WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal removal fluid

  1. Metal organic frameworks for removal of compounds from a fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Embodiments provide a method of compound removal from a fluid. The method includes contacting one or more metal organic framework (MOF) compositions with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons. One or more of CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF.

  2. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Ger T.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO.sub.x and optionally SO.sub.2 from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe.sup.2+) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC' is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution.

  3. A luminescent metal organic framework with high sensitivity for detecting and removing copper ions from simulated biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tian-Tian; Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Zhou-Wen; Li, Meng-Ting; Sun, Chun-Yi; Li, Xiao; Wang, Xin-Long; Su, Zhong-Min

    2017-02-21

    The crystal structure of Cd-MOF-74 was obtained for the first time that possesses high sensitivity for the detection of copper ions from water and simulated biological fluids based on changes in luminescent intensity. Furthermore, Cd-MOF-74 could selectively remove Cu 2+ from simulated biological fluids that contain Mg 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , Fe 2+ , Ni 2+ , Na + , and K + . The adsorption capacity of this adsorbent for copper ions reached 189.5 mg g -1 and it quickly adsorbed copper ions within 10 minutes under 10 ppm Cu 2+ in the simulated biological system. XPS, PXRD, and gas adsorption measurements revealed that this high sensitivity and selectivity of Cd-MOF-74 resulted from the partial substitution of Cd 2+ by Cu 2+ in the framework. Although many MOF materials have been employed for sensor or selective adsorption of Cu 2+ , Cd-MOF-74 is the first example of MOFs showing both capabilities in simulated biological fluids, which represents a pioneering work that extends the applications of MOF materials in the biological field.

  4. Electrokinetic removal of heavy metals from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvvadi Venkata Sivapullaiah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Removal of heavy metal ions from soils by electrokinetic treatment has several advantages. The extent of removal, however, is both soil specific and ion specific. The conditions to be maintained have to be established based on laboratory studies. With a view to maximize the removal of metal ions the trends of removal of heavy metal ions such as iron, nickel and cadmium form a natural Indian kaolinitic red earth during different conditions maintained in the electrokinetic extraction process are studied. A laboratory electrokinetic extraction apparatus was assembled for this purpose. Attempts are also made to elucidate the mechanism of removal of the metal ions from soil. The composition of the flushing fluid, voltage and duration of extraction are varied. While dilute acetic acid has been used to neutralize the alkalinity that develops at the cathode, EDTA solution has been used to desorb heavy metals from clay surface. Generally the extent of removal was proportional to the osmotic flow. Nickel and Cadmium are more effectively removed than iron. The percentage removal of Ni is generally proportional to the osmotic flow but shows sensitivity to the pH of the system. There is an optimum voltage for removal of metal ions from soil. The removal of iron was negligible under different conditions studied.

  5. Metals removal from spent salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  6. Birch's Law for fluid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaner, J.W.; Hixson, R.S.; Winkler, M.A.; Boness, D.A.; Brown, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    By comparing acoustic velocities in fluid metals over a very wide range of densities we have established Birch's Law as an approximate representation over the entire liquid range. For a given liquid metal the acoustic velocity is close to linear in density, with a slope determined by the atomic weight. The measurements include isobaric expansion to less than half normal density, ultrasonics on molten metals at 1 atmosphere, and shock melted metals to greater than twice normal density

  7. Hydrogen sulfide removal in water-based drilling fluid by metal oxide nanoparticle and ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi Morgani, M.; Saboori, R.; Sabbaghi, S.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced approaches to the application of nanomaterials for environmental studies, such as waste-water treatment and pollution removal/adsorption, have been considered in recent decades. In this research, hydrogen sulfide removal from water-based drilling fluid by ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles and a ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite was studied experimentally. The ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by sedimentation and the sol-gel method. A sol-chemical was employed to synthesize the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the produced ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles, and the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite. The results showed that the concentration of hydrogen sulfide decreased from 800 ppm to about 250 ppm (about 70% removal) and less than 150 ppm (more than 80% removal) using the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles with a 0.67 wt% concentration, respectively. Hydrogen sulfide removal using the ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite with a 0.67 wt% showed the highest value of removal in comparison with the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. The hydrogen sulfide level was lowered from 800 ppm to less than 5 ppm (99% removal) by the nanocomposite.

  8. Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

    2014-04-08

    A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

  9. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  10. MICROBIAL REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS FROM WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Koc-Jurczyk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization result in increase of heavy metals released into the environment (soil, lakes, rivers, seas, oceans, groundwater. Studies on biosorption of heavy metals are aimed to specify types of microorganisms which could efficiently bind metals. This approach has a very important significance for both slowing down metals exploitation by recovery, and also reduction of environmental pollution by decrease of their excessive concentration. Recent studies have reported about the capabilities of fungi, algae, yeasts, bacteria, waste and agricultural residues or materials containing chitosan derived from crustacean shells as a biosorbents. Biohydrometallurgy could be considered as a new “green” technology of heavy metals removal from wastewater.

  11. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by using mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... biomass indicates that they are effective in removing metal ions from single metal solutions as well as other co-ions with ... been devised for the treatment and removal of heavy metals. The commonly used procedures for removing metal ions from aqueous streams include phyto- ...... Removal of uranium (vi).

  13. The removal of actinide metals from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.D.; Howell, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A process is specified for removing actinide metals (e.g. uranium) from solutions. The solution is contacted with a substrate comprising the product obtained by reacting an inorganic solid containing surface hydroxyl groups (e.g. silica gel) with a compound containing a silane grouping, a nitrogen-containing group (e.g. an amine) and other specified radicals. After treatment, the actinide metal is recovered from the substrate. (U.K.)

  14. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  15. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding

  16. [Designing metal frame removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, D.J.; Barel, J.C.; Keltjens, H.M.A.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Oral health care providers have the full responsibility for designing metal frame removable partial dentures and making all of the necessary preparations. Important principles of design are that the denture should hamper natural cleaning and daily oral hygiene as little as possible and that it

  17. (suspended solids and metals) removal efficiencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Presented in this paper are the results of correlational analyses and logistic regression between metal substances (Cd, Cu,. Pb, Zn), as well as suspended solids removal, and physical pond parameters of 19 stormwater retention pond case studies obtained from the International Stormwater BMP database.

  18. Removal of heavy metals from biowaste : modelling of heavy metal behaviour and development of removal technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands, recycling of solid organic waste streams as compost only becomes possible if the compost complies with the heavy metals standards of the BOOM decree. This dissertation focuses on the removal of heavy metals from biowaste, i.e. the source separated organic fraction of

  19. Trace and low concentration co2 removal methods and apparatus utilizing metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-10

    In general, this disclosure describes techniques for removing trace and low concentration CO2 from fluids using SIFSIX-n-M MOFs, wherein n is at least two and M is a metal. In some embodiments, the metal is zinc or copper. Embodiments include devices comprising SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids. In particular, embodiments relate to devices and methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids, wherein CO2 concentration is trace. Methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids can occur in confined spaces. SIFSIX-n-M MOFs can comprise bidentate organic ligands. In a specific embodiment, SIFSIX-n-M MOFs comprise pyrazine or dipryidilacetylene ligands.

  20. Biosorbents for Removing Hazardous Metals and Metalloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Parajuli, Durga; Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Biswas, Biplob Kumar; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Oshima, Tatsuya; Ohto, Keisuke

    2017-07-26

    Biosorbents for remediating aquatic environmental media polluted with hazardous heavy metals and metalloids such as Pb(II), Cr(VI), Sb(III and V), and As(III and V) were prepared from lignin waste, orange and apple juice residues, seaweed and persimmon and grape wastes using simple and cheap methods. A lignophenol gel such as lignocatechol gel was prepared by immobilizing the catechol functional groups onto lignin from sawdust, while lignosulfonate gel was prepared directly from waste liquor generated during pulp production. These gels effectively removed Pb(II). Orange and apple juice residues, which are rich in pectic acid, were easily converted using alkali (e.g., calcium hydroxide) into biosorbents that effectively removed Pb(II). These materials also effectively removed Sb(III and V) and As(III and V) when these were preloaded with multi-valent metal ions such as Zr(IV) and Fe(III). Similar biosorbents were prepared from seaweed waste, which is rich in alginic acid. Other biosorbents, which effectively removed Cr(VI), were prepared by simply treating persimmon and grape wastes with concentrated sulfuric acid.

  1. Biosorbents for Removing Hazardous Metals and Metalloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsutoshi Inoue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biosorbents for remediating aquatic environmental media polluted with hazardous heavy metals and metalloids such as Pb(II, Cr(VI, Sb(III and V, and As(III and V were prepared from lignin waste, orange and apple juice residues, seaweed and persimmon and grape wastes using simple and cheap methods. A lignophenol gel such as lignocatechol gel was prepared by immobilizing the catechol functional groups onto lignin from sawdust, while lignosulfonate gel was prepared directly from waste liquor generated during pulp production. These gels effectively removed Pb(II. Orange and apple juice residues, which are rich in pectic acid, were easily converted using alkali (e.g., calcium hydroxide into biosorbents that effectively removed Pb(II. These materials also effectively removed Sb(III and V and As(III and V when these were preloaded with multi-valent metal ions such as Zr(IV and Fe(III. Similar biosorbents were prepared from seaweed waste, which is rich in alginic acid. Other biosorbents, which effectively removed Cr(VI, were prepared by simply treating persimmon and grape wastes with concentrated sulfuric acid.

  2. Removal of soluble toxic metals from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Vijayan, S.; McConeghy, G.J.; Maves, S.R.; Martin, J.F.

    1990-05-01

    The removal of selected, soluble toxic metals from aqueous solutions has been accomplished using a combination of chemical treatment and ultrafiltration. The process has been evaluated at the bench-scale and is undergoing pilot-scale testing. Removal efficiencies in excess of 95-99% have been realized. The test program at the bench-scale investigated the limitations and established the optimum range of operating parameters for the process, while the tests conducted with the pilot-scale process equipment are providing information on longer-term process efficiencies, effective processing rates, and fouling potential of the membranes. With the typically found average concentrations of the toxic metals in groundwaters at Superfund sites used as the feed solution, the process has decreased levels up to 100-fold or more. Experiments were also conducted with concentrated solutions to determine their release from silica-based matrices. The solidified wastes were subjected to EP Toxicity test procedures and met the criteria successfully. The final phase of the program involving a field demonstration at a uranium tailings site will be outlined

  3. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated β-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs

  4. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO 2 is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO 2 and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO 2 cooling has

  5. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  6. Metal plating removal from insulator substrate using pulsed arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, K.; Gnapowski, S.; Akiyama, H.

    2014-06-01

    Removal technique of metal materials from a metal plating insulator substrate using a pulsed arc discharge was proposed and its fundamental characteristics were investigated. The metal plating substrate with three metal-layers structure (cupper, nickel and gold layers) is used as the sample substrate. Repetitive pulsed arc discharge plasma is generated using three types of electrode systems. Effects of the electrode systems on the metal plating removal from the insulator substrate were investigated. The metal plating was removed by the pulsed arc discharge between the electrode and substrate surface. A part of the gold layer, which is the topmost metal layer on the insulator substrate is vaporized and removed by the repetitive pulsed arc discharges.

  7. Removal Of Heavy Metals From Industrial Wastewaters Using Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wastewater samples from battery, paint and textile industries were treated with different doses of locally available alum, aluminum sulphate and ferric chloride in order to determine and compare their effectiveness in removing heavy metal contents from the wastewaters. The percentage removal of the metals from the ...

  8. Forced fluid removal in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, R E; Perner, A; Jensen, A K

    2018-01-01

    with acute kidney injury and fluid accumulation of more than 10% ideal bodyweight. METHODS: The FFAKI-trial was a pilot trial of forced fluid removal vs standard care in adult ICU patients with moderate to high risk acute kidney injury and 10% fluid accumulation. Fluid removal was done with furosemide and...

  9. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more...

  10. Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

    1997-12-01

    A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

  11. Removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ilou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work concerns the optimization of the operating conditions for the removal of heavy metals from synthetic solution by Electrocoagulation (EC. To reach this purpose, we prepared a synthetic wastewater containing certain heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe and Pb to study the influence of various parameters (conductivity, pH, time of electrolysis, current density and the initial concentration of the metal on the rate of removal of these metals. The results show that this rate of removal can reach 99.9 % in the following optimal conditions: pH included between 6 and 8 and a density of the current of 1~1.5A / dm2. This study shows that it is possible to remove metals in aqueous solution by the technique of electrocoagulation. 

  12. pH and metal concentration of synovial fluid of osteoarthritic joints and joints with metal replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošev, Ingrid; Levašič, Vesna; Vidmar, Janja; Kovač, Simon; Trebše, Rihard

    2017-11-01

    Due to degradation and metal dissolution during articulation of metal joint replacements the chemical periprosthetic environment may change. The aim was to establish whether metal replacements cause the local changes in pH and elevated metal concentrations. pH was measured on samples from 167 patients: native hip and knee osteoarthritic joints, joints with hip and knee replacements revised for aseptic or septic reasons. pH of synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue was measured perioperatively using a microelectrode and pH indicator papers for removed metal components. Metal concentrations were measured in 21 samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at native osteoarthritic joints (n = 101) was 7.78 ± 0.38. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at revision aseptic operation (n = 58) was 7.60 ± 0.31, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.002) compared to native osteoarthritic joints. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at revision septic operation (n = 8) was 7.55 ± 0.25, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.038) compared to native osteoarthritic joints. Measurements in tissue and at stems were not reliable. In the majority of samples taken at revision increased levels of cobalt and chromium were measured. A small but statistically significant difference was observed in the pH of synovial fluid between natural joints with degenerative diseases and joints treated with metal replacements. Based on the increased metal levels we expected the value of pH to be lower, but the influence of metal ions is counteracted by the buffering capacity of human body. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2507-2515, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mechanisms of bacterial metals removal from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torma, A.E.; Pryfogle, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Great Lakes area sediments are contaminated with varying amounts of heavy metals and polychlorinated organic matter. With respect to the bioremediation of metallic contents of these sediments, it was shown that a number of microorganisms exist which can effectively solubilize heavy metals. The basic reaction mechanisms of bioleaching processes were discussed and the effects of semiconductor character of the sulfide substrate explained. A special emphasis was made to comment on INEL's bioremediation capability. 37 refs

  14. Selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction of metal ions from waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.N.; Laintz, K.E.; Yonker, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The removal of toxic organics, metals, and radioisotopes from solids or liquids is a major concern in the treatment of industrial and nuclear wastes. For this reason, developing methods for selective separation of toxic metals and radioactive materials from solutions of complex matrix is an important problem in environmental research. Recent developments indicate supercritical fluids are good solvents for organic compounds. Many gases become supercritical fluids under moderate temperatures and pressures. For example, the critical temperature and pressure of carbon dioxide are 31 degrees C and 73 atm, respectively. The high diffusivity, low viscosity, and T-P dependence of solvent strength are some attractive properties of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Since CO 2 offers the additional benefits of stability and non-toxicity, the SFE technique avoids generation of organic liquid waste and exposure of personnel to toxic solvents. While direct extraction of metal ions by supercritical fluids is highly inefficient, these ions when complexed with organic ligands become quite soluble in supercritical fluids. Specific ligands can be used to achieve selective extraction of metal ions in this process. After SFE, the fluid phase can be depressurized for precipitation of the metal chelates and recycled. The ligand can also be regenerated for repeated use. The success of this selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction (SC-SFE) process depends on a number of factors including the efficiencies of the selective chelating agents, solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical fluids, rate of extraction, ease of regeneration of the ligands, etc. In this report, the authors present recent results on the studies of the solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical CO 2 , experimental ions from aqueous solution, and the development of selective chelating agents (ionizable crown ethers) for the extraction of lanthanides and actinides

  15. Anomalously metal-rich fluids form hydrothermal ore deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie J; Stoffell, Barry; Wilkinson, Clara C; Jeffries, Teresa E; Appold, Martin S

    2009-02-06

    Hydrothermal ore deposits form when metals, often as sulfides, precipitate in abundance from aqueous solutions in Earth's crust. Much of our knowledge of the fluids involved comes from studies of fluid inclusions trapped in silicates or carbonates that are believed to represent aliquots of the same solutions that precipitated the ores. We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to test this paradigm by analysis of fluid inclusions in sphalerite from two contrasting zinc-lead ore systems. Metal contents in these inclusions are up to two orders of magnitude greater than those in quartz-hosted inclusions and are much higher than previously thought, suggesting that ore formation is linked to influx of anomalously metal-rich fluids into systems dominated by barren fluids for much of their life.

  16. [Exposure to vegetal esters based metal cutting fluids: health effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, M M; Bellini, M; Leghissa, P; Gambini, D; Mosconi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our research is to study respiratory and dermatologic diseases (irritative and allergic) in a cohort of workers exposed to vegetal esters based metal cutting fluids of the latest generation. A cohort of 81 workers (mean age 34.5 years, seniority 17.4 years), with mean exposure to vegetal esters based metal cutting fluids of 2.8 years, has been subjected to clinical evaluations. The investigation did not reveal any disease or disorder of the respiratory system, any folluculitis or any allergic contact dermatitis caused by sensitization to vegetal esters based metal cutting fluids. On the contrary we documented 5 cases of irritant contact dermatitis, even if favored by an improper use of protection devices. According to early results, the introduction of vegetal esters based metal cutting fluids seems to reduce the risk to the worker's health. A longitudinal surveillance is still needed to confirm that even in the medium and long-term sensitizations will not occur.

  17. Individual and competitive removal of heavy metals using capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhe; Lu, Lu; Cai, Zhenxiao; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-01-25

    This study presents the viability and preference of capacitive deionization (CDI) for removing different heavy metal ions in various conditions. The removal performance and mechanisms of three ions, cadmium (Cd(2+)), lead (Pb(2+)) and chromium (Cr(3+)) were investigated individually and as a mixture under different applied voltages and ion concentrations. It was found that CDI could effectively remove these metals, and the performance was positively correlated with the applied voltage. When 1.2 V was applied into solution containing 0.5mM individual ions, the Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Cr(3+) removal was 32%, 43%, and 52%, respectively, and the electrosorption played a bigger role in Cd(2+) removal than for the other two ions. Interestingly, while the removal of Pb(2+) and Cr(3+) remained at a similar level of 46% in the mixture of three ions, the Cd(2+) removal significantly decreased to 14%. Similar patterns were observed when 0.05 mM was used to simulate natural contaminated water condition, but the removal efficiencies were much higher, with the removal of Pb(2+), Cr(3+), and Cd(2+) increased to 81%, 78%, and 42%, respectively. The low valence charge and lack of physical sorption of Cd(2+) were believed to be the reason for the removal behavior, and advanced microscopic analysis showed clear deposits of metal ions on the cathode surface after operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals.

  19. Biosorbents for Removing Hazardous Metals and Metalloids ?

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Parajuli, Durga; Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Biswas, Biplob Kumar; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Oshima, Tatsuya; Ohto, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    Biosorbents for remediating aquatic environmental media polluted with hazardous heavy metals and metalloids such as Pb(II), Cr(VI), Sb(III and V), and As(III and V) were prepared from lignin waste, orange and apple juice residues, seaweed and persimmon and grape wastes using simple and cheap methods. A lignophenol gel such as lignocatechol gel was prepared by immobilizing the catechol functional groups onto lignin from sawdust, while lignosulfonate gel was prepared directly from waste liquor ...

  20. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Metal Chelate: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin; Liu, Qinli; Hou, Xiongpo; Fang, Tao

    2017-03-04

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a new green extraction technology, has been used in extracting various metal species. The solubilities of chelating agents and corresponding metal chelates are the key factors which influence the efficiency of SFE. Other main properties of them such as stability and selectivity are also reviewed. The extraction mechanisms of mainly used chelating agents are explained by typical examples in this paper. This is the important aspect of SFE of metal ions. Moreover, the extraction efficiencies of metal species also depend on other factors such as temperature, pressure, extraction time and matrix effect. The two main complexation methods namely in-situ and on-line chelating SFE are described in detail. As an efficient chelating agent, tributyl phosphate-nitric acid (TBP-HNO 3 ) complex attracts much attention. The SFE of metal ions, lanthanides and actinides as well as organometallic compounds are also summarized. With the proper selection of ligands, high efficient extraction of metal species can be obtained. As an efficient sample analysis method, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is introduced in this paper. Recently, the extraction method combining ionic liquids (ILs) with supercritical fluid has been becoming a novel technology for treating metal ions. The kinetics related to SFE of metal species is discussed with some specific examples.

  1. Multiple heavy metal removal using an entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Deepak; Dey, Priyadarshini; Bhattacharya, Arghya; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Namburath, Maneesh; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2016-10-01

    Towards the development of a potential remediation technology for multiple heavy metals [Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Cr(VI) and Ni(II)] from contaminated water, present study examined the growth kinetics and heavy metal removal ability of Beauveria bassiana in individual and multi metals. The specific growth rate of B. bassiana varied from 0.025h(-1) to 0.039h(-1) in presence of individual/multi heavy metals. FTIR analysis indicated the involvement of different surface functional groups in biosorption of different metals, while cellular changes in fungus was reflected by various microscopic (SEM, AFM and TEM) analysis. TEM studies proved removal of heavy metals via sorption and accumulation processes, whereas AFM studies revealed increase in cell surface roughness in fungal cells exposed to heavy metals. Present study delivers first report on the mechanism of bioremediation of heavy metals when present individually as well as multi metal mixture by entomopathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrodialytic Removal of Heavy Metals from Different Solid Waste Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2003-01-01

    A variety of heavy metal polluted waste products must be handled today. Electrochemical methods have been developed for remediation of polluted soil. One of the methods is the electrodialytic remediation method that is based on electromigration of heavy metal ions and ionic species within the soil...... could be used when removing Cu and Cr from a soil with 25% carbonates. The final concentrations of the elements were below the target values after the remediation. A question of whether the electrodialytic remediation method can be used for other waste products arose. Preliminary experiments showed...... that the method could be used for removal of different heavy metals from impregnated wood waste, fly ash from straw combustion, and fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration. The best result was obtained with the wood waste where more than 80% of each of the polluting elements Cu, Cr and As was removed...

  3. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  4. Removal of heavy metal from industrial effluents using Baker's yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Anika; Maisha, Nuzhat; Sultana, Nayer; Ahmed, Shoeb

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation of wastewater containing heavy metals is one of the major challenges in environmental biotechnology. Heavy metals are not degraded and as a result they remain in the ecosystem, and pose serious health hazards as it comes in contact with human due to anthropogenic activities. Biological treatment with various microorganisms has been practiced widely in recent past, however, accessing and maintaining the microorganisms have always been a challenge. Microorganisms like Baker's yeast can be very promising biosorbents as they offer high surface to volume ratio, large availability, rapid kinetics of adsorption and desorption and low cost. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the biosorption process using baker's yeast. Here we present an experimental investigation of biosorption of Chromium (Cr) from water using commercial Baker's Yeast. It was envisaged that yeast, dead or alive, would adsorb heavy metals, however, operating parameters could play vital roles in determining the removal efficiency. Parameters, such as incubation time, pH, amount of biosorbent and heavy metal concentration were varied to investigate the impacts of those parameters on removal efficiency. Rate of removal was found to be inversely proportional to the initial Cr (+6) concentrations but the removal rate per unit biomass was a weakly dependent on initial Cr(+6) concentrations. Biosorption process was found to be more efficient at lower pH and it exhibited lower removal with the increase in solution pH. The optimum incubation time was found to be between 6-8 hours and optimum pH for the metal ion solution was 2. The effluents produced in leather industries are the major source of chromium pollution in Bangladesh and this study has presented a very cost effective yet efficient heavy metal removal approach that can be adopted for such kind of wastewater.

  5. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Environment-friendly approach for the removal of toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N.; Mehmood, F.; Sheikh, S.T.; Javed, K.; Amin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Water pollution is serious economical problem and the presence of toxic metals like lead causes contamination of plants and then through nutritional chain it affects the health of humans and animals. This research work describes the removal of lead from wastewater using natural bentonites taken from various areas of Pakistan. The batch adsorption process was applied to remove this toxic metal. The quantities of lead metal before and after the treatment of standard solutions with different samples of bentonite were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopic method. The studies were carried out at room temperature, pH 7 and -200 mesh particle size using 50 ml of metal solutions. The time taken to maintain equilibrium was one hour. Then percentage adsorption was estimated on bentonite samples. (author)

  7. Thermo-fluid behaviour of periodic cellular metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Tian Jian; Wen, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Thermo-Fluid Behaviour of Periodic Cellular Metals introduces the study of coupled thermo-fluid behaviour of cellular metals with periodic structure in response to thermal loads, which is an interdisciplinary research area that requires a concurrent-engineering approach.  The book, for the first time, systematically adopts experimental, numerical, and analytical approaches, presents the fluid flow and heat transfer in periodic cellular metals under forced convection conditions, aiming to establish structure-property relationships for tailoring material structures to achieve properties and performance levels that are customized for defined multifunctional applications. The book, as a textbook and reference book, is intended for both academic and industrial people, including graduate students, researchers and engineers. Dr. Tian Jian Lu is a professor at the School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China. Dr. Feng Xu is a professor at the Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering o...

  8. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration.......The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  9. Metal removal efficiency and ecotoxicological assessment of field-scale passive treatment biochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic biochemical reactors (BCRs) are useful for removing metals from mining-impacted water (MIW) at remote sites. Removal processes include sorption and precipitation of metal sulfides, carbonates and hydroxides. A question of interest is whether BCRs remove aquatic toxicit...

  10. Evaluation of some heavy metals concentration in body fluids of metal workers in Kano metropolis, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Sani, Ali; Abdullahi, Ibrahim Lawal

    2017-01-01

    Metal workers in urban Kano constitute a major workforce with a considerable population. The present work was aimed at obtaining baseline data on the extent of metal ion concentration in body fluids (urine and blood) of sampled population in the area. The investigation involves interaction with sampled population as well as blood and urine sample collection for heavy metals analysis. The health problems associated with the practice identified by respondents include: metal fume fever; eye and ...

  11. Heavy Metal Removal by Chitosan and Chitosan Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Mohdy, F.A.; El-Sawy, S.; Ibrahim, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation grafting of diethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) on chitosan to impart ion exchange properties and to be used for the separation of metal ions from waste water, was carried out. The effect of experimental conditions such as monomer concentration and the radiation dose on grafting were studied. On using chitosan, grafted chitosan and some chitosan composites in metal ion removal they show high up-take capacity for Cu 2+ and lower uptake capacities for the other divalent metal ions used (Zn and Co). Competitive study, performed with solutions containing mixture of metal salts, showed high selectivity for Cu 2+ than the other metal ion. Limited grafting of DEAEMA polymer -containing specific functional groups-onto the chitosan backbone improves the sorption performance

  12. Minimization of metal debris while cutting and removing orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, J D

    2001-09-01

    High-speed cutting burrs often throw minute particles of metal, bone, and soft tissue in the air during removal or revision of fracture fixation. A simple technique using lap sponges, water-soluble lubricant, and a smoke evacuator and shield can nearly eliminate soft-tissue contamination.

  13. Removal of metal ions using dead-end filtration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-07-03

    Jul 3, 2005 ... Surfactants due to their high selectivity properties have been used in enhancing membrane filtration for the removal of metal ions in aqueous solutions. Natural surfactants are preferred to synthetic surfactants because the synthetic surfactants have the disadvantage of introducing secondary pollutants into ...

  14. Coagulation / flocculation process in the removal of trace metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attempts were made in this study to examine the effectiveness of polymer addition to coagulation process during treatment of a beverage industrial wastewater to remove some of its trace metals content such as lead, cadmium, total iron, total chromium, nickel and zinc. Experiments were conducted using the standard Jar ...

  15. Removal of heavy metal from industrial wastewater using hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The batch removal of heavy metals lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) from industrial wastewater effluent under different experimental conditions using hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Experimental results indicated that at pH 6.5, pre-treatment analysis gave the following values: Pb 57.63 mg/l, Zn 18.9 mg/l and Cu ...

  16. Vanadium removal by metal (hydr)oxide adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, A; Westerhoff, P; Mustafa, S

    2007-04-01

    Vanadium is listed on the United States Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) candidate contaminant list # 2 (CCL2), and regulatory guidelines for vanadium exist in some US states. The USEPA requires treatability studies before making regulatory decisions on CCL2 contaminants. Previous studies have examined vanadium adsorption onto some metal hydroxides but not onto commercially available adsorbents. This paper briefly summarizes known vanadium occurrence in North American groundwater and assesses vanadium removal by three commercially available metal oxide adsorbents with different mineralogies. GTO (Dow) is TiO2 based and E-33 (Seven Trents) and GFH (US Filter) are iron based. Preliminary vanadate adsorption kinetics onto GFH, E-33 and GTO has been studied and the homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) is used to describe the adsorption kinetics data. The effects of pH, vanadium concentration, and volume/mass ratio are assessed. Vanadium adsorption decreases with increasing pH, with maximum adsorption capacities achieved in at pH 3-4. Results indicate that all adsorbents remove vanadium; GFH has the highest adsorption capacity, followed by GTO and E-33. Data are best fit with the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich isotherms. Both the sorption maxima (Xm) and binding energy constant (b) follow the trend GFH>GTO>E-33. Naturally occurring vanadium is also removed from Arizona ground water in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). Metal oxide adsorption technologies currently used for arsenic removal may also remove vanadium but not always with the same effectiveness.

  17. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  18. Fluid Mechanics Of Molten Metal Droplets In Additive Manufacturing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Šonský, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2016), s. 403-412 ISSN 2046-0546 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : additive manufacturing * droplets * molten metal Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.witpress.com/elibrary/cmem-volumes/4/4/1545

  19. Adsorptive Removal of Metal Ions from Water using Functionalized Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Kanchanmala

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis and modification of cost-effective sorbents for removing heavy metals from water resources is an area of significance. It had been reported that materials with biological origins, such as agricultural and animal waste, are excellent alternatives to conventional adsorbents due to their higher affinity, capacity and selectivity towards metal ions. These properties of biomaterials help to reduce or detoxify metal ions concentration in contaminated water to acceptable regulatory standards. Synthesis of novel, efficient, cost effective, eco-friendly biomaterials for heavy metal adsorption from water is still an area of challenge. In this comprehensive review, acompilation of patents as well as published articles is carried out to outline the properties of different biomaterials based on their precursors along withdetailed description of biomaterial morphology and various surface modification approaches. A detailed study of the performance of adsorbents and the role of physical and chemical modification in terms of enhancing their potential for metal adsorption from water is compiled here. The factors affecting adsorption behavior i.e., capacity and affinity of e biomaterials is also compiled. This paper presents a concise review of reported studies on the synthesis and modification of biomaterials, their use for heavy metal removal from waters and future prospects of this technology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Insulator-metal transition of fluid molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically compressed fluid hydrogen shows evidence for metallization at the relatively low pressure of 140 GPa (1.4 Mbar) while experiments on solid hydrogen made in a diamond-anvil cell have failed to detect any evidence for gap closure up to a pressure of 230 GPa (2.3 Mbar). Two possible mechanisms for metal- liclike resistivity are put forward. The first is that as a consequence of the large thermal disorder in the fluid (kT∼0.2 endash 0.3 eV) short-range molecular interactions lead to band tailing that extends the band edge into the gap, resulting in closure at a lower pressure than in the solid. The second mechanism argues that molecular dissociation creates H atoms that behave similar to n-type donors in a heavily doped semiconductor and undergo a nonmetal-metal Mott-type transition. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Physiochemicals and Heavy Metal Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Phycoremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ab Razak Abdul Rafiq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The common sources of water pollution in Malaysia are domestic sewage and industrial waste. Therefore, domestic wastewater quality effluent should be improved before discharged through the outlets. The alternative method of treatment uses microalgae for water remediation which is known as phycoremediation was applied. This technique is to remove or reduce nutrients and harmful pollutants in domestic wastewater. Thus, objective of the present study is to bioremediate the physiochemical and heavy metal from domestic wastewater using freshwater green microalgae Botryococcus sp. A photobioreactor is used to treat the wastewater by employing the microalgae Botryococcus sp. as a vital part of the treatment system. The results show that several nutrients have been reduced successfully such as phosphate and total phosphorus of 100% removal, inorganic carbon of 99% removal, total carbon of 42% removal, and nitrate of 10%. The most prominent heavy metal content that has been removed is Aluminium of 41%. At the same time, the growth of microalgae Botryococcus sp. in this wastewater has achieved the maximum value at Day 4 with 2.58 × 105 cell/ml only. These results show the potential of Botryococcus sp. cultivation as an alternative method to treat domestic wastewater and any other biotechnology works in the future.

  2. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of Toxic Metals from Aqueous Solution by Saw Dust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, feasibility studies of using a natural and low cost adsorbent; saw dust for the removal of Cr(VI), Ni(II), Fe(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution was carried out. The efficiency of the adsorbent was judged from the variation of the % adsorption with (i) contact time, (ii) adsorbent dose, (iii) initial metal ion concentration ...

  4. Resolution of Metallic Biliary Stent Allergic Reaction After Partial Stent Removal in a Patient with Nickel Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparaz, Anthony M; Ahmed, Muneeb

    2017-07-01

    Local and systemic reactions to implanted metallic devices, particularly to those containing nickel, are well documented. Metal ions are released due to exposure of the metal to blood, proteins, other body fluids, and sheer mechanical stress. Metal ions then complex with native proteins and become antigens, which can elicit hypersensitivity reactions. Another case report depicts a specific allergic complication (early stent occlusion) related to metallic biliary stent implantation. We present a case of allergic symptoms, associated with eating, in a patient who developed nickel sensitivity after biliary metal stent placement confirmed by allergic skin testing to the same metallic biliary stent placed one year earlier. Symptoms resolved following partial removal of the non-epithelialized portion of the biliary stent.

  5. Biosorbents for Removing Hazardous Metals and Metalloids †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Parajuli, Durga; Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Biswas, Biplob Kumar; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Oshima, Tatsuya; Ohto, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    Biosorbents for remediating aquatic environmental media polluted with hazardous heavy metals and metalloids such as Pb(II), Cr(VI), Sb(III and V), and As(III and V) were prepared from lignin waste, orange and apple juice residues, seaweed and persimmon and grape wastes using simple and cheap methods. A lignophenol gel such as lignocatechol gel was prepared by immobilizing the catechol functional groups onto lignin from sawdust, while lignosulfonate gel was prepared directly from waste liquor generated during pulp production. These gels effectively removed Pb(II). Orange and apple juice residues, which are rich in pectic acid, were easily converted using alkali (e.g., calcium hydroxide) into biosorbents that effectively removed Pb(II). These materials also effectively removed Sb(III and V) and As(III and V) when these were preloaded with multi-valent metal ions such as Zr(IV) and Fe(III). Similar biosorbents were prepared from seaweed waste, which is rich in alginic acid. Other biosorbents, which effectively removed Cr(VI), were prepared by simply treating persimmon and grape wastes with concentrated sulfuric acid. PMID:28773217

  6. Method for removing impurities from an impurity-containing fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2010-04-06

    A method of removing at least one polar component from a fluid stream. The method comprises providing a fluid stream comprising at least one nonpolar component and at least one polar component. The fluid stream is contacted with a supercritical solvent to remove the at least one polar component. The at least one nonpolar component may be a fat or oil and the at least one polar component may be water, dirt, detergents, or mixtures thereof. The supercritical solvent may decrease solubility of the at least one polar component in the fluid stream. The supercritical solvent may function as a solvent or as a gas antisolvent. The supercritical solvent may dissolve the nonpolar components of the fluid stream, such as fats or oils, while the polar components may be substantially insoluble. Alternatively, the supercritical solvent may be used to increase the nonpolarity of the fluid stream.

  7. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  8. High efficiency particulate removal with sintered metal filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirstein, B.E.; Paplawsky, W.J.; Pence, D.T.; Hedahl, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their particle removal efficiencies and durability, sintered metal filters have been chosen for HEPA filter protection in the off-gas treatment system for the proposed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility. Process evaluation of sintered metal filters indicated a lack of sufficient process design data to assume trouble-free operation. Subsequent pilot-scale testing was performed with fly ash as the test particulate. The test results showed that the sintered metal filters can have an efficiency greater than 0.9999999 for the specific test conditions used. Stable pressure drop characteristics were observed in pulsed and reversed flow blowback modes of operation. Over 4900 hours of operation were obtained with operating conditions ranging up to approximately 90 0 C and 24 volume percent water vapor in the gas stream

  9. High efficiency particulate removal with sintered metal filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirstein, B.E.; Paplawsky, W.J.; Pence, D.T.; Hedahl, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their particle removal efficiencies and durability, sintered metal filters have been chosen for high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter protection in the off-gas treatment system for the proposed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility. Process evaluation of sintered metal filters indicated a lack of sufficient process design data to ensure trouble-free operation. Subsequence pilot scale testing was performed with flyash as the test particulate. The test results showed that the sintered metal filters can have an efficiency greater than 0.9999999 for the specific test conditions used. Stable pressure drop characteristics were observed in pulsed and reversed flow blowback modes of operation. Over 4900 hours of operation were obtained with operating conditions ranging up to approximately 90 0 C and 24 vol % water vapor in the gas stream

  10. Using microbiological leaching method to remove heavy metals from sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyu Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial leaching is one of the most effective methods to remove heavy metals from sludge. In the conducted researches, the sludge samples were processed with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans obtained via cultivation, extraction and purification processes. Heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were leached from sludge by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans within different substrate concentration and pH value conditions. It is defined that from the point of view of economy and efficiency the optimal concentration of FeSO4.7H2O and sulfur for bio-leaching process was 0.2 g. The leaching rates of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni of the same concentration were 74.72%, 81.54%, 70.46% and 77.35% respectively. However, no significant differences depending on the pH value among the leaching rates were defined, even for the pH value of 1.5. Along with the removal of heavy metals from sludge, the organic matter, N, P, K were also leached to some extent. The losing rate of phosphorus was the highest and reached 38.44%. However, the content of organic matter, N, P, K in the processed sludge were higher in comparison with level I of the National Soil Quality Standards of China. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sludge before and after leaching was assessed by Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo and comprehensive potential risk (RI. The results of research defined that the content of heavy metals in sludge meets the level of low ecological risk after leaching and their contents is lower in comparison with the National Agricultural Sludge Standard of China. Sludge leached by biological methods is possible to use for treatment for increasing soil fertility.

  11. Novel forward osmosis process to effectively remove heavy metal ions

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Yue

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a novel forward osmosis (FO) process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater was demonstrated for the first time. The proposed FO process consists of a thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane made from interfacial polymerization on a macrovoid-free polyimide support and a novel bulky hydroacid complex Na4[Co(C6H4O7)2]·r2H2O (Na-Co-CA) as the draw solute to minimize the reverse solute flux. The removal of six heavy metal solutions, i.e., Na2Cr2O7, Na2HAsO4, Pb(NO3)2, CdCl2, CuSO4, Hg(NO3)2, were successfully demonstrated. Water fluxes around 11L/m2/h (LMH) were harvested with heavy metals rejections of more than 99.5% when employing 1M Na-Co-CA as the draw solution to process 2000ppm(1 ppm=1 mg/L) heavy metal solutions at room temperature. This FO performance outperforms most nanofiltration (NF) processes. In addition, the high rejections were maintained at 99.5% when a more concentrated draw solution (1.5M) or feed solution (5000ppm) was utilized. Furthermore, rejections greater than 99.7% were still achieved with an enhanced water flux of 16.5LMH by operating the FO process at 60°C. The impressive heavy metal rejections and satisfactory water flux under various conditions suggest great potential of the newly developed FO system for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Encysted Fluid Collections after Catheter Removal for Peritonitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Peritonitis is a frequent complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). This case series describes episodes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) related fungal or Pseudomonas peritonitis that were complicated by the formation of encysted intra abdominal fluid collections despite prompt catheter ...

  13. Removal of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater by membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galaya Srisuwan

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was to study the treatment of heavy metals in electroplating wastewater using membranes. Two selected membrane types, cellulose acetate microfiltration membrane with pore size 0.2 μm and polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane with MWCO of 30 kDa were used in this study. Synthetic and factory electroplating wastewater were used as the samples. The experiments were performed by chemical precipitating both synthetic and factory wastewater in the first step and membrane filtrating of supernatant at the pressure of 50, 100 and 200 kPa in the second step. The concentration of chromium, copper, nickel and zinc of treated water were compared with standard values given by the Ministry of Industry (MOI, Thailand. The experimental results showed that flux was highest at the pressure of 200 kPa and decreased as the pressure decreased. The rejection was highest at the pressure of 50 kPa and decreased as pressure increased. The results from synthetic wastewater were better than those from factory wastewater. Thecapability of heavy metal removal of microfiltration and ultrafiltration membrane was the same, but microfiltration gave more flux. The heavy metal removal efficiency of microfiltration of synthetic electroplating wastewater of four processes of chromium, copper, nickel and zinc electroplating , each was higher than that from factory wastewater but slightly lower than the removal efficiency obtained from composite synthetic wastewater. The removal efficiency of chromium, copper, nickel and zinc from composite synthetic wastewater was higher than those from composite factory wastewater for both microfiltration and ultrafiltration processes. The results from the study of membrane surface washing showed little flux increase after washing the membrane by stirring with a propeller at a distance of 2 mm above membrane surface at 400 rpm for 30 minutes.

  14. Simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using an upward electrokinetic soil remediation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-Y.; Huang, X.-J.; Kao, Jimmy C.M.; Stabnikova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Kaolins contaminated with heavy metals, Cu and Pb, and organic compounds, p-xylene and phenanthrene, were treated with an upward electrokinetic soil remediation (UESR) process. The effects of current density, cathode chamber flushing fluid, treatment duration, reactor size, and the type of contaminants under the vertical non-uniform electric field of UESR on the simultaneous removal of the heavy metals and organic contaminants were studied. The removal efficiencies of p-xylene and phenanthrene were higher in the experiments with cells of smaller diameter or larger height, and with distilled water flow in the cathode chamber. The removal efficiency of Cu and Pb were higher in the experiments with smaller diameter or shorter height cells and 0.01 M HNO 3 solution as cathode chamber flow. In spite of different conditions for removal of heavy metals and organics, it is possible to use the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process for their simultaneous removal. Thus, in the experiments with duration of 6 days removal efficiencies of phenanthrene, p-xylene, Cu and Pb were 67%, 93%, 62% and 35%, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the feasibility of simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process

  15. Removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil by electrodialytic remediation enhanced with organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdoud, Ouarda; Cameselle, Claudio; Boulakradeche, Mohamed Oualid; Akretche, Djamal Eddine

    2016-11-09

    The soil from an industrial area in Algeria was contaminated with Cr (8370 mg kg -1 ), Ni (1135 mg kg -1 ) and zinc (1200 mg kg -1 ). The electrodialytic remediation of this soil was studied using citric acid and EDTA as facilitating agents. 0.1 M citric acid or EDTA was added directly to the soil before it was introduced in an electrodialytic cell in an attempt to enhance the heavy metal solubility in the interstitial fluid. The more acidic pH in the soil when citric acid was used as the facilitating agent was not enough to mobilize and remove the metals from the soil. Only 7.2% of Ni and 6.7% of Zn were removed from the soil in the test with citric acid. The best results were found with EDTA, which was able to solubilize and complex Zn and Ni forming negatively charged complexes that were transported and accumulated in the anolyte. Complete removal was observed for Ni and Zn in the electrodialytic treatment with EDTA. Minor amounts of Cr were removed with both EDTA and citric acid.

  16. Simultaneous electrodialytic removal of PAH, PCB, TBT and heavy metals from sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2017-01-01

    was found to be important for the removal of heavy metals and TBT, while photolysis was significant for removal of PAH, PCB and TBT. In addition, dechlorination was found to be important for the removal of PCB. The highest removal efficiencies were found for heavy metals, TBT and PCB (>40%) and lower...

  17. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  18. A new material for removing heavy metals from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center developed and is patenting a new high capacity ion exchange material (IEM) that removes toxic metals from contaminated water in laboratory tests. The IEM can be made into many forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As a result, it can be adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water wherever it is found, be it in waste water treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or in homes. Laboratory tests have been conducted on aqueous solutions containing only one of the following metal cations: lead, copper, mercury, cadmium, silver, chromium (III), nickel, zinc, and yttrium. Tests were also conducted with: (1) calcium present to determine its effects on the uptake of cadmium and copper, and (2) uranium and lanthanides which are stand-ins for other radioactive elements, (3) drinking water for the removal of copper and lead, and (3) others compositions. The results revealed that the IEM removes all these cations, even in the presence of the calcium. Of particular interest are the results of the tests with the drinking water: the lead concentration was reduced from 142 ppb down to 2.8 ppb (well below the accepted EPA standard).

  19. Major- and minor-metal composition of three distinct solid material fractions associated with Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids (northeast Pacific), and calculation of dilution fluid samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, T.K.; Seeley, J.L.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct types of solid material are associated with each sample of the hydrothermal fluid that was collected from the vents of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The solid materials appear to be representative of deposits on ocean floors near mid-ocean ridges, and interpretation of the chemistry of the hydrothermal solutions requires understanding of them. Sr isotopic evidence indicates that at least two and probably all three of these solid materials were removed from the solution with which they are associated, by precipitation or adsorption. This occurred after the "pure" hydrothermal fluid was diluted and thoroughly mixed with ambient seawater. The three types of solid materials, are, respectively, a coarse Zn- and Fe-rich material with small amounts of Na and Ca; a finer material also rich in Zn and Fe, but with alkali and alkaline-earth metals; and a scum composed of Ba or Zn, with either considerable Fe or Si, and Sr. Mineral identification is uncertain because of uncertain anion composition. Only in the cases of Ba and Zn were metal masses greater in solid materials than in the associated fluids. For all other metals measured, masses in fluids dwarf those in solids. The fluids themselves contain greater concentrations of all metals measured, except Mg, than seawater. We discuss in detail the relative merits of two methods of determining the mixing proportions of "pure" hydrothermal solution and seawater in the fluids, one based on Sr isotopes, and another previously used method based on Mg concentrations. Comparison of solute concentrations in the several samples shows that degree of dilution of "pure" hydrothermal solutions by seawater, and amounts of original solutes that were removed from it as solid materials, are not related. There is no clear evidence that appreciable amounts of solid materials were not conserved (lost) either during or prior to sample collection. ?? 1988.

  20. Heavy metal removal from water/wastewater by nanosized metal oxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Zhang, Shujuan; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Quanxing

    2012-04-15

    Nanosized metal oxides (NMOs), including nanosized ferric oxides, manganese oxides, aluminum oxides, titanium oxides, magnesium oxides and cerium oxides, provide high surface area and specific affinity for heavy metal adsorption from aqueous systems. To date, it has become a hot topic to develop new technologies to synthesize NMOs, to evaluate their removal of heavy metals under varying experimental conditions, to reveal the underlying mechanism responsible for metal removal based on modern analytical techniques (XAS, ATR-FT-IR, NMR, etc.) or mathematical models, and to develop metal oxide-based materials of better applicability for practical use (such as granular oxides or composite materials). The present review mainly focuses on NMOs' preparation, their physicochemical properties, adsorption characteristics and mechanism, as well as their application in heavy metal removal. In addition, porous host supported NMOs are particularly concerned because of their great advantages for practical application as compared to the original NMOs. Also, some magnetic NMOs were included due to their unique separation performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mineral Adsorbents for Removal of Metals in Urban Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Karin; Li, Loretta

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the capacity of four different soil minerals to adsorb metals frequently detected in urban runoff. These are low-cost, natural and commercially available soil minerals. Contaminated surface runoff from urban areas is a major cause of concern for water quality and aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Pollution in urban areas is generated by a wide array of non-point sources, including vehicular transportation and building materials. Some of the most frequently detected pollutants in urban runoff are metals. Exhaust gases, tire wear and brake linings are major sources of such metals as Pb, Zn and Cu, while impregnated wood, plastics and galvanized surfaces may release As, Cd, Cr and Zn. Many metals have toxic effects on aquatic plants and animals, depending on metal speciation and bioavailability. The removal efficiency of pollutants in stormwater depends on treatment practices and on the properties the pollutant. The distribution of metals in urban runoff has shown, for example, that Pb is predominantly particle-associated, whereas Zn and Cd are present mainly in dissolved form. Many metals are also attached to colloids, which may act as carriers for contaminants, thereby facilitating their transport through conventional water treatment processes. Filtration of stormwater is one of the most promising techniques for removal of particulates, colloidal and truly dissolved pollutants, provided that effective filtration and adsorption media are used. Filtration and infiltration are used in a wide array of stormwater treatment methods e.g. porous paving, infiltration drains and rain gardens. Several soil minerals were investigated for their potential as stormwater filter materials. Laboratory batch tests were conducted to determine the adsorption capacity of these minerals. A synthetic stormwater was tested, with spiked concentrations corresponding to levels reported in urban runoff, ranging from 50-1,500 µg/L for Zn; 5-250 µg/L for Cu

  2. Biological removal of metal ions from aqueous process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumate, S.E. II; Strandberg, G.W.; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Aqueous waste streams from nuclear fuel processing operations may contain trace quantities of heavy metals such as uranium. Conventional chemical and physical treatment may be ineffective or very expensive when uranium concentrations in the range of 10 to 100 g/m 3 must be reduced to 1 g/m 3 or less. The ability of some microorganisms to adsorb or complex dissolved heavy metals offers an alternative treatment method. Uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-2574 and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined to identify factors which might affect a process for the removal of uranium from wastewater streams. At uranium concentrations in the range of 10 to 500 g/m 3 , where the binding capacity of the biomass was not exceeded, temperature, pH, and initial uranium concentration were found to influence the rate of uranium uptake, but not the soluble uranium concentration at equilibrium. 6 figs

  3. The removal of alkali metals from hot gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orjala, M.; Haukka, P. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Polttoaine- ja Polttotekniikan Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    In investigations in progress at the Fuel and Combustion Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland, we have been studying in co-operation with A. Ahlstrom Boiler Works, the removal of alkali metals from flue gases of ash-rich fuel with a dense suspension particle cooler. The applications of the particle cooler can be found in combined cycles and in industrial gas cleaning and heat recovery. We have also developed a general mathematical model of heat and mass transfer as well as chemical and physical reactions in multiphase systems.

  4. On the matter of synovial fluid lubrication: implications for Metal-on-Metal hip tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myant, Connor; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Artificial articular joints present an interesting, and difficult, tribological problem. These bearing contacts undergo complex transient loading and multi axes kinematic cycles, over extremely long periods of time (>10 years). Despite extensive research, wear of the bearing surfaces, particularly metal-metal hips, remains a major problem. Comparatively little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanism in artificial joints which is a serious gap in our knowledge as this determines film formation and hence wear. In this paper we review the accepted lubrication models for artificial hips and present a new concept to explain film formation with synovial fluid. This model, recently proposed by the authors, suggests that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins. The implications of this new mechanism for the tribological performance of new implant designs and the effect of patient synovial fluid properties are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ion exchangers as adsorbents for removing metals from aquatic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Meraj A; Bushra, Rani; Ahmad, Anees; Nabi, Syed A; Khan, Dilwar A; Akhtar, Arshia

    2014-02-01

    A polyaniline-based composite cation-exchange material was synthesized by way of sol-gel method and studied to explore its analytical and environmental applications. It was characterized by using instrumental analyses [Fourier transform infrared (spectrometer), X-ray, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis, standard electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy]. Physicochemical studies, such as ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, and chemical stability, along with effect of eluent concentration and elution, were also performed to exploit the ion-exchange capabilities. pH titration studies showed that the material presents monofunctional strong cation-exchange behavior. This nanocomposite material is semicrystalline in nature and exhibits improved thermal and chemical stability. The partition coefficient studies of different metal ions in the material were performed in demineralised water and different surfactant media, and it was found to be selective for Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions. To exploit the usefulness of the material as an adsorbent, some important quantitative binary separations of metal ions were performed on polyaniline Zr(IV) molybdophosphate columns. This composite cation exchanger can be applied for the treatment of polluted water to remove heavy metals.

  6. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  7. High efficiency metal removal from hexane-extracted algae oil using super and subcritical propane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Hiroshi; Horizoe, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal removal from algae oil was achieved by supercritical propane solvent extraction. • Continuous metal removing process was developed. • Required energy for metal removing was calculated. - Abstract: As a renewable energy source, oil-producing algae have received much attention in recent years. Raw oil, which is normally extracted from algae using solvents such as hexane or ethyl acetate, includes trace metal compounds that rapidly deactivate the hydrogenation catalyst. In this study, metal removal from hexane-extracted algae oil with supercritical and subcritical propane extraction was examined at temperatures from 40 °C to 130 °C and at 6 MPa pressure. The results showed that the metal concentration became decreasing with temperature increasing and metals were not detectable at 114 °C. Using these results, an energy saving process was proposed. Simulation results showed that the metal removal required a mere 3–4% energy consumption compared to a lower heating value of raw oil

  8. Use of algae for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S K; Gaur, J P

    2005-01-01

    Many algae have immense capability to sorb metals, and there is considerable potential for using them to treat wastewaters. Metal sorption involves binding on the cell surface and to intracellular ligands. The adsorbed metal is several times greater than intracellular metal. Carboxyl group is most important for metal binding. Concentration of metal and biomass in solution, pH, temperature, cations, anions and metabolic stage of the organism affect metal sorption. Algae can effectively remove metals from multi-metal solutions. Dead cells sorb more metal than live cells. Various pretreatments enhance metal sorption capacity of algae. CaCl2 pretreatment is the most suitable and economic method for activation of algal biomass. Algal periphyton has great potential for removing metals from wastewaters. An immobilized or granulated biomass-filled column can be used for several sorption/desorption cycles with unaltered or slightly decreased metal removal. Langmuir and Freundlich models, commonly used for fitting sorption data, cannot precisely describe metal sorption since they ignore the effect of pH, biomass concentration, etc. For commercial application of algal technology for metal removal from wastewaters, emphasis should be given to: (i) selection of strains with high metal sorption capacity, (ii) adequate understanding of sorption mechanisms, (iii) development of low-cost methods for cell immobilization, (iv) development of better models for predicting metal sorption, (v) genetic manipulation of algae for increased number of surface groups or over expression of metal binding proteins, and (vi) economic feasibility.

  9. Removal of heavy metals and pollutants by membrane adsorption techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulbe, K. C.; Matsuura, T.

    2018-03-01

    Application of polymeric membranes for the adsorption of hazardous pollutants may lead to the development of next-generation reusable and portable water purification appliances. Membranes for membrane adsorption (MA) have the dual function of membrane filtration and adsorption to be very effective to remove trace amounts of pollutants such as cationic heavy metals, anionic phosphates and nitrates. In this review article, recent progresses in the development of MA membranes are surveyed. In addition, recent progresses in the development of advanced adsorbents such as nanoparticles are summarized, since they are potentially useful as fillers in the host membrane to enhance its performance. The future directions of R&D in this field are also shown in the conclusion section.

  10. Magnetic fluid modified peanut husks as an adsorbent for organic dyes removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Ivo; Safarikova, Mirka

    Magnetically responsive nanocomposite materials, prepared by modification of diamagnetic materials by magnetic fluids (ferrofluids), have already found many important applications in various areas of biosciences, medicine, biotechnology, environmental technology etc. Ferrofluid modified biological waste (peanut husks) has been successfully used for the separation and removal of water soluble organic dyes and thus this low cost adsorbent could be potentially used for waste water treatment.

  11. REMOVAL OF TANK AND SEWER SEDIMENT BY GATE FLUSHING: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will discuss the application of a computational fluid dynamics 3D flow model to simulate gate flushing for removing tank/sewer sediments. The physical model of the flushing device was a tank fabricated and installed at the head-end of a hydraulic flume. The fl...

  12. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model

  13. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-07-13

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model.

  14. Removal of Technetium, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Metals from DOE Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Darab, John G.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research is to prepare, characterize, and evaluate new materials for the removal of technetium (Tc) compounds, halogenated organics, and other troublesome metals from DOE waste streams and contaminated areas. This work follows the discovery that a nanoscale form of zero-valent iron, dispersed on high surface area supports, reduces metal ions (Cr, Hg, Pb, Cd) and Re (as a surrogate for Tc) to insoluble forms much faster than does unsupported iron. The scientific goals of the project are to better understand the mechanism of the reduction process, to develop supports that are compatible with a variety of mixed waste compositions, and to develop surface modifiers for supported iron that will optimize selectivity for the contaminants of interest. The support composition is of particular interest in the case of Tc separation and stabilization in the Hanford tank wastes. While tests with tank waste simulants have shown that pertechnetate is reduced insoluble TcO2, the support material must be compatible with the vitrification process used in the final waste disposition. The surface modifications are also a focal point for Hanford applications because of the complex and variable makeup of the tank wastes

  15. Compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsiao, Shin-Tien

    2008-03-01

    A novel process, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX), was developed to generate micro-sized solvent-coated air bubbles (MSAB) for metal extraction. Through pressurization of solvent with compressed air followed by releasing air-oversaturated solvent into metal-containing wastewater, MSAB were generated instantaneously. The enormous surface area of MSAB makes extraction process extremely fast and achieves very high aqueous/solvent weight ratio (A/S ratio). CASX process completely removed Cr(VI) from acidic electroplating wastewater under A/S ratio of 115 and extraction time of less than 10s. When synthetic wastewater containing Cd(II) of 50mgl(-1) was treated, A/S ratios of higher than 714 and 1190 could be achieved using solvent with extractant/diluent weight ratio of 1:1 and 5:1, respectively. Also, MSAB have very different physical properties, such as size and density, compared to the emulsified solvent droplets, making separation and recovery of solvent from treated effluent very easy.

  16. Forced fluid removal versus usual care in intensive care patients with high-risk acute kidney injury and severe fluid overload (FFAKI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Rasmus E.; Itenov, Theis; Perner, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous administration of fluids is an essential part of critical care. While some fluid administration is likely beneficial, there is increasing observational evidence that the development of fluid overload is associated with increased mortality. There are no randomised trials...... to confirm this association in patients with acute kidney injury. We aim to perform a pilot trial to test the feasibility of forced fluid removal compared to standard care in patients with acute kidney injury and severe fluid overload, the FFAKI trial. Methods: Then FFAKI trial is a pilot, multicentre......, randomised clinical trial recruiting adult intensive care patients with acute kidney injury and fluid overload, defined as more than 10% of ideal bodyweight. Patients are randomised with concealed allocation to either standard care or forced fluid removal with a therapeutic target of negative net fluid...

  17. Assessment of heavy metal removal technologies for biowaste by physico-chemical fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the heavy metal content of biowaste-compost frequently exceeds the legal standards for heavy metals. In order to assess heavy metal removal technologies, a physico-chemical fractionation scheme was developed to gain insight into the distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and

  18. Supported liquid membranes technologies in metals removal from liquid effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Agreda, D.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of liquid effluents containing organic and inorganic residues from industries present a potential hazardousness for environment and human health, being mandatory the elimination of these pollutants from the respective solutions containing them. In order to achieve this goal, several techniques are being used and among them, supported liquid membranes technologies are showing their potential for their application in the removal of metals contained in liquid effluents. Supported liquid membranes are a combination between conventional polymeric membranes and solvent extraction. Several configurations are used: flat-sheet supported liquid membranes, spiral wounds and hollow fiber modules. In order to improve their effectiveness, smart operations have been developed: non-dispersive solvent extraction, non-dispersive solvent extraction with strip phase dispersion and hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane. This paper overviewed some of these supported liquid membranes technologies and their applications to the treatment of metal-bearing liquid effluents.

    La generación, por parte de las industrias, de efluentes líquidos conteniendo sustancias orgánicas e inorgánicas, es un peligro potencial tanto para los humanos como para el medio ambiente, siendo necesaria la eliminación de estos elementos tóxicos de las disoluciones que los contienen. Para conseguir este fin, se están aplicando diversas técnicas y entre ellas las tecnologías de membranas líquidas soportadas, están demostrando sus aptitudes para la eliminación de metales contenidos en efluentes líquidos. Las membranas líquidas soportadas, resultan de la unión de las membranas poliméricas y de la tecnología de extracción líquido-líquido. Este tipo de membranas se pueden utilizar en diversas configuraciones: plana, módulo en fibra hueca y módulo en espiral y para aumentar su efectividad se están desarrollando las llamadas operaciones avanzadas: extracción no

  19. Evaluation of some heavy metals concentration in body fluids of metal workers in Kano metropolis, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sani

    Full Text Available Metal workers in urban Kano constitute a major workforce with a considerable population. The present work was aimed at obtaining baseline data on the extent of metal ion concentration in body fluids (urine and blood of sampled population in the area. The investigation involves interaction with sampled population as well as blood and urine sample collection for heavy metals analysis. The health problems associated with the practice identified by respondents include: metal fume fever; eye and skin irritation; dizziness and respiratory problems; lack of or inadequate protective devices during activity were also reported. Laboratory investigation of urine samples by Atomic absorption spectrophotometry indicated higher concentrations for Manganese (Mn, Lead (Pb and Nickel (Ni; in blood samples, there were higher concentrations of Manganese (Mn, Lead (Pb, Chromium (Cr and Nickel (Ni. Metal workers of urban Kano are at risk because of the concentration of Mn and Pb in particular. There is the need to monitor occupational activities that are responsible for pollution and with serious health risk. Keywords: Heavy metals, Welders, Biomonitoring, Blood, Urine

  20. Optical nanosphere sensor based on shell-by-shell fabrication for removal of toxic metals from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S A; Abdellatef, S; Ismael, M; Shahat, A

    2013-06-01

    Because toxic heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate, they represent a substantial human health hazard. Various methods are used to identify and quantify toxic metals in biological tissues and environment fluids, but a simple, rapid, and inexpensive system has yet to be developed. To reduce the necessity for instrument-dependent analysis, we developed a single, pH-dependent, nanosphere (NS) sensor for naked-eye detection and removal of toxic metal ions from drinking water and physiological systems (i.e., blood). The design platform for the optical NS sensor is composed of double mesoporous core-shell silica NSs fabricated by one-pot, template-guided synthesis with anionic surfactant. The dense shell-by-shell NS construction generated a unique hierarchical NS sensor with a hollow cage interior to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, longevity, selectivity, and signal stability. Here, we examined the application of the NS sensor for the removal of toxic metals (e.g., lead ions from a physiological system, such as human blood). The findings show that this sensor design has potential for the rapid screening of blood lead levels so that the effects of lead toxicity can be avoided. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. In vitro removal of toxic heavy metals by poly(γ-glutamic acid-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbaraj BS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Baskaran Stephen Inbaraj,1 Bing-Huei Chen1,21Department of Food Science, 2Graduate Institute of Medicine, Fu Jen University, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Chelation therapy involving organic chelators for treatment of heavy metal intoxication can cause cardiac arrest, kidney overload, mineral deficiency, and anemia.Methods: In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs modified with an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid (PGA were synthesized by coprecipitation method, characterized and evaluated for their removal efficiency of heavy metals from a metal solution, and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (SGIF.Results: Instrumental characterization of bare- and PGA-SPIONs revealed 7% coating of PGA on SPIONs with a spherical shape and an iron oxide spinel structure belonging to magnetite. The particle sizes as determined from transmission electron microscopy images were 8.5 and 11.7 nm for bare- and PGA-SPIONs, respectively, while the magnetization values were 70.3 and 61.5 emu/g. Upon coating with PGA, the zeta potentials were shifted from positive to negative at most of the environmental pH (3–8 and biological pH (1–8, implying good dispersion in aqueous suspension and favorable conditions for heavy metal removal. Batch studies showed rapid removal of lead and cadmium with the kinetic rates estimated by pseudo-second-order model being 0.212 and 0.424 g/mg•min, respectively. A maximum removal occurred in the pH range 4–8 in deionized water and 5–8 in SGIF corresponding to most gastrointestinal pH except for the stomach. Addition of different ionic strengths (0.001–1 M sodium acetate and essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and K did not show any marked influence on lead removal by PGA-SPIONs, but significantly reduced the binding of cadmium. Compared to deionized water, the lead removal from SGIF was high at all pH with the Langmuir monolayer removal capacity being 98.70 mg/g for the former and 147.71 mg/g for the

  2. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  3. Development of a low-cost alternative for metal removal from textile wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekomo Birame, C.

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) found in textile wastewater are removed by a combination of adsorption using volcanic rock as adsorbent, sulfide precipitation and phytoremediation techniques. The integrated system for metal removal combining anaerobic bioreactor as main treatment step and a

  4. Study on the efficiency of the different units for removing metallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study on the efficiency of the different units for removing metallic ions in Isfahan water treatment plant. ... Concentration of heavy metals in each sample was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that removal efficiency of iron, manganese, copper and nickel were 71, 60, 79 and 40 percent, ...

  5. Evaluation of some heavy metals concentration in body fluids of metal workers in Kano metropolis, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Ali; Abdullahi, Ibrahim Lawal

    2017-01-01

    Metal workers in urban Kano constitute a major workforce with a considerable population. The present work was aimed at obtaining baseline data on the extent of metal ion concentration in body fluids (urine and blood) of sampled population in the area. The investigation involves interaction with sampled population as well as blood and urine sample collection for heavy metals analysis. The health problems associated with the practice identified by respondents include: metal fume fever; eye and skin irritation; dizziness and respiratory problems; lack of or inadequate protective devices during activity were also reported. Laboratory investigation of urine samples by Atomic absorption spectrophotometry indicated higher concentrations for Manganese (Mn), Lead (Pb) and Nickel (Ni); in blood samples, there were higher concentrations of Manganese (Mn), Lead (Pb), Chromium (Cr) and Nickel (Ni). Metal workers of urban Kano are at risk because of the concentration of Mn and Pb in particular. There is the need to monitor occupational activities that are responsible for pollution and with serious health risk.

  6. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Precious Metals and Removal of Hazardous Metals Using Persimmon Tannin and Persimmon Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsutoshi Inoue

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel and environmentally benign adsorbents were prepared via a simple sulfuric acid treatment process using the wastes of astringent persimmon, a type of biomass waste, along with persimmon tannin extract which is currently employed for the tanning of leather and as natural dyes and paints. The effectiveness of these new biosorbents was exemplified with regards to hydrometallurgical and environmental engineering applications for the adsorptive removal of uranium and thorium from rare earths, cesium from other alkaline metals such as sodium, hexa-valent chromium from zinc as well as adsorptive recovery of gold from chloride media. Furthermore, reductive coagulation of gold from chloride media for the direct recovery of metallic gold and adsorptive recovery of palladium and platinum using chemically modified persimmon tannin extract were studied. OPEN

  7. An optimised method for electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from harbour sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-compartment electrodialytic cell set-up for treatment of solid materials has in many respects proven superior to other types of cells in removing heavy metals from sediments. Most notably, remediation times were shorter, energy consumption was lower and higher removal efficiencies were observed....... By employing m1ultivariate modelling and investigating additional experimental variables, the relative importance of variables effecting remediation was determined and response surfaces for heavy metal removal were calculated. Employing optimal conditions it was possible to remove targeted metals (Pb, Cu, Zn...

  8. Acidification of Harbour sediment and removal of heavy metals induced by water splitting in electrodialytic remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrøm, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Harbor sediments are often contaminated with heavy metals, which can be removed by electrodialytic remediation. Water splitting at the anion exchange membrane in contact with the contaminated material in electrodialytic remediation is highly important for the removal of heavy metals. Here...... it was investigated how acidification caused by water splitting at the anion exchange membrane during electrodialytic remediation of contaminated harbor sediment and hence the metal removal, was influenced by different experimental conditions. Two different experimental cells were tested, where the number...... the sediment was acidified, the voltage decreased and electrical conductivity increased. After 5 days of remediation the sediment was acidified at the chosen current density (1 mA/cm(2)) and the main metal removal was observed shortly after. Thus it was crucial for the metal removal that the sediment was fully...

  9. Application of Iron Oxide Nano materials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, P.N.; Chopda, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nana particles based nano materials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  10. Metal resistance mechanisms in Gram-negative bacteria and their potential to remove Hg in the presence of other metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Costa, Alexandre Pereira; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Gianello, Clesio; Bento, Fátima Menezes

    2017-06-01

    Contamination of the environment by heavy metals has been increasing in recent years due to industrial activities. Thus research involving microorganisms capable of surviving in multi-contaminated environments is extremely important. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the removal of mercury alone and in the presence of cadmium, nickel and lead by four mercury-resistant microorganisms; estimate the removal of Cd, Ni and Pb; understand the mechanisms involved (reduction, siderophores, biofilms, biosorption and bioaccumulation) in the metal resistance of the isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50D; and determine the capacity of Pseudomonas sp. B50D in removing Hg, Cd, Ni and Pb from an industrial effluent. It was shown that the four isolates evaluated were capable of removing from 62% to 95% of mercury from a culture medium with no addition of other metals. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50D showed the best performance in the removal of mercury when evaluated concomitantly with other metals. This isolate was capable of removing 75% of Hg in the presence of Cd and 91% in the presence of Ni and Pb. With respect to the other metals it removed 60%, 15% and 85% of Cd, Ni and Pb, respectively. In tests with effluent, the isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50D removed 85% of Hg but did not remove the other metals. This isolate presented reduction, biosorption, biofilm production and siderophore production as its metal resistance mechanisms. Pseudomonas sp. B50D was thus a candidate with potential for application in the bioremediation of effluents with complex metal contaminations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. To study the recovery of L-Cysteine using halloysite nanotubes after heavy metal removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Juhi

    2016-04-01

    Industrial wastes are a major source of soil and water pollution that originate from mining industries, chemical industries, metal processing industries, etc. These wastes consist of a variety of chemicals including phenolics, heavy metals, etc. Use of industrial effluent and sewage sludge on agricultural land has become a common practice in the world which results in these toxic metals being transferred and ultimately concentrate in plant tissues from water and the soil. The metals that get accumulated, prove detrimental to plants themselves and may also cause damage to the healths of animals as well as man. This is because the heavy metals become toxins above certain concentrations, over a narrow range. As a further matter, these metals negatively affect the natural microbial populations as well, that leads to the disruption of fundamental ecological processes. However, many techniques and methods have been advanced to clear the heavy metal polluted soils and waters. One important method is by removing heavy metals with the help of amino acids like L-Cysteine and L-Penicillamine. But also, economy of removal of pollutant heavy metals from soils and waters is a major concern. Present study helps in decreasing the cost for large-scale removal of heavy metals from polluted water by recovering the amino acid (L-Cysteine) after removal of nickel (Ni+2) at a fixed pH, by binding the Ni+2 with halloysite nanotubes(HNT), so that L-Cysteine can be reused again for removal of heavy metals.

  12. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Krafcik, Karen L; Léonard, François; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication. (paper)

  13. Cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the removal of heavy metal mixtures from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Pengpeng; Calo, Joseph M; Hradil, George

    2011-11-15

    The description and operation of a novel cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the simultaneous removal of mixtures of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are presented. CEP combines the advantages of electrowinning in a spouted particulate electrode (SPE) with that of chemical precipitation and redissolution, to remove heavy metals at low concentrations as solid metal deposits on particulate cathode particles without exporting toxic metal precipitate sludges from the process. The overall result is very large volume reduction of the heavy metal contaminants as a solid metal deposit on particles that can either be safely discarded as such, or further processed to recover particular metals. The performance of this system is demonstrated with data on the removal of mixtures of copper, nickel, and cadmium from aqueous solutions.

  14. Removal, recovery and enrichment of metals from aqueous solutions using carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Gang Yu; Central South University, Changsha, Hunan; Ministry of Education; Xiu-Hui Zhao; Lin-Yan Yu; Fei-Peng Jiao; Xiao-Qing Chen; Ministry of Education; Jian-Hui Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution caused by toxic metals (heavy metals, radioactive metals, etc.) is one of the major global issues, thus removal of toxic metals from contaminated water seems to be particularly important. On the other hand, the recovery and enrichment of metals, especially noble metals, from waste water is also crucial. To address these issues, nanotechnology plays an essential role in environmental monitoring and pollution control. To remove metals from contaminated water, or enrich metals from waste water, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites have attracted great attention due to their excellent adsorption performance. The removal efficiency for metal ions by CNTs was observed around 10-80 %, which could be improved to approach 100 % by selectively functionalizing CNTs with organic ligands. Herein, we review the applications of CNTs in treatment of toxic metal-containing wastewater for environmental monitoring and metals recovery. Due to their higher sensitivity and selectivity towards the enrichment of metals or detection of toxic metal pollution of the environment, and the latest research progress of using CNT composites for metal treatment is also discussed. (author)

  15. Metal working fluid exposure and diseases in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Michael F; Pletscher, Claudia; Scholz, Stefan M; Schneuwly, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to metal working fluids (MWF) is common in machining processes worldwide and may lead to diseases of the skin and the respiratory tract. The aim of the study was to investigate exposure and diseases due to MWF in Switzerland between 2004 and 2013. We performed descriptive statistics including determination of median and 90th percentile values of MWF concentrations listed in a database of Suva. Moreover, we clustered MWF-induced occupational diseases listed in a database from the Swiss Central Office for Statistics in Accident Insurance, and performed linear regression over time to investigate temporal course of the illnesses. The 90th percentile for MWF air concentration was 8.1 mg (aerosol + vapor)/m 3 and 0.9 mg aerosol/m 3 (inhalable fraction). One thousand two hundred and eighty skin diseases and 96 respiratory diseases were observed. This is the first investigation describing exposure to and diseases due to MWF in Switzerland over a timeframe of 10 years. In general, working conditions in the companies of this investigation were acceptable. Most measured MWF concentrations were below both the Swiss and most international occupational exposure limits of 2014. The percentage of workers declared unfit for work was 17% compared to the average of other occupational diseases (12%).

  16. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gładysz-Płaska, A.; Skwarek, E.; Budnyak, T. M.; Kołodyńska, D.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm3 NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  17. Removal of heavy metals from waste water of tanning leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most dominant A. candidus on the isolation plates exhibited the highest activity for biosorption of heavy metals. The results indicate that fungi of contaminated soils have high level of metal biosorption capacities. Keywords: Fungi, industrial wastewater, biosorption, heavy metals. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  18. Sulfate and metal removal in bioreactors treating acid mine drainage dominated with iron and aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Craig A; O'Sullivan, Aisling D; Milke, Mark W; Weber, Paul A; Trumm, Dave A

    2009-03-01

    Bioreactors represent an emerging technology for removing metals and sulfate commonly found in acid mine drainage (AMD). Six continuously fed anaerobic bioreactors employing organic and alkaline waste materials were operated to investigate relationships between metal and sulfate removal from AMD. Median AMD influent chemistry was 65.8mg/L Fe (49.7-113mg/L), 46.5mg/L Al (33.5-72.4mg/L) and 608mg/L sulfate (493-1007mg/L). Bioreactors containing mussel shells as an alkaline substrate amendment were more effective at removing metals and sulfate than those containing limestone. Experimental results indicated bioreactor design and operation should be dependent on treatment goals. These include 0.3mol sulfate loading/m(3)/day for sulfate removal (mean of 94.1% (87.6-98.0%), 0.4mol metals/m(3)/day for metal (mean of 99.0% (98.5-99.9%)) and partial sulfate (mean of 46.0% (39.6-57.8%)) removal and 0.8mol metals/m(3)/day for metal (mean of 98.4% (98.2-98.6%) and minimal sulfate (mean of 16.6% (11.9-19.2%)) removal. Aluminum removal efficiency was on average 1.72% (0.04-3.42%) greater than Fe during stable operating conditions.

  19. New biosorbent in removing some metals from industrial wastewater in El Mex Bay, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Maha Ahmed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Osman, Maher M.; Ahmed, Somaia B.

    2017-07-01

    Biosorption is an extensive technology applied for the removal of heavy metal ions and other pollutants from aqueous solutions. In the present study, the biosorption of cadmium, lead, chromium and mercury ions from polluted surface seawater in El-Max Bay was determined using hybrid active carbon sorbents. These sorbents were treated chemically by acid, base and redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker's yeast biomass for increasing their biosorption capacity and the highest metal uptake values. The surface function and morphology of the hybrid immobilized sorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Metal removal values proved that the vital role of baker's yeast as a significant high removable due to functional groups at baker's yeast cell wall surface that have the ability to forming various coordination complexes with metal ions. A noticeable increase in the removal of all studied metals was observed and reached to 100 %.

  20. Efficiency of SPIONs functionalized with polyethylene glycol bis(amine) for heavy metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanna, Yongyuth, E-mail: yongyuth.wanna@gmail.com [College of KMITL Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Rd., Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Nara Machinery Co., Ltd., 2-5-7, Jonan-Jima, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 143-0002 (Japan); Chindaduang, Anon; Tumcharern, Gamolwan [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), 111 Thailand Science Park, Pahol Yothin Rd, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Phromyothin, Darinee [College of KMITL Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Rd., Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Porntheerapat, Supanit [NECTEC, National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Khlong Nueng, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Nukeaw, Jiti [College of KMITL Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Rd., Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Hofmann, Heirich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Pratontep, Sirapat [College of KMITL Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Rd., Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    Hybrid magnetic nanoparticles based on poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanopaticles (SPIONs) with selective surface modification has been developed for heavy metal removal by applying external magnetic fields. The nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion polymerization technique in an aqueous suspension of SPIONs. The hydrolysis of carboxyl functional group was then applied for grafting polyethylene glycol bis(amine)(PEG-bis(amine)) onto the PMMA-coated SPIONs. The morphology, the chemical structure and the magnetic properties of the grafted nanoparticles were investigated. The efficiency of the hybrid nanoparticles for heavy metal removal were conducted on Pb(II), Hg(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) in aqueous solutions.The metal concentration in the solutions after separation by the hybrid nanoparticles was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The results show the heavy metal uptake ratios of 0.08, 0.04, 0.03, and 0.01 mM per gramme of the grafted SPIONs for Pb(II), Hg(II), Cu(II), and Co(II), respectively. A competitive removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Co(II) and Hg(II) ions in mixed metal salt solutions has also been studied.The heavy metal removal efficiency of the hybrid nanoparitcles was found to depend on the cation radius, in accordance with capture of metal ions by the amine group. - Highlights: • We synthesis hybrid magnetic nanoparticles for heavy metal removal. • The efficiency of hybrid nanoparticles for heavy metal removal is proposed. • We investigated the characteristic of hybrid nanoparticle. • The heavy metal removal efficiency of the hybrid nanoparticle was founded that depend on the heavy metal cation radius.

  1. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions from Polluted Waters by Using of Low Cost Adsorbents: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaedi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is a fundamental process in the physicochemical treatment of wastewaters which industries employ to reduce hazardous organic and inorganic wastes in effluents. In recent years the use of low-cost adsorbents has been widely investigated as a replacement for the currently costly methods of removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. It is well-known that cellulosic waste materials can be obtained and employed as cheap adsorbents and their performance to remove heavy metal ions can be affected upon chemical treatment. In this study, the use of some of low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater has been reviewed.

  2. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  3. The removal of trace metals at the wastewater treatment plant of Psyttalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. FIRFILIONIS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the levels of trace metals in the input and output of the Psyttalia wastewater treatment plant, as well as the removal of the various trace metal forms (dissolved, particulate during primary sedimentation. The trace metals determined were: Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, and Ni. The experimental procedure included the collection and analysis of inflow and outflow samples. Dissolved and particulate forms were separated by filtration through 0.45 and 8 Μm Millipore filters and trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that particulate matter consists mainly of large particles (> 8 µ m and the sedimentation process is more effective in their removal in contrast to smaller particles. The removal of trace metals during primary sedimentation follows the decreasing sequence: Particulate metal in large particles > Particulate metal in small particles > Dissolved metal. Concerning the various metals the removal follows the sequence: Pb ~= Cu>Zn ~= Cr>Cd>Ni. The quantities of trace metals that are discharged to the sea through the outflow pipes of the Psyttalia treatment plant follow the decreasing sequence: Zn >> Cr > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cd.

  4. Removal and recovery of metal ions from process and waste streams using polymer filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Kraus, K.M.; Thompson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Polymer Filtration (PF) is an innovative, selective metal removal technology. Chelating, water-soluble polymers are used to selectively bind the desired metal ions and ultrafiltration is used to concentrate the polymer-metal complex producing a permeate with low levels of the targeted metal ion. When applied to the treatment of industrial metal-bearing aqueous process streams, the permeate water can often be reused within the process and the metal ions reclaimed. This technology is applicable to many types of industrial aqueous streams with widely varying chemistries. Application of PF to aqueous streams from nuclear materials processing and electroplating operations will be described

  5. Particle-bound metal transport after removal of a small dam in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pawtuxet River in Rhode Island, USA, has a long history of industrial activity and pollutant discharges. Metal contamination of the river sediments is well documented and historically exceeded toxicity thresholds for a variety of organisms. The Pawtuxet River dam, a low-head dam at the mouth of the river, was removed in August 2011. The removal of the dam was part of an effort to restore the riverine ecosystem after centuries of anthropogenic impact. Sediment traps were deployed below the dam to assess changes in metal concentrations and fluxes (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from the river system into Pawtuxet Cove. Sediment traps were deployed for an average duration of 24 days each, and deployments continued for 15 months after the dam was removed. Metal concentrations in the trapped suspended particulate matter dropped after dam removal (e.g., 460 to 276 mg/kg for Zn) and remained below preremoval levels for most of the study. However, particle-bound metal fluxes increased immediately after dam removal (e.g., 1206 to 4248 g/day for Zn). Changes in flux rates during the study period indicated that river volumetric flow rates acted as the primary mechanism controlling the flux of metals into Pawtuxet Cove and ultimately upper Narragansett Bay. Even though suspended particulate matter metal concentrations initially dropped after removal of the dam, no discernable effect on the concentration or flux of the study metals exiting the river could be associa

  6. Magmatic Hydrothermal Fluids: Experimental Constraints on the Role of Magmatic Sulfide Crystallization and Other Early Magmatic Processes in Moderating the Metal Content of Ore-Forming Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, P. M.; Candela, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    It has been recognized for some time that sulfide phases, although common in intermediate-felsic volcanic rocks, are not as common in their plutonic equivalents. That sulfide crystallization, or the lack thereof, is important in the protracted magmatic history of porphyry Cu and related systems is supported by the work of e.g., Rowins (2000). Candela and Holland (1986) suggested that sulfide crystallization could moderate the ore metal concentrations in porphyry environments. Experiments show clearly that Au and Cu can partition into Cl-bearing vapor and brine. This effect can be enhanced by S (Simon, this session). However, in some instances enhances this effect. That is, the partitioning of Au and Cu into vapor+brine is highly efficient (e.g. Simon et al. 2003; Frank et al 2003). This suggests that if sulfides do not sequester ore metals early during the history of a magma body from the melt, they will partition strongly into the volatile phases. Whether volatile release occurs in the porphyry ore environment, or at deeper levels upon magma rise, is a yet unsolved question. Little is known about deep release of volatiles (during magma transport at lower- to mid-crustal levels). Saturation of melts with a CO2-bearing fluid could happen at levels much deeper than those typical of ore formation. CO2 is released preferentially, so a high CO2 concentration in fluids in the porphyry ore environment argues against deep fluid release. Of course, this depends upon the specific processes of crystallization and fluid release, which may be complex. Our experiments on sulfides have concentrated on pyrrhotite and Iss. Our partitioning data for Po/melt exhibit wide variations from metal to metal: Cu (2600); Co (170); Au (140); Ni (100); Bi, Zn and Mn (2). These results suggest that crystallization of Po can contribute to variable ore metal ratios (e.g. Cu/Au). Other sulfides behave differently. If a melt is Iss (Cpy) saturated, then Cu will be buffered at a high value, and Au

  7. Continuous transfer of liquid metal droplets across a fluid-fluid interface within an integrated microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, Berrak; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J; Kurdzinski, Michael E; Tang, Shi-Yang; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-06-07

    Micro scale liquid metal droplets have been hailed as the potential key building blocks of future micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). However, most of the current liquid metal enabled systems involve millimeter scale droplets, which are manually injected onto the desired locations of the microchip. Despite its simplicity, this method is impractical for patterning large arrays or complex systems based on micro scale droplets. Here, we present a microfluidic chip, which integrates continuous generation of micro scale galinstan droplets in glycerol, and the hydrodynamic transfer of these droplets into sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Observation via high-speed imaging along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis are utilised to comprehend the lateral migration of droplets from the glycerol to NaOH fluid. This platform is simple, can be readily integrated into other microfluidic systems, and creates flexibility by separating the continuous phase for droplet generation from the eventual target carrier fluid within a monolithic chip.

  8. A bioseparation process for removing heavy metals from waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of cell structure, cell wall, micropores and macropores is evaluated in terms of the potential of these biosorbents for metal sequestration. Binding mechanisms are discussed, including the key functional groups involved and the ion-exchange process. Quantification of metal-biomass interactions is fundamental to the ...

  9. Coagulation / flocculation process in the removal of trace metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    @JASEM. Since the early 1970s, there has been growing concern over the diverse effects of heavy metals on humans and aquatic ecosystems. Many heavy metals and their compound have been found that are toxic, while some are also subjected to biomagnifications. (Viessman and Hammer, 1993; Gardea – Torresday.

  10. Comparative assessment of heavy metal removal by immobilized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Microorganisms play a vital role in heavy metal contaminated soil and wastewater by the mechanisms of biosorption. In this study, heavy ... Key words: Biosorption, bacteria, heavy metal, dead bacterial cells, immobilization. INTRODUCTION. The current ..... Uranium uptake by immobilized cells of. Pseudomonas sp. strains ...

  11. Biosorption: An eco-friendly alternative for heavy metal removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metals occur in immobilized form in sediments and as ores in nature. However due to various human activities like ore mining and industrial processes the natural biogeochemical cycles are disrupted causing increased deposition of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic environment. Release of these pollutants ...

  12. Comparative assessment of heavy metal removal by immobilized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microorganisms play a vital role in heavy metal contaminated soil and wastewater by the mechanisms of biosorption. In this study, heavy metal resistant bacteria were isolated from an electroplating industrial effluent samples that uses copper, cadmium and lead for plating. These isolates were characterized to evaluate their ...

  13. removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using rice husks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    chemical methods have been deployed to remove toxic heavy metals from waste water. Such methods include ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrochemical precipitation, electro-dialysis, evaporation and solvent extraction (Rohaizer et al. 2013).

  14. Decay heat removal for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanick, P.P.; Brown, N.W.

    1975-01-01

    The functional and reliability requirements of the decay heat removal systems are described. The reliability requirement and its rationale as adequate assurance that public health and safety are safeguarded are presented. The means by which the reliability of the decay heat removal systems are established to meet their requirement are identified. The heat removal systems and their operating characteristics are described. The discussion includes the overflow heat removal service and its role in decay heat removal if needed. The details of the systems are described to demonstrate the elements of redundancy and diversity in the systems design. The quantitative reliability assessment is presented, including the reliability model, the most important assumptions on which the analysis is based, sources of failure data, and the preliminary numerical results. Finally, the qualitative analyses and administrative controls will be discussed which ensure reliability attainment in design, fabrication, and operation, including minimization of common mode failures. A component test program is planned to provide reliability data on selected critical heat removal system equipment. This test plan is described including a definition of the test parameters of greatest interest and the motivation for the test article selection. A long range plan is also in place to collect plant operational data and the broad outlines of this plan are described. A statement of the high reliability of the Clinch River Breeder reactor Plant decay heat removal systems and a summary of the supporting arguments is presented. (U.S.)

  15. Metal oxide regenerable carbon dioxide removal system for an advanced portable life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacheff, Maurena S.; Chang, Craig H.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a CO2 removal system for an astronaut portable life support system to meet the EVA requirements for the Space Station is discussed, focusing on the factors important in the selection of the metal oxide absorbent for CO2 removal. Results from laboratory tests on metal oxide absorbent materials are given, including characterization studies and dynamic CO2 uptake and regeneration measurements. The preliminary design of the breadboard system to perform both the absorption and regeneration functions is presented.

  16. REMOVAL OF HEAVY-METALS FROM WASTEWATER USING A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    333 K. The adsorption data fitted both the ... The industries are, as a consequence, required to implement more formidable effluent treatment .... The percentage removal of Pb(II) from solution increased with increasing batch adsorbent mass.

  17. Removal of oxyfluorfen from ex-situ soil washing fluids using electrolysis with diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Elisama Vieira; Sáez, Cristina; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel Andres

    2016-04-15

    In this research, firstly, the treatment of soil spiked with oxyfluorfen was studied using a surfactant-aided soil-washing (SASW) process. After that, the electrochemical treatment of the washing liquid using boron doped diamond (BDD) anodes was performed. Results clearly demonstrate that SASW is a very efficient approach in the treatment of soil, removing the pesticide completely by using dosages below 5 g of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) per Kg of soil. After that, complete mineralization of organic matter (oxyflourfen, SDS and by-products) was attained (100% of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removals) when the washing liquids were electrolyzed using BDD anodes, but the removal rate depends on the size of the particles in solution. Electrolysis of soil washing fluids occurs via the reduction in size of micelles until their complete depletion. Lower concentrations of intermediates are produced (sulfate, chlorine, 4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenol and ortho-nitrophenol) during BDD-electrolyzes. Finally, it is important to indicate that, sulfate (coming from SDS) and chlorine (coming from oxyfluorfen) ions play an important role during the electrochemical organic matter removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Removing metal debris from thermosetting EMC powders by Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaw Yowching

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the preparation of thermosetting encapsulation molding compounds (EMCs for semiconductor packaging, metal debris are always present in the EMC powders due to the hard silica fillers in the compound. These metal debris in the EMC powders will cause circuit shortage and therefore have to be removed before molding. In this study, Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets are used to remove these debris. The results show that the metal debris can be removed effectively as the rate of accumulation of the metal debris increases as time proceeds in the removing operation. The removal effectiveness of the debris is affected by both the magnetic flux density and the flow around the magnet. The wake flow behind the magnet is a relatively low speed recirculation region which facilities the attraction of metal debris in the powders. Thus, the largest amount of the accumulated EMC powders occurs downstream of the magnet. Hence, this low speed recirculation region should be better utilized to enhance the removal efficiency of the metal debris.

  19. The removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions using sour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... delightful ice cream or iced drink. The seeds are then removed from the fruit and dried at room temperature. These are then opened with the inner dried part used for the adsorption process. The sour sop fruit grows as far as the month of March. The aim of this work is to study the removal of toxic heavy metal ...

  20. Removal of chlorine gas by an amine functionalized metal-organic framework via electrophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, Jared B; Browe, Matthew A; Wagner, George W; Rossin, Joseph A; Peterson, Gregory W

    2015-08-11

    Here we report the removal of chlorine gas from air via a reaction with an amine functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF). It is found that UiO-66-NH2 has the ability to remove 1.24 g of Cl2 per g of MOF via an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction producing HCl, which is subsequently neutralized by the MOF.

  1. The removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions using sour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conventional methods for the removal of heavy metals from waste waters are often cost prohibitive. These constraints have caused the search for alternative technologies for metal sequestering to cost-effective environmentally acceptable levels. One of the exploitations is the use of biomaterials. The results obtained after ...

  2. artocarpus altilis proving its worth in toxic metal removal from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... breadfruit nuts have been applied in its natural form for the biosorption removal of some toxic (heavy) metal ions (Cd2+, Pb2+ and Ni2+) from aqueous systems. Since it is suspected that polar functional groups could be a strong factor in the biosorption of toxic metal ions (Ricordel et al, 2011), the infared (IR).

  3. Variation in levels and removal efficiency of heavy and trace metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general abundance distribution pattern for metals was Zn > Cu > Pb > Cr > Ni > As > Co > Cd > Hg. The removal efficiency ranged from 1.5% for Hg at Zandvliet WWTP plant during winter to 98.27% for Cu at Athlone WWTP treatment plant during summer. The final effluent concentration for most of the metals were within ...

  4. Neutron radiographic detection limits of fluids in metal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.

    1976-01-01

    Routine maintenance of process pipes at the Savannah River Plant has indicated that undesirable fluids can build up in the various gas lines. Thermal neutron radiography has been used to image thin films of various fluids in thick-walled high-pressure process pipes. A 3.5 x 10 6 n/(cm 2 -sec) thermal neutron beam and standard transfer imaging techniques were used to provide radiographs of the fluid-bearing pipes. In addition, a computer graphics procedure was developed that simulated the neutron radiographs; this method permitted examination of some fluid-pipe configurations not studied experimentally. Actual pipe dimensions ranged in OD from 1 / 4 to 9 / 16 in. with OD/ID = 3. Many common industrial fluids such as H 2 O, oils, and CCl 4 may be detected in thick-walled process pipes, even when distributed in thin (3 to 10 mil) fluid films. By contrast, fluids with a low thermal neutron cross section (D 2 O and T 2 O) can be detected only for much thicker films

  5. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)); Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- bioremoval'' -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

  6. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States); Wilde, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- `` bioremoval`` -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R&D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

  7. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benemann, J.R.; Wilde, E.W.

    1991-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- '' bioremoval'' -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R ampersand D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes

  8. Removal and treatment of radioactive, organochlorine, and heavy metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieco, S.A.; Neubauer, E.D.; Rhea, J.R.; Escue, L.S.

    1995-01-01

    A decontamination system was tested on concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive ( 238 U and 99 Tc) and hazardous (PCBs and lead) waste in Oak Ridge, TN. The principal objectives of this on-site soda blasting demonstration project were to evaluate the effectiveness of decontamination by blasting with sodium bicarbonate and to minimize waste volume by dissolving and treating blasting residuals through a wastewater treatment system. Areas of concrete floors and columns and steel and aluminum surfaces were selected to evaluate the soda blasting process. Testing evaluated six operating variables: air pressure, water pressure, nozzle orifice diameter, nozzle orifice design, media type, and media flow rate. Spent blasting media was mixed with water for treatment. The treatment system comprised pH adjustment, chemical precipitation, solids removal, carbon adsorption, and ion exchange. Removal rates from blasting averaged between 95 and 100% beta/gamma and non-quantifiable to 100% alpha for surfaces tested using selected blasing parameters. The non-quantifiable percent removals for alpha resulted from initial readings which approached background levels. In each test, the post blast alpha readings were below the release limit of 5000 dpm. The waste volume reduction system effectively removed more than 97% of uranium and more than 99 percent of lead and PCBs. Ion exchange column testing results demonstrated technetium removal to below the 100 pCi/l treatment objective for both resins. Testing results demonstrated that this soda blasting/waste residuals treatment system provided a 70% reduction in waste volume as compared to blasting without treatment. The system removed fixed radioactive and hazardous surface contamination, while leaving the surface intact, and produced water meeting stringent water quality criteria and residual solid waste requiring off-site management

  9. Removal of 222Rn daughters from metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzel, G.; Pelczar, K.; Wójcik, M.

    2018-01-01

    Removal of 210Po from copper, stainless steel and germanium was studied by using a standard, semiconductor-based- and a large-surface, low-background alpha spectrometer. Electropolishing and etching were applied as the surface cleaning techniques. Application of a "dynamical" process resulted for the first time in an effective 210Po removal from copper surface by etching. According to the performed measurements weak (natural) specific activities of polonium were also reduced after electropolishing of copper and stainless steel samples. An example of a bulk 210Po measurement in Titanium and deconvolution of the bulk and surface contributions to the registered spectrum is also discussed.

  10. Baseline and time-averaged fluid removal affect technique survival in peritoneal dialysis in a non-linear fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Kathryn J; Rumpsfeld, Markus; Hawley, Carmel M; O'Shea, Amanda; Isbel, Nicole M; Campbell, Scott B; Johnson, David W

    2007-06-01

    The longevity of peritoneal dialysis (PD) is limited by technique failure and patient mortality. The authors assessed the influence of baseline and time-averaged fluid removal on patient, technique and death-censored technique survival. Peritoneal and total fluid removal was measured 1 month after commencing PD, then 6 monthly, in 225 incident patients (mean age 55.3+/-15.8 years, 52% male). A Cox proportional hazards model regression analysis was performed to identify variables independently predictive of technique and patient survival. Seventy (31.9%) patients were transferred to haemodialysis and 39 (17.63%) died. Technique survival was greatest in the middle tertile of baseline total fluid removal (mean survival time 3.5 vs 2.5 and 2.2 years for the lower and upper tertiles, respectively, log rank 6.5, P=0.039). The middle tertile of both baseline and time-averaged total fluid removal were significant predictors of PD survival (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.476, 95% CI 0.286-0.795, P=0.005 relative to the upper tertile and HR 0.573, 95% CI 0.350-0.939, P=0.027 for baseline and time-averaged, respectively). Other significant variables on multivariate analysis were body mass index (HR 1.044 per kg/m2, 95% CI 1.005-1.084, P=0.028), creatinine (HR 0.999 per micromol, 95% CI 0.998-1.000, P=0.048) and residual Kt/V (HR 0.418, 95% CI 0.233-0.747, P=0.003). Patient survival was not affected by fluid removal. Patients with moderate total fluid removal both at baseline and throughout their PD career have improved technique survival. Attention should be paid to optimizing total fluid removal.

  11. Application of Sargassum biomass to remove heavy metal ions from synthetic multi-metal solutions and urban storm water runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Teo, Ting Ting; Balasubramanian, R; Joshi, Umid Man

    2009-05-30

    The ability of Sargassum sp. to biosorb four metal ions, namely lead, copper, zinc, and manganese from a synthetic multi-solute system and real storm water runoff has been investigated for the first time. Experiments on synthetic multi-solute systems revealed that Sargassum performed well in the biosorption of all four metal ions, with preference towards Pb, followed by Cu, Zn, and Mn. The solution pH strongly affected the metal biosorption, with pH 6 being identified as the optimal condition for achieving maximum biosorption. Experiments at different biosorbent dosages revealed that good biosorption capacity as well as high metal removal efficiency was observed at 3g/L. The biosorption kinetics was found to be fast with equilibrium being attained within 50 min. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, Sargassum exhibited maximum uptakes of 214, 67.5, 24.2 and 20.2mg/g for lead, copper, zinc, and manganese, respectively in single-solute systems. In multi-metal systems, strong competition between four metal ions in terms of occupancy binding sites was observed, and Sargassum showed preference in the order of Pb>Cu>Zn>Mn. The application of Sargassum to remove four heavy metal ions in real storm water runoff revealed that the biomass was capable of removing the heavy metal ions. However, the biosorption performance was slightly lower compared to that of synthetic metal solutions. Several factors were responsible for this difference, and the most important factor is the presence of other contaminants such as anions, organics, and other trace metals in the runoff.

  12. Soil amendments for heavy metals removal from stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of dissolved metals in stormwater runoff from urbanized watersheds are much higher than established guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Five potential soil amendment materials derived from affordable, abundant sources have been tested as filter media using shaker tests and were found to remove dissolved metals in stormwater runoff. Blast furnace (BF) slag and basic oxygenated furnace (BOF) slag from a steel mill, a drinking water treatment residual (DWTR) from a surface water treatment plant, goethite-rich overburden (IRON) from a coal mine, and woodchips (WC) were tested. The IRON and BOF amendments were shown to remove 46-98% of dissolved metals (Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn) in repacked soil columns. Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants for six metals across five materials were calculated. Breakthrough curves of dissolved metals and total metal accumulation within the filter media were measured in column tests using synthetic runoff. A reduction in system performance over time occurred due to progressive saturation of the treatment media. Despite this, the top 7 cm of each filter media removed up to 72% of the dissolved metals. A calibrated HYDRUS-1D model was used to simulate long-term metal accumulation in the filter media, and model results suggest that for these metals a BOF filter media thickness as low as 15 cm can be used to improve stormwater quality to meet standards for up to twenty years. The treatment media evaluated in this research can be used to improve urban stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs).

  13. Recent advances in nanoscale-metal assisted biochar derived from waste biomass used for heavy metals removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Zhu, Shishu; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-12-01

    Pollution of heavy metals (HMs) is a detrimental treat to human health and need to be cleaned up in a proper way. Biochar (BC), a low-cost and "green" adsorbent, has attracted significant attention due to its considerable HMs removal capacity. In particular, nano-metals have recently been used to assist BC in improving its reactivity, surface texture and magnetism. Synthesis methods and metal precursors greatly influence the properties and structures of the nanocomposites, thereby affecting their HMs removal performance. This review presents advances in synthesis methods, formation mechanisms and surface characteristics of BC nanocomposites, along with the discussions on HMs removal mechanisms and the effects of environmental factors on HMs removal efficiency. Performance of using BC nanocomposites to remediate real HMs-containing wastewater and issues associated with its process scale-up are also discussed. This review aims to provide useful information to facilitate the development of HMs removal by nanoscale-metal assisted BC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy metal removal capacity of individual components of permeable reactive concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ryan R.; Hart, Megan L.; Kevern, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are a well-known technique for groundwater remediation using industrialized reactive media such as zero-valent iron and activated carbon. Permeable reactive concrete (PRC) is an alternative reactive medium composed of relatively inexpensive materials such as cement and aggregate. A variety of multimodal, simultaneous processes drive remediation of metals from contaminated groundwater within PRC systems due to the complex heterogeneous matrix formed during cement hydration. This research investigated the influence coarse aggregate, portland cement, fly ash, and various combinations had on the removal of lead, cadmium, and zinc in solution. Absorption, adsorption, precipitation, co-precipitation, and internal diffusion of the metals are common mechanisms of removal in the hydrated cement matrix and independent of the aggregate. Local aggregates can be used as the permeable structure also possessing high metal removal capabilities, however calcareous sources of aggregate are preferred due to improved removal with low leachability. Individual adsorption isotherms were linear or curvilinear up, indicating a preferred removal process. For PRC samples, metal saturation was not reached over the range of concentrations tested. Results were then used to compare removal against activated carbon and aggregate-based PRBs by estimating material costs for the remediation of an example heavy metal contaminated Superfund site located in the Midwestern United States, Joplin, Missouri.

  15. The Dependency of Surfactants on the Metal Surface Removal Using CO2-HNO3 Microemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwangheon; Lee, Jungkeun; Koh, Moosung; Kim, Hongdoo; Kim, Hakwon; Koh, Moosung

    2007-01-01

    Metal surface removal is one of important steps in decontamination of radioactive contaminated metal parts and components. The conventional chemical stripping method prevalently used today cleans materials by dipping them into a strong acidic or alkaline solution in order to remove metal film. Because so much more toxic solvent is used than needed, excessive expense is incurred in treating the waste by-products. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has excellent properties; economical, environment.friendly, good in penetration and reasonable in critical conditions. However, CO 2 is a non-polar compound that is very poor at dissolving polarized materials. To increase the dissolving power of CO 2 against polar materials, our laboratory has developed a CO 2 micro-emulsion method. We use acid- CO 2 microemulsion in metal surface or coating removal. Formation of microemulsion in liquid or supercritical CO 2 essentially needs surfactants. So far, we have developed 3 types of surfactants- fluorinated AOT, proline, and NP-4. This three surfactants help the formation of microemulsion of water (or acid) with CO 2 . In this paper, we compare the characteristics of microemulsion formed by each surfactant in metal coating removal. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was used to measure the rate of metal coating removal

  16. Removal of some metal ions from aqueous solution using orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the use of orange mesocarp residue biomass (modified and unmodified) as a costeffective and environmentally safe technique to remove Mg2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ from aqueous solution was investigated. The results showed that unmodified orange mesocarp residue bound 56% of Mg2+, 81% of Zn2+, 71% of ...

  17. Removal of metal ions from contaminated water using agricultural residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    As the world population grows, there is a growing awareness that our environment is getting more polluted. Clean water is becoming a critical issue for many parts of the world for human, animal and agricultural use. Filtration systems to clean our air and water are a growing industry. There are many approaches to removing contaminates from our water supply ranging from...

  18. Method of removing bulk sodium from metallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, H.P.; Borisch, R.R.

    1975-11-11

    A process of removing sodium from an article, particularly one made of stainless steel, by treating it with a mixture of water vapor and a gas which is inert to sodium is described. By selecting combinations of temperature and water vapor-to-gas ratio, the reaction temperature is controlled to prevent damage to the articles.

  19. Role of live autochthonous fungi in removing toxic metals from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-04

    Jul 4, 2011 ... Biosorption is considered to be the removal of sub- stances from solution by inactive, dead biological materials, while bioaccumulation is described as intra- cellular pollutant accumulation (Gadd, 2009; Wang and. Chen, 2009). Both living and dead fungal cells possess a remarkable ability for taking up ...

  20. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnesh N. Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nanaparticles based nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  2. Extraction of workpiece rotary symmetrical error and its deterministic removal by fluid jet polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongfu; Jin, Tan; Liu, Qifeng; Lu, Ange; Qu, Meina

    2018-01-01

    Rotary symmetric error (RSE) is a typical type of surface machining errors for precision components, related to the relative tool-workpiece movements adopted. A quick removal method of the workpiece surface RSE using a fluid jet polishing (FJP) process, in which the tool nozzle and workpiece move relatively as in an end-face turning process, is presented. Efficient improvement in the workpiece surface form accuracy was achieved using a relatively simple device. Two methods to extract the RSE from the measured surface error curves, i.e., the average and minimum methods, are introduced and compared. The influence of the local jet rotation radius on the removal function of FJP was investigated experimentally. The algorithm for solving the dwell time curve in two-dimensional FJP process was derived. Deterministic FJP experiments were conducted to remove the RSE by means of the end-face turning movement. Experimental results show that the proportion of the RSE to the overall surface error on most workpieces was reduced from >60% to average RSE extraction method and combining it with the zero-phase filtering method to filter the dwell time can effectively reduce the frequency of residual circular error in the polishing surface and avoid increasing of power spectral density in the mid-high frequency after polishing.

  3. Silver-modified clinoptilolite for the removal of Escherichia coli and heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhigbe, Lulu; Ouki, Sabeha; Saroj, Devendra; Lim, Xiang Min

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential of using the silver antibacterial properties combined with the metal ion exchange characteristics of silver-modified clinoptilolite to produce a treatment system capable of removing both contaminants from aqueous streams. The results have shown that silver-modified clinoptilolite is capable of completely eliminating Escherichia coli after 30-min contact time demonstrating its effectiveness as a disinfectant. Systems containing both E. coli and metals exhibited 100 % E. coli reduction after 15-min contact time and maximum metal adsorption removal efficiencies of 97, 98, and 99 % for Pb(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) respectively after 60 min; 0.182-0.266 mg/g of metal ions were adsorbed by the zeolites in the single- and mixed-metal-containing solutions. Nonmodified clinoptilolite showed no antibacterial properties. This study demonstrated that silver-modified clinoptilolite exhibited high disinfection and heavy metal removal efficiencies and consequently could provide an effective combined treatment system for the removal of E. coli and metals from contaminated water streams.

  4. Removal of Heavy Metals and PAH in Highway Detention Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke

    2005-01-01

    , which has been designed according to standard design criteria for several decades. The study will focus on heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The long-term simulation of input of flow and pollution to the ponds will be a hind cast based on time series of historical...

  5. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by using mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosorbent and unfertilizable flowering buds of mango plant, a local agrowaste in Multan, Pakistan known as battoor is used in this study. Efficacy of the biosorbent is tested in batch for Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ in single metal solution under control experimental conditions. The concentration of the biomass was 0.5 g.

  6. Identification of Bacillus megaterium and Microbacterium liquefaciens genes involved in metal resistance and metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierros-Romero, Grisel; Gómez-Ramírez, Marlenne; Arenas-Isaac, Ginesa E; Pless, Reynaldo C; Rojas-Avelizapa, Norma G

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus megaterium MNSH1-9K-1 and Microbacterium liquefaciens MNSH2-PHGII-2, 2 nickel- and vanadium-resistant bacteria from mine tailings located in Guanajuato, Mexico, are shown to have the ability to remove 33.1% and 17.8% of Ni, respectively, and 50.8% and 14.0% of V, respectively, from spent petrochemical catalysts containing 428 ± 30 mg·kg(-1) Ni and 2165 ± 77 mg·kg(-1) V. In these strains, several Ni resistance determinants were detected by conventional PCR. The nccA (nickel-cobalt-cadmium resistance) was found for the first time in B. megaterium. In M. liquefaciens, the above gene as well as the czcD gene (cobalt-zinc-cadmium resistance) and a high-affinity nickel transporter were detected for the first time. This study characterizes the resistance of M. liquefaciens and B. megaterium to Ni through the expression of genes conferring metal resistance.

  7. Removal of heavy metals from kaolin using an upward electrokinetic soil remedial (UESR) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-Y.; Huang, X.-J.; Kao, Jimmy C.M.; Stabnikova, Olena

    2006-01-01

    An upward electrokinetic soil remedial (UESR) technology was proposed to remove heavy metals from contaminated kaolin. Unlike conventional electrokinetic treatment that uses boreholes or trenches for horizontal migration of heavy metals, the UESR technology, applying vertical non-uniform electric fields, caused upward transportation of heavy metals to the top surface of the treated soil. The effects of current density, treatment duration, cell diameter, and different cathode chamber influent (distilled water or 0.01 M nitric acid) were studied. The removal efficiencies of heavy metals positively correlated to current density and treatment duration. Higher heavy metals removal efficiency was observed for the reactor cell with smaller diameter. A substantial amount of heavy metals was accumulated in the nearest to cathode 2 cm layer of kaolin when distilled water was continuously supplied to the cathode chamber. Heavy metals accumulated in this layer of kaolin can be easily excavated and disposed off. The main part of the removed heavy metals was dissolved in cathode chamber influent and moved away with cathode chamber effluent when 0.01 M nitric acid was used, instead of distilled water. Energy saving treatment by UESR technology with highest metal removal efficiencies was provided by two regimes: (1) by application of 0.01 M nitric acid as cathode chamber influent, cell diameter of 100 mm, duration of 18 days, and constant voltage of 3.5 V (19.7 kWh/m 3 of kaolin) and (2) by application of 0.01 M nitric acid as cathode chamber influent, cell diameter of 100 cm, duration of 6 days, and constant current density of 0.191 mA/cm 2 (19.1 kWh/m 3 of kaolin)

  8. Heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions by sorption using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acid-base properties of two raw and purified mixed clays from Burkina Faso were studied, as well as their potential to remove copper(II), lead(II) and ... The point of zero charge (pHpzc) values of the clays, as determined by potentiometric titrations, were 6.79 and 9.52 for the raw clays, while after purification they were ...

  9. Selective removal of heavy metal ions by disulfide linked polymer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dongah; Lee, Joo Sung; Patel, Hasmukh A; Jakobsen, Mogens H; Hwang, Yuhoon; Yavuz, Cafer T; Hansen, Hans Chr Bruun; Andersen, Henrik R

    2017-06-15

    Heavy metal contaminated surface water is one of the oldest pollution problems, which is critical to ecosystems and human health. We devised disulfide linked polymer networks and employed as a sorbent for removing heavy metal ions from contaminated water. Although the polymer network material has a moderate surface area, it demonstrated cadmium removal efficiency equivalent to highly porous activated carbon while it showed 16 times faster sorption kinetics compared to activated carbon, owing to the high affinity of cadmium towards disulfide and thiol functionality in the polymer network. The metal sorption mechanism on polymer network was studied by sorption kinetics, effect of pH, and metal complexation. We observed that the metal ions-copper, cadmium, and zinc showed high binding affinity in polymer network, even in the presence of competing cations like calcium in water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective removal of heavy metal ions by disulfide linked polymer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ko, Dongah; Sung Lee, Joo; Patel, Hasmukh A.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal contaminated surface water is one of the oldest pollution problems, which is critical to ecosystems and human health. We devised disulfide linked polymer networks and employed as a sorbent for removing heavy metal ions from contaminated water. Although the polymer network material has...... a moderate surface area, it demonstrated cadmium removal efficiency equivalent to highly porous activated carbon while it showed 16 times faster sorption kinetics compared to activated carbon, owing to the high affinity of cadmium towards disulfide and thiol functionality in the polymer network. The metal...... sorption mechanism on polymer network was studied by sorption kinetics, effect of pH, and metal complexation. We observed that the metal ions―copper, cadmium, and zinc showed high binding affinity in polymer network, even in the presence of competing cations like calcium in water....

  11. Investigation of heavy metal removal from motorway stormwater using inorganic ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Stormwater runoff from motorway surfaces contains toxic heavy metals that are not sufficiently removed by current treatment systems. This research has investigated the potential use of inorganic ion exchange materials to further reduce the levels of dissolved heavy metals. Candidate materials (synthetic/natural zeolites, clay/modified clay, hydrotalcite, lignite) were tested by a shaking procedure (mixed 5 mg dm -3 of each heavy metals, shaken for 10 min) and analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The synthetic zeolites MAP and Y showed 100% heavy metal removal and were investigated further by a series of batch experiments. The zeolites exhibited a selectivity sequence Pb > Cu > Cd ∼ Zn. Zeolite MAP has a high capacity for heavy metal uptake (4.5 meq g -1 ), but is not practical for use in a treatment facility owing to its low particle size (3 μm). However, large zeolite pellets (∼ 2 mm) were found to have a low heavy metal uptake (∼ 44 %) due to diffusion limitations. Selected materials (zeolites MAP, Y, mordenite, and carbon-based lignite) were tested in actual and spiked motorway stormwater. The synthetic zeolites effectively remove heavy metals (∼ 100 %) but change the environmental chemistry of the stormwater by releasing high concentrations of sodium, removing calcium ions and increasing the solution pH. The presence of other dissolved contaminants in motorway stormwater inhibited the uptake of heavy metals by the natural zeolite mordenite (34 % less removal). Alkali/alkaline-earth metals (Na, Ca) in solution compete for exchange sites in lignite and mordenite, reducing the heavy metal uptake. Chloride in solution forms complexes with cadmium, severely reducing its uptake by zeolite Y. The presence of dissolved road salt is a potentially serious concern as it causes previously exchanged heavy metals to be re-eluted, especially zinc and cadmium. Zeolite MAP as an exchanger is relatively unaffected by road salt. There is potential for the use of

  12. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30

    Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol

  13. Tissue removal utilizing Steiner Morcellator within a LapSac: effects of a fluid-filled environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, A R; Moran, M E; Newkirk, R E; Desai, P J; Calvano, C J

    2000-03-01

    Tissue removal can be a simple process of withdrawal of the entire organ, piecemeal removal with surgical clamps, or mechanical morcellation. Different mechanical morcellators exist that each have advantages and disadvantages. We have investigated a particular morcellator having an internal mechanized blade system that increases the chances of damage to tissue isolation sacks but removes large volumes of intact organ that can more readily be evaluated histologically. The primary premise of this investigation is that a fluid-filled sack would be less likely to be damaged by the activated blades of the morcellator. Utilizing a Steiner Morcellator (Karl Storz, Culver City, CA), two porcine kidneys were morcellated within the large LapSac (Cook Urological, Spencer, IN). Two environmental variables were evaluated: dry sac morcellation and fluid-filled sac morcellation. Each session was timed, fluid leakage identified, grasping of the sacks quantified, and gross spillage noted. The tissues were submitted for pathologic evaluation to quantify any differences grossly or histologically. All LapSacs were inspected for gross violation and inflated to distention with fluid to check for tiny leaks. The Steiner Morcellator worked much better within the confines of the LapSac filled with fluid. There were no perforations in our experimental setting. It was not possible discern use of fluid-filled sacks histologically. The Steiner Morcellator can be utilized safely in the LapSac if cautious observation and fluid-filled sack conditions are maintained. The extracted tissue is easily evaluated histologically.

  14. Heavy metal ion removal by adsorption on to biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson-Charrier, M.; Guibal, E.; Le Cloirec, P.; Surjous, R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of regulations constraints in the industrial waste-waters management leads to the study of new treatment processes, using raw or functionalized biological materials. These processes show competitive performances in metal ion sorption efficiency for the low metal content effluents. Uptake capacities of Uranium as high as 400 mg.g -1 chitosan, equivalent to the double of the uptake capacity of fungal origin biomass, can be reached. The application of these processes to real mine wastewaters gives efficiency coefficient upper to 90%, the residual concentrations are compatible to a direct injection into the environment. The grafting of functional groups onto the chitosan scales up the sorption performances to uptake capacity upper than 600 mg.g -1 polymer. pH, metal concentration are cited as major parameters, particle size influences both uptake kinetics and sorption equilibrium, in the case of the uranium accumulation by chitosan. The desorption of uranium from the sorbent allows the valorization of uranium and the re-use of the sorbent. (authors). 21 refs., 10 figs

  15. Anaerobic Biochemical Reactor (BCR) Treatment Of Mining-Influenced Water (MIW) - Investigation Of Metal Removal Efficiency and Ecotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    BCR have been successful at removing a high percentage of metals from MIW, while BCR effluent toxicity has not been examined previously in the field. This study examined 4 active pilot BCR systems for removal of metals and toxicity. Removal efficiency for Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb...

  16. Spontaneous Phase Transfer-Mediated Selective Removal of Heavy Metal Ions Using Biocompatible Oleic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeehan; Yoo, Sooyeon; Lee, Wooju; Kim, Dongchoul; Kang, Taewook

    2017-12-01

    Here, we propose an environmentally benign removal technique for heavy metal ions based on selective and spontaneous transfer to oleic acid. The ions can be removed via (1) the selective and rapid complexation with the carboxylic end of oleic acid at an oleic acid/water interface, and (2) the diffusion of such complex into the oleic acid layer. A wide variety of heavy metal ions such as Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Ni 2+ can be selectively removed over K + and Na + . For example, the concentration of Cu 2+ is reduced to below 1.3 ppm within 24 h, which corresponds to the level of Cu 2+ permitted by the Environmental Protection Agency. The addition of ethylenediamine ligand to the metal ion solutions is also shown to enhance the phase transfer. The removal efficiency is increased by up to 6 times when compared with that in the absence of the ligand and follows the order, Cu 2+ (99%) > Pb 2+ (96%) > Zn 2+ (95%) > Ni 2+ (65%). Moreover, the removal time can be shortened from 24 h to 1 h. The effect of an emulsion induced by a mechanical agitation on the removal of heavy metal ion is also studied.

  17. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied ...

  18. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by nonliving Ulva seaweed as biosorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kametani, Takuji; Maruyama, Toshiroh

    2005-05-01

    The growth of dense green seaweed mats of Ulva spp. is an increasing problem in estuaries and coasts worldwide. The enormous amount of Ulva biomass thus becomes a troublesome waste disposal problem. On the other hand, it has been revealed that nonliving seaweed biomass, particularly brown seaweeds, has a high capacity for assimilating heavy metals. In this study, the possibility of using Ulva seaweed biomass as a biosorbent for the removal of heavy metals was examined. After processing, the biomass material was very easy to separate from the aqueous solution using a mesh. The sorption capacity of Cd on Ulva biomass increased upon pretreatment with alkali solution. The outstanding function of the biosorbent was demonstrated at around pH 8. On the basis of the Langmuir isotherms of Cd, Zn and Cu using the alkali-pretreated biomass, the parameters q(m) and b were determined to be within the narrow range of 60-90 mg/g and 0.03-0.04 L/mg, respectively, for each metal. Given the q(m) and b values, Ulva seaweed is a good biosorbent material for removing heavy metals. In an experiment using artificial wastewater containing Cd, Zn, Cu, Cr and Ni, it was possible to remove each metal simultaneously using Ulva biomass. Adsorption by Ulva biomass is effective for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Thermohydrodynamics Interfacing Supercritical Fluid and Liquid Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jong H.; Suh, Kune Y.; Jung, Wi S.

    2008-01-01

    A shell-and-tube heat exchanger is the most common type of heat exchanger in nuclear power plants as well as oil refineries and other large chemical processes, and is suited for higher-pressure applications. This type of heat exchanger comprises a vessel with a bundle of tubes inside. One fluid runs through the tubes, and another fluid flows over the tubes through the shell to transport heat in-between. The tube bundle contains such varying tubes as plain, longitudinally finned, and so forth. Heat exchangers may be divided into a shell-and-tube, double pipe, flat plate, helical coil or printed-circuit type according to geometry. The shell-and-tube heat exchanger is commonly adopted in a variety of power conversion systems. Tubular Exchanger Manufacturers Association (TEMA) categorized the shell-and-tube heat exchanger into a floating head, fixed tube sheet, Utube and kettle type. Maximization of the heat exchanger effectiveness tends to reduce the waste of energy, whereby increasing the efficiency of the nuclear power conversion system. A great deal of attempts has been made to improve efficiency of the heat exchanger by increasing the heat transfer surface area exposed to the working fluids and reducing the difference in temperature between the primary and secondary fluids. Limitations, though, exist to achievable tube densities based on manufacturing constraints and cooling requirements

  20. Multidisciplinary emergent removal of a metal penoscrotal constriction device

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, GJ

    2017-03-01

    Strangulation of the genital organs is a rare presentation to the emergency department which requires urgent intervention to avoid long term complications. Penoscrotal constriction devices are either used for autoerotic stimulus or to increase sexual performance by maintaining an erection for a longer period. We report a case of a man who presented with penile strangulation following the application of a titanium penoscrotal constriction ring during sexual intercourse seven hours previously. The Fire Brigade department attended with an electric operated angle grinder to facilitate removal of the ring as standard medical equipment (orthopaedic saws, bolt and bone cutters) were insufficient. Fully functional recovery was achieved.

  1. The rate of pleural fluid drainage as a criterion for the timing of chest tube removal: theoretical and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Garth H

    2013-12-01

    Clinicians place chest tubes approximately 1 million times each year in the United States, but little information is available to guide their management. Specifically, use of the rate of pleural fluid drainage as a criterion for tube removal is not standardized. Absent such tubes, pleural fluid drains primarily through parietal pleural lymphatics at rates approaching 500 mL of fluid per day or more for each hemithorax. Early removal of tubes does not appear to be harmful. A noninferiority randomized trial currently in progress comparing removal without considering the drainage rate to a conservative threshold (2 mL/kg body weight in 24 hours) may better inform tube management. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous electrodialytic removal of PAH, PCB, TBT and heavy metals from sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kristine B; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille E; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2017-08-01

    Contaminated sediments are remediated in order to protect human health and the environment, with the additional benefit of using the treated sediments for other activities. Common for many polluted sediments is the contamination with several different pollutants, making remediation challenging with the need of different remedial actions for each pollutant. In this study, electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of sediments was found effective for simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic pollutants for sediments from Arctic regions - Sisimiut in Greenland and Hammerfest in Norway. The influence of sediment properties and experimental settings on the remediation process was studied by employing multivariate analysis. The importance of the variables studied varied with the pollutant and based on these results it was possible to assess removal processes for the different pollutants. Desorption was found to be important for the removal of heavy metals and TBT, while photolysis was significant for removal of PAH, PCB and TBT. In addition, dechlorination was found to be important for the removal of PCB. The highest removal efficiencies were found for heavy metals, TBT and PCB (>40%) and lower removal efficiencies for PAH (<35%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Heavy metal removal by GLDA washing: Optimization, redistribution, recycling, and changes in soil fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiyin; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Zhong, Qinmei; Zhang, Chuer; Jia, Yongxia; Li, Ting; Deng, Ouping; Li, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Soil washing, an emerging method for treating soils contaminated by heavy metals, requires an evaluation of its efficiency in simultaneously removing different metals, the quality of the soil following remediation, and the reusability of the recycled washing agent. In this study, we employed N,N-bis (carboxymethyl)-l-glutamic acid (GLDA), a novel and readily biodegradable chelator to remove Cd, Pb, and Zn from polluted soils. We investigated the influence of washing conditions, including GLDA concentration, pH, and contact time on their removal efficiencies. The single factor experiments showed that Cd, Pb, and Zn removal efficiencies reached 70.62, 74.45, and 34.43% in mine soil at a GLDA concentration of 75mM, a pH of 4.0, and a contact time of 60min, and in polluted farmland soil, removal efficiencies were 69.12, 78.30, and 39.50%, respectively. We then employed response surface methodology to optimize the washing parameters. The optimization process showed that the removal efficiencies were 69.50, 88.09, and 40.45% in mine soil and 71.34, 81.02, and 50.95% in polluted farmland soil for Cd, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the overall highly effective removal of Cd and Pb was connected mainly to their highly effective removal from the water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fractions. GLDA-washing eliminated the same amount of metals as EDTA-washing, while simultaneously retaining most of the soil nutrients. Removal efficiencies of recycled GLDA were no >5% lower than those of the fresh GLDA. Therefore, GLDA could potentially be used for the rehabilitation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Persimmon leaf bio-waste for adsorptive removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Yun; Choi, Hee-Jeong

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate heavy metal removal using waste biomass adsorbent, persimmon leaves, in an aqueous solution. Persimmon leaves, which are biomaterials, have a large number of hydroxyl groups and are highly suitable for removal of heavy metals. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possibility of removal of Cu, Pb, and Cd in aqueous solution by using raw persimmon leaves (RPL) and dried persimmon leaves (DPL). Removal of heavy metals by RPL and DPL showed that DPL had a 10%-15% higher removal than RPL, and the order of removal efficiency was found to be Pb > Cu > Cd. The pseudo-second order model was a better fit to the heavy metal adsorption experiments using RPL and DPL than the pseudo-first order model. The adsorption of Cu, Pb, and Cd by DPL was more suitable with the Freundlich isothermal adsorption and showed an ion exchange reaction which occurred in the uneven adsorption surface layer. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cu, Pb, and Cd was determined to be 19.42 mg/g, 22.59 mg/g, and 18.26 mg/g, respectively. The result of the adsorption experiments showed that the n value was higher than 2 regardless of the dose, indicating that the heavy metal adsorption on DPL was easy. In the thermodynamic experiment, ΔG° was a negative value, and ΔH° and ΔS° were positive values. It can be seen that the heavy metal adsorption process using DPL was spontaneous in nature and was an endothermic process. Moreover, as the temperature increased, the adsorption increased, and the affinity of heavy metal adsorption to DPL was very good. This experiment, in which heavy metals are removed using the waste biomass of persimmon leaves is an eco-friendly new bioadsorbent method because it can remove heavy metals without using chemicals while utilizing waste recycling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Method and device for removing nuclear fuel pellets from a metal fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    There are to be removed the pellets from a nuclear fuel rod without being destroyed by the process. For this purpose at one end of the fuel rod an opening is produced, through which a fluid is pressed at high pressure. Thereby the can is expanded and subsequently cut open by means of a cutting device. The pellets then may slip out. (TK) [de

  6. USEBILITY OF HYDROGELS IN ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGHY FOR REMOVAL OF HEAVY METAL AND DYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AÇIKEL Safiye Meriç

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals and Dyes are very toxic and nonbiodegradable in waste waters to cause adverse health effects in human body and to induce irreversible pollution. Adsorption offers many potential advantages for removal of toxic heavy metals being flexibility in design and operation, high-quality treated effluent, reversible nature for multiple uses, and many commercially available adsorbent materials, such as activated carbon, zeolite, clay, sawdust, bark, biomass, lignin, chitosan and other polymer adsorbents. Compared to conventional adsorbent materials above, hydrogelbased adsorbents recently have attracted special attention to their highly potential for effective removal of heavy metals and dyes. Hydrogels are named “Hydrophilic Polymer” because of care for water. Hydrogels is not solved in water; however they have been swollen to their balance volume. Because of this swell behavior, they can adsorb big quantity of water in this structure. So they can term of “three sized polymers” due to protect their existing shape [9]. Hydrogels with porous structures and chemically-responsive functional groups, enable to readily capture metal ions and dyes from wastewater. Hydrogels with porous structures and chemically-responsive functional groups, enable to readily capture metal ions and dyes from wastewater. In adsorption applications, hydrogels are used in water purification, heavy metal/dying removing, controlled fertilizer released, ion exchange applications, chromatographic applications, dilute extractions, waste water treatments. This article general inform about usage of hydrogels in Dye and Heavy Metal adsorption.

  7. A combination of bioleaching and bioprecipitation for deep removal of contaminating metals from dredged sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Di; Zhang Ruichang; Zhou Lixiang; Li Jie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Bioleaching-bioprecipitation can deeply cleanup sediment-borne metal contaminants. → Bioleaching results in a sufficient solubilisation of sediment-borne metals. → Bioprecipitation removes most of solubilised metals from sediment leachate at pH 3.7. → Bioremoval of soluble Zn, Cu and Cr is due to the formation of ZnS, Cu 2 S and CrOOH. → Alkalization of bioleached sediment by Ca(OH) 2 excludes the risk of re-acidification. - Abstract: A linked microbial process comprising bioleaching with sulfate-oxidizing bacteria and bioprecipitation with sulfate-reducing bacteria operating sequentially was investigated to deeply remove contaminating metals from dredged sediment. The results showed that sediment bioleaching resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH ∼7.6 to pH ∼2.5 within 10-20 days, approximately 65% of the main heavy metals present (Zn + Cu + Cr) were solubilized, and most of the unsolubilized metals existed in residual form of sediment. The acidic leachate that resulted from sediment bioleaching was efficiently stripped of metal sulfates using a bioprecipitation reactor when challenged with influent as low as pH ∼3.7. More than 99% of Zn 2+ , 99% of Cu 2+ and 90% of Cr 3+ were removed from the leachate, respectively, due to the formation of ZnS, Cu 2 S and CrOOH precipitates, as confirmed by SEM-EDS and XRD detection. It was also found that alkalization of bioleached sediment using Ca(OH) 2 excluded the risk of sediment re-acidification. The ability of the combined process developed in this study to deeply remove heavy metals in insoluble sulfides or hydroxides forms makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of different types of metal contaminants.

  8. Application of aragonite shells for the removal of aqueous metals in polluted soils and wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucca, M.; Köhler, S. J.; Dietzel, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the present study the use of coupled precipitation/dissolution processes for metal (Me) removal from polluted soils and waters by biogenic carbonate (CaCO3) shell surfaces is proposed, according to the following overall reaction: CaCO3 + Me2+ = MeCO3 + Ca2+ This reaction has been investigated at fixed experimental conditions using synthetic model systems consisting in columns, batch, and reactors (e.g. lead, zinc, and cadmium artificial solutions mixed with aragonite shells) that allowed quantifying the kinetics of the process of metal carbonate formation. The above mentioned process has the potential of being used in three different areas of water treatment: a) use of shells as a cheap and effective geologic barrier for contaminated ground or surface waters, b) use as a material in filter beds or fluidized bed for selective cleaning of waste water with the potential of partial metal recovery and c) use as seed crystals during the elimination of metals through precipitation with soda (Na2CO3). Acidic wastewaters containing several pollutants, including heavy and trace metals, are created during production of pesticides, paper, lubricating oil, batteries, acid/alkali, or in ship repair manufacturing, mines drainage systems, metalworking and metal plating industries. Biogenic shells are a waste product in many coastal countries and may thus be more favorable than other solid phases such as clays or zeolithes from an economic viewpoint. Our metal elimination study aims at setting up a low-cost effective elimination system for various types of metal rich waste waters. A number of experimental techniques such as batch, column and flow through reactors were used to optimize the metal removal efficiency in both synthetic and waste waters from the metal finishing industry. Solid liquid ratio, initial and final pH, metal concentration and combination of metals have been varied. Measurements of pH, metal concentration, conductivity and alkalinity were recorded over the

  9. Removal of heavy metals using a microbial active, continuously operated sand filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy metals play an important role within the spectrum of the various pollutants, emitted into the environment via human activities. In contrast to most organic pollutants, heavy metal can not be degraded. Many soils, lakes and rivers show a high contamination with heavy metals due to the enrichment of these pollutants. In addition to existing chemical-physical and biological technologies for the treatment of heavy metal containing waste waters a demand for new, efficient and low-cost cleaning technologies exists, particularly for high volumes of weakly contaminated waters. Such a technology was developed within the framework of a scientific project of the European Union. The approach makes use of a continuously operated, moving-bed Astrasand filter, which has been operated as a continuous biofilm reactor. By inoculation of the reactor with bacteria providing different, defined mechanisms of metal immobilization, and by continuous supply of suitable nutrients, a metal-immobilizing biofilm is built up and regenerated continuously. Metal-enriched biomass is removed continuously from the system, and the contained metals can be recycled by pyrometallurgical treatment of the biomass. The subjects of the present work were the optimization of the nutrient supply for the process of metal removal, the investigation of the toxicity of different waste waters, the optimization of inoculation and biofilm formation, set-up and operation of a lab scale sand filter and the operation of a pilot scale sand filter treating rinsing water of a chemical nickel plating plant. First, basic parameters like toxicity of heavy metal-containing waste waters and the influence of the nutrition of bacteria on biosorption and total metal removal were examined, using freely suspended bacteria in batch culture. Concerning toxicity great differences could be found within the spectrum of heavy metal-containing waste waters tested. Some waters completely inhibited growth, while others did not

  10. Design dopamine-modified polypropylene fibers towards removal of heavy metal ions from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach to preparing dopamine-modified polypropylene fibers with a controllable polydopamine amount is supplied. By the dopamine modification, the hydrophobic polypropylene fibers have been changed into hydrophilic. The hydrophilicity can be improved by increasing the amount of polydopamine, as revealed by the contact angle evolutions. The hydrophilic dopamine-modified polypropylene fibers can rapidly and effectively remove copper and lead ions in water. Moreover, the performance of removing heavy metals is prominently improved as the polydopamine amount increases. This is because the polydopamine introduction can supply many available sites for adsorbing heavy metal ions, as revealed by theoretical simulation results. These results are crucial in future engineering fiber filters towards efficiently removing heavy metal ions using dopamine-modified polypropylene fibers.

  11. Effective Removal of Cadmium Ions from a Simulated Gastrointestinal Fluid by Lentinus edodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qiao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lentinus edodes, a functional food, was evaluated as a potential antidote for adsorption/removal of cadmium ion from simulated gastrointestinal fluids. An adsorption/removal capacity of 65.12 mg/g was achieved by L. edodes in solutions with a pH ranging from 2.5 to 6.0, while little if any adsorption was observed in solutions with a pH under 2.5. In solutions with pH 6.0, 84% of the cadmium adsorption by L. edodes occurred in the first minute. Scanning electronic microscopic examination showed that the cell wall polysaccharides of L. edodes provided a rough sponge-like surface for effective cadmium adsorption. FTIR indicated that the carboxyl, hydroxyl and –NH groups of the cell wall polysaccharides and proteins were the primary functional groups that chemically bind with cadmium ions. The energy dispersive spectrometry further revealed that cation exchange might be attributed to cadmium biosorption. These results suggested that L. edodes was effective for cadmium detoxication, especially in low concentration.

  12. Studies of toxic metals removal in industrial wastewater after electron-beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Marcia Almeida

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Oxidation Process, using electron-beam, have been studied by scientific community due to its capacity to mineralize the toxic organic compound from highly reactive radical's formation. The electron-beam treatment process has been adopted by several countries for organic compounds removal and to effluents and sewers biological degradation. In this work, studies of metals removal in the simulated aqueous solutions and in the actual industrial effluents were carried out, using electron-beam treatment. The effluents samples were collected at ETE/SABESP (Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant) in Suzano, SP city. The sampling was outlined at three distinctive sites: Industrial Receiver Unit, Medium Bar, and Final Effluent. The effluents samples were irradiated using different irradiation doses (20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 kGy). The removal behavior of metals Ca, CI, S, P, K, Al, Fe, As, Ni, Cr, Zn, Si, Co, Mn, As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb was verified. The elements determination was accomplished with the x-ray fluorescence (WD-XRFS) technique using Fundamental Parameters method and thin film samples. The elements Fe, Zn, Cr and Co presented a removal > 99% to 200 kGy of irradiation dose in industrial effluent. At the same dose, P, Al and Si presented a removal of 81.8%, 97.6% and 98.7%, respectively. Ca and S were removed more than 80% at 20 kGy and Na, CI and K did not presented any degree of removal. As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb removal was studied in the simulated aqueous solutions and industrial effluents with scavengers addition (EDTA and HCOONa). The elements As and Hg presented a removal of 92% and 99%, respectively, with HCOONa, at 500 kGy irradiation dose. The Se presented a 96.5% removal at same irradiation dose without scavengers addition. The removal of Cd and Pb did not give a significant removal, once all of the assay were carried out in the oxidant medium. (author)

  13. Removal of maxillary sinus metallic foreign body like a hand sewing needle by magnetic iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Linqin; Qin, Xiurong; Ma, Yingwei

    2014-01-01

    Metallic foreign bodies are rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and usually they have a dental origin. Two main surgical app-roaches are currently used for the removal of foreign bodies in the maxillary sinus: the bone flap and the endoscopic sinus tech-niques. However, the treatment is not only surgical removal. We are reporting one case of foreign body like a hand sewing needle entered into the maxillary sinus through an unusual route- carious deciduous molar tooth. It was diagnosed by three-dimensional images from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and removed by a simple procedure, with magnetic iron, thereby avoiding the risk of damage to a large portion of the alveolar bone near the maxillary sinus. How to cite this article: Shao L, Qin X, Ma Y. Removal of Maxillary Sinus Metallic Foreign Body Like a Hand Sewing Needle by Magnetic Iron. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):61-64.

  14. Comparison of heavy metals and uranium removal using adsorbent in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Yun, Hunsik

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates heavy metals (As, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Pb) and uranium removal onto geomaterials (limestone, black shale, and concrete) and biosorbents (Pseudomonas putida and starfish) from waste in soil. Geomaterials or biosorbents with a high capacity for heavy metals and uranium can be obtained and employed of with little cost. For investigating the neutralization capacity, the change in pH, Eh, and EC as a function of time was quantified. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing heavy metals and uranium concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than lother sorbents. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd > Ni. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated soil.

  15. High Efficient Nanocomposite for Removal of Heavy Metals (Hg2+ and Pb2+ from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ebadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In current work, CdS/black carbon nanocomposites were successfully synthesized with the aid of chestnut and cadmium nitrate as the starting reagents. Besides, the effects of preparation parameters such as reaction time, and precursor concentration on the morphology of products and removal of heavy metals (Hg+2, Pb+2 were studied by scanning electron microscopy images and batch adsorption mode. CdS/black carbon nanocomposite introduced as new and high efficient system for removal of heavy metal ions. The as-synthesized products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and spectra energy dispersive analysis of X-ray.

  16. Application of Electrochemical Process in Removal of Heavy Metals from Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafaii Gh.1 PhD,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims Municipal landfill leachate contains high concentrations of heavy metals, organics, ammonia. The efficeincy of electrochemically removal of heavy metals from landfill leachate was studied. Materials & Methods The leachate was obtained from Kahrizak landfill in south of Tehran. The experiments were carried out by batch process. The 2liter batch reactor was made of glass. There were eight anodes and cathodes electrodes. The electrodes were placed vertically parallel to each other and they were connected to a digital DC power supply. The pH and conductivity were adjusted to a desirable value using NaOH or H2SO4, and NaCl. All the runs were performed at constant temperature of 25°C. In each run, 1.5liter of the leachate was placed into the electrolytic cell. Samples were extracted every 10min and then filtered through a mixed cellulose acetate membrane (0.42μm. The amount of Lead, Zinc and Nickel removal was measured at pH=7 and in current density of 0.5, 0.75, and 1A. Findings When current density and time reaction increased, removal efficiency of heavy metals such as Lead, Zinc and Nickel increased. At initial pH=7, density 1A and reaction time= 60min, Lead, Nickel and Zinc were removed up to 86, 93 and 95%, respectively. Conclusion Electrochemical process can be proposed as a suitable technique to remove heavy metal from landfill leachate.

  17. Removal of platinum group metals contained in molten glass using copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruga, Kazuyoshi; Sawada, Kayo; Arita, Yuji; Enokida, Youichi; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Removal of platinum group metals (PGMs) such as Pd, Ru, and RuO 2 from molten glass by using various amounts of liquid Cu was done as a basic study on a new vitrification process for a high-level radio-active waste. We prepared two types of borosilicate glasses containing PGMs and Cu, respectively. These glasses were mixed together and heated at 1,473 K for 4h in Ar atmosphere. More than 95% of Pd were removed as a spherical metal button composed of Pd-Cu alloy when Cu was added in an amount 0.5 times the weight of Pd. Nearly 95% of Ru was also removed as a spherical button with 2.5-5 times as much Cu addition as Ru in weight. Ruthenium oxide was reduced to metallic Ru by a reaction with Cu in the molten glass. The removal fraction was increased by increasing the amount of Cu and reached 63% when Cu addition was 7.5 times as much as RuO 2 in weight. By addition of Si as a reducing agent, nearly 90% of Pd and Ru were removed with Cu and Si metal composites even under O 2 :Ar=20:80 (v/v) condition. (author)

  18. Removal Of Phenol From Wastewater By Using Low-Cost Catalyst From Metal Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbičková Blanka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of AOPs (Advanced oxidation processes as an emerging technology for removing of pollutants from wastewater is developed. In this paper, UV photodegradation was used for removing of phenol from wastewater. As a source of UV radiation medium pressure mercury lamp with output 400W was used. The influence of low-cost catalysts on this process was also monitored. Wastes from metal production, red mud and black nickel mud, were used as catalysts.

  19. Removal Of Phenol From Wastewater By Using Low-Cost Catalyst From Metal Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbičková, Blanka; Soldán, Maroš; Belčík, Michal; Balog, Karol

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of AOPs (Advanced oxidation processes) as an emerging technology for removing of pollutants from wastewater is developed. In this paper, UV photodegradation was used for removing of phenol from wastewater. As a source of UV radiation medium pressure mercury lamp with output 400W was used. The influence of low-cost catalysts on this process was also monitored. Wastes from metal production, red mud and black nickel mud, were used as catalysts.

  20. Metal Removal and Antimicrobial Properties of Watermelon rind modified with clove

    OpenAIRE

    Othman N.; Azhar N.; Megat Abdul Rani P. S.; Mohamed Zaini H.

    2016-01-01

    The current rapid development of industrial activity indirectly discharged pollutant into the local water stream. One of the harmful industrial wastes that enter public drainage is heavy metal owing to its toxic, non-biodegradable and persistent in nature. Improper treatment of domestic waste also will discharged high amount of microbial. Various types of technology were developed for removing pollutant in wastewater, but most of the technology employed to address on removing organic content ...

  1. Use of constructed wetland for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sardar; Ahmad, Irshad; Shah, M Tahir; Rehman, Shafiqur; Khaliq, Abdul

    2009-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a continuous free surface flow wetland for removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater, in Gadoon Amazai Industrial Estate (GAIE), Swabi, Pakistan. Industrial wastewater samples were collected from the in-let, out-let and all cells of the constructed wetland (CW) and analyzed for heavy metals such as lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) using standard methods. Similarly, samples of aquatic macrophytes and sediments were also analyzed for selected heavy metals. Results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the CW for Pb, Cd, Fe, Ni, Cr, and Cu were 50%, 91.9%, 74.1%, 40.9%, 89%, and 48.3%, respectively. Furthermore, the performance of the CW was efficient enough to remove the heavy metals, particularly Cd, Fe, and Cu, from the industrial wastewater fed to it. However, it is suggested that the metal removal efficiency of the CW can be further enhanced by using proper management of vegetation and area expansion of the present CW.

  2. Mathematical modeling of impact of two metal plates using two-fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, P. S.; Fortova, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the development of the two-fluid mathematical model and the computational algorithm for the modeling of two metal plates impact. In one-dimensional case the governing system of equations comprises seven equations: three conservation laws for each fluid and transfer equation for the volume fraction of one of the fluids. Both fluids are considered to be compressible and equilibrium on velocities. Pressures equilibrium is used as fluids interface condition. The system has hyperbolic type but could not be written in the conservative form because of nozzling terms in the right-hand side of the equations. The algorithm is based on the Harten–Lax–van Leer numerical flux function. The robust computation in the presence of the interface boundary is carried out due to the special pressure relaxation procedure. The problem is solved using stiffened gas equations of state for each fluid. The parameters in the equations of state are calibrated using the results of computations using wide-range equations of state for the metals. In simulations of metal plates impact we get two shocks after the initial impact that propagate to the free surfaces of the samples. The characteristics of shock waves are close (maximum relative error in characteristics of shocks is not greater than 7%) to the data from the wide-range equations of states computations.

  3. Implications for metal and volatile cycles from the pH of subduction zone fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Matthieu E.; Connolly, James A. D.; Manning, Craig E.

    2016-11-01

    The chemistry of aqueous fluids controls the transport and exchange—the cycles—of metals and volatile elements on Earth. Subduction zones, where oceanic plates sink into the Earth’s interior, are the most important geodynamic setting for this fluid-mediated chemical exchange. Characterizing the ionic speciation and pH of fluids equilibrated with rocks at subduction zone conditions has long been a major challenge in Earth science. Here we report thermodynamic predictions of fluid-rock equilibria that tie together models of the thermal structure, mineralogy and fluid speciation of subduction zones. We find that the pH of fluids in subducted crustal lithologies is confined to a mildly alkaline range, modulated by rock volatile and chlorine contents. Cold subduction typical of the Phanerozoic eon favours the preservation of oxidized carbon in subducting slabs. In contrast, the pH of mantle wedge fluids is very sensitive to minor variations in rock composition. These variations may be caused by intramantle differentiation, or by infiltration of fluids enriched in alkali components extracted from the subducted crust. The sensitivity of pH to soluble elements in low abundance in the host rocks, such as carbon, alkali metals and halogens, illustrates a feedback between the chemistry of the Earth’s atmosphere-ocean system and the speciation of subduction zone fluids via the composition of the seawater-altered oceanic lithosphere. Our findings provide a perspective on the controlling reactions that have coupled metal and volatile cycles in subduction zones for more than 3 billion years7.

  4. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  5. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  6. Heavy Metal Removal From The Wastewater By Using Low Cost Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Inamdar Ejaj; Bhagat Sanjay; Joshi Swapnali; Pund Sharad; Satwadhar Ajinkya

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity because of industrial waste has been a threat to the environment for the past several decades, particularly within the developing countries like India, China and Kingdom of Thailand wherever price effectiveness of the removal method may be a major factor. This industrialization has not only brought development and prosperity however eventually disturbed the system. One of the impacts is visible; in kind of pollution. Within the gift study heavy metal contamination of wate...

  7. Kinetics of heavy metal removal in a suspended and immobilized bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, S. R. M.; Ezechi, E. H.; Khaw, S. G.; Lai, C. L.; Isa, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The capacity of microorganisms to remove heavy metal from wastewater has been a subject of diverse interest. Whereas some heavy metals are essential for effective microbial activity, some heavy metals could be toxic to the microorganisms at concentrations higher than their minimal inhibitory limit. The kinetics of Zn2+ removal from aqueous solution was evaluated in terms of substrate removal rate for two identical suspended and immobilized bioreactors. The suspended growth bioreactor was used as a control system (CS) and contains only biomass. The immobilized bioreactor (IB) contains both biomass and microwave incinerated rice husk ash (MIRHA). The bioreactors were operated at a fixed HRT of 29.1 hours, whereas Zn2+ influent concentration was varied in the range of 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/L. At steady state conditions, the results show that Zn2+ removal was in the range of 72, 75, 72.5, 68.2, 70.3 and 58.7% for CS, whereas it was in the range of 88, 90, 83, 88.6, 86.2 and 83.7% for IB. The substrate removal rate was found as 1.1856 g/L.d for CS and 4.2693 g/L.d for IB. The results clearly show that Zn2+ removal was more favorable in IB, indicating that the performance of the bioreactor was enhanced by the addition of MIRHA.

  8. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    -moval efficiencies were observed, especially for Pb and Zn. Cd, the sole heavy metal of environmental concern in the wood ash, was found more tightly bonded in this ash than in the two MSWI ashes. It was suggested that complex Cd-silicates are likely phases in the wood ash whereas more soluble, condensed phases......Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied...... in lab scale, and the results were discussed in relation to the expected heavy metal speciation in the ashes. In initial leaching experiments the pH-dependent desorption characteristics of the heavy metals Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu were analogous in the two MSWI ashes, and thus it was expected...

  9. Use of silica-immobilized humin for heavy metal removal from aqueous solution under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, G; Gardea-Torresdey, J L; Peralta-Videa, J R; Herrera, I; Contreras, C

    2003-10-01

    Humin extracted from Sphagnum peat moss was immobilized in a silica matrix and column experiments were performed in order to evaluate the removal and recovery of metal ions from aqueous solution under flow conditions. These experiments also allowed testing the recycling capacity of the column. Single-element solutions of Cu(II) and Pb(II), and a multi-metal solution containing Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Ni(II), and Cr(III) were passed through the columns at a flow rate of 2 ml/min. A 0.5 M sodium citrate solution was used as the stripping agent in the metal-ion recovery process. Humin immobilized in the silica matrix exhibited a similar, and in some cases, even a higher capacity than other biosorbents for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions under flow conditions. The sodium citrate was effective in removing Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) from the metal saturated column. The selectivity of the immobilized biomass was as follows: Cr(III)>Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Ni(II). This investigation provides a new, environmentally friendly and cost-effective possibility to clean up heavy-metal contaminated wastewaters by using the new silica-immobilized humin material.

  10. Chemical and microstructural analyses for heavy metals removal from water media by ceramic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asmaa; Ahmed, Abdelkader; Gad, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of low cost ceramic membrane filtration in removing three common heavy metals namely; Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ from water media. The work includes manufacturing ceramic membranes with dimensions of 15 by 15 cm and 2 cm thickness. The membranes were made from low cost materials of local clay mixed with different sawdust percentages of 0.5%, 2.0%, and 5.0%. The used clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Aqueous solutions of heavy metals were prepared in the laboratory and filtered through the ceramic membranes. The influence of the main parameters such as pH, initial driving pressure head, and concentration of heavy metals on their removal efficiency by ceramic membranes was investigated. Water samples were collected before and after the filtration process and their heavy metal concentrations were determined by chemical analysis. Moreover, a microstructural analysis using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was performed on ceramic membranes before and after the filtration process. The chemical analysis results showed high removal efficiency up to 99% for the concerned heavy metals. SEM images approved these results by showing adsorbed metal ions on sides of the internal pores of the ceramic membranes.

  11. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  12. High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Robert; McConnell, Elizabeth

    2016-06-29

    Machining methods across many industries generally require multiple operations to machine and process advanced materials, features with micron precision, and complex shapes. The resulting multiple machining platforms can significantly affect manufacturing cycle time and the precision of the final parts, with a resultant increase in cost and energy consumption. Ultrafast lasers represent a transformative and disruptive technology that removes material with micron precision and in a single step manufacturing process. Such precision results from athermal ablation without modification or damage to the remaining material which is the key differentiator between ultrafast laser technologies and traditional laser technologies or mechanical processes. Athermal ablation without modification or damage to the material eliminates post-processing or multiple manufacturing steps. Combined with the appropriate technology to control the motion of the work piece, ultrafast lasers are excellent candidates to provide breakthrough machining capability for difficult-to-machine materials. At the project onset in early 2012, the project team recognized that substantial effort was necessary to improve the application of ultrafast laser and precise motion control technologies (for micromachining difficult-to-machine materials) to further the aggregate throughput and yield improvements over conventional machining methods. The project described in this report advanced these leading-edge technologies thru the development and verification of two platforms: a hybrid enhanced laser chassis and a multi-application testbed.

  13. Removal of metal ions by Phormidium bigranulatum (cyanobacteria)-dominated mat in batch and continuous flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Rai, Jyoti; Gaur, J P

    2012-01-01

    Live Phormidium bigranulatum-dominated mat successfully removed Pb(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution. Percent metal removal approached equilibrium within 4h, independent of mat thickness (0.2-1.6 mm), in batch system. But % metal removal increased with increase in mat thickness due to enhancement of biomass, which provided more metal binding sites. Metal accumulation decreased with increase in mat thickness due to lessened metal availability vis-à-vis biomass. Metal removal (%) increased with increasing mat area, but decreased with increasing metal concentration in the solution. In continuous flow system, metal accumulation increased with increasing volume of single or multi-metal solution passed over the mat. The mat removed all the tested metals from the multi-metal solution with almost the same efficiency. The maximum removal of the test metals occurred at the lowest tested flow rate. Raceway type ponds can be employed for large-scale use of Phormidium mat in bioremediation of metalliferous wastewaters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural Jordanian zeolite: removal of heavy metal ions from water samples using column and batch methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hutaf M; Massadeh, Adnan M; Younes, Hammad A

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural Jordanian zeolites with respect to Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) was studied in order to consider its application to purity metal finishing drinking and waste water samples under different conditions such as zeolite particle size, ionic strength and initial metal ion concentration. In the present work, a new method was developed to remove the heavy metal by using a glass column as the one that used in column chromatography and to make a comparative between the batch experiment and column experiment by using natural Jordanian zeolite as adsorbent and some heavy metals as adsorbate. The column method was used using different metal ions concentrations ranged from 5 to 20 mg/L with average particle size of zeolite ranged between 90 and 350 mum, and ionic strength ranged from 0.01 to 0.05. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used for analysis of these heavy metal ions, the results obtained in this study indicated that zeolitic tuff is an efficient ion exchanger for removing heavy metals, in particular the fine particle sizes of zeolite at pH 6, whereas, no clear effect of low ionic strength values is noticed on the removal process. Equilibrium modeling of the removal showed that the adsorption of Cd(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Pb(2 + ), and Zn(2 + ) were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR). The sorption energy E determined in the DKR equation (9.129, 10.000, 10.541, and 11.180 kJ/mol for Zn(2 + ), Cu(2 + ), Cd(2 + ) and Pb(2 + ) respectively) which revealed the nature of the ion-exchange mechanism.

  15. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Uchelen, J. van; Witter, D.J.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression

  16. Efficient volatile metal removal from low rank coal in gasification, combustion, and processing systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Alan E.; Sellakumar, Kumar Muthusami; Newcomer, Jesse D.

    2017-03-21

    Efficient coal pre-processing systems (69) integrated with gasification, oxy-combustion, and power plant systems include a drying chamber (28), a volatile metal removal chamber (30), recirculated gases, including recycled carbon dioxide (21), nitrogen (6), and gaseous exhaust (60) for increasing the efficiencies and lowering emissions in various coal processing systems.

  17. New Approach to Remove Metals from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-Treated Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Hui Pan

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood particles was investigated using binary acid solutions consisting of acetic, oxalic, and phosphoric acids in a microwave reactor. Formation of an insoluble copper oxalate complex in the binary solution containing oxalic acid was the major factor for low copper removal. Furthermore, the...

  18. A highly efficient and selective polysilsesquioxane sorbent for heavy metal removal

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan

    2012-02-29

    Suited for heavy stuff: An efficient mesoporous sorbent based on a pure ethylendiamine-bridged polysilsesquioxane is presented. This material, with both a high amine loading and a high surface area, is applied for heavy metal ion removal. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Coal and Zea mays cob waste as adsorbents for removal of metallic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of coal (CO) and Zea mays (ZM) cob adsorbents for the removal of metallic ions from wastewater is reported. The adsorbents were used in both their granular (GCO and GZM) and powdered (PCO and PZM) forms respectively. Chromium, nickel, iron and cadmium were used as model ions. Efficiency of the ...

  20. Preparation and characterization of gum karaya hydrogel nanocomposite flocculant for metal ions removal from mine effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fosso-Kankeu, E

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research paper reports the removal of heavy metal ions from mine effluents using the gum karaya (GK)-grafted poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) incorporated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) hydrogel nanocomposite [i.e., GK...

  1. Flexible Reactive Berm (FRBerm) for Removal of Heavy Metals from Runoff Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Flexible Reactive Berm (FRBerm) for Removal of Heavy Metals from Runoff Water Steve Larson, W. Andy Martin - ERDC-EL JJ. Romano - Alion Science and...13 5.3 TREATABILITY STUDY RESULTS ........................................................................ 13 5.4 FIELD TESTING...Arms Firing Ranges, Site of the Field Demonstration. ............................................................................................. 9

  2. Regenerable metallic oxide systems for removal of carbon dioxide: A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts for portable canisters for removal of carbon dioxide are described. One is screen pack configuration consisting of brazed rectangular canister with four metal oxide packs inserted. Other is radial flow canister with perforated central tube. Methods of production and operating principles are presented.

  3. Impact of the amount of working fluid in loop heat pipe to remove waste heat from electronic component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitka Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the options on how to remove waste heat from electronic components is using loop heat pipe. The loop heat pipe (LHP is a two-phase device with high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes change phase to transport heat. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980’s. The main parts of LHP are an evaporator, a condenser, a compensation chamber and a vapor and liquid lines. Only the evaporator and part of the compensation chamber are equipped with a wick structure. Inside loop heat pipe is working fluid. As a working fluid can be used distilled water, acetone, ammonia, methanol etc. Amount of filling is important for the operation and performance of LHP. This work deals with the design of loop heat pipe and impact of filling ratio of working fluid to remove waste heat from insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT.

  4. Heavy metal removal using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): Theory and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaolin; Wang, Wei; Liang, Feipeng; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2017-01-15

    Treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals requires considerations on simultaneous removal of different ions, system reliability and quick separation of reaction products. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an ideal reagent for removing heavy metals from wastewater. Batch experiments show that nZVI is able to perform simultaneous removal of different heavy metals and arsenic; reactive nZVI in uniform dispersion brings rapid changes in solution E h , enabling a facile way for reaction regulation. Microscope characterizations and settling experiments suggest that nZVI serves as solid seeds that facilitate products separation. A treatment process consisting of E h -controlled nZVI reaction, gravitational separation and nZVI recirculation is then demonstrated. Long-term (>12 months) operation shows that the process achieves >99.5% removal of As, Cu and a number of other toxic elements. The E h -controlled reaction system sustains a highly-reducing condition in reactor and reduces nZVI dosage. The process produces effluent of stable quality that meets local discharge guidelines. The gravitational separator shows high efficacy of nZVI recovery and the recirculation improves nZVI material efficiency, resulting in extraordinarily high removal capacities ((245mg As+226 mg-Cu)/g-nZVI). The work provides proof that nanomaterials can offer truly green and cost-effective solutions for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The removal of heavy metals by iron mine drainage sludge and Phragmites australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Ha, Nguyen Thi; Anh, Bui Thi Kim

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the removal of heavy metals from solutions by the combination of modified iron mine drainage sludge (sorbent column) and surface and subsurface flow constructed wetlands using the common reed (Phragmites australis) during 30 days of experiment. The results of this study demonstrated that the average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column were 59.0, 55.1, 38.7, and 42.4%, respectively. The decreasing trend of removal rates of metals by sorbent column was obtained during the experiment. The average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column-surface constructed wetland were 78.9, 73.5, 91.2, and 80.5%, respectively; those by sorbent column-subsurface flow constructed wetland were 81.7, 81.1, 94.1, and 83.1% which reflected that subsurface flow constructed wetland showed higher removal rate than the surface system. Concentrations of heavy metals in the outlet water were lower than the Vietnamese standard limits regulated for industrial wastewater. The results indicate the feasibility of integration of iron mine drainage sludge and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment.

  6. Fluid displacive resin embedding of laminated sediments: preserving trace metals for high-resolution paleoclimate investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Lange, G.J. de; Reichart, G.-J.

    2008-01-01

    For the high-resolution study of trace metal profiles in laminated anoxic sediments, a specially adapted method of resin embedding has been developed. Fluid displacement is the preferred means of sediment dehydration, offering optimum structural preservation and facilitating desalination. Exchanges

  7. Determination of the bioaccessible fraction of metals in urban aerosol using simulated lung fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufalík, Pavel; Mikuška, Pavel; Matoušek, Tomáš; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 140, SEP (2016), s. 469-475 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25558S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-01438S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : metal * aerosol * simulated lung fluid Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.629, year: 2016

  8. Electromagnetic, heat and fluid flow phenomena in levitated metal droplets both under earthbound and microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Julian

    1988-01-01

    The purpose is to develop an improved understanding of the electromagnetic, heat, and fluid flow phenomena in electromagnetically levitated metal droplets, both under earthbound and microgravity conditions. The main motivation for doing this work, together with the past accomplishments, and the plans for future research are discussed.

  9. Geochemical Signature of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluids Exsolved from the Beauvoir Rare-Metal Granite (Massif Central, France: Insights from LA-ICPMS Analysis of Primary Fluid Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Harlaux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beauvoir granite (Massif Central, France represents an exceptional case in the European Variscan belt of a peraluminous rare-metal granite crosscutting an early W stockwork. The latter was strongly overprinted by rare-metal magmatic-hydrothermal fluids derived from the Beauvoir granite, resulting in a massive topazification of the quartz-ferberite vein system. This work presents a complete study of primary fluid inclusions hosted in quartz and topaz from the Beauvoir granite and the metasomatized stockwork, in order to characterize the geochemical composition of the magmatic fluids exsolved during the crystallization of this evolved rare-metal peraluminous granite. Microthermometric and Raman spectrometry data show that the earliest fluid (L1 is of high temperature (500 to >600°C, high salinity (17–28 wt.% NaCl eq, and Li-rich (Te100 m and interaction with external fluids.

  10. Review on metal speciation analysis in cerebrospinal fluid-current methods and results: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalke, Bernhard; Nischwitz, Volker

    2010-12-03

    The large number of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease motivates many research groups worldwide to investigate pathogenic factors and molecular mechanisms of these diseases. Recent studies and reviews indicate that metals are involved in these neurodegenerative processes in case their homeostasis in the brain is disturbed. Important is that the focus of these recent studies is on essential metals like Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn, but not on the well-known neurotoxic metals like Hg and Pb. Key issues for understanding metal induced neurotoxic effects are the transport processes across the neural barriers, the metal binding forms (species) and their interactions with neuronal structures. Total metal concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid were published in several studies for controls and patients, but the amount of reliable data sets is not yet sufficient for clear definition of normal and elevated levels. The need for more detailed information on metal species in CSF is highlighted in this review. However, studies on element speciation analysis, that means identification and quantification of the various binding forms of metals in cerebrospinal fluid, are rare. The major reasons therefore are difficulties in accessing cerebrospinal fluid samples, the non-covalent nature of many metal species of interest and their rather low concentrations. In spite of this, several applications demonstrate the potential of hyphenated techniques as additional diagnostic tools for cerebrospinal fluid analysis. This review shows the importance of trace element analysis and more specifically of element speciation in cerebrospinal fluid for an improved understanding of pathologic mechanisms promoting neuro-degeneration. Respective analytical techniques are also highlighted. Additionally, biochemical assays for selected high molecular mass metal species are summarized and critically discussed. Moreover additional potential techniques

  11. Polyrhodanine modified anodic aluminum oxide membrane for heavy metal ions removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jooyoung; Oh, Hyuntaek; Kong, Hyeyoung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2011-03-15

    Polyrhodanine was immobilized onto the inner surface of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane via vapor deposition polymerization method. The polyrhodanine modified membrane was applied to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solution because polyrhodanine could be coordinated with specific metal ions. Several parameters such as initial metal concentration, contact time and metal species were evaluated systematically for uptake efficiencies of the fabricated membrane under continuous flow condition. Adsorption isotherms of Hg(II) ion on the AAO-polyrhodanine membrane were analyzed with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) ion on the membrane was obeyed by a pseudo-second order equation, indicating the chemical adsorption. The maximum removal capacity of Hg(II) ion onto the fabricated membrane was measured to be 4.2 mmol/g polymer. The AAO-polyrhodanine membrane had also remarkable uptake performance toward Ag(I) and Pb(II) ions. Furthermore, the polyrhodanine modified membrane could be recycled after recovery process. These results demonstrated that the polyrhodanine modified AAO membrane provided potential applications for removing the hazardous heavy metal ions from wastewater. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymer functionalized nanocomposites for metals removal from water and wastewater: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofrano, Giusy; Carotenuto, Maurizio; Libralato, Giovanni; Domingos, Rute F; Markus, Arjen; Dini, Luciana; Gautam, Ravindra Kumar; Baldantoni, Daniela; Rossi, Marco; Sharma, Sanjay K; Chattopadhyaya, Mahesh Chandra; Giugni, Maurizio; Meric, Sureyya

    2016-04-01

    Pollution by metal and metalloid ions is one of the most widespread environmental concerns. They are non-biodegradable, and, generally, present high water solubility facilitating their environmental mobilisation interacting with abiotic and biotic components such as adsorption onto natural colloids or even accumulation by living organisms, thus, threatening human health and ecosystems. Therefore, there is a high demand for effective removal treatments of heavy metals, making the application of adsorption materials such as polymer-functionalized nanocomposites (PFNCs), increasingly attractive. PFNCs retain the inherent remarkable surface properties of nanoparticles, while the polymeric support materials provide high stability and processability. These nanoparticle-matrix materials are of great interest for metals and metalloids removal thanks to the functional groups of the polymeric matrixes that provide specific bindings to target pollutants. This review discusses PFNCs synthesis, characterization and performance in adsorption processes as well as the potential environmental risks and perspectives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of pulse current on energy consumption and removal of heavy metals during electrodialytic soil remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran

    : transport of water (electroosmosis) and ions (electromigration), with electromigration being the most important transport process when treating heavy metal contaminated soils. Electrodialytic remediation (EDR), one of the enhanced electrochemical remediation techniques, is developed at the Technical...... University of Denmark in the early 1990s and aims at removal of heavy metals from contaminated soils. The electrodialytic remediation method differs from the electrokinetic remediation methods in the use of ion exchange membranes for separation of the soil and the processing solutions in the electrode...... the applicability for remediation beyond bench and pilot scale. The overall aim of the present PhD study is to clarify and understand the underlying mechanisms of the effect of pulse current on energy consumption and removal of heavy metals during electrodialytic soil remediation. Series of experiments...

  14. The use of biosorbents for heavy metals removal from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Amin, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Biomaterials, which could be adsorbed heavy metals, such bacteria, algae, yeasts, fungi and agricultural waste, is called Biomass. Recently, they are widely used for heavy metal removal from aqueous media, due to their large available quantities, low cost and good performance. The biosorbent, unlike mono functional ion exchange resins, contains variety of functional sites including carboxyl, imidazole, sulphydryl, amino, phosphate, sulfate, thioether, phenol, carbonyl, amide and hydroxyl moieties. In this paper, the biosorbents word widely and nationally used for heavy metal removal were reviewed. Their biosorption performance, their pretreatment and modification, aiming to improve their sorption capacity, and regeneration/reuse was introduced and evaluated. The potential application of biosorption and biosorbents was discussed. (author)

  15. Terahertz artificial material based on integrated metal-rod-array for phase sensitive fluid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Borwen; Chen, Ching-Yu; Yu, Chin-Ping; Liu, Tze-An; Hattori, Toshiaki; Lu, Ja-Yu

    2017-04-17

    A terahertz artificial material composed of metal rod array is experimentally investigated on its transmission spectral property and successfully incorporated into microfluidics as a miniaturized terahertz waveguide with an extended optical-path-length for label-free fluidic sensing. Theoretical and experimental characterizations of terahertz transmission spectra show that the wave guidance along the metal rod array originates from the resonance of transverse-electric-polarized waves within the metal rod slits. The extended optical path length along three layers of metal-rod-array enables terahertz waves sufficiently overlapping the fluid molecules embedded among the rods, leading to strongly enhanced phase change by approximately one order of magnitude compared with the blank metal-parallel-plate waveguide. Based on the enhanced phase sensitivity, three kinds of colorless liquid analytes, namely, acetone, methanol, and ethanol, with different dipole moments are identified in situ using the metal-rod-array-based microfluidic sensor. The detection limit in molecular amounts of a liquid analyte is experimentally demonstrated to be less than 0.1 mmol, corresponding to 2.7 μmol/mm2. The phase sensitive terahertz metal-rod-array-based sensor potentially has good adaptability in lab-chip technology for various practical applications, such as industrial toxic fluid detection and medical breath inspection.

  16. Analysis of the Influence of the Use of Cutting Fluid in Hybrid Processes of Machining and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Cortina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid manufacturing processes that combine additive and machining operations are gaining relevance in modern industry thanks to the capability of building complex parts with minimal material and, many times, with process time reduction. Besides, as the additive and subtractive operations are carried out in the same machine, without moving the part, dead times are reduced and higher accuracies are achieved. However, it is not clear whether the direct material deposition after the machining operation is possible or intermediate cleaning stages are required because of the possible presence of residual cutting fluids. Therefore, different Laser Metal Deposition (LMD tests are performed on a part impregnated with cutting fluid, both directly and after the removal of the coolant by techniques such as laser vaporizing and air blasting. The present work studies the influence of the cutting fluid in the LMD process and the quality of the resulting part. Resulting porosity is evaluated and it is concluded that if the part surface is not properly clean after the machining operation, deficient clad quality can be obtained in the subsequent laser additive operation.

  17. Influence of voltage input to heavy metal removal from electroplating wastewater using electrocoagulation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulan, D. R.; Cahyaningsih, S.; Djaenudin

    2017-03-01

    In medium capacity, electroplating industry usually treats wastewater until 5 m3 per day. Heavy metal content becomes concern that should be reduced. Previous studies performed electrocoagulation method on laboratory scale, either batch or continuous. This study was aimed to compare the influence of voltage input variation into heavy metal removal in electroplating wastewater treatment using electrocoagulation process on laboratory-scale in order to determine the optimum condition for scaling up the reactor into pilot-scale. The laboratory study was performed in 1.5 L glass reactor in batch system using wastewater from electroplating industry, the voltage input varied at 20, 30 and 40 volt. The electrode consisted of aluminium 32 cm2 as sacrifice anode and copper 32 cm2 as cathode. During 120 min electrocoagulation process, the pH value was measured using pH meter, whereas the heavy metal of chromium, copper, iron, and zinc concentration were analysed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). Result showed that removal of heavy metals from wastewater increased due to the increasing of voltage input. Different initial concentration of heavy metals on wastewater, resulted the different detention time. At pilot-scale reactor with 30 V voltage input, chromium, iron, and zinc reached removal efficiency until 89-98%, when copper reached 79% efficiency. At 40V, removal efficiencies increased on same detention time, i.e. chromium, iron, and zinc reached 89-99%, whereas copper reached 85%. These removal efficiencies have complied the government standard except for copper that had higher initial concentration in wastewater. Kinetic rate also calculated in this study as the basic factor for scaling up the process.

  18. Heavy metal removal using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): Theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaolin, E-mail: lishaolin@tongji.edu.cn; Wang, Wei; Liang, Feipeng; Zhang, Wei-xian, E-mail: zhangwx@tongji.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • nZVI is able to perform fast and simultaneous removal of different heavy metal ions. • Fast separation and seeding effect of nZVI facilities its application in wastewater. • A novel process of E{sub h}-controlled reactor, nZVI separator and reuse is proposed. • E{sub h}-controlled system and nZVI recirculation increase material efficiency of nZVI. • The process produces stable effluent and is effective in wastewater treatment. - Abstract: Treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals requires considerations on simultaneous removal of different ions, system reliability and quick separation of reaction products. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an ideal reagent for removing heavy metals from wastewater. Batch experiments show that nZVI is able to perform simultaneous removal of different heavy metals and arsenic; reactive nZVI in uniform dispersion brings rapid changes in solution E{sub h}, enabling a facile way for reaction regulation. Microscope characterizations and settling experiments suggest that nZVI serves as solid seeds that facilitate products separation. A treatment process consisting of E{sub h}-controlled nZVI reaction, gravitational separation and nZVI recirculation is then demonstrated. Long-term (>12 months) operation shows that the process achieves >99.5% removal of As, Cu and a number of other toxic elements. The E{sub h}-controlled reaction system sustains a highly-reducing condition in reactor and reduces nZVI dosage. The process produces effluent of stable quality that meets local discharge guidelines. The gravitational separator shows high efficacy of nZVI recovery and the recirculation improves nZVI material efficiency, resulting in extraordinarily high removal capacities ((245 mg As + 226 mg-Cu)/g-nZVI). The work provides proof that nanomaterials can offer truly green and cost-effective solutions for wastewater treatment.

  19. Heavy metal removal in an UASB-CW system treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Varga, D; Díaz, M A; Ruiz, I; Soto, M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate for the first time the long-term removal of heavy metals (HMs) in a combined UASB-CW system treating municipal wastewater. The research was carried out in a field pilot plant constituted for an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) digester as a pretreatment, followed by a surface flow constructed wetland (CW) and finally by a subsurface flow CW. While the UASB showed (pseudo) steady state operational conditions and generated a periodical purge of sludge, CWs were characterised by the progressive accumulation and mineralisation of retained solids. This paper analyses the evolution of HM removal from the water stream over time (over a period of 4.7 year of operation) and the accumulation of HMs in UASB sludge and CW sediments at two horizons of 2.7 and 4.0 year of operation. High removal efficiencies were found for some metals in the following order: Sn > Cr > Cu > Pb > Zn > Fe (63-94%). Medium removal efficiencies were registered for Ni (49%), Hg (42%), and Ag (40%), and finally Mn and As showed negative percentage removals. Removal efficiencies of total HMs were higher in UASB and SF units and lower in the last SSF unit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal removal and associated binding fraction transformation in contaminated river sediment washed by different types of agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available In ex-situ washing, HCl, EDTA and H2O2 solutions can effectively extract heavy metals in river sediment. Nevertheless they often target different sediment components, possibly transforming metal species into more bioavailable and hence toxic ones. This study, in batch settings, investigated the influences of different types of washing agents (i.e. HCl, EDTA and H2O2 on metal (i.e. Cu and Zn removal from contaminated river sediment, destroy or dissolution of sediment components, and transformation of metal fractions during chemical washing treatment. Additionally, bioavailability of these metals left in the washed sediment was assessed. Results showed that HCl obtained the highest Cu and Zn removal through destroying the reducible, oxidizable and residual sediment components. Meanwhile, it transformed metal fractions to acid extractable one, resulting in an increase in metal bioavailability. Thus, the feasibility of washing with HCl for sediment remediation shall be reconsidered due to the caused high metal bioavailability. EDTA was capable of removing metals via direct complexation of labile metal species and indirect dissolution of reducible and oxidizable sediment components, where the transformation of corresponding metal binding fraction may occur. H2O2 obtained the lowest total Cu and Zn removal, but it preferentially removed the oxidizable metal species by oxidizing sulfides in the sediment. The bioavailable levels of Cu and Zn in the sediment washed by EDTA or H2O2 seemed not increase. To maintain a good balance between labile metal species removal and avoiding increase of metal bioavailability, EDTA and H2O2 are promising additives for metal removal by sediment washing.

  1. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A.

  2. Selective removal of heavy metal ions by disulfide linked polymer networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Dongah [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej 113, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Lee, Joo Sung [Graduate School of EEWS, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Patel, Hasmukh A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jakobsen, Mogens H. [Department of Micro and Nano technology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, 345B, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hwang, Yuhoon [Department of Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongreung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811 (Korea, Republic of); Yavuz, Cafer T. [Graduate School of EEWS, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R., E-mail: henrik@ndersen.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej 113, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Disulfide/thiol polymer networks are promising as sorbent for heavy metals. • Rapid sorption and high Langmuir affinity constant (a{sub L}) for stormwater treatment. • Selective sorption for copper, cadmium, and zinc in the presence of calcium. • Reusability likely due to structure stability of disulfide linked polymer networks. - Abstract: Heavy metal contaminated surface water is one of the oldest pollution problems, which is critical to ecosystems and human health. We devised disulfide linked polymer networks and employed as a sorbent for removing heavy metal ions from contaminated water. Although the polymer network material has a moderate surface area, it demonstrated cadmium removal efficiency equivalent to highly porous activated carbon while it showed 16 times faster sorption kinetics compared to activated carbon, owing to the high affinity of cadmium towards disulfide and thiol functionality in the polymer network. The metal sorption mechanism on polymer network was studied by sorption kinetics, effect of pH, and metal complexation. We observed that the metal ions–copper, cadmium, and zinc showed high binding affinity in polymer network, even in the presence of competing cations like calcium in water.

  3. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids after implantation of hip replacements with metal-on-metal bearing--systematic review of clinical and epidemiological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Hartmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of metal-on-metal (MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. OBJECTIVE: To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. METHODS: Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor, patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors. RESULTS: Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L. Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. DISCUSSION: Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed "time out" for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted

  4. Metal Ion Concentrations in Body Fluids after Implantation of Hip Replacements with Metal-on-Metal Bearing – Systematic Review of Clinical and Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Albrecht; Hannemann, Franziska; Lützner, Jörg; Seidler, Andreas; Drexler, Hans; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Schmitt, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The use of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds) in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. Objective To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. Methods Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs) and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum) in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor), patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors). Results Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies) totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine) irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L). Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Discussion Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed „time out“ for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted indication for hip

  5. Removal Process of Heavy Metal Ions from Squid Gut Wastes with Dilute Suluric Acid Leaching and Electrowinning Methods

    OpenAIRE

    嶋影, 和宜; 平井, 伸治; 戸田, 茂雄; 山本, 浩

    2003-01-01

    In order to remove heavy metal ions contained in organic squid gut waste, a novel process has been developed with both dilute suluric acid leaching and electrowinning methods. This process was consisted of three procedures, which are the elimination of greasy component in squid gut wastes, the dissolution of heavy metal ions and the electro-deposition of heavy metal ions. Heavy metal ions contained in organic squid gut wastes are zinc, cadmium and copper ions. Heavy metal ions are leached eas...

  6. Pervious concrete reactive barrier for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage - column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalala, Ayanda N; Ekolu, Stephen O; Diop, Souleymane; Solomon, Fitsum

    2017-02-05

    This paper presents a column study conducted to investigate the potential use of pervious concrete as a reactive barrier for treatment of water impacted by mine waste. The study was done using acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from a gold mine (WZ) and a coalfield (TDB). Pervious concrete mixtures consisting of Portland cement CEM I 52.5R with or without 30% fly ash (FA) were prepared at a water-cementitious ratio of 0.27 then used to make cubes which were employed in the reactor columns. It was found that the removal efficiency levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were 75%, 98%, 99%, 94% and 95% for WZ; 87%, 96%, 99%, 98% and 90% for TDB, respectively. The high rate of acid reduction and metal removal by pervious concrete is attributed to dissolution of portlandite which is a typical constituent of concrete. The dominant reaction product in all four columns was gypsum, which also contributed to some removal of sulphate from AMD. Formation of gypsum, goethite, and Glauber's salt were identified. Precipitation of metal hydroxides seems to be the dominant metal removal mechanism. Use of pervious concrete offers a promising alternative treatment method for polluted or acidic mine water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparation and characterisation of biodegradable pollen-chitosan microcapsules and its application in heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargın, İdris; Kaya, Murat; Arslan, Gulsin; Baran, Talat; Ceter, Talip

    2015-02-01

    Biosorbents have been widely used in heavy metal removal. New resources should be exploited to develop more efficient biosorbents. This study reports the preparation of three novel chitosan microcapsules from pollens of three common, wind-pollinated plants (Acer negundo, Cupressus sempervirens and Populus nigra). The microcapsules were characterized (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis) and used in removal of heavy metal ions: Cd(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). Their sorption capacities were compared to those of cross-linked chitosan beads without pollen grains. C. sempervirens-chitosan microcapsules exhibited better performance (Cd(II): 65.98; Cu(II): 67.10 and Zn(II): 49.55 mg g(-1)) than the other microcapsules and the cross-linked beads. A. negundo-chitosan microcapsules were more efficient in Cr(III) (70.40 mg g(-1)) removal. P. nigra-chitosan microcapsules were found to be less efficient. Chitosan-pollen microcapsules (except P. nigra-chitosan microcapsules) can be used in heavy metal removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective removal of dissolved toxic metals from groundwater by ultrafiltration in combination with chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Le, V.T.; McConeghy, G.J.; Martin, J.F.

    1989-09-01

    An alternative in-place process for the removal of toxic heavy metals based on aqueous solution chemistry and treatment is being evaluated under the auspices of the Emerging Technologies Program funded through the USEPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program. The technique involves the contacting of aqueous solutions containing the heavy metal contaminants with low concentrations of polyelectrolytes, and then removing the polyelectrolytes from solution with ultrafiltration membranes. The first phase of the program is considered complete. Success has been achieved for the separation of soluble, heavy metal ions: cadmium, lead, and mercury even in the presence of an organic compound, toluene. Removal was successful at alkaline conditions, using any combination of membrane material or polyelectrolyte. Arsenic was removed, but not effectively, using the current polyelectrolytes, simply because arsenic is present as an anionic species rather than as a cationic species. Optimization of the process variables is nearing completion and pilot and field testing will take place in the second year of the program to verify the process under realistic conditions and to establish process economics

  9. A novel approach of utilization of the fungal conidia biomass to remove heavy metals from the aqueous solution through immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chun-Xiang; Xu, Jian; Deng, Nian-Fang; Dong, Xue-Wei; Tang, Hao; Liang, Yu; Fan, Xian-Wei; Li, You-Zhi

    2016-11-01

    The biomass of filamentous fungi is an important cost-effective biomass for heavy metal biosorption. However, use of free fungal cells can cause difficulties in the separation of biomass from the effluent. In this study, we immobilized the living conidia of the heavy metal-resistant Penicillium janthinillum strain GXCR by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-sodium alginate (SA) beads to remove heavy metals from an aqueous solution containing a low concentration (70 mg/L) of Cu, Pb, and Cd. The PVA-SA-conidia beads showed perfect characters of appropriate mechanical strength suitable for metal removal from the dynamic wastewater environment, an ideal settleability, easy separation from the solution, and a high metal biosorption and removal rate even after four cycles of successive sorption-desorption of the beads, overcoming disadvantages when fungal biomasses alone are used for heavy metal removal from wastewater. We also discuss the major biosorption-affecting factors, biosorption models, and biosorption mechanisms.

  10. Removing coordinated metal ions from proteins: a fast and mild method in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Charlotte; Stolz, Michael; Lewitzki, Erwin; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Kolbesen, Bernd O; Grell, Ernst

    2006-08-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of metal binding to proteins require the investigation of metal-free proteins, which are often difficult to obtain. We have developed a very fast and mild method to eliminate metal ions from proteins by column chromatography using a commercially available Ni-NTA-type stationary phase. This material, initially designed for protein purification purposes in biotechnology, acts as a strong cation chelator when Ni2+ ions are removed. We have tested this new method with Ca-ATPase, an integral membrane protein exhibiting a strong affinity for Ca2+. By eluting the protein over the Ni2+-free NTA gel, we could remove 95% of the total Ca2+ and obtain an essentially Ca2+-free protein. This method is efficient with only a small amount of NTA gel, and we suggest that it can be applied in general for removal of metal ions from proteins. Moreover, as this procedure can be carried out under mild conditions, the chosen protein kept its enzymatic activity.

  11. Removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate using combined bioelectrochemical systems and electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hu-Chun; Lei, Tao; Shi, Gang; Sun, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wu, Wei-Min

    2014-01-15

    Based on environmental and energetic analysis, a novel combined approach using bioelectrochemical systems (BES) followed by electrolysis reactors (ER) was tested for heavy metals removal from fly ash leachate, which contained high detectable levels of Zn, Pb and Cu according to X-ray diffraction analysis. Acetic acid was used as the fly ash leaching agent and tested under various leaching conditions. A favorable condition for the leaching process was identified to be liquid/solid ratio of 14:1 (w/w) and leaching duration 10h at initial pH 1.0. It was confirmed that the removal of heavy metals from fly ash leachate with the combination of BESs and ER is feasible. The metal removal efficiency was achieved at 98.5%, 95.4% and 98.1% for Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicated that Cu(II) was reduced and recovered mainly as metal Cu on cathodes related to power production, while Zn(II) and Pb(II) were not spontaneously reduced in BESs without applied voltage and basically electrolyzed in the electrolysis reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of Some Heavy Metals from Wastewater using Radiation- Adsorption Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessouki, A.M.; Hegazy, E.A.; El-Kelesh, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    Wastewater containing toxic materials poses a serious environmental problem. Many of the pollutants are not readily biodegradable and complete removal in many cases is a relatively expensive process. On the other hand, incomplete removal is a serious health hazard. In the present study, a try was made to explain the degradation kinetics due to gamma-irradiation and adsorption of some heavy metals: Uranium, Molybdenum, Zirconium, and Vanadium. Factors affecting the process such as concentration, irradiation dose and ph of the solution was studied. Gamma-radiation doses up to 50 kGy did not result in the degradation of the heavy metals. However, as expected gamma radiation resulted in a change in the valency of these heavy metal ions to other oxidation states which may have resulted in less toxicity. Adsorption and ion-exchange purification of the heavy metals onto GAC,Merck Ion Exchangers I, and IV and polymeric membranes showed that GAC has the highest adsorption capacity for all pollutants compared with the ion-exchangers and polymeric membranes which may be due to its very high surface area and high porous nature which causes internal and external distribution within the carbon particle more than it dose in the case of polymeric membranes and ion-exchangers. GAC was followed by the cation exchanger with different percent adsorption according to the type of pollutant and the least removal percent was shown by the polymeric membranes. Also, a study of the affinity of the pollutants towards the different adsorbents was carried out

  13. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  14. Kinetic study of heavy metal ions removal by ion exchange in batch conical air spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Zewail

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouted bed contactor is a hybrid of fixed and fluidized bed contactors, which retains the advantages of each with good hydrodynamic conditions. The aim of the present study is to investigate the performance of a batch conical air spouted vessel for heavy metal removal by strong cation exchange resins (AMBERJET 1200 Na. The effect of various parameters such as type of heavy metal ions (Ni+2 and Pb+2, contact time, superficial air velocity and initial heavy metal ion concentration on % heavy metal ion removal has been investigated. It has been found that under optimum conditions 98% and 99% removal of Ni+2 and Pb+2 were achieved respectively. Several kinetic models were used to test the experimental data and to examine the controlling mechanism of the sorption process. The present results of Ni+2 and Pb+2 well fit pseudo second order kinetic model with a high correlation coefficient. Both film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion contribute to the ion exchange process. The present study revealed that spouted bed vessel may provide an effective alternative for conducting ion exchange reactions.

  15. Polyurethane and alginate immobilized algal biomass for the removal of aqueous toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, I.V.; Mehlhorn, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the development of immobilized, processed algal biomass for use as an adsorptive filter in the removal of toxic metals from waste water. To fabricate an adsorptive filter from precessed biomass several crucial criteria must be met, including: (1) high metal binding capacity, (2) long term stability (both mechanical and chemical), (3) selectivity for metals of concern (with regard to ionic competition), (4) acceptable flow capacity (to handle large volumes in short time frames), (5) stripping/regeneration (to recycle the adsorptive filter and concentrate the toxic metals to manageable volumes). This report documents experiments with processed algal biomass (Spirulina platensis and Spirulina maxima) immobilized in either alginate gel or preformed polyurethane foam. The adsorptive characteristics of these filters were assessed with regard to the criteria listed above.

  16. Pervious concrete reactive barrier for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage − column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalala, Ayanda N., E-mail: Ayanda.Shabalala@ump.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Ekolu, Stephen O. [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Diop, Souleymane [Council for Geoscience, Private bag x112, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Solomon, Fitsum [University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2017-02-05

    Highlights: • Pervious concrete raises the low pH of acid mine drainage up to 12; heavy metals precipitate. • Pervious concrete successfully removed greater than 99% of inorganic contaminants. • Ca(OH){sub 2} in pervious concrete reacts with SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in acid mine drainage to form expansive gypsum. • Incorporating fly ash into pervious concrete mitigates damage caused by gypsum. • Pervious concrete reactive barrier offers a promising alternative method for treatment of acid mine drainage. - Abstract: This paper presents a column study conducted to investigate the potential use of pervious concrete as a reactive barrier for treatment of water impacted by mine waste. The study was done using acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from a gold mine (WZ) and a coalfield (TDB). Pervious concrete mixtures consisting of Portland cement CEM I 52.5R with or without 30% fly ash (FA) were prepared at a water-cementitious ratio of 0.27 then used to make cubes which were employed in the reactor columns. It was found that the removal efficiency levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were 75%, 98%, 99%, 94% and 95% for WZ; 87%, 96%, 99%, 98% and 90% for TDB, respectively. The high rate of acid reduction and metal removal by pervious concrete is attributed to dissolution of portlandite which is a typical constituent of concrete. The dominant reaction product in all four columns was gypsum, which also contributed to some removal of sulphate from AMD. Formation of gypsum, goethite, and Glauber’s salt were identified. Precipitation of metal hydroxides seems to be the dominant metal removal mechanism. Use of pervious concrete offers a promising alternative treatment method for polluted or acidic mine water.

  17. Pervious concrete reactive barrier for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage − column study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalala, Ayanda N.; Ekolu, Stephen O.; Diop, Souleymane; Solomon, Fitsum

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pervious concrete raises the low pH of acid mine drainage up to 12; heavy metals precipitate. • Pervious concrete successfully removed greater than 99% of inorganic contaminants. • Ca(OH) 2 in pervious concrete reacts with SO 4 2− in acid mine drainage to form expansive gypsum. • Incorporating fly ash into pervious concrete mitigates damage caused by gypsum. • Pervious concrete reactive barrier offers a promising alternative method for treatment of acid mine drainage. - Abstract: This paper presents a column study conducted to investigate the potential use of pervious concrete as a reactive barrier for treatment of water impacted by mine waste. The study was done using acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from a gold mine (WZ) and a coalfield (TDB). Pervious concrete mixtures consisting of Portland cement CEM I 52.5R with or without 30% fly ash (FA) were prepared at a water-cementitious ratio of 0.27 then used to make cubes which were employed in the reactor columns. It was found that the removal efficiency levels of Al, Fe, Mn, Co and Ni were 75%, 98%, 99%, 94% and 95% for WZ; 87%, 96%, 99%, 98% and 90% for TDB, respectively. The high rate of acid reduction and metal removal by pervious concrete is attributed to dissolution of portlandite which is a typical constituent of concrete. The dominant reaction product in all four columns was gypsum, which also contributed to some removal of sulphate from AMD. Formation of gypsum, goethite, and Glauber’s salt were identified. Precipitation of metal hydroxides seems to be the dominant metal removal mechanism. Use of pervious concrete offers a promising alternative treatment method for polluted or acidic mine water.

  18. Removal of metals from industrial wastewater and urban runoff by mineral and bio-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Harshita; Leiviskä, Tiina; Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Postila, Heini; Tanskanen, Juha

    2018-03-01

    The study was performed to evaluate chemically modified biosorbents, hydrochloric acid treated peat (HCl-P) and citric acid treated sawdust (Citric acid-SD) for their metal removal capacity from dilute industrial wastewater and urban runoff and compare their efficiency with that of commercially available mineral sorbents (AQM PalPower M10 and AQM PalPower T5M5 magnetite). Batch and column experiments were conducted using real water samples to assess the sorbents' metal sorption capacity. AQM PalPower M10 (consisting mainly of magnesium, iron and silicon oxides) exhibited excellent Zn removal from both industrial wastewater and spiked runoff water samples even at low dosages (0.1 g/L and 0.05 g/L, respectively). The high degree of Zn removal was associated with the release of hydroxyl ions from the sorbent and subsequent precipitation of zinc hydroxide. The biosorbents removed Ni and Cr better than AQM PalPower M10 from industrial wastewater and performed well in removing Cr and Cu from spiked runoff water, although at higher dosages (0.3-0.75 g/L). The main mechanism of sorption by biosorbents was ion exchange. The sorbents required a short contact time to reach equilibrium (15-30 min) in both tested water samples. AQM PalPower T5M5 magnetite was the worst performing sorbent, leaching Zn into both industrial and runoff water and Ni into runoff water. Column tests revealed that both HCl-P and AQM PalPower M10 were able to remove metals, although some leaching was witnessed, especially As from AQM PalPower M10. The low hydraulic conductivity observed for HCl-P may restrict the possibilities of using such small particle size peat material in a filter-type passive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alginate-based nanocomposites for efficient removal of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Mohamed; Farghali, Ahmed A; Khedr, Mohamed H; El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M

    2017-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CF), titanate nanotubes (T), alginate (G) and their nanocomposite microparticles (CF/G and T/G) were prepared and used for efficient removal of Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ and As 3+ ions from water. The nanocomposites were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), FTIR and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). In addition, the effects of pH, contact time, adsorbent weight and heavy metal ion concentration on the removal efficiency were investigated. Our results revealed a successful preparation of the nanocomposite particles. The optimized batch experiment conditions were found to be pH of 6.5, contact time of 2h and adsorbent weight of 0.15g. The removal efficiencies for Cu 2+ using G, CF, T, CF/G and T/G were found to be 91%, 100%, 99.9%, 95% and 98%, respectively. While that of Fe 3+ removal was 60%, 100%, 100%, 60% and 82%, respectively. Efficient removal of As 3+ ions was also attained (98% upon using T nanoadsorbents). The current study demonstrated that the developed nanomaterials (CF and T) and their corresponding alginate-based nanocomposite microparticles could be further tailored and used as efficient adsorbents for the uptake of different heavy metal ions from wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of heavy metals on nitrogen and oxygen demand removal in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, P E; Tay, M G; Mak, K Y; Mohamed, N

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the respective effects of Zn, Pb and Cd as well as the combined effect of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu on the removal of nitrogen and oxygen demand in constructed wetlands. Four laboratory-scale gravel-filled subsurface-flow constructed wetland units planted with cattails (Typha latifolia) were operated outdoors and fed with primary-treated domestic wastewater at a constant flow rate of 25 ml/min. After 6 months, three of the wetland units were fed with the same type of wastewater spiked with Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively, at 20, 5 and 1 mg/l for a further 9 months. The remaining unit was fed with the same type of wastewater spiked with a combination of Zn(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) at concentrations of 10, 2.5, 0.5 and 5 mg/l, respectively, over the same period. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammoniacal nitrogen (AN) concentrations were monitored at the inlet, outlet and three additional locations along the length of the wetland units to assess the performance of the wetland units at various metal loadings. At the end of the study, all cattail plants were harvested for the determination of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and metal concentrations. The results showed that the COD removal efficiency was practically independent of increasing metal loading or a combination of metal loadings during the duration of the study. In contrast, the AN removal efficiency deteriorated progressively with increasing metal loading. The relative effect of the heavy metals was found to increase in the order: Znnitrogen uptake by cattail plants as indicated by lower nitrogen uptake rates in comparison to rates recorded in wetland systems treating domestic wastewater only. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Heavy metal ion removal by thiol functionalized aluminum oxide hydroxide nanowhiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Baird, Lance; Zimmerman, Natasha; Yeager, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we developed a cost effective method of using thiol functionalized γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide (γ-AlOOH) filters for removing three key heavy metals from water: mercury, lead, and cadmium under non-concomitant conditions. Compared to non-thiol treated γ-AlOOH filters, the introduction of thiol functional groups greatly improved the heavy metal removal efficiency under both static and dynamic filtration conditions. The adsorption kinetics of thiol functionalized γ-AlOOH were investigated using the Lagergren first order and pseudo-second order kinetics models; whereas the isothermal adsorption behavior of these membranes was revealed through the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Heavy metal concentration was quantified by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy, and the thiol level on γ-AlOOH surface was measured by a colorimetric assay using Ellman's reagent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to further address the surface sulfur state on the membranes after heavy metal exposure. Mechanisms for heavy metal adsorption were also discussed.

  2. Role of estuarine natural processes in removal of trace metals under emergency situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Karbassi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are well known for their potential in removing metal from fresh water to provide micro-nutrients to aquatic life. In the present investigation, we have tried to bring out the metal removal potential of estuaries during accidental spills. For this purpose artificial river water containing high concentration of Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni and Pb were mixed with sea water at different salinity regimes. Water samples were taken from a station on the main branch of Tajan River that flows in to the Caspian Sea. For this purpose, solutions with a concentration of 5 mg/L of each studied metal (Mn,Cu, Zn, Pb were prepared in Tajan River water. The salinity regimes include 3, 6, 8, 10 and 11 ppt. It was noted that metal concentration decreased by increasing salinity. Metals were flocculated at different rates: Cu (88% > Ni (86% > Pb (84% > Mn (74%.Thus, as average about 80% of total elemental content flocculates. Hence, it was concluded that a large amount of micro nutrients is carried by the river and flocculated in the estuary where the river water mixes with the sea water which may play a vital role in supplying nutrients to the aquatic animals. Cluster analyses have shown that Mn and Ni are governed by EC, pH and salinity.

  3. Effective Removal of Heavy Metal Ions Using Glycerol and Starch Xanthate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Mohammed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol and insoluble starch xanthates were synthesised and effectively used in the removal of Pb, Cd and Cu from aqueous solutions. The insoluble metal complex formed between the sulphur atoms in the xanthates and the heavy metals were easily separated. Lower dosage of glycerol xanthate was required in each case, with the optimum molar ratio (M2+/GX of 2. Moreover, the use of glycerol xanthate required no pH adjustments to give a 100 % heavy metal removal within the range of the detection limit. As for the ISX, there was a remarkable metal scavenging activity when the ISX contained high amount of Sulphur per molecule (10.12% S and when the pH was adjusted to 6. Butyl xanthate was also synthesised to make a good comparison with the glycerol and insoluble starch xanthate. The xanthates from these two sustainable materials (Starch and glycerol are proven to be more effective in metal scavenging activity. FTIR and CHNS elemental analyses were used to prove the evidence of xanthation, in addition, 13C NMR was used to characterise the glycerol xanthate.

  4. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Azizi

    Full Text Available For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours, while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l, is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater.

  5. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Shohreh; Kamika, Ilunga; Tekere, Memory

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l) concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours), while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l), is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater. PMID:27186636

  6. Polyaza macroligands as potential agents for heavy metal removal from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizondo Martínez Perla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two polyaza macroligands N,N´-bis(2-aminobenzyl-1,2- ethanediamine (L1 and 3,6,9,12-tetraaza-4(1,2,11(1,2-dibenzo-1(1,3- piridinaciclotridecafano (L2 were characterized and investigated for their metal ion extraction capabilities. The nature of all complexes was established by spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium constants were determined by spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques and the residual concentration of metals in the solutions by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS. The capacity of the ligands to remove heavy metals such as Cu(II, Ni(II, Cd(II, Zn(II and Pb(II as insoluble complexes was evaluated in wastewater from industrial effluents. These agents showed high affinity for the studied metals. The values of equilibrium constants of the isolated complexes (between 1 x 104 and 2 x 107 demonstrated the feasibility of applying these chelating agents as an alternative to remove heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  7. Metal Removal and Antimicrobial Properties of Watermelon rind modified with clove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current rapid development of industrial activity indirectly discharged pollutant into the local water stream. One of the harmful industrial wastes that enter public drainage is heavy metal owing to its toxic, non-biodegradable and persistent in nature. Improper treatment of domestic waste also will discharged high amount of microbial. Various types of technology were developed for removing pollutant in wastewater, but most of the technology employed to address on removing organic content in wastewater. Other pollutant namely, heavy metals and microbial indirectly treated at low concentration of pollutant loading. Among various available technologies for water treatment adsorption process is considered a promising technology as compared to other methods because of convenience, easy operational and low cost of treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate potential used of local fruit rind modified with herb as adsorbent material. The rind present strong potential due to its high content of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and lignin as active binding sites for metal sorption. Modified rind improves absorption by having anti microbial properties to kill pathogenic organisms. The concentration of heavy metal ions was analysed using ICP-MS. E. coli and total colifrm were plated out using chromocult agar. The results showed significant reductions of heavy metals and microbial concentration after wastewater was treated with clove modified rind.

  8. Estuaries as filters: the role of tidal marshes in trace metal removal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Teuchies

    Full Text Available Flux calculations demonstrate that many estuaries are natural filters for trace metals. Yet, the underlying processes are poorly investigated. In the present study, it was hypothesized that intertidal marshes contribute significantly to the contaminant filter function of estuaries. Trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were measured along a transect from the subtidal, over an intertidal flat and marsh to a restored marsh with controlled reduced tide. Metal concentrations in the intertidal and restored marsh were found to be a factor two to five higher than values in the subtidal and intertidal flat sediments. High metal concentrations and high accretion rates indicate a high metal accumulation capacity of the intertidal marshes. Overbank sedimentation in the tidal marshes of the entire estuary was calculated to remove 25% to 50% of the riverine metal influx, even though marshes comprise less than 8% of the total surface of the estuary. In addition, the large-scale implementation of planned tidal marsh restoration projects was estimated to almost double the trace metal storage capacity of the present natural tidal marshes in the estuary.

  9. Neural networks-based modeling applied to a process of heavy metals removal from wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suditu, Gabriel D; Curteanu, Silvia; Bulgariu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This article approaches the problem of environment pollution with heavy metals from disposal of industrial wastewaters, namely removal of these metals by means of biosorbents, particularly with Romanian peat (from Poiana Stampei). The study is carried out by simulation using feed-forward and modular neural networks with one or two hidden layers, pursuing the influence of certain operating parameters (metal nature, sorbent dose, pH, temperature, initial concentration of metal ion, contact time) on the amount of metal ions retained on the unit mass of sorbent. In neural network modeling, a consistent data set was used, including five metals: lead, mercury, cadmium, nickel and cobalt, the quantification of the metal nature being done by its electronegativity. Even if based on successive trials, the method of designing neural models was systematically conducted, recording and comparing the errors obtained with different types of neural networks, having various numbers of hidden layers and neurons, number of training epochs, or using various learning methods. The errors with values under 5% make clear the efficiency of the applied method.

  10. Removal and recovery of radionuclides and toxic metals from wastes, soils and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1993-07-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the removal of metals and radionuclides from contaminated materials, soils, and waste sites (Figure 1). In this process, citric acid, a naturally occurring organic complexing agent, is used to extract metals such as Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, and radionuclides Co, Sr, Th, and U from solid wastes by formation of water soluble, metal-citrate complexes. Citric acid forms different types of complexes with the transition metals and actinides, and may involve formation of a bidentate, tridentate, binuclear, or polynuclear complex species. The extract containing radionuclide/metal complex is then subjected to microbiological degradation followed by photochemical degradation under aerobic conditions. Several metal citrate complexes are biodegraded and the metals are recovered in a concentrated form with the bacterial biomass. Uranium forms binuclear complex with citric acid and is not biodegraded. The supernatant containing uranium citrate complex is separated and upon exposure to light, undergoes rapid degradation resulting in the formation of an insoluble, stable polymeric form of uranium. Uranium is recovered as a precipitate (uranium trioxide) in a concentrated form for recycling or for appropriate disposal. This treatment process, unlike others which use caustic reagents, does not create additional hazardous wastes for disposal and causes little damage to soil which can then be returned to normal use

  11. Fabrication of chelating diethylenetriaminated pan micro and nano fibers for heavy metal removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdouss Majid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, commercial acrylic fibers were modified with diethylenetriamine to prepare metal chelating fibers. The effects of process parameters on the efficiency of the reaction were investigated. FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis were used to confirm the chemical changes made to the fibers during the reaction. The ability of the modified fibers for removal of Pb (II, Cu (II and Ce (IV ions from aqueous media was determined. The modified fibers showed a slight decrease in mechanical properties compared to raw ones. Furthermore, the acrylic micro fibers were electrospun to nanofibers and the ability of modified nanofibers for the adsorption of the metal ions was studied.

  12. Characterization and use of Moringa oleifera seeds as biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cleide S T; Alves, Vanessa N; Rezende, Hélen C; Almeida, Ione L S; de Assunção, Rosana M N; Tarley, César R T; Segatelli, Mariana G; Coelho, Nivia M Melo

    2010-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds were investigated as a biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents. The morphological characteristics as well as the chemical composition of M. oleifera seeds were evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The FT-IR spectra showed the presence of lipids and protein components. Scanning electron micrographs showed that Moringa seeds have an adequate morphological profile for the retention of metal ions. The results suggest that M. oleifera seeds have potential application in Cd(II), Pb(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) decontamination from aqueous effluents.

  13. Method for removing strongly adsorbed surfactants and capping agents from metal to facilitate their catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Gong, Kuanping; Cai, Yun; Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2016-11-08

    A method of synthesizing activated electrocatalyst, preferably having a morphology of a nanostructure, is disclosed. The method includes safely and efficiently removing surfactants and capping agents from the surface of the metal structures. With regard to metal nanoparticles, the method includes synthesis of nanoparticle(s) in polar or non-polar solution with surfactants or capping agents and subsequent activation by CO-adsorption-induced surfactant/capping agent desorption and electrochemical oxidation. The method produces activated macroparticle or nanoparticle electrocatalysts without damaging the surface of the electrocatalyst that includes breaking, increasing particle thickness or increasing the number of low coordination sites.

  14. Removal of heavy metals from metal-containing effluent by yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cr) and tin (Sn) from metal-containing effluent by waste brewer's yeast. Biosorption of Cr and Sn was studied under batch conditions at a pH value of 6.5. The biomass, non-viable cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is able to adsorb ...

  15. Removal of heavy metals from metal-containing effluent by yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... from the chrome and tin effluents of a local iron and steel industry. Key words: ... source of biomass for bioremediation of waste water. It ... microbes. Unz and Shuttleworth (1996) stated that the capacity of biomass to recover metals from waste water depends on its physical, chemical and biological pro-.

  16. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater by chemically modified plant wastes as adsorbents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ngah, W S; Hanafiah, M A K M

    2008-07-01

    The application of low-cost adsorbents obtained from plant wastes as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing heavy metal ions from wastewater has been reviewed. It is well known that cellulosic waste materials can be obtained and employed as cheap adsorbents and their performance to remove heavy metal ions can be affected upon chemical treatment. In general, chemically modified plant wastes exhibit higher adsorption capacities than unmodified forms. Numerous chemicals have been used for modifications which include mineral and organic acids, bases, oxidizing agent, organic compounds, etc. In this review, an extensive list of plant wastes as adsorbents including rice husks, spent grain, sawdust, sugarcane bagasse, fruit wastes, weeds and others has been compiled. Some of the treated adsorbents show good adsorption capacities for Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni.

  17. Fluoroscopic removal of metallic foreign bodies in the stomach with a magnetic orogastric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, E.K.; Jaffe, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of metallic foreign bodies in the stomach were referred for fluoroscopically guided removal by means of a 5-mm diameter magnet coupled to an orogastric tube. The foreign bodies included 29 disk batteries, two nails, two screws, a nut and bolt, an unopened jack knife, and a metallic whistle. The average patient age was 4 years (range, 11 months to 13 years). Removal was successful in 33 of the 36 cases (92%). The three failures were the result of inadvertent passage of the foreign body into the duodenum (two cases) and lack of magnetic attraction (one case). There were no complications. No patient required general anesthesia, hospital admission, or endoscopic surgical intervention

  18. Functional metal sulfides and selenides for the removal of hazardous dyes from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin; Raza, Bareera; Saba, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Water contamination by organic dyes, is among the most alarming threats to healthy green environment. Complete removal of organic dyes is necessary to make water healthy for drinking, cooking, and for other useful aspects. Recently use of nanotechnology for removing organic dyes, became fruitful because of high surface to volume ratio and adsorption properties. Among these materials, metal chalcogenides emerge as new class of active materials for water purification. In this review article, we gathered information related to sulfide and selenide based nanomaterials which include metal sulfides and selenides, their binary composites, and use of different capping agents and dopants for enhancing photocatalysis. We have discussed in detail, about adsorption power of different dyes, relative percentage degradation, reaction time and concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Removing paint from a metal substrate using a flattened top laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shu-Dong; Li Wei; Du Peng; Wang Meng; Song Feng; Liu Shu-Jing; Chen Nian-Jiang; Zhao Hong; Yang Wen-Shi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate laser cleaning using a flattened top laser to remove paint coating from a metal substrate. Under the irradiation of a flattened top laser, the coating paint of the metal substrate can be removed efficiently by laser induced ablation, stress, and displacement force. The temperature distribution, stress, and displacement are calculated in the coating layer and substrate using finite element analysis. The effects of a Gaussian laser and a flattened top laser and the results of different diameters of laser spot are compared. The investigation shows that the flattened top laser can reduce the substrate damage and enhance the cleaning efficiency. This method meets the need of large area industrial cleaning applications by optimizing the flattened top laser parameters

  20. Removing paint from a metal substrate using a flattened top laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shu-Dong; Li, Wei; Du, Peng; Wang, Meng; Song, Feng; Liu, Shu-Jing; Chen, Nian-Jiang; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Wen-Shi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate laser cleaning using a flattened top laser to remove paint coating from a metal substrate. Under the irradiation of a flattened top laser, the coating paint of the metal substrate can be removed efficiently by laser induced ablation, stress, and displacement force. The temperature distribution, stress, and displacement are calculated in the coating layer and substrate using finite element analysis. The effects of a Gaussian laser and a flattened top laser and the results of different diameters of laser spot are compared. The investigation shows that the flattened top laser can reduce the substrate damage and enhance the cleaning efficiency. This method meets the need of large area industrial cleaning applications by optimizing the flattened top laser parameters.

  1. Investigation of Media Effects on Removal of Heavy Metals in Bioretention Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbaz, Sezar; Melek Kazezyilmaz-Alhan, Cevza; Copty, Nadim K.

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals are the most toxic elements at high concentrations, although some of them such as Cu and Zn are essential to plants, humans, and animals within a limited value. However, some heavy metals, such as Pb, have adverse effects even at low concentrations. Therefore, it is known that the toxic metals such as Zn, Cu and Pb in storm water runoff are serious threat for aquatic organisms. It is very important to control and reduce heavy metal concentration in urban storm water runoff. There are several methods to remove the aforementioned toxic metals such as electrolyte extraction, chemical precipitation, ion-exchange, reverse osmosis, membrane filtration, adsorption, cementation, and electrochemical treatment technologies. However, these methods are highly expensive and hard to implement for treatment of big volumes of water such as storm water. For this purpose, Low Impact Development (LID) Best Management Practices (BMPs) have become popular to collect, infiltrate, and treat toxic metals in storm water runoff in recent years. LID-BMP is a land planning method which is used to manage storm water runoff and improve water quality by reducing contaminant in storm water runoff. Bioretention is an example of LID-BMP application of which usage has recently been started in storm water treatment. Researchers have been investigating the advantages of bioretention systems and this study contributes to these research efforts by seeking for the media effects of bioretention on heavy metal removal. For this purpose, batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the distribution coefficients and retardation factor of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) for bioretention media such as mulch, turf, local or vegetative soil, sand and gravel. Furthermore, sorption reaction kinetics of Cu, Pb and Zn are tested in order to assess the sorption equilibrium time of these metals for 5 bioretention media. The results of sorption test show that turf has higher sorption

  2. Low protein content of drainage fluid is a good predictor for earlier chest tube removal after lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgac, Guven; Cosgun, Tugba; Vayvada, Mustafa; Ozdemir, Atilla; Kutlu, Cemal Asim

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the great absorption capability of the pleura for transudates, the protein content of draining pleural fluid may be considered as a more adequate determinant than its daily draining amount in the decision-making for earlier chest tube removal. In an a priori pilot study, we observed that the initially draining protein-rich exudate converts to a transudate quickly in most patients after lobectomies. Thus, chest tubes draining high-volume but low-protein fluids can safely be removed earlier in the absence of an air leak. This randomized study aims to investigate the validity and clinical applicability of this hypothesis as well as its influence on the timing for chest tube removal and earlier discharge after lobectomy. Seventy-two consecutive patients undergoing straightforward lobectomy were randomized into two groups. Patients with conditions affecting postoperative drainage and with persisting air leaks beyond the third postoperative day were excluded. Drains were removed if the pleural fluid to blood protein ratio (PrRPl/B) was ≤0.5, regardless of its daily draining amount in the study arm (Group S; n = 38), and patients in the control arm (Group C; n = 34) had their tubes removed if daily drainage was ≤250 ml regardless of its protein content. Patients were discharged home immediately or the following morning after removal of the last drain. All cases were followed up regarding the development of symptomatic pleural effusions and hospital readmissions for a redrainage procedure. Demographic and clinical characteristics as well as the pattern of decrease in PrRPl/B were the same between groups. The mean PrRPl/B was 0.65 and 0.67 (95% CI = 0.60-0.69 and 0.62-0.72) on the first postoperative day, and it remarkably dropped down to 0.39 and 0.33 (95% CI = 0.33-0.45 and 0.27-0.39) on the second day in Groups S and C, respectively, and remained below 0.5 on the third day (repeated-measures of ANOVA design, post hoc 'within-group' comparison of the first

  3. Fluid mechanics of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of droplets – a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a survey of principles of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of molten metal droplets, focusing on fluid-mechanical problems that deserve being investigated. The main problem is slowness of manufacturing due to necessarily small size of added droplets. Increase of droplet repetition rate calls for basic research of the phenomena that take place inside and around the droplets: ballistics of their flight, internal flowfield with heat and mass transfer, oscillation of surfaces, and the ways to elimination of satellite droplets.

  4. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by adsorption on weathered coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meena, A.K.; Gupta, M.D.; Mishra, G.K.; Rajagopal, C.; Nagar, P.N. [Central Research Institute (Ayurveda), Gwalior (India)

    2009-07-01

    The adsorption followed first-order kinetics. The results indicate the potential application of this method for effluent treatment in industries and also provide strong evidence to support the adsorption mechanism proposed. On the basis of experimental results, it can be inferred that the adsorbent weathered coal may be useful in developing an adsorptive technology for the removal of heavy metals. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  6. Study of metal removal by square Wetland System with Eleocharis SP. using SR-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avelino Neto, Sebastiao; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mails: savneto@bol.com.br; silvana@fec.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    The pollution of the water resources for metals, results of different economic activities. The objective of the present study was to use the SR-TXRF technique to evaluate the performance of Wetland system cultivated with Eleocharis sp. installed at FEAGRI-UNICAMP, in the metal removal. The metals analyzed were Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn and Pb. Samples of the wastewater in the exit, Eleocharis sp. leaf and medium boulder were collected during 20 weeks consecutively. The system was operated with different outflows and hydraulic detention times (HDT) as: 600 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 2 days), 400 L.day-1 (HDT 3 days), 300 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 4 days) and 200 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 6 days). The main source of metal removal was medium boulder with efficiency varying 30.1% for Cr and 98.9% for Pb, independent of the hydraulic detention time (HDT) used. The efficiency of the wetland in the Cr removal varied between 39.6 and 98.7%, and for Mn was higher than 81.6%. For Fe the performance was higher than 70.6% and for Cu the efficiency varied between 88.4 and 99.7 %, while for Pb the variation was 67.5 to 98.4 %. The wetland system with Eleocharis sp were in agreement with CONAMA legislation concern to Fe, Cu and Zn removal and for HDT of 2, 3, 4 and 6 days (HDT), moreover for Mn was necessary 4 and 6 days (HDT) and for Cr and Pb 6 days (HDT). (author)

  7. Study of metal removal by square Wetland System with Eleocharis SP. using SR-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelino Neto, Sebastiao; Moreira, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The pollution of the water resources for metals, results of different economic activities. The objective of the present study was to use the SR-TXRF technique to evaluate the performance of Wetland system cultivated with Eleocharis sp. installed at FEAGRI-UNICAMP, in the metal removal. The metals analyzed were Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn and Pb. Samples of the wastewater in the exit, Eleocharis sp. leaf and medium boulder were collected during 20 weeks consecutively. The system was operated with different outflows and hydraulic detention times (HDT) as: 600 L.day -1 (HDT 2 days), 400 L.day-1 (HDT 3 days), 300 L.day -1 (HDT 4 days) and 200 L.day -1 (HDT 6 days). The main source of metal removal was medium boulder with efficiency varying 30.1% for Cr and 98.9% for Pb, independent of the hydraulic detention time (HDT) used. The efficiency of the wetland in the Cr removal varied between 39.6 and 98.7%, and for Mn was higher than 81.6%. For Fe the performance was higher than 70.6% and for Cu the efficiency varied between 88.4 and 99.7 %, while for Pb the variation was 67.5 to 98.4 %. The wetland system with Eleocharis sp were in agreement with CONAMA legislation concern to Fe, Cu and Zn removal and for HDT of 2, 3, 4 and 6 days (HDT), moreover for Mn was necessary 4 and 6 days (HDT) and for Cr and Pb 6 days (HDT). (author)

  8. Functional Oxide Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites for the Removal of Heavy Metals and Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sarika; Barick, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity and its contamination with toxic metal ions and organic dyes represent a serious worldwide problem in the 21st century. A wide range of conventional approaches have been used to remove these contaminants from waste. Recently, nanotechnology has been given great scope for the fabrication of desirable nanomaterials with large surface-to-volume ratios and unique surface functionalities to treat these pollutants. Amongst these, oxide-based nanomaterials emerge as promising new mate...

  9. Metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Stonesifer, Greg T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of Allied Signal metal oxide based absorbents demonstrated that these absorbents offer a unique capability to regeneratively remove both metabolic carbon dioxide and water vapor from breathing air; previously, metal oxides were considered only for the removal of CO2. The concurrent removal of CO2 and H2O vapor can simplify the astronaut Portable Life Support System (PLSS) by combining the CO2 and humidity control functions into one regenerative component. The use of metal oxide absorbents for removal of both CO2 ad H2O vapor in the PLSS is the focus of an ongoing program. The full scale Metal Oxide Carbon dioxide and Humidity Remover (MOCHR) and regeneration unit is described.

  10. Influence of pH on heavy metal speciation and removal from wastewater using micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinhui; Yuan, Fang; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xue; Gu, Yanling; Shi, Lixiu; Liu, Wenchu; Shi, Yahui

    2017-04-01

    pH plays an important role in heavy metal removal during micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF). In the present work, the influence of pH on heavy metal speciation and removal from wastewater by MEUF was investigated using an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and a hydrophilic membrane (polyether sulfone). Experiments were performed with pH values in the range of 1-12. Metal ion removal efficiency (R) was used to assess the effects of the MEUF process. Results showed that better removal rate of copper and cadmium was achieved at high pH values (pH > 3) with SDS feed concentration of 8 mM, while the optimal pH range was 3-10 for zinc and lead. The corresponding efficiencies for heavy metal removal decreased with the increasing feed concentration of metal ions under the pH conditions of 1-12. Furthermore, the heavy metal ion removal rate (50 mg/L) followed the order of Pb 2+  > Cd 2+  > Zn 2+  > Cu 2+ . These results showed that pH is a key parameter in metal ion speciation and removal during MEUF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency.

  12. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading.

  13. Green Approach in the Bio-removal of Heavy Metals from wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gani Paran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of microalgae has been suggested as a green approach for a sustainable wastewater treatment especially heavy metal bioremediation. This study investigated the bio-removal of zinc (Zn, iron (Fe, cadmium (Cd and manganese (Mn from domestic wastewater (DW and food processing wastewater (FW using green microalgae, Botryococcus sp.. The total of five treatments represented by five different cell concentrations (1×103, 1×104, 1×105, 1×106 and 1×107 cells/mL of Botryococcus sp. in the wastewaters medium. The results revealed high removal efficiency of Zn, Fe, Cd and Mn after 18 days of the culture compared to control (wastewaters without algae. In DW , Zn, Fe, Cd and Mn were successfully removed at the highest efficiencies up to 71.5%, 51.2%, 83.5% and 97.2%, respectively while in FW, the same metal concentrations were reduced by up to 64.4%, 53.3%, 52.9% and 26.7%, respectively. Overall, most of the algae cell concentrations tested were successfully reducing the metals contaminant presence in both wastewaters and provides a baseline for further phycoremediation coupled with biomass production.

  14. Effects of pulse current on energy consumption and removal of heavy metals during electrodialytic soil remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this paper were to investigate the possibility for energy saving when using a pulsed electric field during electrodialytic soil remediation (EDR) and the effect of the pulsed current on removal of heavy metals. Eight experiments with constant and pulse current in the different...... industrially polluted soils were performed. At a current density of 0.1mA/cm2 in soil 1 and 0.2mA/cm2 in soil 2, there was no difference on energy consumption and removal of heavy metals between pulse current and constant current experiments, but at higher current experiments (i.e., 0.2mA/cm2 in soil 1 and 0.......8mA/cm2 in soil 2) the energy was saved 67% and 60% and the removal of heavy metals was increased 17–76% and 31–51% by pulse current in soil 1 and soil 2, respectively. When comparing the voltage drop at different parts of EDR cells, it was found that the voltage drop of the area across cation...

  15. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading. PMID:24736500

  16. Heavy Metals Removal from Sewage Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste (MSW by Co-Composting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Babaee Darzi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: One of the most important pollutants in drinking water, air and soils is heavy metals. It is very harmful for humans and other live organisms. The purpose of this study was the usage of a co-composting process for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was a conducted sewage sludge and municipal solid waste. For collection of samples from urban solid waste composting and wastewater treatment plant, a 200 mL polyethylene bottles was used, samples after acidification were stored in a dark place at 4°C temperature until the metals analysis the heavy metals values remaining in the samples was measured by graphite furnace absorption spectrometer method (Varian, SpectrAA 240, Australia. In this study, we used SPSS version 16 for data processing; and they were also analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: Result of this study showed that values of C/N in the first, second and third stage compost were 31.7, 27.3 and 41.8, respectively. Based on the result of this study the value of removal of Cd with 9.8 mg kg-1 in first stage and Cr, Cu and Zn with 89, 21 and 87.6 mg kg-1 in third stage were highest treatment. Conclusion: Our results show that co-composting process between many treatment processes having to be cost effective for heavy metal removal from solid waste and wastewater treatment.

  17. Removal of Heavy Metals from Solid Wastes Leachates Coagulation-Flocculation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Z.; Zazouli, M. A.

    The main objectives of present research were to determine heavy metals (Ni, Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) and COD concentration in raw leachate in Esfahan (Iran) composting plant and to examine the application of coagulation-flocculation process for the treatment of raw leachates. Jar-test experiments were employed in order to determine the optimum conditions (effective dosage and optimum pH) for the removal of COD and heavy metals. Alum (aluminum sulphate) and Ferric chloride were tested as conventional coagulants. Ten times had taken sampling from leachates as standard methods in the composting plant prior to composting process. The results showed that Leachate pH was 4.3-5.9 and the average was 4.98±0.62. The concentration of Leachate pollutants were more than effluent standard limits (Environment protection Agency). And also the results indicated, Cd and Zn with concentration 0.46±0.41 and 5.81±3.69 mg L-1, had minimum and maximum levels, respectively. The results of coagulation and flocculation tests showed that in optimum conditions, the removal efficiency of heavy metals and COD by using alum were 77-91 and 21%, respectively. While removal of heavy metals and COD by ferric chloride were 68-85.5% and 28%, respectively. Also the residues of heavy metals after treatment get to under of standard limits of Iran EPA. The results have indicated optimum pH of two coagulants for leachate treatment was 6.5 and 10 and also effective coagulant dosages were 1400 and 1000 mg L-1 for alum and ferric chloride, respectively. In view of economical, ferric chloride is cost benefit. The physico-chemical process may be used as a useful pretreatment step, especially for fresh leachates.

  18. Study of heavy metals removal from model solutions by wooden materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demcak, S.; Balintova, M.; Demcakova, M.

    2017-10-01

    The paper deals with the heavy metals removal by wooden material. The adsorption experiments were carried out using of wood sawdust and bark from poplar tree for the removal of copper and zinc cations from model solutions with initial concentration of 10 mg.L-1. The FTIR was used for functional groups determination not for analysis of hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin in structure of wood sawdust and bark were studied by infrared spectrometry. Poplar sawdust efficiency for Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal from aquatic model solutions reached approximately 80.0%. Changes of pH values were also observed in model solutions that were probably caused by ion exchange between the ions of sorbents and the ions in solutions.

  19. Utilization of poplar wood sawdust for heavy metals removal from model solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demcak Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Some kinds of natural organic materials have a potential for removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater. It is well known that cellulosic waste materials or by-products can be used as cheap adsorbents in chemical treatment process. In this paper, poplar wood sawdust were used for removal of Cu(II, Zn(II and Fe(II ions from model solutions with using the static and dynamic adsorption experiments. Infrared spectrometry of poplar wood sawdust confirmed the presence of the functional groups which correspond with hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin. At static adsorption was achieved approximately of 80 % efficiency for all treated model solutions. Similar efficiency of the adsorption processes was reached after 5 min at dynamic condition. The highest efficiency of Cu(II removal (98 % was observed after 30 min of dynamic adsorption. Changes of pH values confirmed a mechanism of ion exchange on the beginning of the adsorption process.

  20. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  1. Titanium removable denture based on a one-metal rehabilitation concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Sato, Yohei; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yasunori

    2017-09-26

    The use of a single metal for all restorations would be necessary because it protects against metal corrosion caused by the contact of different metals. For this "one-metal rehabilitation" concept, non-alloyed commercially pure (CP) titanium should be used for all restorations. Titanium frameworks have been cast and used for the long term without catastrophic failure, whereas they have been fabricated recently using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM). However, the milling process for the frameworks of removable partial dentures (RPDs) is not easy because they have very complicated shapes and consist of many components. Currently, the fabrication of RPD frameworks has been challenged by one-process molding using repeated laser sintering and high-speed milling. Laser welding has also been used typically for repairing and rebuilding titanium frameworks. Although laboratory and clinical problems still remain, the one-metal rehabilitation concept using CP titanium as a bioinert metal can be recommended for all restorations.

  2. Preparation of polyelectrolyte-modified membranes for heavy metal ions removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhter, M A; Lakard, S; Magnenet, C; Euvrard, M; Lakard, B

    2017-10-01

    Polyethersulfone membranes were modified by polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayers, made of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) with poly(styrene sulfonate), to remove Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ heavy metal cations from aqueous solutions in a wide range of metal concentration (50-1200 ppm). After characterization of the modified membranes, the efficiency of the process was estimated for single heavy metal ions solution leading to high rejection rates (>90% for 50 ppm) and good adsorption capacities (7.0-8.5 mg cm -2 ) whatever the metal ion tested. The stability in time of the modified membranes was proved by repeating successive filtrations with the same membrane. The filtration process was also used with mixed solutions composed of Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ and Ni 2+ ions. The rejection rates obtained for these ternary systems were very similar to the ones obtained for the single metal solutions, showing that the filtration process is still efficient for mixed solutions and can be applied for the decontamination of complex solutions. The long-term stability of the modified membranes was also demonstrated for mixed solutions. The high efficiency of the filtration process and the good adsorption capacities of the modified membranes are due to the ability of the PEs used to complex all the metallic dications tested in this study.

  3. Seasonal assessment, treatment and removal of heavy metal concentrations in a tropical drinking water reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Moshood Keke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are present in low concentrations in reservoirs, but seasonal anthropogenic activities usually elevate the concentrations to a level that could become a health hazard. The dry season concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, mercury, nickel and zinc were assessed from three sites for 12 weeks in Oyun reservoir, Offa, Nigeria. Triplicate surface water samples were collected and analysed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The trend in the level of concentrations in the three sites is site C > B > A, while the trend in the levels of the concentrations in the reservoir is Ni > Fe > Zn > Pb > Cd > Cu > Hg. Ni, Cd, Pb and Hg were found to be higher than the WHO guidelines for the metals in drinking water. The high concentration of these metals was from anthropogenic watershed run-off of industrial effluents, domestic sewages and agricultural materials into the reservoir coming from several human activities such as washing, bathing, fish smoking, especially in site C. The health effects of high concentration of these metals in the reservoir were highlighted. Methods for the treatment and removal of the heavy metals from the reservoir during water purification such as active carbon adsorption, coagulation-flocculation, oxidation-filtration, softening treatment and reverse osmosis process were highlighted. Other methods that could be used include phytoremediation, rhizofiltration, bisorption and bioremediation. Watershed best management practices (BMP remains the best solution to reduce the intrusion of the heavy metals from the watershed into the reservoir.

  4. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2017-07-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration ( C o), contact time ( t) and different adsorbent masses ( m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  5. Hg removal and the effects of coexisting metals in forward osmosis and membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Zhang, Dai-Zhou; Kobayashi, Jun

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the rejection of Hg, Cd, and Pb and the effect of coexisting metals on Hg removal through forward osmosis (FO) and membrane distillation (MD) in order to establish a more effective water treatment process. The results of our laboratory experiment indicate that more than 97% of the rejection for each metal is achieved through the FO system, and this rejection is the highest among previous studies using membrane filtrations. Moreover, we examine the matrix effect of the coexisting Cd and Pb on the rejection of Hg in the FO system. Hg 2+ rejection increases with increase in the concentration of the coexisting metals. Furthermore, we study the effect of the Hg concentration and the water temperature on rejection of Hg 2+ . Indeed, the rejection of Hg 2+ is achieved above 95% under any condition. However, approximately 1-10 ppb Hg from the feed solution remains in the draw solution due to permeation. Therefore, we use a FO-MD hybrid system. Approximately 100% rejection of Hg 2+ and a stable water flux are achieved. Thus, the FO-MD hybrid system is considered an important alternative to previous studies using membrane filtration for heavy metals removal.

  6. Parthenium hysterophorus: Novel adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals and dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Bapat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals and dyes are major contributors in contamination of water streams. These contaminants enter into our eco- system, thus posing a significant threat to public health, ecological equilibrium and environment. Thus a combined discharge of these contaminants results in water pollution with high chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand, color, particulate matter, suspended particles and odor. The mounting pollution of the water bodies has attracted attention of the researchers towards the development of novel techniques and materials for water pollution. The paper describes the use of such a material Parthenium hysterophorus, a weed, explored for water purification. The potential of the weed has been tested for several heavy metals and dyes as described in this paper. As per literature the weed is capable of showing adsorption tendency up to 90% in certain cases for some heavy metals and dyes. Powdered weed, activated carbon, ash etc. of Parthenium have been employed for the removal process.

  7. Parthenium hysterophorus: Novel adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals and dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bapat, S. A.; Jaspal, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals and dyes are major contributors in contamination of water streams. These contaminants enter into our eco- system, thus posing a significant threat to public health, ecological equilibrium and environment. Thus a combined discharge of these contaminants results in water pollution with high chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand, color, particulate matter, suspended particles and odor. The mounting pollution of the water bodies has attracted attention of the researchers towards the development of novel techniques and materials for water pollution. The paper describes the use of such a material Parthenium hysterophorus, a weed, explored for water purification. The potential of the weed has been tested for several heavy metals and dyes as described in this paper. As per literature the weed is capable of showing adsorption tendency up to 90% in certain cases for some heavy metals and dyes. Powdered weed, activated carbon, ash etc. of Parthenium have been employed for the removal process.

  8. Study of the sorption properties of the peat for removal of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayrapetyan, S.S.; Gevorgyan, S.A.; Hayrapetyan, L.S.; Bareghamyan, S.F.; Pirumyan, G.P.

    2016-01-01

    The processes of sorption of several heavy metals on peat samples taken from basin of lake Sevan (near Vardenis Gegharkunik region of Armenia) were investigated. The peat samples were taken from different locations from 1 m depth. The sorption processes have been done in the static mode. The peat samples were used without any modification, i.e. the sorption properties of natural raw peat were studied. The studies were conducted on the basis of synthetic solution containing ions of these following metals - Ni, Co, As, U, Ba. The sorption properties of peat were estimated by ICP-MS. Thus, peat can be a very effective sorption medium for removal of heavy metals from water. Most of them are absorbed in the first minutes of peat exposure to aqueous solution. For the sorption of barium, uranium, arsenic peat exhibits very high sorption efficiency. For comparison, their relative sorption values about 10 times more than those of cobalt, nickel and zinc.

  9. The Metal And Sulphate Removal From Mine Drainage Waters By Biological-Chemical Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenčárová Jana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mine drainage waters are often characterized by high concentrations of sulphates and metals as a consequence of the mining industry of sulphide minerals. The aims of this work are to prove some biological-chemical processes utilization for the mine drainage water treatment. The studied principles of contamination elimination from these waters include sulphate reduction and metal bioprecipitation by the application of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB. Other studied process was metal sorption by prepared biogenic sorbent. Mine drainage waters from Slovak localities Banská Štiavnica and Smolník were used to the pollution removal examination. In Banská Štiavnica water, sulphates decreased below the legislative limit. The elimination of zinc by sorption experiments achieved 84 % and 65 %, respectively.

  10. The role of carbon dioxide in the transport and fractionation of metals by geological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokh, Maria A.; Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Salvi, Stefano; Guillaume, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Although carbon dioxide is one of the major components of crustal fluids responsible for ore deposit formation, its effect on transport and precipitation of metals remains unknown, due to a lack of direct experimental data and physical-chemical models for CO2-rich fluids. To fill this gap, we combined laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling to systematically quantify the role played by CO2 for the solubility of economically important metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Au, Mo, Pt, Sn under hydrothermal conditions. Solubility measurements of common ore minerals of these metals (FeS2, CuFeS2, ZnS, Au, MoS2, PtS, SnO2) were performed, using a flexible-cell reactor equipped with a rapid sampling device, in a single-phase fluid (CO2-H2O-KCl) at 350-450 °C and 600-750 bar, buffered with iron sulfide and oxide and alkali-aluminosilicate mineral assemblages. In addition, another type of experiments was conducted to measure gold solubility in more sulfur-rich supercritical CO2-H2O-S-NaOH fluids at 450 °C and 700 bar using a batch reactor that allows fluid quenching. Our results show that the solubilities of Si, Au, Mo, Pt and Cu either decrease (within 1 log unit) with CO2 contents in the fluid increasing from 0 to 50 wt%. These data were interpreted using a simple model that does not require any new adjustable parameters, and is based on the dielectric constant of the H2O-CO2 solvent and on the Born solvation parameter for the dominant metal-bearing species in an aqueous fluid. Our predictions using this model suggest that in a supercritical CO2-H2O-S-salt fluid typical of metamorphic Au deposits, in equilibrium with pyrite and chalcopyrite, the Cu/Fe ratio decreases by up to 2 orders of magnitude with an increase of CO2 content from 0 to 70 wt%. This effect is due to the decrease of the fluid dielectric constant in the presence of CO2, which favors the stability of neutral species (FeCl20) compared to charged ones (CuCl2-). Our results explain the Fe enrichment and Cu

  11. An eco-friendly method for heavy metal removal from mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Fereshteh; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2018-03-29

    One of the serious environmental problems that society is facing today is mine tailings. These byproducts of the process of extraction of valuable elements from ores are a source of pollution and a threat to the environment. For example, mine tailings from past mining activities at Giant Mines, Yellowknife, are deposited in chambers, stopes, and tailing ponds close to the shores of The Great Slave Lake. One of the environmentally friendly approaches for removing heavy metals from these contaminated tailing is by using biosurfactants during the process of soil washing. The objective of this present study is to investigate the effect of sophorolipid (SL) concentration, the volume of washing solution per gram of medium, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of sophorolipids in removing heavy metals from mine tailings. It was found that the efficiency of the sophorolipids depends on its concentration, and is greatly affected by changes in pH, and temperature. The results of this experiment show that increasing the temperature from 15 to 23 °C, while using sophorolipids, resulted in an increase in the removal of iron, copper, and arsenic from the mine tailing specimen, from 0.25, 2.1, and 8.6 to 0.4, 3.3, and 11.7%. At the same time, increasing the temperature of deionized water (DIW) from 15 to 23 °C led to an increase in the removal of iron, copper, and arsenic from 0.03, 0.9, and 1.8 to 0.04, 1.1, and 2.1%, respectively. By increasing temperature from 23 to 35 °C, when using sophorolipids, 22% reduction in the removal of arsenic was observed. At the same time while using DI water as the washing solution, increasing temperature from 23 to 35 °C resulted in 6.2% increase in arsenic removal. The results from this present study indicate that sophorolipids are promising agents for replacing synthetic surfactants in the removal of arsenic and other heavy metals from soil and mine tailings.

  12. Experimental observation of proton-induced shocks and magneto-fluid- dynamics in liquid metal

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, A

    2003-01-01

    A liquid metal target is one of the options for the pion production target of a nu-factory. The interaction between a liquid metal and a proton beam were observed with static mercury as well as with a free mercury jet and up to 4 multiplied by 10**1**2 protons/bunch. The experimental method for investigating the magneto-fluid-dynamic effects of a high-velocity liquid metal in a high magnetic field magnet has been validated by recording the behaviour of a 15 m/s mercury burst entering the gradient of a 13 T solenoid at GHMFL Grenoble. The paper includes the description of the optical read-out system as well as numerical results of the mercury drop velocities.

  13. Magnetic Zr-MOFs nanocomposites for rapid removal of heavy metal ions and dyes from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2018-05-01

    Amino-decorated Zr-based magnetic Metal-Organic Frameworks composites (Zr-MFCs) were prepared by a facile and efficient strategy. The nano-sized Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 core (about 15 nm) was coated with a shell of Zr-MOFs (about 5 nm) by means of in-situ growth. And, Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @UiO-66 and its amino derivatives (Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @UiO-66-NH 2 and Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @UiO-66-Urea) were successfully prepared by using different precursors. The obtained Zr-MFCs were demonstrated to be efficient adsorbents for metal ions/organic dyes removal from aqueous solution, with high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics. It was found that the amine-decorated MFCs were highly efficient for metal ions/dyes removal compared to raw MFC-O. Among them, MFC-N exhibited the highest capacity for Pb 2+ (102 mg g -1 ) and methylene blue (128 mg g -1 ), while MFC-O exhibited the highest capacity for methyl orange (219 mg g -1 ). Moreover, anionic and cationic dyes could be selectively separated and removed from the mixed solution just by adjusting the solution pH with Zr-MFCs as the adsorbents. And these Zr-MFCs materials can be easily regenerated by desorbing metal ions/organic dyes from the sorbents with appropriate eluents, and the adsorption capacity can be remained unchanged after 6 recycles. The obtained results demonstrated the great application potential of the prepared MFCs as fascinating adsorbents for water treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Removal of metal ions by modified Pinus radiata bark and tannins from water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Graciela; Freer, Juanita; Baeza, Jaime

    2003-12-01

    Pinus radiata bark and tannins, chemically modified with an acidified formaldehyde solution were used for removing metal ions from aqueous solutions and copper mine acidic residual waters. The adsorption ability to different metal ions [V(V), Re(VII), Mo(VI), Ge(IV), As(V), Cd(II), Hg(II), Al(III), Pb(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Cu(II)] and the factors affecting their removal from solutions were investigated. Effect of pH on the adsorption, desorption, maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbents, and selectivity experiments with metal ion solutions and waste waters from copper mine were carried out. The adsorbents considerably varied in the adsorption ability to each metal ion. The adsorption depends largely upon the pH of the solution. Modified tannins showed lower adsorption values than the modified bark. For the same adsorbent, the maximum capacity at pH 3 for the different ions were very different, ranging for modified bark from 6.8 meqg(-1) for V to 0.93 meqg(-1) for Hg. Waste waters were extracted with modified bark as adsorbent and at pH 2. The ions Cu(II) (35.2 mgL(-1)), Fe(III) (198 mgL(-1)), Al(III) (83.5 mgL(-1)) and Cd(II) (0.15 mgL(-1)) were removed in 15.6%, 46.9%, 83.7% and 3.3%, respectively, by using 1g of adsorbent/10 mL of waste water. In general, a continuous adsorption on a packed column gave higher adsorbed values than those observed in the batchwise experiment.

  15. Metal organic framework absorbent platforms for removal of co2 and h2s from natural gas

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands which have high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Methods include capturing one or more of H2S, H2O, and CO2 from fluid compositions, such as natural gas.

  16. Metal transports and enrichments in iron depositions hosted in basaltic rocks. II: Metal rich fluids and Fe origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Xuetong; Hu, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on revealing the mechanism of metal transport, enrichment and Fe origin of iron deposition during water basalt interactions occurred in basaltic rocks. Observations of the iron deposits (anhydrite-magnetite-pyroxene type deposits) hosted in K-rich basaltic rocks in the Mesozoic volcanic area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River valley, China, indicate that the mechanism of metal transport and enrichment for those deposits are significant objective to scientists, and the Fe origin problem is not well resolved. Here the metal transport, enrichment and iron origin have been investigated in high temperature experiments of water basaltic interactions. These deposits were accompanying a wide zone with metal alteration. The effects of hydrothermal alteration on major rock-forming element concentrations in basaltic rock were investigated by systematically comparing the chemical compositions of altered rocks with those of fresh rocks. In the deposits, these metals are distributed throughout altered rocks that exhibit vertical zoning from the deeper to the shallow. Then, combined with the investigations of the metal-alterations, we performed kinetic experiments of water-basaltic rock interactions using flow-through reactors in open systems at temperatures from 20 °C to 550 °C, 23-34 MPa. Release rates for the rock-forming elements from the rocks have been measured. Experiments provide the release rates for various elements at a large temperature range, and indicate that the dissolution rates (release rates) for various elements vary with temperature. Si, Al, and K have high release rates at temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C; the maximum release rates (RMX) for Si are reached at temperatures from 300 °C to 400 °C. The RMXs for Ca, Mg, and Fe are at low temperatures from 20 °C to 300 °C. Results demonstrate that Fe is not released from 400 °C to 550 °C, and indicate that when deep circling fluids passed through basaltic rocks, Fe was not mobile, and

  17. Heavy Metal Tolerance and Removal Capacity of Trichoderma species Isolated from Mine Tailings in Itogon, Benguet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myra Tansengco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Waste from mining industries contains various heavy metals that can pollute the environment. Bioremediation using efficient fungi can help in eliminating these heavy metal contaminants. This study focused on the isolation, identification, and characterization of heavy metal-resistant fungi from mine tailings in Itogon, Benguet. Isolation of fungi was done by serial dilution and spread plate techniques on potato dextrose agar (PDA with an individual heavy metal, i.e. chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, and nickel (Ni. Of the 29 fungal isolates, four species were selected and molecularly identified as Trichoderma virens, T. harzianum, T. saturnisporum, and T. gamsii. Growth tolerance on PDA with increasing concentrations (200-1000 ppm of an individual heavy metal indicated the following trend: T. virens > T. harzianum > T. gamsii > T. saturnisporum. Growth test indicates that all Trichoderma isolates can tolerate high levels of Cr and Pb, however tolerance to Cu, Zn, and Ni was species specific. Shakeflask culture using T. virens showed high lead removal (91-96% over broad pH range while and at neutral pH, T. virens had 70% and 63% reductions for Cu and Cr, respectively. Results of this study highlights the potential of Trichoderma isolates for biological wastewater treatment in mining industries.

  18. Effective heavy metal removal from aqueous systems by thiol functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoliang; Zhao Zongshan; Liu Jiyan; Jiang Guibin

    2011-01-01

    A thiol-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica material (called SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 ), synthesized by a modified Stoeber method, has been investigated as a convenient and effective adsorbent for heavy metal ions. Structural characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analyses confirms the mesoporous structure and the organic moiety content of this adsorbent. The high saturation magnetization (38.4 emu/g) make it easier and faster to be separated from water under a moderate magnetic field. Adsorption kinetics was elucidated by pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and exhibited 3-stage intraparticle diffusion mode. Adsorption isotherms of Hg and Pb fitted well with Langmuir model, exhibiting high adsorption capacity of 260 and 91.5 mg of metal/g of adsorbent, respectively. The distribution coefficients of the tested metal ions between SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 and different natural water sources (groundwater, lake water, tap water and river water) were above the level of 10 5 mL/g. The material was very stable in different water matrices, even in strong acid and alkaline solutions. Metal-loaded SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 was able to regenerate in acid solution under ultrasonication. This novel SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 is suitable for repeated use in heavy metal removal from different water matrices.

  19. A study of the removal characteristics of heavy metals from wastewater by low-cost adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar E. Abdel Salam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption behavior of some low-cost adsorbents such as peanut husk charcoal, fly ash, and natural zeolite, with respect to Cu2+, and Zn2+ ions, has been studied in order to consider its application to the purification of metal finishing wastewater. The batch method was employed: parameters such as pH, contact time, and initial metal concentration were studied. The influence of the pH of the metal ion solutions on the uptake levels of the metal ions by the different adsorbents used were carried out between pH 4 and pH 11. The optimum pH for copper and zinc removal was 6 in the case of peanut husk charcoal and natural zeolite, and it was 8 in case of fly ash. An equilibrium time of 2 h was required for the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto peanut husk charcoal and fly ash and an equilibrium time 3 h was required for the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto natural zeolite. Adsorption parameters were determined using both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, but the experimental data were better fitted to the Langmuir equation than to Freundlich equation. The results showed that peanut husk charcoal, fly ash and natural zeolite all hold potential to remove cationic heavy metal species from industrial wastewater in the order fly ash < peanut husk charcoal < natural zeolite.

  20. Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (EC deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol.We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC.Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers. Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease.The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of users and bystanders.

  1. Selective heavy metals removal from waters by amorphous zirconium phosphate: behavior and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Qingrui; Du, Wei; Zhang, Weiming; Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Qingjian; Xu, Zhengwen; Zhang, Quanxing

    2007-07-01

    Selective removal of heavy metals from water has been of considerable concern for several decades. In the present study, the amorphous zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was synthesized and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrography (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) as well as pH-titration experiments. Uptake of heavy metals including lead, cadmium, and zinc onto ZrP was studied by using a polystyrene sulfonic-acid exchanger D-001 as a reference sorbent and Ca(2+) as a competing cation due to its ubiquity in natural or industrial waters. The results indicated that the uptake of heavy metals onto ZrP is essentially an ion-exchange process and dependent upon solution pH. In comparison with D-001, ZrP exhibited more favorable sorption of heavy metals particularly in terms of high selectivity, as indicated by the distribution coefficients of ZrP even several orders higher than D-001 towards heavy metals when calcium ion coexisted at a high level in solution. The Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic investigation indicated that the uptake of calcium, cadmium, and zinc ions onto ZrP is only driven by the electrostatic interaction, while that of lead ion is possibly dependent upon the inner-sphere complex formation with ZrP. XPS results further elucidated that ZrP displays different sorption affinity towards heavy metals in the same order as selectivity sequence of Pb(2+)>Zn(2+) approximately Cd(2+)>Ca(2+), which can be explained by hard and soft acids and bases (HASB) theory. Moreover, uptake of heavy metals onto ZrP approached to equilibrium quickly and the used ZrP could be readily regenerated for reuse by the dilute HCl solution. Thus, all the results suggest that amorphous ZrP has excellent potential as a sorption material for water treatment.

  2. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance.

  3. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-01-01

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments

  4. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  5. Removal of PCR error products and unincorporated primers by metal-chelate affinity chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhu Kanakaraj

    Full Text Available Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC has been used for decades to purify proteins on the basis of amino acid content, especially surface-exposed histidines and "histidine tags" genetically added to recombinant proteins. We and others have extended the use of IMAC to purification of nucleic acids via interactions with the nucleotide bases, especially purines, of single-stranded RNA and DNA. We also have demonstrated the purification of plasmid DNA from contaminating genomic DNA by IMAC capture of selectively-denatured genomic DNA. Here we describe an efficient method of purifying PCR products by specifically removing error products, excess primers, and unincorporated dNTPs from PCR product mixtures using flow-through metal-chelate affinity adsorption. By flowing a PCR product mixture through a Cu(2+-iminodiacetic acid (IDA agarose spin column, 94-99% of the dNTPs and nearly all the primers can be removed. Many of the error products commonly formed by Taq polymerase also are removed. Sequencing of the IMAC-processed PCR product gave base-calling accuracy comparable to that obtained with a commercial PCR product purification method. The results show that IMAC matrices (specifically Cu(2+-IDA agarose can be used for the purification of PCR products. Due to the generality of the base-specific mechanism of adsorption, IMAC matrices may also be used in the purification of oligonucleotides, cDNA, mRNA and micro RNAs.

  6. Magnetic fluid modified peanut husks as an adsorbent for organic dyes removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 9 (2010), s. 274-278 ISSN 1875-3892. [12th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids. Sendai, 01.08.2010-05.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09052; GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : magnetic fluid * peanut husks * dyes adsorption Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  7. Effect of large pore size of multifunctional mesoporous microsphere on removal of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Li, Nan; Chi, Yue; Geng, Wangchang; Yan, Wenfu; Zhao, Ying; Li, Xiaotian; Dong, Bin

    2013-06-15

    Pore size of mesoporous materials is crucial for their surface grafting. This article develops a novel multifunctional microsphere with a large pore size mesoporous silica shell (ca. 10.3 nm) and a magnetic core (Fe₃O₄), which is fabricated using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as pore-forming agents, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as silicon source through a sol-gel process. Compared with small pore size mesoporous silica magnetic microspheres (ca. 2-4 nm), the large pore size one can graft 447 mg/g amino groups in order to adsorb more heavy metal ions (Pb(2+): 880.6 mg/g, Cu(2+): 628.3mg/g, Cd(2+): 492.4 mg/g). The metal-loaded multifunctional microspheres could be easily removed from aqueous solution by magnetic separation and regenerated easily by acid treatment. The results suggest that the large pore size multifunctional microspheres are potentially useful materials for high effectively adsorbing and removing different heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visa, Maria; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  9. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visa, Maria, E-mail: maria.visa@unitbv.ro; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria, E-mail: andreea.chelaru1@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  10. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters using dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Ziccarelli, Ida; Espro, Claudia; Galvagno, Signorino; Giofré, Salvatore V; Romeo, Roberto; Cicero, Nicola; Bua, Giuseppe D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Legnani, Laura; Chiacchio, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for heavy metal ion removal from wastewaters were developed. Triazole dendrimers (TD) were built directly onto the carbon nanotube surface by successive click chemistry reactions affording the zero- and first-generation dendrimer-functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-TD1 and MWCNT-TD2). The Moedritzer-Irani reaction carried out on the amino groups present on the MWCNT-TD2 sample gave the corresponding α-aminophosphonate nanosystem MWCNT-TD2P. Both MWCNT-TD2 and MWCNT-TD2P nanosystems have been characterized by physical, chemical, and morphological analyses. Their chelating abilities towards the toxic metal ions Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Ni 2+ and the harmless Ca 2+ ion have been experimentally evaluated in the two different sets of experiments and at the salt concentrations of 1 mg/mL or 1 μg/mL by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of these studies pointed out the interesting chelating behavior for the phosphonated nanosystem towards the Hg 2+ ion. The complexation mode of the best chelating system MWCNT-TD2P with mercury was investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, suggesting a chelation mechanism involving the two oxygen atoms of the phosphate group. The synthesized dendrimers, supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, have shown the potential to be used for the selective toxic metal ion removal and recovery.

  11. Preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposites for toxic metals removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Alswata

    Full Text Available This research work has proposed preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposite (Zeolite/ZnO NCs by using a co-precipitation method. Then, the prepared Nanocomposite has been tested for adsorption of Lead Pb (II and Arsenic As (V from aqueous solution under the room pressure and temperature. After that, the prepared adsorbent has been studied by several techniques. For adsorption process; the effect of the adsorbent masses, contact time, PH and initial metals concentration as well as, the kinetics and isotherm for adsorption process have been investigated. The results revealed that; ZnO nanoparticles (NPs with average diameter 4.5 nm have successfully been loaded into Zeolite. The optimum parameters for the removal of the toxic metals 93% and 89% of Pb (II and As (V, respectively, in 100 mg/L aqua solutions were pH4, 0.15 g and 30 min. According to the obtained results; pseudo second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm model have higher correlation coefficients and provided a better agreement with the experimental data. The prepared sorbent showed an economical and effective way to remove the heavy toxic metals due to its ambient operation conditions, low- consumption energy and facile regeneration method. Keywords: Zeolite, ZnO, Nanocomposites, Adsorbent, Kinetic, Isotherm

  12. Polymer films removed from solid surfaces by nanostructured fluids: microscopic mechanism and implications for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Martina; Selvolini, Giulia; Montis, Costanza; Baglioni, Michele; Bonini, Massimo; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-25

    Complex fluids based on amphiphilic formulations are emerging, particularly in the field of conservation of works of art, as effective and safe liquid media for the removal of hydrophobic polymeric coatings. The comprehension of the cleaning mechanism is key to designing tailored fluids for this purpose. However, the interaction between nanostructured fluids and hydrophobic polymer films is still poorly understood. In this study, we show how the combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides interesting and complementary insight into this process. We focused on the interaction between an ethyl methacrylate/methyl acrylate 70:30 copolymer film deposited onto a glass surface and a water/nonionic surfactant/2-butanone (MEK) ternary system, with MEK being a good solvent and water being a nonsolvent for the polymer. Our results indicate a synergy between the organic solvent and the surfactant assemblies: MEK rapidly swells the outer layers of the polymer film allowing for the subsequent diffusion of solvent molecules, while the amphiphile decreases the interfacial energy between the polymeric coating and the liquid phase, favoring dewetting and dispersion of swollen polymer droplets in the aqueous phase. The chemical nature of the surfactant and the microstructure of the assemblies determine both the kinetics and the overall efficiency of polymer removal, as assessed by comparing the behavior of similar formulations containing an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS).

  13. Orogenic gold: Common or evolving fluid and metal sources through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Groves, David I.

    2015-09-01

    Orogenic gold deposits of all ages, from Paleoarchean to Tertiary, show consistency in chemical composition. They are the products of aqueous-carbonic fluids, with typically 5-20 mol% CO2, although unmixing during extreme pressure fluctuation can lead to entrapment of much more CO2-rich fluid inclusions in some cases. Ore fluids are typically characterized by significant concentrations of CH4 and/or N2, common estimates of 0.01-0.36 mol% H2S, a near-neutral pH of 5.5, and salinities of 3-7 wt.% NaCl equiv., with Na > K > > Ca,Mg. This fluid composition consistency favors an ore fluid produced from a single source area and rules out mixing of fluids from multiple sources as significant in orogenic gold formation. Nevertheless, there are broad ranges in more robust fluid-inclusion trapping temperatures and pressures between deposits that support a model where this specific fluid may deposit ore over a broad window of upper to middle crustal depths. Much of the reported isotopic and noble gas data is inconsistent between deposits, leading to the common equivocal interpretations from studies that have attempted to define fluid and metal source areas for various orogenic gold provinces. Fluid stable isotope values are commonly characterized by the following ranges: (1) δ18O for Precambrian ores of + 6 to + 11‰ and for Phanerozoic ores of + 7 to + 13‰; (2) δD and δ34S values that are extremely variable; (3) δ13C values that range from - 11 to - 2‰; and (4) δ15N of + 10 to + 24‰ for the Neoarchean, + 6.5 to + 12‰ for the Paleoproterozoic, and + 1.5 to + 10‰ for the Phanerozoic. Secular variations in large-scale Earth processes appear to best explain some of the broad ranges in the O, S, and N data. Fluid:rock interaction, particularly in ore trap areas, may cause important local shifts in the O, S, and C ratios. The extreme variations in δD mainly reflect measurements of hydrogen isotopes by bulk extraction of waters from numerous fluid inclusion

  14. Impact of humic/fulvic acid on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using nanomaterials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wang-Wang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gong, Ji-Lai; Liang, Jie; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Nowadays nanomaterials have been widely used to remove heavy metals from water/wastewater due to their large surface area and high reactivity. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) exist ubiquitously in aquatic environments and have a variety of functional groups which allow them to complex with metal ions and interact with nanomaterials. These interactions can not only alter the environmental behavior of nanomaterials, but also influence the removal and transportation of heavy metals by nanomaterials. Thus, the interactions and the underlying mechanisms involved warrant specific investigations. This review outlined the effects of HA/FA on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by various nanomaterials, mainly including carbon-based nanomaterials, iron-based nanomaterials and photocatalytic nanomaterials. Moreover, mechanisms involved in the interactions were discussed and potential environmental implications of HA/FA to nanomaterials and heavy metals were evaluated. © 2013.

  15. Enhancing the removal of arsenic, boron and heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetlands using different supporting media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, K Lizama; Fletcher, T D; Sun, G

    2011-01-01

    The presence of arsenic and heavy metals in drinking water sources poses a serious health risk due to chronic toxicological effects. Constructed wetlands have the potential to remove arsenic and heavy metals, but little is known about pollutant removal efficiency and reliability of wetlands for this task. This lab-scale study investigated the use of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands for removing arsenic, boron, copper, zinc, iron and manganese from synthetic wastewater. Gravel, limestone, zeolite and cocopeat were employed as wetland media. Conventional gravel media only showed limited capability in removing arsenic, iron, copper and zinc; and it showed virtually no capability in removing manganese and boron. In contrast, alternative wetland media: cocopeat, zeolite and limestone, demonstrated significant efficiencies--in terms of percentage removal and mass rate per m3 of wetland volume--for removing arsenic, iron, manganese, copper and zinc; their ability to remove boron, in terms of mass removal rate, was also higher than that of the gravel media. The overall results demonstrated the potential of using vertical flow wetlands to remove arsenic and metals from contaminated water, having cocopeat, zeolite or limestone as supporting media.

  16. Early chest tube removal after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jensen, Katrine; Petersen, Rene Horsleben

    2014-01-01

    In fast-track pulmonary resections, we removed chest tubes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day. Subsequently, we evaluated the frequency of recurrent pleural effusions requiring reintervention....

  17. Methods and apparatus for carbon dioxide removal from a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Ruud, James Anthony; Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Liu, Ke

    2010-01-19

    An apparatus for producing hydrogen gas wherein the apparatus includes a reactor. In one embodiment, the reactor includes at least two conversion-removal portions. Each conversion-removal portion comprises a catalyst section configured to convert CO in the stream to CO.sub.2 and a membrane section located downstream of and in flow communication with the catalyst section. The membrane section is configured to selectively remove the CO.sub.2 from the stream and to be in flow communication with a sweep gas.

  18. Removing adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces via applying interfacial properties of rhamnolipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Bode; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interfacial properties of biosurfactant rhamnolipid were investigated and were applied to remove adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces with flushing operations. The surface tension-lowering activity, micelle charge characteristic, and foaming ability of rhamnolipid were identified first. For rhamnolipid in water, the negatively charged characteristic of micelles or aggregates was confirmed and the foaming ability at concentrations higher than 40 mg/L was evaluated. By using the rhamnolipid solutions in a batch washing approach, the potential of applying the interfacial properties of rhamnolipid to remove adsorbed copper ions from sand surfaces was then demonstrated. In rhamnolipid solution flushing operations for sand-packed medium, higher efficiency was found for the removal of adsorbed copper ions with residual type than with inner-sphere interaction type, implying the important role of interaction type between the copper ion and the sand surface in the removal efficiency. In addition, the channeling effect of rhamnolipid solution flow in the sand-packed medium was clearly observed in the solution flushing operations and was responsible for the low removal efficiency with low contact areas between solution and sand. By using rhamnolipid solution with foam to flush the sand-packed medium, one could find that the channeling effect of the solution flow was reduced and became less pronounced with the increase in the rhamnolipid concentration, or with the enhanced foaming ability. With the reduced channeling effect in the flushing operations, the removal efficiency for adsorbed copper ions was significantly improved. The results suggested that the foam-enhanced rhamnolipid solution flushing operation was efficient in terms of surfactant usage and operation time.

  19. Enhanced NO{sub x} removal in wet scrubbers using metal chelates. Final report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-01

    Successful pilot plant tests of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a wet lime flue gas desulfurization system were concluded in December. The test, at up to 1.5 MW(e) capacity, were conducted by the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company and Dravo Lime Company for the US Department of Energy at a pilot plant facility at the Miami Fort station of CG&E near Cincinnati, Ohio. The pilot plant scrubbed a slipstream of flue gas from Unit 7 a 530 MW coal-fired electric generating unit. Tests were conducted in three phases between April and December. The technology tested was wet scrubbing with Thiosorbic{reg_sign} magnesium-enhanced lime for SO{sub 2} removal and simultaneous NO scrubbing with ferrous EDTA, a metal chelate. Magnesium-enhanced lime-based wet scrubbing is used at 20 full-scale high-sulfur coal-fired electric generating units with a combined capacity of 8500 MW. Ferrous EDTA reacts with nitric oxide, NO, which comprises about 96% of NO{sub x} from coal-fired boilers. In this report, although not precise, NO and NO{sub x} are used interchangeably. A major objective of the tests was to combine NO{sub x} removal using ferrous EDTA, a developing technology, with SO{sub 2} removal using wet lime FGD, already in wide commercial use. If successful, this could allow wide application of this NO{sub x} removal technology. Volume 2 covers: description and results of NO{sub x} removal tests; and description and results of waste characterization studies.

  20. Evaluation of single and multilayered reactive zones for heavy metals removal from stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Katarzyna; Fronczyk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC), silica spongolite (SS) and zeolite (Z) to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions has been investigated through column tests. The breakthrough times for a mobile tracer that does not sorb to the material for SS, GAC and layered SS, Z and GAC were as follows: 2.54×10(4) s, 2.38×10(4) s and 3.02×10(4) s. The breakthrough time (tbR) for Ni was in the range from tbR=1.70×10(6) s for SS, through tbR=3.98×10(5) s for the layered bed, to tbR=8.75×10(5) s for GAC. The breakthrough time for Cd was in the range from tbR=1.83×10(5) s for GAC to tbR=1.30×10(6) s for SS, Z, GAC. During the experiment, the concentration of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the solution from a column filled with construction aggregate and the concentration of Pb, and Cu in a filtrate from the column filled with several materials was close to zero. The reduction in metal ions removal was due to high pH values of the solution (above 8.00). In addition, during the testing period, an increase in Cd and Zn concentrations in the filtrate from the column filled with the layered bed was observed, but at the end of the experiment the concentrations did not reach the maximum values. The test results suggest that the multilayered permeable reactive barrier is the most effective technology for long time effective removal of heavy metals.

  1. Removal of Selected Heavy Metals from Green Mussel via Catalytic Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizuan Abdullah; Abdull Rahim Mohd Yusoff; Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar; Razali Ismail; Dwi Priya Hadiyanto

    2014-01-01

    Perna viridis or green mussel is a potentially an important aquaculture product along the South Coast of Peninsular Malaysia especially Johor Straits. As the coastal population increases at tremendous rate, there was significant effect of land use changes on marine communities especially green mussel, as the heavy metals input to the coastal area also increase because of anthropogenic activities. Heavy metals content in the green mussel exceeded the Malaysian Food Regulations (1985) and EU Food Regulations (EC No: 1881/ 2006). Sampling was done at Johor Straits from Danga to Pendas coastal area for green mussel samples. This research introduces a catalytic oxidative technique for demetallisation in green mussel using edible oxidants such as peracetic acid (PAA) enhanced with alumina beads supported CuO, Fe 2 O 3 , and ZnO catalysts. The lethal dose of LD 50 to rats of PAA is 1540 mg kg -1 was verified by National Institute of Safety and Health, United State of America. The best calcination temperature for the catalysts was at 1000 degree Celsius as shown in the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Nitrogen Adsorption (BET surface area) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analyses. The demetallisation process in green mussel was done successfully using only 100 mgL -1 PAA and catalyzed with Fe 2 O 3 / Al 2 O 3 for up to 90 % mercury (Hg) removal. Using PAA with only 1 hour of reaction time, at room temperature (30-35 degree Celsius), pH 5-6 and salinity of 25-28 ppt, 90 % lead (Pb) was removed from life mussel without catalyst. These findings have a great prospect for developing an efficient and practical method for post-harvesting heavy metals removal in green mussel. (author)

  2. Portable life support system regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal by metal oxide absorbents preprototype hardware development and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joan M.; Borghese, Joseph B.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Johnson has acquired a preprototype/full-scale metal oxide CO2 and humidity remover (MOCHR), together with its regeneration module. Tests conducted prior to delivery by the MOCHR's manufacturer have demonstrated the concurrent removal of H2O and CO2 at rates, and under conditions, that are applicable to EVA Portable Life Support Systems.

  3. Electrospun and functionalized PVDF/PAN composite for the removal of trace metals in contaminated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthumbi, R. M.; Adelodun, A. A.; Ngila, J. C.

    2017-08-01

    The electrospinning of a nanofiber composite of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in a dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent was carried out prior to functionalization by free radical grafting of acrylic acid (AA) brushes. Subsequent application for the removal of Pb2+ and Cd2+ from contaminated water is reported. Free radicals were initiated on the polymeric nanofiber composite using 5% 2,2‧-Azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) in acetone. Upon solvent removal by air-drying, AA was added and grafting (in a methanol-water solvent system) was carried out in an oil bath at 70 °C for 5 h under nitrogen atmosphere. Structural and chemical characterization of the composite was done using scanning electron microscope (SEM), nitrogen sorption at 77 K (BET method), goniometer and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), while changes in metal ion concentration during batch adsorption were monitored using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Through isotherm study, the adsorption was confirmed to follow both Langmuir and Freundlich models whilst adsorption kinetic studies showed that the adsorption rate is of pseudo-second order. In furtherance, the respective values for adsorption capacity and estimated removal efficiency for Pb2+ and Cd2+ were 1.585 and 0.164 mg g-1, 90% and 80% respectively, while a 5% loss in regeneration efficiency after 10 cycles was also observed. Consequently, the nanocomposite was found efficient when applied to the removal of Pb2+ and Cd2+ from contaminated water.

  4. Study of Modern Nano Enhanced Techniques for Removal of Dyes and Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samavia Batool

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial effluent often contains the significant amount of hexavalent chromium and synthetic dyes. The discharge of wastewater without proper treatment into water streams consequently enters the soil and disturbs the aquatic and terrestrial life. A range of wastewater treatment technologies have been proposed which can efficiently reduce both Cr(VI and azo dyes simultaneously to less toxic form such as biodegradation, biosorption, adsorption, bioaccumulation, and nanotechnology. Rate of simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI and azo dyes can be enhanced by combining different treatment techniques. Utilization of synergistic treatment is receiving much attention due to its enhanced efficiency to remove Cr(VI and azo dye simultaneously. This review evaluates the removal methods for simultaneous removal of Cr(VI and azo dyes by nanomicrobiology, surface engineered nanoparticles, and nanophotocatalyst. Sorption mechanism of biochar for heavy metals and organic contaminants is also discussed. Potential microbial strains capable of simultaneous removal of Cr(VI and azo dyes have been summarized in some details as well.

  5. Removing heavy metals in water: the interaction of cactus mucilage and arsenate (As (V)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dawn I; Pichler, Thomas; Yeh, Daniel H; Alcantar, Norma A

    2012-04-17

    High concentrations of arsenic in groundwater continue to present health threats to millions of consumers worldwide. Particularly, affected communities in the developing world need accessible technologies for arsenic removal from drinking water. We explore the application of cactus mucilage, pectic polysaccharide extracts from Opuntia ficus-indica for arsenic removal. Synthetic arsenate (As (V)) solutions were treated with two extracts, a gelling extract (GE) and a nongelling extract (NE) in batch trials. The arsenic concentration at the air-water interface was measured after equilibration. The GE and NE treated solutions showed on average 14% and 9% increases in arsenic concentration at the air-water interface respectively indicating that the mucilage bonded and transported the arsenic to the air-water interface. FTIR studies showed that the -CO groups (carboxyl and carbonyl groups) and -OH (hydroxyl) functional groups of the mucilage were involved in the interaction with the arsenate. Mucilage activity was greater in weakly basic (pH 9) and weakly acidic (pH 5.5) pH. This interaction can be optimized and harnessed for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. This work breaks the ground for the application of natural pectic materials to the removal of anionic metallic species from water.

  6. Application of Metal Oxide Heterostructures in Arsenic Removal from Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become one of the major environmental problems for people worldwide to be exposed to high arsenic concentrations through contaminated drinking water, and even the long-term intake of small doses of arsenic has a carcinogenic effect. As an efficient and economic approach for the purification of arsenic-containing water, the adsorbents in adsorption processes have been widely studied. Among a variety of adsorbents reported, the metal oxide heterostructures with high surface area and specific affinity for arsenic adsorption from aqueous systems have demonstrated a promising performance in practical applications. This review paper aims to summarize briefly the metal oxide heterostructures in arsenic removal from contaminated water, so as to provide efficient, economic, and robust solutions for water purification.

  7. Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

    1993-03-01

    This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

  8. Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

  9. Flexible-Robust Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient Removal of Propyne from Propylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Libo; Lin, Rui-Biao; Krishna, Rajamani; Wang, Xiaoqing; Li, Bin; Wu, Hui; Li, Jinping; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Banglin

    2017-06-14

    The removal of trace amounts of propyne from propylene is critical for the production of polymer-grade propylene. We herein report the first example of metal-organic frameworks of flexible-robust nature for the efficient separation of propyne/propylene mixtures. The strong binding affinity and suitable pore confinement for propyne account for its high uptake capacity and selectivity, as evidenced by neutron powder diffraction studies and density functional theory calculations. The purity of the obtained propylene is over 99.9998%, as demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves for a 1/99 propyne/propylene mixture.

  10. Particulate metal bioaccessibility in physiological fluids and cell culture media: Toxicological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Bérénice; Alleman, Laurent Yves; Perdrix, Esperanza; Riffault, Véronique; Happillon, Mélanie; Strecker, Alain; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Garçon, Guillaume; Coddeville, Patrice

    2017-07-01

    According to the literature, tiny amounts of transition metals in airborne fine particles (PM 2.5 ) may induce proinflammatory cell response through reactive oxygen species production. The solubility of particle-bound metals in physiological fluids, i.e. the metal bioaccessibility is driven by factors such as the solution chemical composition, the contact time with the particles, and the solid-to-liquid phase ratio (S/L). In this work, PM 2.5 -bound metal bioaccessibility was assessed in various physiological-like solutions including cell culture media in order to evidence the potential impact on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) when studying the cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses of PM 2.5 towards the target bronchial compartment. Different fluids (H 2 O, PBS, LHC-9 culture medium, Gamble and human respiratory mucus collected from COPD patients), various S/L conditions (from 1/6000 to 1/100,000) and exposure times (6, 24 and 72h) were tested on urban PM 2.5 samples. In addition, metals' total, soluble and insoluble fractions from PM 2.5 in LHC-9 were deposited on NHBE cells (BEAS-2B) to measure their cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential (i.e., G6PDH activity, secretion of IL-6 and IL-8). The bioaccessibility is solution-dependent. A higher salinity or organic content may increase or inhibit the bioaccessibiliy according to the element, as observed in the complex mucus matrix. Decreasing the S/L ratio also affect the bioaccessibility depending on the solution tested while the exposure time appears less critical. The LHC-9 culture medium appears to be a good physiological proxy as it induces metal bioaccessibilities close to the mucus values and is little affected by S/L ratios or exposure time. Only the insoluble fraction can be linked to the PM 2.5 -induced cytotoxicity. By contrast, both soluble and insoluble fractions can be related to the secretion of cytokines. The metal bioaccessibility in LHC-9 of the total, soluble, and insoluble

  11. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by an efficient low cost biosorbent (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, S.; Ullah, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of removing some heavy metals from water by a low-cost bio sorbent. Removal of lead and cadmium which differ in toxicity, as well as in some other characteristics were examined. Sawdust of Morus alba wood modified with 0.5N NaOH was applied as low cost bio sorbent. The sample was characterized by BET surface area, EDX, FTIR and Zeta potential technique. The removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by treated sawdust has been found to be concentration, contact time, adsorbate dose and temperature dependent. The adsorption parameters were determined using Freundlich, Langmuir and Tempkin isotherm models. The applicability of kinetic models i.e. pseudo first order, Elovich and parabolic diffusion has also been investigated. Thermodynamic parameters like delta H, delta S and delta G were calculated from the kinetic data. The equilibrium adsorption was achieved in 100 min. The result shows that the adsorbent examined was found to have good adsorption capacity. Surface complexation and ion exchange are the major removal mechanisms involved. The correlation coefficient for Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin equation were well fitted. The adsorption follows first-order kinetics. The rate of adsorption was high at high temperature. The positive values of delta S reflect some structural exchange among the active site of the adsorbent and metal ion. The negative value of Gibbs free energy (delta G) shows the spontaneous nature of the process. The findings of the data reveal that the modified Sawdust is a low-cost, easily available bio sorbent and can be use as alternative to other commercial adsorbents as well as for effluent treatment in industries. (author)

  12. Montmorillonite surface properties and sorption characteristics for heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijagbemi, Christianah Olakitan; Baek, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Dong-Su

    2009-01-01

    Surface properties of montmorillonite (MMT) and its adsorption characteristics for heavy metals have been investigated with nickel and copper as sorbate from aqueous solutions. Employing the potentiometric and mass titration techniques in batch experimental methods, the point of zero charge (PZC) and point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) of MMT edges at different ionic strengths present pH PZC and pH PZNPC to be 3.4 ± 0.2. A crossing point was observed for the proton adsorption vs. pH curves at different ionic strengths of KCl electrolyte and in investigating MMT remediation potentialities as sorbent for heavy metals polluted waters, the effects of heavy metal concentration, pH, MMT dosage, reaction time and temperature for Cu 2+ and Ni 2+ uptake were studied. The sorption of metal ions by MMT was pH dependent and the adsorption kinetics revealed sorption rate could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. The data according to mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion models confirmed diffusion of solutes inside the clay particles as the rate-controlling step and more important for the adsorption rate than the external mass transfer. Adsorption isotherms showed that the uptake of Cu 2+ and Ni 2+ could be described by the Langmuir model and from calculations on thermodynamic parameters, the positive ΔG o values at different temperatures suggest that the sorption of both metal ions were non-spontaneous. Change in enthalpy (ΔH o ) for Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ were 28.9 and 13.27 kJ/mol K respectively, hence an endothermic diffusion process, as ion uptake increased with increase in temperature. Values of ΔS o indicate low randomness at the solid/solution interface during the uptake of both Cu 2+ and Ni 2+ by MMT. Montmorillonite has a considerable potential for the removal of heavy metal cationic species from aqueous solution and wastewater.

  13. Chemical Processing for Sol-Gel Derived Metal Oxide Thin Films using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Y; Narishige, S; Fujioka, K; Uchida, H; Koda, S, E-mail: uchidah@sophia.ac.jp [Sophia University, Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Chemical processing using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid (scCO{sub 2}) was demonstrated for lowering processing temperature of sol-gel-derived metal oxide thin films. The film processing was performed in a hot-wall closed vessel filled with scCO{sub 2} fluid. Precursor films of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) on soda-glass substrates prepared by sol-gel coating using Ti-alkoxide solution were converted to crystalline TiO{sub 2} (anatase) films successfully by the scCO{sub 2} treatment at a fluid pressure of 15 MPa and a substrate temperature of 300deg. C whereas no crystallization was occurred by conventional heat treatment at 400 deg. C. XPS analysis indicated that the interface reaction related to Si element was suppressed successfully by scCO{sub 2} treatment at 300 deg. C. These results suggest that the sol-gel synthesis using scCO{sub 2} fluid would be a cadidate for low-temperature processing of crystalline oxide films, which is more preferable than conventional techniques based on the heat treatment.

  14. Removal Efficiency of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Heavy Metal by Intermittent Cycle Extended Aeration System from Municipal Wastewater (Yazd-ICEAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Vahid Ghelmani

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The high removal efficiency of BOD5, TKN, and NH4+ showed that this advanced SBR system had an appropriate efficiency for nitrification. Phosphorus removal (TP had a lower efficiency than those of NH4+ and TKN, but it was within the environmental standard limits. On the other hand, in the advanced SBR the removal efficiency of heavy metals for Cd was not within the standard limits.

  15. Simultaneous removal of metals and organic compounds from a heavily polluted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpyrkowicz, L.; Radaelli, M.; Bertini, S.; Daniele, S.; Casarin, F.

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the results of treatment of soil samples, deriving from a dismissed industrial site, contaminated with several metals: Hg, Ni, Co, Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, As and organic substances. The soil was subjected to remediation based on a process in which an oxidising leaching agent was produced electrochemically in-line in an undivided electrochemical cell reactor equipped with a Ti/Pt-Ir anode and a stainless steel cathode. Leaching of the soil samples was performed under dynamic conditions using a leaching column. A subsequent regeneration of the leaching solution, which consisted in electrodeposition of metals and electro-oxidation of organic substances, was carried out in a packed-bed reactor equipped with a centrally positioned graphite rod, serving as an anode, and stainless steel three-dimensional filling as a cathode. The study was focused on how and to which extent the metals present in the soil, as organic complexes, can be solubilised and how the process rates are impacted by the solution pH and other process variables. Data obtained under non-oxidising conditions, typically adopted for leaching of metals, are compared with the performance of chlorine-enriched leaching solutions. The results obtained under various conditions are also discussed in terms of the total organic carbon (TOC) removal from the water phase

  16. Removable butterfly valve, especially for polluting and/or dangerous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrigues, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to a valve for use in systems carrying polluting, corrosive or dangerous fluids requiring the use of biological protection. The facilities concerned are those in which fluids, mainly polluting, corrosive or dangerous liquids requiring the use of various types of biological protection, are handled. This is particularly so for nuclear installations in which the equipment is surrounded by protective shields which stop the radiation and prevent radioactive gases and aerosols from spreading. The invention proposes for the present valve a high-safety leaktightness system which respects the most specifications and standards and which suppresses any dead volume inside the valve [fr

  17. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  18. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  19. Removal of metallic tracheobronchial stents in lung transplantation with flexible bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruchter Oren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway complications are among the most challenging problems after lung transplantation, and Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS are used to treat airway complications such as stenosis or malacia at the bronchial anastomosis sites. Several transplantation centers are reluctant to use SEMS since their removal is sometimes needed and usually requires the use of rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia. The objective of the current report is to describe our experience in SEMS retrieval by flexible bronchoscopy under conscious sedation. Methods A retrospective review was done of patients requiring tracheobronchial stent placement after lung transplantation in which the SEMS had to be removed. The retrieval procedure was done by flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care ambulatory basis. Results Between January 2004 and January 2010, out of 305 lung transplantation patients, 24 (7.8% underwent SEMS placement. Indications included bronchial stenosis in 20 and bronchomalacia in 4. In six patients (25% the SEMS had to be removed due to excessive granulation tissue formation and stent obstruction. The average time from SEMS placement to retrieval was 30 months (range 16-48 months. The stent was completely removed in five patients and partially removed in one patient; no major complications were encountered, and all patients were discharged within 3 hours of the procedure. In all procedures, new SEMS was successfully re-inserted thereafter. Conclusions The retrieval of SEMS in patients that underwent lung transplantation can be effectively and safely done under conscious sedation using flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care basis, this observation should encourage increasing usage of SEMS in highly selected patients.

  20. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions by using Calcium Carbonate Extracted from Starfish Treated by Protease and Amylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong-Soo Hong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available CaCO3 extracted from starfish by using the commercial protein lyase having α-amylase, β-amylase, and protease is applied to remove heavy metal ions. The extracted CaCO3 shows excellent characteristics in removing heavy metal ions such as Cu2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, and Cr6+ compared with conventional materials such as crab shells, sawdust, and activated carbon except for removing Zn2+. SEM images reveal that the extracted CaCO33 has a good morphology and porosity. We characterize the removal efficiencies of the extracted CaCO3 for the heavy metal ions according to the concentrations, pH, temperatures, and conditions of empty bed contact times.

  1. Generation of Hydroxyl Radicals from Dissolved Transition Metals in Surrogate Lung Fluid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Edgar; Jung, Heejung; Anastasio, Cort

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological research has linked exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) to several adverse health effects, including cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. Despite these links, the mechanisms by which PM causes adverse health effects are poorly understood. The generation of hydroxyl radical (.OH) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) through transition metal-mediated pathways is one of the main hypotheses for PM toxicity. In order to better understand the ability of particulate transition metals to produce ROS, we have quantified the amounts of .OH produced from dissolved iron and copper in a cell-free, surrogate lung fluid (SLF). We also examined how two important biological molecules, citrate and ascorbate, affect the generation of .OH by these metals. We have found that Fe(II) and Fe(III) produce little .OH in the absence of ascorbate and citrate, but that they efficiently make .OH in the presence of ascorbate and this is further enhanced when citrate is also added. In the presence of ascorbate, with or without citrate, the oxidation state of iron makes little difference on the amount of .OH formed after 24 hours. In the case of Cu(II), the production of .OH is greatly enhanced in the presence of ascorbate, but is inhibited by the addition of citrate. The mechanism for this effect is unclear, but appears to involve formation of a citrate-copper complex that is apparently less reactive than free, aquated copper in either the generation of HOOH or in the Fenton-like reaction of copper with HOOH to make .OH. By quantifying the amount of .OH that Fe and Cu can produce in surrogate lung fluid, we have provided a first step into being able to predict the amounts of .OH that can be produced in the human lung from exposure to PM containing known amounts of transition metals.

  2. Removal of metal ions and humic acids through polyetherimide membrane with grafted bentonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Raghavendra S; Isloor, Arun M; Prabhu, Balakrishna; Inamuddin; Asiri, Abdullah M; Ismail, A F

    2018-03-16

    Functional surfaces and polymers with branched structures have a major impact on physicochemical properties and performance of membrane materials. With the aim of greener approach for enhancement of permeation, fouling resistance and detrimental heavy metal ion rejection capacity of polyetherimide membrane, novel grafting of poly (4-styrenesulfonate) brushes on low cost, natural bentonite was carried out via distillation-precipitation polymerisation method and employed as a performance modifier. It has been demonstrated that, modified bentonite clay exhibited significant improvement in the hydrophilicity, porosity, and water uptake capacity with 3 wt. % of additive dosage. SEM and AFM analysis showed the increase in macrovoides and surface roughness with increased additive concentration. Moreover, the inclusion of modified bentonite displayed an increase in permeation rate and high anti-irreversible fouling properties with reversible fouling ratio of 75.6%. The humic acid rejection study revealed that, PEM-3 membrane having rejection efficiency up to 87.6% and foulants can be easily removed by simple hydraulic cleaning. Further, nanocomposite membranes can be significantly employed for the removal of hazardous heavy metal ions with a rejection rate of 80% and its tentative mechanism was discussed. Conspicuously, bentonite clay-bearing poly (4-styrenesulfonate) brushes are having a synergistic effect on physicochemical properties of nanocomposite membrane to enhance the performance in real field applications.

  3. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity.

  4. Paraffin wax removal from metal injection moulded cocrmo alloy compact by solvent debinding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandang, N. A. N.; Harun, W. S. W.; Khalil, N. Z.; Ahmad, A. H.; Romlay, F. R. M.; Johari, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    One of the most crucial and time consuming phase in metal injection moulding (MIM) process is “debinding”. These days, in metal injection moulding process, they had recounted that first debinding practice was depend on thermal binder degradation, which demanding more than 200 hours for complete removal of binder. Fortunately, these days world had introduced multi-stage debinding techniques to simplified the debinding time process. This research study variables for solvent debinding which are temperature and soaking time for samples made by MIM CoCrMo powder. Since wax as the key principal in the binder origination, paraffin wax will be removed together with stearic acid from the green bodies. Then, debinding process is conducted at 50, 60 and 70°C for 30-240 minutes. It is carried out in n-heptane solution. Percentage weight loss of the binder were measured. Lastly, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and visual inspection were observed for the surface of brown compact. From the results, samples debound at 70°C exhibited a significant amount of binder loss; nevertheless, sample collapse, brittle surface and cracks were detected. But, at 60°C temperature and time of 4 hours proven finest results as it shows sufficient binder loss, nonappearance of surface cracks and easy to handle. Overall, binder loss is directly related to solvent debinding temperature and time.

  5. ACIDIC REMOVAL OF METALS FROM FLUIDIZED CATALYTIC CRACKING CATALYST WASTE ASSISTED BY ELECTROKINETIC TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. G. Valt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOne of the main uses of catalysts in the oil industry is in the fluidized catalytic cracking process, which generates large quantities of waste material after use and regeneration cycles and that can be treated by the electrokinetic remediation technique, in which the contaminant metals are transported by migration. In this study, deactivated FCC catalyst was characterized before and after the electrokinetic remediation process to evaluate the amount of metal removed, and assess structural modifications, in order to indicate a possible use as an adsorbent material. The analyses included pH measurement and the concentration profile of vanadium ions along the reactor, X-ray microtomography, X-ray fluorescence, BET analysis and DTA analysis. The results indicated that 40% of the surface area of the material was recovered in relation to the disabled material, showing an increase in the available area for the adsorption. The remediation process removed nearly 31% of the vanadium and 72% of the P2O5 adhering to the surface of the catalyst, without causing structural or thermal stability changes.

  6. Application of magnetic chitosan composites for the removal of toxic metal and dyes from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Harikishore Kumar; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic chitosan composites (MCCs) are a novel material that exhibits good sorption behavior toward various toxic pollutants in aqueous solution. These magnetic composites have a fast adsorption rate and high adsorption efficiency, efficient to remove various pollutants and they are easy to recover and reuse. These features highlight the suitability of MCCs for the treatment of water polluted with metal and organic materials. This review outlines the preparation of MCCs as well as methods to characterize these materials using FTIR, XRD, TGA and other microscopy-based techniques. Additionally, an overview of recent developments and applications of MCCs for metal and organic pollutant removal is discussed in detail. Based on current research and existing materials, some new and futuristic approaches in this fascinating area are also discussed. The main objective of this review is to provide up-to-date information about the most important features of MCCs and to show their advantages as adsorbents in the treatment of polluted aqueous solutions. © 2013.

  7. Comparative Study of Heavy Metals in Dried and Fluid Milk in Peshawar by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosia Lutfullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various essential and toxic heavy metals (Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni contents in various types of dried (infant formula and powdered and fluid (fresh and processed cow milk were assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The milk samples were collected from local markets of different parts of Peshawar city, Pakistan. Heavy metal concentrations varied significantly depending upon the type of milk. The heavy metal concentrations in most of the samples were within normal and permissible ranges. It was observed that the samples contained considerable amounts of calcium, while magnesium levels were well above the required levels. The results also revealed that copper levels were slightly lower than the permissible limits. The concentration of zinc in dried milk samples was greater than the values for the liquid milk types. Infant milk formulae had higher iron levels as compared to other milk samples because of the added constituents. Significant differences were observed in the mean values of manganese and cadmium in different types of milk. The toxic metals were within the acceptable limits and did not show significant levels leading to toxicity.

  8. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using Rhizopus delemar mycelia in free and polyurethane-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsekova, K. [Lab. of Microbial Ecology, Inst. of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrov, G. [Dept. of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Univ. of Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2002-08-01

    This study assesses the ability of mycelia of Rhizopus delemar (both free and immobilized on polyurethane foam) to remove heavy metals from single-ion solutions as well as from a mixture of them. All experiments were conducted using 0.5-5 mM solutions of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O, CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O and FeSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O. Mycelia immobilized on polyurethane foam cells showed some times increase in uptake compared with that of free cells. Metal ions accumulation from a mixed solution was decreased slightly for cobalt and iron and considerable for copper ions. Heavy metal uptake was examined in the immobilized column experiments and more than 92% heavy metal removal (mg heavy metals removed/mg heavy metals added) from a mixed solution was achieved during the 5 cycles. During these experiments, the dry weight of the immobilized cells was decreased by only 2%. These results showed that immobilized mycelia of Rhizopus delemar can be used repeatedly for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis and implementation of nano-chitosan and its acetophenone derivative for enhanced removal of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Abou Kana, Maram T H; Hendy, Ahmed A

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, nano-chitosan (Nano-Ch) was synthesized by ionic gelation of chitosan/tripolyphosphate system and successfully modified with acetophenone via Schiff's base condensation to produce nano-chitosan-modified-actophenone (Nano-Ch-Ac). The produced nano-materials were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, HR-TEM and TGA techniques. The average particle sizes were found in the range of 5.20-14.54nm based on the HR-TEM analysis. The metal interaction properties of Nano-Ch and Nano-Ch-Ac with Cu(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) were compared in presence of various experimental parameters. Nano-Ch-Ac sorbent was found more superior in the extraction processes of all examined metal ions under the evaluated experimental parameters. This trend was confirmed from the highest determined metal sorption capacity values of metal ions as 1298-1608 and 810-1236μmolg(-1) in pH 7.0 by Nano-Ch-Ac and Nano-Ch sorbents, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium was established at 30.0min of contact time by the two nano-chitosan sorbents. The superiority of Nano-Ch-Ac was also confirmed from the dynamic applications of this nano-sorbent for removal of divalent metal ions from tap water, sea water and industrial wastewater (91.3-100.0±1.0-3.0). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Removal of Heavy Metals and Organic Contaminants from Wwater by Novel Filtration Methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The removal of hazardous waste, generated by the dismantling of nuclear weapons is a problem that requires urgent attention by the US Department of Energy. Low levels of radioactive contaminants combined with organic solvent residues have leaked from aging containers into the soil and underground water in the surrounding area. Due to the complexity of the problem, it is evident that traditional adsorption methods are ineffective, since the adsorbent tends to saturate with the aqueous component. It has become apparent that a much more aggressive approach is required which involves the use of specially designed materials. We have investigated the potential of solids that combine high surface area/high pore volume and high electrical conductivity, a rare combination of properties found in a single material. In this program we examined the potential of newly developed materials for the trapping of organic solvents within specially engineered cavities without allowing the material to become saturated with water. Catalytically grown carbon nanofibers are a set of novel structures that are produced by the decomposition of selected carbon-containing gases over metal particles. These materials consist of extremely small graphite platelets stacked in various orientations with respect to the fiber axis. Such an arrangement results in a unique structure that is composed of an infinite number of extremely short and narrow pores, suitable for sequestering small molecules. In addition, when the graphene layers are aligned parallel to the fiber axis, an unusual combination of high surface area and low electrical resistivity solids are attained. We have attempted to capitalize on this blend of properties by using such structures for the selective removal of organic contaminants from aqueous streams. Experimental results indicate that nanofibers possessing a structure in which the graphite platelets are aligned perpendicular to the fiber axis and possessing a high degree of

  11. Rapid magnetic removal of aqueous heavy metals and their relevant mechanisms using nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pengpeng; Ye, Zhengfang; Xie, Wuming; Chen, Qi; Li, Jing; Xu, Zhencheng; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-08-01

    Much work is devoted to heavy metal sorption, reduction and relevant mechanisms by nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particle, but fewer studies utilize its magnetic properties in aqueous metal removals. Here, we have investigated the use of nZVI particles both electrosprayed (E-nZVI) and non-electrosprayed (NE-nZVI) with different concentration levels (0.186-1.86 mg/mL) in removing aqueous Cd(II), Cr(IV), and Pb(II) through the magnetic separation means. The effects of the reaction time (5-20 min) and magnetic treatment time (1-30 min) on relevant magnetic removal efficiencies were studied. Metal ion concentration was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and the magnetically obtained metal-nZVI mixtures were further analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that the magnetic removal efficiencies of heavy metals varied with the metal species, nZVI loading, reaction and magnetic separation time. In most cases, use of 1.5 mg/mL E-nZVI or NE-nZVI resulted in removal efficiencies of more than 80% for Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cr(IV). Increasing the magnetic treatment time from 1 to 20 min was shown to lead to ≈ 20% increase in Pb(II) removal efficiency, but no improvements for Cd(II) and Cr(IV). In contrast, increasing the reaction time decreased the Pb(II) removal efficiency, yet no effects observed for Cd(II) and Cr(IV). In general, 1 min reaction and 5 min magnetic treatment were found sufficient to achieve considerable heavy metal removals. For comparable efficiencies, use of magnetic method could significantly reduce nZVI loading. XPS analysis results indicated that atomic percentages of O 1s, Fe 2p, Cd 3d, Pb 4f and Cr 2p varied with metal exposures. Different from Cd(II) and Cr(IV), aqueous iron ions might be possibly present when treating Pb(II). This study demonstrated a rapid heavy metal removal method using the magnetic property of nZVI particles, while contributing to understanding of the relevant removal mechanisms

  12. Oxidative removal of implanted photoresists and barrier metals in semiconductor processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rajkumar

    Chemical systems containing oxidants are widely used at various stages in semiconductor processing, particularly for wet cleaning and polishing applications. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to oxidative removal of materials in the Front-End-Of-Line (FEOL) and Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processes during IC fabrication. In the first part of this study, stripping of photoresists exposed to high dose of ions (1E16 As/cm2) was investigated in activated hydrogen peroxide systems. Stripping of photoresists (PR) exposed to high dose (>1E15/cm2) ion beams is one of the most challenging steps in FEOL processing. This is due to unreactive crust layer that forms on the resist surface during ion implantation. The use of hydrogen peroxide systems activated by metal ion or UV light, for disrupting crust formed on deep UV resist to enable complete removal of crust as well as underlying photoresist was investigated. A systematic evaluation of variables such as hydrogen peroxide and metal ion concentration, UV intensity, temperature and time was conducted and an optimal formulation capable of attacking the crust was developed. A two step process involving pretreatment with activated hydrogen peroxide solution, followed by treatment with sulfuric acid-hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) was developed for complete removal of crusted resist films. In the second part of this study, electrochemically enhanced abrasive removal of Ta/TaN films was investigated in solutions containing 2,5 dihydroxy benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and potassium iodate (KIO3). This method known as Electrically-assisted Chemical Mechanical Planarization (ECMP) is generating a lot of interest in IC manufacturing. Ta/TaN films were abraded at low pressures (polyurethane pad under galvanostatic conditions. The effect of variables including pH, KIO3 concentration, and current density has been explored. In the optimized formulation, tantalum and tantalum nitride removal rates of ˜170 A

  13. Production of biochar from olive mill solid waste for heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Samya O; Dosoretz, Carlos G; Rytwo, Giora; Gerchman, Yoram; Azaizeh, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    Commercial activated carbon (CAC) and biochar are useful adsorbents for removing heavy metals (HM) from water, but their production is costly. Biochar production from olive solid waste from two olive cultivars (Picual and Souri) and two oil production process (two- or three-phase) and two temperatures (350 and 450°C) was tested. The biochar yield was 24-35% of the biomass, with a surface area of 1.65-8.12m 2 g -1 , as compared to 1100m 2 g -1 for CAC. Picual residue from the two-phase milling technique, pyrolysed at 350°C, had the best cumulative removal capacity for Cu +2 , Pb +2 , Cd +2 , Ni +2 and Zn +2 with more than 85% compared to other biochar types and CAC. These results suggest that surface area cannot be used as a sole predictor of HM removal capacity. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of different functional groups in the different biochar types, which may be related to the differences in absorbing capacities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adsorptive removal of hazardous materials using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Hasan, Zubair; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-01-15

    Efficient removal of hazardous materials from the environment has become an important issue from a biological and environmental standpoint. Adsorptive removal of toxic components from fuel, waste-water or air is one of the most attractive approaches for cleaning technologies. Recently, porous metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have been very promising in the adsorption/separation of various liquids and gases due to their unique characteristics. This review summarizes the recent literatures on the adsorptive removal of various hazardous compounds mainly from fuel, water, and air by virgin or modified MOF materials. Possible interactions between the adsorbates and active adsorption sites of the MOFs will be also discussed to understand the adsorption mechanism. Most of the observed results can be explained with the following mechanisms: (1) adsorption onto a coordinatively unsaturated site, (2) adsorption via acid-base interaction, (3) adsorption via π-complex formation, (4) adsorption via hydrogen bonding, (5) adsorption via electrostatic interaction, and (6) adsorption based on the breathing properties of some MOFs and so on. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of metal and organic pollutants from wastewater by a sequential selective technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobas, M; Danko, A S; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2016-08-01

    In this study the application of a sequential selective system that combined biosorption with biodegradation was evaluated as a feasible process for the removal of Cr(VI) and m-cresol from effluents. Cr(VI) biosorption on pretreated chestnut shells showed 100% metal removal and modelling efforts demonstrated that the pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fit well the process behaviour. Thus, the treated stream was an appropriate environment for the biodegradation of m-cresol using a laccase-producer fungus, Phlebia radiata. Two bioreactor configurations, rotating drum and modified-airlift, were studied using the fungus grown on chestnut shells, which act as support-substrate as well as oxidative enzyme inductor increasing the laccase activity up to 1000UL(-1). The best bioreactor, rotating drum, reached 100% removal in 7days. Finally, the best configuration for the sequential selective system was modelled operating in continuous mode by the breakthrough curves generated using FASTv2.0 and the design bioreactor flow model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide: A potential material for pollutants removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mambrini, Raquel V.; Fonseca, Thales L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; Araujo, Maria Helena [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Moura, Flavia C.C., E-mail: flaviamoura@ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New magnetic molybdenum carbide composites can be prepared by CVD from ethanol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic molybdenum carbide shows promising results for pollutants removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbide composites can be easily recovered magnetically and reused. - Abstract: New magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide, Ni/Mo{sub 2}C, have been produced via catalytic chemical vapor deposition from ethanol. Scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies suggest that the CVD process occurs in a single step. This process involves the reduction of NiMo oxides at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C) with catalytic deposition of carbon from ethanol producing molybdenum carbide on Ni surface. In the absence of molybdenum the formation of Ni/C was observed. The magnetic molybdenum carbide was successfully used as pollutants removal by adsorption of sulfur and nitrogen compounds from liquid fuels and model dyes such as methylene blue and indigo carmine. The dibenzothiofene adsorption process over Ni/Mo{sub 2}C reached approximately 20 mg g{sup -1}, notably higher than other materials described in the literature and also removed almost all methylene blue dye. The great advantage of these carbide composites is that they may be easily recovered magnetically and reused.

  17. Magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide: A potential material for pollutants removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mambrini, Raquel V.; Fonseca, Thales L.; Dias, Anderson; Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; Araujo, Maria Helena; Moura, Flávia C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New magnetic molybdenum carbide composites can be prepared by CVD from ethanol. ► Magnetic molybdenum carbide shows promising results for pollutants removal. ► The carbide composites can be easily recovered magnetically and reused. - Abstract: New magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide, Ni/Mo 2 C, have been produced via catalytic chemical vapor deposition from ethanol. Scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies suggest that the CVD process occurs in a single step. This process involves the reduction of NiMo oxides at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C) with catalytic deposition of carbon from ethanol producing molybdenum carbide on Ni surface. In the absence of molybdenum the formation of Ni/C was observed. The magnetic molybdenum carbide was successfully used as pollutants removal by adsorption of sulfur and nitrogen compounds from liquid fuels and model dyes such as methylene blue and indigo carmine. The dibenzothiofene adsorption process over Ni/Mo 2 C reached approximately 20 mg g −1 , notably higher than other materials described in the literature and also removed almost all methylene blue dye. The great advantage of these carbide composites is that they may be easily recovered magnetically and reused.

  18. Kinetic study on removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by using soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soh-Fong; Lee, Agnes Yung Weng

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the feasibility of soil used as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The kinetics for adsorption of the heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by soil was examined under batch mode. The influence of the contact time and initial concentration for the adsorption process at pH of 4.5, under a constant room temperature of 25 ± 1 °C were studied. The adsorption capacity of the three heavy metal ions from aqueous solution was decreased in order of Pb(2+) > Cu(2+) > Zn(2+). The soil was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopic-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), and Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer. From the FTIR analysis, the experimental data was corresponded to the peak changes of the spectra obtained before and after adsorption process. Studies on SEM-EDX showed distinct adsorption of the heavy metal ions and the mineral composition in the study areas were determined to be silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), and iron(III) oxide (FeO3). A distinct decrease of the specific surface area and total pore volumes of the soil after adsorption was found from the BET analysis. The experimental results obtained were analyzed using four adsorption kinetic models, namely pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion. Evaluating the linear correlation coefficients, the kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order equation described the data appropriable than others. It was concluded that soil can be used as an effective adsorbent for removing Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) ions from aqueous solution.

  19. Chitosan/sporopollenin microcapsules: preparation, characterisation and application in heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargın, İdris; Arslan, Gulsin

    2015-04-01

    Use of natural polymers as biosorbents for heavy metal removal is advantageous. This paper reports a study aiming to design a novel biosorbent from two biomacromolecules; chitosan, a versatile derivative of chitin, and sporopollenin, a biopolymer with excellent mechanical properties and great resistance to chemical and biological attack. Chitosan/sporopollenin microcapsules were prepared via cross-linking and characterised by employing scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Sorption performance of the microcapsules and the plain chitosan beads were tested for Cu(II), Cd(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions at different metal ion concentration, pH, amount of sorbent, temperature and sorption time. The adsorption pattern followed Langmuir isotherm model and the sorption capacity of the chitosan/sporopollenin microcapsules was found to be Cu(II): 1.34, Cd(II): 0.77, Cr(III): 0.99, Ni(II): 0.58 and Zn(II): 0.71 mmol g(-1). Plain chitosan beads showed higher affinity for the ions; Cu(II): 1.46, Cr(III): 1.16 and Ni(II): 0.81 mmol g(-1) but lower for Cd(II): 0.15 and Zn(II): 0.25 mmol g(-1). Sporopollenin enhanced Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions sorption capacity of the chitosan microcapsules. Chitosan/sporopollenin microcapsules can be used in Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Removal and treatment of radioactive, organochlorine and heavy metal contaminants from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieco, S.A.; Neubauer, E.D.; Rhea, J.R.; Escue, L.S.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is defining decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) obligations at its sites. Current D ampersand D activities are Generally labor intensive, use chemical reagents that are difficult to treat, and may expose workers to radioactive and hazardous chemicals. Therefore, new technologies are desired that minimize waste, allow much of the decommissioned materials to be reused rather than disposed of as waste, and produce wastes that will meet disposal criteria The O'Brien ampersand Gere Companies tested a scouring decontamination system on concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous wastes under the sponsorship of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) at DOE's K-25 former gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The scouring system that O'Brien ampersand Gere Companies developed removes fixed radioactive and hazardous surface contamination, while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are dissolved and treated using physical/chemical processes. Bench- and pilot-scale testing of the soda blasting system was conducted between December 1993 and September 1994 on surfaces contaminated with uranium, technetium, heavy metals, and PCBs. Areas of concrete and metal surfaces were blasted. Blasting residuals were dissolved in tap water and treated for radioactive, hazardous, and organochlorine constituents. The treatment system comprised pH adjustment, aeration, solids settling, filtration, carbon adsorption, and ion exchange. This system produced treated water and residual solid waste. Testing demonstrated that the system is capable of removing greater than 95% of radioactive and PCB surface contamination to below DOE's unrestricted use release limits; aqueous radionuclides, heavy metals, and PCBs were below DOE and USEPA treatment objectives after blasting residuals treatment. Waste residuals volume was decreased by 71%

  1. Development of the removal technology for toxic heavy metal ions by surface-modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geun Il; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Kwang Wook; Kim, In Tae; Cho, Il Hoon; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of both radionuclides(uranium, cobalt) and toxic heavy metals (lead, cadmium and chromium) using double surface-modified activated carbon in wide pH ranges are extensively evaluated. Surface-modified activated carbons are classified as AC(as-received carbon), OAC(single surface-modified carbon with nitric acid solution) and OAC-Na(double surface-modified carbon with various alkali solutions). It is established that optimal condition for the second surface modification of OAC is to use the mixed solution of both NaOH and NaCl with total concentration of 0.1 N based on adsorption efficiencies of uranium and cobalt. Variations of adsorption efficiencies in pH ranges of 2{approx}10 and the adsorption capacities in batch adsorber and fixed bed for removal of both radionuclides and toxic heavy metals using OAC-Na were shown to be superior to that of the AC and OAC even in a low pH range. Capacity factors of OAC-Na for the removal of various metal ions are also excellent to that of AC or OAC. Quantitative analysis of capacity factors for each ions showed that adsorption capacity of OAC-Na increased by 30 times for uranium, 60 times for cobalt, 9 times for lead, 30 times for cadmium, 3 times for chromium compared to that of AC at pH 5, respectively. Adsorption capacity of OAC-Na is comparable to that of XAD-16-TAR used as commercial ion exchange resin.

  2. Contemplating the feasibility of vermiculate blended chitosan for heavy metal removal from simulated industrial wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, N.; Soundarrajan, M.; Arungalai Vendan, S.; Sudha, P. N.; Renganathan, N. G.

    2017-12-01

    Wastewater contaminated by heavy metals pose great challenges as they are non biodegradable, toxic and carcinogenic to the soil and aquifers. Vermiculite blended with chitosan have been used to remove Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from the industrial wastewater. The results indicate that the vermiculite blended with chitosan adsorb Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from industrial waste water. Batch adsorption experiments were performed as a function of pH 5.0 and 5.5 respectively for chromium and cadmium. The adsorption rate was observed to be 72 and 71 % of chromium and cadmium respectively. The initial optimum contact time for Cr(VI) was 300 min with 59.2 % adsorption and 300 min for Cd(II) with 71.5 % adsorption. Whereas, at 4-6 there is saturation, increasing the solid to liquid ratio for chitosan biopolymers increases the number of active sites available for adsorption. The optimum pH required for maximum adsorption was found to be 5.0 and 5.5 for chromium and cadmium respectively. The experimental equilibrium adsorption data were fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich equations. It was observed that adsorption kinetics of both the metal ions on vermiculite blended chitosan is well be analyzed with pseudo-second-order model. The negative free energy change of adsorption indicates that the process was spontaneous and vermiculite blended chitosan was a favourable adsorbent for both the metals.

  3. Metal removal from aqueous media by polymer-assisted ultrafiltration with chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégorio Crini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymer assisted ultrafiltration (PAUF is a relatively new process in water and wastewater treatment and the subject of an increasing number of papers in the field of membrane science. Among the commercial polymers used, poly(ethyleneimine and poly(acrylic acid are the most popular to complex numerous metal ions. Recently, there is an increasing interest in the use of chitosan, a natural linear polymer, as chelating agent for complexing metals. Chitosan has a high potential in wastewater treatment mainly due to its polyelectrolyte properties at acidic pH. The objectives of this review are to present the PAUF process and to highlight the advantages gained from the use of chitosan in the process of complexation–ultrafiltration. For this, a PAUF-based literature survey has been compiled and is discussed. From these data, chitosan, a biopolymer that is non-toxic to humans and the environment, is found to be effective in removing metal ions and exhibits high selectivity. It might be a promising polyelectrolyte for PAUF purposes.

  4. Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhanen, Petri A.; Vepsäläinen, Jouko J.; Peräniemi, Sirpa

    2015-01-01

    A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step. PMID:25758924

  5. Removing heavy metals from wastewaters with use of shales accompanying the coal beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska, Beata; Siedlecka, Ewa

    2015-05-15

    A possibility of using clay waste rocks (shales) from coal mines in the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters is considered in this paper. Raw and calcined (600 °C) shales accompanying the coal beds in two Polish coal mines were examined with respect to their adsorptive capabilities for Pb, Ni and Cu ions. The mineralogical composition of the shales was determined and the TG/DTG analysis was carried out. The granulometric compositions of raw and calcined shales were compared. Tests of adsorption for various Pb(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) concentrations were conducted and the pH before and after adsorption was analyzed. The results indicate that the shales from both coal mines differ in adsorptive capabilities for particular metal ions. The calcination improved the adsorptive capabilities for lead, but worsened them for nickel. The examined shales have good adsorptive capabilities, and could be used as inexpensive adsorbents of heavy metal ions, especially in the regions where resources of shale are easy accessible in the form of spoil tips. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the hybrid complexation-ultrafiltration process for metal ion removal from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jianxian [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China) and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)], E-mail: zengjianxian@163.com; Ye Hongqi [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu Zhongyu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2009-01-30

    Complexation-ultrafiltration process was investigated for mercury and cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by using poly(acrylic acid) sodium salt (PAASS) as a complexing agent. The kinetics of complexation reactions of PAASS with the metal ions were studied under a large excess PAASS and pH 5.5. It takes 25 and 50 min for mercury and cadmium to get the complexation equilibrium, respectively, and the reaction kinetics can be described by a pseudo-first-order equation. Effects of various operating parameters such as loading ratios, pH values, etc. on metal rejection coefficients (R) were investigated. In the process of concentration, membrane fluxes decline slowly and R values are about 1. The concentrated retentates were used further for the decomplexation. The decomplexation ratio of mercury-PAASS complex is about 30%, whereas that of cadmium-PAASS complex reaches 93.5%. After the decomplexation, diafiltration experiments were carried out at pH 2.5. Cadmium can be diafiltrated satisfactorily from the retentate, but for mercury it is the contrary. Selective separation of the both metal ions was studied from a binary solution at pH 5. When mercury, cadmium and PAASS concentrations are 30, 30 and 40 mg L{sup -1}, respectively, mercury is retained by ultrafiltration while almost all cadmium passes through the membrane.

  7. Removal of toxic metal ions from solution by inactivated cells of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, R.; Khattak, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper to present the study of plant Larrea tridentate (bush) that grows abundantly in the desert environment of Hub, Balochistan toward the industrial area of Karachi (Pakistan). The binding of Ni(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) to Larrea tridentataroots. Stems, and leaves has been shown to be dependent upon pH, with best binding occurring between pH 5 and 6. This effect in pH suggests that the binding mechanism may be an ion exchange type process. Also, the binding mechanism for these metals is a stable, rapid process which implies that the binding is taking place on the cell wall surface of the creosote bush. Capacity and recovery experiments have demonstrated that Larrea tridentate possessed the ability to bind appreciable amounts of Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) as compared to other biosorbents. This ability to remove and recover heavy metals from solution indicates the tremendous potential that the creosote bush could have for cleansing the environment and industrial waste effluents from toxic metal ions. (author)

  8. BIOLOGICAL REMOVAL OF LEAD BY BACILLUS SP. OBTAINED FROM METAL CONTAMINATED INDUSTRIAL AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinoy Varghese

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study bacterial strains were isolated from soil, sediment and water samples of metal polluted environment. As a result, various 164 heterotrophic bacterial strains were isolated and studied the multiple metal tolerance profile and lead bioaccumulation potentiality. We also analyze the metal contamination of the selected study area. The average abundance order of heavy metal contents in soil, water and sediments were Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd. Zinc concentration ranged from 39.832µg/L to 310.24µg/L in water, 12.81µg/g to 407.53µg/g in soil and 81.06µg/g to 829.54µg/g in sediment; copper concentration from 25.54µg/L to 66.29µg/L in water, 8.22µg/g to 73.11µg/g in soil and 32.28µg/g to 600.61µg/g in sediment; lead concentration from 8.09µg/L to 25.23µg/L in water, 5.31µg/g to 73.11µg/g in soil and 1.02µg/g to 60.14µg/g in sediment and cadmium concentration ranged from 39.832µg/L to 310.24µg/L in water, 12.81µg/g to 407.53µg/g in soil and 81.06µg/g to 829.54µg/g in sediment. Metal resistance studies of the bacterial isolates revealed that out of 164 isolates collected about 45% of the isolates showed very high tolerance (>6000µg/ml to lead. Tolerance to Cd and Zn were relatively low (<500 µg/ml. Resistance to Ni and Cr were in between 1000µg/ml - 1500µg/ml. A total of 18 bacterial genera were recorded from the study area; ten genera from soil and 11 from water, while only 5 bacterial genera were recorded from sediment samples. Bioaccumulation studies revealed that with increase in time, the biomass of the selected bacterial isolates increased. Correspondingly, with increase in biomass, the heavy metal bioaccumulation was also increased. In lead removal studies, around 50% of the lead in the experimental flasks was reduced by Bacillus sp. In control flask, only 5% metal reduction occurs. The obtained results showed that the selected Bacillus sp. is good bioaccumulation medium for lead ions.

  9. Determination of metal ions released by stainless steel arch bar into bio-fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori A. Joseph

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The amounts of cobalt, iron, manganese, nickel and chromium ions released from new and reused stainless steel arch bar used for maxillomandibular fixation was determined in Hank’s solutions of different hydrogen and chloride ions concentrations, whole blood serum and phosphate buffered saline (PBS in vitro, over a six-week immersion time at 37 oC, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The corrosion levels of the wires due to effects of media and incubation times in the bio-fluids were compared by Duncan’s two-way ANOVA (P less than 0.05. Pearson’s correlation was used in establishing relationship in the amounts of metal ions released by new and reused arch bars. The study indicated that the reused wires released more ions than new ones at all time points. The variation of pH and chloride ions of the bio-fluids had a significant effect on the amount of Ni, Mn and Cr ions released. Ageing prior use of arch bars significantly increased Ni ions released into the bio-fluids.

  10. Zero-Valent Metallic Treatment System and Its Application for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Pcbs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    PCBs are removed from contaminated media using a treatment system including zero-valent metal particles and an organic hydrogen donating solvent. The treatment system may include a weak acid in order to eliminate the need for a coating of catalytic noble metal on the zero-valent metal particles. If catalyzed zero-valent metal particles are used, the treatment system may include an organic hydrogen donating solvent that is a non-water solvent. The treatment system may be provided as a "paste-like" system that is preferably applied to natural media and ex-situ structures to eliminate PCBs.

  11. Heat transfer and fluid flow analysis of self-healing in metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Lucci, J.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores imparting self-healing characteristics to metal matrices similar to what are observed in biological systems and are being developed for polymeric materials. To impart self-healing properties to metal matrices, a liquid healing method was investigated; the met hod consists of a container filled with low melting alloy acting as a healing agent, embedded into a high melting metal matrix. When the matrix is cracked; self-healing is achieved by melting the healing agent allowing the liquid metal to flow into the crack. Upon cooling, solidification of the healing agent occurs and seals the crack. The objective of this research is to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer to impart self-healing property to metal matrices. In this study, a dimensionless healing factor, which may help predict the possibility of healing is proposed. The healing factor is defined as the ratio of the viscous forces and the contact area of liquid metal and solid which prevent flow, and volume expansion, density, and velocity of the liquid metal, gravity, crack size and orientation which promote flow. The factor incorporates the parameters that control self-healing mechanism. It was observed that for lower values of the healing factor, the liquid flows, and for higher values of healing factor, the liquid remains in the container and healing does not occur. To validate and identify the critical range of the healing factor, experiments and simulations were performed for selected combinations of healing agents and metal matrices. The simulations were performed for three-dimensional models and a commercial software 3D Ansys-Fluent was used. Three experimental methods of synthesis of self-healing composites were used. The first method consisted of creating a hole in the matrices, and liquid healing agent was poured into the hole. The second method consisted of micro tubes containing the healing agent, and the third method consisted of incorporating micro balloons containing

  12. Isotherm studies for determination of removal capacity of bi-metal (Ni and Cr) ions by aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, K.; Yusuf, M.; Hameed, A.; Noreen, Z.; Hafeez, F.Y.; Faryal, R.

    2010-01-01

    Pakistan is among the developing countries where there is a need to establish new industries to meet the demands of a growing population. This has led to industrial setup in various sectors, without proper planning and consideration for treatment of contamination, leading to disposal of untreated wastewater into nearby land and water bodies. This study was planned to investigate an indigenous Aspergillus niger for development of biosorbent for the removal of metal ions. The Aspergillus isolate's Ni and Cr removal efficiency was determined in batch mode over various pH (4.0-10.0) and temperature (25-40 deg. C) as single as well as bimetal ions. Using a single metal ion, maximum biosorption potential was obtained at pH 5.0-6.0 and 30-35 deg. C for both ions. On the other hand, Ni removal was reduced in the presence of Cr, while Ni removal influenced Cr removal with an increase showing maximum removal at an initial adsorbate concentration of 50mg/L, pH 6.0 and 35 deg. C. Effect of presence of bimetal in a solution on biosorption potential of Aspergillus niger was predicted by using equilibrium modeling. Adsorption trends for both nickel (R2 0.9916) and chromium (R2 0.8548) followed Langmuir isotherm in single metal removal system, but under bimetal condition chromium adsorption fitted better to Freundlich model and that of nickel followed Temkin isotherm, suggesting considerable change in behavior and interaction between biosorbent and metal ions. Therefore, we concluded that Aspergillus niger a viable strain for development of a biosorbent for removal of a mixture of metal ions. (author)

  13. Effective removal of heavy metals from industrial sludge with the aid of a biodegradable chelating ligand GLDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qing; Cui, Yanrui; Li, Qilu; Sun, Jianhui, E-mail: sunjh@htu.cn

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • A novel readily biodegradable chelating ligand was employed to remove heavy metals. • The effects of different conditions on the extraction with GLDA were probed. • Species distribution of metals before and after extraction with GLDA was analyzed. • GLDA was effective for Cd extraction from sludge samples under various conditions. • GLDA offers special insights in the effective removal of heavy metals. - Abstract: Tetrasodium of N,N-bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid (GLDA), a novel readily biodegradable chelating ligand, was employed for the first time to remove heavy metals from industrial sludge generated from a local battery company. The extraction of cadmium, nickel, copper, and zinc from battery sludge with the presence of GLDA was studied under different experimental conditions such as contact times, pH values, as well as GLDA concentrations. Species distribution of metals in the sludge sample before and after extraction with GLDA was also analyzed. Current investigation showed that (i) GLDA was effective for Cd extraction from sludge samples under various conditions. (ii) About 89% cadmium, 82% nickel and 84% copper content could be effectively extracted at the molar ratio of GLDA:M(II) = 3:1 and at pH = 4, whereas the removal efficiency of zinc was quite low throughout the experiment. (iii) A variety of parameters, such as contact time, pH values, the concentration of chelating agent, stability constant, as well as species distribution of metals could affect the chelating properties of GLDA.

  14. Microfungal spores (Ustilago maydis and U. digitariae) immobilised chitosan microcapsules for heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargın, İdris; Arslan, Gulsin; Kaya, Murat

    2016-03-15

    Designing effective chitosan-based biosorbents from unexploited biomass for heavy metal removal has received much attention over the past decade. Ustilago, loose smut, is a ubiquitous fungal plant pathogen infecting over 4000 species including maize and weed. This study aimed to establish whether the spores of the phytopathogenic microfungi Ustilago spores can be immobilised in cross-linked chitosan matrix, and it reports findings on heavy metal sorption performance of chitosan/Ustilago composite microcapsules. Immobilisation of Ustilago maydis and U. digitariae spores (from maize and weed) in chitosan microcapsules was achieved via glutaraldehyde cross-linking. The cross-linked microcapsules were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Sorption capacities of chitosan-U. maydis and chitosan-U. digitariae microcapsules were investigated and compared to cross-linked chitosan beads: Cu(II): 66.72, 69.26, 42.57; Cd(II): 49.46, 53.96, 7.87; Cr(III): 35.88, 49.40, 43.68; Ni(II): 41.67, 33.46, 16.43 and Zn(II): 30.73, 60.81, 15.04mg/g, respectively. Sorption experiments were conducted as a function of initial metal ion concentration (2-10mg/L), contact time (60-480min), temperature (25, 35 and 45°C), amount of the sorbent (0.05-0.25g) and pH of the metal solution. The microcapsules with spores exhibited better performance over the plain chitosan beads, demonstrating their potential use in water treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative Study for Removal of Some Heavy Metals from Liquid Wastes Using Natural Resources and Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty three bacterial strains have been isolated from polluted water and soil samples of Ismailia Canal in Egypt. The polluted sites were at Abu Zabal Factory (fertilizer factory), Elshaba factory (Aluminum sulfate factory) and Oil-pipes Company (petrochemical materials). By screening the abilities of these isolates to tolerate heavy metals, it has been found that isolate M AM-4 w as the most potent isolate. This isolate was identified as Providencia rettgeri. As the concentration of Al 3+ increased the ability of P. rettgeri to uptake Al 3+ decreased. P. rettgeri could remove 97.2% of Al 3+ from 25 mg/L. Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778 (American Type Culture Collection, U.S.A) gave the same trend for Al 3+ uptake but P. rettgeri was more tolerant to Al 3+ than B. cereus ATCC 11778.With increasing Co 2+ concentration, abilities of P. rettgeri and B. cereus ATCC 11778 to uptake decreased. P. rettgeri could uptake 59 mg/L Co 2+ from 200 mg/L (29.5%), while B. cereus ATCC 11778 uptake 68.3 mg/L (34.1%). Also, as the concentration of Cu 2+ increased the abilities of P. rettgeri and B. cereus ATCC 11778 to uptake Cu 2+ decreased. P. rettgeri removed 11.5 mg/Cu 2+ from 25 mg/L (47.0%), while B. cereus ATCC 11778 removed 13.5 mg/L from the some concentration (54.%). Combined treatment of 1.0% untreated clay with P. rettgeri could remove 471.8 mg/L Al 3+ from 500 mg/L (94.4%), 82.4 mg/L Co 2+ from 200 mg/L (41.2%) and 150 mg/L Cu 2+ from 300 mg/L (50%). However, 1.0 % treated clay combined with P. rettgeri adsorbed 207.8 mg/L Al 3+ from 500 mg/L (41.5%), 52.0 mg/L Co 2+ from 200 mg/L (26.0%) and 185 mg/L Cu 2+ from 300 mg/L (61.6%). The combined treatment adsorbed more heavy metals than clay only or bacterial cells only. Three KGy gamma radiations reduced the viable count of P. rettgeri by 7.4 log cycles. P. rettegri mutant MI was able to tolerate more Al 3+ than the parent strain

  16. Decrease of trace elements in erythrocytes and plasma after removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Peter; Lindvall, Anders; Hudecek, Romuald; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration changes of 13 elements in erythrocytes and plasma after the removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys. Blood samples from 250 patients were collected, separated into erythrocytes and plasma, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The 250 patients were divided into 3 groups (Negative, Zero, and Positive) depending on their estimation of quality of life in an earlier study. Magnesium in plasma, selenium and mercury in plasma, and erythrocytes showed decreased concentrations after amalgam removal in all groups (p amalgam removal in the Negative and Positive groups (p amalgam removal (p amalgam removal in the Negative compared to the Positive group (p amalgam removal.

  17. Application of the artificial intelligence to estimate the constructed wetland response to heavy metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elektorowicz, M. [Concordia Univ., Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: mariae@civil.concordia.ca; Balanzinski, M. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Mechnical Engineering, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Qasaimeh, A. [Concordia Univ., Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2002-06-15

    Current design approaches lack essential parameters necessary to evaluate the removal of metals contained in wastewater which is discharged to constructed wetlands. As a result, there is no guideline for an accurate design of constructed wetlands. An artificial intelligence approach was used to assess constructed wetland design. For this purpose concentrations of bioavailable mercury were evaluated in conditions where initial concentrations of inorganic mercury, chloride concentrations and pH values changed. Fuzzy knowledge base was built based on results obtained from previous investigations performed in a greenhouse for floating plants, and from computations for mercury speciation. The Fuzzy Decision Support System (FDSS) used the knowledge base to find parameters that permit to generate the highest amount of mercury available for plants. The findings of this research can be applied to wetlands and all natural processes where correlations between them are uncertain. (author)

  18. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  19. Preparation and characterization of bentonite clays mixture destined to the removal of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Neto, A.F. de; Silva, M.G.C. da

    2009-01-01

    In this work a mixture was prepared with 50% wt. of the Bofe and Verde-lodo clays. The characterization methods used they were: thermal analyses (TG and DTG), X-ray diffraction, fisissorption of N 2 , scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The rehearsals of adsorption we accomplished in system of finite bath using as adsorbent the mixture loamy in natura or it mixes calcined. Starting from TG and DTG a thermal treatment was accomplished to 500 deg C of the loamy mixture. Through the results of the copper adsorption, it was verified that mixes loamy it provokes chemical precipitation of the copper while the calcined sample presents amount metal adsorbed around 7.31 mg of copper/g of adsorbent. The value of removal percentage obtained by the calcined sample it was of 63.02%. (author)

  20. Removal of metals and water-insoluble materials from desalter emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, S.K.; Mosby, J.F.; Treadman, J.E. II.

    1993-06-15

    A process for removing metals and insoluble materials from crude oil is described comprising the steps of: blending crude oil with water and desalting chemicals; charging the oil blend to a desalting chamber and passing it through an electrical field whereby agglomeration of suspended insoluble materials occurs and layers of clean oil, brine and oil-brine interface emulsion are formed; withdrawing the oil and brine; measuring the volume of the emulsion layer; withdrawing a portion of the emulsion layer; blending the withdrawn emulsion with up to 2 volumes of aromatic-rich hydrocarbon containing at least 20% aromatics by volume; maintaining the blend at a temperature of 100 to 300 F and a positive pressure; and subjecting the blend to a force of at least about 500 g, whereby oil free of at least 90% of suspended particulates and water results.

  1. Application of the artificial intelligence to estimate the constructed wetland response to heavy metal removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Balanzinski, M.; Qasaimeh, A.

    2002-01-01

    Current design approaches lack essential parameters necessary to evaluate the removal of metals contained in wastewater which is discharged to constructed wetlands. As a result, there is no guideline for an accurate design of constructed wetlands. An artificial intelligence approach was used to assess constructed wetland design. For this purpose concentrations of bioavailable mercury were evaluated in conditions where initial concentrations of inorganic mercury, chloride concentrations and pH values changed. Fuzzy knowledge base was built based on results obtained from previous investigations performed in a greenhouse for floating plants, and from computations for mercury speciation. The Fuzzy Decision Support System (FDSS) used the knowledge base to find parameters that permit to generate the highest amount of mercury available for plants. The findings of this research can be applied to wetlands and all natural processes where correlations between them are uncertain. (author)

  2. Removal of metals and phenols by adsorption/ion exchange process; Eliminacion conjunta de metales y fenoles por adsorcion/intercambio ionico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranon, E.; Castrillon, I.; Monster, T.; Sastre, H.

    2002-07-01

    The present work studies the possible interactions in the removal of metals and phenolic compounds that may be present in an industrial wastewater by means of an adsorption/ion exchange process. The resins employed were Amberlite 252-C for the removal of metals and Amberlite XAD-4 for the removal of phenol. Firstly, elimination was studied by means of assays with solutions that contained either 100 mg/l of copper, 100 mg/l of zinc or 1000 mg/l of phenol. Subsequently, assays were carried out using solutions containing a mixture of 100 mg/l of each metal, and finally, with solutions containing a mixture of 100 mg/l of each metal and 1000 mg/l of phenol. The saturation capacity of the Amberlite 252-C resin for metals decreased slightly in the presence of phenol, the decrease in working capacity being greater than that of saturation capacity. However, the presence of metallic cations increased the sorption of phenol by the Amberlite XAD-4 resin. (Author) 14 refs.

  3. Removal of industrial dyes and heavy metals by Beauveria bassiana: FTIR, SEM, TEM and AFM investigations with Pb(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Deepak; Malik, Anushree; Namburath, Maneesh; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2017-10-01

    Presence of industrial dyes and heavy metal as a contaminant in environment poses a great risk to human health. In order to develop a potential technology for remediation of dyes (Reactive remazol red, Yellow 3RS, Indanthrene blue and Vat novatic grey) and heavy metal [Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI) and Pb(II)] contamination, present study was performed with entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (MTCC no. 4580). High dye removal (88-97%) was observed during the growth of B. bassiana while removal percentage for heavy metals ranged from 58 to 75%. Further, detailed investigations were performed with Pb(II) in terms of growth kinetics, effect of process parameters and mechanism of removal. Growth rate decreased from 0.118 h -1 (control) to 0.031 h -1 , showing 28% reduction in biomass at 30 mg L -1 Pb(II) with 58.4% metal removal. Maximum Pb(II) removal was observed at 30 °C, neutral pH and 30 mg L -1 initial metal concentration. FTIR analysis indicated the changes induced by Pb(II) in functional groups on biomass surface. Further, microscopic analysis (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM)) was performed to understand the changes in cell surface morphology of the fungal cell. SEM micrograph showed a clear deformation of fungal hyphae, whereas AFM studies proved the increase in surface roughness (RSM) in comparison to control cell. Homogenous bioaccumulation of Pb(II) inside the fungal cell was clearly depicted by TEM-high-angle annular dark field coupled with EDX. Present study provides an insight into the mechanism of Pb(II) bioremediation and strengthens the significance of using entomopathogenic fungus such as B. bassiana for metal and dye removal.

  4. Simultaneous removal of oil and grease, and heavy metals from artificial bilge water using electro-coagulation/flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Guillermo J; La Motta, Enrique J

    2014-11-01

    US and international regulations pertaining to the control of bilge water discharges from ships have concentrated their attention to the levels of oil and grease rather than to the heavy metal concentrations. The consensus is that any discharge of bilge water (and oily water emulsion within 12 nautical miles from the nearest land cannot exceed 15 parts per million (ppm). Since there is no specific regulation for metal pollutants under the bilge water section, reference standards regulating heavy metal concentrations are taken from the ambient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life. The research herein presented discusses electro-coagulation (EC) as a method to treat bilge water, with a focus on oily emulsions and heavy metals (copper, nickel and zinc) removal efficiency. Experiments were run using a continuous flow reactor, manufactured by Ecolotron, Inc., and a synthetic emulsion as artificial bilge water. The synthetic emulsion contained 5000 mg/L of oil and grease, 5 mg/L of copper, 1.5 mg/L of nickel, and 2.5 mg/l of zinc. The experimental results demonstrate that EC is very efficient in removing oil and grease. For oil and grease removal, the best treatment and cost efficiency was obtained when using a combination of carbon steel and aluminum electrodes, at a detention time less than one minute, a flow rate of 1 L/min and 0.6 A/cm(2) of current density. The final effluent oil and grease concentration, before filtration, was always less than 10 mg/L. For heavy metal removal, the combination of aluminum and carbon steel electrodes, flow rate of 1 L/min, effluent recycling, and 7.5 amps produced 99% zinc removal efficiency. Copper and nickel are harder to remove, and a removal efficiency of 70% was achieved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metallothionein Induction in the Coelomic Fluid of the Earthworm Lumbricus terrestris following Heavy Metal Exposure: A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Calisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms are useful bioindicator organisms for soil biomonitoring. Recently the use of pollution biomarkers in earthworms has been increasingly investigated for soil monitoring and assessment. Earthworm coelomic fluid is particularly interesting from a toxicological perspective, because it is responsible for pollutant disposition and tissue distribution to the whole organism. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of heavy metal exposure on metallothionein (Mt induction in the coelomic fluid of Lumbricus terrestris in view of future use as sensitive biomarker suitable for application to metal polluted soil monitoring and assessment. L. terrestris coelomic fluid showed a detectable Mt concentration of about 4.0±0.6 μg/mL (mean ± SEM, n=10 in basal physiological condition. When the animals were exposed to CuSO4 or CdCl2 or to a mixture of the two metals in OECD soils for 72 h, the Mt specific concentration significantly (P<0.001 increased. The Mt response in the coelomic fluid perfectly reflected the commonly used Mt response in the whole organism when the two responses were compared on the same specimens. These findings indicate the suitability of Mt determination in L. terrestris coelomic fluid as a sensitive biomarker for application to metal polluted soil monitoring and assessment.

  6. Metal-based particles in human amniotic fluids of fetuses with normal karyotype and congenital malformation--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barošová, H; Dvořáčková, J; Motyka, O; Kutláková, K Mamulová; Peikertová, P; Rak, J; Bielniková, H; Kukutschová, J

    2015-05-01

    This study explores the inorganic composition of amniotic fluid in healthy human fetuses and fetuses with congenital malformation with a special attention to presence of metal-based solid particles. Amniotic fluid originates from maternal blood and provides fetus mechanical protection and nutrients. In spite of this crucial role, the environmental impact on the composition of amniotic fluid remains poorly studied. The samples of human amniotic fluids were obtained by amniocentesis, including both healthy pregnancies and those with congenital malformations. The samples were analysed using several techniques, including Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersed spectrometry (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Several metal-based particles containing barium, titanium, iron, and other elements were detected by SEM-EDS and Raman microspectroscopy. XRD analysis detected only sodium chloride as the main component of all amniotic fluid samples. Infrared spectroscopy detected protein-like organic components. Majority of particles were in form of agglomerates up to tens of micrometres in size, consisting of mainly submicron particles. By statistical analysis (multiple correspondence analysis), it was observed that groups of healthy and diagnosed fetuses form two separate groups and therefore, qualitative differences in chemical composition may have distinct biological impact. Overall, our results suggest that metal-based nanosized pollutants penetrate into the amniotic fluid and may affect human fetuses.

  7. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  8. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C.; Larese, Kathleen Caroline; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov

    2017-05-30

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  9. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mokhlesur M; Adil, Mohd; Yusof, Alias M; Kamaruzzaman, Yunus B; Ansary, Rezaul H

    2014-05-07

    In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II), lead(II) and chromium(VI). Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II) and lead(II) were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II) and lead(II). The removal of chromium(VI) was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cr(VI) by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  10. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  11. Influence of enhancing electrolytes on the removal efficiency of heavy metals from Gabes marine sediments (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Amel; Said, Imen; Lafhaj, Zoubeir; Hamdi, Essaieb

    2016-12-15

    This study focused on the feasibility of the treatment of heavy metals-contaminated sediments from Gabes harbor (Tunisia) using enhanced electrokinetic process. It presented a laboratory short-time electrokinetic experiment. The enhancing agents, as citric, acetic acids and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used regarding their low environmental hazard. The electrokinetic cell was specially designed in order to elaborate two experiments at the same time. This paper is composed of three parts. The first part introduces the characterization of Gabes sediments. The second part describes the design of laboratory electrokinetic cell and the followed methods. The third part is dedicated to the results analysis. Treatment efficiency revealed that more than 80% of lead was removed from Gabes marine sediments. The reduction of cooper concentration, in sediments after treatment, ranged from 74 to 87%. Despite, the high removal of cadmium that ranged from 58 to 79%, treated sediments presented Cd concentration above the threshold limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous systems with thiol functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Cynthia L; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Addleman, R Shane; Carter, Timothy G; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Warner, Marvin G

    2007-07-15

    We have shown that superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a surface functionalization of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) are an effective sorbent material for toxic soft metals such as Hg, Ag, Pb, Cd, and Tl, which effectively bind to the DMSA ligands and for As, which binds to the iron oxide lattices. The nanoparticles are highly dispersible and stable in solutions, have a large surface area (114 m2/g), and have a high functional group content (1.8 mmol thiols/g). They are attracted to a magnetic field and can be separated from solution within a minute with a 1.2 T magnet. The chemical affinity, capacity, kinetics, and stability of the magnetic nanoparticles were compared to those of conventional resin based sorbents (GT-73), activated carbon, and nanoporous silica (SAMMS) of similar surface chemistries in river water, groundwater, seawater, and human blood and plasma. DMSA-Fe3O4 had a capacity of 227 mg of Hg/g, a 30-fold larger value than GT-73. The nanoparticles removed 99 wt% of 1 mg/L Pb within a minute, while it took over 10 and 120 min for Chelex-100 and GT-73 to remove 96% of Pb.

  13. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mokhlesur M.; Adil, Mohd; Yusof, Alias M.; Kamaruzzaman, Yunus B.; Ansary, Rezaul H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II), lead(II) and chromium(VI). Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II) and lead(II) were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II) and lead(II). The removal of chromium(VI) was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cr(VI) by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:28788640

  14. Removal of phosphorus by a composite metal oxide adsorbent derived from manganese ore tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Wu, Kun; Zeng, Lihua

    2012-05-30

    The selective adsorption of phosphate (P) from wastewater is a promising method for controlling eutrophication in water bodies. In this study, an adsorbent of composite metal oxides (CMOMO) was synthesized from manganese ore tailings by the process of digestion-oxidation-coprecipitation. CMOMO was characterized using several methods, and its adsorption behaviors for phosphate were investigated. Based on the results from SEM and BET analysis, CMOMO exhibited a rough surface and a large surface area (307.21 m(2)/g). According to the results of EDAX, XRD and XPS, its main constituents were determined to be amorphous FeOOH, MnO(2) and AlOOH. The kinetic data were best fit using the Elovich model due to its complicate composites. The maximal adsorption capacity of P would increase with elevated temperatures. Additionally, it was found that the P removal efficiency decreased with an increase of pH (4-10) or a decrease of ion strength (1-0.01 M). The coexisting anions had little effects on phosphate removal, implying the specific adsorption of P by CMOMO. Furthermore, the desorption and reuse results indicated that this adsorbent could be regenerated using alkali solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Technologies for Decentralized Fluoride Removal: Testing Metallic Iron-based Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Igor Ndé-Tchoupé

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the realization in the 1930s that elevated fluoride concentrations in drinking water can have detrimental effects on human health, new methods have been progressively developed in order to reduce fluoride to acceptable levels. In the developing world the necessity for filtration media that are both low-cost and sourced from locally available materials has resulted in the widespread use of bone char. Since the early 1990s metallic iron (Fe0 has received widespread use as both an adsorbent and a reducing agent for the removal of a wide range of contaminant species from water. The ion-selectivity of Fe0 is dictated by the positively charged surface of iron (hydroxides at circumneutral pH. This suggests that Fe0 could potentially be applied as suitable filter media for the negatively charged fluoride ion. This communication seeks to demonstrate from a theoretical basis and using empirical data from the literature the suitability of Fe0 filters for fluoride removal. The work concludes that Fe0-bearing materials, such as steel wool, hold good promise as low-cost, readily available and highly effective decentralized fluoride treatment materials.

  16. Comparison of 2-compartment, 3-compartment and stack designs for electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from harbour sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons of cell and stack designs for the electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from two harbour sediments, were made. Multivariate modelling showed that sediment properties and experimental set-ups had the highest influence on the heavy metal removal indicating that they should be modelled...... and analysed separately. Clean-up levels of Cu, Pb and Zn were significantly higher for the cell designs, implying that longer time and relatively more electric charge and energy would be necessary to achieve similar clean-up levels in the stack design experiments.In the studied experimental domain...

  17. Evaluation of removal efficiency of heavy metals by low-cost activated carbon prepared from African palm fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazak, Sani; Hussaini, K.; Sani, H. M.

    2017-10-01

    This study details the removal of heavy metals; Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead from wastewater effluent using an activated carbon produced from African palm fruit. The effluent was obtained from Old Panteka market; a metal scrap Market located in Kaduna State, Nigeria, which has several components that constitute high level of pollution in the environment. The effect of temperature and contact time on the removal of these heavy metals using the activated carbon produced was investigated. The activated carbon showed a significant ability in removing heavy metals; Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead from the wastewater. Higher percentage removal was observed at a temperature of 80 °C (93.23 ± 0.035, 96.71 ± 0.097, 92.01 ± 0.018, and 95.42 ± 0.067 % for Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead, respectively) and at an optimum contact time of 60 min (99.235 ± 0.148, 96.711 ± 0.083, 95.34 ± 0.015, and 97.750 ± 0.166 % for Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead, respectively) after which the percentage removal decreases. This work, therefore, suggests that African palm fruit can be successfully applied to solve this environmental pollution.

  18. Activated parthenium carbon as an adsorbent for the removal of dyes and heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshwarisivaraj; Subburam, V

    2002-11-01

    Parthenium hysterophorous (L) is a perennial weed distributed all over the country. Carbonized parthenium activated with conc. H2SO4 and ammonium persulphate was effective in the removal of dyes, heavy metals and phenols. Variation in the percentage removal of adsorbates was observed with increase in the contact time. Among the adsorbates tested, the affinity of the activated parthenium carbon was highest for Hg2+, Methylene Blue and Malachite Green.

  19. Effect of metals on Candida albicans growth in the presence of chemical chelators and human abscess fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohnle, P G; Hahn, B L; Karmarkar, R

    2001-04-01

    Calprotectin is a calcium- and zinc-binding protein that is present in abscess fluid supernatants and appears to inhibit microbial growth through competition for zinc. In the present study, growth inhibition by chemical chelators was compared with that produced by human abscess fluid to determine whether other chelators, perhaps with different metal specificities, would have the same or different patterns of metal reversibility as abscess fluid. Zinc was found to be more potent than the other metals tested in reversing C. albicans growth inhibition by human abscess fluid and three chemical chelators, even though in some cases the stability constants of certain of these chelators were higher for other metals. For example, in the presence of the chelator diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid, zinc stimulated Candida growth at a 10-fold lower concentration than did iron, even though this chelator has a stability constant for iron that is almost 10(10) higher than that for zinc. These results suggest that the zinc specificity of calprotectin's C. albicans growth inhibition can best be explained by the marked sensitivity of this organism to zinc deprivation rather than by selective binding of this metal by the protein.

  20. Application of Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge to Removal of Uranium Dioxide from Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Saber, Hamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that radio-frequency (rf) plasma glow discharge using NF 3 gas is an effective technique for the removal of uranium oxide from metal surfaces. The results of these experiments are analyzed to explain the measured dependence of the UO 2 removal or etch rate on the NF 3 gas pressure and the absorbed power in the plasma. The NF 3 gas pressure in the experiments was varied from 10.8 to 40 Pa, and the deposited power in the plasma was varied from 25 to 210 W. The UO 2 etch rate was strongly dependent on the absorbed power and, to a lesser extent, on the NF 3 pressure and decreased exponentially with immersion time. At 210 W and 17 Pa, all detectable UO 2 in the samples (∼10.6 mg each) was removed at the endpoint, whereas the initial etch rate was ∼3.11 μm/min. When the absorbed power was ≤50 W, however, the etch rate was initially ∼0.5 μg/min and almost zero at the endpoint, with UO 2 only partially etched. This self-limiting etching of UO 2 at low power is attributed to the formation of nonvolatile intermediates UF 2 , UF 3 , UF 4 , UF 5 , UO 2 F, and UO 2 F 2 on the surface. Analysis indicated that the accumulation of UF 6 and, to a lesser extent, O 2 near the surface partially contributed to the exponential decrease in the UO 2 etch rate with immersion time. Unlike fluorination with F 2 gas, etching of UO 2 using rf glow discharge is possible below 663 K. The average etch rates of the amorphous UO 2 in the NF 3 experiments are comparable to the peak values reported in other studies for crystalline UO 2 using CF 4 /O 2 glow discharge performed at ∼150 to 250 K higher sample temperatures

  1. Applications of porous electrodes to metal-ion removal and the design of battery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trost, G.G.

    1983-09-01

    This dissertation treats the use of porous electrodes as electrochemical reactors for the removal of dilute metal ions. A methodology for the scale-up of porous electrodes used in battery applications is given. Removal of 4 μg Pb/cc in 1 M sulfuric acid was investigated in atmospheric and high-pressure, flow-through porous reactors. The atmospheric reactor used a reticulated vitreous carbon porous bed coated in situ with a mercury film. Best results show 98% removal of lead from the feed stream. Results are summarized in a dimensionless plot of Sherwood number vs Peclet number. High-pressure, porous-electrode experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pressure on the current efficiency. Pressures were varied up to 120 bar on electrode beds of copper or lead-coated spheres. The copper spheres showed high hydrogen evolution rates which inhibited lead deposition, even at high cathodic overpotentials. Use of lead spheres inhibited hydrogen evolution but often resulted in the formation of lead sulfate layers; these layers were difficult to reduce back to lead. Experimental data of one-dimensional porous battery electrodes are combined with a model for the current collector and cell connectors to predict ultimate specific energy and maximum specific power for complete battery systems. Discharge behavior of the plate as a whole is first presented as a function of depth of discharge. These results are combined with the voltage and weight penalties of the interconnecting bus and post, positive and negative active material, cell container, etc. to give specific results for the lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide high-temperature battery. Subject to variation is the number of positive electrodes, grid conductivity, minimum current-collector weight, and total delivered capacity. The battery can be optimized for maximum energy or power, or a compromise design may be selected

  2. A dipeptide-based superhydrogel: Removal of toxic dyes and heavy metal ions from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Nibedita; Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Roy, Subhasish; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    A short peptide-based molecule has been found to form a strong hydrogel at phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.46. The hydrogel has been characterized thoroughly using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), wide angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and rheological analysis. It has been observed from FE-SEM images that entangled nanofiber network is responsible for gelation. Rheological investigation demonstrates that the self-assembly of this synthetic dipeptide results in the formation of mechanically strong hydrogel with storage modulus (G') around 10 4 Pa. This gel has been used for removing both cationic and anionic toxic organic dyes (Brilliant Blue, Congo red, Malachite Green, Rhodamine B) and metal ions (Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ) from waste water. Moreover, only a small amount of the gelator is required (less than 1 mg/mL) for preparation of this superhydrogel and even this hydrogel can be reused three times for dye/metal ion absorption. This signifies the importance of the hydrogel towards waste water management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4 4 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  4. On the Hydrogen Cyanide Removal from Air using Metal loaded Polyacrylonitrile Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozorgmehr Maddah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study highlights the potential application of electrospun polyacrylonitrile/metal salts (CrO3, CuCO3 nanofibrous filter media impregnated with TEDA (PAN-M-TEDA as an efficient adsorbent for hydrogen cyanide removal from air. The PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber before and after adsorption of hydrogen cyanide was characterized with Fourier transform infrared microscopy (FTIR. The concentration of hydrogen cyanide passes through the samples was determined by measuring the absorption of hydrogen cyanide in the solution containing indicator via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed that introducing metal salts to PAN nanofiber along with their impregnation with TEDA, significantly increases the adsorption capacity of nanofibrous filter media. The adsorption of hydrogen cyanide over PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber was also studied as a function of thickness, PAN concentration and TEDA concentration by response surface methodology (RSM based on central composite design. It is found that the highest adsorption capacity can be achieved at thickness 28.42 mm, PAN concentration 16.19 w/v % and TEDA concentration 14.80 w/v %.

  5. New generation Amberlite XAD resin for the removal of metal ions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akil; Siddique, Jamal Akhter; Laskar, Mohammad Asaduddin; Kumar, Rajeev; Mohd-Setapar, Siti Hamidah; Khatoon, Asma; Shiekh, Rayees Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    The direct determination of toxic metal ions, in environmental samples, is difficult because of the latter's presence in trace concentration in association with complex matrices, thereby leading to insufficient sensitivity and selectivity of the methods used. The simultaneous removal of the matrix and preconcentration of the metal ions, through solid phase extraction, serves as the promising solution. The mechanism involved in solid phase extraction (SPE) depends on the nature of the sorbent and analyte. Thus, SPE is carried out by means of adsorption, ion exchange, chelation, ion pair formation, and so forth. As polymeric supports, the commercially available Amberlite resins have been found very promising for designing chelating matrices due to its good physical and chemical properties such as porosity, high surface area, durability and purity. This review presents an overview of the various works done on the modification of Amberlite XAD resins with the objective of making it an efficient sorbent. The methods of modifications which are generally based on simple impregnation, sorption as chelates and chemical bonding have been discussed. The reported results, including the preconcentration limit, the detection limit, sorption capacity, preconcentration factors etc., have been reproduced. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Laser cutting performances for thick steel specimens studied by molten metal removal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Toyama, Shin'ichi

    2017-01-01

    Laser cutting performances for thick carbon steel and stainless steel specimens up to 300 mm in thickness were studied to dismantle large steel objects. The cutting performances were summarized based on the assist gas flow rate and the front kerf width, and the range for appropriate cutting conditions was shown. Gas pressure in the kerf region required for molten metal removal was estimated from the pressure loss on the kerf surface, which depended on the gas flow rate and the kerf width. The relation to keep sufficient gas pressure in the kerf well corresponded to the experimental relations for appropriate cutting. Drag force to the molten metal on the kerf surface was also estimated, which varied by the structures and materials. The behaviors such as cavity formation and its expansion in the kerf region at the unsuccessful cutting trials were well explained. The results are informative for the development of the laser cutting technology applied to the thick steel specimen for the nuclear decommissioning. (author)

  7. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  8. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. - Highlights: • Low molecular nanoscaled pectin was obtained using original hydrolysis method • Metal binding activity of pectin compounds was studied in a batch sorption system • Pectins exert highest metal binding activity at pH 6.0 • Metal binding isotherms of all pectins are best described by the Langmuir equation • Low molecular pectin from seagrasses is more effective than high-molecular pectins

  9. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khozhaenko, Elena [Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, 8, Sukhanova str., Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation); Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena [A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation); Khotimchenko, Maksim, E-mail: maxkhot@yandex.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, 8, Sukhanova str., Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); A.V. Zhirmunsky Institute of Marine Biology Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 17, Palchevskgo str., Vladivostok 690059 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. - Highlights: • Low molecular nanoscaled pectin was obtained using original hydrolysis method • Metal binding activity of pectin compounds was studied in a batch sorption system • Pectins exert highest metal binding activity at pH 6.0 • Metal binding isotherms of all pectins are best described by the Langmuir equation • Low molecular pectin from seagrasses is more effective than high-molecular pectins.

  10. Corrosion study of resorbable Ca60Mg15Zn25 bulk metallic glasses in physiological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Babilas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion activity of amorphous plates of Ca60Mg15Zn25 alloy was investigated. The biocompatible elements were selected for the alloy composition. The electrochemical corrosion and immersion tests were carried out in a multi-electrolyte fluid and Ringer's solution. Better corrosion behavior was observed for the samples tested in a multi-electrolyte fluid despite the active dissolution of Ca and Mg in Ringer's solution. The experimental results indicated that reducing concentration of NaCl from 8.6 g/dm3 for Ringer's solution to 5.75 g/dm3 caused the decrease of the corrosion rate. The volume of the hydrogen evolved after 480 min in Ringer's solution (40.1 ml/cm2 was higher in comparison with that obtained in a multi-electrolyte fluid (24.4 ml/cm2. The values of open-circuit potential (EOCP for the Ca60Mg15Zn25 glass after 1 h incubation in Ringer's solution and a multi-electrolyte fluid were determined to be −1553 and −1536 mV vs. a saturated calomel electrode (SCE. The electrochemical measurements indicated a shift of the corrosion current density (jcorr from 1062 μA/cm2 for the sample tested in Ringer's solution to 788 μA/cm2 for the specimen immersed in a multi-electrolyte fluid. The corrosion products analysis was conducted by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The corrosion products were identified to be CaCO3, Mg(OH2, CaO, MgO and ZnO. The mechanism of corrosion process was proposed and described based on the microscopic observations. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR also indicated that Ca(OH2, CaCO3, Zn(OH2 and Ca(Zn(OH32·2H2O mainly formed on the surface of the studied alloy. Keywords: Ca-based metallic glasses, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Corrosion resistance, Hydrogen evaluation

  11. Electro-Optic Effects in Colloidal Dispersion of Metal Nano-Rods in Dielectric Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In modern transformation optics, one explores metamaterials with properties that vary from point to point in space and time, suitable for application in devices such as an “optical invisibility cloak” and an “optical black hole”. We propose an approach to construct spatially varying and switchable metamaterials that are based on colloidal dispersions of metal nano-rods (NRs in dielectric fluids, in which dielectrophoretic forces, originating in the electric field gradients, create spatially varying configurations of aligned NRs. The electric field controls orientation and concentration of NRs and thus modulates the optical properties of the medium. Using gold (Au NRs dispersed in toluene, we demonstrate electrically induced change in refractive index on the order of 0.1.

  12. Mussel inspired preparation of amine-functionalized Kaolin for effective removal of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiang; Liu, Meiying; Deng, Fengjie [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Huang, Hongye; Xu, Dazhuang; Zeng, Guangjian [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption has been well regarded as a promising and efficient method for the removal of low concentration heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions. And kaolin has been considered as a kind of low cost and environment-friendly adsorbent for its abundant in nature. But the low adsorption capacity to heavy metal ions and severe aggregation in solution restrains its application. In this work, an environment-friendly adsorbent (denoted as Kaolin-PDA-PEI) was prepared based on mussel inspired chemistry and Michael addition reaction between high reaction activity of polydopamine (PDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which was possesses a number of amine groups. The amine groups have displayed strong adsorption affinity towards copper ions. The successful modification of Kaolin by PDA and PEI was confirmed by a series of analyses, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, pH, initial concentrations of copper ions and temperature on copper ion adsorption by Kaolin-PDA-PEI were investigated. Kaolin-PDA-PEI shows higher adsorption capacity as compared with the raw Kaolin. The kinetic adsorption data were analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion model. The Langmuir isotherm and Freundlich isotherm equilibrium model were applied to adsorption isotherm data to find the better fit isotherm. The results showed that adsorption process was well fitted by Langmuir isotherm model. The values of thermodynamics constants such as entropy change (ΔS{sup 0}), enthalpy change (ΔH{sup 0}) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG{sup 0}) were also calculated. The results indicated that the adsorption process of Kaolin-PDA-PEI were endothermic and spontaneous. - Graphical abstract: Amino groups functionalized Kaolin was facilely prepared via mussel inspired chemistry. The modified Kaolin exhibited much

  13. Feasibility/treatability studies for removal of heavy metals from training range soils at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    A feasibility/treatability study was performed to investigate the leaching potential of heavy metals (particularly lead) from soils at the Grafenw6hr Training Area (GTA) in Germany. The study included an evaluation of the effectiveness of chelant extraction to remediate the heavy-metal-contarninated soils. Batch shaker tests indicated that ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (0.01M) was more effective than citric acid (0.01M) at removing cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. EDTA and citric acid were equally effective in mobilizing chromium and barium from the soil. The batch shaker technique with chelant extraction offers promise as a remediation technique for heavy-metal-contaninated soil at the GTA. Columnar flooding tests conducted as part of the study revealed that deionized water was the least effective leaching solution for mobilization of the heavy metals; the maximum solubilization obtained was 3.72% for cadmium. EDTA (0.05M) achieved the greatest removal of lead (average removal of 17.6%). The difficulty of extraction using deionized water indicates that all of the heavy metals are very tightly bound to the soil; therefore, they are very stable in the GTA soils and do not pose a serious threat to the groundwater system. Columnar flooding probably does not represent a viable remediation technique for in-situ cleanup of heavy-metal-contaminated soils at the GTA.

  14. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of heavy metals and arsenic from a co-contaminated soil by sieving combined with washing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Li, You; Yan, Xiulan

    2016-03-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with a heavy metals and arsenic co-contaminated soil from an abandoned mine to evaluate the feasibility of a remediation technology that combines sieving with soil washing. Leaching of the arsenic and heavy metals from the different particle size fractions was found to decrease in the order: 2mm. With increased contact time, the concentration of heavy metals in the leachate was significantly decreased for small particles, probably because of adsorption by the clay soil component. For the different particle sizes, the removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were 75%-87%, and 61%-77% for Zn and Cu, although the extent of removal was decreased for As and Cr at soil particles >2mm, although good metal removal efficiencies were also achieved in the small particle size fractions. Through SEM-EDS observations and correlation analysis, the leaching regularity of the heavy metals and arsenic was found to be closely related to Fe, Mn, and Ca contents of the soil fractions. The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil by sieving combined with soil washing was proven to be efficient, and practical remediation parameters were also recommended. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Removal heavy metals and sulphate from waste waters by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnierová Mária

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the process of bacterial sulphate reduction, which is used to removal of heavy metals and sulphate ions from waste waters.The life of animals and plants depends on the existence of microscopic organisms – microorganisms (MO, which play an important role in cycle changes of biogenic elements on the earth. The sulphur cycle in the nature is considered as one of the oldest and most significant biological systems (Fig. 1. The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB miss the assimilatory part of the cycle and produce sulphides. The microbial population of this dissimilatory part is called “sulfuretum”. The SRB can be found in anaerobic mud and sediments of freshwater, thermal or non-thermal sulphur springs, mining waters from sulphide deposits, oil deposits, sea and ocean beds, and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals. The SRB represent a group of chemoorganotrophic, strictly anaerobic and gramnegative bacteria, which exhibit a great morphological and physiological diversity. Despite of their considerable morphological variety, they have one property in common, which is the ability to utilise preferentially sulphates (occasionally sulphites, thiosulphates, tetrathionates as electron acceptors, which are reduced to sulphides, during anaerobic respiration. The electron donors in these processes are simple organic compounds as lactate, malate, etc.,(heterotrophically reduction or gaseous hydrogen (autotrophically reduction. SRB can produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulphide, which reacts easily in aqueous solution with the cations of heavy metals, forming metal sulphides that have low solubility. The bacterial sulphate reduction can be used for the treatment of acid mine drainage waters, which is considered to be the major problem associated with mining activities.In order to remove heavy metals from waste waters, e.g., from galvanizing plants, mine waters (Smolnik, Šobov locality and metallurgic plants (works

  17. Cytotoxicity and metal ions removal using antibacterial biodegradable hydrogels based on N-quaternized chitosan/poly(acrylic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Riham R; Elella, Mahmoud H Abu; Sabaa, Magdy W

    2017-05-01

    Physically crosslinked hydrogels resulted from interaction between N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan chloride (N-Quaternized Chitosan) (NQC) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were synthesized in different weight ratios (3:1), (1:1) and (1:3) taking the following codes Q3P1, Q1P1 and Q1P3, respectively. Characterization of the mentioned hydrogels was done using several analysis tools including; FTIR, XRD, SEM, TGA, biodegradation in simulated body fluid (SBF) and cytotoxicity against HepG-2 liver cancer cells. FTIR results proved that the prepared hydrogels were formed via electrostatic and H-bonding interactions, while XRD patterns proved that the prepared hydrogels -irrespective to their ratios- were more crystalline than both matrices NQC and PAA. TGA results, on the other hand, revealed that Q1P3 hydrogel was the most thermally stable compared to the other two hydrogels (Q3P1 and Q1P1). Biodegradation tests in SBF proved that these hydrogels were more biodegradable than the native chitosan. Examination of the prepared hydrogels for their potency in heavy metal ions removal revealed that they adsorbed Fe (III) and Cd (II) ions more than chitosan, while they adsorbed Cr (III), Ni (II) and Cu (II) ions less than chitosan. Moreover, testing the prepared hydrogels as antibacterial agents towards several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria revealed their higher antibacterial activity as compared with NQC when used alone. Evaluating the cytotoxic effect of these hydrogels on an in vitro human liver cancer cell model (HepG-2) showed their good cytotoxic activity towards HepG-2. Moreover, the inhibition rate increased with increasing the hydrogels concentration in the culture medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Laser ablation-ICP-AES for the determination of metals in fluid inclusions: An application to the study of magmatic ore fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J. J.; Rankin, A. H.; Mulshaw, S. C.; Nolan, J.; Ramsey, M. H.

    1994-02-01

    The laser ablation-ICP-AES (L-ICP-AES) technique is an effective method for the multielement analysis of individual fluid inclusions. Recent tests on synthetic fluid inclusions and improvements in data processing suggest that the method is valid for the analysis of a range of alkali-, alkali-earth, and transition metals in single, large inclusions (> 30 μm) of moderate to high salinity (>20 wt% NaCl equiv.). The system, involving a small, perspex ablation chamber, a 1 J ruby laser focussed through an optical microscope, and a conventional ICP-AES instrument is discussed and applied to natural fluid inclusions in quartz from two contrasting types of magmatic-hydrothermal mineralization. Samples were selected from the San Pedro Cu-Au porphyry system, New Mexico, USA, and the Sn-W-Cu-mineralized Dartmoor granite of southwest England. Variable salinity, high temperature fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz from both environments display similarly high concentrations and ratios of Na, K, Ca, and Fe. The ore metals Cu, Zn, and Mn (but not Sn, Mo, W) were detected in inclusions from both environments. The estimated combined concentrations of up to 3 wt% show that these three elements are major components of these fluids. A method has been devised to estimate the confidence intervals of the measured concentration ratios. The confidence intervals obtained show that the analytical uncertainty for an inclusion is much less than the natural geochemical variation between inclusions so that geologically useful information can be obtained. A trend of increasing salinity with decreasing Na and K and increasing Ca and Fe contents is observed in inclusions from San Pedro, consistent with the continuous evolution of a magmatic aqueous phase exsolved from a low pressure melt during crystallization. In contrast, the combined compositional and microthermometric data for samples from Lee Moor, Dartmoor, suggest that a magmatic aqueous phase evolved from Fe-K-rich to Na

  19. Removal of dissolved heavy metals from pre-settled stormwater runoff by iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J.; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    Sorption to iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) is a promosing technology for removal of the dissolved heavy metal fraction in stormwater runoff. The development of a new technology is necessary since studies of stormwater runoff from traffic areas indicate that an oil separator and detention pond may...... by IOCS after 480 pore volumes. Control columns with uncoated filter sand show that lead, copper and zinc were removed with >95%, 35% and 5%, respectively. The removal of the negative metaloxy-ion, CrO4-3 was insignificant in both IOCS and sand columns at pH=7.7. Destruction of the columns after...

  20. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms. Volume 1, State-of-the-art and potential applications at the SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  1. Confirmatory analysis of the AP1000 passive residual heat removal heat exchanger with 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, James R.; Karim, Naeem U.; Thakkar, Jivan G.; Taylor, Creed; Schulz, Terry; Wright, Richard F.

    2006-01-01

    The AP1000 is an 1100 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 received final design approval from the US-NRC in 2004. The AP1000 design is based on the AP600 design that received final design approval in 1999. Wherever possible, the AP1000 plant configuration and layout was kept the same as AP600 to take advantage of the maturity of the design and to minimize new design efforts. As a result, the two-loop configuration was maintained for AP1000, and the containment vessel diameter was kept the same. It was determined that this significant power up-rate was well within the capability of the passive safety features, and that the safety margins for AP1000 were greater than those of operating PWRs. A key feature of the passive core cooling system is the passive residual heat removal heat exchanger (PRHR HX) that provides decay heat removal for postulated LOCA and non-LOCA events. The PRHR HX is a C-tube heat exchanger located in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) above the core promoting natural circulation heat removal between the reactor cooling system and the tank. Component testing was performed for the AP600 PRHR HX to determine the heat transfer characteristics and to develop correlations to be used for the AP1000 safety analysis codes. The data from these tests were confirmed by subsequent integral tests at three separate facilities including the ROSA facility in Japan. Owing to the importance of this component, an independent analysis has been performed using the ATHOS-based computational fluid dynamics computer code PRHRCFD. Two separate models of the PRHR HX and IRWST have been developed representing the ROSA test geometry and the AP1000 plant geometry. Confirmation of the ROSA test results were used to validate PRHRCFD, and the AP1000 plant model

  2. Formation and removal of apical vapor lock during syringe irrigation: a combined experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioukis, C; Kastrinakis, E; Lambrianidis, T; Verhaagen, B; Versluis, M; van der Sluis, L W M

    2014-02-01

    (i) To evaluate the effect of needle type and insertion depth, root canal size and irrigant flow rate on the entrapment of air bubbles in the apical part of a root canal (apical vapor lock) during syringe irrigation using experiments and a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, (ii) to investigate whether the irrigant contact angle affects bubble entrapment, (iii) to examine if an established vapor lock can be removed by syringe irrigation. Bubble entrapment during irrigation of straight artificial root canals of size 35 or 50 was evaluated by real-time visualizations. The irrigant was delivered by a closed-ended or an open-ended needle positioned at 1 or 3 mm short of working length (WL) and at a flow rate of 0.033-0.260 mL s(-1) . Results were analysed by nonparametric tests at 0.05 significance. Selected cases were also simulated by a two-phase CFD model. A vapor lock was observed in 48% of the cases investigated experimentally. Increasing the apical size, using an open-ended needle, positioning the needle closer to WL and delivering the irrigant at higher flow rate resulted in significantly smaller vapor lock. An increased contact angle resulted in the entrapment of a larger bubble when a low flow rate was used. Both brief insertion of the needle to WL whilst irrigating at a flow rate of 0.083 mL s(-1) and delivering the irrigant at 0.260 mL s(-1) without changing the needle position were capable of removing an established vapor lock. Apical vapor lock may occur under certain conditions, but appears to be easily prevented or removed by syringe irrigation. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Influence of the civil construction debris layer in heavy metals removal of the leachate submitted to recirculation in landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Rossmann

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the ability of stabilized organic matter (old MSW and construction waste (RCC to retain heavy metals from leachate generated in landfills. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of MSW to remove old heavy metals in MSW leachate produced by freshly collected, and the effect of RCC in the concentration of heavy metals in effluents from MSW old. In three columns (CR, put a layer of RCC and then MSW old and, on the other three (SR, only MSW old. Analyzed in the leachate and effluent pH, EC, BOD and metals Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb. There were similar and efficient removal of BOD and heavy metals in both treatments. The presence of the layer of RCC was considered important to the overall improvement in effluent quality, but did not influence the concentration of metals in the effluent. The order of retention of metals in the columns was: Cu ~ Pb> Cd> Zn. With the exception of Cd and Zn, all other variables assessed in the effluent were below the maximum standards set in DN 01.08 COPAM / CERH for release effluent into water bodies.

  4. Electrodialytic remediation of harbour sediment in suspension - Evaluation of effects induced by changes in stirring velocity and current density on heavy metal removal and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation was used to remove heavy metals from a suspension of dredged harbour sediment. The studied metals Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd are normally strongly bound in anoxic sediment. Six electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments were made, lasting 14 days and under oxic conditions....... The influence on the metal removal was investigated by changing current densities and stirring velocity of the sediment suspension. Using a current density of 1.0 mA/cm2 gave the highest metal removal. The sediment suspension was partly oxidised when mixed into a suspension for the electrodialytic remediation...... experiments and was further oxidised during the experiments. Even at low stirring velocities, oxic conditions were obtained. The metal removal was dependent on the achieved pH in the sediment and the highest metal removal and corresponding low pH was obtained by using a current density of 1.0 mA/cm2...

  5. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a

  6. Rapid preparation of biosorbents with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungrodnimitchai, Supitcha

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of the cellulose phosphate with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals. In this study, rice straw and bagasse were modified by the reaction with phosphoric acid in the presence of urea. The introduced phosphoric group is an ion exchangeable site for heavy metal ions. The reaction by microwave heating yielded modified rice straw and modified bagasse with greater ion exchange capacities (∼3.62 meq/g) and shorter reaction time (1.5-5.0 min) than the phosphorylation by oil bath heating. Adsorption experiments towards Pb²⁺, Cd²⁺, and Cr³⁺ ions of the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse were performed at room temperature (heavy metal concentration 40 ppm, adsorbent 2.0 g/L). The kinetics of adsorption agreed with the pseudo-second-order model. It was shown that the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse could adsorb heavy metal ions faster than the commercial ion exchange resin (Dowax). As a result of Pb²⁺ sorption test, the modified rice straw (RH-NaOH 450W) removed Pb²⁺ much faster in the initial step and reached 92% removal after 20 min, while Dowax (commercial ion exchange resin) took 90 min for the same removal efficiency.

  7. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation, an electrochemically assisted separation method, has previ-ously shown potential for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of MSWI fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent wa...

  8. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation, an electrochemically assisted separation method, has previ-ously shown potential for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of MSWI fly ash using ammonium citrate as assisting agent...

  9. Rapid Preparation of Biosorbents with High Ion Exchange Capacity from Rice Straw and Bagasse for Removal of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supitcha Rungrodnimitchai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the preparation of the cellulose phosphate with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals. In this study, rice straw and bagasse were modified by the reaction with phosphoric acid in the presence of urea. The introduced phosphoric group is an ion exchangeable site for heavy metal ions. The reaction by microwave heating yielded modified rice straw and modified bagasse with greater ion exchange capacities (∼3.62 meq/g and shorter reaction time (1.5–5.0 min than the phosphorylation by oil bath heating. Adsorption experiments towards Pb2+, Cd2+, and Cr3+ ions of the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse were performed at room temperature (heavy metal concentration 40 ppm, adsorbent 2.0 g/L. The kinetics of adsorption agreed with the pseudo-second-order model. It was shown that the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse could adsorb heavy metal ions faster than the commercial ion exchange resin (Dowax. As a result of Pb2+ sorption test, the modified rice straw (RH-NaOH 450W removed Pb2+ much faster in the initial step and reached 92% removal after 20 min, while Dowax (commercial ion exchange resin took 90 min for the same removal efficiency.

  10. AN ELECTROLYTIC CIP-CLEANING PROCESS FOR REMOVING IMPURITIES FROM THE INNER SURFACE OF A METALLIC CONTAINER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a novel electrolytic process for removing impurities from the inner surface of a metallic container. The process is particularly useful for cleaning process reactors used for culturing microorganisms, and storage tanks used for storing metabolites formed in the process...... reactor, as well as containers for dairy products....

  11. Removal of eutrophication factors and heavy metal from a closed cultivation system using the macroalgae, Gracilaria sp. (Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Sui, Zhenghong

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the ability of macroalgae Gracilaria sp. of removing eutrophication factors and toxic heavy metals Al, Cr, and Zn in a closed cultivation system is reported. The results show that the concentration of the three heavy metals decreased significantly during the experimental period in an algal biomass dependent manner. The biofiltration capacity of the alga for Al, Cr, and Zn is 10.1%-72.6%, 52.5%-83.4% and 36.5%-91.7%, respectively. Using more materials resulted in stronger heavy metal removal. Additionally, the concentration of chl- a, TN, TP and DIN of water samples from aquariums involving large, medium, and small algal biomass cultivation increased first and then decreased during the experiment. COD value of all three groups decreased with time and displayed algal biomass dependency: more algae resulting in a greater COD value than those of less biomass. Furthermore, changes in COD reflect an obvious organic particles deprivation process of algae. This is the first report on heavy metal removal effect by Gracilaria species. The results suggest that macroalgae can be used as a biofilter for the treatment of nutrient-enriched or heavy-metal polluted water, to which an appropriate time range should be carefully determined.

  12. Removal of a hazardous heavy metal from aqueous solution using functionalized graphene and boron nitride nanosheets: Insights from simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamat, Jafar; Sattary, Batoul Shirforush; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-09-01

    A computer simulation was performed to investigate the removal of Zn(2+) as a heavy metal from aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS). The simulated systems were comprised of a graphene nanosheet or BNNS with a functionalized pore containing an aqueous ionic solution of zinc chloride. In order to remove heavy metal from an aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and BNNS, an external voltage was applied along the z-axis of the simulated box. For the selective removal of zinc ions, the pores of graphene and BNNS were functionalized by passivating each atom at the pore edge with appropriate atoms. For complete analysis systems, we calculated the potential of the mean force of ions, the radial distribution function of ion-water, the residence time of ions, the hydrogen bond, and the autocorrelation function of the hydrogen bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Palladium and gold removal and recovery from precious metal solutions and electronic scrap leachates by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Neil J; Baxter-Plant, Victoria S; Henderson, John; Potter, M; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2006-09-01

    Biomass of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to recover Au(III) as Au(0) from test solutions and from waste electronic scrap leachate. Au(0) was precipitated extracellularly by a different mechanism from the biodeposition of Pd(0). The presence of Cu(2+) ( approximately 2000 mg/l) in the leachate inhibited the hydrogenase-mediated removal of Pd(II) but pre-palladisation of the cells in the absence of added Cu(2+) facilitated removal of Pd(II) from the leachate and more than 95% of the Pd(II) was removed autocatalytically from a test solution supplemented with Cu(II) and Pd(II). Metal recovery was demonstrated in a gas-lift electrobioreactor with electrochemically generated hydrogen, followed by precipitation of recovered metal under gravity. A 3-stage bioseparation process for the recovery of Au(III), Pd(II) and Cu(II) is proposed.

  14. AMOchar: Amorphous manganese oxide coating of biochar improves its efficiency at removing metal(loid)s from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakal, Lukáš; Michálková, Zuzana; Beesley, Luke; Vítková, Martina; Ouředníček, Petr; Barceló, Andreu Piqueras; Ettler, Vojtěch; Číhalová, Sylva; Komárek, Michael

    2018-06-01

    A novel sorbent made from biochar modified with an amorphous Mn oxide (AMOchar) was compared with pure biochar, pure AMO, AMO+biochar mixtures and biochar+birnessite composite for the removal of various metal(loid)s from aqueous solutions using adsorption and solid-state analyses. In comparison with the pristine biochar, both Mn oxide-biochar composites were able to remove significantly greater quantities of various metal(loid)s from the aqueous solutions, especially at a ratio 2:1 (AMO:biochar). The AMOchar proved most efficient, removing almost 99, 91 and 51% of Pb, As and Cd, respectively. Additionally, AMOchar and AMO+biochar mixture exhibited reduced Mn leaching, compared to pure AMO. Therefore, it is concluded that the synthesis of AMO and biochar is able to produce a double acting sorbent ('dorbent') of enhanced efficiency, compared with the individual deployment of their component materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of sediment properties and experimental variables on the efficiency of electrodialytic removal of metals from sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2017-01-01

    properties for achieving acidification (lag-phase, pH > 4), necessary for desorbing and mobilising metals in the polluted sediments, were buffer capacity and grain size distribution. Higher stirring rate reduced the acidification time, stressing the importance of thorough mixing of the sediment suspension......Chemometrics was used to determine the influence of sediment properties and experimental settings for the electrodialytic removal (EDR) of Cu, Pb and Zn from six harbour sediments from Greenland and Norway. A Projection onto latent structures (PLS) model revealed that the most important sediment...... to achieve a fast and uniform acidification. PLS models were calculated to determine the influence of sediment properties on the removal of metals during EDR, which was observed to vary depending on the targeted metal and the stage of the remediation. In general, buffer capacity, grain size distribution...

  16. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Cultural Heritage Preservation: The Case of Acetic Acid Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedecker, Kevin; Pillai, Renjith S; Nouar, Farid; Pires, João; Steunou, Nathalie; Dumas, Eddy; Maurin, Guillaume; Serre, Christian; Pinto, Moisés L

    2018-04-11

    The removal of low concentrations of acetic acid from indoor air at museums poses serious preservation problems that the current adsorbents cannot easily address owing to their poor affinity for acetic acid and/or their low adsorption selectivity versus water. In this context, a series of topical water-stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with different pore sizes, topologies, hydrophobic characters, and functional groups was explored through a joint experimental-computational exploration. We demonstrate how a subtle combination of sufficient hydrophobicity and optimized host-guest interactions allows one to overcome the challenge of capturing traces of this very polar volatile organic compound in the presence of humidity. The optimal capture of acetic acid was accomplished with MOFs that do not show polar groups in the inorganic node or have lipophilic but polar (e.g., perfluoro) groups functionalized to the organic linkers, that is, the best candidates from the list of explored MOFs are MIL-140B and UiO-66-2CF 3 . These two MOFs present the appropriate pore size to favor a high degree of confinement, together with organic spacers that allow an enhancement of the van der Waals interactions with the acetic acid. We establish in this work that MOFs can be a viable solution to this highly challenging problem in cultural heritage protection, which is a new field of application for this type of hybrid materials.

  17. Mechanism study of selective heavy metal ion removal with polypyrrole-functionalized polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianqiang; Luo, Chao; Qi, Genggeng; Pan, Kai; Cao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber used for Cr(VI) removal. • Adsorption mechanisms were investigated. • Selective adsorption performances were investigated. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole (PAN/PPy) core/shell nanofiber mat was prepared through electrospinning followed by a simple chemical oxidation method. The polypyrrole-functionalized nanofiber mats showed selective adsorption performance for anions. The interaction between heavy metal anions and polypyrrole (especially the interaction between Cr 2 O 7 2− and polypyrrole) during the adsorption process was studied. The results showed that the adsorption process included two steps: one was the anion exchange process between the Cl − and Cr(VI), and the other was the redox process for the Cr(VI) ions. The adsorption amount was related to the protonation time of the PAN/PPy nanofiber mat and increased as protonation time increased. Meanwhile, the Cr(VI) ions were reduced to Cr(III) through the reaction with amino groups of polypyrrole (from secondary amines to tertiary amines). PAN/PPy nanofiber mat showed high selectivity for Cr(VI), and the adsorption performance was nearly unaffected by other co-existing anions (Cl − , NO 3 − , and SO 4 2− ) except for PO 4 3− for the pH change

  18. Mechanism study of selective heavy metal ion removal with polypyrrole-functionalized polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianqiang; Luo, Chao [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Qi, Genggeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Pan, Kai, E-mail: pankai@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cao, Bing, E-mail: bcao@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PAN/PPy core/shell nanofiber used for Cr(VI) removal. • Adsorption mechanisms were investigated. • Selective adsorption performances were investigated. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole (PAN/PPy) core/shell nanofiber mat was prepared through electrospinning followed by a simple chemical oxidation method. The polypyrrole-functionalized nanofiber mats showed selective adsorption performance for anions. The interaction between heavy metal anions and polypyrrole (especially the interaction between Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2−} and polypyrrole) during the adsorption process was studied. The results showed that the adsorption process included two steps: one was the anion exchange process between the Cl{sup −} and Cr(VI), and the other was the redox process for the Cr(VI) ions. The adsorption amount was related to the protonation time of the PAN/PPy nanofiber mat and increased as protonation time increased. Meanwhile, the Cr(VI) ions were reduced to Cr(III) through the reaction with amino groups of polypyrrole (from secondary amines to tertiary amines). PAN/PPy nanofiber mat showed high selectivity for Cr(VI), and the adsorption performance was nearly unaffected by other co-existing anions (Cl{sup −}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) except for PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} for the pH change.

  19. Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries

  20. Titanium Pyrophosphate for Removal of Trivalent Heavy Metals and Actinides Simulated by Retention of Europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Espinosa, Rosa María; Ordoñez-Regil, Eduardo; Fernández-Valverde, Suilma Marisela

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the synthesis of titanium pyrophosphate, as well as the characterization and evaluation of the sorption process of europium, for removal of trivalent heavy metals and actinides simulate. The evaluation of the surface properties of titanium pyrophosphate was carried out determining the surface roughness and surface acidity constants. The values obtained from the determination of the surface roughness of the synthesized solid indicate that the surface of the material presents itself as slightly smooth. The FITEQL program was used to fit the experimental titration curves to obtain the surface acidity constants: log⁡K+ = 3.59 ± 0.06 and log⁡K− = −3.90 ± 0.05. The results of sorption kinetics evidenced that the pseudo-order model explains the retention process of europium, in which the initial sorption velocity was 8.3 × 10−4 mg g−1 min−1 and kinetic constant was 1.8 × 10−3 g mg min−1. The maximum sorption capacity was 0.6 mg g−1. The results obtained from sorption edge showed the existence of two bidentate complexes on the surface. PMID:28785720

  1. [Developing a plan of treatment with a cast metal frame removable partial denture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, D J; Barèl, J C; Keltjens, H M A M; de Baat, C; Creugers, N H J

    2011-02-01

    When considering prosthetic replacement of absent teeth, a treatment plan is necessary. In evaluating whether replacement of teeth is sensible, the causes and consequences of tooth loss must be considered. This concerns information about problems having to do with the patient, potential complications, purely prosthodontic problems, and specific problems. The patient-related problems require collecting data through patient history as well as a clinical and radiologic examination. Complications are risk-factors which negatively influence the prognosis of general health or of a treatment. Potential complications should be eliminated as much as possible through a preliminary treatment. Purely prosthodontic problems are conditions in the area of absence of several teeth or parts of them, and in the area of occlusal and mandibular stability and articulation. Specific problems may be related to inadequate interocclusal space and the quality of the abutment teeth. A cast metal frame removable partial denture may be a relatively inexpensive and minimally treatment alternative for an expensive and complicated treatment with 1 or more fixed partial dentures.

  2. Diffused vs. Focused Flow - Metaproteogenomic Insights into Effects of Hydrothermal Fluid Flow on Metal-Sulfide Chimney Colonizing Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjevac, P.; Markert, S.; Richter, M.; Gruber-Vodicka, H.; Schweder, T.; Amann, R.; Meyerdierks, A.

    2014-12-01

    At many sites of hydrothermal discharge in the deep-sea, the deposition of metal sulfides from hydrothermal fluids leads to the formation of geological structures known as hydrothermal chimneys. The mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with oxygenated seawater leads to the formation of steep redox gradients within the chimney walls. These gradients facilitate the co-existence of metabolically diverse microorganisms in the narrow habitable zone of hydrothermal chimney walls. However, the overall composition of chimney-associated microbial community is usually of low complexity and represents an environment suitable for metaomic-based studies. We used metagenomic and metaproteomic tools to compare microbial communities colonizing two metal-sulfide chimneys from the Manus Basin back-arc spreading center in the Bismarck Sea off Papua New Guinea. These chimneys were supplied by the same source hydrothermal fluids, but exhibited different fluid flow regimes. One chimney (RMR5) had a focused venting edifice, while the other (RMR-D) displayed diffuse fluid efflux on its entire outer surface. Although the microbial diversity of both chimneys is similar and dominated by mesophilic Epsilonproteobacteria, our results indicate a strong structuring effect of hydrothermal fluid flow regime on chimney-associated biofilms. The microbial community composition indicates a homogeneous colonization of the diffuse chimney walls. In contrast, the walls of the focused venting chimney appear to be colonized in layers reflecting different temperature tolerances of the dominant microorganisms. Sulfide-oxidation is likely the key metabolism in both chimneys, which is in line with the high sulfide content of the source hydrothermal fluid. However, preliminary metaproteome analysis indicates high activity of low-abundant methanotrophic Bacteria in the diffuser chimney walls. This finding is particularly interesting in light of the very low methane content of the source hydrothermal fluid

  3. Sewage sludge ash to phosphate fertilizer by chlorination and thermal treatment: residence time requirements for heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Benedikt; Wegerer, Harald; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash can be performed by mixing the ash with environmentally compatible chlorides (e.g. CaCl2 or MgCl2) and water, pelletizing the mixture and treating the pellets in a rotary reactor at about 1000 degrees C. Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy, muffle oven tests (500-1150 degrees C) and investigations in a laboratory-scale rotary reactor (950-1050 degrees C, residence time 1-25 min) were carried out. In the rotary reactor, up to 97% of Cu, 95% Pb and 95% Zn can be removed at 1050 degrees C. As Cl release starts from 400 degrees C (obtained from thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry experiments), heavy metals are already removed partially within the heating period. This heavy metal removal can be described as being similar to a first-order rate law. To meet the limit values specified in the Austrian and German fertilizer ordinances, residence times of the order of minutes are sufficient at 950 degrees C.

  4. Removal and recovery of heavy metals from aqueous solution using Ulmus carpinifolia and Fraxinus excelsior tree leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangi, Mohammad Reza; Shahmoradi, Ali; Zolgharnein, Javad; Azimi, Gholam Hassan; Ghorbandoost, Morteza

    2008-07-15

    Ulmus carpinifolia and Fraxinus excelsior tree leaves, which are in great supply in Iran, were evaluated for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. Maximum biosorption capacities for U. carpinifolia and F. excelsior were measured as 201.1, 172.0 mg/g for Pb(II), 80.0, 67.2 mg/g for Cd(II) and 69.5, 33.1 mg/g for Cu(II), respectively. For both sorbents the most effective pH range was found to be 2-5 for Pb(II), 3-5 for Cd(II) and 4-5 for Cu(II). Metal ion biosorption increased as the ratio of metal solution to the biomass quantity decreased. Conversely, biosorption/g biosorbent decreased as the quantity of biomass increased. The biosorption of metal ions increased as the initial metal concentration increased. Biosorption capacities of metal ions were in the following order: Pb(II)>Cd(II)>Cu(II). The equilibrium data for Pb(II) and Cu(II) best fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the biosorption rates could be described by a second-order expression. Both the sorbents could be regenerated using 0.2 M HCl during repeated biosorption-desorption cycles with no loss in the efficiency of the Cu(II) removal observed. Biosorption of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) was investigated in the presence of Na, K, Mg and Ca ions. The results from these studies show a novel way of using U. carpinifolia and F. excelsior tree leaves to remove Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) from metal-polluted waters.

  5. Removal of some heavy metals from industrial waste water using polyacrylamide ferric antimonate as new ion exchange material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Aryan, Y.F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Composite ion exchangers consist of one or more ion exchangers combined with another material, which can be inorganic or organic and may it be an ion exchanger. The reason for manufacturing a composite material is to produce a granular material, with sufficient strength for column use, from ion exchangers that do not form, or only form weak, granules themselves. Attempts in this study are focused to prepare composite ion exchangers for treatment of wastewater. Heavy metals when present in water in concentrations exceeding the permitted limits are injurious to the health. Hence, it is very important to treat such waters to remove the metal ions present before it is supplied for any useful purpose. Therefore, many investigations have studied to develop more effective process to treat such waste stream. Ion-exchange has been widely adopted in heavy metal containing wastewater and most of the ion-exchangers (i.e. ion-exchange media) currently being used are commercially mass-produced organic resins.Therefore, the main aim of this work is directed to find the optimum conditions for removal of some heavy metals from industrial waste water.1-Preparation of polyacrylamide ferric antimonate composite.2-Characterization of the prepared exchanger using IR spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, DTA and TG analyses.3-Chemical stability, capacity and equilibrium measurements will be determined on the materials using at different conditions (ph heating temperature and reaction temperature).4-Kinetic studies of some heavy metals.5-Ion exchange isotherm.6-Breakthrough curves for removal of the investigated metal ions on the prepared exchanger under certain condition.

  6. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Feasibility of using low-cost, byproduct materials as sorbents to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumer, Marta E; Vidal, Miquel; Mangrich, Antonio S; Rigol, Anna

    2018-02-22

    This work investigates the sorption of heavy metals by low-cost, byproducts such as charcoal fines (CF), waste green sand, and rice husk ash, in order to examine the feasibility of their use as alternative filter materials for metal-contaminated waters. The sorption of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn was investigated in batch experiments and sorption isotherms were constructed. The three byproducts showed high metal removal efficiencies (>95%, regardless of the metal concentration tested). The highest metal sorption distribution coefficients were obtained for CF, with maximum values within the 10 5 -10 6  L kg -1 range for all the target metals. The sorption isotherms were satisfactorily fitted using the Freundlich equation and a linear model, the latter only being valid for initial metal concentrations lower than 0.4 mmol L -1 . Sorption reversibility was very low, with desorption yields lower than 2% and desorption distribution coefficients often higher than 10 6  L kg -1 . The values of the sorption and desorption parameters indicated that the use of these materials, especially CF, could constitute a low-cost alternative for the remediation of contaminated waters.

  8. Influence of vegetable based cutting fluids on cutting force and vibration signature during milling of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental and health issues, there is an enormous requirement for developing the novel cutting fluids (CFs. The vegetable based cutting fluid (VBCFs doesn’t affect the environment, diminish the harmful effects to the operator and also enhance the machining performances such as surface roughness, tool life, minimum vibration and cutting forces. In this work, the performances of four different VBCFs like palm, coconut, sunflower, soya bean oils, and a commercial type of CFs were considered to analyze the influence of cutting fluids while measuring the cutting force and vibration signatures during milling of 7075–T6 hybrid aluminium metal matrix composite with carbide insert tool. The experiments were conducted in CNC L-MILL 55 vertical machining center, with milling tool dynamometer to measure the cutting force and a tri-axial accelerometer to measure the vibration signals. The flow rate of the VBCFs were maintained at a constant rate and the results were compared with a commercial cutting fluid. The obtained result shows that palm oil suits better than the other vegetable based cutting fluids in terms of minimum cutting force requirement and minimum vibration. Also, the experimental result shows that the cutting fluid was one of the important parameter needs to be considered which influences the cutting force and vibration signals.

  9. Effect of Metal Alloys, Degradation Inhibitors, Temperatures, and Exposure Duration on the Stability of Poly(hexafluoropropene oxide) Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciorek, Kazimiera J. L.; Masuda, Steven R.; Lin, Wen-Huey; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Results of the action of 440C steel, Ti(4Al,4Mn), and Ti(6Al,4V) alloys on poly(hexafluoropropene oxide) fluid and the degradation inhibition by phosphate esters, phosphine, and monophospha-s-triazine are reported. The effects of temperature, exposure duration, and metal surface area are discussed. The studies show clearly the autocatalytic nature of the metal-promoted degradation, which explains the effectiveness of the degradation-arresting additives, even in the case of the highly detrimental titanium alloys.

  10. Fabrication of γ-Fe2O3 Nanoparticles by Solid-State Thermolysis of a Metal-Organic Framework, MIL-100(Fe, for Heavy Metal Ions Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtao Hei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared via a solid-state conversion process of a mesoporous iron(III carboxylate crystal, MIL-100(Fe. First, the MIL-100(Fe crystal that served as the template of the metal oxide was synthesized by a low-temperature (<100°C synthesis route. Subsequently, the porous γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were fabricated by facile thermolysis of the MIL-100(Fe powders via a two-step calcination treatment. The obtained γ-Fe2O3 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques, and then used as an adsorbent for heavy metal ions removal in water treatment. This study illustrates that the metal-organic frameworks may be suitable precursors for the fabrication of metal oxides nanomaterials with large specific surface area, and the prepared porous γ-Fe2O3 exhibits a superior adsorption performance for As(V and As(III ions removal in water treatment.

  11. Analysis of fluid lubrication mechanisms in metal forming at mesoscopic scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubar, L.; Hubert, C.; Christiansen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    computation steps. The first one is a fully coupled fluid-structure Finite Element computation, where pockets in the surface are plastically deformed leading to the pressurization of the entrapped fluid. The second step computes the fluid exchange between cavities through the plateaus of asperity contacts...

  12. Research on ultrasonic excitation for the removal of drilling fluid plug, paraffin deposition plug, polymer plug and inorganic scale plug for near-well ultrasonic processing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjun; Zeng, Jing; Song, Hao; Li, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Near-well ultrasonic processing technology attracts more attention due to its simple operation, high adaptability, low cost and no pollution to the formation. Although this technology has been investigated in detail through laboratory experiments and field tests, systematic and intensive researches are absent for certain major aspects, such as whether ultrasonic excitation is better than chemical agent for any plugs removal; whether ultrasound-chemical combination plug removal technology has the best plugs removal effect. In this paper, the comparison of removing drilling fluid plug, paraffin deposition plug, polymer plug and inorganic scale plug using ultrasonic excitation, chemical agent and ultrasound-chemical combination plug removal technology is investigated. Results show that the initial core permeability and ultrasonic frequency play a significant role in plug removal. Ultrasonic excitation and chemical agent have different impact on different plugs. The comparison results show that the effect of removing any plugs using ultrasound-chemicals composite plug removal technology is obviously better than that using ultrasonic excitation or chemical agent alone. Such conclusion proves that ultrasonic excitation and chemical agent can cause synergetic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of waste water treatment on river metal concentrations: removal or enrichment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuchies, J.; Bervoets, L.; Cox, T.J.S.; Meire, P.; de Deckere, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Discharge of untreated domestic and industrial waste in many European rivers resulted in low oxygen concentrations and contamination with trace metals, often concentrated in sediments. Under these anoxic conditions, the formation of insoluble metal sulfides is known to reduce metal

  14. Zeolite bearing tuff as an adsorbent for heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions and acid mine drainage

    OpenAIRE

    Zendelska, Afrodita; Golomeova, Mirjana; Golomeov, Blagoj; Krstev, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Zeolite bearing tuff (stilbite 27%) from Vetunica deposit, localized in northern marginal parts of the Kratovo-Zletovo volcanic area in Republic of Macedonia was investigated as an adsorbent for removal of copper, zinc, manganese and lead ions from synthetic aqueous solutions and acid mine drainage from SASA lead - zinc mine in Republic of Macedonia. In order to determine the metals uptake at equilibrium a series of experiments were performed under batch conditions from single ion solution...

  15. Rapid microwave-assisted acid extraction of southern pine waste wood to remove metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Bin Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood particles was investigated by extraction in a microwave reactor with binary combinations of acetic acid (AA), oxalic acid (OxA), and phosphoric acid (PhA). Use of OxA was not successful, as insoluble copper oxalate complexes impeded copper removal. The combination of OxA and AA also had...

  16. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Avila, J.S.; Nascimento, R.R. [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. EVALUATION OF FERRIC CHLORIDE AND ALUM EFFICIENCIES IN ENHANCED COAGULATION FOR TOC REMOVAL AND RELATED RESIDUAL METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mesdaghinia, M. T. Rafiee, F. Vaezi and A. H. Mahvi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the removal of colloidal particles continues to be an important reason for using coagulation, a newer objective, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs, is growing in importance. Enhanced coagulation is thus introduced to most water utilities treating surface water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to compare the effectiveness of alum and ferric chloride in removing DBPs precursors from eight synthetic water samples, each representing a different element of the USEPA’s 3×3 enhanced coagulation matrix. The effect of enhanced coagulation on the residual metal (aluminum/iron concentration in the treated water was assessed as well. The removal of total organic carbon (TOC was dependent on the coagulant type and was enhanced with increasing coagulant dose, but the latter had no further considerable effect in case of increasing to high levels. For all the treated samples coagulation with ferric chloride proved to be more effective than alum at similar doses and the mean values of treatment efficiencies were 51% and 32% for ferric chloride and alum, respectively. Ferric chloride was therefore considered the better chemical for enhancing the coagulation process. Besides, due to less production of sludge by this coagulant, it would be predicted that treatment plants would be confronted to fewer problems with respect to final sludge disposal. Measurements of residual metal in treated water indicated that iron and aluminum concentrations had been increased as expected but the quality of water concerning the residual metal deteriorated much more in cases of under-dosing. Despite expecting high residual Al and Fe concentrations under enhanced coagulation, metal concentrations were frequently remained low and were not increased appreciably.

  18. Design and Development of a Continuous-Flow Countercurrent Metal Extraction System to Remove Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neale, Christopher M. U

    1997-01-01

    .... The research focused on eight contaminated soils from Army installations and the metal extraction capabilities of eight extracting agents including HNO3, HCI, fluorosilicic acid, citric acid, EDTA, DTPA, NTA, and NaOH...

  19. Removal of heavy metals and organic contaminants from aqueous streams by novel filtration methods. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    'Graphite nanofibers are a new type of material consisting of nanosized graphite platelets where only edges are exposed. Taking advantage of this unique configuration the authors objective is: (1) To produce graphite nanofibers with structural properties suitable for the removal of contaminants from water. (2) To test the suitability of the material in the removal of organic from aqueous solutions. (3) To determine the ability of the nanofibers to function as an electrochemical separation medium the selective removal of metal contaminants from solutions. This report summarizes work after 1.5 of a 3-year project. During this period, efforts have been concentrated on the production, characterization and optimization of graphite nanofibers (GNF). This novel material has been developed in the laboratory from the metal catalyzed decomposition of certain hydrocarbons (1). The structures possess a cross-sectional area that varies between 5 to 100 nm and have lengths ranging from 5 to 100 mm (2). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies have revealed that the nanofibers consist of extremely well-ordered graphite platelets, which are oriented in various directions with respect to the fiber axis (3). The arrangement of the graphene layers can be tailored to a desired geometry by choice of the correct catalyst system and reaction conditions, and it is therefore possible to generate structures where the layers are stacked in a ribbon, herring-bone, or stacked orientation. The research has been directed on two fronts: (a) the use of the material for the removal of organic contaminants, and (b) taking advantage of the high electrical conductivity as well as high surface area of the material to use it as electrode for the electrochemical removal of metal pollutants from aqueous streams.'

  20. Practical study on the electrochemical simultaneous removal of copper and zinc from simulated binary-metallic industrial wastewater using a packed-bed cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshaal F. Alebrahim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, electrochemical-simultaneous removal of copper and zinc from simulated binary-metallic industrial wastewater containing different ratios of copper to zinc was studied using a packed-bed continuous-recirculation flow electrolytic reactor. The total nominal initial concentration of both metals, circulating rate of flow and nominal initial pH were held constant. Parameters affecting the removal percent and current efficiency of removal, such as applied current and time of electrolysis were investigated. Results revealed that increased current intensity accelerated the removal of metals and diminish current efficiency. It was also observed that selective removal of both metals is possible when the applied current was of small intensity. Moreover, the factors that led to loss of faradaic efficiency were discussed.

  1. The use of raw and acid-pretreated bivalve mollusk shells to remove metals from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Sun Changbin; Xu Jin; Li Youzhi

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal removal from industrial wastewater is not only to protect living organisms in the environment but also to conserve resources such as metals and water by enabling their reuse. To overcome the disadvantage of high cost and secondary pollution by the conventional physico-chemical treatment techniques, environmentally benign and low-cost adsorbents are in demand. In this study, the use of raw and acid-pretreated bivalve mollusk shells (BMSs) to remove metals from aqueous solutions with single or mixed metal was evaluated at different BMSs doses, pH and temperatures in batch shaking experiments in laboratory conditions. When the BMSs were used to treat CuSO 4 .5H 2 O solution, the copper sorption capacities of the raw and acid-pretreated BMSs were approximately 38.93 mg/g and 138.95 mg/g, respectively. The copper removal efficiency (CRE) of the raw BMSs became greatly enhanced with increasing initial pH, reaching 99.51% at the initial pH 5. Conversely, the CRE of the acid-pretreated BMSs was maintained at 99.48-99.52% throughout the pH range of 1-5. Furthermore, the CRE values of the raw and acid-pretreated BMSs were not greatly changed when the temperature was varied from 15 deg. C to 40 deg. C. In addition, the CRE value of the raw BMSs was maintained for 12 cycles of sorption-desorption with a CRE of 98.4% being observed in the final cycle. Finally, when the BMSs were used to treat electroplating wastewater, the removal efficiencies (REs) of the raw BMSs were 99.97%, 98.99% and 87% for Fe, Zn and Cu, respectively, whereas the REs of the acid-pretreated BMSs were 99.98%, 99.43% and 92.13%, respectively. Ion exchange experiments revealed that one of mechanisms for metal sorption by the BMSs from aqueous solution is related to ion exchange, especially between the metal ions in the treated solution and Ca 2+ from BMSs. Infrared absorbance spectra analysis indicated that the acid pretreatment led to occurrence of the groups (i.e. -OH, -NH, C=O and S=O) of

  2. Efficiency of Aluminum and Iron Electrodes for the Removal of Heavy Metals [(Ni (II), Pb (II), Cd (II)] by Electrocoagulation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar; Hussain, Amira; Muneer, Majid; Zia, Khalid Mahmood [Government College Univ., Faisalabad (Pakistan); Hafeez, Samia [Bahaud-din-Zakariya Univ., Multan (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15

    Electrocoagulation (EC) technique is applied for the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals ions such as nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) by using sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant flocs usually aluminium or iron cations into the solution. During electrolytic reactions hydrogen gas evolve at the cathode. All the experiments were carried out in Batch mode. The tank was filled with synthetic wastewater containing heavy metals and efficiency of electrocoagulation in combination with aluminum and iron electrodes were investigated for removal of such metals. Several parameters, such as contact time, pH, electro-coagulant concentration, and current density were optimized to achieve maximum removal efficiency (%). The concentrations of heavy metals were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). It is found that the electro-coagulation process has potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of heavy metals from wastewater specially using iron electrodes in terms of high removal efficiencies and operating cost.

  3. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanti, Venty, E-mail: venty@mipa.uns.ac.id; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta, Central Java 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  4. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  5. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution

  6. Removal of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Heavy Metals in a River-Sea System: Role of Aquatic Microgel Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, R. F.; Lee, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) polymers are complex and poorly understood mixture of organic macromolecules in environment system. Portions of these polymers spontaneously form microgels that play key roles in many biogeochemical reactions, including mediating aggregation processes, element cycling, and pollutant mobility. However, the detailed interaction of microgels-heterogeneous materials in aquatic systems is still lacking. Insight into the interaction between surrounding materials and microgels from different types of aquatic DOC polymers are extremely important, as it is crucial in determining the fate and transport of these materials. Here, we use riverine and marine DOC polymers to examine their aggregation behavior, and to evaluate the roles of microgel formation in scavenging of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and heavy metals in a river-sea system. Our results indicate that riverine and marine microgels did not exhibit too much difference in size ( 3-5 μm) and self-assembly curve; however, the assembly effectiveness ([microgel]/DOC) of marine samples was much higher than riverine. Instead of concentration of DOC, other factors such as types and sources of DOC polymers may control the microgel abundance in aquatic environments. After filtering water samples (microgels removed), the CDOM and selected metals (Cu, Ni, Mn) in the filtrate were quantified. CDOM and metals were concurrently removed to an extent via DOC polymer re-aggregation, which also suggested that the microgels had the sequestering capability in CDOM and metals. This finding provides an alternative route for CDOM and heavy metals removal from the water column. As such the process of re-aggregation into microgels should then be considered besides traditional phase partitioning in the assessment of the ecological risk and fate of pollutant.

  7. Changes in coagulation-fibrinolysis function in alveolar lavage fluid of endotoxemic dogs after partial removal of peripheral leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-gang ZHOU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of partial removal of peripheral leucocytes on the coagulation-fibrinolysis function of alveolar lavage fluid(ALF in endotoxemic dogs,and explore the influence and mechanisms of activated leucocytes on lung injury in endotoxemic dogs.Methods Thirty male mongrel dogs were involved in present study and randomly divided into 3 groups(10 each: LPS group(group L,sham leukocytapheresis group(group S and leukocytapheresis group(group T.Endotoxemic model was reproduced in group L by administration of LPS(2mg/kg,but the animals did not receive leukocytapheresis.Animals in group T received leukocytapheresis using a continuous-flow blood cell separator 12-14 hours after administration of LPS.Animals in group S received sham leukocytapheresis(the end products were transfused back into the dogs at 12-14 hours after administration of LPS.At 36h after administration of LPS,the lung tissues were harvested to obtain ALF,and the levels of neutrophil elastase(NE,soluble thrombomodulin(sTM,activated protein C(APC and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1 in ALF were determined,the expression of thrombomodulin in lung tissue was observed by immunohistochemical staining,while the routine pathological examination and wet/dry ratio of lung tissue were performed.Results The APC level in ALF was significantly higher,while the NE,sTM and PAI-1 levels in ALF and wet/dry ratio of lung tissue were significantly lower in group T than in group L and group S(P < 0.05.Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the expression of thrombomodulin in lung tissue was higher in group T than in group L and group S.No significant difference was found between group L and group S in the indexes mentioned above.Pathological observation showed the incidence of acute lung injury was significantly lower in group T(2/10 than in group L(7/10 and group S(8/10,P < 0.05.Conclusion Partial removal of peripheral leukocytes may lower the level of NE in ALF

  8. NanoCrystalline Cellulose isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch and its potential in cadmium metal removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yong Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NanoCrystalline Cellulose (NCC was isolated via ultrasonic cavitation assisted acid hydrolysis method. Characterization was done using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS together with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM imaging to double prove the existence of NCC. DLS measures length of 236.6 nm with width of 34.40 nm, supported by SEM which showed NCC a rod-like shaped particle with large surface area and high porosity. It was then attempted for heavy metal cadmium ion (Cd2+ removal from aqueous solution. The pH implication to the rate of Cd2+ adsorption was investigated by varying the solution to pH 4, pH 7 and pH 10 over a duration of 120 minutes. The removal efficiency was analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS resulting in pH 7 being the most favorable for Cd2+ removal.

  9. Efficiency Evaluation of Food Waste Materials for the Removal of Metals and Metalloids from Complex Multi-Element Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Giuliano, Antonella; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Congedo, Rossana; Masotti, Andrea; Canepari, Silvia

    2018-02-26

    Recent studies have shown the potential of food waste materials as low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals and toxic elements from wastewater. However, the adsorption experiments have been performed in heterogeneous conditions, consequently it is difficult to compare the efficiency of the individual adsorbents. In this study, the adsorption capacities of 12 food waste materials were evaluated by comparing the adsorbents' efficiency for the removal of 23 elements from complex multi-element solutions, maintaining homogeneous experimental conditions. The examined materials resulted to be extremely efficient for the adsorption of many elements from synthetic multi-element solutions as well as from a heavy metal wastewater. The 12 adsorbent surfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and showed different types and amounts of functional groups, which demonstrated to act as adsorption active sites for various elements. By multivariate statistical computations of the obtained data, the 12 food waste materials were grouped in five clusters characterized by different elements' removal efficiency which resulted to be in correlation with the specific adsorbents' chemical structures. Banana peel, watermelon peel and grape waste resulted the least selective and the most efficient food waste materials for the removal of most of the elements.

  10. Efficiency Evaluation of Food Waste Materials for the Removal of Metals and Metalloids from Complex Multi-Element Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Massimi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown the potential of food waste materials as low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals and toxic elements from wastewater. However, the adsorption experiments have been performed in heterogeneous conditions, consequently it is difficult to compare the efficiency of the individual adsorbents. In this study, the adsorption capacities of 12 food waste materials were evaluated by comparing the adsorbents’ efficiency for the removal of 23 elements from complex multi-element solutions, maintaining homogeneous experimental conditions. The examined materials resulted to be extremely efficient for the adsorption of many elements from synthetic multi-element solutions as well as from a heavy metal wastewater. The 12 adsorbent surfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and showed different types and amounts of functional groups, which demonstrated to act as adsorption active sites for various elements. By multivariate statistical computations of the obtained data, the 12 food waste materials were grouped in five clusters characterized by different elements’ removal efficiency which resulted to be in correlation with the specific adsorbents’ chemical structures. Banana peel, watermelon peel and grape waste resulted the least selective and the most efficient food waste materials for the removal of most of the elements.

  11. Preparation of thiol-functionalized activated carbon from sewage sludge with coal blending for heavy metal removal from contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Xing, Xing; Li, Jiao; Shi, Mei; Lin, Aijun; Xu, Congbin; Zheng, Jianzhong; Li, Ronghua

    2018-03-01

    Sewage sludge produced from wastewater treatment is a pressing environmental issue. Mismanagement of the massive amount of sewage sludge would threat our valuble surface and shallow ground water resources. Use of activated carbon prepared from carbonization of these sludges for heavy metal removal can not only minimize and stabilize these hazardous materials but also realize resources reuse. In this study, thiol-functionalized activated carbon was synthesized from coal-blended sewage sludge, and its capacity was examined for removing Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) from water. Pyrolysis conditions to prepare activated carbons from the sludge and coal mixture were examined, and the synthesized material was found to achieve the highest BET surface area of 1094 m 2 /g under 500 °C and 30 min. Batch equilibrium tests indicated that the thiol-functionalized activated carbon had a maximum sorption capacity of 238.1, 96.2, 87.7 and 52.4 mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) removal from water, respectively. Findings of this study suggest that thiol-functionalized activated carbon prepared from coal-blended sewage sludge would be a promising sorbent material for heavy metal removal from waters contaminated with Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of heavy-metal pollutants from ground water using a reverse-osmosis/coupled-transport hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Ray, R.J.; Scholfield, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two membrane processes - reverse osmosis (RO) and coupled transport (CT) - are useful in removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions and producing purified water. Each process has advantages. RO produces clean water reliably and relatively inexpensively. However, the pollutants are removed nonselectively and cannot be appreciably concentrated. CT removes pollutants selectively and can concentrate them by several orders of magnitude, but CT suffers from limited reliability and performs poorly at low pollutant concentrations. By combining these two unit processes in a hybrid process, it is possible to capitalize on the advantages of each process and to minimize their disadvantages. The RO/CT hybrid process the authors are developing removes more than 98% of the uranium and chromium in a contaminated groundwater stream - reducing concentrations of each pollutant to less than 100 ppb. These pollutants are simultaneously recovered as a concentrate at metal-ion concentrations greater than 1 wt% in relatively pure form. The hybrid process promises to be reliable and to reduce treatment costs below that for costs if either CT or RO were used alone. Even more importantly, the high selectivity of the hybrid process minimizes the volume of waste requiring disposal

  13. Relationships between heavy metal concentrations in three different body fluids and male reproductive parameters: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ten Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal studies have shown the reproductive toxicity of a number of heavy metals. Very few human observational studies have analyzed the relationship between male reproductive function and heavy metal concentrations in diverse biological fluids. Methods The current study assessed the associations between seminal and hormonal parameters and the concentration of the 3 most frequent heavy metal toxicants (lead, cadmium and mercury in three different body fluids. Sixty one men attending infertility clinics that participated in a case-control study to explore the role of environmental toxins and lifestyles on male infertility were analyzed. Concentration of lead, cadmium and mercury were measured in blood and seminal plasma and whole blood using anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Serum samples were analyzed for follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and testosterone. Semen analyses were performed according to World Health Organization criteria. Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rank correlations were used for unadjusted analyses. Multiple linear regression models were performed controlling for age, body mass index and number of cigarettes per day. Results There were no significant differences between cases and controls in the concentrations of heavy metals in any of the three body fluids. In multivariate analyses using all subjects no significant associations were found between serum hormone levels and metal concentrations. However there was a significant positive association between the percentage of immotile sperms and seminal plasma levels of lead and cadmium. Conclusions Our results suggest that the presence of lead and cadmium in the reproductive tract of men may be related to a moderate alteration of their seminal parameters.

  14. Application of carbon foam for heavy metal removal from industrial plating wastewater and toxicity evaluation of the adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Song, Mi-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains various types of toxic substances, such as heavy metals, solvents, and cleaning agents. Carbon foam was used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from real industrial plating wastewater. Its sorption capacity was compared with those of a commercial ion-exchange resin (BC258) and a heavy metal adsorbent (CupriSorb™) in a batch system. The experimental carbon foam has a considerably higher sorption capacity for Cr and Cu than commercial adsorbents for acid/alkali wastewater and cyanide wastewater. Additionally, cytotoxicity test showed that the newly developed adsorbent has low cytotoxic effects on three kinds of human cells. In a pilot plant, the carbon foam had higher sorption capacity for Cr (73.64 g kg(-1)) than for Cu (14.86 g kg(-1)) and Ni (7.74 g kg(-1)) during 350 h of operation time. Oxidation pretreatments using UV/hydrogen peroxide enhance heavy metal removal from plating wastewater containing cyanide compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Competitive removal of heavy metal ions from squid oil under isothermal condition by CR11 chelate ion exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Omid; Goodarzi, Vahabodin; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Borja, Rafael

    2017-07-15

    Heavy metal ions (HMIs) are serious threats to the environment. Sub-critical water treatment was used to mimic contamination of squid oil in aqueous, metal-soap and oil phases. Isothermal adsorption of HMIs (Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ ) was studied from aqueous phase to oil phase (493, 523, 548, and 573K) for solutions with different initial concentration of HMIs was studied. Decomposition of glycerides into fatty acids was favored at high subcritical temperatures, with metal-soap phase showing the highest chelation ability toward Cu 2+ (96%, isotherm 573K). The removal-ability of HMIs from contaminated oil was performed by CR11 chelate ion exchanger, showing facilitated removal from metal-soap and oil phases at low temperatures compared to general-purpose PEI-chitosan bead and PEI-chitosan fiber sorbents. The chelation behavior of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ was the same in the OIL, with maximum values of 5.7×10 -3 (mol/l) and 5.0×10 -3 (mol/l) at 573K, respectively. By contrast, concentration of Zn 2+ ion showed a slight increase with increasing temperature due to electrostatic forces between Zn 2+ and active sites of glycerides in oil phase. For oil solution, the selectivity of adsorption for CR11, especially for Zn 2+ , was at least five-fold larger compared to PEI-chitosan bead and PEI-chitosan fiber adsorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of potassium hydroxide (KOH) modified hydrochars from different feedstocks for enhanced removal of heavy metals from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kejing; Tang, Jingchun; Gong, Yanyan; Zhang, Hairong

    2015-11-01

    Hydrochars produced from different feedstocks (sawdust, wheat straw, and corn stalk) via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and KOH modification were used as alternative adsorbents for aqueous heavy metals remediation. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrochars and KOH-treated hydrochars were characterized, and the ability of hydrochars for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions as a function of reaction time, pH, and initial contaminant concentration was tested. The results showed that KOH modification of hydrochars might have increased the aromatic and oxygen-containing functional groups, such as carboxyl groups, resulting in about 2-3 times increase of cadmium sorption capacity (30.40-40.78 mg/g) compared to that of unmodified hydrochars (13.92-14.52 mg/g). The sorption ability among different feedstocks after modification was as the following: sawdust > wheat straw > corn stack. Cadmium sorption kinetics on modified hydrochars could be interpreted with a pseudo-second order, and sorption isotherm was simulated with Langmuir adsorption model. High cadmium uptake on modified hydrochars was observed over the pH range of 4.0-8.0, while for other heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) the range was 4.0-6.0. In a multi-metal system, the sorption capacity of heavy metals by modified hydrochars was also higher than that by unmodified ones and followed the order of Pb(II) > Cu(II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II). The results suggest that KOH-modified hydrochars can be used as a low cost, environmental-friendly, and effective adsorbent for heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions.

  17. Selective Removal of Toxic Metals like Copper and Arsenic from Drinking Water Using Phenol-Formaldehyde Type Chelating Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of different toxic metals has increased beyond environmentally and ecologically permissible levels due to the increase in industrial activity. More than 100 million people of Bangladesh and West Bengal in India are affected by drinking ground water contaminated with arsenic and some parts of India is also affected by poisoning effect of copper, cadmium and fluoride. Different methods have been evolved to reduce the arsenic concentration in drinking water to a maximum permissible level of 10 μg/L where as various methods are also available to separate copper from drinking water. Of the proven methods available today, removal of arsenic by polymeric ion exchangers has been most effective. While chelating ion exchange resins having specific chelating groups attached to a polymer have found extensive use in sorption and pre concentration of Cu2+ ions. Both the methods are coupled here to separate and preconcentrate toxic metal cation Cu2+ and metal anion arsenate(AsO4– at the same time. We have prepared a series of low-cost polymeric resins, which are very efficient in removing copper ion from drinking water and after coordinating with copper ion they act as polymeric ligand exchanger, which are efficiently removing arsenate from drinking water. For this purpose Schiff bases were prepared by condensing o-phenylenediamine with o-, m-, and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Condensing these phenolic Schiff bases with formaldehyde afforded the chelating resins in high yields. These resins are loaded with Cu2+, Ni2+ 2+, and Fe3+ ions. The resins and the polychelates are highly insoluble in water. In powdered form the metal ion-loaded resins are found to very efficiently remove arsenate ion from water at neutral pH. Resins loaded with optimum amount of Cu2+ ion is more effective in removing arsenate ions compared to those with Fe3+ ion, apparently because Cu2+ is a stronger Lewis acid than Fe3+. Various parameters influencing the removal of the

  18. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs

  19. Removal of metal cations from wastewater using recycled wool-based non-woven material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJA RADETIC

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of low-temperature air plasma, biopolymer chitosan and hydrogen peroxide treatment of recycled wool-based non-woven material on metal cation uptake was investigated. Recycled wool-based material either as an untreated or modified material showed ability to bind all investigated metal cations in the following order: Pb2+>Cu2+>Zn2+>Co2+. Material performed good selectivity due to distinct sorption rates of studied metal cations.

  20. Nitrate removal from eutrophic wetlands polluted by metal-mine wastes: effects of liming and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaraz, María Nazaret; Conesa, Héctor Miguel; Álvarez-Rogel, José

    2013-10-15

    Wetlands are highly effective systems in removing large amounts of N from waters, preventing eutrophication processes. However, when wetlands are polluted by metal-mine wastes their capacity to act as green filters may be diminished. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of liming and plants (Sarcocornia fruticosa and Phragmites australis) on the removal of NO3(-) from eutrophic water in slightly acidic, wetland soils polluted by metal-mine wastes. Simulated soil profiles were constructed and six treatments were assayed: (1) no liming + no plant, (2) no liming + S. fruticosa, (3) no liming + P. australis, (4) liming + no plant, (5) liming + S. fruticosa and (6) liming + P. australis. Three horizons were differentiated: A (never under water), C1 (alternating flooding-drying conditions) and C2 (always under water). The eutrophic water used to flood the soil profiles was enriched in N and organic carbon (pH ~ 7.5, electrical conductivity ~ 11 dS m(-1), NO3(-) ~ 234 mg L(-1) and dissolved organic carbon ~ 106 mg L(-1)). The pH, Eh and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N-NO3(-) and N-NH4(+) were measured regularly for 18 weeks. Liming stimulated the growth of plants, especially for S. fruticosa (20-fold more plant biomass than without liming), increased the soil pH and favoured the decline of the Eh values, enhancing the removal of NO3(-) via denitrification. Of all the treatments assayed, liming + S. fruticosa was the only treatment that removed almost completely the high concentration of NO3(-) from the eutrophic flooding water, reaching ~1 mg L(-1) N-NO3(-) at the end of the experiment, at all depths. The higher content of DOC in the pore water of this treatment could explain this behaviour, since more labile carbon was available to the soil microorganisms in the rhizosphere, favouring NO3(-) removal through denitrification processes. However, the treatment liming + P. australis (2-fold more plant biomass that without liming) did not