several types of e-waste by hydrometallurgical process. Leaching test was conducted on the e-waste by using acid as the reagent solution. Prior to the leaching test, manual dismantling, separation, and crushing process were carried out to the e-waste. The e-waste were characterized by Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) and the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to define the elements inside the sample of e-waste. While the liquid residue from leaching test was analyzed by using Inductively Couple Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) to define the dissolution behaviour of the metal element that contain in the e-waste. It was found that the longest time for dismantling process was the dismantling of laptop. The dissolution behaviour of Fe, Al, Zn and Pb elements in the e-waste has affected to the increase of pH. The increasing pH led to the reduction of the metals element during leaching process.

  3. Geochemical investigations of metals release from submerged coal fly ash using extended elutriate tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, A J; Chappell, M A; Seiter, J M; Stanley, J K; Averett, D E; Jones, W T; Pettway, B A; Kennedy, A J; Hendrix, S H; Steevens, J A

    2010-12-01

    A storage pond dike failure occurred at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant that resulted in the release of over 3.8 million cubic meters (5 million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of this material deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, 3.5 km upstream of the confluence of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts to date have focused on targeted removal of material from the channel through hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in some areas. The agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could alter the redox state of metals present in the fly ash and thereby change their sorption and mobility properties. A series of extended elutriate tests were used to determine the concentration and speciation of metals released from fly ash. Results indicated that arsenic and selenium species released from the fly ash materials during elutriate preparation were redox stable over the course of 10d, with dissolved arsenic being present as arsenate, and dissolved selenium being present as selenite. Concentrations of certain metals, such as arsenic, selenium, vanadium, and barium, increased in the elutriate waters over the 10d study, whereas manganese concentrations decreased, likely due to oxidation and precipitation reactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Standard test method for determining the orientation of a metal crystal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the back-reflection Laue procedure for determining the orientation of a metal crystal. The back-reflection Laue method for determining crystal orientation (1, 2) may be applied to macrograins (3) (0.5-mm diameter or larger) within polycrystalline aggregates, as well as to single crystals of any size. The method is described with reference to cubic crystals; it can be applied equally well to hexagonal, tetragonal, or orthorhombic crystals. 1.2 Most natural crystals have well developed external faces, and the orientation of such crystals can usually be determined from inspection. The orientation of a crystal having poorly developed faces, or no faces at all (for example, a metal crystal prepared in the laboratory) must be determined by more elaborate methods. The most convenient and accurate of these involves the use of X-ray diffraction. The “orientation of a metal crystal” is known when the positions in space of the crystallographic axes of the unit cell have been located with...

  5. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium metal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium metal to determine compliance with specifications.

  6. Preliminary tests for Salix sp. tolerance to heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneanu, Mihaela; Hernea, Cornelia; Butnariu, Monica; Corneanu, Gabriel; Sărac, Ioan; Hollerbach, Wilhelm; Neţoiu, Constantin; Petcov, Andreea Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The species of Salix genus constitute potential sources of germplasm in the prevention of the environment degradation, and offer remedy for about two third from the all degradation types. The majority of the willow species, present a good adaptation to hypoxic conditions, feature which suggest that they manifest a preference for mineral nutrition in comparison with organic one. Thus, many of willow species can be developed on soils with a big amount of minerals and/or radionuclides, being both phytoremediatory species, as well as pioneer ones, contributing to the restoration of soil. Thus, the willow species, posses the capacity for development in degraded areas, natural or anthropic, as swamps, abandoning crops areas, sandy dune, riparian sandy areas, gravels, a.o. In this paper are present some laboratory comparative tests of heavy metals tolerance on four Salix sp. genotypes: clone 202 (Salix alba), hybrid 892 (Salix alba), Inger (Salix viminalis) and Gudrun (Salix viminalis). The genotypes of Salix alba are native from Romania, produced in the Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest, while the genotypes of Salix viminalis are native from Sweden, but the plant material was produced under license in Romania by REBINA Agrar SRL. As plant material were used one-year-old cuttings (5-10 cm long), with 2-6 buds each. Per genotype, per heavy metal and each of three concentration five replication were used. There were ten experimental variants for each genotype: three concentrations for each of the heavy metals; concentrations selected, in the accordance SR ISO 11269-2/March 1999 and Control (tap water). The cuttings were maintained in metalic solutions for 15 days. In the days 7th and 15th, were performed biometrical observations on: the roots number and length, the shoots number and length, the leaves number/shoot, viability of the shoots. At the end of the experiment the content in heavy metals was determined in roots and shoots (by atomic absorption

  7. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  8. Stress measurement using magnetic Barkhausen noise and metal magnetic memory testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ping; Zhu, Shougao; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Xin; Wilson, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a comparison of the magnetic Barkhausen noise (BN) and metal magnetic memory (MMM) testing techniques for stress measurement. BN has become an important non-destructive technique due to its exceptional material and stress characterization capabilities. MMM is a recently developed technique with special ability for stress detection and stress history. In the applied tensile experiment, BN and MMM signals were acquired via a BN measurement system and EMS-2003 MMM instrument. Relationships between magnetic signals and applied tensile stresses were derived from experiment results. The difference and correlation of the two methods are investigated. Conclusions were derived based on the experiment results

  9. Optical Production and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves in Metals for Nondestructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves were produced by striking the surface of a metal with the focused one-joule pulse of a Q-switched ruby laser. Rayleigh (surface) waves and longitudinal waves were detected with conventional transducers. Optical methods of detection were tested and developed. Rayleigh waves were produced with an oscillator and transducer. They were optically detected on curved polished surfaces, and on unpolished surfaces. The technique uses a knife edge to detect small angle changes of the surface as the wave pulse passes the illuminated spot. Optical flaw detection using pulse echo and attenuation is demonstrated.

  10. The increase in cobalt release in metal-on-polyethylene hip bearings in tests with third body abrasives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Danielle; Traynor, Alison; Collins, Simon N; Shelton, Julia C

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving metal-on-metal hip replacements have been attributed to corrosion products as observed by elevated cobalt and chromium ions in the blood. Although the majority of cases are reported in metal-on-metal, incidences of these reactions have been reported in the metal-on-polyethylene patient population. To date, no in vitro study has considered cobalt release for this bearing combination. This study considered four 28 mm and seven 52 mm diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings tested following ISO standard hip simulator conditions as well as under established abrasive conditions. These tests showed measurable cobalt in all bearings under standard conditions. Cobalt release, as well as polyethylene wear, increased with diameter, increasing from 52 to 255 ppb. The introduction of bone cement particles into the articulation doubled polyethylene wear and cobalt release while alumina particles produced significant damage on the heads demonstrated by cobalt levels of 70,700 ppb and an increased polyethylene wear from a mean value of 9-160 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was indicative of head damage and correlated with polyethylene wear at the next gravimetric interval. The removal of third body particles resulted in continued elevated cobalt levels in the 52 mm diameter bearings tested with alumina compared to standard conditions but the bearings tested with bone cement particles returned to standard levels. The polyethylene wear in the bone cement tested bearings also recovered to standard levels, although the alumina tested bearings continued to wear at a higher rate of 475 mm(3)/mc. Cobalt release was shown to occur in metal-on-polyethylene bearings indicating damage to the metal head resulting in increased polyethylene wear. While large diameter metal-on-polyethylene bearings may provide an increased range of motion and a reduced dislocation risk, increased levels of cobalt are likely to be released and this needs to be fully

  11. Development of a new biaxial testing system for generating forming limit diagrams for sheet metals under hot stamping conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Z; Li, N; Lin, J; Dean, TA

    2016-01-01

    Conventional experimental approaches used to generate forming limit diagrams (FLDs) for sheet metals at different linear strain paths are not applicable to hot stamping and cold die quenching processes because cooling occurs prior to deformation and consistent values of heating rate, cooling rate, deformation temperature and strain rate are not easy to obtain. A novel biaxial testing system for use in a Gleeble testing machine has been adopted to generate forming limits of sheet metals, inclu...

  12. Standard guide for pyrophoricity/combustibility testing in support of pyrophoricity analyses of metallic uranium spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers testing protocols for testing the pyrophoricity/combustibility characteristics of metallic uranium-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The testing will provide basic data for input into more detailed computer codes or analyses of thermal, chemical, and mechanical SNF responses. These analyses would support the engineered barrier system (EBS) design bases and safety assessment of extended interim storage facilities and final disposal in a geologic repository. The testing also could provide data related to licensing requirements for the design and operation of a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS) or independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). 1.2 This guide describes testing of metallic uranium and metallic uranium-based SNF in support of transportation (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR71), interim storage (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR72), and geologic repository disposal (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR60/63). The testing described ...

  13. Standard practice for slow strain rate testing to evaluate the susceptibility of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for the design, preparation, and use of axially loaded, tension test specimens and fatigue pre-cracked (fracture mechanics) specimens for use in slow strain rate (SSR) tests to investigate the resistance of metallic materials to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). While some investigators utilize SSR test techniques in combination with cyclic or fatigue loading, no attempt has been made to incorporate such techniques into this practice. 1.2 Slow strain rate testing is applicable to the evaluation of a wide variety of metallic materials in test environments which simulate aqueous, nonaqueous, and gaseous service environments over a wide range of temperatures and pressures that may cause EAC of susceptible materials. 1.3 The primary use of this practice is to furnish accepted procedures for the accelerated testing of the resistance of metallic materials to EAC under various environmental conditions. In many cases, the initiation of EAC is accelerated through the applic...

  14. Thermo-magneto-elastoplastic coupling model of metal magnetic memory testing method for ferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengpeng; Zhang, Pengcheng; Jin, Ke; Chen, Zhenmao; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2018-04-01

    Metal magnetic memory (MMM) testing (also known as micro-magnetic testing) is a new non-destructive electromagnetic testing method that can diagnose ferromagnetic materials at an early stage by measuring the MMM signal directly on the material surface. Previous experiments have shown that many factors affect MMM signals, in particular, the temperature, the elastoplastic state, and the complex environmental magnetic field. However, the fact that there have been only a few studies of either how these factors affect the signals or the physical coupling mechanisms among them seriously limits the industrial applications of MMM testing. In this paper, a nonlinear constitutive relation for a ferromagnetic material considering the influences of temperature and elastoplastic state is established under a weak magnetic field and is used to establish a nonlinear thermo-magneto-elastoplastic coupling model of MMM testing. Comparing with experimental data verifies that the proposed theoretical model can accurately describe the thermo-magneto-elastoplastic coupling influence on MMM signals. The proposed theoretical model can predict the MMM signals in a complex environment and so is expected to provide a theoretical basis for improving the degree of quantification in MMM testing.

  15. Methodology for Life Testing of Refractory Metal/Sodium Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James J.; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this work was to establish an approach to generate carefully controlled data that can conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. To accomplish this goal acceleration is required to compress 10 years of operational life into 3 years of laboratory testing through a combination of increased temperature and mass fluence. Specific test series have been identi3ed, based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, to investigate long term corrosion rates. The refractory metal selected for demonstration purposes is a Molybdenum-44.5%Rhenium alloy formed by powder metallurgy. The heat pipe makes use of an annular crescent wick design formed by hot isostatic pressing of Molybdenum-Rhenium wire mesh. The heat pipes are filled using vacuum distillation and purity sampling is considered. Testing of these units is round-the-clock with 6-month destructive and non-destructive inspection intervals to identify the onset and level of corrosion. Non-contact techniques are employed for providing power to the evaporator (radio frequency induction heating at I to 5 kW per unit) and calorimetry at the condenser (static gas gap coupled water cooled calorimeter). The planned operating temperature range would extend from 1123 to 1323 K. Accomplishments prior to project cancellation included successful demonstration of the heat pipe wick fabrication technique, establishment of all engineering designs, baselined operational test requirements and procurement/assembly of supporting test hardware systems.

  16. Development and Testing of Tailored Tool Surfaces for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulaiman, Mohd Hafis Bin

    This thesis describes measures taken to minimize or substitute environmentally hazardous lubricants applied in sheet metal forming processes by less harmful lubricants or not applying lubricant at all. The breakdown of lubricant film often leads to galling, and therefore application of the hazard......This thesis describes measures taken to minimize or substitute environmentally hazardous lubricants applied in sheet metal forming processes by less harmful lubricants or not applying lubricant at all. The breakdown of lubricant film often leads to galling, and therefore application......; compressibility of lubricants, application of structured tool surfaces and application of anti-seizure tool coatings. In order to analyze the mechanisms of lubricant entrapment and escape, knowledge of the lubricant bulk modulus characterizing the compressibility of lubricant is required. Two methods were studied...... ironing production of deep drawn, stainless steel cans, Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating were deposited on SRT tools. The DLC coated tools with multi-, double- and single-layer coating structures were tested under severe tribological conditions, i.e, high normal pressure and temperature. A screening test...

  17. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  18. Seasonal changes in the tests of fish Puntius ticto, and their relation to heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pundir, R. (Holkar Science College, Indore (India)); Saxena, A.B. (Vikram Univ., Ujjain (India))

    1990-08-01

    An integrated hypothesis explaining the implications of environmental influence on the reproductive process has not emerged owing to paucity of data. Nevertheless, evidence is at hand to show that favorable physiological disposition for reproduction is brought about with external and internal factors through the mediation of the neuroendocrine mechanisms. It is now clear that the environmental factors impinge on the exteroreceptors and through them affect the central nervous system, the hypothalamus, the pituitary and finally the gonad. Another endogenous factor is the internal rhythm, which is known to regulate at least in part the seasonal reproductive activity. A review of literature reveals that comparatively much work has been done on the structure and seasonal changes of the testes of fishes. The aim of the present study is to observe seasonal changes in the testes of fish Puntius ticto and their relation to heavy metal toxicity.

  19. Standard test method for plastic strain ratio r for sheet metal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers special tension testing for the measurement of the plastic strain ratio, r, of sheet metal intended for deep-drawing applications. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Effects of a chelating resin on metal bioavailability and toxicity to estuarine invertebrates: Divergent results of field and laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, Emma M., E-mail: ewilkie@bio.mq.edu.a [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Department of Environment and Climate Change, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Roach, Anthony C. [Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Department of Environment and Climate Change, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Micevska, Tina [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kelaher, Brendan P.; Bishop, Melanie J. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    Benthic invertebrates can uptake metals through diffusion of free ion solutes, or ingestion of sediment-bound forms. This study investigated the efficacy of the metal chelating resin SIR 300{sup TM} in adsorbing porewater metals and isolating pathways of metal exposure. A field experiment (Botany Bay, Sydney, Australia) and a laboratory toxicity test each manipulated the availability of porewater metals within contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. It was predicted that within contaminated sediments, the resin would adsorb porewater metals and reduce toxicity to invertebrates, but in uncontaminated sediments, the resin would not significantly affect these variables. Whereas in the laboratory, the resin produced the predicted results, in the field the resin increased porewater metal concentrations of contaminated sediments for at least 34 days and decreased abundances of four macroinvertebrate groups, and richness in all sediments. These contrasting findings highlight the limits of extrapolating the results of laboratory experiments to the field environment. - Laboratory experiments do not predict the effects on porewater metals or macroinvertebrates of adding a chelating resin to metal-contaminated field sediments.

  1. Impact Analyses and Tests of Metal Cask Considering Aircraft Engine Crash - 12308

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Choi, Woo-Seok; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The structural integrity of a dual purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Management Cooperation (KRMC) is evaluated through analyses and tests under a high-speed missile impact considering the targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from the literature. The missile impact velocity was set at 150 m/s, and two impact orientations were considered. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine is designed from an impact load history curve provided in the literature. In the analyses, the focus is on the evaluation of the containment boundary integrity of the metal cask. The analyses results are compared with the results of tests using a 1/3 scale model. The results show very good agreements, and the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural analyses are validated. While the integrity of the cask is maintained in one evaluation where the missile impacts the top side of the free standing cask, the containment boundary is breached in another case in which the missile impacts the center of the cask lid in a perpendicular orientation. A safety assessment using a numerical simulation of an aircraft engine crash into spent nuclear fuel storage systems is performed. A commercially available explicit finite element code is utilized for the dynamic simulation, and the strain rate effect is included in the modeling of the materials used in the target system and missile. The simulation results show very good agreement with the test results. It is noted that this is the first test considering an aircraft crash in Korea. (authors)

  2. Patch testing with a large series of metal allergens: findings from more than 1,000 patients in one decade at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark D P; Wang, Michael Z; Yiannias, James A; Keeling, James H; Connolly, Suzanne M; Richardson, Donna M; Farmer, Sara A

    2011-01-01

    The standard allergen series used in patch testing contains metals that most commonly cause allergic contact dermatitis, but testing with additional metal allergens is warranted for select patients. To report our experience with patch testing of metals. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of 1,112 patients suspected of having metal allergies. Patients were seen from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2009. Patch testing was performed with 42 metal preparations (6 in the standard series, 36 in the metal series). Patch testing most commonly was performed for patients with oral disease (almost half the patients), hand dermatitis, generalized dermatitis, and dermatitis affecting the lips, legs, arms, trunk, or face. At least one positive reaction was reported for 633 patients (57%). Metals with the highest allergic patch-test reaction rates were nickel, gold, manganese, palladium, cobalt, Ticonium, mercury, beryllium, chromium, and silver. Metals causing no allergic patch-test reactions were titanium, Vitallium, and aluminum powder. Metals with extremely low rates of allergic patch-test reactions included zinc, ferric chloride, and tin. Reaction rates varied depending on metal salt, concentration, and timing of readings. Many metals not in the standard series were associated with allergic patch-test reactions. The many questions raised by these findings, concerning patch testing with individual metals, will be the subject of future studies.

  3. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivask, Angela; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne

    2009-05-08

    Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (microg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights-off" construct (control) for every

  4. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahru Anne

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains. Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1: 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO32, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii

  5. Standard test method for determining the superplastic properties of metallic sheet materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the procedure for determining the superplastic forming properties (SPF) of a metallic sheet material. It includes tests both for the basic SPF properties and also for derived SPF properties. The test for basic properties encompasses effects due to strain hardening or softening. 1.2 This test method covers sheet materials with thicknesses of at least 0.5 mm but not greater than 6 mm. It characterizes the material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Note 1—Most industrial applications of superplastic forming involve a multi-axial stress condition in a sheet; however it is more convenient to characterize a material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Tests should be performed in different orientations to the rolling direction of the sheet to ascertain initial anisotropy. 1.3 This method has been used successfully between strain rates of 10-5 to 10-1 per second. 1.4 This method has been used successfully on Aluminum and Titanium alloys. The use of the method wi...

  6. Using a chewing simulator for fatigue testing of metal ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, S D; Eser, A; Monreal, D; Rousson, V

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic loading is a more important predictor for the clinical longevity of ceramic crowns than static loading. However, dynamic loading machines are costly and mostly have only one test station. The SD Mechatronik Chewing Simulator (formerly Willytec) may be a cost-effective alternative to evaluate the fatigue resistance of metal ceramic crowns. Four metal ceramic materials were tested on lower first molar crowns: GC InitiaI, Creation (Willy Geller), IPS InLine (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the new low-fusion IPS Style Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent). The ceramic material was manually layered on frames made of the nickel-chromium alloy 4all (Ivoclar Vivadent) by using a silicone mould. The crowns were adhesively luted to PMMA dies. Dynamic loading was carried out with a SD Mechatronik Chewing Simulator using additional bars with weights. A steel antagonist (Ø 4mm) with 40mm/s downward speed hit the disto-buccal cusp of the crown with minimal impulse while sliding for a distance of 0.7mm. The starting load was 250N. The forces at each load level had been verified with a 3D force sensor (Kistler). Four crowns per group and load were submitted to four decreasing load levels for 200,000 cycles with a resulting simulation frequency of 0.9Hz and simultaneous thermocycling (5°C/55°C) until all four crowns no longer showed chippings. Statistical analyses had been carried out using an exponential, a Weibull and a lognormal model. The fatigue resistance was defined as the maximal load for which one would observe less than 1% failure after 200,000 cycles. In addition to the fatigue testing of the molar crowns, simulations of finite element method (FEM) were conducted in order to investigate the influence of the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) between the PMMA die and the molar crown on the fatigue resistance. The 3D-force measurements revealed that the summarised forces were very similar to the force of the dead weights that were put on the bars. The failure modes

  7. Creep testing of foil-gage metals at elevated temperature using an automated data acquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    A method is being developed to obtain creep data on foil gage metals at elevated temperatures using an automated data acquisition system in conjunction with a mechanically counter balanced extensometer. The automated system components include the Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9845A desktop computer, the HP 3455A digital voltmeter and the HP 3495A scanner. Software for test monitoring and data collection was developed; data manipulation, including curve plotting was done with a HP regression analysis software package. Initial creep tests were conducted on .003 in. thick foil specimens of Ti-6A1-4V at temperatures of 800 F and 1000 F and at stress levels of 25 ksi and 45 ksi. For comparison, duplicate tests were run on .049 in. thick specimens sheet of the same alloy. During testing, the furnace and specimen temperature, bridge voltage, strain and load output were automatically monitored and recorded at predetermined intervals. Using the HP regression analysis program, recorded strain output was plotted as a function of time. These resultant creep curves indicate that, under similar conditions of temperature and stress, foil gage specimens exhibit a higher creep rate than sheet specimens.

  8. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  9. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  10. Analysis and Testing of a Metallic Repair Applicable to Pressurized Composite Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Development of repair technology is vital to the long-term application of new structural concepts on aircraft structure. The design, analysis, and testing of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a mid-bay to mid-bay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange, and skin. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from tension and pressure panel tests conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. Simulation and experimental strain and displacement results show good correlation, indicating that the finite element modeling techniques applied in the effort are an appropriate compromise between required fidelity and computational effort. Static tests under tension and pressure loadings proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. Furthermore, the pressure repair panel was subjected to 55,000 pressure load cycles to verify that the design can withstand a life cycle representative for a transport category aircraft. These findings enable upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. This conclusion enables more weight efficient structural designs utilizing the composite concept under investigation.

  11. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  12. Evaluation of metals, metalloids, and ash mixture toxicity using sediment toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojak, Amber; Bonnevie, Nancy L; Jones, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    In December 2008, a release of 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant occurred. Ash washed into the Emory River and migrated downstream into the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment evaluated risks to ecological receptors from ash in the river system post-dredging. This article describes the approach used and results from sediment toxicity tests, discussing any causal relationships between ash, metals, and toxicity. Literature is limited in the realm of aquatic coal combustion residue (CCR) exposures and the potential magnitude of effects on benthic invertebrates. Sediment samples along a spectrum of ash content were used in a tiered toxicity testing approach and included a combination of 10 day sediment toxicity acute tests and longer-term, partial life cycle "definitive" tests with 2 species (Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus). Arsenic, and to a lesser extent Se, in the ash was the most likely toxicant causing observed effects in the laboratory toxicity tests. Sites in the Emory River with the greatest statistical and biologically significant effects had As concentrations in sediments twice the probable effects concentration of 33 mg/kg. These sites contained greater than 50% ash. Sites with less than approximately 50% ash in sediments exhibited fewer significant toxic responses relative to the reference sediment in the laboratory. The results discussed here present useful evidence of only limited effects occurring from a worst-case exposure pathway. These results provided a valuable line of evidence for the overall assessment of risks to benthic invertebrates and to other ecological receptors, and were crucial to risk management and development of project remediation goals. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. Testing the electrostatic characteristics of polypropylene fabric with metallic yarns, intended for use in coal mines threatened by the explosion hazard. Part 2: Tests in coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarek, M; Orzech, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the electrostatic safety of polypropylene fabric with metallic yarns intended for use in coal mines. Such fabrics have not been used in the Polish mining industry yet. The tests conducted have been divided into two subgroups: laboratory tests and tests in a coal mine. This paper presents the results of tests in a coal mine, where we have focused on the resistance-to-ground in some specific situations. Bags made of fabric at the roadway face were tested, as well as the roll of fabric during transport and carried by a miner. The results obtained allow the reliable assessment of the risk of using fabrics with metallic yarns in the explosive atmosphere which often occurs in coal mines.

  14. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  15. The challenges of testing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in algal bioassays: titanium dioxide and gold nanoparticles as case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic toxicology of engineered nanoparticles is challenged by methodological difficulties stemming partly from highly dynamic and poorly understood behavior of nanoparticles in biological test systems. In this paper scientific and technical challenges of testing not readily soluble nanoparticle...

  16. Performance Testing of a Liquid Metal Pump for In-Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Fission surface power (FSP) systems could be used to provide power on the surface of the moon, Mars, or other planets and moons of our solar system. Fission power systems could provide excellent performance at any location, including those near the poles or other permanently shaded regions, and offer the capability to provide on demand power at any time, even at large distances from the sun. Fission-based systems also offer the potential for outposts, crew and science instruments to operate in a power-rich environment. NASA has been exploring technologies with the goal of reducing the cost and technical risk of employing FSP systems. A reference 40 kWe option has been devised that is cost-competitive with alternatives while providing more power for less mass anywhere on the lunar surface. The reference FSP system is also readily extensible for use on Mars, where it would be capable of operating through global dust storms and providing year-round power at any Martian latitude. Detailed development of the FSP concept and the reference mission are documented in various other reports. The development discussed in this paper prepares the way for testing of the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU), which is a 10 kWe end-to-end test of FSP technologies intended to raise the entire FSP system to technology readiness level (TRL) 6. The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) was established by NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide a capability for performing hardware-directed activities to support multiple in-space nuclear reactor concepts by using a nonnuclear test methodology. This includes fabrication and testing at both the module/component level and at near prototypic reactor components and configurations allowing for realistic thermal-hydraulic evaluations of systems. The liquid-metal pump associated with the FSP system must be compatible with the liquid NaK coolant and have adequate performance to enable a viable flight system. Idaho National

  17. Fabrication experience of sodium bonded metallic test fuel with U-6%Zr in T91 clad tube for irradiation in FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidaran, P.; Prabhu, T.V.; Manivannan, A.; Vinod, A.V.; Padmanabhan, R.; Ravisankar, G.; Ganesan, V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Future fast reactors in India will be fuelled by metallic alloys to achieve the enhanced breeding necessary to ensure rapid growth of power generation. Since, experience in fabrication and irradiation of metallic alloy fuel does not exist in the country, it is necessary to generate fabrication and irradiation experience before launching commercial FBRs with metallic alloy fuel. As part of this development, sodium bonded metallic test fuel pin fabrication was taken up at IGCAR. This paper describes the fabrication experience of sodium bonded metallic test fuel pin using Nat. U-6%Zr and T91 clad tube towards test irradiation in FBTR at Chemistry Group

  18. Microwave-assisted digestion using nitric acid for heavy metals and sulfated ash testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhácek, T; Hanzal, J; Hendrych, J; Milde, D

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of inorganic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients plays a crucial role in the quality control of the pharmaceutical production. The heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash methods employing microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid have been demonstrated as alternatives to inappropriate compendial methods recommended in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The recoveries using the heavy metals method ranged between 89% and 122% for nearly all USP and Ph. Eur. restricted elements as well as the recoveries of sodium sulfate spikes were around 100% in all tested matrices. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion method allowed simultaneous decomposition of 15 different active pharmaceutical ingredients with sample weigh up to 1 g. The heavy metals and sulfated ash procedures were successfully applied to the determination of heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash content in mycophenolate mofetil, nicergoline and silymarin.

  19. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  20. Infrared Thermography as a Non-destructive Testing Solution for Thermal Spray Metal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Paolo E.; Allesina, Giulio; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Matikainen, Ville; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-12-01

    In this work, an infrared (IR) thermographic procedure was evaluated as a non-destructive testing tool to detect damage in thermal spray metallic coatings. As model systems, polished HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Fe-based layers deposited onto steel plates were employed. Damage by external-object impingement was simulated through a cyclic impact-test apparatus, which induced circumferential and radial cracks across all model systems, and interface cracks of different sizes in distinct samples. Damaged and undamaged plates were bulk-heated to above 100 °C using an IR lamp; their free-convection cooling was then recorded by an IR thermocamera. The intentionally induced defects were hardly detectable in IR thermograms, due to IR reflection and artificial "hot" spots induced by residuals of transfer material from the impacting counterbody. As a micrometer-thin layer of black paint was applied, surface emissivity got homogenized and any artifacts were effectively suppressed, so that failed coating areas clearly showed up as "cold spots." This effect was more apparent when large interface cracks occurred. Finite-element modeling proved the physical significance of the IR-thermography approach, showing that failed coating areas are cooled by surrounding air faster than they are heated by conduction from the hot substrate, which is due to the insulating effect of cracks.

  1. Activity Tests of Macro-Meso Porous Catalysts over Metal Foam Plate for Steam Reforming of Bio-Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Kuk; Jeong, Yong Han; Kang, Misook; Lee, Tae Jin

    2018-09-01

    The catalytic activity of a macro-mesoporous catalyst coated on a metal foam plate in the reforming of bio-ethanol to synthesis gas was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by coating a support with a noble metal and transition metal. The catalytic activity for the production of synthetic gas by the reforming of bio-ethanol was compared according to the support material, reaction temperature, and steam/carbon ratio. The catalysts coated on the metal foams were prepared using a template method, in which macro-pores and meso-pores were formed by mixing polymer beads. In particular, the thermodynamic equilibrium composition of bio-ethanol reforming with the reaction temperature and steam/carbon ratio to produce synthetic gas was examined using the HSC (Enthalpy-Entropy-Heat capacity) chemistry program in this study. The composition of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the reformate gas produced by steam reforming over the Rh/Ni-Ce-Zr/Al2O3-based pellet type catalysts and metal foam catalysts that had been coated with the Rh/Al-Ce-Zr-based catalysts was investigated by experimental activity tests. The activity of the metal foam catalyst was higher than that of the pellet type catalyst.

  2. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  3. Batch and column tests of metal mobilization in soil impacted by landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Mecozzi, R

    2010-01-01

    The percolation of landfill leachate, even in the absence of a high concentration of specific pollutant, may induce a strong modification of soil chemical and physical characteristics, due to the alteration of the natural equilibrium between the aqueous phase and the soil matrix. As a result, a huge amount of cations can be solubilized, thus inducing groundwater pollution. In this work batch and column experiments of metal mobilization from a soil sampled down gradient of a municipal waste landfill in Northern Italy are presented. The experiments were initially performed in batch scale on soil slurries at different pH and Eh. Distilled water was used first and then a groundwater sampled down-gradient in the same site. Subsequently, to better simulate the aquifer conditions, 50 d column tests were performed on 15 kg of saturated soil. The concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Ni were evaluated when these selected environmental parameters were altered. Results indicated a greater release when acidic conditions were achieved, a positive effect in this case of the addition of an oxidant and a great Mn mobilization when negative redox potentials were established. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metallic mirrors for plasma diagnosis in current and future reactors: tests for ITER and DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, M.; Moon, Soonwoo; Petersson, P.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Hallén, A.; Krawczynska, A.; Fortuna-Zaleśna, E.; Gilbert, M.; Płociński, T.; Widdowson, A.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging diagnostics in next-step fusion devices will rely on metallic mirrors. The performance of mirrors is studied in present-day tokamaks and in laboratory systems. This work deals with comprehensive tests of mirrors: (a) exposed in JET with the ITER-like wall (JET-ILW); (b) irradiated by hydrogen, helium and heavy ions to simulate transmutation effects and damage which may be induced by neutrons under reactor conditions. The emphasis has been on surface modification: deposited layers on JET mirrors from the divertor and on near-surface damage in ion-irradiated targets. Analyses performed with ion beams, microscopy and spectro-photometry techniques have revealed: (i) the formation of multiple co-deposited layers; (ii) flaking-off of the layers already in the tokamak, despite the small thickness (130–200 nm) of the granular deposits; (iii) deposition of dust particles (0.2–5 μm, 300–400 mm‑2) composed mainly of tungsten and nickel; (iv) that the stepwise irradiation of up to 30 dpa by heavy ions (Mo, Zr or Nb) caused only small changes in the optical performance, in some cases even improving reflectivity due to the removal of the surface oxide layer; (v) significant reflectivity degradation related to bubble formation caused by the irradiation with He and H ions.

  5. Characteristics of Metal Magnetic Memory Testing of 35CrMo Steel during Fatigue Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue fracture of a drillstring could cause drilling disturbances and some negative impacts (e.g., economic loss will be brought when restoring the drillstring to functionality. In order to evaluate the effects of the fatigue damage of the drillstring during drilling, a new apparatus, which could monitor the load level in real-time, was built to perform the four-point bending fatigue test on 35CrMo steel, a typical material of drillstrings. Such an apparatus is based on metal magnetic memory (MMM technology and can acquire the tangential and normal components of MMM signals. Based on the analysis of the change of surface morphology and MMM signals, it was concluded that the variation of MMM signals could be divided into four stages, which are used to accurately describe the fatigue damage process of the drillstring. Additionally, the MMM signal characteristics are introduced to especially evaluate the fatigue damage of the drillstring, including crack initiation. Furthermore, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM results demonstrated that morphologies of fatigue fracture were related to the variation of MMM signals. Linear fitting results indicated that fatigue crack length had a good linear relationship with the characteristics, so it is feasible to monitor fatigue damage and predict the residual life of a drillstring by using MMM technology.

  6. Measurement of volatiles, semi-volatiles and heavy metals in an oil burn test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.; Caron, T.; Landriault, M.; Pare, J.R.J.; Fingas, M.

    1992-01-01

    Tests involving meso-scale burning of Louisiana crude oil were conducted, and during each burn, extensive samples were taken from the oil, residue, and the smoke plume. The detailed analytical work employed to obtain and analyze the burn samples is outlined and discussed. The analytical parameters included volatiles and semi-volatiles of environmental interests as well as heavy metals typically contained in the starting crude oil. Because the smoke plume did not always impinge on the samplers, the ground samplers did not collect sufficient samples for a definitive analysis. Crude/residue analyses showed the burn resulted in a significant reduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the original oil. Most of the reduction was thought to be simply evaporation or destruction from combustion. The residue did not have the degree of enrichment of the higher molecular weight PAHs as was the case in bench-scale burn experiments. Volatile organic compound and dioxin/furan measurements likewise did not show high levels of contamination from the burn itself. Most of the elevated levels of contaminants could probably be due to evaporation of the oil itself. Insufficient sampling was conducted to investigate the background levels from the weathering process. A novel means of sampling using a small remote controlled helicopter was attempted and sufficiently interesting results were obtained to indicate the potential of this passive sampling device for future work. 5 refs., 4 figs

  7. Mechanical properties testing of several 800 MeV proton irradiated BCC metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S.; Tschalaer, C.

    1986-01-01

    A spallation neutron source for the 600-MeV proton accelerator facility at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN) consists of a vertical cylinder filled with molten Pb-Bi. The proton beam enters the cylinder, passing upward through a window in contact with the Pb-Bi eutectic liquid. Investigations are underway at the 800-MeV proton accelerator at LAMPF to test the performance of candidate SIN window materials. Based on considerations of chemical compatibility with molten Pb-Bi, as well as radiation damage mechanisms, Fe, Ta, Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo, and Fe-12Cr-1Mo (Ht-9) were chosen as candidate materials. Sheet tensile samples were sealed inside capsules containing Pb-Bi and were proton-irradiated at LAMPF to two fluences, 4.8 and 54 x 10 23 p/m 2 . The beam current was approximately equal to the 1 mA anticipated for the upgraded SIN accelerator. Yield and ultimate strengths increased upon irradiation in all materials, while the ductility decreased. The pure metals, Ta and Fe, exhibited the greatest radiation hardening and embrittlement. The HT-9 alloy showed the smallest changes in strength and ductility

  8. Reproducible direct exposure environmental testing of metal-based magnetic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    A flow geometry and flow rate for mixed flowing gas testing is proposed. Use of an impinging jet of humid polluted air can provide a uniform and reproducible exposure of coupons of metal-based magnetic media. Numerical analysis of the fluid flow and mass transfer in such as system has shown that samples confined within a distance equal to the nozzle radius on the surface of impingement are uniformly accessible to pollutants in the impinging gas phase. The critical factor is the nozzle height above the surface of impingement. In particular, the uniformity of exposure is less than plus/minus 2% for a volumetric flow rate of 1600 cm(exp 3)/minute total flow with the following specifications: For a one inch nozzle, the height of the nozzle opening above the stage should be 0.177 inches; for a 2 inch nozzle - 0.390 inches. Not only is the distribution uniform, but one can calculate the maximum delivery rate of pollutants to the samples for comparison with the observed deterioration.

  9. Recommended practice for small punch (SP) testing of metallic materials (draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo; Mao, Xinyuan

    1988-09-01

    This practice covers the determination of fracture toughness characteristics of metallic materials such as ductile to brittle transition temperature (SPDBTT) and elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J ICSP ) using miniature small punch (SP) specimens. Three kinds of specimens with different shape; 10 by 10 by 0.5 mm, 10 by 10 by 0.25 mm and φ3 by 0.25 mm, are selected as the standard SP specimens. Two types of fixture shall be respectively used for the 10 and φ3 specimens. The relationship between load and deflection during buldge tests shall be recorded from low to high temperatures. Following two parameters in relation to fracture toughness are obtained from analyses of load-deflection curves: (1) The SP energy is calculated from the area surrounded with load-deflection curves, which corresponds to the total energy consumed up to the fracture. (2) The equivalent fracture strain (ε-bar qf ) is calculated from the maximum deflection at fracture (δ*). The SPDBTT can be derived from temperature dependence of SP energy, and the J ICSP can be estimated from the rational correlation curve between ε-bar qf and J IC . (author)

  10. Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, G.L.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Scratch test of thermoplastic denture base resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Misao; Iwata, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Masatoshi; Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Asano, Takashi; Komiyama, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Several thermoplastic denture base resins have been introduced for the fabrication of non-metal clasp dentures. Although the surface of these materials is easily damaged, the surface roughness and characteristics of scratches created have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of thermoplastic resins using a scratch test for the development of future materials. Four thermoplastic (polyamide: Valplast(®); VLP and Lucitone FRS(®); FRS, polyethylene terephthalate: EstheShot(®); ES, and polyester: EstheShot Bright(®); ESB) and two conventional acrylic (Heat-polymerizing: Urban(®); HC, and Pour type auto-polymerizing: Pro-Cast DSP(®); PR) denture base resins were examined. Eight specimens, approximately 10mm×10mm×30mm in size, of each material were fabricated. Scratch test was performed by a scratch tester with a diamond indenter of 10-μm radius and cone angle 90°, applying a constant load of 500mN, and 2-mm-long scratches were made. The scratch marks were studied under 3D laser measuring microscope and cross-section profiles at approximately 0.5mm, 1.0mm, and 1.5mm from the starting point were extracted and measured with analysis software. Data from 24 cross-section profiles in each denture base material were analyzed. The maximum depths of ES, ESB and FRS were greater than VLP, PR and HC, and the scratch widths of ES, ESB, FRS and VPL were greater than PR and HC. The results showed that the surface of thermoplastic denture base resins was easily damaged compared to polymethyl methacrylate. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a finite element model for comparing metal and composite fuselage section drop testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gransden, D.I.; Alderliesten, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the work of AircraftFire, a project investigating the effects of fire and crash on aircraft survivability, is presented. This work compares the effect of changing the material model from metallic to composite on the impact damage and floor acceleration characteristics. First, the metallic

  13. Validation of an in vitro cytotoxicity test for four heavy metals using cell lines derived from a green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fengxia; Wang, Min; Wang, Weimin; Alonso Aguirre, A; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-06-01

    Ten cell lines established from juvenile green sea turtles were tested and evaluated for their cytotoxic responses to four heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu). Following a 24-h exposure to these metal salts at selected concentrations, test cells were comparatively characterized by morphology, viability, and proliferation. Experimental results indicated that all these metal salts were cytotoxic to these turtle cell lines at varied concentrations. Calculated 10% and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(10) and IC(50)) values revealed that the cytotoxicities of Cd and Cr were significantly more potent than the other two metal salts (p metal contamination and may be used for initial environmental monitoring, while the highly tolerant nature of GT-LV and GT-EYE cells to the tested heavy metals suggest their potential use as an emergency last-resort indicator of potential metal-related adverse effect on human health.

  14. Heavy metal contaminant remediation study of western Xiamen Bay sediment, China: laboratory bench scale testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luoping; Feng, Huan; Li, Xiaoxia; Ye, Xin; Jing, Youhai; Ouyang, Tong; Yu, Xingtian; Liang, Rongyuan; Chen, Weiqi

    2009-12-15

    A surface sediment sample (metal removal, whereas agitation, aeration and rotation of the samples in chemical complexation solutions yield much better metal removal efficiency (up to 90%). A low pH condition (e.g., pHliquid ratio (e.g., S:L=1:50) could increase metal removal efficiency. The experimental results suggest that 0.20 M (NH4)2C2O4+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 and 0.50 M ammonium acetate (NH4Ac)+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 are the most effective methods for metal removal from the contaminated sediments. This research provides additional useful information for sediment metal remediation technology development.

  15. Method and composition for testing for the presence of an alkali metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guon, Jerold

    1981-01-01

    A method and composition for detecting the presence of an alkali metal on the surface of a body such as a metal plate, tank, pipe or the like is provided. The method comprises contacting the surface with a thin film of a liquid composition comprising a light-colored pigment, an acid-base indicator, and a nonionic wetting agent dispersed in a liquid carrier comprising a minor amount of water and a major amount of an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of the lower aliphatic alcohols, ketones and ethers. Any alkali metal present on the surface in elemental form or as an alkali metal hydroxide or alkali metal carbonate will react with the acid-base indicator to produce a contrasting color change in the thin film, which is readily discernible by visual observation or automatic techniques.

  16. Method and composition for testing for the presence of an alkali metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guon, J.

    1981-01-01

    A method and composition for detecting the presence of an alkali metal on the surface of a body such as a metal plate, tank, pipe or the like is provided. The method comprises contacting the surface with a thin film of a liquid composition comprising a light-colored pigment, an acid-base indicator, and a nonionic wetting agent dispersed in a liquid carrier comprising a minor amount of water and a major amount of an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of the lower aliphatic alcohols, ketones and ethers. Any alkali metal present on the surface in elemental form or as an alkali metal hydroxide or alkali metal carbonate will react with the acid-base indicator to produce a contrasting color change in the thin film, which is readily discernible by visual observation or automatic techniques

  17. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  18. The dynamics of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces: testing the foundations of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  19. Heavy metals in toys and low-cost jewelry: critical review of U.S. and Canadian legislations and recommendations for testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Mert; Zagury, Gerald J

    2012-04-17

    High metal contamination in toys and low-cost jewelry is a widespread problem, and metals can become bioavailable, especially via oral pathway due to common child-specific behaviors of mouthing and pica. In this review, the U.S., Canadian, and European Union (EU) legislations on metals in toys and jewelry are evaluated. A literature review on content, bioavailability, children's exposure, and testing of metals in toys and low-cost jewelry is provided. A list of priority metals is presented, and research needs and legislative recommendations are addressed. While the U.S. and Canadian legislations put emphasis on lead exposure prevention, other toxic elements like arsenic and cadmium in toy materials are not regulated except in paint and coatings. The EU legislation is more comprehensive in terms of contaminants and scientific approach. Current toy testing procedures do not fully consider metal bioavailability. In vitro bioaccessibility tests developed and validated for toys and corresponding metal bioaccessibility data in different toy matrices are lacking. The U.S. and Canadian legislations should put more emphasis on metal bioavailability and on other metals in addition to lead. A two-step management approach with mandatory testing of toys for total metal concentrations followed by voluntary bioaccessibility testing could be implemented.

  20. Determination of Focal Laws for Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing of Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Ye; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Song, Myung Ho; Kang, Suk Chull; Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Cho

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of dissimilar metal welds using phased array ultrasound is not easy at all, because crystalline structure of dissimilar metal welds cause deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beams. Thus, in order to have focusing and/or steering phased array beams in dissimilar metal welds, proper time delays should be determined by ray tracing. In this paper, we proposed an effective approach to solve this difficult problem. Specifically, we modify the Oglivy's model parameters to describe the crystalline structure of real dissimilar metal welds in a fabricated specimen. And then, we calculate the proper time delay and incident angle of linear phased array transducer in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous material for focusing and/or steering phased array ultrasonic beams on the desired position

  1. Testing the Planet-Metallicity Correlation in M-dwarfs with Gemini GNIRS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, M. J.; Jofré, E.; García, L.; Petrucci, R.; Gómez, M.

    2018-04-01

    While the planet-metallicity correlation for FGK main-sequence stars hosting giant planets is well established, it is less clear for M-dwarf stars. We determine stellar parameters and metallicities for 16 M-dwarf stars, 11 of which host planets, with near-infrared spectra from the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS). We find that M-dwarfs with planets are preferentially metal-rich compared to those without planets. This result is supported by the analysis of a larger catalogue of 18 M stars with planets and 213 M stars without known planets T15, and demonstrates the utility of GNIRS spectra to obtain reliable stellar parameters of M stars. We also find that M dwarfs with giant planets are preferentially more metallic than those with low-mass planets, in agreement with previous results for solar-type stars. These results favor the core accretion model of planetary formation.

  2. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  3. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Kraus, Adam

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6σ confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  4. Metals interaction tested in children’s hair originating from industrial and rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kwapulinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Different biological samples (blood, gallstone, teeth, hair serve as a biomarker of exposure to metals for many years. This method appeared to be useful not only in clinical medicine, but also in the studies on the environment. Aim. The study is to compare the amount of selected metals in children’s hair residing in industrial and rural areas. Material and methods. Research of occurrence of 12 metals in children’s hair at the age of 7, 10 and 14 living in an industrial (Nowy Bytom town and a rural (Strumień town areas has been presented. Determination of Pb, Cd, Ni, Co Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe and Ca was carried out by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS using a spectrometer PerkinElmer 400. Results. In the case of seven-year old children, regardless of gender a common mechanism of co-occurrence was noticed for manganese and calcium, manganese and magnesium, calcium and magnesium, sodium and potassium. Apart from the correlation of metals for the seven-year-old-children mentioned, in case of ten-year old children, an additional correlation between calcium and zinc appears. Conclusion: The amount of some metals in the hair with the diversified possibility of interaction between the metals themselves and their relation to gender and age of children revealed different environmental exposure.

  5. Testing new tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Ceron, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    of a methodology for off-line testing of new tribo-systems for advanced high strength steels and stainless steels. The methodology is presented and applied to an industrial case, where different tribo-systems are tested. A universal sheet tribotester has been developed, which can run automatically repetitive......Testing of new tribo-systems in sheet metal forming has become an important issue due to new legislation, which forces industry to replace current, hazardous lubricants. The present paper summarizes the work done in a recent PhD project at the Technical University of Denmark on the development...

  6. Performance and cycle life test results of a PEVE first-generation prismatic nickel/metal-hydride battery pack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, B. G.; Duong, T. Q.; Bloom, I.

    A first-generation, prismatic, nickel/metal-hydride battery pack from Panasonic EV Energy Company Ltd. (PEVE) was characterized following the standard PNGV test procedures and then cycle life tested at 25 °C. The pack met, or exceeded, PNGV power and energy goals at the beginning of life. After more than 500,000 cycles, the data for capacity and discharge pulse power capability showed no measurable fade; similarly, discharge pulse resistance at 60% DOD also showed no measurable change. After the same pack was tested with two size factors, it still met or exceeded the PNGV goals.

  7. ICP-OES and Micronucleus Test to Evaluate Heavy Metal Contamination in Commercially Available Brazilian Herbal Teas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Priscila Francisca Tschaen; Kalil, Ieda Carneiro; Pimentel-Schmitt, Elisangela Flavia; Lenz, Dominik; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere; Ribeiro, Juliano Souza; Endringer, Denise Coutinho

    2016-07-01

    Increased tea consumption in combination with intensive pesticide use is generating heavy metal contaminations amongst Brazilian tea consumers, causing health concerns. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was applied to quantify minerals and heavy metals such as aluminum, barium, cadmium, lead, cobalt, copper, chromium, tin, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, vanadium and zinc in Brazilian chamomile, lemongrass, fennel and yerba mate teas. Teas, purchased in local supermarkets, were prepared using infusion and acid digestion. Higher concentrations of Al were present in all samples. In the digested samples, the Al mean concentration was 2.41 μg g(-1) (sd = 0.72) for fennel and 33.42 μg g(-1) (sd = 17.18) for chamomile, whilst the sample C for chamomile tea presented the highest concentration with 51.62 μg g(-1) (sd = 9.17). The safety relation in decreasing order is fennel, lemongrass, chamomile and yerba mate. Chemometric analyses demonstrated a strong correlation between the elements Cd and Pb in the samples. Yerba mate had the highest amount of metal (100 mg kg(-1)), being the subject of a micronucleus test assay for cytotoxicity. The metals found in Yerba mate did not present cytotoxicity/mutagenicity using the micronucleus test. The inorganic contaminants in teas should have their impact carefully monitored.

  8. Testing new tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Ceron, Ermanno

    2014-01-01

    of a methodology for off-line testing of new tribo-systems for advanced high strength steels and stainless steels. The methodology is presented and applied to an industrial case, where different tribo-systems are tested. A universal sheet tribotester has been developed, which can run automatically repetitive......Testing of new tribo-systems in sheet metal forming has become an important issue due to new legislation, which forces industry to replace current, hazardous lubricants. The present paper summarizes the work done in a recent PhD project at the Technical University of Denmark on the development...... Bending Under Tension tests. The overall results show that the methodology ensures satisfactory agreement between laboratory tests and production tests, although disagreement can occur, if tribological conditions are not the same in the two cases....

  9. A novel method for preventing surface film entrapment of water fleas and its application for toxicity testing with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rongxue; Kwak, Jin Il; An, Youn-Joo

    2017-02-01

    Some water fleas such as Daphnia galeata and Bosmina longirostris are difficult to culture and use in ecotoxicity testing since they can easily become entrapped at the surface film. Cetyl alcohol was the most prevalent chemical used to prevent the entrapment of water fleas in previous studies. However, cetyl alcohol possesses a number of disadvantages including its toxicity and water insolubility. This study presents a novel method for preventing surface film entrapment of the water flea D. galeata and B. longirostris acute testing. We examined the applicability of saponin extracts from Quillaja saponaria, natural surfactants commonly extracted from plants. Its application of saponin extracts was tested by ecotoxicity testing of heavy metals. Based on the acute test results for heavy metals, a concentration of 1.0 mg/L of saponins was determined as suitable for preventing surface film entrapment of D. galeata and B. longirostris with negligible adverse effects. This study proposes a novel method for preventing surface film entrapment of D. galeata and B. longirostris through the application saponins and could be valuable to make them suitable test species in ecotoxicity testing.

  10. Analysis of adhesion test methods and the evaluation of their use for ion-beam-mixed metal/ceramic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.

    1988-07-01

    Several thin film adhesion tests have been examined to determine which provides the most reliable method for the measurement of the adhesion of thin metallic films to ceramic substrate. An attempt was made to use the testing techniques described to measure adhesion changes caused by ion beam mixing for a variety of metal/ceramic systems. The techniques analyzed were the scratch test, the acoustic-emission test, and the pull test. The major variables of the scratch test include film thickness, substrate hardness, and stylus radius, but it is not known precisely what effects changes in these have on the measurement of adhesion. The scratch analyses methods discussed in the literature, each describing a load or stress on the system that is presumed to cause de-adhesion, do not always hold because none of the analyses account for both plastic and elastic deformation or incorporate many of the important parameters. The scratch test was much more likely to reveal a critical value for de-adhesion for relatively brittle films such as chromium than for ductile films such as nickel. 65 refs, 29 figs, 17 tabs.

  11. Pilot test of pollution control and metal resource recovery for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Mai, Ge; Chen, Tao; Lei, Chang; Xiao, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken in order to recover the metal resources from acid mine drainage (AMD). A 300 m(3)/d continuous system was designed and fractional precipitation technology employed for the main metals Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn recovery. The system was operated for six months using actual AMD in situ. The chemicals' input and also the retention time was optimized. Furthermore, the material balance was investigated. With the system, the heavy metals of the effluent after the Mn neutralization precipitation were below the threshold value of the Chinese integrated wastewater discharge limit. The precipitates generated contained 42%, 12%, 31%, and 18% for Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, respectively, and the recovery rates of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn were 82%, 79%, 83%, and 83%, respectively. The yield range of the precipitate had significant correlation with the influent metal content. Using the X-ray diffraction analysis, the refinement for Fe, Cu, and Zn could be achieved through the processes of roasting and floatation. Cost-benefit was also discussed; the benefit from the recycled metal was able to pay for the cost of chemical reagents used. Most important of all, through the use of this technology, the frustrating sludge problems were solved.

  12. Standard test methods for conducting creep, creep-rupture, and stress-rupture tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the amount of deformation as a function of time (creep test) and the measurement of the time for fracture to occur when sufficient force is present (rupture test) for materials when under constant tensile forces at constant temperature. It also includes the essential requirements for testing equipment. For information of assistance in determining the desirable number and duration of tests, reference should be made to the product specification. 1.2 These test methods list the information which should be included in reports of tests. The intention is to ensure that all useful and readily available information is transmitted to interested parties. Reports receive special attention for the following reasons: (1) results from different, recognized procedures vary significantly; therefore, identification of methods used is important; (2) later studies to establish important variables are often hampered by the lack of detailed information in published reports; (3) t...

  13. Study of the sensitivity of wire image quality indicators (IQI) used in radiographic testing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, W.; Oki, H.

    1974-01-01

    Radiographic sensitivity is defined and its mathematical expresion is derived in order to justify the use of image quality indicators-IQI- formed by wires of different diameters which represent the radiographic quality. It is demonstrated that IQI sensibility is not related to the minimum dimensions of the metallic discontinuities that may be detected in radiographic tests. The experimental results are in good agreement whith the mathematical formulation proposed

  14. Baikal test stand modifications for liquid metal and gas fill operations for TOPAZ II space power acceptance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrieber, Christopher A.; Peterson, Earl; Sinkevich, Valery G.; Vdovin, Boris

    1995-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) facility, part of the TOPAZ International Program, in Albuquerque is currently testing Russian TOPAZ II space power systems (Wold 1993). The TOPAZ International Program has received six TOPAZ II Space Nuclear Power Reactors. Two of these reactors (Eh-43 and Eh-44) are considered ``flight quality.'' A considerable transfer of technology has occurred during the preparations for acceptance testing of the Eh-43 and Eh-44 TOPAZ II reactors. Eh-43 and Eh-44 are new systems that require the coolant loop and gas cavities to be filled and have not undergone any testing. In comparison to the tests performed on the V-71 and Ya-21u systems, the future operations with the flight units Eh-43 and Eh-44 will require expansion of the Baikal Test Stand's capabilities.

  15. Standard Practices for Simulated Service Testing for Corrosion of Metallic Containment Materials for Use With Heat-Transfer Fluids in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1980-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover test procedures simulating field service for evaluating the performance under corrosive conditions of metallic containment materials in solar heating and cooling systems. All test results relate to the performance of the metallic containment material only as a part of a metal/fluid pair. Performance in these test procedures, taken by itself, does not necessarily constitute an adequate basis for acceptance or rejection of a particular metal/fluid pair in solar heating and cooling systems, either in general or in a particular design. 1.2 These practices describe test procedures used to evaluate the resistance to deterioration of metallic containment materials in the several conditions that may occur in operation of solar heating and cooling systems. These conditions include: (1) operating full flow; (2) stagnant empty vented; (3) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, non-draindown; and (4) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, draindown. 1.3 The recommended practices cover the following three te...

  16. Pathogenic bacteria and heavy metals toxicity assessments in evaluating unpasteurized raw milk quality through biochemical tests collected from dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Iqbal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hygienic quality by determining the presence of predominant pathogenic microbial contaminants (contagious or environmental and indiscriminate heavy metals contained in unpasteurized milk samples collected from cattle specie of cow. Methods: Raw milk samples were collected in October, 2014 from different regions of District Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan and cultured on the selective media plates according to the manufacturer instructions to observe pathogenic microbial flora and confirm it with relevant biochemical tests to specify bacterial specie. Results: Milk samples analyzed on MacConkey and nutrient agar media were found contaminated mostly with coliform, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus vulgaris. Similarly, result of the heavy metals analysis performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer flame photometry showed that raw milk contains heavy metals residues of lead and cadmium contents at higher levels while copper, zinc and chromium were observed lower than permissible limits whereas manganese within specified recommended values. Conclusions: Microbial contamination of milk and toxic metals is mainly accredited to the scrupulous unhygienic measures during processing of milk exhibiting a wide array of hazardous impacts on human health.

  17. Testing hypotheses on the resistance to metals by Daphnia longispina: differential acclimation, endpoints association, and fitness costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saro, Liliana; Lopes, Isabel; Martins, Nelson; Ribeiro, Rui

    2012-04-01

    Pollution by metals may lead to an increased tolerance in the exposed population through adaptive microevolution, with resistant genotypes becoming more abundant than in reference sites. This work investigated the outcomes associated with selection for resistance by testing three hypotheses to assess the following: Do resistant versus sensitive clonal lineages of Daphnia longispina differentially acclimate to metals during a long-term sublethal exposure, is there a significant correlation between lethal and sublethal responses, and does resistance to metals entail costs to fitness under uncontaminated conditions? No evidence of acclimation was observed. The median effective dilutions of acid mine drainage for reproduction were similar for successive broods within clones during long-term exposures. Lethal and sublethal responses were not correlated, indicating that mechanisms regulating the two types of response were more than likely different. Finally, fitness costs associated with the resistance to lethal levels of metals were not detected, but resistance to sublethal levels of Cu was found to be correlated with a lower intrinsic growth rate under control conditions. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  18. Determination of Lubricant Bulk Modulus in Metal Forming by Means of a Simple Laboratory Test and Inverse FEM Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafis, S. M.; Christiansen, P.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2016-01-01

    facilitates the lubricant entrainment, pressurization and possible escape by micro-plasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. In order to model these mechanisms an important lubricant propertyd esignated as the bulk modulus is needed for characterizing the compressibility of the lubricant. The present paper describes...... a simple, practical test to determine the bulk modulus. Combination of the experimental upsetting of an axisymmetric metal workpiece containing a truncated conical surface pocket with an inverse finite element analysis of the test allows determining the lubricant bulk modulus. The finite element analysis...

  19. NF ISO 10270. Corrosion of metals and alloys. Aqueous corrosion tests of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This international standard prescribes the determination of the mass gain and the superficial control of zirconium and zirconium alloy products after a corrosion test performed in water at 360 deg. C and in steam at 400 deg. C or more. A pressure of 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) is applied during the tests performed in vapor. This standard applies to welded and molded products, to powder metallurgy products and to filler metals for welding application. The method has been widely used in the development of new alloys and new techniques of thermal treatment and in the evaluation of welding techniques. (J.S.)

  20. Temperature gradient compatibility tests of some refractory metals and alloys in bismuth and bismuth--lithium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Cavin, O.B.

    1976-11-01

    Quartz, T-111, and Mo thermal-convection loop tests were conducted at temperatures up to 700 0 C (100 0 C ΔT) to determine the compatibility of several refractory metals/alloys with bismuth and bismuth-lithium solutions for molten salt breeder reactor applications. Methods of evaluation included weight change measurements, metallographic examination, chemical and electron microprobe analysis, and mechanical properties tests. Molybdenum, T-111, and TA--10 percent W appear to be the most promising containment materials, while niobium and iron-based alloys are unacceptable

  1. Scratch test induced shear banding in high power laser remelted metallic glass layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Laser remelted surface layers of a Cu-based metallic glass forming alloy have been produced with fully amorphous depths up to 350 mu m for single track widths of around 1.3 mm and have been checked by transmission of synchrotron radiation. They have been subjected to indentation hardness and scratch

  2. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  3. Industrial Arts Test Development Book 2: Resource Items for Ceramics, Graphic Arts, Metals, Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Industrial Arts Education.

    This publication encompasses questions for Ceramics, Graphic Arts, Metals, and Plastics for the second of a series. The use of this publication and the previously published (1973) book containing resource items for Drawing, Electricity/Electronics, Power Mechanics, and Woods (ED 109 457) will provide complete coverage of the basic series courses…

  4. Multi-Axial Deformation Setup for Microscopic Testing of Sheet Metal to Fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tasan, C.C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Dekkers, E.C.A.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2012-01-01

    While the industrial interest in sheet metal with improved specific-properties led to the design of new alloys with complex microstructures, predicting their safe forming limits and understanding their microstructural deformation mechanisms remain as significant challenges largely due to the

  5. Test and Analysis Correlation of a Large-Scale, Orthogrid-Stiffened Metallic Cylinder without Weld Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michelle T.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Lindell, Michael C.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project (SBKF) was established in 2007 by the NESC with the primary objective to develop analysis-based buckling design factors and guidelines for metallic and composite launch-vehicle structures.1 A secondary objective of the project is to advance technologies that have the potential to increase the structural efficiency of launch-vehicles. The SBKF Project has determined that weld-land stiffness discontinuities can significantly reduce the buckling load of a cylinder. In addition, the welding process can introduce localized geometric imperfections that can further exacerbate the inherent buckling imperfection sensitivity of the cylinder. Therefore, single-piece barrel fabrication technologies can improve structural efficiency by eliminating these weld-land issues. As part of this effort, SBKF partnered with the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch (AMPB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Mechanical and Fabrication Branch at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and ATI Forged Products to design and fabricate an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened seamless metallic cylinder. The cylinder was subjected to seven subcritical load sequences (load levels that are not intended to induce test article buckling or material failure) and one load sequence to failure. The purpose of this test effort was to demonstrate the potential benefits of building cylindrical structures with no weld lands using the flow-formed manufacturing process. This seamless barrel is the ninth 8-ft-diameter metallic barrel and the first single-piece metallic structure to be tested under this program.

  6. Combined high-pressure cell-ultrahigh vacuum system for fast testing of model metal alloy catalysts using scanning mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for fabrication, surface analysis in ultrahigh vacuum, and testing of the catalytic activity of model metal alloy catalysts is described. Arrays of model catalysts are produced by electron-beam deposition of up to four metals simultaneously onto a substrate. The surface analysis...... be studied on a substrate 10 mm in diameter. A high pressure cell with an all-metal sealed ultrahigh vacuum lock is also described as part of the work. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Acquisition of Co metal from spent lithium-ion battery using emulsion liquid membrane technology and emulsion stability test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Wulandari, P. T.; Amiliana, R. A.; Huda, M.; Kusumadewi, F. A.

    2018-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are the most common type to be used as energy source in mobile phone. The amount of lithium-ion battery wastes is approximated by 200 – 500 ton/year. In one lithium-ion battery, there are 5 – 20% of cobalt metal, depend on the manufacturer. One of the way to recover a valuable metal from waste is leaching process then continued with extraction, which is the aim of this study. Spent lithium-ion batteries will be characterized with EDX and AAS, the result will show the amount of cobalt metal with form of LiCoO2 in the cathode. Hydrochloric acid concentration used is 4 M, temperature 80°C, and reaction time 1 hour. This study will discuss the emulsion stability test on emulsion liquid membrane. The purpose of emulsion stability test in this study was to determine optimum concentration of surfactant and extractant to produce a stable emulsion. Surfactant and extractant used were SPAN 80 and Cyanex 272 respectively with both concentrations varied. Membrane and feed phase ratios used in this experiment was 1 : 2. The optimum results of this study were SPAN 80 concentrations of 10% w/v and Cyanex 272 0.7 M.

  8. Comparison of three-stage sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching tests to evaluate metal mobility in mining wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margui, E.; Salvado, V.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abandoned mining sites contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterised by high concentrations of heavy metals. The form in which a metal exists strongly influences its mobility and, thus, the effects on the environment. Operational methods of speciation analysis, such as the use of sequential extraction procedures, are commonly applied. In this work, the modified three-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by the BCR (now the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in mining wastes from old Pb-Zn mining areas located in the Val d'Aran (NE Spain) and Cartagena (SE Spain). Analyses of the extracts were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure was evaluated by using a certified reference material, BCR-701. The results of the partitioning study indicate that more easily mobilised forms (acid exchangeable) were predominant for Cd and Zn, particularly in the sample from Cartagena. In contrast, the largest amount of lead was associated with the iron and manganese oxide fractions. On the other hand, the applicability of lixiviation tests commonly used to evaluate the leaching of toxic species from landfill disposal (US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and DIN 38414-S4) to mining wastes was also investigated and the obtained results compared with the information on metal mobility derivable from the application of the three-stage sequential extraction procedure

  9. The roles of EBR-II and TREAT [Transient Reactor Test] in establishing liquid metal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the role of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) and Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facilities in contributing to the understanding and resolution of key safety issues in liquid metal reactor safety during the decade of the 80's. Fuels and materials testing has been carried out to address questions on fuels behavior during steady-state and upset conditions. In addition, EBR-II has conducted plant tests to demonstrate passive response to ATWS events and to develop control and diagnostic strategies for safe operation of advanced LMRs. TREAT and EBR-II complement each other and between them provide a transient testing capability that covers the whole range of concerns during overpower conditions. EBR-II, with use of the special Automatic Control Rod Drive System, can generate power change rates that overlap the lower end of the TREAT capability. 21 refs

  10. Proposed modification to avoidance test with Eisenia fetida to assess metal toxicity in agricultural soils affected by mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Víctor; Verdejo, José; Mondaca, Pedro; Verdugo, Gabriela; Gaete, Hernán; Hodson, Mark E; Neaman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Use of avoidance tests is a quick and cost-effective method of assessing contaminants in soils. One option for assessing earthworm avoidance behavior is a two-section test, which consists of earthworms being given the choice to move between a test soil and a control substrate. For ecological relevance, tested soils should be field-contaminated soils. For practical reasons, artificial soils are commonly used as the control substrate. Interpretation of the test results compromised when the test soil and the artificial substrate differ in their physico-chemical properties other than just contaminants. In this study we identified the physico-chemical properties that influence avoidance response and evaluated the usefulness of adjusting these in the control substrate in order to isolate metal-driven avoidance of field soils by earthworms. A standardized two-section avoidance test with Eisenia fetida was performed on 52 uncontaminated and contaminated (Cu >155mgkg -1 , As >19mgkg -1 ) agricultural soils from the Aconcagua River basin and the Puchuncaví Valley in Chile. Regression analysis indicated that the avoidance response was determined by soil organic matter (OM), electrical conductivity (EC) and total soil Cu. Organic matter content of the artificial substrate was altered by peat additions and EC by NaCl so that these properties matched those of the field soils. The resultant EC 80 for avoidance (indicative of soils of "limited habitat") was 433mg Cu kg -1 (339 - 528mgkg -1 95% confidence intervals). The earthworm avoidance test can be used to assess metal toxicity in field-contaminated soils by adjusting physico-chemical properties (OM and EC) of the artificial control substrate in order to mimic those of the field-collected soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The plasma device for the high-heat plasma testing of refractory metals and inventing of new highly porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, V. P.; Fedorovich, S. D.; Martynenko, Yu V.; Lukashevsky, M. V.; Gubkin, M. K.; Lazukin, A. V.; Karpov, A. V.; Shestakov, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    A unique plasma device has been constructed at the NRU “MPEI” for the study of plasma-surface interaction and the high-heat plasma testing of refractory metals, such as tungsten, molybdenum, steel and other plasma facing materials used in fusion reactor including the ITER. This plasma device is a multi-cusp linear stationary plasma confinement system. It has power-saving characteristics as well as compactness due to the employment of the 8-pole multicusp magnetic field configuration instead of a strong axial magnetic field. Experiments are planned to develop a novel technology for highly porous surface structure of the refractory metal with a pore size and nanofibers of 50 nanometers including tungsten “fuzz”.

  12. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  13. Facilities, testing program and modeling needs for studying liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bühler, L., E-mail: leo.buehler@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mistrangelo, C.; Konys, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bhattacharyay, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) (China); Obukhov, D. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA) (Russian Federation); Smolentsev, S. [University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States); Utili, M. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, Camugnano 40032 (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Since many years, liquid metal flows for applications in fusion blankets have been investigated worldwide. A review is given about modeling requirements and existing experimental facilities for investigations of liquid metal related issues in blankets with the focus on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Most of the performed theoretical and experimental works were dedicated to fundamental aspects of MHD flows under very strong magnetic fields as they may occur in generic elements of fusion blankets like pipes, ducts, bends, expansions and contractions. Those experiments are required to progressively validate numerical tools with the purpose of obtaining codes capable to predict MHD flows at fusion relevant parameters in complex blanket geometries, taking into account electrical and thermal coupling between fluid and structural materials. Scaled mock-up experiments support the theoretical activities and help deriving engineering correlations for cases which cannot be calculated with required accuracy up to now.

  14. TESTING THE ASTEROSEISMIC MASS SCALE USING METAL-POOR STARS CHARACTERIZED WITH APOGEE AND KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Courtney R.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Chaplin, William J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Park Road, West Midlands, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Shetrone, Matthew [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Mosser, Benoît [LESIA, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Hekker, Saskia [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Silva Aguirre, Víctor [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Bedding, Timothy R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); García, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universit Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pérez, Ana E. García; Hearty, Fred R., E-mail: epstein@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

    2014-04-20

    Fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, and age, can be inferred using asteroseismology. Cool stars with convective envelopes have turbulent motions that can stochastically drive and damp pulsations. The properties of the oscillation frequency power spectrum can be tied to mass and radius through solar-scaled asteroseismic relations. Stellar properties derived using these scaling relations need verification over a range of metallicities. Because the age and mass of halo stars are well-constrained by astrophysical priors, they provide an independent, empirical check on asteroseismic mass estimates in the low-metallicity regime. We identify nine metal-poor red giants (including six stars that are kinematically associated with the halo) from a sample observed by both the Kepler space telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey. We compare masses inferred using asteroseismology to those expected for halo and thick-disk stars. Although our sample is small, standard scaling relations, combined with asteroseismic parameters from the APOKASC Catalog, produce masses that are systematically higher (<ΔM > =0.17 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}) than astrophysical expectations. The magnitude of the mass discrepancy is reduced by known theoretical corrections to the measured large frequency separation scaling relationship. Using alternative methods for measuring asteroseismic parameters induces systematic shifts at the 0.04 M {sub ☉} level. We also compare published asteroseismic analyses with scaling relationship masses to examine the impact of using the frequency of maximum power as a constraint. Upcoming APOKASC observations will provide a larger sample of ∼100 metal-poor stars, important for detailed asteroseismic characterization of Galactic stellar populations.

  15. Using NIF to Test Theories of High-Pressure, High-Rate Plastic Flow in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Robert E.; Arsenlis, A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Huntington, C. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Park, H. S.; Powell, P.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Swift, D.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Yang, L.

    2017-10-01

    Precisely controlled plasmas are playing key roles both as pump and probe in experiments to understand the strength of solid metals at high energy density (HED) conditions. In concert with theoretical advances, these experiments have enabled a predictive capability to model material strength at Mbar pressures and high strain rates. Here we describe multiscale strength models developed for tantalum starting with atomic bonding and extending up through the mobility of individual dislocations, the evolution of dislocation networks and so on until the ultimate material response at the scale of an experiment. Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) probe strength in metals ramp compressed to 1-8 Mbar. The model is able to predict 1 Mbar experiments without adjustable parameters. The combination of experiment and theory has shown that solid metals can behave significantly differently at HED conditions. We also describe recent studies of lead compressed to 3-5 Mbar. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  16. Standard test method for determining a threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the environment-assisted cracking threshold stress intensity factor parameters, KIEAC and KEAC, for metallic materials from constant-force testing of fatigue precracked beam or compact fracture specimens and from constant-displacement testing of fatigue precracked bolt-load compact fracture specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to environment-assisted cracking in aqueous or other aggressive environments. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength as long as specimens are of sufficient thickness and planar size to meet the size requirements of this test method. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size may be variable and adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness is a variable independent of planar size. 1.5 Specimen configurations other than those contained in this test method may be used, provided that well-established stress ...

  17. Elevated-Temperature Tensile-Testing of Foil-Gage Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Automated system for measuring strain in metal foils at temperatures above 500 degrees F (260 degrees C) uses mechanical extensometer and displacement transducer. System includes counterbalance feature, which eliminates weight contribution of extensometer and reduces grip pressure required for attachment to specimen. Counterbalancing feature overcomes two major difficulties in using extensometers with foil-gage specimens: (1) Weight of extensometer and transducer represents significant fraction of total load applied to specimen and may actually damage it; and (2) grip pressure required for attachment of extensometer to specimens may induce bending stresses in foil-gage materials.

  18. Design, fabrication and spin testing of ceramic blade metal disk attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic turbine blade-metal disk attachment was designed for small, non man-rated turbine engine applications. The selected design consisted of a hot pressed silicon nitride blade having a skewed dovetail attachment with a compliant interlayer between the disk and the blade. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses predicted that life goals could be achieved, considering both NDE limitations and crack growth rates for the ceramic material. Twenty ceramic blades were fabricated to closely-held manufacturing tolerances. New fracture mechanics data at elevated temperature are presented.

  19. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ( 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 14 C, 129 I, 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, and U), stable major components (NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , H 3 BO 3 , K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 109 Cd, 51 Cr, 210 Pb, 203 Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, 125 I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by 99 Tc, 75 Se, and finally U, 14 C, and 110m Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  20. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  1. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cellier, F. [Framatome, Centre Technique, 71 - Saint Marcel (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  2. Testing WHAM-FTOX with laboratory toxicity data for mixtures of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Pb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Windermere humic aqueous model using the toxicity function (WHAM-FTOX ) describes cation toxicity to aquatic organisms in terms of 1) accumulation by the organism of metabolically active protons and metals at reversible binding sites, and 2) differing toxic potencies of the bound cations. Cation accumulation (νi , in mol g(-1) ) is estimated through calculations with the WHAM chemical speciation model by assuming that organism binding sites can be represented by those of humic acid. Toxicity coefficients (αi ) are combined with νi to obtain the variable FTOX (= Σ αi νi ) which, between lower and upper thresholds (FTOX,LT , FTOX,UT ), is linearly related to toxic effect. Values of αi , FTOX,LT , and FTOX,LT are obtained by fitting toxicity data. Reasonable fits (72% of variance in toxic effect explained overall) were obtained for 4 large metal mixture acute toxicity experiments involving daphnids (Cu, Zn, Cd), lettuce (Cu, Zn, Ag), and trout (Zn, Cd, Pb). Strong nonadditive effects, most apparent in results for tests involving Cd, could be explained approximately by purely chemical competition for metal accumulation. Tentative interpretation of parameter values obtained from these and other experimental data suggests the following order of bound cation toxicity: H < Al < (Cu Zn Pb UO2 ) < (Cd Ag). Another trend is a strong increase in Cd toxicity relative to that of Zn as organism complexity increases (from bacteria to fish). © 2014 SETAC.

  3. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F.

    2007-01-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  4. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/DSM/DRFC Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F. [Framatome, 71 - Saint Marcel (France). Centre Technique

    2007-07-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  5. Development and testing of a method for coating metallic wastes by thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassigny, C. de

    1985-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear installations produces large-sized metallic components difficult to be compacted or to be inserted in the usual containers. The purpose of this study was to develop a coating procedure for low and medium activity wastes, in order to: - fix the contamination of the waste by a first appropriate layer; - protect this layer from mechanical shocks by a second thick layer; - reduce the diffusion of radionuclides. The study has proven the feasibility of depositing epoxy resins by electrostatic spraying in a nuclear environment on steel sub-strata with an efficiency higher than 95%; showing that it is possible to work in closed ventilated rooms without risk of clogging the filters. Two layers of epoxy resin are sufficient to fix contamination with a factor of 8600; their thickness (about 30 μm) nevertheless limits their use to this application. To reduce diffusion of radionuclides (Co-60 and Cs-137), polyurethane resins were chosen with which it is possible to obtain a thick coating in only a short time. Their properties of fixing the contamination, retaining of radionuclides and resistance to impact, have been assessed. First application of the procedure on a contaminated metallic bellow coming from dismantling of nuclear reactor, has been carried out

  6. Field Testing Pulsed Power Inverters in Welding Operations to Control Heavy Metal Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    performed on mild steel (ɘ.5% Cr), HY-80 steel (1.0-1.9% Cr), and “chrome-moly” 4130 steel (nominally 1% Cr) test plates at four DOD facilities (2...conformance to criteria for weld quality was determined by tests designed to measure the tensile strength, yield strength, ductility and the Charpy V...processes, rods and wires, and on various steel alloy test plates. All were consumables, base materials and processes typically used at the activity

  7. Exploratory loading techniques. [in holographic nondestructive testing of flat metal plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M., III

    1976-01-01

    Interferometric holographic nondestructive testing of aluminum, copper, and steel flat plates is reported. Structural weaknesses under positive pressure, negative pressure, heating, and cooling are discussed.

  8. Separation tests of heavy metals in samples of industrial wastes through flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrego L, J.

    1995-12-01

    Samples of residual muds, taken at the exit of the filter-press of the water treatment plant of a galvanoplastics industry in Lerma, Estado de Mexico, its were prepared for its qualitative and quantitative analysis. Likewise, the residual waters of the cistern located at the end of the electrodeposition process, was subjected to qualitative chemical analysis for the neutron activation technique and to quantitative analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were treated by a flotation process by means of the one which it was studied the heavy metals removal. The results show that the AP-845 collector is the one that better it fulfilled the objectives since, it solves the problem, unless by the copper that although their concentration in the residual waters drop a lot, it was not inside the standard. (Author)

  9. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  10. TESTS METALLIC BIOMATERIALS FOR COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF FIXED PROSTHETIC RESTORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. RYNIEWICZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A direct metal laser sintering method (DMLS is a new technology used for getting structures by the CAD/CAM procedures. The aim of the elaboration was a question of structural identification and setting strength parameters of titanium (Ticp and its alloy (Ti6Al4V which are used to serve as base for those permanent prosthetic supplements which are later manufactured with the employment of CAD/CAM systems. The research work was performed on Ticp samples – those which were intended for manufacture of structures by decrement milling working, and Ti6Al4V samples that comes from laser increment sintering of powder. According to the results obtained, the following conclusion has been derived: when strength aspect is discussed, the DMLS method is a preferred one for manufacturing of load structures in dentistry and may be an alternate way for the CAD/CAM system used in decrement processing.

  11. Assessing Arsenic Removal by Metal (Hydr)Oxide Adsorptive Media Using Rapid Small Scale Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapid small scale column test (RSSCT) was use to evaluate the the performance of eight commercially available adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic. Side-by-side tests were conducted using RSSCTs and pilot/full-scale systems either in the field or in the laboratory. ...

  12. Fracture of metal foams : In-situ testing and numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; van Merkerk, R.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Schmidt, I

    This paper is on a combined experimental/modeling study on the tensile fracture of open-cell foams. In-situ tensile tests show that individual struts can fail in a brittle or ductile mode, presumably depending on the presence of casting defects. In-situ single strut tests were performed, enabling

  13. Reliability Tests of Aluminium Wedge Wire Bonding on Auto-catalytic Silver Immersion Gold (ASIG) PCB Metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Drozd, A; Kaufmann, S; Manolescu, F; McGill, I

    2011-01-01

    The Auto-catalytic Silver Immersion Gold (ASIG) PCB metallization is a new process that has clear advantages for PCB assembly especially with regard to lead-free soldering. As it may become a popular process in the future for electronics used in physics experiments, the quality of this metallization for aluminium wire bonding has been studied. Aluminium wedge wire bonding continues to be the interconnection method of choice for many physics detector sensors, for high density signal routing and for unpackaged die. Although advertised as having good quality for aluminium wire bonding, this study was performed to verify this claim as well as to test the longer term reliability of the wire bonds taking into consideration the environmental conditions and life-expectancy of devices, in particular for high energy physics detector applications. The tests were performed on PCBs made with the ASIG and ENIG (Electro-less Nickel Immersion Gold) processes at the same time in order to make a comparison with the current ind...

  14. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarime, Nur'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%-63% and 46%-54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50-2.59 and 2.45-2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35-5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32-5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%-0.34% and 0.39%- 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m2/g-21.93 m2/g and 25.76 m2/g-26.83 m2/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  15. Test of electrodialytic upgrading of MSWI APC residue in pilot scale: focus on reduced metal and salt leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Villumsen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    In this study a pilot plant for electrodialytic treatment of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air pollution control (APC) residue was tested and proposed as a treatment method which can lead to reuse of this otherwise hazardous waste. The pilot plant was developed based on a design...... that is adapted from conventional electrodialysis, e.g. used in desalination of solutions. The APC residue was treated in a suspension (8 kg APC residue and 80 L tap water) and circulated through an electrodialytic (ED) stack consisting of 50 cell pairs separated by ion exchange membranes. A direct current...... was applied to the ED stack for removal of heavy metals (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) and salts (Cl, Na, SO4) from the APC residue suspension. Different tank designs for mixing the APC residue suspension were tested as well as changing experimental conditions. A part of the raw experimental APC residue...

  16. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Testing the toxicity of metals, phenol, effluents, and receiving waters by root elongation in Lactuca sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jie; Park, Jihae; Kumar Pandey, Lalit; Choi, Soyeon; Lee, Hojun; De Saeger, Jonas; Depuydt, Stephen; Han, Taejun

    2018-03-01

    Phytotoxicity tests using higher plants are among the most simple, sensitive, and cost-effective of the methods available for ecotoxicity testing. In the present study, a hydroponic-based phytotoxicity test using seeds of Lactuca sativa was used to evaluate the water quality of receiving waters and effluents near two industrial sites (Soyo and Daejon) in Korea with respect to the toxicity of 10 metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn) and phenol, and of the receiving waters and effluents themselves. First, the L. sativa hydroponic bioassay was used to determine whether the receiving water or effluents were toxic; then, the responsible toxicant was identified. The results obtained with the L. sativa bioassay ranked the EC 50 toxicities of the investigated metal ions and phenol as: Cd > Ni > Cu > Zn > Hg > phenol > As > Mn > Cr > Pb > Fe. We found that Zn was the toxicant principally responsible for toxicity in Daejeon effluents. The Daejeon field effluent had a higher Zn concentration than permitted by the effluent discharge criteria of the Ministry of Environment of Korea. Our conclusion on the importance of Zn toxicity was supported by the results of the L. sativa hydroponic assay, which showed that the concentration of Zn required to inhibit root elongation in L. sativa by 50% (EC 50 ) was higher in the Daejeon field effluent than that of pure Zn. More importantly, we proved that the L. sativa hydroponic test method can be applied not only as an alternative tool for determining whether a given waste is acceptable for discharge into public water bodies, but also as an alternative method for measuring the safety of aquatic environments using EC 20 values, with respect to the water pollutants investigated (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn, and phenol). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Failure analysis based on microvoid growth for sheet metal during uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbassi, Fethi; Mistou, Sebastien; Zghal, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cruciform specimen designed and biaxial tensile test carried out. ► Stereo Correlation Image technique is used for 3D full-filed measurements. ► SEM fractography analysis is used to explain the fracture mechanism. ► Constitutive modeling of the necking phenomenon was developed using GTN model. - Abstract: The aim of the presented investigations is to perform an analysis of fracture and instability during simple and complex load testing by addressing the influence of ductile damage evolution in necking processes. In this context, an improved experimental methodology was developed and successfully used to evaluate localization of deformation during uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests. The biaxial tensile tests are carried out using cruciform specimen loaded using a biaxial testing machine. In this experimental investigation, Stereo-Image Correlation technique has is used to produce the heterogeneous deformations map within the specimen surface. Scanning electron microscope is used to evaluate the fracture mechanism and the micro-voids growth. A finite element model of uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests are developed, where a ductile damage model Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) is used to describe material deformation involving damage evolution. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results show the accuracy of the finite element model to predict the instability phenomenon. The advanced measurement techniques contribute to understand better the ductile fracture mechanism

  19. Metrology test object for dimensional verification in additive manufacturing of metals for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Kopacz, Alexander J; Nikolov, Hristo N; Holdsworth, David W

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing continues to increase in popularity and is being used in applications such as biomaterial ingrowth that requires sub-millimeter dimensional accuracy. The purpose of this study was to design a metrology test object for determining the capabilities of additive manufacturing systems to produce common objects, with a focus on those relevant to medical applications. The test object was designed with a variety of features of varying dimensions, including holes, cylinders, rectangles, gaps, and lattices. The object was built using selective laser melting, and the produced dimensions were compared to the target dimensions. Location of the test objects on the build plate did not affect dimensions. Features with dimensions less than 0.300 mm did not build or were overbuilt to a minimum of 0.300 mm. The mean difference between target and measured dimensions was less than 0.100 mm in all cases. The test object is applicable to multiple systems and materials, tests the effect of location on the build, uses a minimum of material, and can be measured with a variety of efficient metrology tools (including measuring microscopes and micro-CT). Investigators can use this test object to determine the limits of systems and adjust build parameters to achieve maximum accuracy. © IMechE 2014.

  20. Preparation, characterization and use of a reference material to proficiency testing for determination of metals in fish tissue in natura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de

    2013-01-01

    The proficiency tests are widely used to evaluate the analytical capacity of laboratories and also as part of the accreditation process. For this reason, are important tools for the control of the quality of the analytical results obtained in the laboratories that work directly with seafood companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for metals potentially toxic in fish tissues. In this work will be described all steps used for the production of reference materials to be used in a proficiency testing pilot study for As, Cd, Pb and Hg in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. He preparation scheme consisted in selecting the individuals, cleaning, grinding, homogenization and fortification with As, Cd and Pb in two concentration levels. The preparation resulted in 164 sachets of 10 g each. In order to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation in the samples conservation 52 sachets were irradiated with 60 Co (10.00 ± 1.05 kGy) in a gamma cell. This material with others non irradiated 52 sachets were used for the homogeneity and stability studies. The remaining 60 were used for the proficiency testing. The results demonstrated that both materials were homogeneous and presented good stability (during a period of 45 days). However, the irradiated material present better integrity, concerning biological degradation, when stored in ambient temperature. For this reason they were used to the proficiency testing pilot program. Ten laboratories participated in the proficiency testing pilot study and the results were evaluated using the following tests: z-score, confidence ellipse and En numbers. This work demonstrates the capability of the laboratory to produce reference materials as well as to organize and conduct proficiency testing. (author)

  1. Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These

  2. A new tropical algal test to assess the toxicity of metals in freshwaters. Supervising Scientists Report 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, N.; Stauber, J.; Markich, S.; Lim, R.

    1998-01-01

    Copper (Cu) and uranium (U) are of potential ecotoxicological concern to tropical Australian freshwater biota as a result of mining impacts. No local data on the toxicity of these metals to tropical freshwater algae are currently available. The aim of this study was to develop a toxicity test for an Australian tropical freshwater alga that can be added to the suite of tests currently available for tropical freshwater invertebrates and fish. This toxicity test was used to investigate the toxicity of Cu and U to the alga Chlorella sp (new species) in a synthetic softwater and to specifically determine the effect of pH on metal toxicity over the range typically found in soft fresh surface waters in tropical northern Australia. A growth inhibition toxicity test was successfully developed for this alga, which was isolated from Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, prior to conducting the toxicity testing. Key environmental parameters including light, temperature and nutrients were optimised to obtain acceptable algal growth rates over 72 hours. HEPES buffer (2 mM at pH 6.5) was found to be a suitable and practical option for pH control that could be incorporated in the test protocol for Chlorella sp. The results obtained in this study confirmed a lack of toxic effects by HEPES on the algae, as well as negligible complexation with both Cu and U. Adequate pH control (ie -1 ) than U (13 μg L -1 ), and more sensitive than other Australian tropical freshwater species, with an order of sensitivity: Alga ≥Crustacea > Cnidaria > Mollusca > Chordata. The toxicity of Cu and U was highly pH-dependent. Copper concentrations needed to inhibit growth by 50% (72 h EC 50 ) increased from 1.5 to 35 μg Cu L -1 as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.7. The 72 h EC 50 for U increased from 44 to 78 μg U L -1 over the same pH range. Decreased toxicity at pH 5.7 was due to lower concentrations of cell-bound and intracellular Cu and U compared to that at pH 6.5. These results are explained

  3. p-Benzoquinone-mediated amperometric biosensor developed with Psychrobacter sp. for toxicity testing of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Xin; Wu, Zhen; Yang, Lianzhen; Xia, Siqing; Chen, Ling; Zhao, Jianfu

    2013-03-15

    A rapid and reliable p-benzoquinone-mediated amperometric biosensor (ToxTell) incorporated with Psychrobacter sp. to detect toxicities of heavy metal ions has been developed. This ToxTell biosensor relied on the real-time monitoring of inhibition effect for metabolism by toxicant to provide early detection and assessment of the degree of toxicity to living cells. The effect of growth phase on the sensitivity of Psychrobacter sp. biosensor was studied. The results showed that at the middle of the logarithmic phase or transition from logarithmic to stationary phase, the Psychrobacter sp. ToxTell biosensor had a higher sensitivity to toxicants. The effects of pH, salinity in respiratory substrates and incubation time on the performance of Psychrobacter sp. biosensor were also investigated. EC(50) values of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Cr(6+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) to Psychrobacter sp. determined at incubation time 30 min were 2.6 mg/L, 47.3 mg/L, 10.9 mg/L, 14.0 mg/L, 0.8 mg/L and 110.1 mg/L, respectively. The ToxTell microbial biosensor developed in this work demonstrated excellent storage stability for more than 60 days. The biosensor could incorporate different microbial species as biocomponent to reflect the comprehensive values for toxicants in real samples and the results therefore had high degree of validity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bio testing with micro algae in the pollution of environment with heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaverdiyev, S.R; Aliyev, E. Sh; Abdullayev, M.A; Khalilov

    2010-01-01

    Full text:Use of micro-algae is more expedient to determine how dangerous for living organisms the pollution of the environment with heavy metals. Photosynthesis is a process very sensitive to the impact of various factors. Photosynthesis is a process very sensitive to the impact of various factors. This process influences the changes in various non-photosynthetic solar energy losses of the indicator, which is the swallowing fluorescence especially in the late chordophone fluorescent (GF) parameters shows itself. The method of fluorescent indicator of photosynthetic membranes is based on the peculiar situation of the chordophone algae cells. Chlamydomonas Reinhardt by the research work presented in different environments micro-algae (Tries, taps), Fe, Ag and Au ions under the influence of changes of variable and delayed kinetics were studied fluorescent settings. In general, growth in the period of incubation experiments carried out in all the salts of the corresponding effect (increase or decrease) strengthened. At present, under the influence of radioactive pollution of the object to determine the degree of pollution due to changes in the initial work is being continued.

  5. Testing Metallic Iron Filtration Systems for Decentralized Water Treatment at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Tepong-Tsindé

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors to consider for the design of appropriate water treatment systems including: cost, the concentration and type of biological and/or chemical contamination, concentration limits at which contaminant(s are required to be removed, required flow rate, level of local expertise for on-going maintenance, and social acceptance. An ideal technology should be effective at producing clean, potable water; however it must also be low-cost, low-energy (ideally energy-free and require low-maintenance. The use of packed beds containing metallic iron (Fe0 filters has the potential to become a cheap widespread technology for both safe drinking water provision and wastewater treatment. Fe0 filters have been intensively investigated over the past two decades, however, sound design criteria are still lacking. This article presents an overview of the design of Fe0 filters for decentralized water treatment particularly in the developing world. A design for safe drinking water to a community of 100 people is also discussed as starting module. It is suggested that Fe0 filters have the potential for significant worldwide applicability, but particularly in the developing world. The appropriate design of Fe0 filters, however, is site-specific and dependent upon the availability of local expertise/materials.

  6. Technologies for Decentralized Fluoride Removal: Testing Metallic Iron-based Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Igor Ndé-Tchoupé

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the realization in the 1930s that elevated fluoride concentrations in drinking water can have detrimental effects on human health, new methods have been progressively developed in order to reduce fluoride to acceptable levels. In the developing world the necessity for filtration media that are both low-cost and sourced from locally available materials has resulted in the widespread use of bone char. Since the early 1990s metallic iron (Fe0 has received widespread use as both an adsorbent and a reducing agent for the removal of a wide range of contaminant species from water. The ion-selectivity of Fe0 is dictated by the positively charged surface of iron (hydroxides at circumneutral pH. This suggests that Fe0 could potentially be applied as suitable filter media for the negatively charged fluoride ion. This communication seeks to demonstrate from a theoretical basis and using empirical data from the literature the suitability of Fe0 filters for fluoride removal. The work concludes that Fe0-bearing materials, such as steel wool, hold good promise as low-cost, readily available and highly effective decentralized fluoride treatment materials.

  7. Assessment of mechanical properties of metallic thin-films through micro-beam testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Elizalde, M.R.; Martínez-Esnaola, J.M. [CEIT and TECNUN (University of Navarra), P. Manuel Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Hernandez, M.T.; Li, H.; Pantuso, D. [Design Technology Solutions, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro 97124, OR (United States); Ocaña, I., E-mail: iocana@ceit.es [CEIT and TECNUN (University of Navarra), P. Manuel Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-11-28

    Microelectronic industry is driven by the continuous miniaturization process conducing to the introduction of materials with better performance. These materials are subjected to stresses mainly due to thermal mismatch, microstructural changes or process integration which can be in the origin of mechanical reliability issues. To study these phenomena and even electromigration a good mechanical characterization of the materials is needed. This work aims at developing tests to assess fracture and elastoplastic behavior of thin Cu films. The tests developed are based on the deflection of microbeams (micromachined using a focused ion beam) using a nanoindenter. Different test geometries for microbeams have been evaluated and quantitative data have been obtained combining experimental results with analytical or numerical models, depending on the property under study. Microbeam response shows a strong dependence on the orientation of the grains close to the fixed end. Grain orientation has been measured by electron backscatter diffraction and the plastic behavior has been modeled by the finite element method using an in-house crystal plasticity subroutine. The effect of film thickness on fracture energy has been determined from tests of notched beams. - Highlights: • Cu microbeams have been machined with a focused ion beam and tested at a TriboIndenter. • Crystal plasticity has been accounted for when modeling constitutive behavior of Cu. • Fracture energy has been calculated using notched microcantilever beams. • Fracture energy decreases with film thickness.

  8. Selective versus routine patch metal allergy testing to select bar material for the Nuss procedure in 932 patients over 10years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Robert J; Gaffar, Sheema; Kelly, Robert E; Kuhn, M Ann; Frantz, Frazier W; McGuire, Margaret M; Paulson, James F; Kelly, Cynthia S

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of patch metal allergy testing to select bar material for the Nuss procedure. An IRB-approved (11-04-WC-0098) single institution retrospective, cohort study comparing selective versus routine patch metal allergy testing to select stainless steel or titanium bars for Nuss repair was performed. In Cohort A (9/2004-1/2011), selective patch testing was performed based on clinical risk factors. In Cohort B (2/2011-9/2014), all patients were patch tested. The cohorts were compared for incidence of bar allergy and resultant premature bar loss. Risk factors for stainless steel allergy or positive patch test were evaluated. Cohort A had 628 patients with 63 (10.0%) selected for patch testing, while all 304 patients in Cohort B were tested. Over 10years, 15 (1.8%) of the 842 stainless steel Nuss repairs resulted in a bar allergy, and 5 had a negative preoperative patch test. The incidence of stainless steel bar allergy (1.8% vs 1.7%, p=0.57) and resultant bar loss (0.5% vs 1.3%, p=0.23) was not statistically different between cohorts. An allergic reaction to a stainless steel bar or a positive patch test was more common in females (OR=2.3, pmetal sensitivity. Stainless steel bar allergies occur at a low incidence with either routine or selective patch metal allergy testing. If selective testing is performed, it is advisable in females and patients with a personal or family history of metal sensitivity. A negative preoperative patch metal allergy test does not preclude the possibility of a postoperative stainless steel bar allergy. Level III Treatment Study and Study of Diagnostic Test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and U), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 203}Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, {sup 125}I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by {sup 99}Tc, {sup 75}Se, and finally U, {sup 14}C, and {sup 110m}Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Demonstration test on manufacturing steel bars for concrete reinforcement for recycling of reactor decommissioning metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, D.; Anabuki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    To prove the possibility of recycling the steel scrap resulting from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant, this salvaged steel would be formed into steel bars for concrete reinforcement, as the restricted use and limited use at nuclear plants. The shifting behavior of radioactive isotopes (RI) in the melting process was confirmed through the laboratory hot test using the RI. Then, the demonstration cold test for steel bars for reinforcement using the nonradioactive isotope was conducted in on-line production facilities. In this test the quality of steel bars and uniform distribution of RI were proven and material balance and operational data were obtained. These data show the recycling to steel bars for concrete reinforcement is applicable from economical and safety aspects

  11. Determination of friction in sheet metal forming by means of simulative tribo-tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    operations a coefficient of friction μ is often determined by calibration of the simulation results with experimental observations of material flow and/or measured load. In case of modeling of new stamping operations μ is typically selected based on former experience. These procedures are, however......Numerical modeling of complex sheet stamping operations is well developed and implemented in industry. The weakest link now seems to be appropriate modeling of friction and to some extent also material properties especially when it comes to new lubricants and materials. In modeling of 3-D stamping......, not appropriate when introducing new tribo-systems (lubricant, workpiece material, tool material or tool coating). In order to determine friction under the very varied conditions in sheet stamping simulative testing may be applied, e.g., Plane-Strip-Testing (PST), Draw-Bead-Testing (DBT) and Bending...

  12. Testing applicability of black poplar (Populus nigra L.) bark to heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlizov, A.N.; Blum, O.B.; Filby, R.H.; Malyuk, I.A.; Tryshyn, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of the capabilities of black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as a biomonitor of atmospheric heavy-metal pollution is reported. Performance indicators (concentrations and enrichment factors) of heavy metal bioaccumulation of bark were compared to the corresponding indicators of epiphytic lichens Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. and Physcia adscendens (Fr.) H. Oliver, collected simultaneously with bark samples within the Kiev urban-industrial conurbation. The concentrations of 40 minor and trace elements in the samples were measured by a combination of epithermal and instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) using a 10 MW nuclear research reactor WWR-M as the neutron source. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using non-parametric tests. It was shown that for the majority of the elements determined a good correlation exists between their concentrations in bark and in the lichen species. The accumulation capability of the bark was found to be as effective as, and in some cases better, for both types of lichens. Based on the background levels and variations of the elemental concentration in black poplar-tree bark, threshold values for the enrichment factors were established. For a number of elements (As, Au, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, La, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, Sm, Ti, Th, U, V, W) an interspecies calibration was performed. An optimized pre-irradiation treatment of the bark sample was employed which efficiently separated the most informative external layer from the deeper layers of the bark and thus minimized variations of the element concentrations. Results of this study support black poplar-tree bark as an alternative to epiphytic lichens for heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions, where severe environmental conditions may result in scarcity or even lack of the indicator species

  13. Testing applicability of black poplar (Populus nigra L.) bark to heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlizov, A N; Blum, O B; Filby, R H; Malyuk, I A; Tryshyn, V V

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of the capabilities of black poplar-tree (Populus nigra L.) bark as a biomonitor of atmospheric heavy-metal pollution is reported. Performance indicators (concentrations and enrichment factors) of heavy metal bioaccumulation of bark were compared to the corresponding indicators of epiphytic lichens Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. and Physcia adscendens (Fr.) H. Oliver, collected simultaneously with bark samples within the Kiev urban-industrial conurbation. The concentrations of 40 minor and trace elements in the samples were measured by a combination of epithermal and instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) using a 10 MW nuclear research reactor WWR-M as the neutron source. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using non-parametric tests. It was shown that for the majority of the elements determined a good correlation exists between their concentrations in bark and in the lichen species. The accumulation capability of the bark was found to be as effective as, and in some cases better, for both types of lichens. Based on the background levels and variations of the elemental concentration in black poplar-tree bark, threshold values for the enrichment factors were established. For a number of elements (As, Au, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, La, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, Sm, Ti, Th, U, V, W) an interspecies calibration was performed. An optimized pre-irradiation treatment of the bark sample was employed which efficiently separated the most informative external layer from the deeper layers of the bark and thus minimized variations of the element concentrations. Results of this study support black poplar-tree bark as an alternative to epiphytic lichens for heavy metal air pollution monitoring in urban and industrial regions, where severe environmental conditions may result in scarcity or even lack of the indicator species.

  14. Behavioural and biochemical responses to metals tested alone or in mixture (Cd-Cu-Ni-Pb-Zn) in Gammarus fossarum: From a multi-biomarker approach to modelling metal mixture toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Jérémie D; Uher, Emmanuelle; Fechner, Lise C

    2017-12-01

    Metals are usually present as mixtures at low concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. However, the toxicity and sub-lethal effects of metal mixtures on organisms are still poorly addressed in environmental risk assessment. Here we investigated the biochemical and behavioural responses of Gammarus fossarum to Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn tested individually or in mixture (M2X) at concentrations twice the levels of environmental quality standards (EQSs) from the European Water Framework Directive. The same metal mixture was also tested with concentrations equivalent to EQSs (M1X), thus in a regulatory context, as EQSs are proposed to protect aquatic biota. For each exposure condition, mortality, locomotion, respiration and enzymatic activities involved in digestive metabolism and moult were monitored over a 120h exposure period. Multi-metric variations were summarized by the integrated biomarker response index (IBR). Mono-metallic exposures shed light on biological alterations occurring at environmental exposure levels in gammarids and depending on the considered metal and gender. As regards mixtures, biomarkers were altered for both M2X and M1X. However, no additive or synergistic effect of metals was observed comparing to mono-metallic exposures. Indeed, bioaccumulation data highlighted competitive interactions between metals in M2X, decreasing subsequently their internalisation and toxicity. IBR values indicated that the health of gammarids was more impacted by M1X than M2X, because of reduced competitions and enhanced uptakes of metals for the mixture at lower, EQS-like concentrations. Models using bioconcentration data obtained from mono-metallic exposures generated successful predictions of global toxicity both for M1X and M2X. We conclude that sub-lethal effects of mixtures identified by the multi-biomarker approach can lead to disturbances in population dynamics of gammarids. Although IBR-based models offer promising lines of enquiry to predict metal mixture toxicity

  15. High temperature brush seal tuft testing of metallic bristles versus chrome carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenstein, James A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Kenneth D.; Boyes, Esther

    1996-01-01

    The tribology of brush seals is of considerable interest to turbine engine designers because bristle wear continues to limit long term seal performance and life. To provide better materials characterization and foster the development of improved seals, NASA Lewis has developed a brush seal tuft tester. In this test, a 'paintbrush' sample tuft is loaded under constant contact pressure against the outside diameter of a rotating journal. With this configuration a direct measurement of load and friction is made. Accurate wear rate measurements are possible due to the known contact pressure. Previously reported baseline research using this facility showed good data repeatability and wear morphology similar to published seal data. This paper extends and expands the database for candidate brush seal materials. A series of tuft tests were completed to evaluate the performance of five high temperature superalloy wires sliding against plasma sprayed nichrome-bonded chrome carbide. Wire materials were either nickel-chrome or cobalt-chrome based superalloys. Good corroboration of the tuft results with dynamic seal rig tests was observed; giving additional confidence in the tuft test as a screening and development tool.

  16. Development and flight test of metal-lined CFRP cryogenic tank for reusable rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Ken; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Sato, Eiichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Namiki, Fumiharu; Tanaka, Kohtaro; Watabe, Yoko

    2005-07-01

    A cryogenic tank made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) shell with aluminum thin liner has been designed as a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank for an ISAS reusable launch vehicle, and the function of it has been proven by repeated flights onboard the test vehicle called reusable vehicle testing (RVT) in October 2003. The liquid hydrogen tank has to be a pressure vessel, because the fuel of the engine of the test vehicle is supplied by fuel pressure. The pressure vessel of a combination of the outer shell of CFRP for strength element at a cryogenic temperature and the inner liner of aluminum for gas barrier has shown excellent weight merit for this purpose. Interfaces such as tank outline shape, bulk capacity, maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP), thermal insulation, pipe arrangement, and measurement of data are also designed to be ready onboard. This research has many aims, not only development of reusable cryogenic composite tank but also the demonstration of repeated operation including thermal cycle and stress cycle, familiarization with test techniques of operation of cryogenic composite tanks, and the accumulation of data for future design of tanks, vehicle structures, safety evaluation, and total operation systems.

  17. Standard test methods for performance characteristics of metallic bonded resistance strain gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this standard is to provide uniform test methods for the determination of strain gauge performance characteristics. Suggested testing equipment designs are included. 1.2 Test Methods E 251 describes methods and procedures for determining five strain gauge parameters: Section Part I—General Requirements 7 Part II—Resistance at a Reference Temperature 8 Part III—Gauge Factor at a Reference Temperature 9 Part IV—Temperature Coefficient of Gauge Factor\t10 Part V—Transverse Sensitivity\t11 Part VI—Thermal Output\t12 1.3 Strain gauges are very sensitive devices with essentially infinite resolution. Their response to strain, however, is low and great care must be exercised in their use. The performance characteristics identified by these test methods must be known to an acceptable accuracy to obtain meaningful results in field applications. 1.3.1 Strain gauge resistance is used to balance instrumentation circuits and to provide a reference value for measurements since all data are...

  18. Water mutagenic potential assessment on a semiarid aquatic ecosystem under influence of heavy metals and natural radioactivity using micronuclei test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luiz Cláudio Cardozo; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Morais Ferreira, Douglisnilson; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia; Ferreira da Costa, Thomas; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Souza do Amaral, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    The contamination of water bodies by heavy metals and ionizing radiation is a critical environmental issue, which can affect water quality and, thus, human health. This study aimed to evaluate the water quality of the Boqueirão de Parelhas Dam in the Brazilian semiarid region. A 1-year study (2013-2014) was performed through the assessment of physicochemical parameters, heavy metal content, and radioactivity along with the mutagenicity potential of water using micronuclei test in Orechromis niloticus (in vivo) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocytes (in vitro). A deterioration of water organoleptics characteristics by the presence of high levels of sulfate and total solids was observed. High concentrations of aluminum, nickel, silver, and lead along with the alpha particle content were higher than the limits suggested by the World Health Organization and Brazilian legislation for drinking water. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities was observed in both experimental models. The results obtained confirmed the mutagenic potential present in water samples. This study highlights that geogenic agents affect water quality becoming a human health concern to be taken into account due to the relevance that this water reservoir has in the region.

  19. Toxicokinetics of metals in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus exposed to natural polluted soils – relevance of laboratory tests to the field situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giska, Iwona; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Skip, Borys; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the bioavailability of essential (Zn, Cu) and non-essential metals (Cd, Pb) to the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus exposed to soils originating from a gradient of metal pollution in Southern Poland. Metal uptake and elimination kinetics were determined and related to soils properties. Experimental results were compared with tissue metal concentrations observed in earthworms from the studied transect. Cd and Pb were intensively accumulated by the earthworms, with very slow or no elimination. Their uptake rate constants, based on 0.01 M CaCl 2 -extractable concentrations in the soils, increased with soil pH. Internal concentrations of Cu and Zn were maintained by the earthworms at a stable level, suggesting efficient regulation of these metals by the animals. The estimated uptake and elimination kinetics parameters enabled fairly accurate prediction of metal concentrations reached within a life span of L. rubellus in nature. - Highlights: • We estimated bioavailability of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn to the earthworm L. rubellus. • Earthworms intensively accumulated Cd and Pb. • Uptake rate constants of Cd and Pb increased with soil pH. • Earthworms showed efficient regulation of Cu and Zn internal concentrations. • Toxicokinetics was predictive of metal accumulation by earthworms in the field. - Toxicokinetics tests with earthworms are indicative of metal bioavailability in the field

  20. Hydrogen Abundances in Metal Grains from the Hammadah Al Hamra (HaH) 237 Metal-rich Chondrite: A Test of the Nebular-Formation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Bencubbin-like (CB) chondrites are metal-rich, primitive meteorites [1,2]. Some of these chondrites (HaH 237, QUE 94411) contain compositionally zoned metal grains with near-chondritic bulk compositions. Thermodynamic modeling of the zoning patterns in these grains suggests that they were formed by condensation in a region of the solar nebula with enhanced dust/gas ratios and a total pressure of 10(exp -4) bars at temperatures between 1400 - 1500 K [3]. If these predictions are correct than the metal grains would have been exposed to abundant H2 gas, which comprises the bulk of nebular systems. Since Fe-based alloys can absorb significant quantities of H, metal grains formed in the solar nebula should contain measurable abundances of H.

  1. Initial Testing for the Recommendation of Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Procedures for HY-80 Steel Plate Butt Joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD by Veronika J...FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...at naval shipyards. This thesis explores arc weld theory to develop ideal submarine hull butt joint designs and recommends preliminary testing to

  2. The design and testing of a memory metal actuated boom release mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powley, D. G.; Brook, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    A boom latch and release mechanism was designed, manufactured and tested, based on a specification for the ISEE-B satellite mechanism. From experimental results obtained, it is possible to calculate the energy available and the operating torques which can be achieved from a torsional shape memory element in terms of the reversible strain induced by prior working. Some guidelines to be followed when designing mechanisms actuated by shape memory elements are included.

  3. Identification of heavy and radioactive metals in drinking water by an indirect analysis method based on scale tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, M.; Lacnjevac, C.; Stojanovic, M.; Toskovic, D.; Pantelic, G.; Jovanic, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The analysis of water quality, regarding the content of metals, especially heavy and radioactive ones, has been carried out in an indirect way, by testing scale formed in a hot-water heater, using water from the water-supply network of the city of Belgrade - the district of New Belgrade. The determination of the composition and the structure of the scale has resulted in its complete identification, and its crystallochemical formula has been defined. It has unequivocally been established that the obtained results are within the tolerance boundary with the results acquired by a conventional analysis of water, when it is a matter of very low concentrations. The presence of radioactive elements of uranium and strontium in a scale sample has been found and the way of their penetrating its composition and structure has been explained. Applying the fractional extraction method, uranium has been established to be of an anthropogenic origin

  4. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D. F.; Fan, Chang-Xin; Ruan, J. Z.; Han, S. G.; Wong, K. W.; Sun, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A nondestructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUID's and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUID's. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  5. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  6. Performance testing of a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) based continuous metal emissions monitor at a pyrolytic waste treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, D.W.; Hencken, K.R.; Johnsen, H.A.

    1997-07-01

    A program was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories to develop and demonstrate an advanced continuous emissions monitor that will provide realtime measurement of metal emissions in the wastestreams of thermal treatment facilities. This effort led to the development of a prototype metals monitor based on an optical technique referred to as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurements are performed in situ, and are both noninvasive and real-time. The automated software incorporates a new conditional analysis algorithm that utilizes single particle detection. The metal emissions monitor was tested during March 1997 at a pilot scale pyrolytic waste processing facility in Santa Fe Springs, California. This report describes the field test, including the monitor installation, test cycle, and overall instrument performance. The Clean Air Act metals chromium and manganese were recorded at concentrations from approximately 2 to 5 parts per billion. Iron was recorded at concentrations from 40 to 140 parts per billion. The overall accuracy was in very good agreement with contracted EPA Reference Method 29 results. Overall, the LIBS-based metals monitor performed exceptionally well on a waste treatment facility with very low metal emissions levels. 19 refs., 12 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Extending standard testing period in honeybees to predict lifespan impacts of pesticides and heavy metals using dynamic energy budget modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, H; Lahive, E; Horton, A A; Robinson, A G; Svendsen, C; Rortais, A; Dorne, J-L; Baas, J; Spurgeon, D J; Heard, M S

    2016-12-20

    Concern over reported honeybee (Apis mellifera spp.) losses has highlighted chemical exposure as a risk. Current laboratory oral toxicity tests in A. mellifera spp. use short-term, maximum 96 hour, exposures which may not necessarily account for chronic and cumulative toxicity. Here, we use extended 240 hour (10 day) exposures to examine seven agrochemicals and trace environmental pollutant toxicities for adult honeybees. Data were used to parameterise a dynamic energy budget model (DEBtox) to further examine potential survival effects up to 30 day and 90 day summer and winter worker lifespans. Honeybees were most sensitive to insecticides (clothianidin > dimethoate ≫ tau-fluvalinate), then trace metals/metalloids (cadmium, arsenic), followed by the fungicide propiconazole and herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). LC 50 s calculated from DEBtox parameters indicated a 27 fold change comparing exposure from 48 to 720 hours (summer worker lifespan) for cadmium, as the most time-dependent chemical as driven by slow toxicokinetics. Clothianidin and dimethoate exhibited more rapid toxicokinetics with 48 to 720 hour LC 50 s changes of <4 fold. As effects from long-term exposure may exceed those measured in short-term tests, future regulatory tests should extend to 96 hours as standard, with extension to 240 hour exposures further improving realism.

  8. The role of Metals in Amyloid Aggregation: A Test Case for ab initio Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minicozzi, V.; Rossi, G. C.; Stellato, F.; Morante, S.

    2007-01-01

    First principle ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the Car-Parrinello type have proved to be of invaluable help in understanding the microscopic mechanisms of chemical bonding both in solid state physics and in structural biophysics. In this work we present as test cases the study of the Cu coordination mode in two especially important examples: Prion protein and β-amyloids. Using medium size PC-clusters as well as larger parallel platforms, we are able to deal with systems comprising 300 to 500 atoms and 1000 to 1500 electrons for as long as 2-3 ps. We present structural results which confirm indications coming from NMR and XAS data

  9. Heavy metal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of spawning, resistance to diseases and social acceptability (Pillay, 1993). This study aimed at determining the carbohydrate reserves and heavy metal accumulation of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis miloticus after treatment with heavy metals such as lead, copper and zinc. 2. Materials and Methods. Test organism: Nile tilapia ...

  10. Validation of a simplified computer simulation method for plastic forming of metals by conventional tensile tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fraga Pinto

    Full Text Available Abstract This work was developed in order to validate a simplified computer simulation method for application in the drawing processes. The results of tensile tests on AISI 1004, AISI 1020 steel and copper were compared to those of computer simulations performed using the Deform-3D TM software. Each specimen was assumed to be an elasto-plastic material and was meshed with 50,000 finite elements. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were the only material properties considered in the elastic region; the parameters of Hollomon's equation were used in the plastic region up to constriction. A strain rate of 1x10-3 s-1 was applied during the simulations. In the plastic region, up to the point of constriction, the curves obtained from the simulations showed reasonable correspondence to those determined from physical testing. However, the former diverged from the latter in the elastic and elastic-plastic transition regions. This divergence indicates that microstructural factors may have a greater influence in the transition region than in the plastic region. Moreover, the correlation obtained in the plastic region indicates that the proposed method has the potential to be applied in drawing processes.

  11. Multiple allergies to metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Eng Tu

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Metal alloys may induce multiple metal allergies. Patients suspected of having a metal allergy should be patch tested with an extended series of metals. We recommend adding palladium and gold, at least, to the standard series.

  12. No Increased Risk of Knee Arthroplasty Failure in Patients With Positive Skin Patch Testing for Metal Hypersensitivity: A Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Dalibel; Wagner, Eric R; Larson, Dirk R; Davis, Mark P; Pagnano, Mark W; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear whether a positive skin patch test for metal allergy in patients with skin hypersensitivity to metals is associated with an increased risk of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) failure. Our aim was to determine whether patients with a history of metal allergy who had a positive skin patch test (SPT+) had worse outcomes after primary TKA compared with those with a negative skin patch test and compared with controls. Over 12 years, 127 patients underwent 161 TKA after skin patch testing (SPT; 56 were positive). Cases were matched by age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, implant type, and implant manufacturer to 161 control knee arthroplasties without any prior history of metal allergy and no SPT. Median follow-up was 5.3 years. Differences in outcome measures were assessed between groups. Patients with a SPT+ to metal did not have a higher complication, reoperation, or revision rates compared with patients with a SPT- and matched controls. Survivorship free of revision at 5 years was 98.1% for SPT+; 100% for SPT-; 97.6% for SPT+ controls, 99.0% for SPT- controls. There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative pain between SPT+ and SPT- patients and matched controls. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of metal hypersensitivity on TKA outcomes and the role of SPT in patients before TKA. In this study, a SPT+ for metals was of little practical value in predicting the midterm outcome after TKA and cannot be strongly recommended as a method to guide the selection of implant type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT TEST SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF THE TOXICITY OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS. I. SENSITIVITY OF PLANT SPECIES TO HEAVY METAL STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andon VASSILEV

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of young bean, cucumber and lettuce plants to heavy metals stress was studied at control conditions in a climatic room. The plants were grown in pots with perlite and supplied daily by half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution. The plants were treated for 8 days with different heavy metal doses (full, ½ and ¼ starting at appearance of the fi rst true leaf (cucumber and bean or the full development of the second leaf (lettuce. The full dose consisted 500 μM Zn, 50 μM Cd and 20 μM Cu added to the nutrient solution. Based on the measured morphological (fresh weight, leaf area, root length and physiological parameters (photosynthetic pigments content and activity of guaiacol peroxidase in roots, the cucumber plants presented the highest sensitivity to heavy metal stress.

  14. Analysis of samples of reflector materials which are multicoated and metal samples with oxide coatings which have been exposed the space environment in LDEF testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The use of low angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and Auger spectrometry have been tested as suitable methods for analysis of thin oxide films on metal substrates exposed to the space environment during Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) testing. No significant changes in the composition of silicon monoxide overcoats on aluminum surfaces was found. XPS and Auger testing appear to be more suitable for ultrathin films than XRD.

  15. Preparation, characterization, and testing of metal-doped carbon xerogels as catalyst for phenol CWAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleşa Chicinaş, Raluca; Coteţ, L Cosmin; Măicăneanu, Andrada; Vasilescu, Mihai; Vulpoi, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Co-, Ce-, and Ni-doped carbon xerogels (Me-CX) synthesized by sol-gel method followed by an ion exchange process were used as catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. The prepared catalysts were characterized using TEM, SEM, BET surface area, and XRD. Me-CX catalysts were tested in mild conditions (20-60 °C, atmospheric pressure) in a semi-batch reactor in various reaction conditions (30-60 L/h, 0.05-0.2 g catalysts, 50-175 mg phenol/L). Total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency values obtained decrease in the following order Co-CX ≅ Ce-CX > Ni1-CX > K-CX for the catalysts obtained using the same procedure. TOC removal efficiencies of up to 72% were reached in case of Co-CX catalyst at 20 °C, 40 L/h, using 0.15 g catalyst and a solution of 100 mg phenol/L.

  16. Performance of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory calculations for liquid metal: A benchmark test for sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong-Hwan; Oda, Takuji

    2018-04-01

    The performance of exchange-correlation functionals in density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for liquid metal has not been sufficiently examined. In the present study, benchmark tests of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), Armiento-Mattsson 2005 (AM05), PBE re-parameterized for solids, and local density approximation (LDA) functionals are conducted for liquid sodium. The pair correlation function, equilibrium atomic volume, bulk modulus, and relative enthalpy are evaluated at 600 K and 1000 K. Compared with the available experimental data, the errors range from -11.2% to 0.0% for the atomic volume, from -5.2% to 22.0% for the bulk modulus, and from -3.5% to 2.5% for the relative enthalpy depending on the DFT functional. The generalized gradient approximation functionals are superior to the LDA functional, and the PBE and AM05 functionals exhibit the best performance. In addition, we assess whether the error tendency in liquid simulations is comparable to that in solid simulations, which would suggest that the atomic volume and relative enthalpy performances are comparable between solid and liquid states but that the bulk modulus performance is not. These benchmark test results indicate that the results of liquid simulations are significantly dependent on the exchange-correlation functional and that the DFT functional performance in solid simulations can be used to roughly estimate the performance in liquid simulations.

  17. Development of an in-plane biaxial test for forming limit curve (FLC) characterization of metallic sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidane, I; Guines, D; Léotoing, L; Ragneau, E

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to propose a new experimental device able to give for a single specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability under static and dynamic conditions (for intermediate strain rates). In this paper, we focus on the characterization of sheet metal forming. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators allowing biaxial tensile tests on cruciform specimens. The formability is evaluated thanks to the classical forming limit diagram (FLD), and one of the difficulties of this study was the design of a dedicated specimen for which the necking phenomenon appears in its central zone. If necking is located in the central zone of the specimen, then the speed ratio between the two axes controls the strain path in this zone and a whole forming limit curve can be covered. Such a specimen is proposed through a numerical and experimental validation procedure. A rigorous procedure for the detection of numerical and experimental forming strains is also presented. Finally, an experimental forming limit curve is determined and validated for an aluminium alloy dedicated to the sheet forming processes (AA5086)

  18. Possibility of using non-metallic check samples to assess the performance of penetrant materials and the sensitivity of penetrant testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina S. Lobanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Liquid penetrant testing (PT is one of the most widely used non-destructive testing methods for detecting surface discontinuities in nonporous solid materials. This method has shown good results when looking for defects in details made of any nonporous materials including glass, ceramics, plastic, magnetic or nonmagnetic metals or alloys. Penetrant materials and check samples are the main tools for PT. The samples are used to estimate the performance of penetrant materials and to evaluate the sensitivity of the testing technology. AIM OF THE PAPER. The paper aims to evaluate the discontinuity parameters, such as cracks, in non-metal samples to determine the feasibility of using these samples to assess the sensitivity of the testing technology. METHODS. Discontinuity parameters in non-metallic check samples were determined using a microscope, and then the data was statistically processed in accordance with GOST 8.736-2011"Multiple direct measurements. Methods of measurement results processing. Main principles". RESULTS. The conducted study has showed that samples made of non-metallic material can be used to estimate the performance of penetrant families, as well as to assess penetrant testing sensitivity since the cracks in samples are virtually straight.

  19. In vitro tests to assess toxic effects of airborne PM(10) samples. Correlation with metals and chlorinated dioxins and furans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Rovira, Joaquim; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2013-01-15

    Inhalation is an important exposure pathway to airborne pollutants such as heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and particulate matter. Chronic exposure to those chemicals, which form part of complex environmental mixtures, may mean important human health risks. In the present study, the suitability of different in vitro tests to evaluate the toxic effects of air PM(10) pollutants is investigated. In addition, it is also assessed how to distinguish the contribution of chemical pollutants to toxicity. Sixty-three air samples were collected in various areas of Catalonia (Spain), and the levels of ecotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated. Aqueous acidic extractions of quartz fiber filters, where PM(10) had been retained, were performed. The photo-luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri (Microtox®) bioassay was performed to assess ecotoxicity. Moreover, MTT and Comet Assays, both using human lung epithelial cells A549 as target cells, were applied to assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of air samples, respectively. The results show that Microtox® is an excellent screening test to perform a first evaluation of air quality, as it presented a significant correlation with chemical contaminants, contrasting with MTT Assay. Although none of the samples exhibited genotoxicity, a high correlation was found between this in vitro test and carcinogenic agents. Urban samples from traffic-impacted areas would be significantly more toxic. Finally, environmental temperature was identified as a key parameter, as higher values of ecotoxicity were found in winter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of the physiologically-based extraction test to assess the oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown in contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intawongse, Marisa; Dean, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The oral bioaccessibility of metals in vegetable plants grown on contaminated soil was assessed. This was done using the physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) to simulate the human digestion of plant material. A range of vegetable plants, i.e. carrot, lettuce, radish and spinach, were grown on metal contaminated soil. After reaching maturity the plants were harvested and analysed for their total metal content (i.e. Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The plant samples were then subsequently extracted using an in vitro gastrointestinal approach or PBET to assess the likelihood of oral bioaccessibility if the material was consumed by humans. - Evaluation of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess the risk to humans of consuming contaminated vegetables

  1. Test structures for accurate UHF C-V measurements of nano-scale CMOSFETs with HfSiON and TiN metal gate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Kyong-Taek; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Brown, George A.; Heh, Dawei; Choi, Rino; Harris, Rusty; Song, Seung-Chul; Lee, Byoung Hun; Han, In-Sikh; Lee, Hi-Deok; Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2007-01-01

    Test structures for accurate UHF capacitance –voltage (C-V) measurements of high performance CMOSFETs with Hf-based high-k dielectric and TiN metal gate are analyzed. It is shown that series resistance or substrate resistance between the channel region and body contact plays a role in UHF C-V

  2. The origin of the hot metal-poor gas in NGC 1291 - Testing the hypothesis of gas dynamics as the cause of the gas heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, [No Value; Freeman, K

    In this paper we test the idea that the low-metallicity hot gas in the centre of NGC 1291 is heated via a dynamical process. In this scenario, the gas from the outer gas-rich ring loses energy through bar-driven shocks and falls to the centre. Heating of the gas to X-ray temperatures comes from the

  3. Chemical stabilization of metals in mine wastes by transformed red mud and other iron compounds: laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardau, C; Lattanzi, P; Peretti, R; Zucca, A

    2014-01-01

    A series of static and kinetic laboratory-scale tests were designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of transformed red mud (TRM) from bauxite refining residues, commercial zero-valent iron, and synthetic iron (III) hydroxides as sorbents/reagents to minimize the generation of acid drainage and the release of toxic elements from multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes. In particular, in some column experiments the percolation of meteoric water through a waste pile, alternated with periods of dryness, was simulated. Wastes were placed in columns together with sorbents/reagents in three different set-ups: as blended amendment (mixing method), as a bed at the bottom of the column (filtration method), or as a combination of the two previous methods. The filtration methods, which simulate the creation of a permeable reactive barrier downstream of a waste pile, are the most effective, while the use of sorbents/reagents as amendments leads to unsatisfactory results, because of the selective removal of only some contaminants. The efficacy of the filtration method is not significantly affected by the periods of dryness, except for a temporary rise of metal contents in the leachates due to dissolution of soluble salts formed upon evaporation in the dry periods. These results offer original information on advantages/limits in the use of TRM for the treatment of multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes, and represent the starting point for experimentation at larger scale.

  4. Processing and Prolonged 500 C Testing of 4H-SiC JFET Integrated Circuits with Two Levels of Metal Interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, David J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liangyu; Lukco, Dorothy; Chang, Carl W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2015-01-01

    Complex integrated circuit (IC) chips rely on more than one level of interconnect metallization for routing of electrical power and signals. This work reports the processing and testing of 4H-SiC junction field effect transistor (JFET) prototype IC's with two levels of metal interconnect capable of prolonged operation at 500 C. Packaged functional circuits including 3- and 11-stage ring oscillators, a 4-bit digital to analog converter, and a 4-bit address decoder and random access memory cell have been demonstrated at 500 C. A 3-stage oscillator functioned for over 3000 hours at 500 C in air ambient. Improved reproducibility remains to be accomplished.

  5. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  6. Rationale and feasibility study of a mechanical model for the testing of material fatigue in metal ureteral stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafaloukas, Nikos; Birch, Malcom; Buchholz, Noor

    2008-02-01

    Stents are used abundantly to maintain ureteral patency. The majority are plastic tubes that adjust easily to upper urinary-tract motion. Recently, a coiled-wire lumenless stent was introduced (ZebraStent, Neo Medical, Munich, Germany) to facilitate expulsion of stone fragments after lithotripsy. Its metal core is composed of Nitinol, with the soft J ends being of titanium. The thin shape considerably increases the extraluminal space. The ZebraStent stretches the ureter and also provides a surface for the fragments to glide along. In our 18-month experience with the ZebraStent, two of them fractured along the shaft. We sought to learn whether this complication resulted from a defect in stent design or from material fatigue secondary to constant movement. Our model is powered by an electric motor that produces a constant displacement similar to stent movements in vivo. The whole ZebraStent is embedded in a 37 degrees C waterbath to simulate physiological conditions within the ureter. We used an average displacement of 16 mm. The average frequency of ventilatory-cycle simulation was 20 times that in vivo, allowing us to collect data in a shorter time. All 10 stents broke within the proximal Nitinol shaft at the equivalent of 4 to 6 months (125-179 days). Our preliminary results show that all stents break after the equivalent of 4 or more months. The fact that this occurs in the homogenous proximal Nitinol shaft rather than at the welding point between the shaft and the titanium curl implies that breakage is secondary to material fatigue and not design error. Extensive testing is under way to confirm material fatigue as the cause of breakage. We hope to determine a safe dwelling time for these stents, which at the moment should not exceed 3 months.

  7. Heaters to simulate fuel pins for heat transfer tests in single-phase liquid-metal-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, V.; Graf, E.; Hartmann, W.

    1976-09-01

    The development of heaters for thermal simulation of the fuel elements of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (SNR) is reported. Beginning with the experimental demands various heating methods are discussed for thermodynamic investigations of the heat transfer in liquid metals. Then a preferred heater rod is derived to simulate the fuel pins of a SNR. Finally it is reported on the fabrication and the operation practice. (orig.) [de

  8. Separation tests of heavy metals in samples of industrial wastes through flotation; Pruebas de separacion de metales pesados en muestras de residuos industriales mediante flotacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrego L, J

    1995-12-15

    Samples of residual muds, taken at the exit of the filter-press of the water treatment plant of a galvanoplastics industry in Lerma, Estado de Mexico, its were prepared for its qualitative and quantitative analysis. Likewise, the residual waters of the cistern located at the end of the electrodeposition process, was subjected to qualitative chemical analysis for the neutron activation technique and to quantitative analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry. The samples were treated by a flotation process by means of the one which it was studied the heavy metals removal. The results show that the AP-845 collector is the one that better it fulfilled the objectives since, it solves the problem, unless by the copper that although their concentration in the residual waters drop a lot, it was not inside the standard. (Author)

  9. The use of a physiologically-based extraction test to assess relationships between bioaccessible metals in urban soil and neurodevelopmental conditions in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jie; Wang, Yinding; McDermott, Suzanne; Cai, Bo; Aelion, C. Marjorie; Lead, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) and cerebral palsy (CP) are serious neurodevelopment conditions and low birth weight (LBW) is correlated with both ID and CP. The actual causes and mechanisms for each of these child outcomes are not well understood. In this study, the relationship between bioaccessible metal concentrations in urban soil and these child conditions were investigated. A physiologically based extraction test (PBET) mimicking gastric and intestinal processes was applied to measure the bio-accessibility of four metals (cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and lead (Pb)) in urban soil, and a Bayesian Kriging method was used to estimate metal concentrations in geocoded maternal residential sites. The results showed that bioaccessible metal concentrations of Cd, Ni, and Pb in the intestinal phase were statistically significantly associated with the child outcomes. Lead and nickel were associated with ID, lead and cadmium was associated with LBW, and cadmium was associated with CP. The total concentrations and stomach concentrations were not correlated to significant effects in any of the analyses. For lead, an estimated threshold value was found that was statistically significant in predicting low birth weight. The change point test was statistically significant (p value = 0.045) at an intestine threshold level of 9.2 mg/kg (95% confidence interval 8.9–9.4, p value = 0.0016), which corresponds to 130.6 mg/kg of total Pb concentration in the soil. This is a narrow confidence interval for an important relationship. - Highlights: • Correlation between bioavailable metals and child development were investigated. • Cd, Ni, and Pb in the intestinal phase significantly affect neurodevelopment. • Pb has a threshold value 130.6 mg/kg (of whole soil) for low birth weight. - Based on physiologically based extraction test, the 130.6 mg/kg of total Pb concentration in the soil may cause low birth weight of baby.

  10. Mobile Phones-An asset or a liability: A study based on characterization and assessment of metals in waste mobile phone components using leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Meenakshi; Yadav, Sudesh; Morthekai, P; Linda, Anurag; Kumar, Sushil; Sharma, Anupam

    2018-01-15

    The prolonged use of old fashioned gadgets, especially mobile phones, is declining readily with the advancement in technology which ultimately lead to generation of e-waste. The present study investigates the concentrations of nine metals (Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Sn, and Zn) in various components of the mobile phones using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), Waste Extraction Test (WET) and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP). The results were compared with the threshold limits for hazardous waste defined by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (CDTSC) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The average concentrations of metals were found high in PWBs. WET was found relatively aggressive as compared to TCLP and SPLP. Redundancy analysis (RDA) suggests that part of mobile, extraction test, manufacturer, mobile model and year of manufacturing explain 34.66% of the variance. According to the present study, waste mobile phones must be considered as hazardous due to the potential adverse impact of toxic metals on human health and environment. However, mobile phones can be an asset as systematic extraction and recycling could reduce the demand of primary metals mining and conserve the natural resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities: Establishing methods for testing the safe design of ductile cast iron casks with higher content of metallic recycling material (EBER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, U.; Voelzke, H.; Droste, B.

    2001-01-01

    The safe design of ductile cast iron (DCI) casks with higher content of metallic recycling material is investigated. Based upon the requirements of transport and storage containers for radioactive waste appropriate test scenarios are defined. A representative accident scenario (5 m drop of a cubic DCI container with given material properties onto a hard repository ground simulating concrete target) is analysed numerically by means of the finite element method using three-dimensional models. Dynamic flow curves of ductile cast iron with different scrap metal additions which are necessary for precise elastic-plastic calculations are given. The accuracy and numerical stability of the resulting dynamic stresses and strains are investigated. A comparison between calculation results and measurements from drop tests with DCI containers shows, that known mechanical effects like bending vibrations of the container walls are reflected by the finite element models. The detailed stress analysis and knowledge of the material properties are prerequisites for the safety assessment concept developed for DCI casks with higher content of metallic recycling material. Equations for semi-elliptical surface cracks in the walls of a cubically shaped container which are used in the safety assessment concept are verified under dynamic conditions. This allows the specification of the maximum permissible size of crack-like flaws depending on the material quality. Mainly the fracture mechanical properties of ductile cast iron with higher content of metallic recycling material determine the suitability of such materials for transport and storage containers. (orig.) [de

  12. Standard test method for the determination of impurities in plutonium metal: acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This Test Method covers the determination of 58 trace elements in plutonium (Pu) metal. The Pu sample is dissolved in acid, and the concentration of the trace impurities are determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). 1.2 This Test Method is specific for the determination of trace impurities in Pu metal. It may be applied to other types of Pu materials, such as Pu oxides, if the samples are dissolved and oxidized to the Pu(IV) state. However, it is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the performance of other matrices. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this method to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use of this standard.

  13. Laboratory calibration and field testing of the Chemcatcher-Metal for trace levels of rare earth elements in estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Paschke, Albrecht; Broekaert, Jose A C; Prange, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Little knowledge is available about water concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in the marine environment. The direct measurement of REEs in coastal waters is a challenging task due to their ultra-low concentrations as well as the high salt content in the water samples. To quantify these elements at environmental concentrations (pg L(-1) to low ng L(-1)) in coastal waters, current analytical techniques are generally expensive and time consuming, and require complex chemical preconcentration procedures. Therefore, an integrative passive sampler was tested as a more economic alternative sampling approach for REE analysis. We used a Chemcatcher-Metal passive sampler consisting of a 3M Empore Chelating Disk as the receiving phase, as well as a cellulose acetate membrane as the diffusion-limiting layer. The effect of water turbulence and temperature on the uptake rates of REEs was analyzed during 14-day calibration experiments by a flow-through exposure tank system. The sampling rates were in the range of 0.42 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 0.25 m s(-1)) to 4.01 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 1 m s(-1)). Similar results were obtained for the different REEs under investigation. The water turbulence was the most important influence on uptake. The uptake rates were appropriate to ascertain time-weighted average concentrations of REEs during a field experiment in the Elbe Estuary near Cuxhaven Harbor (exposure time 4 weeks). REE concentrations were determined to be in the range 0.2 to 13.8 ng L(-1), where the highest concentrations were found for neodymium and samarium. In comparison, most of the spot samples measured along the Chemcatcher samples had REE concentrations below the limit of detection, in particular due to necessary dilution to minimize the analytical problems that arise with the high salt content in marine water samples. This study was among the first efforts to measure REE levels in the field using a passive sampling approach. Our results suggest that passive samplers could be

  14. Ames Research Center cryogenic mirror testing program - A comparison of the cryogenic performance of metal and glass mirrors with different types of mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacob H.; Melugin, Ramsey K.; Augason, Gordon C.; Howard, Steven D.; Pryor, G. Mark

    1989-01-01

    A summary of the cryogenic testing of glass and metal mirrors performed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and two other places is presented. Recent improvements to the ARC Cryogenic Optics Test Facility are described. The purposes of the tests were to determine: (1) how glass mirrors would perform at cryogenic temperatures compared with metal mirrors and (2) how various mirror mounts would affect the cryogenic performance of mirrors. Details of a cryogenic test of a 50 cm 'double arch', fused-silica mirror with a three-point mount and with a radially-compliant, flexured mount are given. Within the accuracy of the measurements, it was determined that the flexured mount did not induce appreciable distortion in the double arch mirror. Results of the cryogenic tests of a number of glass mirrors and two beryllium mirrors are included. The cryogenic distortion of the glass mirrors was found to be less than that for the beryllium mirrors. Within the accuracy of the measurements, no hysteresis was found in the glass mirrors. It was possible to measure hysteresis in one of the beryllium mirrors.

  15. Effect of crack blunting in liquid metal environments on K-IEAC determined by the rising load test

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available tests. Although these tests have been used extensively in the past, they require substantially long testing times before reliable K-IEAC values can be obtained. By using environments significantly more aggressive than those encountered in practice...

  16. Preliminary evidence of differences in cadmium tolerance in metal-free stocks of the standard earthworm test species Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Patricks Voua; Otomo, Laetitia Voua; Bezuidenhout, Carlos C; Maboeta, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    To test whether metal-tolerant and metal-sensitive earthworm specimens could be an inherent part of metal-free earthworm populations, (i) we used DNA barcoding to identify and categorize earthworms from 8 populations of the standard test species Eisenia andrei, and (ii) the earthworms carrying three of the identified COI haplotypes (named Hap1, hap3 and Hap3) were paired up and exposed to Cd in order to assess the difference in Cd sensitivity between the breeding pairs. A total of six breeding pairs were exposed to 0, 25, 50 and 100 mg Cd/kg for 4 weeks at 20 °C. The survival of the breeding pairs, their change in biomass and cocoon production were assessed. For all of the endpoints assessed, the results indicated that couple 6 (Hap3 × Hap3) was the most sensitive breeding pair whereas couple 4 (Hap1 × Hap3) was the least sensitive one. The analysis of Cd tissue contents revealed that with increasing Cd concentration, Cp6 (Hap3 × Hap3) could accumulate significantly more Cd than any other breeding pair (p ≤ 0.01). Our findings indicate that E. andrei may harbour intrinsically Cd-tolerant and Cd-sensitive individuals and that this may be due to individual differences in Cd accumulation kinetics. In the context of ecotoxicological testing, our results underline the importance of using genetically diverse populations in laboratory testing to prevent generating flawed data from genetically homogeneous laboratory stocks. Although we do not regard the present mitochondrial haplotypes as proxy for possibly nuclear encoded traits, we discuss the necessity of a standardised earthworm barcoding protocol that could help not only to confirm the taxonomy of laboratory earthworm stocks but also to select genetically diverse stocks suitable for laboratory testing.

  17. A TEST OF THE ADDITIVITY OF ACUTE TOXICITY OF BINARY-METAL MIXTURES OF NI WITH CD, CU, AND ZN TO DAPHNIA MAGNA, USING THE INFLECTION POINT OF THE CONCENTRATION–RESPONSE CURVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Elizabeth M.; Ranville, James F.; Smith, Samantha A.; Meyer, Joseph S.

    2018-01-01

    Mixtures of metals are often present in surface waters, leading to toxicity that is difficult to predict. To provide data for development of multimetal toxicity models, Daphnia magna neonates were exposed to individual metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) and to binary combinations of those metals in standard 48-h lethality tests conducted in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water with 3 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. Toxicity tests were performed with mixtures of Ni and 1) Cd, which is considerably more toxic than Ni; 2) Cu, which is less toxic than Cd but more toxic than Ni; and 3) Zn, which has a toxicity threshold similar to Ni. For each combination of metals in the binary mixtures, the concentration of 1 metal was held constant while the second metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations; then the roles of the metals were reversed. Inflection points of the concentration–response curves were compared to test for additivity of toxicity. Sublethal concentrations of Ni caused less-than-additive toxicity with Cd, slightly less-than-additive toxicity with Zn, and greater-than-additive toxicity with Cu. One explanation of these results might be competition among the metals for binding to biological ligands and/or dissolved organic matter. Therefore, models might have to incorporate sometimes competing chemical interactions to accurately predict metal-mixture toxicity. PMID:26681657

  18. Chemical and plant tests to assess the viability of amendments to reduce metal availability in mine soils and tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this research was to assess the potential of several industrial wastes to immobilise metals in two polluted soils deriving from an old Pb/Zn mine. Two different approaches were used to assess the performance of different amendments: a chemical one, using extraction by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and a biological one, using Lupinus albus as a bio-indicator. Four amendments were used: inorganic sugar production waste (named 'sugar foam', SF), sludge from a drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), organic waste from olive mill waste (OMW) and paper mill sludge (PMS). Amendment to soil ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 (w/w). All the amendments were capable of significantly decreasing (p mine soils as it led to a decrease in the availability and toxicity of metals and, thus, facilitated the growth of a vegetation layer.

  19. Development and testing of on-line analytical instrumentation for alkali and heavy metal release in pressurised conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Haeyrinen, V.; Oikari, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the project is to demonstrate in industrial conditions and further develop the continuous alkali measurement method plasma excited alkali resonance line spectroscopy (PEARLS) developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT). The demonstration takes place in joint measuring campaigns, where two other continuous alkali measurement methods, ELIF and surface ionisation, are being simultaneously demonstrated. A modification of PEARLS will also be developed for the continuous measurement of heavy metal concentrations. A market study of continuous measuring techniques for alkali and heavy metals is further part of the project. The method will be demonstrated in two pressurised fluidised bed combustion facilities. One of these is the 10 MW PCFB of Foster Wheeler Energia Oy in Karhula. The second one is yet to be decided. The first measuring campaign is scheduled for the spring of 1997 in Karhula. In 1996 the group at TUT participated in the performance of a market study regarding continuous measuring techniques for alkali and heavy metal concentrations. A draft report was submitted to and approved by the EC. Development work on PEARLS in 1996 has centered around the construction of a calibration device for alkali measurements. The device can be used by all three measuring techniques in the project to check readings against a known alkali concentration at controlled and known conditions. In 1996 PEARLS was applied for alkali measurement at several pressurised combustion installations of laboratory and industrial pilot scale

  20. Evaluation of the bioaccessible gastric and intestinal fractions of heavy metals in contaminated soils by means of a simple bioaccessibility extraction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Mendoza, C; Tatiana Garrido, R; Cristian Quilodrán, R; Matías Segovia, C; José Parada, A

    2017-06-01

    A study is made to evaluate the bioaccessibility of heavy metals in contaminated soils through a simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET), applied to the analysis of both the gastric and intestinal phases. Soils with high metal content of the Mapocho, Cachapoal, and Rancagua series were studied; they are located in suburban areas of large cities in the central valley of Chile. The bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were related to the main physicochemical characteristics of the soils and to the chemical forms obtained by sequential extraction. The elements Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn are distributed in the soils between the exchangeable fractions, bound to oxides, to organic matter, and in the residual fraction. On the other hand, Cr and Pb are found mainly in the fractions bound to organic matter and in the residual fraction. The three soils have a high Cu content, (640-2060 mg/kg), in the order Cachapoal > Rancagua > Mapocho. The SBET test allowed establishing a different bioaccessibility for the elements in the soil. Cu was notoriously bioaccessible in both the gastric and intestinal phases in the three soils, reaching more than 50% in the Cachapoal and Rancagua soils. The other elements, regardless of the soil, were bioaccessible only in one of the phases, more frequently in the gastric phase. The multiple correlation study indicates that the metal forms have a higher incidence than the soil's physicochemical factors on the extractability to evaluate the human oral bioaccessibility of the metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  2. Modified batch anaerobic digestion assay for testing efficiencies of trace metal additives to enhance methane production of energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulé, Mathieu; Bolduan, Rainer; Seidelt, Stephan; Schlagermann, Pascal; Bott, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Batch biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays to evaluate the methane yield of biogas substrates such as energy crops are usually carried out with undiluted inoculum. A BMP assay was performed on two energy crops (green cuttings and grass silage). Anaerobic digestion was performed both with and without supplementation of three commercial additives containing trace metals in liquid, solid or adsorbed form (on clay particles). In order to reveal positive effects of trace metal supplementation on the methane yield, besides undiluted inoculum, 3-fold and 10-fold dilutions of the inoculum were applied for substrate digestion. Diluted inoculum variants were supplemented with both mineral nutrients and pH-buffering substances to prevent a collapse of the digestion process. As expected, commercial additives had no effect on the digestion process performed with undiluted inoculum, while significant increases of methane production through trace element supplementation could be observed on the diluted variants. The effect of inoculum dilution may be twofold: (1) decrease in trace metal supplementation from the inoculum and (2) reduction in the initial number of bacterial cells. Bacteria require higher growth rates for substrate degradation and hence have higher trace element consumption. According to common knowledge of the biogas process, periods with volatile fatty acids accumulation and decreased pH may have occurred in the course ofanaerobic digestion. These effects may have led to inhibition, not only ofmethanogenes and acetogenes involved in the final phases of methane production, but also offibre-degrading bacterial strains involved in polymer hydrolysis. Further research is required to confirm this hypothesis.

  3. Distinguishing metal bioconcentration from particulate matter in moss tissue: Testing methods of removing particles attached to the moss surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spagnuolo, V.; Giordano, S. [Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Via Cintia 4, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pérez-Llamazares, A.; Ares, A.; Carballeira, A.; Fernández, J.A. [Area de Ecología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [Area de Ecología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    Accurate differentiation of the proportion of bioconcentrated metals (i.e. incorporated into cells) and the proportion that is not bioconcentrated (i.e. adsorbed at the surface) would lead to a better understanding of the uptake processes and would represent an advance in the use of mosses as biomonitors. Traditionally the methods used to remove contaminants that are not bioconcentrated were to wash the plant material with water or to apply the sequential elution technique, but nowadays both options are considered inaccurate for these purposes. The remaining possibilities are to clean the moss samples with a nitrogen jet or by power ultrasound. Samples of terrestrial moss Pseudoscleropodium purum (Hewd.) Fleisch. were collected from five sampling stations. Different nitrogen jet cleaning procedures and ultrasound cleaning procedures were applied to the mosses. To determine whether any of the treatments altered the membrane integrity of the moss samples, the concentrations of K were determined. The shoots were observed under a scanning electron microscope, and the size and number of particles were determined. Nitrogen jet cleaning was determined to be unacceptable because it damaged the phyllids and/or altered the membrane permeability and did not eliminate the particles from the moss surface. Moreover, ultrasound cleaning treatment should also discarded because of the loss of extracellular metals that are transferred to the water in which the moss is cleaned. - Highlights: • The cleaning of surface particles on mosses is an unresolved issue • The use of a nitrogen jet as cleaning procedure was ruled out • The use of ultrasound treatments as cleaning procedure was also discarded • Currently it is not possible to quantify the bioconcentrated metal fraction in mosses.

  4. Distinguishing metal bioconcentration from particulate matter in moss tissue: Testing methods of removing particles attached to the moss surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spagnuolo, V.; Giordano, S.; Pérez-Llamazares, A.; Ares, A.; Carballeira, A.; Fernández, J.A.; Aboal, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate differentiation of the proportion of bioconcentrated metals (i.e. incorporated into cells) and the proportion that is not bioconcentrated (i.e. adsorbed at the surface) would lead to a better understanding of the uptake processes and would represent an advance in the use of mosses as biomonitors. Traditionally the methods used to remove contaminants that are not bioconcentrated were to wash the plant material with water or to apply the sequential elution technique, but nowadays both options are considered inaccurate for these purposes. The remaining possibilities are to clean the moss samples with a nitrogen jet or by power ultrasound. Samples of terrestrial moss Pseudoscleropodium purum (Hewd.) Fleisch. were collected from five sampling stations. Different nitrogen jet cleaning procedures and ultrasound cleaning procedures were applied to the mosses. To determine whether any of the treatments altered the membrane integrity of the moss samples, the concentrations of K were determined. The shoots were observed under a scanning electron microscope, and the size and number of particles were determined. Nitrogen jet cleaning was determined to be unacceptable because it damaged the phyllids and/or altered the membrane permeability and did not eliminate the particles from the moss surface. Moreover, ultrasound cleaning treatment should also discarded because of the loss of extracellular metals that are transferred to the water in which the moss is cleaned. - Highlights: • The cleaning of surface particles on mosses is an unresolved issue • The use of a nitrogen jet as cleaning procedure was ruled out • The use of ultrasound treatments as cleaning procedure was also discarded • Currently it is not possible to quantify the bioconcentrated metal fraction in mosses

  5. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  6. The enchytraeid reproduction test (ERT): A potentially quick and affordable tool for the assessment of metal contaminated soils in emerging economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voua Otomo, Patricks; Wahl, Jurie; Maboeta, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    The enchytraeid reproduction test (ERT) was used to assess the ecotoxicity of selected mine tailings and agricultural soils from South Africa. The mine tailings had higher cumulative metal concentrations than agricultural soils. The most contaminated mine tailings significantly reduced the survival of the oligochaete Enchytraeus doerjesi whose reproduction was suppressed in all mine waste substrates. Because it reliably singled out the most contaminated substrate and was found easy to perform, we suggest that the ERT could be a quick and affordable tool for assigning intervention values for soil remediation in emerging economies such as South Africa.

  7. Organization of experimental technological complex for serial manufacturing and testing products and semi-products of diamond-like and metal laminates for leading branches of mechanical engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilous, V.А.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental technological complex, which includes the following sections: coating with diamond-like nanostructured composites; manufacturing of radiation-protective and other types of layered metal composites; testing of radiation-protective characteristics of materials, has been created. The technological equipment and the diagnostic tester for material radiation-protective characteristics of have been upgraded. According to the developed experimental industrial methods the batch of diamond-like coated ring seals of large diameter and samples of Al-Pb multilayer composites were made. It is proved experimentally that radiation-protective efficiency of the composites is 30-40 % higher in comparison with aluminum.

  8. Distinguishing metal bioconcentration from particulate matter in moss tissue: testing methods of removing particles attached to the moss surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, V; Giordano, S; Pérez-Llamazares, A; Ares, A; Carballeira, A; Fernández, J A; Aboal, J R

    2013-10-01

    Accurate differentiation of the proportion of bioconcentrated metals (i.e. incorporated into cells) and the proportion that is not bioconcentrated (i.e. adsorbed at the surface) would lead to a better understanding of the uptake processes and would represent an advance in the use of mosses as biomonitors. Traditionally the methods used to remove contaminants that are not bioconcentrated were to wash the plant material with water or to apply the sequential elution technique, but nowadays both options are considered inaccurate for these purposes. The remaining possibilities are to clean the moss samples with a nitrogen jet or by power ultrasound. Samples of terrestrial moss Pseudoscleropodium purum (Hewd.) Fleisch. were collected from five sampling stations. Different nitrogen jet cleaning procedures and ultrasound cleaning procedures were applied to the mosses. To determine whether any of the treatments altered the membrane integrity of the moss samples, the concentrations of K were determined. The shoots were observed under a scanning electron microscope, and the size and number of particles were determined. Nitrogen jet cleaning was determined to be unacceptable because it damaged the phyllids and/or altered the membrane permeability and did not eliminate the particles from the moss surface. Moreover, ultrasound cleaning treatment should also discarded because of the loss of extracellular metals that are transferred to the water in which the moss is cleaned. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Guided wave radiation in a finite-sized metallic or composite plate-like structure for its nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenin, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Different models are developed to provide generic tools for simulating nondestructive methods relying on elastic guided waves applied to metallic or composite plates. Various inspection methods of these structures exist or are under study. Most of them make use of ultrasonic sources of finite size; all are sensitive to reflection phenomena resulting from the finite size of the monitored objects. The developed models deal with transducer diffraction effects and edge reflection. As the interpretation of signals measured in guided wave inspection often uses the concept of modes, the models themselves are explicitly modal. The case of isotropic plates (metal) and anisotropic (multilayer composites) are considered; a general approach under the stationary phase approximation allows us to consider all the cases of interest. For the first, the validity of a Fraunhofer-like approximation leads to a very efficient computation of the direct and reflected fields radiated by a source. For the second, special attention is paid to the treatment of caustics. The stationary phase approximation being difficult to generalize, a model (so-called 'pencil model') of more geometrical nature is proposed with a high degree of genericity. It chains terms of isotropic or anisotropic propagation and terms of interaction with a boundary. The equivalence of the stationary phase approximation and the pencil model is demonstrated in the case of the radiation and reflection in an isotropic plate, for which an experimental validation is proceeded. (author) [fr

  10. Immunomodulation by heavy metals tested individually or in mixtures in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Dardon, J.; Voccia, I.; Hontela, A.; Chilmonczyk, S.; Dunier, M.; Boermans, H.; Blakley, B.; Fournier, M.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heavy metals, at environmentally relevant concentrations, on the immune response of rainbow trout. Trout were exposed for 30 d to cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}), mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}), or zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) either individually or in combinations: CdCl{sub 2}/HgCl{sub 2}, CdCl{sub 2}/ZnCl{sub 2}, HgCl{sub 2}/ZnCl{sub 2}, or CdCl{sub 2}/HgCl{sub 2}/ZnCl{sub 2}. Following the 30-d exposure, parameters of the nonspecific cellular immune response (phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and lymphoblastic proliferation) and of the nonspecific humoral immune response (lysozyme activity and the level of immunoglobulin) were measured. The results obtained indicate that individually, all three metals induce significant immunomodulations. However, the toxicity of mercury or cadmium is significantly reduced in fish simultaneously exposed to zinc, indicating that a protection is afforded by zinc against cadmium- and mercury-induced immunotoxicity.

  11. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Yu

    Full Text Available The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET. In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P, the hazard index (HI and the cancer risk index (RI were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As > cadmium (Cd > lead (Pb > copper (Cu > chromium (Cr, in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3 and 1.05 × 10(-3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1 and 2.80 × 10(-1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  12. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-01-01

    The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P), the hazard index (HI) and the cancer risk index (RI) were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As) > cadmium (Cd) > lead (Pb) > copper (Cu) > chromium (Cr), in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3) and 1.05 × 10(-3), respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ) of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1) and 2.80 × 10(-1), respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  13. Pathological changes in Sertoli cells and dysregulation of divalent metal transporter 1 with iron responsive element in the testes of idiopathic azoospermia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, T; Wang, P; Liu, Y; Zhao, J; Niu, X; Wang, X

    2018-03-01

    Iron is essential for rapidly dividing spermatocytes during normal mammalian spermatogenesis. Decreased transferrin and transferrin receptor levels were observed in seminal plasma from idiopathic azoospermia (IA) patients, suggesting disturbed iron metabolism in IA testes. However, how Sertoli cells (SCs) contribute to the iron homoeostasis in IA is still unclear. In this study, we analysed 30 IA and 30 age-matched obstructive azoospermia (OA) patients undergoing testicular sperm aspiration (TESA). SCs hyperplasia was indicated by higher SC density and Ki-67 labelling index in the IA TESA specimens. The attenuated expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) suggested an impaired antioxidative capacity in IA testes. We further detected increased levels of iron importer divalent metal transporter 1 with iron responsive element (DMT1 + IRE) in IA testes, whereas the increasing trend of iron exporter ferroportin 1 (FPN1) was not statistically significant. Next, we demonstrated that iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which can potentially bind to the IRE and hypoxia-responsive element in the DMT1 + IRE mRNA, were both up-regulated in IA testes. Unexpectedly, HIF-2α was down-regulated in IA testes. These results indicate that there is a dysregulation of DMT1 + IRE in IA testes, which might due to the up-regulation of IRP1 and HIF-1α. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. fruit peel oil on mutagenicity of two alkylating agents and two metals in the Drosophila wing spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Eşref; Kocaoğlu, Serap; Cetin, Huseyin; Kaya, Bülent

    2009-07-01

    Antigenotoxic effects of Citrus aurentium L. (Rutaceae) fruit peel oil (CPO) in combination with mutagenic metals and alkylating agents were studied using the wing spot test of D. melanogaster. The four reference mutagens, potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), cobalt chloride (CoCl2), ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS), and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) were clearly genotoxic. CPO alone at doses from 0.1 to 0.5% in Tween 80 was not mutagenic and did not enhance the mutagenic effect of the reference mutagens. However, antigenotoxic effects of CPO were clearly demonstrated in chronic cotreatments with mutagens and oil, by a significant decrease in wing spots induced by all four mutagens. The D. melanogaster wing spot test was found to be a suitable assay for detecting antigenotoxic effects in vivo. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Metal matrix composites: Testing, analysis, and failure modes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 26, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the tension and compression testing of MMCs, the measurement of advanced composites' thermal expansion, plasticity theory for fiber-reinforced composites, a deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry, strength prediction methods for MMCs, and the analysis of notched MMCs under tensile loading. Also discussed are techniques for the mechanical and thermal testing of Ti3Al/SCS-6 MMCs, damage initiation and growth in fiber-reinforced MMCs, the shear testing of MMCs, the crack growth and fracture of continuous fiber-reinforced MMCs in view of analytical and experimental results, and MMC fiber-matrix interface failures.

  16. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  17. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  18. Tests of star formation metrics in the low-metallicity galaxy NGC 5253 using ALMA observations of H30α line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendo, G. J.; Miura, R. E.; Espada, D.; Nakanishi, K.; Beswick, R. J.; D'Cruze, M. J.; Dickinson, C.; Fuller, G. A.

    2017-11-01

    We use Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of H30α (231.90 GHz) emission from the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 to measure the star formation rate (SFR) within the galaxy and to test the reliability of SFRs derived from other commonly used metrics. The H30α emission, which originates mainly from the central starburst, yields a photoionizing photon production rate of (1.9 ± 0.3) × 1052 s-1 and an SFR of 0.087 ± 0.013 M⊙ yr-1 based on conversions that account for the low metallicity of the galaxy and for stellar rotation. Among the other star formation metrics we examined, the SFR calculated from the total infrared flux was statistically equivalent to the values from the H30α data. The SFR based on a previously published version of the H α flux that was extinction corrected using Paα and Paβ lines was lower than but also statistically similar to the H30α value. The mid-infrared (22 μm) flux density and the composite star formation tracer based on H α and mid-infrared emission give SFRs that were significantly higher because the dust emission appears unusually hot compared to typical spiral galaxies. Conversely, the 70 and 160 μm flux densities yielded SFRs lower than the H30α value, although the SFRs from the 70 μm and H30α data were within 1σ-2σ of each other. While further analysis on a broader range of galaxies is needed, these results are instructive of the best and worst methods to use when measuring SFR in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies like NGC 5253.

  19. Engineering Design and Testing of a Novel High-Resolution Trace-Metal Clean Sampler for Profiling and Long-term Deployment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, A. V.; Crusius, J.; Carlson, K.; Chapin, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Design, assembly, and testing of a novel in-situ sampler for automated high-frequency trace-metal clean sampling at ocean moorings was undertaken with the goal of improving marine data density for iron (and other metals) by up to a factor of ten relative to existing samplers. Target characteristics are: modular, flexible use (profiling, static moorings, AUV-deployed), high capacity (100-200 samples), low power, low cost ($3k per 100-samples), ability to collect filtered + unfiltered samples, and simple assembly. Smaller sample volumes (10mL) are enabled by recent innovations in analysis techniques, while use of off-the-shelf components enables lower cost and faster development time, although attention must be taken to verify trace-metal cleanliness of materials in commercial products. Standard polypropylene syringes (tips with lock fittings) are adapted as sample chambers through fabrication of a dual (viton) o-ring replacement plunger to prevent barrel contamination between acid washing and sample collection. Syringes are mounted along a (pumped) sampling channel machined into a modular custom-designed 7.5in. HDPE ring; successive rings stack, fitted around the central 3 in. PVC pressure housing containing the pump, batteries, and temperature and pressure sensors. Optional filtering (0.45um) is easily added at the inlet to the pumped sampling line. Syringes, pre-filled with acid for sample preservation, are held "closed" using plastic zipties connected to the plunger pull; individual syringes are selected for filling by breaking a 0.003in. wire (e.g., stainless steel, gold-plated tungsten/rhenium) with a pulse of current or by melting the ziptie loop using a nichrome wire. Multiplexed addressing minimizes required microcontroller output pins and wires between the free-flooded collection chamber and the pressure housing. A novel, custom rotating inlet mounting scheme ensures that the pump tubing inlet remains positioned approximately 1m upstream of the sampler.

  20. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  1. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  2. Development and testing of high-performance fuel pin simulators for boiling experiments in liquid metal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, V.

    1976-01-01

    There are unknown phenomena, about local and integral boiling events in the core of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors. Therefore at GfK depend out-of-pile boiling experiments have been performed using electrically heated dummies of fuel element bundles. The success of these tests and the amount of information derived from them depend exclusively on the successful simulation of the fuel pins by electrically heated rods as regards the essential physical properties. The report deals with the development and testing of heater rods for sodium boiling experiments in bundles including up to 91 heated pins

  3. Compression and immersion tests and leaching of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination waste collected from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Kraft, N.C.; Mandler, J.W.

    1994-06-01

    A study was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate structural stability and leachability of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from seven commercial boiling water reactors and one pressurized water reactor. The decontamination methods used at the reactors were the Can-Decon, AP/Citrox, Dow NS-1, and LOMI processes. Samples of untreated resin waste and solidified waste forms were subjected to immersion and compressive strength testing. Some waste-form samples were leach-tested using simulated groundwaters and simulated seawater for comparison with the deionized water tests that are normally performed to assess waste-form leachability. This report presents the results of these tests and assesses the effects of the various decontamination methods, waste form formulations, leachant chemical compositions, and pH of the leachant on the structural stability and leachability of the waste forms. Results indicate that releases from intact and degraded waste forms are similar and that the behavior of some radionuclides such as 55 Fe, 60 Co, and 99 Tc were similar. In addition, the leachability indexes are greater than 6.0, which meets the requirement in the NRC's ''Technical Position on Waste Form,'' Revision 1

  4. Compression and immersion tests and leaching of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination waste collected from nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Kraft, N.C.; Mandler, J.W. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-06-01

    A study was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate structural stability and leachability of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from seven commercial boiling water reactors and one pressurized water reactor. The decontamination methods used at the reactors were the Can-Decon, AP/Citrox, Dow NS-1, and LOMI processes. Samples of untreated resin waste and solidified waste forms were subjected to immersion and compressive strength testing. Some waste-form samples were leach-tested using simulated groundwaters and simulated seawater for comparison with the deionized water tests that are normally performed to assess waste-form leachability. This report presents the results of these tests and assesses the effects of the various decontamination methods, waste form formulations, leachant chemical compositions, and pH of the leachant on the structural stability and leachability of the waste forms. Results indicate that releases from intact and degraded waste forms are similar and that the behavior of some radionuclides such as {sup 55}Fe, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 99}Tc were similar. In addition, the leachability indexes are greater than 6.0, which meets the requirement in the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form,`` Revision 1.

  5. In Situ XPS Chemical Analysis of MnSiO3 Copper Diffusion Barrier Layer Formation and Simultaneous Fabrication of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electrical Test MOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Conor; Brennan, Barry; McCoy, Anthony P; Bogan, Justin; Brady, Anita; Hughes, Greg

    2016-02-03

    Copper/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices both with and without a MnSiO3 barrier layer at the Cu/SiO2 interface have been fabricated in an ultrahigh vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system, which allows interface chemical characterization of the barrier formation process to be directly correlated with electrical testing of barrier layer effectiveness. Capacitance voltage (CV) analysis, before and after tube furnace anneals of the fabricated MOS structures showed that the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer significantly improved electric stability of the device structures. Evidence of improved adhesion of the deposited copper layer to the MnSiO3 surface compared to the clean SiO2 surface was apparent both from tape tests and while probing the samples during electrical testing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling measurements of the MOS test structures reveal distinct differences of copper diffusion into the SiO2 dielectric layers following the thermal anneal depending on the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer.

  6. pH(stat) vs. single extraction tests to evaluate heavy metals and arsenic leachability in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, A; Mateu, J; González-Núñez, R; Rauret, G; Vidal, M

    2009-01-19

    Here we compared the pH(stat) test, which examines the leachability of major elements (Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, and trace elements (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, and As) in a wide pH range, with single extraction tests based on the use of mild extractants (calcium chloride, acetic acid or EDTA). For this purpose, we examined samples from a variety of environmental conditions (sludges, mineral soils, organic soils, and soils with particulate and/or soluble contamination). Extraction yields obtained with CaCl(2) (0.01 mol L(-1)) and CH(3)COOH (0.43 mol L(-1)) correlated well with those from the pH(stat) at the same pH (r=0.98 and 0.95, respectively), while the use of EDTA (0.05 mol L(-1)) led to systematically higher extraction yields than those quantified with the pH(stat) at the same pH. However, the pH(stat) test had three distinct advantages: (1) it revealed the relationship between the solubility of the main soil phases and pH; (2) it showed the variation in pollutant leachability due to changes in pH; and (3) it better predicted the maximum contaminant availability. Thus we propose that the pH(stat) is the best laboratory tests to evaluate the contaminant leachability over a wide range of sample types (soil, sludge, and sediment).

  7. Mechanical tests imaging on metallic matrix composites. Experimental contribution to homogenization methods validation and identification of phase-related mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quoc-Thang Vo

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on a matrix/inclusion metal composite. A simple method is proposed to evaluate the elastic properties of one phase while the properties of the other phase are assumed to be known. The method is based on both an inverse homogenization scheme and mechanical field's measurements by 2D digital image correlation. The originality of the approach rests on the scale studied, i.e. the microstructure scale of material: the characteristic size of the inclusions is about few tens of microns. The evaluation is performed on standard uniaxial tensile tests associated with a long-distance microscope. It allows observation of the surface of a specimen on the microstructure scale during the mechanical stress. First, the accuracy of the method is estimated on 'perfect' mechanical fields coming from numerical simulations for four microstructures: elastic or porous single inclusions having either spherical or cylindrical shape. Second, this accuracy is estimated on real mechanical field for two simple microstructures: an elasto-plastic metallic matrix containing a single cylindrical micro void or four cylindrical micro voids arranged in a square pattern. Third, the method is used to evaluate elastic properties of αZr inclusions with arbitrary shape in an oxidized Zircaloy-4 sample of the fuel cladding of a pressurized water reactor after an accident loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In all this study, the phases are assumed to have isotropic properties. (author) [fr

  8. Ultrasound-assisted single extraction tests for rapid assessment of metal extractability from soils by total reflection X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Calle, I; Cabaleiro, N; Lavilla, I; Bendicho, C

    2013-09-15

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was employed for acceleration of metal extraction from soil samples. After extraction, multielemental analysis (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) of EDTA and acetic acid extracts was performed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF). High-intensity ultrasonic processors, i.e. the ultrasonic probe (50W) and the cup-horn sonoreactor (200W) were applied. Both ultrasonic procedures were compared with a miniaturized version of the single extraction scheme proposed by the Standards, Measurements and Testing program (SM&T). The extraction time with EDTA was reduced from 1h (conventional procedure) to 2 min (ultrasonic probe) or to 10 min (cup-horn sonoreactor). The time required for acetic acid extraction was also reduced from 16 h (conventional procedure) to 6 min (ultrasonic probe) or to 30 min (cup-horn sonoreactor). In addition, the amount of sample and extractants was drastically reduced as a result of the miniaturization implemented in the developed approaches. The combination of UAE and TXRF allows assessing the potential metal mobility and bioavailability in a simple way. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efecto de los metales sobre microcrustáceos de agua dulce. Avances metodológicos y potencialidad de cladóceros y copépodos como organismos test Effects of metals on freshwater microcrustaceans. Metodological advances and potentiality of cladocerans and copepods as test organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Gutierrez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El incremento de los metales en los cuerpos de agua dulce a causa de las actividades antropogénicas genera importantes alteraciones sobre la biota. Esta revisión analiza los efectos adversos de varios metales de relevancia ecotoxicológica sobre los microcrustáceos zooplanctónicos (cladóceros y copépodos, los avances experimentales en esta línea y las ventajas de cada grupo como organismos test. En general, la necesidad de obtener indicadores más sensibles y representativos que los tradicionales, promovió lineamientos hacia estudios subcrónicos, interspecíficos y multigeneracionales. Por otra parte, la tendencia actual hacia el estudio de mezclas de sustancias y los efectos indirectos permite adquirir una visión más integral del problema. El impacto sobre las poblaciones es muy variable, dependiendo de la naturaleza del metal, las características del medio, el tiempo de exposición, las condiciones de cultivo y aspectos genéticos. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los trabajos se centran en pocas especies, dejando vacancias en el conocimiento de las representantes de cada región particular. Si bien algunos atributos de los cladóceros y copépodos como el tamaño, la morfología y el rol ecológico los tornan buenos indicadores, las diferencias en el desarrollo, reproducción y estrategias de perpetuación confieren ventajas a un grupo sobre otro.The increase of metals in fresh water systems due to anthropogenic activities cause important alterations on the biota. The present review analyze the adverse effects of various metals of ecotoxicological relevance on microcrustaceans zooplankton species (cladocerans and copepods, the experimental advances and the advantages of each group as test organisms. In general, the need to obtain more sensitive and representative indicators than the tradicional ones leads to subchronic, interespecific and multigenerational studies. Additionally, the analysis of mixtures as well as their indirect

  10. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  11. Summary of Liquid Oxygen/Hydrogen, Direct Metal Laser Sintering Injector Testing and Evaluation Effort at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gregory; Bullard, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed a significant advancement in the area of additive manufacturing technology. One area that has seen substantial expansion in application has been laser sintering (or melting) in a powder bed. This technology is often termed 3D printing or various acronyms that may be industry, process, or company specific. Components manufactured via 3D printing have the potential to significantly reduce development and fabrication time and cost. The usefulness of 3D printed components is influenced by several factors such as material properties and surface roughness. This paper details three injectors that were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to evaluate the utility of 3D printed components for rocket engine applications. The three injectors were tested in a hot-fire environment with chamber pressures of approximately 1400 psia. One injector was a 28 element design printed by Directed Manufacturing. The other two injectors were identical 40 element designs printed by Directed Manufacturing and Solid Concepts. All the injectors were swirl-coaxial designs and were subscale versions of a full-scale injector currently in fabrication. The test and evaluation programs for the 28 element and 40 element injectors provided a substantial amount of data that confirms the feasibility of 3D printed parts for future applications. The operating conditions of previously tested, conventionally manufactured injectors were reproduced in the 28 and 40 element programs in order to contrast the performance of each. Overall, the 3D printed injectors demonstrated comparable performance to the conventionally manufactured units. The design features of the aforementioned injectors can readily be implemented in future applications with a high degree of confidence.

  12. Extending standard testing period in honeybees to predict lifespan impacts of pesticides and heavy metals using dynamic energy budget modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Hesketh, H.; Lahive, E.; Horton, A.A.; Robinson, A.G.; Svendsen, C.; Rortais, A.; Dorne, J.-L.; Baas, J.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Heard, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Concern over reported honeybee (Apis mellifera spp.) losses has highlighted chemical exposure as a risk. Current laboratory oral toxicity tests in A. mellifera spp. use short-term, maximum 96?hour, exposures which may not necessarily account for chronic and cumulative toxicity. Here, we use extended 240?hour (10?day) exposures to examine seven agrochemicals and trace environmental pollutant toxicities for adult honeybees. Data were used to parameterise a dynamic energy budget model (DEBtox) t...

  13. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 3 Summary report: Shear web component testing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Three large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of the design concept to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs. An approximate analysis of prebuckling deflections is presented and computer-aided design results, which consider prebuckling deformations, indicate that the design concept offers a theoretical weight saving of 31 percent relative to all metal construction. Recommendations are made for design concept options and analytical methods that are appropriate for production hardware.

  14. Non normal and non quadratic anisotropic plasticity coupled with ductile damage in sheet metal forming: Application to the hydro bulging test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badreddine, Houssem; Saanouni, Khemaies; Dogui, Abdelwaheb

    2007-01-01

    In this work an improved material model is proposed that shows good agreement with experimental data for both hardening curves and plastic strain ratios in uniaxial and equibiaxial proportional loading paths for steel metal until the final fracture. This model is based on non associative and non normal flow rule using two different orthotropic equivalent stresses in both yield criterion and plastic potential functions. For the plastic potential the classical Hill 1948 quadratic equivalent stress is considered while for the yield criterion the Karafillis and Boyce 1993 non quadratic equivalent stress is used taking into account the non linear mixed (kinematic and isotropic) hardening. Applications are made to hydro bulging tests using both circular and elliptical dies. The results obtained with different particular cases of the model such as the normal quadratic and the non normal non quadratic cases are compared and discussed with respect to the experimental results

  15. Remediation of metal-contaminated soils with the addition of materials - part II: leaching tests to evaluate the efficiency of materials in the remediation of contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Núñez, R; Alba, M D; Orta, M M; Vidal, M; Rigol, A

    2012-05-01

    The effect of the addition of materials on the leaching pattern of As and metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cd) in two contaminated soils was investigated. The examined materials included bentonites, silicates and industrial wastes, such as sugar foam, fly ashes and a material originated from the zeolitization of fly ash. Soil + material mixtures were prepared at 10% doses. Changes in the acid neutralization capacity, crystalline phases and contaminant leaching over a wide range of pHs were examined by using pH(stat) leaching tests. Sugar foam, the zeolitic material and MX-80 bentonite produced the greatest decrease in the leaching of pollutants due to an increase in the pH and/or the sorption capacity in the resulting mixture. This finding suggests that soil remediation may be a feasible option for the reuse of non-hazardous wastes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Field tests of nylon-screen diffusion samplers and pushpoint samplers for detection of metals in sediment pore water, Ashland and Clinton, Massachusetts, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Massey, Andrew J.; Scheible, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Efficient and economical screening methods are needed to detect and to determine the approximate concentrations of potentially toxic trace-element metals in shallow groundwater- discharge areas (pore water) where the metals may pose threats to aquatic organisms; such areas are likely to be near hazardous-waste sites. Pushpoint and nylon-screen diffusion samplers are two complementary options for use in such environments. The pushpoint sampler, a simple well point, is easy to insert manually and to use. Only 1 day is required to collect samples. The nylon-screen diffusion sampler is well suited for use in sediments that do not allow a pump to draw water into a pushpoint sampler. In this study, both types of devices were used in sediments suitable for the use of the pushpoint sampler. Sampling with the nylon-screen diffusion sampler requires at least two site visits: one to deploy the samplers in the sediment, and a second to retrieve the samplers and collect the samples after a predetermined equilibration period. Extensive laboratory quality-control studies, field testing, and laboratory analysis of samples collected at the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site along the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, and at a Superfund site-assessment location on Rigby Brook in Clinton, Massachusetts, indicate that these two devices yield comparable results for most metals and should be effective tools for pore-water studies. The nylon-screen diffusion samplers equilibrated within 1-2 days in homogeneous, controlled conditions in the laboratory. Nylon-screen diffusion samplers that were not purged of dissolved oxygen prior to deployment yielded results similar to those that were purged. Further testing of the nylon-screen diffusion samplers in homogeneous media would help to resolve any ambiguities about the data variability from the field studies. Comparison of data from replicate samples taken in both study areas shows that even samples taken from sites within a

  17. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  18. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

  19. Fabrication and Performance Test of Aluminium Alloy-Rice Husk Ash Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite as Industrial and Construction Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rahat Hossain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs used extensively in various engineering fields due to their exceptional mechanical properties. In this present study, aluminium matrix composites (AMCs such as aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with rice husk ash particles (RHA are made to explore the possibilities of reinforcing aluminium alloy. The stir casting method was applied to produce aluminium alloy (A356 reinforced with various amounts of (2%, 4%, and 6% rice husk ash (RHA particles. Physical treatment was carried out before the rice husk ash manufacturing process. The effect of mechanical strength of the fabricated hybrid composite was investigated. Therefore, impact test, tensile stress, compressive stress, and some other tests were carried out to analyse the mechanical properties. From the experimental results, it was found that maximum tensile, and compressive stress were found at 6% rice husk ash (RHA and aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. In future, the optimum percentages of rice husk ash (RHA to fabricate the hybrid composites will be determined. Also, simulation by finite element method (FEM will be applied for further investigation.

  20. Pulsed TV holography measurement and digital reconstruction of compression acoustic wave fields: application to nondestructive testing of thick metallic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, C; Doval, A F; Deán-Ben, X L; López-Vázquez, J C; Fernández, J L; Hernández-Montes, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique that numerically reconstructs the complex acoustic amplitude (i.e. the acoustic amplitude and phase) of a compression acoustic wave in the interior volume of a specimen from a set of full-field optical measurements of the instantaneous displacement of the surface. The volume of a thick specimen is probed in transmission mode by short bursts of narrowband compression acoustic waves generated at one of its faces. The temporal evolution of the displacement field induced by the bursts emerging at the opposite surface is measured by pulsed digital holographic interferometry (pulsed TV holography). A spatio-temporal 3D Fourier transform processing of the measured data yields the complex acoustic amplitude at the plane of the surface as a sequence of 2D complex-valued maps. Finally, a numerical implementation of the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula is employed to reconstruct the complex acoustic amplitude at other planes in the interior volume of the specimen. The whole procedure can be regarded as a combination of optical digital holography and acoustical holography methods. The technique was successfully tested on aluminium specimens with and without an internal artificial defect and sample results are presented. In particular, information about the shape and position of the defect was retrieved in the experiment performed on the flawed specimen, which indicates the potential applicability of the technique for the nondestructive testing of materials

  1. Toxicokinetics of metals in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus exposed to natural polluted soils – relevance of laboratory tests to the field situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giska, I.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Skip, B.; Laskowski, R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the bioavailability of essential (Zn, Cu) and non-essential metals (Cd, Pb) to the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus exposed to soils originating from a gradient of metal pollution in Southern Poland. Metal uptake and elimination kinetics were determined and related

  2. Optical pump-and-probe test system for thermal characterization of thin metal and phase-change films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Kazuo; Polynkin, Pavel; Mansuripur, Masud

    2005-01-01

    A single-shot optical pump-and-probe test system is reported. The system is designed for thermal characterization of thin-film samples that can change their phase state under the influence of a short and intense laser pulse on a subnanosecond time scale. In combination with numerical analysis, the system can be used to estimate thermal constants of thin films, such as specific heat and thermal conductivity. In-plane and out-of plane thermal conductivity can be estimated independently. The system is intended for use in research on optical data storage and material processing with pulsed laser light. The system design issues are discussed. As application examples, we report on using the system to study thermal dynamics in two different thin-film samples: a gold film on a glass substrate (a single-phase system) and the quadrilayer phase-change stack typical in optical data-storage applications

  3. FFTF metal fuel pin fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, J.O.; Benecke, M.W.; Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1989-01-01

    A major new initiative to develop, irradiate, and qualify a binary uranium/zirconium metal-fuel system in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Metal-fuel test assemblies have been designed and fabricated, and are now being irradiated in FFTF to provide the data needed to support the potential use of binary metal fuels in FFTF and other liquid-metal reactors. These development efforts support licensing activities for metal-fuel use in near-term advanced liquid-metal reactors

  4. Phytotoxkit® and Ostracodtoxkit® tests for assessing the toxicity of sediment samples with high concentration of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Molina, Jose; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the risk of contaminants, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Ecotoxicological testing may be a useful approach for assessing the toxicity as a complement to chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and applicability of two bioassays representing multiple trophic levels, for the preliminary ecotoxicological screening of sediments from sites contaminated by mining activities: a chronic toxicity test with the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and a phytotoxicity test using Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba seeds. For this study, 30 soils samples were collected from the Sierra Minera (Murcia, SE Spain) for general analytical determinations and the total metal content (Pb, Zn, Cd and As) was determined. The Phytotoxkit® test measures the decrease in (or the absence of) seed germination and of the growth of the young roots after 3 days of exposure of seeds of selected higher plants to a contaminated matrix compared with the controls germinated in a reference soil. The plants selected for the Phytotoxkit® microbiotest were: the monocotyl Sorghum saccharatum (Sorgho) and the dicotyls Lepidium sativum (Garden cress) and Sinapis alba (mustard) (Phytotoxkit®, 2004). The percent inhibition of seed germination (SG) and root growth inhibition (RI) for each plant were calculated. Ostracodtoxkit® test consists of placing freshly hatched ostracod neonates in multiwell cups in 2 ml synthetic freshwater, with 300 µl sediment and 3x107 algal cells (Selenastrum capricornutum). After 6 days, incubation at 25 °C in darkness, the mortality of test organisms was determined (Ostracodtoxkit® FTM, 2001) and growth inhibition was calculated. Soil samples showed a mean pH value of 6.0 in water and 5.7 in KCl. The EC varied from 1.0 dS m-1 to 56.2 dS m-1, with a mean value of 17.7 dS m-1. The mean value for Pb was 0.84 mg kg-1, 10593 mg kg-1 for Zn, 23.18 mg kg-1 for Cd and 0.16 mg kg-1 for As

  5. Requirements and testing methods for surfaces of metallic bipolar plates for low-temperature PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendras, P.; Lötsch, K.; von Unwerth, T.

    2017-03-01

    To reduce emissions and to substitute combustion engines automotive manufacturers, legislature and first users aspire hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Up to now the focus of research was set on ensuring functionality and increasing durability of fuel cell components. Therefore, expensive materials were used. Contemporary research and development try to substitute these substances by more cost-effective material combinations. The bipolar plate is a key component with the greatest influence on volume and mass of a fuel cell stack and they have to meet complex requirements. They support bending sensitive components of stack, spread reactants over active cell area and form the electrical contact to another cell. Furthermore, bipolar plates dissipate heat of reaction and separate one cell gastight from the other. Consequently, they need a low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) to the gas diffusion layer, high flexural strength, good thermal conductivity and a high durability. To reduce costs stainless steel is a favoured material for bipolar plates in automotive applications. Steel is characterized by good electrical and thermal conductivity but the acid environment requires a high chemical durability against corrosion as well. On the one hand formation of a passivating oxide layer increasing ICR should be inhibited. On the other hand pitting corrosion leading to increased permeation rate may not occur. Therefore, a suitable substrate lamination combination is wanted. In this study material testing methods for bipolar plates are considered.

  6. Performance Testing of Molten Regolith Electrolysis with Transfer of Molten Material for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald; Tripathy, Prabhat; Standish, Evan; Sirk, Aislinn; Melendez, Orlando; Stefanescu, Doru

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated the production of oxygen by electrolysis of molten regolith simulants at temperatures near 1600 C. Using an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in the production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Initial direct measurements of current efficiency have confirmed that the process offer potential advantages of high oxygen production rates in a smaller footprint facility landed on the moon, with a minimum of consumables brought from Earth. We now report the results of a scale-up effort toward the goal of achieving production rates equivalent to 1 metric ton O2/year, a benchmark established for the support of a lunar base. We previously reported on the electrochemical behavior of the molten electrolyte as dependent on anode material, sweep rate and electrolyte composition in batches of 20-200g and at currents of less than 0.5 A. In this paper, we present the results of experiments performed at currents up to 10 Amperes) and in larger volumes of regolith simulant (500 g - 1 kg) for longer durations of electrolysis. The technical development of critical design components is described, including: inert anodes capable of passing continuous currents of several Amperes, container materials selection, direct gas analysis capability to determine the gas components co-evolving with oxygen. To allow a continuous process, a system has been designed and tested to enable the withdrawal of cathodically-reduced molten metals and spent molten oxide electrolyte. The performance of the withdrawal system is presented and critiqued. The design of the electrolytic cell and the configuration of the furnace were supported by modeling the thermal environment of the system in an effort to realize a balance between external heating and internal joule heating. We will discuss the impact these simulations and experimental findings have

  7. Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    between amounts of metals in the aquatic insects and the surrounding water medium,. Materials and methods indicating that most of the accumulated. Test animals metals were from the water medium. Tympanotonus fuscatus var. radula L. The significance of bioaccumulation. (Periwinkle) (Mollusca; Gastropoda, studies lies ...

  8. Experimental studies and computational benchmark on heavy liquid metal natural circulation in a full height-scale test loop for small modular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: chaotics@snu.ac.kr [Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111 Daedeok-daero, 989 Beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jueun; Ju, Heejae; Sohn, Sungjune; Kim, Yeji; Noh, Hyunyub; Hwang, Il Soon [Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Experimental studies on natural circulation for lead-bismuth eutectic were conducted. • Adiabatic wall boundaries conditions were established by compensating heat loss. • Computational benchmark with a system thermal-hydraulics code was performed. • Numerical simulation and experiment showed good agreement in mass flow rate. • An empirical relation was formulated for mass flow rate with experimental data. - Abstract: In order to test the enhanced safety of small lead-cooled fast reactors, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) natural circulation characteristics have been studied. We present results of experiments with LBE non-isothermal natural circulation in a full-height scale test loop, HELIOS (heavy eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of operability and safety of PEACER), and the validation of a system thermal-hydraulics code. The experimental studies on LBE were conducted under steady state as a function of core power conditions from 9.8 kW to 33.6 kW. Local surface heaters on the main loop were activated and finely tuned by trial-and-error approach to make adiabatic wall boundary conditions. A thermal-hydraulic system code MARS-LBE was validated by using the well-defined benchmark data. It was found that the predictions were mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in terms of mass flow rate and temperature difference that were both within 7%, respectively. With experiment results, an empirical relation predicting mass flow rate at a non-isothermal, adiabatic condition in HELIOS was derived.

  9. Nanoparticle Filtration Characteristics of Advanced Metal Foam Media for a Spark Ignition Direct Injection Engine in Steady Engine Operating Conditions and Vehicle Test Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha-Lee Myung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the particle formation and reduction characteristics at the engine-out position, after a three-way catalyst (TWC and a metal foam gasoline particulate filter (GPF, were evaluated for a gasoline direct-injection (GDI engine under part-load operating conditions. The vehicle tests were performed under the Federal Test Procedure-75 (FTP-75 and the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET modes. Particle number (PN concentrations, size distributions, and the filtering efficiency with the GPF were evaluated with a condensation particle counter (CPC and a differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500. Under steady engine operating conditions, the PN concentrations at the engine-out position were 9.7 × 105–2.5 × 106 N/cc. While, the PN concentrations after the GPF were 9.2 × 104–3.5 × 105 N/cc, and the PN was reduced by 77%–96%. The PN filtering efficiency with the GPF-GDI vehicle reached approximately 58% in the FTP-75 and 62% in the HWFET mode. The PN concentration of the GPF-GDI vehicle was significantly reduced to 3.95 × 1011 N/km for the FTP-75 and 8.86 × 1010 N/km for the HWFET mode. The amount of nucleation mode particles below 23 nm was substantially reduced with the GPF-GDI vehicle. The fuel economy, CO2, and regulated emissions of the GPF-GDI vehicle were equivalent to those of the base GDI vehicle under the vehicle certification modes.

  10. Status report. KfK contribution to the development of DEMO-relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Pt. 1: Self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Reimann, J.; Sebening, H.; Barleon, L.; Bogusch, E.; Bojarsky, E.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Buehler, L.; Casal, V.; Deckers, H.; Feuerstein, H.; Fischer, U.; Frees, G.; Graebner, H.; John, H.; Jordan, T.; Kramer, W.; Krieg, R.; Lenhart, L.; Malang, S.; Meyder, R.; Norajitra, P.; Reimann, J.; Schwenk-Ferrero, A.; Schnauder, H.; Stieglitz, R.; Oschinski, J.; Wiegner, E.

    1991-12-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket for a fusion DEMO-reactor and the status of the development programme is described as a part of the European development programme of DEMO relevant test blankets for NET/ITER. Volume 1 (KfK 4907) contains a summary, Volume 2 (KfK 4908) a more detailed version of the report. Both volumes contain sections on previous studies on self-cooled liquid metal breeder blankets, the reference blanket design for a DEMO-reactor, a typical test blanket design including the ancillary loop system and the building requirements for NET/ITER together with the present status of the associated R and D-programme in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, tritium removal and recovery, liquid metal compatibility and purification, ancillary loop system, safety and reliability. An outlook is given regarding the required R and D-programme for the self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket prior to tests in NET/ITER and the relevant test programme to be performed in NET/ITER. (orig.) [de

  11. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  12. Characterization of Multiaxial Stress-Strain Response of Tube Metal from Double-Sided Hydro-Bulging Test Based on Hosford's 1979 Yield Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Zhai-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2017-05-01

    To further explore the characterization of the multiaxial stress-strain responses of anisotropic tube metal from double-sided hydro-bulging tests, an analytical model for the equivalent stress and equivalent strain calculation was derived based on Hosford's 1979 yield criterion. Furthermore, thin-walled 5052-O aluminum alloy tubes were used to conduct the bulging experiment with an external pressure of 85 MPa. After the experimental data were substituted into the above analytical model, the Voce equation was used to fit the equivalent stress-strain relationship. It is concluded that the stress versus strain curves of the 5052-O tubes are strongly dependent on the loaded stress states, the adopted yield criteria, and the anisotropy coefficients. The external pressure of 85 MPa had little or no effect on the stress versus strain curves of the tubes, but the locations of the multiaxial stress versus strain curves were lower than that of the uniaxial stress versus strain curve. Moreover, the curve from Hosford's 1979 yield criterion not only had a higher saturation stress and material constant value than the curve from Mises and Hill's 1948 yield criteria but also had a dependence on the anisotropy coefficient.

  13. RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 modification for transient accident scenario of Test Blanket Modules in ITER involving helium flows into heavy liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J.; Pérez, M.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Batet, L.; Sandeep, T.; Chaudhari, V.; Reventós, F.

    2015-07-01

    The Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, is currently involved in the design and development of its Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in ITER (International Thermo nuclear Experimental Reactor). The Indian TBM concept is a Lead-Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder (LLCB), which utilizes lead-lithium eutectic alloy (LLE) as tritium breeder, neutron multiplier and coolant. The first wall facing the plasma is cooled by helium gas. In preparation of the regulatory safety files of ITER-TBM, a number of off-normal event sequences have been postulated. Thermal hydraulic safety analyses of the TBM system will be carried out with the system code RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 which was initially designed to predict the behavior of light water reactor systems during normal and accidental conditions. In order to analyze some of the postulated off-normal events, there is the need to simulate the mixing of Helium and Lead-Lithium fluids. The Technical University of Catalonia is cooperating with IPR to implement the necessary changes in the code to allow for the mixing of helium and liquid metal. In the present study, the RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4 two-phase flow 6-equations structure has been modified to allow for the mixture of LLE in the liquid phase with dry Helium in the gas phase. Practically obtaining a two-fluid 6-equation model where each fluid is simulated with a set of energy, mass and momentum balance equations. A preliminary flow regime map for LLE and helium flow has been developed on the basis of numerical simulations with the OpenFOAM CFD toolkit. The new code modifications have been verified for vertical and horizontal configurations. (Author)

  14. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  15. Peroxotitanates for Biodelivery of Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, David; Elvington, M.

    2009-02-11

    Metal-based drugs are largely undeveloped in pharmacology. One limiting factor is the systemic toxicity of metal-based compounds. A solid-phase, sequestratable delivery agent for local delivery of metals could reduce systemic toxicity, facilitating new drug development in this nascent area. Amorphous peroxotitanates (APT) are ion exchange materials with high affinity for several heavy metal ions, and have been proposed to deliver or sequester metal ions in biological contexts. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that APT are able to deliver metals or metal compounds to cells. We exposed fibroblasts (L929) or monocytes (THP1) to metal-APT materials for 72 h in vitro, then measured cellular mitochondrial activity (SDH-MTT method) to assess the biological impact of the metal-APT materials vs. metals or APT alone. APT alone did not significantly affect cellular mitochondrial activity, but all metal-APT materials suppressed the mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts (by 30-65% of controls). The concentration of metal-APT materials required to suppress cellular mitochondrial activity was below that required for metals alone, suggesting that simple extracellular release of the metals from the metal-APT materials was not the primary mechanism of mitochondrial suppression. In contrast to fibroblasts, no metal-APT material had a measurable effect on THP1 monocyte mitochondrial activity, despite potent suppression by metals alone. This latter result suggested that 'biodelivery' by metal-APT materials may be cell type-specific. Therefore, it appears that APT are plausible solid phase delivery agents of metals or metal compounds to some types of cells for potential therapeutic effect.

  16. Results of the reactant sand-fracking pilot test and implications for the in situ remediation of chlorinated VOCs and metals in deep and fractured bedrock aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, D L; Bonds, C

    1999-08-12

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), such as the Waterloo Funnel and Gate System, first implemented at Canadian Forces Borden facility in 1992, are a passive remediation technology capable of controlling the migration of, and treating contaminated groundwater in situ. Most of the PRBs installed to date have been shallow installations created by backfilling sheet-pile shored excavations with iron filing reactive media. More recently continuous trenchers [R. Puls, Installation of permeable reactive barriers using continuous trenching equipment, Proceedings of the RTDF Permeable Barriers Work Group, Virginia Beach, VA, September 1997] and Caissons [J. Vogan, Caisson installation of a pilot scale, permeable reactive barrier in situ treatment zone at the Sommersworth Landfill, NH, Presented to the RTDF Permeable Barriers Work Group, Alexandria, VA, April 1996], and vertical fracturing emplacements [G. Hocking, Vertical hydraulic fracture emplacement of permeable reactive barriers, Progress Report delivered to the Permeable Reactive Barriers Workgroup of the Remedial Technology Development Forum, Beaverton, OR, April 1998] have been used to create reactive barriers in soil. None of the prior methods are capable of adequately addressing groundwater contamination in deep and fractured bedrock aquifers. The purpose of the RSF pilot study was to install reactive media into an impacted bedrock aquifer, and to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ treatment of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and metals in that type of aquifer. Three discrete fractures were identified and treated and were subjected to testing before and after treatment. Between 300 and 1700 lb. of 1 mm diameter reactive proppants were injected into each zone to facilitate treatment. Monitoring data obtained from adjacent observation wells verified that fracking fluids reached at least 42 ft from the treatment well following hydrofracturing. The concentrations of many of the CVOCs decreased up to

  17. Strategic surfaces in sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels

    Out-line: Introduction to tribology in sheet metal forming Developed strategic surfaces Tribological testing of strategic surfaces Conclusion......Out-line: Introduction to tribology in sheet metal forming Developed strategic surfaces Tribological testing of strategic surfaces Conclusion...

  18. MetalS(3), a database-mining tool for the identification of structurally similar metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a database search tool to identify metal sites having structural similarity to a query metal site structure within the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) contained in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such a local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. The database search tool, which we called MetalS(3) (Metal Sites Similarity Search), can be accessed through a Web interface at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals3/ . MetalS(3) uses a suitably adapted version of an algorithm that we previously developed to systematically compare the structure of the query metal site with each MFS in MetalPDB. For each MFS, the best superposition is kept. All these superpositions are then ranked according to the MetalS(3) scoring function and are presented to the user in tabular form. The user can interact with the output Web page to visualize the structural alignment or the sequence alignment derived from it. Options to filter the results are available. Test calculations show that the MetalS(3) output correlates well with expectations from protein homology considerations. Furthermore, we describe some usage scenarios that highlight the usefulness of MetalS(3) to obtain mechanistic and functional hints regardless of homology.

  19. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, U.

    1983-12-01

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  20. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-11-30

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  1. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide modification enhances the ability of biochar (hydrochar) produced from hydrothermal carbonization of peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals: Batch and column tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and modeling investigations were conducted to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on hydrothermally produced biochar (hydrochar) from peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals. Characterization measurements showed that hydrogen peroxide modification increased the oxygen-c...

  3. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  4. Metal lagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The metal lagging described is characterized by the fact that it is formed of closed sacks composed of an elastic metal mass, compressed in an outer envelope made of a fine mesh metal fabric. The metal mass is composed of stainless steel wool stuffed into the envelope. This lagging is particularly intended for the thermal protection of the end slab of LMFBR type reactors [fr

  5. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  6. Performance of metallic fuels in liquid-metal fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.; Kittel, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in metallic fuels for liquid-metal fast reactors has come full circle. Metallic fuels are once again a viable alternative for fast reactors because reactor outlet temperature of interest to industry are well within the range where metallic fuels have demonstrated high burnup and reliable performance. In addition, metallic fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events of its high thermal conductivity and fuel behavior. Futhermore, metallic fuels lend themselves to compact and simplified reprocessing and refabrication technologies, a key feature in a new concept for deployment of fast reactors called the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR concept is a metallic-fueled pool reactor(s) coupled to an integral-remote reprocessing and fabrication facility. The purpose of this paper is to review recent metallic fuel performance, much of which was tested and proven during the twenty years of EBR-II operation

  7. Polluted soils with heavy metals. Stabilization by magnesium oxide. Ex-situ and in-situ testings; Suelos contaminados con metales pesados. Estabilizacion con oxido de magnesio. Ensayos ex situ-in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenoz, S.; Hernandez, J.; Gangutia, N.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes the use of Low-Grade MgO as a stabiliser agent for polluted soil reclaim. Low-Grade MgO may be an economically feasible alternative in the stabilisation of heavy metals from heavily contaminated soils. The effectiveness of Low-Grade MgO has been studied in three ex-situ stabilisation of heavily polluted soils contaminated by the flue-dust of pyrite roasting. LG-MgO provides an alkali reservoir guaranteeing long-term stabilisation without varying the pH conditions. The success of the ex-situ stabilisation was corroborated with the analysis of heavy metals in the leachates collected from the landfill o ver a long period of time. The study also includes the results obtained in an in-situ pilot scale stabilisation of contaminated soil. (Author) 17 refs.

  8. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  9. Metal allergy and second-generation metal-on-metal arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousen, Philippa J; Gawkrodger, David J

    2012-02-01

    There are concerns about the induction of metal allergy with second-generation metal-on-metal prostheses, and the role that this may play in the development of complications such as 'pseudotumours' or failure of the implant. In this review, we attempt to set out the current knowledge on this subject. From a review of the literature, it is apparent that the first-generation metal-on-metal replacement hips did cause metal sensitization, and that joint failure was associated with this, although it is still not clear which one led to the other. Highly engineered second-generation metal-on-metal arthroplasties used in joint resurfacings are now increasingly employed. Several studies have recently shown an association between metal sensitization and peri-implant hypersensitivity reactions and implant loosening and failure, although the overall risk appears to be low. The pragmatic approach adopted by most contact dermatologists for patients known to be allergic to nickel, cobalt or chromium and who require joint replacement is to recommend prostheses made of titanium-based alloys. Patch testing continues to be a useful tool as laboratory investigations for metal hypersensitivity continue to emerge. The development of guidelines on the management of patients receiving metal-on-metal arthroplasties suspected of being metal-allergic is desirable. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. The impacts of new street light technologies: experimentally testing the effects on bats of changing from low-pressure sodium to white metal halide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Emma Louise; Wakefield, Andrew; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2015-05-05

    Artificial light at night is a major feature of anthropogenic global change and is increasingly recognized as affecting biodiversity, often negatively. On a global scale, newer technology white lights are replacing orange sodium lights to reduce energy waste. In 2009, Cornwall County Council (UK) commenced replacement of existing low-pressure sodium (LPS) high intensity discharge (HID) street lights with new Phillips CosmoPolis white ceramic metal halide street lights to reduce energy wastage. This changeover provided a unique collaborative opportunity to implement a before-after-control-impact field experiment to investigate the ecological effects of newly installed broad spectrum light technologies. Activity of the bat species Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus and Nyctalus/Eptesicus spp. was significantly higher at metal halide than LPS lights, as found in other studies of bat activity at old technology (i.e. mercury vapour) white light types. No significant difference was found in feeding attempts per bat pass between light types, though more passes overall were recorded at metal halide lights. Species-specific attraction of bats to the metal halide lights could have cascading effects at lower trophic levels. We highlight the need for further research on possible ecosystem-level effects of light technologies before they are installed on a wide scale. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for...

  12. Metallic nanomesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Sun, Tianyi; Guo, Chuanfei

    2018-02-20

    A transparent flexible nanomesh having at least one conductive element and sheet resistance less than 300.OMEGA./.quadrature. when stretched to a strain of 200% in at least one direction. The nanomesh is formed by depositing a sacrificial film, depositing, etching, and oxidizing a first metal layer on the film, etching the sacrificial film, depositing a second metal layer, and removing the first metal layer to form a nanomesh on the substrate.

  13. VLSI metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G; Gildenblat, Gennady Sh

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 15: VLSI Metallization discusses the various issues and problems related to VLSI metallization. It details the available solutions and presents emerging trends.This volume is comprised of 10 chapters. The two introductory chapters, Chapter 1 and 2 serve as general references for the electrical and metallurgical properties of thin conducting films. Subsequent chapters review the various aspects of VLSI metallization. The order of presentation has been chosen to follow the common processing sequence. In Chapter 3, some relevant metal deposition tec

  14. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  15. Die-Casting-Machine Operator (nonfer. metal alloys & prod.) II 6-82.916--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  16. Biomonitoring of humans exposed to arsenic, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and complex mixtures of metals by using the micronucleus test in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annangi, Balasubramanyam; Bonassi, Stefano; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    Various metals have demonstrated genotoxic and carcinogenic potential via different mechanisms. Until now, biomonitoring and epidemiological studies have been carried out to assess the genotoxic risk to exposed human populations. In this sense, the use of the micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes has proven to be a useful tool to determine increased levels of DNA damage, as a surrogate biomarker of cancer risk. Here we review those biomonitoring studies focused on people exposed to arsenic, chromium, nickel, vanadium and complex mixtures of metals. Only those studies that used the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated (BNMN) cells have been taken into consideration, although the inclusion of other biomarkers of exposure and genotoxicity are also reflected and discussed. Regarding arsenic, most of the occupational and environmental biomonitoring studies find an increase in BNMN among the exposed individuals. Thus, it seems conclusive that arsenic exposure increases the risk of exposed human populations. However, a lack of correlation between the level of exposure and the increase in BNMN is also common, and a limited number of studies evaluated the genotype as a risk modulator. As for chromium, a BNMN increase in occupationally exposed subjects and a correlation between level of exposure and effect is found consistently in the available literature. However, the quality score of the studies is only medium-low. On the other hand, the studies evaluating nickel and vanadium are scarce and lacks a correct characterization of the individual exposure, which difficult the building of clear conclusions. Finally, several studies with medium-high quality scores evaluated a more realistic scenario of exposure which takes into account a mixture of metals. Among them, those which correctly characterized and measured the exposure were able to find association with the level of BNMN. Also, several genes associated with DNA damage repair such as OGG1 and XRCC1 were

  17. First studies of ITER-diagnostic mirrors in a tokamak with an all-metal interior: results of the first mirror test in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Matveeva, M.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.; Mayer, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Krieger, K.; Voitsenya, V.; Vayakis, G.; Costley, A. E.; Reichle, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Richter, S.; Breuer, U.; Buzi, L.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.; Wienhold, P.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    In ITER, mirrors will be used as plasma-viewing elements in all optical and laser diagnostics. In the harsh environment, mirror performance will degrade hampering the operation of associated diagnostics. The most adverse effect on mirror performance is caused by the deposition of impurities. It is expected that the most challenging situation will occur in the divertor. With the envisaged changes to all-metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER, an assessment of mirror performance in an existing divertor tokamak with all-metal PFCs is urgently needed. Molybdenum and copper mirrors were exposed for nearly nine months in ASDEX Upgrade which has all-tungsten PFCs. Mirrors were located at the inner wall, under the dome and in the pump duct. During exposure, the mirrors were heated to temperature in the range 145-165 °C. This was made to approach the expected level of heating due to absorption of neutrons and gammas on mirrors in the ITER divertor. After exposure, degradation of the reflectivity was detected on all mirrors. The highest reflectivity drop was measured on mirrors under the dome facing the outer strike point, reaching -55% at 500 nm. The least degradation was detected on mirrors in the pump duct, where the reflectivity was preserved in the range 500-2500 nm and the largest decrease was about -8% at 250 nm. On all contaminated mirrors carbon fraction did not exceed 50 at% while the major contaminants were metals and oxygen. The degradation of exposed mirrors underlines the necessity for urgent R&D on deposition mitigation and in situ mirror cleaning in ITER.

  18. Flexible metal bellows

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    A set of flexible metal bellows being fatigue-tested by repeated offset motion. Such bellows assemblies were used in the SPS vacuum system at places where , for instance, beam stoppers and collimators had to be moved frequently in and out of the beam path.

  19. Evaluation of non destructive testing to characterize the resistance of the prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level: permeability meter, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound, Schmidt sclerometer and metal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Chacon, Dannell

    2014-01-01

    Non destructive testing are determined to be correlated with resistance to compression and flexion of elements belonging to prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level. The characteristics of the non destructive testing are described, such as: measurer of permeability, Schmidt sclerometer, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound and metal detector. The columns and floor tiles are elaborated with 2 mixtures of different resistances at 28 days. The first more than 30 MPa and the second less than 25 MPa are sampled together with the control cylinders necessary to obtain the actual resistance according to ASTM C39. Last resistance testings to compression and Schmidt sclerometer are realized to control cylinders to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Non destructive testings (permeability meter Torrent, Schmidt sclerometer and determination of wave velocity by ultrasound) are performed in columns and floor tiles to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Last resistance testings to flexion is obtained by means of destructive tests of the columns and floor tiles sampled. The correlation of the data obtained is determined to derive values of compression resistance from non destructive testing [es

  20. Metals 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  1. Metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the viewpoint of general crystal chemistry principles and on the base of modern data the structural chemistry of metal carbides is presented. The classification deviding metal carbides into 4 groups depending on chemical and physical properties is presented. The features of the crystal structure of carbides of alkali alkaline earth, transition, 4 f- and 5f-elements and their effect on physical and chemical properties are considered

  2. Epidemiological Approaches to Metal Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological methods are crucial to extract as much valid information as possible from human metal exposures. Thus, modern epidemiological approaches have elucidated human health effects that were not apparent in the past. At the same time, metal toxicology has served as a useful arena...... for testing and further refining methods for study design and data analysis. In contrast to most organic compounds, metals are not broken down, and many of them are retained in the body for long periods, thereby facilitating exposure assessment. In conjunction with the use of inexpensive metal analytical...... to their propensity to cause chronic or delayed toxicity, epidemiological studies of metal toxicity have focused on a wide variety of organ systems, subtle effects as well as mortality, and differences in susceptibility. Toxic metals often serve as paradigms of environmental and occupational toxicity...

  3. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford tank waste via addition of metal cations and chemical oxidant: FY 1995 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, R.J.; Zacher, A.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Elliott, K.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    Chelating organics and some of their degradation products in the Hanford tank waste, such as EDTA, HEDTA, and NTA act to solubilize strontium and transuranics (TRU) in the tank waste supernatant. Displacement of strontium and TRU will facilitate the removal of these radionuclides via precipitation/filtration, ion exchange, or solvent extraction so that low-level waste feed specifications can be met. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated two methods for releasing organic-complexed strontium and TRU components to allow for effective pretreatment of tank waste supernatant: metal cation addition (to promote displacement and flocculation) and chemical oxidant (pennanganate) addition (to promote chelator destruction/defunctionalization and possibly flocculation). These methods, which can be conducted at near-ambient. temperatures and pressures, could be deployed as intank processes

  4. Analysis of the treatment of plastic from electrical and electronic waste in the Republic of Serbia and the testing of the recycling potential of non-metallic fractions of printed circuit boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Aleksandra S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the quantity of plastic and waste printed circuit boards obtained after the mechanical treatment of electrical and electronic waste (E-waste in the Republic of Serbia, as well as the recycling of non-metallic fractions of waste printed circuit boards. The aim is to analyze the obtained recycled material and recommendation for possible application of recyclables. The data on the quantities and treatment of plastics and printed circuit boards obtained after the mechanical treatment of WEEE, were gained through questionnaires sent to the operators who treat this type of waste. The results of the questionnaire analysis showed that in 2014 the dismantling of E-waste isolated 1,870.95 t of plastic and 499.85 t of printed circuit boards. In the Republic of Serbia, E-waste recycling is performed exclusively by using mechanical methods. Mechanical methods consist of primary crushing and separation of the materials which have a utility value as secondary raw materials, from the components and materials that have hazardous properties. Respect to that, the recycling of printed circuit boards using some of the metallurgical processes with the aim of extracting copper, precious metals and non-metallic fraction is completely absent, and the circuit boards are exported as a whole. Given the number of printed circuit boards obtained by E-waste dismantling, and the fact that from an economic point of view, hydrometallurgical methods are very suitable technological solutions in the case of a smaller capacity, there is a possibility for establishing the facilities in the Republic of Serbia for the hydrometallurgical treatment that could be used for metals extraction, and non-metallic fractions, which also have their own value. Printed circuit boards granulate obtained after the mechanical pretreatment and the selective removal of metals by hydrometallurgical processes was used for the testing of the recycling potential

  5. Metal-metal interactions among dietary toxic and essential trace metals in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsenhans, B.; Schmolke, G.; Kolb, K.; Stokes, J.; Forth, W.

    1987-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and essential metals is thought to be reflected by corresponding metal concentrations in tissues. However, toxic and essential metals may influence each other in regard to their retention in the body. Therefore, a basic diet containing four toxic metals (As 7, Cd 9, Ni 13, and Pb 20 ppm) and adequate amounts of essential metals was fed to rats for 2 weeks. Test groups received the basic diet with increasing concentrations of one of the toxic metals (up to 90 ppm As, 180 ppm Cd, 365 ppm Ni, and 394 ppm Pb). As, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined by atomic emission spectroscopy in liver, kidney, intestine, brain, muscle, bone, skin, hair, and blood. A linear relationship between diet and tissue concentration is observed for As and Ni in the kidney, for Cd in the liver, and for Pb in the bone. In other tissues saturation was observed. While Cd-Fe interactions were common to most of the tissues, other interactions were detected only in specific tissues, e.g., As-Cu in the kidney, Cd-Zn in the liver, and As-Mn, Cd-Mn, or Ni-Cu in the intestine. Increases of renal Pb and intestinal Cd by dietary Ni, and a decrease in bone As by dietary Pb were the most pronounced interactions between the toxic metals. The results demonstrate that potential target organs for the evaluation of metal exposure need to be carefully analyzed for interfering metal-metal interactions.

  6. Metal fuel safety performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.J. Jr.; Tentner, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The current development of breeder reactor systems has lead to the renewed interest in metal fuels as the driver material. Modeling efforts were begun to provide a mechanistic description of the metal fuel during anticipated and hypothetical transients within the context of the SAS4A accident analysis code system. Through validation exercises using experimental results of metal fuel TREAT tests, confidence is being developed on the nature and accuracy of the modeling and implementation. Prefailure characterization, transient pin response, margins to failure, axial in-pin fuel relocation prior to cladding breach, and molten fuel relocation after cladding breach are considered. Transient time scales ranging from milliseconds to many hours can be studied with all the reactivity feedbacks evaluated

  7. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  8. Analytic study of plastic instabilities during tension or compression tests on a metallic plate bi-axially loaded in its plane: symmetric and antisymmetric modes with respect to the median plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    This report is a continuation of the thesis [23], devoted to the onset of necking plastic instabilities during tension tests on metallic plates bi-axially loaded in their plane. We are also interested here in compression tests, and in the development of antisymmetric defects with respect to the median plane of the plate. As in the thesis, we search for the dominant mode, i.e. the most unstable pair of wavelengths (λ1, λ2) in the loading plane. An approximate analytical formulation for the growth rate is proposed, especially for plane-strain tests in the absence of viscous effects, and for static tests in tension in the x1 and x2 loading directions. In that latter case, we retrieve published results [14][15]. For plane-strain tests, we show that infinitely dense networks of shear bands inclined at 45 deg. with respect to the loading direction instantaneously occur when heat softening prevails over work-hardening. (author)

  9. Ultralight metal foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-08

    Ultralight (battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  10. Metal Mesh Fabrication and Testing for Infrared Astronomy and ISO Science Programs; ISO GO Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This research program addresses astrophysics research with the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), including efforts to supply ISO-LWS with superior metal mesh filters. This grant has, over the years, enabled Dr. Smith in his role as a Co-Investigator on the satellite, the PI (Principal Investigator) on the Extragalactic Science Team, and a member of the Calibration and performance working groups. The emphasis of the budget in this proposal is in support of Dr. Smith's Infrared Space Observatory research. This program began (under a different grant number) while Dr. Smith was at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, and was transferred to SAO with a change in number. While Dr. Smith was a visiting Discipline Scientist at NASA HQ the program was in abeyance, but it has resumed in full since his return to SAO. The Infrared Space Observatory mission was launched in November, 1996, and since then has successfully completed its planned lifetime mission. Data are currently being calibrated to the 2% level.

  11. metal alkoxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    substituent effects in the head-to-tail double insertion reactions observed ... an internal standard. The yield of diphenyl carbodii- mide was further verified by isolating it as diphenyl urea after hydrolysis. The organic fraction obtained in the catalytic metathesis .... insertion of PhNCO into metal alkoxide 1a to generate. Table 1.

  12. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  13. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  14. Does the stress tolerance of mixed grassland communities change in a future climate? A test with heavy metal stress (zinc pollution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berge, Joke; Naudts, Kim; Janssens, Ivan A.; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Nijs, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Will species that are sensitive/tolerant to Zn pollution still have the same sensitivity/tolerance in a future climate? To answer this question we analysed the response of constructed grassland communities to five levels of zinc (Zn) supply, ranging from 0 to 354 mg Zn kg -1 dry soil, under a current climate and a future climate (elevated CO 2 and warming). Zn concentrations increased in roots and shoots with Zn addition but this increase did not differ between climates. Light-saturated net CO 2 assimilation rate (A sat ) of the species, on the other hand, responded differently to Zn addition depending on climate. Still, current and future climate communities have comparable biomass responses to Zn, i.e., no change in root biomass and a 13% decrease of above-ground biomass. Provided that the different response of A sat in a future climate will not compromise productivity and survival on the long term, sensitivity is not altered by climate change. - Highlights: → We exposed constructed grassland communities to Zn addition in a current and a future climate. → Zn uptake did not differ between the climates. → Although A sat was more responsive to Zn in future climate, climate did not alter biomass responses. → If this response remains on the long term, climate change will not alter sensitivity. - This study is the first to examine plant responses to a heavy metal (Zn) in a changing climate, and shows that the tolerance of plants to Zn stress will not be altered in a future climate.

  15. Heavy metal sorption by microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandau, E. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany); Sandau, P. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany); Pulz, O. [IGV - Inst. fuer Getreideverarbeitung GmbH, Bergholz-Rehbruecke (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Viable microalgae are known to be able to accumulate heavy metals (bioaccumulation). Against a background of the increasing environmental risks caused by heavy metals, the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Spirulina platensis and their potential for the biological removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions were taken as an example for investigation. Small-scale cultivation tests (50 l) with Cd-resistant cells of Chlorella vulgaris have shown that approx. 40% of the added 10 mg Cd/l was removed from the solution within seven days. At this heavy metal concentration sensitive cells died. Non-viable microalgae are able to eliminate heavy metal ions in a short time by biosorption in uncomplicated systems, without any toxicity problems. Compared with original biomasses, the sorption capacity of microalgal by-products changes only insignificantly. Their low price makes them economical. (orig.)

  16. Metal detector technology data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, L.K.; Gallo, L.R.; Murray, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    The tests described in this report were conducted to obtain information on the effects target characteristics have on portal type metal detector response. A second purpose of the tests was to determine the effect of detector type and settings on the detection of the targets. Although in some cases comparison performance of different types and makes of metal detectors is found herein, that is not the primary purpose of the report. Further, because of the many variables that affect metal detector performance, the information presented can be used only in a general way. The results of these tests can show general trends in metal detection, but do little for making accurate predictions as to metal detector response to a target with a complex shape such as a handgun. The shape of an object and its specific metal content (both type and treatment) can have a significant influence on detection. Thus it should not be surprising that levels of detection for a small 100g stainless steel handgun are considerably different than for detection of the 100g stainless steel right circular cylinder that was used in these tests. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Crack-arrest behavior in SEN wide plates of low-upper-shelf base metal tested under nonisothermal conditions: WP-2 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.; Robinson, G.C. Jr.; Iskander, S.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Fields, R.J.; deWit, R.; Low, S.R.; Schwartz, C.W.

    1990-08-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting analytical and experimental studies aimed at understanding the circumstances that would initiate the growth of an existing crack in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the conditions leading to arrest of a propagating crack. Objectives of these studies are to determine (1) if the material will exhibit crack-arrest behavior when the driving force on a crack exceeds the ASME limit, (2) the relationship between K Ia and temperature, and (3) the interaction of fracture modes (arrest, stable crack growth, unstable crack growth, and tensile instability) when arrest occurs at high temperatures. In meeting these objectives, crack-arrest data are being developed over an expanded temperature range through tests involving large thermally shocked cylinders, pressurized thermally shocked vessels, and wide-plate specimens. The wide-plate specimens provide the opportunity for a significant number of data points to be obtained at relatively affordable costs. These tests are designed to provide fracture-toughness measurements approaching or above the onset of the Charpy upper-shelf regime in a rising toughness region and with an increasing driving force. This document discusses test methodology and results. 23 refs., 92 figs., 25 tabs

  18. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  19. Metal phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of phosphides of the most of elements: alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth, transition metals, actinides, indium, beryllium, cadmium forming the variety of formulae and types of structures, is considered. The ways of P atom combination in phosphides vary from single atoms (ions P 3- in compounds of electropositive elements) through one-, two-dimensional complexes P n up to three-dimensional (charged) grids. In all phosphides, containing the systems of bound atoms of phosphorus, certain or all from these atoms form less than three bonds P-P. The formation of one bond P-P by every atom leads to group P 2 found as P 2 4- ion in diphosphides of transition metals with the structure of the pyrite or marcasite type (RuP 2 ). LaP, SmP, ThP, UP, ZrP form structural type NaCl

  20. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  1. Copper acute toxicity tests with Schizothorax o'connori Lloyd and Schizothorax waltoni Regan: a biomonitor of heavy metal pollution in a high altitude area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jian; Xie, Congxin; Qin, Jianhui; Huo, Bin; Luo, Yangzhi

    2014-09-01

    Fingerlings of two different Schizothorax species, S. o'connori Lloyd and S. waltoni Regan, were exposed to copper for 264 h in a series of static toxicity tests. The mortality rates of these two species increased as the exposure concentrations increased and the exposure time was prolonged. Estimated 96 h median lethal concentration (LC50) values were 0.31 and 0.28 mg/L for the two species, respectively. These findings indicated that fingerlings of these species were sensitive to copper, and that both species may be suitable for use as local biomonitors of copper pollution in the high altitude environment. However, S. waltoni may be more useful in indicating the safe concentrations of copper used in aquaculture for therapeutic purposes. Further quantitative studies with measured concentrations of copper are required to verify the results observed in the present study.

  2. Glassy metals

    CERN Document Server

    Russew, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    The topics discussed in this book focus on fundamental problems concerning the structural relaxation of amorphous metallic alloys, above all the possibility of studying it on the basis of viscous flow behavior and its relation to rheological anomalies, such as bend stress relaxation, thermal expansion, specific heat, density changes, and crystallization. Most relaxation studies deal with the relaxation changes of a single definite material property, and not with a wider spectrum of physical properties integrated into a common framework. This book shows that it is possible to describe these property changes on the basis of a more comprehensive theoretical understanding of their mechanism.

  3. Pb-Isotopic Study of Galena by LA-Q-ICP-MS: Testing a New Methodology with Applications to Base-Metal Sulphide Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. M. McFarlane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In situ laser ablation quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure Pb isotopes in galena. Data acquisition was optimized by adjusting spot size, energy density, and ablation time to obtain near steady-state low relative standard deviation (%RSD signals. Standard-sample bracketing using in-house Broken Hill galena as external reference standard was used and offline data reduction was carried out using VizualAge for Iolite3. Using this methodology, galena grain in polished thin sections from selected massive sulphide deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada, were tested and compared to previously published data. Absolute values and errors on the weighted mean of ~20 individual analyses from each sample compared favourably with whole-rock Pb-Pb isotope data. This approach provides a mean to obtain rapid, accurate, and moderately (0.1% 2σ precise Pb isotope measurements in galena and is particularly well suited for exploratory or reconnaissance studies. Further refinement of this approach may be useful in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulphides deposits and might be a useful vectoring tool when complemented with other conventional exploration techniques.

  4. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  5. Metal filled porous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Adam F [Los Angeles, CA; Vajo, John J [West Hills, CA; Cumberland, Robert W [Malibu, CA; Liu, Ping [Irvine, CA; Salguero, Tina T [Encino, CA

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  6. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  8. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved

  9. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  10. Protection of metal artefacts with the formation of metal-oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    OpenAIRE

    Edith eJoseph; Edith eJoseph; Sylvie eCario; Anaële eSimon; Marie eWörle; Rocco eMazzeo; Pilar eJunier; Daniel eJob

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated in vitro. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g.L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxal...

  11. Metal polish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal polishes are used to clean metals, including brass, copper, or silver. This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing metal polish. This article is for information only. DO NOT use ...

  12. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  13. Filler metal development for Hastelloy alloy XR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Hajime; Sahira, Kensho

    1991-11-01

    In order to develop the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall, the weldability and high temperature strength properties of Hastelloy alloy XR weldment were investigated using the filler metals, which were alloy-designed on the basis of multiple regression analysis. The former was examined through the chemical analysis in the deposited metal, bend test, FISCO cracking test, optical microscopy and hardness measurement. The latter was investigated by means of tensile and creep test. It was found from these results that the crack susceptibility in the weldment was apparent to be lowered without degrading the high temperature strength properties. Therefore, it is concluded that these filler metals possess excellent performance as the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall. (author)

  14. Handheld Metal Detectors: Nicaraguan Field Test Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reidy, Dennis M; Garcia, Sigberto A; Mejia Ramos, Duvier A; Soares, Eraldo R

    2001-01-01

    This final technical report details the results of a joint project between the United States Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (OASD-SO/LIC...

  15. TRIBOLOGICAL TESTING IN SHEET METAL FORMING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega Tarantino, Salvador

    Since 2003 an ongoing European project has been running involving Universities, lubricant and steel manufacturers, finite element software developers, and industrial partners from Denmark, Finland, Great Britain, Germany and Spain. One the most important goals of this large project is to develop ...

  16. Testing internal coatings in metal vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, A.; Perkins, P.

    1978-01-01

    Presence of pinholes or defects in nonconductive protective coating on inside surface of closed vessel is detected if vessel has one opening into which small stainless-steel probe can be introduced. By inserting probe and attaching another to outside surface, and by filling vessel with ten percent sodium chloride solution, integrity of coating is determined by measuring electrical conductivity through vessel wall.

  17. Elevated temperature fatigue testing of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    The major technology areas needed to perform a life prediction of an aircraft turbine engine hot section component are discussed and the steps required for life prediction are outlined. These include the determination of the operating environment, the calculation of the thermal and mechanical loading of the component, the cyclic stress-strain and creep behavior of the material required for structural analysis, and the structural analysis to determine the local stress-strain-temperature-time response of the material at the critical location in the components. From a knowledge of the fatigue, creep, and failure resistance of the material, a prediction of the life of the component is made. Material characterization and evaluation conducted for the purpose of calculating fatigue crack initiation lives of components operating at elevated temperatures are emphasized.

  18. Heavy metal jako subkultura

    OpenAIRE

    KOUTNÁ, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with heavy metal subculture. Its aim is to introduce the most important branches and to show broadness of heavy metal. This bachelor thesis describes development and history, briefly shows Czech heavy metal history alongside with the biggest and most popular Czech heavy metal festivals. It shows the most dressing concerns of society against this style.

  19. Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis are comprehensively reviewed, including (a) epidemiological and clinical aspects, (b) carcinogenesis bioassays, (c) bacterial mutagenesis, (d) mammalian cell mutagenesis, (e) chromosomal damage, (f) mammalian cell transformation, (g) microsomal metabolism, (h) DNA strandbreaks and crosslinks, (i) DNA polymerase infidelity, (j) RNA strand initiation, and (k) helical transition of B-DNA to Z-DNA. Based upon these observations, several hypotheses are proposed for the molecular pathogenesis of carcinogenesis by metal compounds. These hypotheses are amenable to experimental test by existing techniques of molecular biology.

  20. Metals and metal derivatives in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colotti, Gianni; Ilari, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto; Morea, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    Several chemical elements are required by living organisms in addition to the four elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen usually present in common organic molecules. Many metals (e.g. sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and selenium) are known to be required for normal biological functions in humans. Disorders of metal homeostasis and of metal bioavailability, or toxicity caused by metal excess, are responsible for a large number of human diseases. Metals are also extensively used in medicine as therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. In the past 5000 years, metals such as arsenic, gold and iron have been used to treat a variety of human diseases. Nowadays, an ever-increasing number of metal-based drugs is available. These contain a broad spectrum of metals, many of which are not among those essential for humans, able to target proteins and/or DNA. This mini-review describes metal-containing compounds targeting DNA or proteins currently in use, or designed to be used, as therapeutics against cancer, arthritis, parasitic and other diseases, with a special focus on the available information, often provided by X-ray studies, about their mechanism of action at a molecular level. In addition, an overview of metal complexes used for diagnosing diseases is presented.

  1. Metal Top Adapter ACV0000807, Manufactured by Delfasco, Inc. for Alliant Techsystems, Inc., for PA116 Containers on a 44" x 40" Wood Pallet, First Article Tests (FATs) IAW MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dugan, Jeffery L

    2008-01-01

    ...) test units were tested with a load of 2,495 lbs each. The tests accomplished on the test units were the Stacking, Repetitive Shock, Drop, Incline-Impact, Sling Compatibility, Forklifting, and Disassembly Tests...

  2. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Hayashi

    Full Text Available Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal.

  3. Carbohydrate Reserves And Metal Accumulation Of The Nile Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the carbohydrate reserves and metal accumulation of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus after exposure to sublethal concentrations of heavy metals such as copper, lead and zinc for a 12-week period, using static renewable toxicity tests. The concentrations of the metals accumulated in the tissue ...

  4. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  5. Structure and properties of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzydlowski, K J

    1999-01-01

    Metals are one of the most widely used types of engineering materials. Some of their properties, e.g. elastic constants, can be directly related to the nature of the metallic bonds between the atoms. On the other hand, macro- and $9 microstructural features of metals, such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and second phase particles, control their yield, flow, and fracture stress. Images of microstructural elements can be obtained by modern $9 imaging techniques. Modern computer aided methods can be further used to obtain a quantitative description of these microstructures. These methods take advantage of the progress made in recent years in the field of image processing, $9 mathematical morphology and quantitative stereology. Quantitative description of the microstructures are used for modeling processes taking place under the action of applied load at a given temperature and test (service) environment. $9 These model considerations can be illustrated on the example of an austenitic stainless...

  6. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  7. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  8. Vitrified metal finishing wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P.A. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.a.bingham@sheffield.ac.uk; Hand, R.J. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-17

    Durable phosphate glasses were formed by vitrifying waste filter cakes from two metal finishing operations. Some melts formed crystalline components during cooling. Compositional analysis of dried, heat treated and vitrified samples was made using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and Leco induction furnace combustion analysis. Hydrolytic dissolution, measured by an adapted product consistency test, was reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude upon heat treatment or vitrification, surpassing the performance of borosilicate glass in some cases. This was attributed to the high levels of iron and zinc in the wastes, which greatly improve the durability of phosphate glasses. One of the wastes arose from a metal phosphating process and was particularly suitable for vitrification due to its high P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content and favourable melting behaviour. The other waste, which arose from a number of processes, was less suitable as it had a low P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content and during heating it emitted harmful corrosive gases and underwent violent reactions. Substantial volume reductions were obtained by heat treatment and vitrification of both wastes. Compositions and performances of some vitrified wastes were comparable with those of glasses which are under consideration for the immobilisation of toxic and nuclear wastes.

  9. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable metals (BMs are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompatibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  10. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  11. Metal traces in paper and paper products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, G.

    1986-01-01

    In the following a survey is given on the problems of detection and occurrence of heavy metals in packaging materials. A method of sample preparation procedure and AAS measurement is presented which allows the direct detection of metals such as cadmium, lead, arsenic and mercury. The method was tested with standard reference materials and checked in Round Robin tests. More than 150 paper samples which are used in food packaging were analysed with regard to their heavy metal content. In case of heavy metal traces, the values were compared with literature data. In order to evaluate the influence of heavy metals in packaging materials it is necessary to determine the soluble part of the total amount of these metals in the packaging material, which also can be done by means of our method. A comparison of metal contents of selected foodstuffs with paper samples analysed by us showed that the consumer will not suffer an additional burdening by migration of heavy metals from packaging materials into foodstuffs.

  12. Synthesis of low cycle fatigue test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Axial strain controlled cycle fatigue tests were carried out on type 316 stainless steel parent metal, vacuum and non-vacuum electron beams welds, submerged arc welds and gas shielded metal arc welds. Testing covered total strains in the range 0.6% to 2%, and was at room temperature and 550 0 C. Parent metal and the electron beam welds showed rapid cyclic hardening, while arc welds showed little hardening. The weld metal cyclic stress-strain response was above that obtained for the parent metal, although below data obtained by other workers for similar parent materials. Weld metal endurances were above the ASME N47 continuous cycling design line at both temperatures, and comparable with parent metal data. However, the weld metal data approached the design line at low strain ranges (around 0.5%). Endurances were predicted from crack growth rates estimated from striation spacings, giving acceptable results except for the gas shielded metal arc weldments. (author)

  13. Metallic fuel design development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Lee, B. O. and others

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual

  14. Metallic fuel design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Lee, B. O. and others

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual design technology on metallic fuel

  15. Aircraft Metal Skin Repair and Honeycomb Structure Repair; Sheet Metal Work 3: 9857.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course helps students determine types of repairs, compute repair sizes, and complete the repair through surface protection. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, protection of metals, repairs to metal skin, and honeycomb structure repair. A bibliography and post-test are appended. A prerequisite for this course is mastery of the…

  16. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-02

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity.

  17. Ship Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-15

    zero degrees angle of attack than the conventional foil at eight degrees angle of attack . This increase in lift is believed to be limited to low...Bureau of Shipping (ABS) supported this effort through the purchase of the 60 specimens used in this thesis. Metal Shark boats also provided aluminum...strength of welded aluminum panels. Metal Shark Boats, again, provided the necessary test panels for this effort. The optical extensometer was not

  18. Predicting metal toxicity revisited: general properties vs. specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, H T; Verburg, T G

    2001-11-12

    The present paper addresses the prediction of metal toxicity by evaluation of the relationships between general metal properties and toxic effects. For this, metal toxicity data were taken from 30 literature data sets, which varied largely in exposure times, organisms, effects and effect levels. General metal properties were selected on basis of literature reviewing of basic metal property classifications: used were the electrochemical potential deltaE0; the ionization potential IP; the ratio between atomic radius and atomic weight AR/AW; and the electronegativity Xm. The results suggest that toxicity prediction may be performed on basis of these fixed metal properties without any adoption to specific organisms, without any division of metals into classes, or grouping of toxicity tests. The results further indicate that metal properties contribute to the observed effects in relative importances which depend on specific effects, effect levels, exposure times, selected organisms and ambient conditions. The discussion strongly suggests that prediction should be by interpolation rather than by extrapolation of calibrated toxicity data: the concept here is that unknown metal toxicities are predicted on basis of observed metal toxicities in calibration experiments. Considering the used metal properties, the calibration covers the largest number of metals by the simultanuous use of Ge(IV), Cs(I), Li(I), Mn(VII), Sc and Bi in toxicity studies. Based on the data from the 30 studies considered, metal toxicities could be ordered in a relative way. This ordering indicates that the natural abundance of metals or metal ions in the Earth's crust may be regarded as a general comparative measure of the metal toxicities. The problems encountered in toxicity interpretation and ordering of toxicities indicate that control of the solution acidity, the metal's solubility and the metal's oxidation state may be key problems to overcome in future metal ion toxicity studies.

  19. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. II. A TEST ON THE NONLINEARITY SCENARIO FOR COLOR BIMODALITY USING THE u-BAND COLORS: THE CASE OF M87 (NGC 4486)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Hak-Sub; Cho, Jaeil; Chung, Chul; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Blakeslee, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The optical color distributions of globular clusters (GCs) in most large elliptical galaxies are bimodal. Based on the assumed linear relationship between GC colors and their metallicities, the bimodality has been taken as evidence of two GC subsystems with different metallicities in each galaxy and has led to a number of theories in the context of galaxy formation. More recent observations and modeling of GCs, however, suggests that the color-metallicity relations (CMRs) are inflected, and thus colors likely trace metallicities in a nonlinear manner. The nonlinearity could produce bimodal color distributions from a broad underlying metallicity spread, even if it is unimodal. Despite the far-reaching implications, whether CMRs are nonlinear and whether the nonlinearity indeed causes the color bimodality are still open questions. Given that the spectroscopic refinement of CMRs is still very challenging, we here propose a new photometric technique to probe the possible nonlinear nature of CMRs. In essence, a color distribution of GCs is a 'projected' distribution of their metallicities. Since the form of CMRs hinges on which color is used, the shape of color distributions varies depending significantly on the colors. Among other optical colors, the u-band related colors (e.g., u – g and u – z) are theoretically predicted to exhibit significantly less inflected CMRs than other preferred CMRs (e.g., for g – z). As a case study, we performed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 archival u-band photometry for the M87 (NGC 4486) GC system with confirmed color bimodality. We show that the u-band color distributions are significantly different from that of g – z and consistent with our model predictions. With more u-band measurements, this method will support or rule out the nonlinear CMR scenario for the origin of GC color bimodality with high confidence. The HST/WFC3 observations in F336W for nearby large elliptical galaxies are highly anticipated in this regard.

  20. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals and chloride from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash and air pollution control residue in suspension - test of a new two compartment experimental cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Magro, Cátia; Guedes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues such as fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues are classified as hazardous waste and disposed of, although they contain potential resources. The most problematic elements in MSWI residues are leachable heavy metals and salts. For reuse...... of MSWI residues in for instance concrete, the aim of remediation should be reduction of the heavy metal leaching, while at the same time keeping the alkaline pH, so the residue can replace cement. In this study a MSWI residues were subjected to electrodialytic remediation under various experimental...

  1. Glassy metallic plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfu; Wang, Junqiang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Bo; Bai, Haiyang; Pan, Mingxiang; Wang, Weihua

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports a class of bulk metallic glass including Ce-, LaCe-, CaLi-, Yb-, and Sr-based metallic glasses, which are regarded as glassy metallic plastics because they combine some unique properties of both plastics and metallic alloys. These glassy metallic plastics have very low glass transition temperature ( T g ˜25°C to 150°C) and low Young’s modulus (˜20 GPa to 35 GPa). Similar to glassy plastics, these metallic plastics show excellent plastic-like deformability on macro-, micro- and even nano-scale in their supercooled liquid range and can be processed, such as elongated, compressed, bent, and imprinted at low temperatures, in hot water for instance. Under ambient conditions, they display such metallic properties as high thermal and electric conductivities and excellent mechanical properties and other unique properties. The metallic plastics have potential applications and are also a model system for studying issues in glass physics.

  2. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  3. Semi-metallic polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubnova, Olga; Khan, Zia Ullah; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report...... a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics....

  4. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  5. Nanochemistry of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Gleb B

    2001-01-01

    The results of studies on the nanochemistry of metals published in recent years are generalised. Primary attention is centred on the methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their chemical reactions. The means of stabilisation of nanoparticles which involve individual metals and incorporate atoms of several metals are considered as well as their physicochemical properties. Self-assembling processes of nanoparticles are described. The prospects of using metal nanoparticles in semiconductor devices, catalysis, biology and medicine are discussed. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  6. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    , and also tests for a thin ductile metal layer bonding two ceramic blocks have indicated rapid void growth. Analyses for these material configurations are discussed here. When the void radius is very small, a nonlocal plasticity model is needed to account for observed size-effects, and recent analyses......Cavitation instabilities have been predicted for a single void in a ductile metal stressed under high triaxiality conditions. In experiments for a ceramic reinforced by metal particles a single dominant void has been observed on the fracture surface of some of the metal particles bridging a crack...... for the influence of such size-effects on cavitation instabilities are presented. When a metal contains a distribution of micro voids, and the void spacing compared to void size is not extremely large, the surrounding voids may affect the occurrence of a cavitation instability at one of the voids. This has been...

  7. Liquid metals for solar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, J.; Niedermeier, K.; Fritsch, A.; Musaeva, D.; Marocco, L.; Uhlig, R.; Baake, E.; Buck, R.; Wetzel, T.

    2017-07-01

    The use of liquid metals in solar power systems is not new. The receiver tests with liquid sodium in the 1980s at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) already proved the feasibility of liquid metals as heat transfer fluid. Despite the high efficiency achieved with that receiver, further investigation of liquid metals in solar power systems was stopped due to a sodium spray fire. Recently, the topic has become interesting again and the gained experience during the last 30 years of liquid metals handling is applied to the concentrated solar power community. In this paper, recent activities of the Helmholtz Alliance LIMTECH concerning liquid metals for solar power systems are presented. In addition to the components and system simulations also the experimental setup and results are included.

  8. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed...

  9. Report on joint research in fiscal 1999. Research and development of technology to promote recycling of non-ferrous metal materials (Report on achievement in researches of demonstration tests and total system technology); 1999 nendo hitetsu kinzokukei sozai recycle sokushin gijutsu seika hokokusho. Jissho shiken kenkyu, total system gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Development has been in progress on promotion of recycling the non-ferrous metal materials, particularly aluminum, base metals and rare metals (such as copper). For aluminum, researches were made on demonstration of the crystal separation process, vacuum deposition process, molten scrap cleaning technology, and residual dross utilizing technology. In the crystal separation process to remove Fe and Si, and the vacuum deposition process to remove Zn, trial operation and adjustments were performed on the demonstration and testing facilities, making simulation in the scale of 1000 tons a month possible. In the molten scrap cleaning technology, discussions were given on a method to install on the trough a filter permitting micro inclusions in the molten scrap, but no results as have been expected were obtained. The residual dross was used on a trial basis for applications such as road aggregate and refractory materials. In the exhaust treatment, it was recognized effective that activated carbon and slaked lime are used simultaneously to remove hydrochloric acid and dioxins. In developing a technology to regenerate high-grade copper from sludge dust, discussions were given on design, fabrication, and trial operation of the demonstration facilities, partly by using a demonstration plant, with regard to the five related technologies including a technology for high precision refining of scraps, and high-speed metal melting technology. (NEDO)

  10. Disintegration and size reduction of slags and metals after melt refining of contaminated metallic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    Melting under an oxidizing slag is an attractive method of decontaminating and reducing the volume of radioactively contaminated metal scrap. The contaminants are concentrated in a relatively small volume of slag, which leaves the metal essentially clean. A potential method of permanently disposing of the resulting slags (and metals if necessary) is emplacing them into deep shale by grout hydrofracture. Suspension in grout mixtures requires that the slag and metal be granular. The feasibility of size-reducing slags and disintegrating metals and subsequently incorporating both into grout mixtures was demonstrated. Various types of slags were crushed with a small jaw crusher into particles smaller than 3 mm. Several metals were also melted and water-blasted into coarse metal powder or shot ranging in size from 0.05 to 3 mm. A simple low-pressure water atomizer having a multiple nozzle with a converging-line jet stream was developed and used for this purpose. No significant slag dust and steam were generated during slag crushing and liquid-metal water-blasting tests, indicating that contamination can be well contained within the system. The crushed slags and the coarse metal powders were suspendable in group fluids, which indicates probable disposability by shale hydrofracture. The granulation of slags and metals facilitates their containment, transport, and storage

  11. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Metal-Related Human Diseases and Metal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calap-Quintana, Pablo; González-Fernández, Javier; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; Llorens, José Vicente; Moltó, María Dolores

    2017-07-06

    Iron, copper and zinc are transition metals essential for life because they are required in a multitude of biological processes. Organisms have evolved to acquire metals from nutrition and to maintain adequate levels of each metal to avoid damaging effects associated with its deficiency, excess or misplacement. Interestingly, the main components of metal homeostatic pathways are conserved, with many orthologues of the human metal-related genes having been identified and characterized in Drosophila melanogaster . Drosophila has gained appreciation as a useful model for studying human diseases, including those caused by mutations in pathways controlling cellular metal homeostasis. Flies have many advantages in the laboratory, such as a short life cycle, easy handling and inexpensive maintenance. Furthermore, they can be raised in a large number. In addition, flies are greatly appreciated because they offer a considerable number of genetic tools to address some of the unresolved questions concerning disease pathology, which in turn could contribute to our understanding of the metal metabolism and homeostasis. This review recapitulates the metabolism of the principal transition metals, namely iron, zinc and copper, in Drosophila and the utility of this organism as an experimental model to explore the role of metal dyshomeostasis in different human diseases. Finally, a summary of the contribution of Drosophila as a model for testing metal toxicity is provided.

  12. Synthesis of arsenic transition metal sulfides and metal arsenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, G.H.; Brown, L.D.; Ryan, D.F. [Exxon Research & Development Labs, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    One of the chief problems in upgrading shale oil is the presence of inherent arsenic which is known to poison downstream catalysts. Highly dispersed transition metal sulfides formed in situ from the decomposition of dithiocarbamate (DTC) complexes of transition metals show excellent potential as dearsenation agents. The authors have studied the reaction of these sulfides with various arsenic compositions and characterized the metal arsenides and arsenic metal sulfides formed as well as the ease of their formation. Thus, the reaction of bis(butyldithiocarbamato)Ni, (NiBuDTC) with model compounds was very facile and gave NiAs, NiAsS, and NiAs2=xSx. In general the effectiveness of the sulfides for dearsenation followed the sequence Ni>Mo{much_gt}Co, while iron sulfides were totally ineffective. Based upon these results, tests were run in autoclaves (as well as a fixed-bed flow-through unit) with NiBuDTC and shale oil having 73 ppm inherent As. Under optimum conditions, dearsenation down to les than 1 ppm was obtained.

  13. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: Common mechanisms across multiple metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsop, Derek, E-mail: alsopde@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    All metals tested reduced calcium uptake in zebrafish larvae. However, it was whole body sodium loss that was functionally related to toxicity. The zebrafish larvae acute toxicity assay save time, space and resources. - Abstract: Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca{sup 2+} uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca{sup 2+} uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca{sup 2+} pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca{sup 2+} levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca{sup 2+} uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na{sup +}, which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K{sup +} were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na{sup +} losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na{sup +} uptake in zebrafish (Na{sup +} uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na{sup +}).

  14. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  15. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D.; Craker, Lyle E.; Xing Baoshan; Nielsen, Niels E.; Wilcox, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha -1 for Cd, 660 g ha -1 for Pb, 180 g ha -1 for Cu, 350 g ha -1 for Mn, and 205 g ha -1 for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 μm) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 μm) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil

  16. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D. [Mississippi State, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and North Mississippi Research and Extension Center, 5421 Highway 145 South, Verona, MS 38879 (United States)], E-mail: vj40@pss.msstate.edu; Craker, Lyle E.; Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, 12 Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Nielsen, Niels E. [Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility Lab, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK1871, Copenhagen (Denmark); Wilcox, Andrew [Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 8NB (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cd, 660 g ha{sup -1} for Pb, 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cu, 350 g ha{sup -1} for Mn, and 205 g ha{sup -1} for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 {mu}m) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 {mu}m) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil.

  17. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Craker, Lyle E; Xing, Baoshan; Nielsen, Niels E; Wilcox, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha(-1) for Cd, 660 g ha(-1) for Pb, 180 g ha(-1) for Cu, 350 g ha(-1) for Mn, and 205 g ha(-1) for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil.

  18. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal?Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Ana?le; W?rle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal–oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L−1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid a...

  19. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  20. Resolving Gas-Phase Metallicity In Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, David

    2017-06-01

    Chapter 2: As part of the Bluedisk survey we analyse the radial gas-phase metallicity profiles of 50 late-type galaxies. We compare the metallicity profiles of a sample of HI-rich galaxies against a control sample of HI-'normal' galaxies. We find the metallicity gradient of a galaxy to be strongly correlated with its HI mass fraction {M}{HI}) / {M}_{\\ast}). We note that some galaxies exhibit a steeper metallicity profile in the outer disc than in the inner disc. These galaxies are found in both the HI-rich and control samples. This contradicts a previous indication that these outer drops are exclusive to HI-rich galaxies. These effects are not driven by bars, although we do find some indication that barred galaxies have flatter metallicity profiles. By applying a simple analytical model we are able to account for the variety of metallicity profiles that the two samples present. The success of this model implies that the metallicity in these isolated galaxies may be in a local equilibrium, regulated by star formation. This insight could provide an explanation of the observed local mass-metallicity relation. Chapter 3 We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies