WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal oxide clusters

  1. Oxide-supported metal clusters: models for heterogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, A K; Goodman, D W

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the size-dependent electronic, structural and chemical properties of metal clusters on oxide supports is an important aspect of heterogeneous catalysis. Recently model oxide-supported metal catalysts have been prepared by vapour deposition of catalytically relevant metals onto ultra-thin oxide films grown on a refractory metal substrate. Reactivity and spectroscopic/microscopic studies have shown that these ultra-thin oxide films are excellent models for the corresponding bulk oxides, yet are sufficiently electrically conductive for use with various modern surface probes including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Measurements on metal clusters have revealed a metal to nonmetal transition as well as changes in the crystal and electronic structures (including lattice parameters, band width, band splitting and core-level binding energy shifts) as a function of cluster size. Size-dependent catalytic reactivity studies have been carried out for several important reactions, and time-dependent catalytic deactivation has been shown to arise from sintering of metal particles under elevated gas pressures and/or reactor temperatures. In situ STM methodologies have been developed to follow the growth and sintering kinetics on a cluster-by-cluster basis. Although several critical issues have been addressed by several groups worldwide, much more remains to be done. This article highlights some of these accomplishments and summarizes the challenges that lie ahead. (topical review)

  2. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of iron oxide with conducting polymer in the form of powders of varying compositions have been studied to understand the effects of particle size, cluster size and magnetic inter-particle interactions. The sizes of the nanoparticles were estimated to be ∼ 10–20 nm from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the ...

  3. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    report preliminary results on the magnetic properties of self standing sheets prepared using γ-Fe2O3 and. NiFe2O4 nanoparticles and conducting polymers. Keywords. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites; structural properties; magnetic properties. 1. Introduction. The diverse properties of magnetic nanoparticle systems.

  4. Kinetic Consequences of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms during Methane Oxidation on Group VIII Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Ya Huei

    2011-01-01

    Molecular insights and the kinetic relevance of reaction elementary steps for methane activation on Group VIII metal and oxide clusters are established based on kinetic, isotopic, and theoretical assessments. These fundamental understandings enable accurate prediction of complex rate dependencies and cluster size effects during methane conversion reactions in catalytic partial oxidation, reforming, and combustion processes.Kinetics of methane reactions with oxygen are described by several reg...

  5. Gas phase infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ionic clusters: metal oxides and microhydrated anions

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, T.

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of the present thesis is the structural characterization of metal oxide clusters in the framework of the Dedicated Research Center “Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity of Transition Metal Oxide Aggregates” (SFB 546), funded by the German Research Foundation. The SFB 546 aimed at developing a detailed understanding of the relationships between structure and reactivity in catalytic systems. A second goal of this thesis is the characterization of the solvation behavior of anions ...

  6. Destructive Clustering of Metal Nanoparticles in Chalcogenide and Oxide Glassy Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, M. V.; Shpotyuk, O. I.; Cebulski, J.; Kozyukhin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic χ-criterion is developed to parameterize difference in the origin of high-order optical non-linearity associated with metallic atoms (Cu, Ag, Au) embedded destructively in oxide- and chalcogenide glasses. Within this approach, it is unambiguously proved that covalent-bonded networks of soft semiconductor chalcogenides exemplified by binary As(Ge)-S(Se) glasses differ essentially from those typical for hard dielectric oxides like vitreous silica by impossibility to accommodate pure agglomerates of metallic nanoparticles. In an excellence according to known experimental data, it is suggested that destructive clustering of nanoparticles is possible in Cu-, Ag-, and Au-ion-implanted dielectric oxide glass media, possessing a strongly negative χ-criterion. Some recent speculations trying to ascribe equally this ability to soft chalcogenide glasses despite an obvious difference in the corresponding bond dissociation energies have been disclosed and criticized as inconclusive.

  7. Interaction of Model Inhibitor Compounds with Minimalist Cluster Representations of Hydroxyl Terminated Metal Oxide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational modeling of corrosion inhibitors at the level of molecular interactions has been pursued for decades, and recent developments are allowing increasingly realistic models to be developed for inhibitor–inhibitor, inhibitor–solvent and inhibitor–metal interactions. At the same time, there remains a need for simplistic models to be used for the purpose of screening molecules for proposed inhibitor performance. Herein, we apply a reductionist model for metal surfaces consisting of a metal cation with hydroxide ligands and use quantum chemical modeling to approximate the free energy of adsorption for several imidazoline class candidate corrosion inhibitors. The approximation is made using the binding energy and the partition coefficient. As in some previous work, we consider different methods for incorporating solvent and reference systems for the partition coefficient. We compare the findings from this short study with some previous theoretical work on similar systems. The binding energies for the inhibitors to the metal hydroxide clusters are found to be intermediate to the binding energies calculated in other work for bare metal vs. metal oxide surfaces. The method is applied to copper, iron, aluminum and nickel metal systems.

  8. Equilibrating metal-oxide cluster ensembles for oxidation reactions using oxygen in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira A. Weinstock; Elena M. G. Barbuzzi; Michael W. Wemple; Jennifer J. Cowan; Richard S. Reiner; Dan M. Sonnen; Robert A. Heintz; James S. Bond; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Although many enzymes can readily and selectively use oxygen in water--the most familiar and attractive of all oxidants and solvents, respectively–-the design of synthetic catalysts for selective water-based oxidation processes utilizing molecular oxygen remains a daunting task. Particularly problematic is the fact that oxidation of substrates by O2 involves radical...

  9. Structures, Interconversions, and Spectroscopy of Iron Carbonyl Clusters with an Interstitial Carbide: Localized Metal Center Reduction by Overall Cluster Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Wofford, Joshua D; Joseph, Chris; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Ali, Azim K; Lynch, Vincent M; Lindahl, Paul A; Rose, Michael J

    2017-05-15

    The syntheses, interconversions, and spectroscopic properties of a set of iron carbonyl clusters containing an interstitial carbide are reported. This includes the low temperature X-ray structures of the six-iron clusters (Y) 2 [Fe 6 (μ 6 -C)(μ 2 -CO) 4 (CO) 12 ] (1a-c; where Y = NMe 4 , NEt 4 , PPh 4 ); the five-iron cluster [Fe 5 (μ 5 -C)(CO) 15 ] (3); and the novel formulation of the five-iron cluster (NMe 4 ) 2 [Fe 5 (μ 5 -C)(μ 2 -CO)(CO) 13 ] (4). Also included in this set is the novel charge-neutral cluster, [Fe 6 (μ 6 -C)(CO) 18 ] (2), for which we were unable to obtain a crystallographic structure. As synthetic proof for the identity of 2, we performed a closed loop of interconversions within a family of crystallographically defined species (1, 3, and 4): [Fe 6 ] 2- → [Fe 6 ] 0 → [Fe 5 ] 0 → [Fe 5 ] 2- → [Fe 6 ] 2- . The structural, spectroscopic, and electronic properties of this "missing link" cluster 2 were investigated by IR, Raman, XPS, and Mössbauer spectroscopies-as well as by DFT calculations. A single ν CO feature (1965 cm -1 ) in the IR spectrum of 2, as well as a prominent Raman feature (ν symm = 1550 cm -1 ), are consistent with the presence of terminal carbonyls and a {(μ 6 -C)Fe 6 } arrangement of iron centers around the central carbide. The XPS of 2 exhibits a higher energy Fe 2p 3/2 feature (707.4 eV) as compared to that of 1 (705.5 eV), consistent with the two-electron oxidation induced by treatment of 1 with two equivalents of [Fc](PF 6 ) under CO atmosphere (for the two added CO ligands). DFT calculations indicate two axial and four equatorial Fe sites in 1, all of which have the same or similar oxidation states, for example, two Fe(0) and four Fe(+0.5). These assignments are supported by Mössbauer spectra for 1, which exhibit two closely spaced quadrupole doublets with δ = 0.076 and 0.064 mm s -1 . The high-field Mössbauer spectrum of 2 (4.2 K) exhibits three prominent quadrupole doublets with δ = -0.18, -0.11, and

  10. Metallic oxide nano-clusters synthesis by ion implantation in high purity Fe10Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ce

    2015-01-01

    ODS (Oxide Dispersed Strengthened) steels, which are reinforced with metal dispersions of nano-oxides (based on Y, Ti and O elements), are promising materials for future nuclear reactors. The detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in the precipitation of these nano-oxides would improve manufacturing and mechanical properties of these ODS steels, with a strong economic impact for their industrialization. To experimentally study these mechanisms, an analytical approach by ion implantation is used, to control various parameters of synthesis of these precipitates as the temperature and concentration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of this method and concerned the behaviour of alloys models (based on aluminium oxide) under thermal annealing. High purity Fe-10Cr alloys were implanted with Al and O ions at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the nano-oxides appear in the Fe-10Cr matrix upon ion implantation at room temperature without subsequent annealing. The mobility of implanted elements is caused by the defects created during ion implantation, allowing the nucleation of these nanoparticles, of a few nm in diameter. These nanoparticles are composed of aluminium and oxygen, and also chromium. The high-resolution experiments show that their crystallographic structure is that of a non-equilibrium compound of aluminium oxide (cubic γ-Al 2 O 3 type). The heat treatment performed after implantation induces the growth of the nano-sized oxides, and a phase change that tends to balance to the equilibrium structure (hexagonal α-Al 2 O 3 type). These results on model alloys are fully applicable to industrial materials: indeed ion implantation reproduces the conditions of milling and heat treatments are at equivalent temperatures to those of thermo-mechanical treatments. A mechanism involving the precipitation of nano-oxide dispersed in ODS alloys is proposed in this manuscript based on the obtained experimental results

  11. Mono-, di-, and trimetallic methacrylate-substituted metal oxide clusters derived from hafnium butoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Silvia; Kickelbick, Guido; Puchberger, Michael; Schubert, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The methacrylate-substituted clusters Hf 4 O 2 (OMc) 12 , Hf 6 O 4 (OH) 4 (OMc) 12 (BuOH), Ti 4 Hf 4 O 6 (OBu) 4 (OMc) 16 , andTi 2 Zr 5 HfO 6 (OMc) 20 (OMc = methacrylate) were prepared by reacting Hf(OBu) 4 , or Hf(OBu) 4 /Ti(OBu) 4 and Hf(OBu) 4 /Zr(OBu) 4 /Ti(OBu) 4 mixtures, respectively, with methacrylic acid. All clusters were characterized by x-ray structure analyses and are basically isostructural, although not in each case isomorphous, with the corresponding oxozirconium clusters. Low-temperature NMR studies revealed that the methacrylate ligands of Hf 4 O 2 (OMc) 12 are highly dynamic even at - 80 o C. Refs. 10 (author)

  12. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  13. Structural variability in transition metal oxide clusters: gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of V3O6-8+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmis, K. R.; Wende, T.; Brummer, M.; Gause, O.; Santambrogio, G.; Stanca-Kaposta, E. C.; Dobler, J.; Niedziela, A.; Sauer, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present gas phase vibrational spectra of the trinuclear vanadium oxide cations V3O6+[middle dot]He1-4{,} V3O7+[middle dot]Ar0{,}1{,} and V3O8+[middle dot]Ar0{,}2 between 350 and 1200 cm-1. Cluster structures are assigned based on a comparison of the experimental and simulated IR spectra. The

  14. Size selected metal clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soft Landing and Fragmentation of Small Clusters Deposited in Noble-Gas Films. Harbich, W.; Fedrigo, S.; Buttet, J. Phys. Rev. B 1998, 58, 7428 ... When gold is not noble: Nanoscale gold catalysts. Sanchez A, Abbet S, Heiz U J. Phys. Chem. A. 1999, 103, 9573.

  15. Fission of Polyanionic Metal Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S.; Jankowski, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wolfram, M.

    2018-04-01

    Size-selected dianionic lead clusters Pbn2 -, n =34 - 56 , are stored in a Penning trap and studied with respect to their decay products upon photoexcitation. Contrary to the decay of other dianionic metal clusters, these lead clusters show a variety of decay channels. The mass spectra of the fragments are compared to the corresponding spectra of the monoanionic precursors. This comparison leads to the conclusion that, in the cluster size region below about n =48 , the fission reaction Pbn2 -→Pbn-10 -+Pb10- is the major decay process. Its disappearance at larger cluster sizes may be an indication of a nonmetal to metal transition. Recently, the pair of Pb10- and Pbn-10 - were observed as pronounced fragments in electron-attachment studies [S. König et al., Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 421, 129 (2017), 10.1016/j.ijms.2017.06.009]. The present findings suggest that this combination is the fingerprint of the decay of doubly charged lead clusters. With this assumption, the dianion clusters have been traced down to Pb212 -, whereas the smallest size for the direct observation was as high as n =28 .

  16. Catalyst Architecture for Stable Single Atom Dispersion Enables Site-Specific Spectroscopic and Reactivity Measurements of CO Adsorbed to Pt Atoms, Oxidized Pt Clusters, and Metallic Pt Clusters on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRita, Leo; Dai, Sheng; Lopez-Zepeda, Kimberly; Pham, Nicholas; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-10-11

    Oxide-supported precious metal nanoparticles are widely used industrial catalysts. Due to expense and rarity, developing synthetic protocols that reduce precious metal nanoparticle size and stabilize dispersed species is essential. Supported atomically dispersed, single precious metal atoms represent the most efficient metal utilization geometry, although debate regarding the catalytic activity of supported single precious atom species has arisen from difficulty in synthesizing homogeneous and stable single atom dispersions, and a lack of site-specific characterization approaches. We propose a catalyst architecture and characterization approach to overcome these limitations, by depositing ∼1 precious metal atom per support particle and characterizing structures by correlating scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and CO probe molecule infrared spectroscopy. This is demonstrated for Pt supported on anatase TiO 2 . In these structures, isolated Pt atoms, Pt iso , remain stable through various conditions, and spectroscopic evidence suggests Pt iso species exist in homogeneous local environments. Comparing Pt iso to ∼1 nm preoxidized (Pt ox ) and prereduced (Pt metal ) Pt clusters on TiO 2 , we identify unique spectroscopic signatures of CO bound to each site and find CO adsorption energy is ordered: Pt iso ≪ Pt metal atoms bonded to TiO 2 and that Pt iso exhibits optimal reactivity because every atom is exposed for catalysis and forms an interfacial site with TiO 2 . This approach should be generally useful for studying the behavior of supported precious metal atoms.

  17. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics.

  18. Oxidation by metal salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhon'kov, D.I.; Cheprakov, A.V.; Rodkin, M.A.; Mil'chenko, A.Yu.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of toluene and para-substituted toluenes containing electron acceptor groups: p-toluic acid, p-methyltoluylate and p-nitrotoluene by ammonium cerium (4) nitrate and ammonium cerium (4) sulfate in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals is studied. The rate and selectivity of oxidative halogenation in side chain and/or aromatic ring under the conditions studied depend both on the nature of substrate and halogenide-ion and on the reaction conditions and ligand surrounding of cerium (4) atom

  19. Self-assembled metal clusters on an alumina nanomesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, A.

    2012-01-01

    Template mediated growth of metals has attracted much interest due to the remarkable magnetic and catalytic properties of clusters in the nanometer range and provides the opportunity to grow clusters with narrow size distributions. When the Ni3Al(111) surface is exposed to oxygen at elevated temperature a thin oxide film with a well-defined structure and uniform thickness grows and covers the alloy surface completely. The structure of the alumina film has been solved mainly by the help of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The structure of the approx. 0.5 nm thick oxide film has sixfold symmetry and exhibits holes with a diameter of approx. 400 pm reaching down to the metal substrate at the corners of the (Sqrt(67) x Sqrt(67))R12.2° unit cell. The side length of the unit cell is 4.1 nm. The driving force for the formation of the oxide nanomesh is the reduction of the metal/oxide interface energy by the formation of energetically favorable Al-Ni bonds at the interface. Due to better wetting of metal on metal surfaces than on oxide surfaces, metal atoms prefer to bind to the substrate in the hole, not to the oxide. Therefore the oxide forms a template with a hexagonal 4.1 nm lattice for the growth of well-ordered metal clusters. Nevertheless, the growth of most metal clusters on top of the corner holes is not straightforward. Fe and Co atoms cannot jump into the corner holes due to a barrier for diffusion and nucleate at their second favorable adsorption site. However, Pd atoms trapped in these corner holes reduce the barrier for diffusion and create metallic nucleation sites where Fe as well as Co clusters can nucleate and form a well-ordered hexagonal arrangement on the oxide nanomesh. We have studied these Fe and Co clusters and applied different methods like STM and surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) to determine the morphology and crystallography of the clusters. For Fe we found cluster growth with

  20. Metal-Ion Induced In Situ Ligand Oxidation for Self-Assembled Clusters: from Bis(5-(2-pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl)methane to Alcohol or Ketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Quan; Peng, Yuan-Yuan; Tong, Lang; Jia, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Chen, Wen-Bin; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2017-09-05

    Hydrothermal reactions of metal nitrates and ligand bis(5-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)methane (H 2 L 1 ) gave three cluster compounds, {Cr 2 }, {Zn 12 } and {Fe 8 }. Notably, methylene group of H 2 L 1 was in situ oxidized either to hydroxymethylated (L 2 -O) 3- in the metallo-ring {Zn 12 } or to a rigid carbonylated (L 3 =O) 2- in the screw-type {Fe 8 }. In light of comparative experimental results, NO 3 - was deduced to be of a catalytic role in the ligand oxidation. Metal ion could be regarded as an "induced" tool for clusters generation in self-assembly process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N(+) for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N(+) (N = 2-6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  2. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  3. Thermal Methane Activation by a Binary V-Nb Transition-Metal Oxide Cluster Cation: A Further Example for the Crucial Role of Oxygen-Centered Radicals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, Z. C.; Liu, J. W.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Schröder, Detlef; Sauer, J.; Schwarz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 35 (2013), s. 11496-11501 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : binary oxide cluster * density functional calculations * mass spectrometry * methane activation * radical ions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.696, year: 2013

  4. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  5. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  6. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  7. A red metallic oxide photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiang; Randorn, Chamnan; Efstathiou, Paraskevi; Irvine, John T. S.

    2012-07-01

    Light absorption across the bandgap in semiconductors is exploited in many important applications such as photovoltaics, light emitting diodes and photocatalytic conversion. Metals differ from semiconductors in that there is no energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied levels; however, it is still possible to excite electrons between bands. This is evidenced by materials with metallic properties that are also strongly coloured. An important question is whether such coloured metals could be used in light harvesting or similar applications. The high conductivity of a metal would preclude sufficient electric field being available to separate photocarriers; however, the high carrier mobility in a metal might also facilitate kinetic charge separation. Here we clearly demonstrate for the first time the use of a red metallic oxide, Sr1-xNbO3 as an effective photocatalyst. The material has been used under visible light to photocatalyse the oxidation of methylene blue and both the oxidation and reduction of water assisted by appropriate sacrificial elements.

  8. Extragalactic globular clusters. I. The metallicity calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, J.P.; Huchra, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of absorption-line strength indices, measured from integrated globular cluster spectra, to predict mean cluster metallicity is explored. Statistical criteria, are used to identify the six best indices out of about 20 measured in a large sample of Galactic and M31 cluster spectra. Linear relations between index and metallicity have been derived along with new calibrations of infrared colors (V - K, J - K, and CO) versus Fe/H. Estimates of metallicity from the six spectroscopic index-metallicity relations have been combined in three different ways to identify the most efficient estimator and the minimum bias estimator of Fe/H - the weighted mean. This provides an estimate of Fe/H accurate to about 15 percent. 37 refs

  9. Microwave Heating of Metal Power Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakov, K. I.; Semenov, V. E.; Volkovskaya, I. I.

    2018-01-01

    The results of simulating the rapid microwave heating of spherical clusters of metal particles to the melting point are reported. In the simulation, the cluster is subjected to a plane electromagnetic wave. The cluster size is comparable to the wavelength; the perturbations of the field inside the cluster are accounted for within an effective medium approximation. It is shown that the time of heating in vacuum to the melting point does not exceed 1 s when the electric field strength in the incident wave is about 2 kV/cm at a frequency of 24 GHz or 5 kV/cm at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The obtained results demonstrate feasibility of using rapid microwave heating for the spheroidization of metal particles with an objective to produce high-quality powders for additive manufacturing technologies.

  10. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  11. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  12. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  13. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  14. Manipulating Light with Transition Metal Clusters, Organic Dyes, and Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogut, Serdar [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The primary goals of our research program is to develop and apply state-of-the-art first-principles methods to predict electronic and optical properties of three systems of significant scientific and technological interest: transition metal clusters, organic dyes, and metal-organic frameworks. These systems offer great opportunities to manipulate light for a wide ranging list of energy-related scientific problems and applications. During this grant period, we focused our investigations on the development, implementation, and benchmarking of many-body Green’s function methods (GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation) to examine excited-state properties of transition metal/transition-metal-oxide clusters and organic molecules that comprise the building blocks of dyes and metal-organic frameworks.

  15. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  16. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of iron oxide with conducting polymer in the form of powders of varying compositions have been studied to understand the effects of particle size, cluster size and magnetic inter-particle interactions. The sizes of the nanoparticles were estimated to be ∼ 10–20 nm from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the ...

  17. Ionization and Coulomb explosion of small uranium oxide clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Matt W; Castleman, A W Jr

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond pulses are used to study the strong-field ionization and subsequent Coulomb explosion of small uranium oxide clusters. The resulting high atomic charge states are explored as a function of laser intensity and compared to ionization rates calculated using semi-classical tunneling theory with sequential ionization potential values. The gap in laser intensity between saturation intensity values for the 7s, 6d, and 5f orbitals are identified and quantified. Extreme charge states of oxygen up to O 4+ are observed indicating multiple ionization enhancement processes occurring within the clusters. The peak splittings of the atomic charge states are explored and compared to previous results on transition metal oxide species. Participation of the 5f orbitals in bonding is clearly identified based on the saturation intensity dependence of oxygen to uranium metal.

  18. Magic structures of binary metallic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Riccardo

    2005-03-01

    The structure of binary metallic clusters is investigated by a variety of computational tools, ranging from genetic and basin-hopping global optimization algorithms, to molecular dynamics, and to density-functional calculations. Three different binary systems are investigated: Ag-Cu, Ag-Ni, and Ag-Pd. A new family of magic cluster structures is found. These clusters have the common feature of presenting a perfect core-shell chemical arrangement (with an outer Ag shell of monoatomic thickness) and of being polyicosahedra, that is being made of interpenetrating icosahedra of 13 atoms. Core-shell polyicosahedra are of special stability, which originates from the interplay of different factors. First of all, polyicosahedra are very compact structures, so that they maximize the number of nearest-neighbor bonds for a given size. However, in single-element clusters, these bonds are not optimal, since inner bonds are strongly compressed and surface bonds are expanded. This is the contrary of what is required from the bond order -bond length correlation in metals, which favors contracted surface bonds. In binary clusters, the situation is different. Substituting the inner atoms of a single-element polyicosahedron with different atoms of smaller size, the bonds can relax close to their optimal distance. This leads naturally to the appearance of core-shell polyicosahedra. In Ag-Cu, Ag-Ni and Ag-Pd the formation of these structures is reinforced by the tendency of Ag atoms to surface segregation. A similar mechanism of structural relaxation, originating from the interplay of cluster geometry and bond order - bond length correlation, is also the cause of the destabilization of icosahedral structures in pure Pt and Au clusters . In these clusters, the compressed inner atoms of the icosahedra can relax because of the formation of rosette structures at vertices in the outer layer.

  19. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  20. The structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  1. Fundamentals of metal oxide catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Hari

    The properties of metal oxide catalysts and hence, catalytic activity are highly dependent on the composition and structure of these oxides. This dissertation has 3 parts -- all directed towards understanding relationships between structure, composition and activity in metal oxide catalysts. The first part of this dissertation focuses on supported metal oxide catalysts of tungsten, vanadium and molybdenum. Mechanisms are proposed for ethanol oxidative dehydrogenation which is used to probe the acidity and reducibility of these oxide catalysts. These studies are then used to develop a novel method to quantify active redox sites and determine the nature of the active site on these catalysts -- our results show that the intrinsic redox turn-over frequency is independent of the nature of the metal oxide and its loading and that the actual rate obtained over an oxide is only a function of the number of removable oxygen atoms linking the metal to the support. The extension of Ultraviolet-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) to the study of active oxide domains in binary oxide catalysts is demonstrated for distinguishing between interacting and non-interacting domains in binary MoO x-WOx catalysts on alumina. We show also how the rigorous analysis of pre-edge features, absorption white-line intensity and the full width at half maximum of the white-line in X-ray Absorption Spectra provide determinants for metal atom coordination and domain size in supported metal oxide catalysts. The second part of this work looks at effects of structure variations on the activity of polyoxometalate catalysts that are promising for the production of Methacrylic Acid from Isobutane. The use of these catalysts is limited by structural changes that impact their performance -- an "activation" period is required before the catalysts become active for methacrylic acid production and structural changes also lead to degradation of the catalyst, which are also seen during thermal

  2. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis at a Low Pressure on Subnanometer Cobalt Oxide Clusters: The Effect of Cluster Size and Support on Activity and Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E.; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-05-21

    In this study, the catalytic activity and changes in the oxidation state during the Fischer Tropsch (FT) reaction was investigated on subnanometer size-selected cobalt clusters deposited on oxide (Al2O3, MgO) and carbon-based (ultrananocrystalline diamond UNCD) supports by temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) combined with in-situ grazing-incidence X-ray absorption characterization (GIXAS). The activity and selectivity of ultrasmall cobalt clusters exhibits a very strong dependence on cluster size and support. The evolution of the oxidation state of metal cluster during the reaction reveals that metal-support interaction plays a key role in the reaction.

  3. Metallicity Spreads in M31 Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Terry

    2003-07-01

    Our recent deep HST photometry of the M31 halo globular cluster {GC} Mayall II, also called G1, has revealed a red-giant branch with a clear spread that we attribute to an intrinsic metallicity dispersion of at least 0.4 dex in [Fe/H]. The only other GC exhibiting such a metallicity dispersion is Omega Centauri, the brightest and most massive Galactic GC, whose range in [Fe/H] is about 0.5 dex. These observations are obviously linked to the fact that both G1 and Omega Cen are bright and massive GC, with potential wells deep enough to keep part of their gas, which might have been recycled, producing a metallicity scatter among cluster stars. These observations dramatically challenge the notion of chemical homogeneity as a defining characteristic of GCs. It is critically important to find out how common this phenomenon is and how it can constrain scenarios/models of GC formation. The obvious targets are other bright and massive GCs, which exist in M31 but not in our Galaxy where Omega Cen is an isolated giant. We propose to acquire, with ACS/HRC, deep imaging of 3 of the brightest M31 GCs for which we have observed velocity dispersion values similar to those observed in G1 and Omega Cen. A sample of GCs with chemical abundance dispersions will provide essential information about their formation mechanism. This would represent a major step for the studies of the origin and evolution of stellar populations.

  4. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, G.

    2014-01-01

    , but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer...... islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous...

  5. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  6. Making A Noble-Metal-On-Metal-Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Davis, Patricia P.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1989-01-01

    Catalyst exhibits superior performance in oxidation of CO in CO2 lasers. Two-step process developed for preparing platinum- or palladium-on-tin-oxide catalyst for recombination of CO and O2, decomposition products that occur in high-voltage discharge region of closed-cycle CO2 laser. Process also applicable to other noble-metal/metal-oxide combinations.

  7. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  8. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Mendoza, Daniel [Santa Fe, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Titanium-Oxide Host Clusters with Exchangeable Guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanyun; Li, Wenyun; Liu, Caiyun; Jia, Jiong; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2018-01-10

    A novel family of water-soluble, polyoxocationic titanium-oxide host-guest clusters are reported herein. They exhibit an unprecedented hexagonal prismatic core structure for hosting univalent cationic guests like K + , Rb + , Cs + and H 3 O + . Guest exchange has been studied using 133 Cs NMR, showing the flexible pore of a host permits passage of a comparatively larger cation and giving an equilibrium constant of ca. 13 for displacing Rb + by Cs + . Attractive ion-dipole interaction, depending on host-guest size complementarity, plays a dominant role for the preferential encapsulation of larger alkali-metal cationic guests.

  10. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  11. An efficient laser vaporization source for chemically modified metal clusters characterized by thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Tsugunosuke; Eckhard, Jan F.; Lange, Kathrin; Visser, Bradley; Tschurl, Martin; Heiz, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    A laser vaporization cluster source that has a room for cluster aggregation and a reactor volume, each equipped with a pulsed valve, is presented for the efficient gas-phase production of chemically modified metal clusters. The performance of the cluster source is evaluated through the production of Ta and Ta oxide cluster cations, TaxOy+ (y ≥ 0). It is demonstrated that the cluster source produces TaxOy+ over a wide mass range, the metal-to-oxygen ratio of which can easily be controlled by changing the pulse duration that influences the amount of reactant O2 introduced into the cluster source. Reaction kinetic modeling shows that the generation of the oxides takes place under thermalized conditions at less than 300 K, whereas metal cluster cores are presumably created with excess heat. These characteristics are also advantageous to yield "reaction intermediates" of interest via reactions between clusters and reactive molecules in the cluster source, which may subsequently be mass selected for their reactivity measurements.

  12. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  13. Unidirectional suppression of hydrogen oxidation on oxidized platinum clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Hang; Xing, Jun; Chen, Zong Jia; Li, Zhen; Tian, Feng; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Solar-driven water splitting to produce hydrogen may be an ideal solution for global energy and environment issues. Among the various photocatalytic systems, platinum has been widely used to co-catalyse the reduction of protons in water for hydrogen evolution. However, the undesirable hydrogen oxidation reaction can also be readily catalysed by metallic platinum, which limits the solar energy conversion efficiency in artificial photosynthesis. Here we report that the unidirectional suppression of hydrogen oxidation in photocatalytic water splitting can be fulfilled by controlling the valence state of platinum; this platinum-based cocatalyst in a higher oxidation state can act as an efficient hydrogen evolution site while suppressing the undesirable hydrogen back-oxidation. The findings in this work may pave the way for developing other high-efficientcy platinum-based catalysts for photocatalysis, photoelectrochemistry, fuel cells and water-gas shift reactions.

  14. Aerobic Oxidations of Light Alkanes over Solid Metal Oxide Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joseph T; Venegas, Juan M; McDermott, William P; Hermans, Ive

    2017-11-07

    Heterogeneous metal oxide catalysts are widely studied for the aerobic oxidations of C 1 -C 4 alkanes to form olefins and oxygenates. In this review, we outline the properties of supported metal oxides, mixed-metal oxides, and zeolites and detail their most common applications as catalysts for partial oxidations of light alkanes. By doing this we establish similarities between different classes of metal oxides and identify common themes in reaction mechanisms and research strategies for catalyst improvement. For example, almost all partial alkane oxidations, regardless of the metal oxide, follow Mars-van Krevelen reaction kinetics, which utilize lattice oxygen atoms to reoxidize the reduced metal centers while the gaseous O 2 reactant replenishes these lattice oxygen vacancies. Many of the most-promising metal oxide catalysts include V 5+ surface species as a necessary constituent to convert the alkane. Transformations involving sequential oxidation steps (i.e., propane to acrylic acid) require specific reaction sites for each oxidation step and benefit from site isolation provided by spectator species. These themes, and others, are discussed in the text.

  15. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-29

    soluble oxides that relations like eq. (3) are significant. The oxides of several metal oxides have been found to be amphoteric , i.e., their solution...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR

  16. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  17. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  18. Supported sub-nanometer Ta oxide clusters as model catalysts for the selective epoxidation of cyclooctene

    KAUST Repository

    Zwaschka, Gregor

    2018-01-22

    The preparation of organic ligands-free, isolated tantalum oxide atoms (Ta1) and small clusters (Tan>1) on flat silicate supports was accomplished by ultra-high vacuum (UHV) techniques followed by oxidation in air. The resulting surface complexes were thoroughly characterized and tested as supported catalysts for the epoxidation of cycloalkenes. The observed catalytic performance highlights the potential of the applied method for the production of active catalysts and the study of well-defined, ligand-free metal oxide moieties.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets

  20. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  1. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  2. Thermodynamics of Pore Filling Metal Clusters in Metal Organic Frameworks: Pd in UiO-66

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have experimentally been demonstrated to be capable of supporting isolated transition-metal clusters, but the stability of these clusters with respect to aggregation is unclear. In this letter we use a genetic algorithm together with density functional theory...... calculations to predict the structure of Pd clusters in UiO-66. The cluster sizes examined are far larger than those in any previous modeling studies of metal clusters in MOFs and allow us to test the hypothesis that the physically separated cavities in UiO-66 could stabilize isolated Pd clusters. Our...

  3. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  4. Self-assembly of a tetrahedral 58-nuclear barium vanadium oxide cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Katharina; Puscher, Bianka; Streb, Carsten

    2013-01-07

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a molecular barium vanadium oxide cluster featuring high nuclearity and high symmetry. The tetrameric, 2.3 nm cluster H(5)[Ba(10)(NMP)(14)(H(2)O)(8)[V(12)O(33)](4)Br] is based on a bromide-centred, octahedral barium scaffold which is capped by four previously unknown [V(12)O(33)](6-) clusters in a tetrahedral fashion. The compound represents the largest polyoxovanadate-based heterometallic cluster known to date. The cluster is formed in organic solution and it is suggested that the bulky N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent ligands allow the isolation of this giant molecule and prevent further condensation to a solid-state metal oxide. The cluster is fully characterized using single-crystal XRD, elemental analysis, ESI mass spectrometry and other spectroscopic techniques.

  5. LCAO-Xα calculations of transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, G.; Eschrig, H.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of some transition metal clusters (V 6 , Cr 6 , Cu 6 , Ag 6 ) is studied by an approximate LCAO-Xα scheme. Energy level spectra are discussed with respect to other theoretical investigations. The density-of-states curves are represented and compared with those from band-structure calculations. The correlation between binding energies of clusters and the corresponding cohesive energies of the bulk material is shown. Furthermore, the binding energies in copper clusters versus cluster size are discussed. Finally, some experimental results according beams of copper clusters and ESR studies of matrix isolated copper clusters are explained briefly. (author)

  6. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Benedetti, M.F.; Ponthieu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to

  7. PREPARATION OF METAL OXIDE POWDERS FROM METAL LOADED VERSATIC ACID

    OpenAIRE

    KAKIHATA, Takayuki; USAMI, Kensuke; YAMAMOTO, Hideki; SHIBATA, Junji

    1998-01-01

    A production process for metal oxide powders was developed using a solvent extraction method. Versatic Acid 10 and D2EHPA solutions containing copper, zinc and nickel were used for a precipitation-stripping process, where oxalic acid was added to the solution as a precipitation reagent.Copper, zinc and nickel oxalates were easily formed in an aqueous phase, and 99.9% of precipitation was obtained for each metal during this process. These metal oxalates were easily converted to metal oxides by...

  8. Samarium Doped Cerium Oxide Clusters: a Study on the Modulation of Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Josey E.; Kafader, Jared O.; Marrero-Colon, Vicmarie; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Cerium oxide is known for its use in solid oxide fuel cells due to its high ionic conductivity. The doping of trivalent samarium atoms into cerium oxide is known to enhance the ionic conductivity through the generation of additional oxygen vacancies. This study probes the electronic structure of Sm_{x}Ce_{y}O_{z} (x+y=3, z=2-4) anion and neutral clusters. Anion photoelectron spectra of these mixed metal clusters exhibit additional spectral features not present in the previously studied cerium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations have been used to aid interpretation of collected spectra. The results of this work can be used to inform the design of materials used for solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. Mesoporous metal oxides and processes for preparation thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suib, Steven L.; Poyraz, Altug Suleyman

    2018-03-06

    A process for preparing a mesoporous metal oxide, i.e., transition metal oxide. Lanthanide metal oxide, a post-transition metal oxide and metalloid oxide. The process comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to form the mesoporous metal oxide. A mesoporous metal oxide prepared by the above process. A method of controlling nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in mesoporous metal oxides. The method comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to control nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in the mesoporous metal oxides. Mesoporous metal oxides and a method of tuning structural properties of mesoporous metal oxides.

  10. METALS IN THE ICM: WITNESSES OF CLUSTER FORMATION AND EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Lovisari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The baryonic composition of galaxy clusters and groups is dominated by a hot, X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM. The mean metallicity of the ICM has been found to be roughly 0.3 ÷ 0.5 times the solar value, therefore a large fraction of this gas cannot be of purely primordial origin. Indeed, the distribution and amount of metals in the ICM is a direct consequence of the past history of star formation in the cluster galaxies and of the processes responsible for the injection of enriched material into the ICM. We here shortly summarize the current views on the chemical enrichment, focusing on the observational evidence in terms of metallicity measurements in clusters, spatial metallicity distribution and evolution, and expectations from future missions.

  11. Catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Jesper J H B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328235601; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323171958; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2014-01-01

    A study is conducted to demonstrate catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides. The study provides a complete overview of the materials used to catalyze this reaction, as dehydrogenation for the production of light olefins has become extremely relevant. Relevant factors,

  12. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2, manganese dioxide (MnO2, nickel oxides (NiO and cobalt oxide (Co3O4, have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4, and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors.

  13. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2016-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses the issues of sensitivity, concentration, and temperature dependency as well as the response and recovery times crucial for sensors. He also presents techniques for synthesizing different metal oxides, particularly those with nanodimensional structures. The text goes on to highlight the gas sensing properties of many nanostructured metal oxides, from aluminum and cerium to iron and titanium to zinc and zirconium. The final...

  14. Electrochemical analysis of metal oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grygar, Tomáš; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Pikna, L.

    90-91, - (2003), s. 45-50 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : powder electroanalysis * Fe oxides * Mn oxides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2003

  15. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  16. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  17. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  18. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy ...

  19. Oxidation behaviour of metallic glass foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, B.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)], E-mail: bbarnard@utk.edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); Demetriou, M.D.; Johnson, W.L. [Department of Materials Science, Keck Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the effects of porosity on the oxidation behaviour of bulk-metallic glasses were investigated. Porous Pd- and Fe-based bulk-metallic glass (BMG) foams and Metglas ribbons were studied. Oxidizing experiments were conducted at 70 deg. C, and around 80 deg. C below glass-transition temperatures, (T{sub g}s). Scanning-electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) studies revealed little evidence of oxidation at 70 deg. C. Specimens exhibited greater oxidation at T{sub g} - 80 deg. C. Oxides were copper-based for Pd-based foams, Fe-, Cr-, and Mo-based for Fe-based foams, and Co-based with borosilicates likely for the Metglas. Pd-based foams demonstrated the best oxidation resistance, followed by Metglas ribbons, followed by Fe-based foams.

  20. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyzed by Noble Metal Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly-efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR have been extensively investigated for the development of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. The state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts suffer from high price, limited accessibility of Pt, sluggish reaction kinetics, as well as undesirable long-term durability. Engineering ultra-small noble metal clusters with high surface-to-volume ratios and robust stabilities for ORR represents a new avenue. After a simple introduction regarding the significance of ORR and the recent development of noble metal clusters, the general ORR mechanism in both acidic and basic media is firstly discussed. Subsequently, we will summarize the recent efforts employing Pt, Au, Ag, Pd and Ru clusters, as well as the alloyed bi-metallic clusters for acquiring highly efficient catalysts to enhance both the activity and stability of ORR. Molecular noble metal clusters with definitive composition to reveal the relevant ORR mechanism will be particularly highlighted. Finally, the current challenges, the future outlook, as well as the perspectives in this booming field will be proposed, featuring the great opportunities and potentials to engineering noble metal clusters as highly-efficient and durable cathodic catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  1. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemp, J.; Gerstl, S.S.A.; Löffler, J.F.; Schönfeld, B.

    2016-01-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3 nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different – as yet unknown – physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. - Highlights: • Field evaporation of metallic glasses is heterogeneous on a scale of up to 3 nm. • Amount of clustered evaporation depends on ion species and temperature. • Length scales of clustered evaporation and correlative evaporation are similar.

  2. PLUTONIUM METAL: OXIDATION CONSIDERATIONS AND APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estochen, E.

    2013-03-20

    Plutonium is arguably the most unique of all metals when considered in the combined context of metallurgical, chemical, and nuclear behavior. Much of the research in understanding behavior and characteristics of plutonium materials has its genesis in work associated with nuclear weapons systems. However, with the advent of applications in fuel materials, the focus in plutonium science has been more towards nuclear fuel applications, as well as long term storage and disposition. The focus of discussion included herein is related to preparing plutonium materials to meet goals consistent with non-proliferation. More specifically, the emphasis is on the treatment of legacy plutonium, in primarily metallic form, and safe handling, packaging, and transport to meet non-proliferation goals of safe/secure storage. Elevated temperature oxidation of plutonium metal is the treatment of choice, due to extensive experiential data related to the method, as the oxide form of plutonium is one of only a few compounds that is relatively simple to produce, and stable over a large temperature range. Despite the simplicity of the steps required to oxidize plutonium metal, it is important to understand the behavior of plutonium to ensure that oxidation is conducted in a safe and effective manner. It is important to understand the effect of changes in environmental variables on the oxidation characteristics of plutonium. The primary purpose of this report is to present a brief summary of information related to plutonium metal attributes, behavior, methods for conversion to oxide, and the ancillary considerations related to processing and facility safety. The information provided is based on data available in the public domain and from experience in oxidation of such materials at various facilities in the United States. The report is provided as a general reference for implementation of a simple and safe plutonium metal oxidation technique.

  3. Method of making spherical metallic oxide and metallic carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for making spherical metallic oxide and metallic carbide particles, especially particles consisting of fuel or breeder material such as oxide or carbide compounds of uranium, plutonium, thorium and the like with a diameter of from 0.1 to 1.5 millimeters, according to which an aqueous solution of a metallic nitrate or a metallic chloride or a mixture of metallic nitrates or metallic chlorides in which the metallic ions and anions are in a stoichiometric ratio to each other, is added dropwise to an organic phase. The method is characterized primarily in that the drops formed from the aqueous solution after congealing are washed in an aqueous solution containing ammonia and from 0.001 percent to 0.1 percent of a non-ionic surface active agent, especially an ethylene oxide condensate, enveloping the particles and preventing them from clumping during the following drying step. The hardened particles are dried in an air current having a temperature of from 150 to 300 0 C and an atmospheric moisture content corresponding to the degree of saturation of the air at a temperature of about from 20 to 50 0 C, and sintered at about 1300 0 C

  4. Metal nanostructures: from clusters to nanocatalysis and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    The properties of metal clusters and nanostructures composed of them are reviewed. Various existing methods for the generation of intense beams of metal clusters and their subsequent conversion into nanostructures are compared. Processes of the flow of a buffer gas with active molecules through a nanostructure are analyzed as a basis of using nanostructures for catalytic applications. The propagation of an electric signal through a nanostructure is studied by analogy with a macroscopic metal. An analysis is given of how a nanostructure changes its resistance as active molecules attach to its surface and are converted into negative ions. These negative ions induce the formation of positively charged vacancies inside the metal conductor and attract the vacancies to together change the resistance of the metal nanostructure. The physical basis is considered for using metal clusters and nanostructures composed of them to create new materials in the form of a porous metal film on the surface of an object. The fundamentals of nanocatalysis are reviewed. Semiconductor conductometric sensors consisting of bound nanoscale grains or fibers acting as a conductor are compared with metal sensors conducting via a percolation cluster, a fractal fiber, or a bunch of interwoven nanofibers formed in superfluid helium. It is shown that sensors on the basis of metal nanostructures are characterized by a higher sensitivity than semiconductor ones, but are not selective. Measurements using metal sensors involve two stages, one of which measures to high precision the attachment rate of active molecules to the sensor conductor, and in the other one the surface of metal nanostructures is cleaned from the attached molecules using a gas discharge plasma (in particular, capillary discharge) with a subsequent chromatography analysis for products of cleaning.

  5. Oxidation-Mediated Fingering in Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Hight, David C.; O'Regan, John D.; Dickey, Michael D.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2017-10-01

    We identify and characterize a new class of fingering instabilities in liquid metals; these instabilities are unexpected due to the large interfacial tension of metals. Electrochemical oxidation lowers the effective interfacial tension of a gallium-based liquid metal alloy to values approaching zero, thereby inducing drastic shape changes, including the formation of fractals. The measured fractal dimension (D =1.3 ±0.05 ) places the instability in a different universality class than other fingering instabilities. By characterizing changes in morphology and dynamics as a function of droplet volume and applied electric potential, we identify the three main forces involved in this process: interfacial tension, gravity, and oxidative stress. Importantly, we find that electrochemical oxidation can generate compressive interfacial forces that oppose the tensile forces at a liquid interface. The surface oxide layer ultimately provides a physical and electrochemical barrier that halts the instabilities at larger positive potentials. Controlling the competition between interfacial tension and oxidative (compressive) stresses at the interface is important for the development of reconfigurable electronic, electromagnetic, and optical devices that take advantage of the metallic properties of liquid metals.

  6. Supported Dendrimer-Encapsulated Metal Clusters: Toward Heterogenizing Homogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Deraedt, Christophe V; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2017-08-15

    Recyclable catalysts, especially those that display selective reactivity, are vital for the development of sustainable chemical processes. Among available catalyst platforms, heterogeneous catalysts are particularly well-disposed toward separation from the reaction mixture via filtration methods, which renders them readily recyclable. Furthermore, heterogeneous catalysts offer numerous handles-some without homogeneous analogues-for performance and selectivity optimization. These handles include nanoparticle size, pore profile of porous supports, surface ligands and interface with oxide supports, and flow rate through a solid catalyst bed. Despite these available handles, however, conventional heterogeneous catalysts are themselves often structurally heterogeneous compared to homogeneous catalysts, which complicates efforts to optimize and expand the scope of their reactivity and selectivity. Ongoing efforts in our laboratories are aimed to address the above challenge by heterogenizing homogeneous catalysts, which can be defined as the modification of homogeneous catalysts to render them in a separable (solid) phase from the starting materials and products. Specifically, we grow the small nanoclusters in dendrimers, a class of uniform polymers with the connectivity of fractal trees and generally radial symmetry. Thanks to their dense multivalency, shape persistence, and structural uniformity, dendrimers have proven to be versatile scaffolds for the synthesis and stabilization of small nanoclusters. Then these dendrimer-encapsulated metal clusters (DEMCs) are adsorbed onto mesoporous silica. Through this method, we have achieved selective transformations that had been challenging to accomplish in a heterogeneous setting, e.g., π-bond activation and aldol reactions. Extensive investigation into the catalytic systems under reaction conditions allowed us to correlate the structural features (e.g., oxidation states) of the catalysts and their activity. Moreover, we have

  7. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  8. Nanopowder Metal Oxide for Photoluminescent Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyrovetsky, V. M.; Popovych, D. I.; Savka, S. S.; Serednytski, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO, TiO2, WO3, SnO2) with average diameters of 40-60 nm were analyzed by room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of gas environment (O2, N2, H2, CO, CO2) on the emission intensity was investigated for metal oxide nanopowders with surface doped by impurities (Pt, Ag, Au, Sn, Ni or Cu). Established physicochemical regularities of modification of surface electronic states of initial and doped nanopowders during gas adsorption. The nature of metal oxide nanopowder gas-sensing properties (adsorption capacity, sensitivity, selectivity) has been established and the design and optimal materials for the construction of the multi-component sensing matrix have been selected.

  9. Nanopowder Metal Oxide for Photoluminescent Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Zhyrovetsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO, TiO2, WO3, SnO2 with average diameters of 40–60 nm were analyzed by room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of gas environment (O2, N2, H2, CO, CO2 on the emission intensity was investigated for metal oxide nanopowders with surface doped by impurities (Pt, Ag, Au, Sn, Ni or Cu. Established physicochemical regularities of modification of surface electronic states of initial and doped nanopowders during gas adsorption. The nature of metal oxide nanopowder gas-sensing properties (adsorption capacity, sensitivity, selectivity has been established and the design and optimal materials for the construction of the multi-component sensing matrix have been selected.

  10. Surface Embedded Metal Oxide Sensors (SEMOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Talat Ali, Syed; Pleth Nielsen, Lars

    is the second and main part of the project. The main challenges in developing metal oxide sensors are proper choice of the material, sensor location and fabrication technique due to lifetime and cross sensitivity issues in harsh environment where the problems like de-bonding or some kind of diffusion......SEMOS is a joint project between Aalborg University, Danish Technological Institute and Danish Technical University in which micro temperature sensors and metal oxide-based gas sensors are developed and tested in a simulated fuel cell environment as well as in actual working fuel cells. Initially...... complex and sensors are not easily implemented in the construction. Hence sensor interface and sensor position must therefore be chosen carefully in order to make the sensors as non-intrusive as possible. Metal Oxide Sensors (MOX) for measuring H2, O2 and CO concentration in a fuel cell environment...

  11. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarata, Antonio, E-mail: cammaant@fel.cvut.cz [Department of Control Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 16627 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-05-23

    CaFeO{sub 3} is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO{sub 3}. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  12. Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Hydrogels Containing Metal Ions and Metals/Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazli Wahid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has caused a serious health problem. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial materials to prevent or control infections caused by these pathogens. Polymer-based nanocomposite hydrogels are versatile materials as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents. Cross-linking of polymeric materials by metal ions or the combination of polymeric hydrogels with nanoparticles (metals and metal oxide is a simple and effective approach for obtaining a multicomponent system with diverse functionalities. Several metals and metal oxides such as silver (Ag, gold (Au, zinc oxide (ZnO, copper oxide (CuO, titanium dioxide (TiO2 and magnesium oxide (MgO have been loaded into hydrogels for antimicrobial applications. The incorporation of metals and metal oxide nanoparticles into hydrogels not only enhances the antimicrobial activity of hydrogels, but also improve their mechanical characteristics. Herein, we summarize recent advances in hydrogels containing metal ions, metals and metal oxide nanoparticles with potential antimicrobial properties.

  13. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. (CERHYD, Algiers (Algeria))

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Subnanometer to nanometer transition metal CO oxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Yasumatsu, Hisato

    2017-12-26

    The present invention provides a catalyst defined in part by a conductive substrate; a film overlaying a surface of the substrate; and a plurality of metal clusters supported by the layer, wherein each cluster comprises between 8 and 11 atoms. Further provided is a catalyst defined in part by a conductive substrate; a layer overlaying a surface of the substrate; and a plurality of metal clusters supported by the layer, wherein each cluster comprises at least two metals.

  15. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  16. Structural evolution, growth and stability of metal titanium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Hasani; Phaahla, Tshegofatso; Ngoepe, Phuti; Catlow, Richard

    The transition metals clusters such as titanium have received a significant attention due to their excellent physical and chemical properties and great technological application in many fields. A survey of small Ti clusters was performed using interatomic potentials and computational methods based on density functional theory; and the knowledge led master code with a genetic algorithm to generate the lowest energy geometries of Tin (n = 2-32) clusters. The all electron spin-unpolarized generalized gradient approximation is used to determine the ground state structures, binding energy and electronic properties. The structural evolution of titanium clusters, which favors the icosahedron structure growth pattern is observed. The energy for the ground state configurations is found to increase monotonically with the clusters size. Their relative stability results predict clusters with 5 and 7 as more stable. The energy difference for clusters n >=24 is very small, suggesting that the larger clusters could be stable at moderate temperatures. In addition to the magic numbers that are often reported i.e. Ti7 and Ti13; clusters 5, 9, 14, 17 and 26 have extra stability.

  17. Magnetic anisotropy of deposited transition metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, S.; Minár, J.; Staunton, J. B.; Honolka, J.; Enders, A.; Kern, K.; Ebert, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present results of magnetic torque calculations using the fully relativistic spin-polarized Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker approach applied to small Co and Fe clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface. From the magnetic torque one can derive amongst others the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE). It was found that this approach is numerically much more stable and also computationally less demanding than using the magnetic force theorem that allows to calculate the MAE directly. Although structural relaxation effects were not included our results correspond reasonably well to recent experimental data.

  18. Metal oxide electrocatalysts for alternative energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquette, Adele Lawren

    This dissertation focuses on the development of metal oxide electrocatalysts with varying applications for alternative energy technologies. Interest in utilizing clean, renewable and sustainable sources of energy for powering the planet in the future has received much attention. This will address the growing concern of the need to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. The facile synthesis of metal oxides from earth abundant metals was explored in this work. The electrocatalysts can be incorporated into photoelectrochemical devices, fuel cells, and other energy storage devices. The first section addresses the utilization of semiconductors that can harness solar energy for water splitting to generate hydrogen. An oxysulfide was studied in order to combine the advantageous properties of the stability of metal oxides and the visible light absorbance of metal chalcogenides. Bi 2O2S was synthesized under facile hydrothermal conditions. The band gap of Bi2O2S was smaller than that of its oxide counterpart, Bi2O3. Light absorption by Bi 2O2S was extended to the visible region (>600 nm) in comparison to Bi2O3. The formation of a composite with In 2O3 was formed in order to create a UV irradiation protective coating of the Bi2O2S. The Bi2O2S/In 2O3 composite coupled with a dye CrTPP(Cl) and cocatalysts Pt and Co3O4 was utilized for water splitting under light irradiation to generate hydrogen and oxygen. The second section focuses on improving the stability and light absorption of semiconductors by changing the shapes and morphologies. One of the limitations of semiconductor materials is that recombination of electron-hole pairs occur within the bulk of the materials instead of migration to the surface. Three-dimensional shapes, such as nanorods, can prevent this recombination in comparison to spherical particles. Hierarchical structures, such as dendrites, cubes, and multipods, were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, in order to reduce recombination and improve

  19. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  20. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31. II. OLD CLUSTER METALLICITIES AND AGES FROM HECTOSPEC DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Rose, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise spectroscopic data on the M31 globular cluster (GC) system, obtained with the Hectospec multifiber spectrograph on the 6.5 m MMT. More than 300 clusters have been observed at a resolution of 5 A and with a median S/N of 75 per A, providing velocities with a median uncertainty of 6 km s -1 . The primary focus of this paper is the determination of mean cluster metallicities, ages, and reddenings. Metallicities were estimated using a calibration of Lick indices with [Fe/H] provided by Galactic GCs. These match well the metallicities of 24 M31 clusters determined from Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams, the differences having an rms of 0.2 dex. The metallicity distribution is not generally bimodal, in strong distinction with the bimodal Galactic globular distribution. Rather, the M31 distribution shows a broad peak, centered at [Fe/H] = -1, possibly with minor peaks at [Fe/H] = -1.4, -0.7, and -0.2, suggesting that the cluster systems of M31 and the Milky Way had different formation histories. Ages for clusters with [Fe/H] > - 1 were determined using the automatic stellar population analysis program EZ A ges. We find no evidence for massive clusters in M31 with intermediate ages, those between 2 and 6 Gyr. Moreover, we find that the mean ages of the old GCs are remarkably constant over about a decade in metallicity (-0.95∼< [Fe/H] ∼<0.0).

  1. Improved description of metal oxide stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Thomas Stenbæk; Olsen, Thomas; Bligaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    transition-metal oxides. The mean absolute error relative to experiments is 0.21 eV and 0.38 eV per oxygen atom for rAPBE and RPA, respectively, and thus the rAPBE method greatly improves the description of metal-oxygen bonds across a wide range of oxides. The failure of the RPA can be partly attributed......The renormalized adiabatic PBE (rAPBE) method has recently been shown to comprise a significant improvement over the random phase approximation (RPA) for total energy calculations of simple solids and molecules. Here we consider the formation energies of 19 group I and II metal oxides and a few...... to the lack of error cancellation between the correlation energy of the oxide on the one hand and the bulk metal and oxygen molecule on the other hand, which are all separately predicted much too negative by the RPA. We ascribe the improved performance of the rAPBE to its significantly better description...

  2. Metal Oxide Vertical Graphene Hybrid Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A metal oxide vertical graphene hybrid supercapacitor is provided. The supercapacitor includes a pair of collectors facing each other, and vertical graphene electrode material grown directly on each of the pair of collectors without catalyst or binders. A separator may separate the vertical graphene electrode materials.

  3. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Flexible macrocycles as versatile supports for catalytically active metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, JD; Gagnon, KJ; Teat, SJ; McIntosh, RD

    2016-02-12

    Here we present three structurally diverse clusters stabilised by the same macrocyclic polyphenol; t-butylcalix[8]arene. This work demonstrates the range of conformations the flexible ligand is capable of adopting, highlighting its versatility in metal coordination. In addition, a Ti complex displays activity for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactide

  5. Two-phonon states in alkali-metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abada, A.; Vautherin, D.

    1992-12-01

    Two phonon-states of alkali-metal clusters (treated as jellium spheres) are calculated by using a method based on a perturbative construction of periodic orbits of the time-dependent mean-field equations. Collective vibrations with various multipolarities in charged Na 21 + are considered. (author) 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  7. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    2016-01-01

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochem...

  8. The metallicity of the open cluster Tombaugh 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, S.; Randich, S.; Geisler, D.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are excellent tracers of the structure, kinematics, and chemical evolution of the disk and a wealth of information can be derived from the spectra of their constituent stars. Aims: We investigate the nature of the chemical composition of the outer disk open cluster Tombaugh 2. This has been suggested to be a member of the GASS/Mon substructure, and a recent study by Frinchaboy et al. (2008) suggested that this was a unique open cluster in possessing an intrinsic metal abundance dispersion. We aim to investigate such claims. Methods: High resolution VLT+GIRAFFE spectra in the optical are obtained and analyzed for a number of stars in the Tombaugh 2 field, together with independent UBVIC photometry. Radial velocities and position in the color-magnitude diagram are used to assess cluster membership. The spectra, together with input atmospheric parameters and model atmospheres, are used to determine detailed chemical abundances for a variety of elements in 13 members with good spectra. Results: We find the mean metallicity to be [Fe/H] = -0.31 ± 0.02 with no evidence for an intrinsic abundance dispersion, in contrary to the recent results of Frinchaboy et al. (2008, MNRAS, 391, 39). We find Ca and Ba to be slightly enhanced, while Ni and Sc are solar. The r-process element Eu was found to be enhanced, giving an average [Eu/Ba] = +0.17. The Li abundance decreases with Teff on the upper giant branch and maintains a low level for red clump stars. The mean metallicity we derive agrees well with that expected from the radial abundance gradient in the disk for a cluster at its Galactocentric distance. Conclusions: Tombaugh 2 is found to have abundances as expected from its Galactocentric distance and no evidence for any intrinsic metallicity dispersion. The surprising result found by Frinchaboy et al. (2008), which is the presence of two distinct abundance groups within the cluster, implying either a completely unique open cluster with an intrinsic

  9. Local Oxidation Nanolithography on Metallic Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pinilla-Cienfuegos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of atomically-thin layers of two dimensional (2D materials in nanodevices demands for precise techniques at the nanoscale permitting their local modification, structuration or resettlement. Here, we present the use of Local Oxidation Nanolithography (LON performed with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM for the patterning of nanometric motifs on different metallic Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (TMDCs. We show the results of a systematic study of the parameters that affect the LON process as well as the use of two different modes of lithographic operation: dynamic and static. The application of this kind of lithography in different types of TMDCs demonstrates the versatility of the LON for the creation of accurate and reproducible nanopatterns in exfoliated 2D-crystals and reveals the influence of the chemical composition and crystalline structure of the systems on the morphology of the resultant oxide motifs.

  10. Preparation of oxide materials from metal alkoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turevskaya, E.P.; Turova, N.Ya.; Yanovskaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies on the sol-gel technologies on the basis of alkoxides are presented. The synthesis and properties of titanates zirconates, niobates, tantalates, vanadates and solid solutions on the basis of Mo, W and Bi oxides, iron oxides and high-temperature superconductors are presented. The most important aspects, determining the choice of optimal conditions for preparation of oxides of concrete compositions with required properties are pointed out. Accomplishment of the whole chain of studies made it possible to synthesize a broad range of metal alkoxides and study their properties and also carry out large-scale studies on preparation of various oxides and materials on the basis thereof, using the source base of the sol-gel method [ru

  11. 40 CFR 721.5549 - Lithiated metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithiated metal oxide. 721.5549... Substances § 721.5549 Lithiated metal oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithiated metal oxide (LiNiO2) (PMN P-96-19...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN P-98-0002...

  13. Polymorphism Control in Nanostructured Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Shantanu

    Polymorphic phase transformations are common to all nanocrystalline binary metal oxides. The polymorphic nature of such metal oxides makes available a large number of phases with differing crystal structures, each stable under certain conditions of temperature, pressure, and/or particle size. These different crystal structures translate to unique physical and chemical properties for each structural class of polymorphs. Thus predicting when polymorphic phase transitions are likely to occur becomes important to the synthesis of stable functional materials with desired properties. Theoretical calculations using a heuristic approach have resulted in an accurate estimation of the critical particle size predicting metastable to stable phase transitions. This formula is applied to different case studies: for anatase to rutile titania; gamma-Alumina to alpha-Alumina; and tetragonal to monoclinic zirconia. The theoretical values calculated have been seen to be very close to the experimental results from the literature. Manifestation of the effect of phase transitions in nanostructured metal oxides was provided in the study of metastable to stable phase transitions in WO3. Nanowires of tungsten trioxide have been synthesized in-situ inside an electron microscope. Such structure of tungsten trioxide result due to a metastable to stable phase transformation, from the cubic to the monoclinic phase. The transformation is massive and complete. The structures formed are unique one-dimensional nanowires. Such a method can be scaled inside any equipment equipped with an electron gun, for example lithography systems either using STEM or E-beam lithography. Another study on nanowire formation in binary metal oxides involved the synthesis of stable orthorhombic MoO3 by means of blend electrospinning. Both a traditional single jet electrospinning set up and a novel high-throughput process to get high aspect ratio nanowires. The latter is a jet-controlled and flow controlled

  14. Metal and Metal Oxide Interactions and Their Catalytic Consequences for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qingying; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Li, Jingkun; Liang, Wentao; Meng, Guangnan [ULVAC Technologies, Inc., 401; Che, Haiying [Shanghai; Zhang, Shiming [Shanghai; Ma, Zi-Feng [Shanghai; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Many industrial catalysts are composed of metal particles supported on metal oxides (MMO). It is known that the catalytic activity of MMO materials is governed by metal and metal oxide interactions (MMOI), but how to optimize MMO systems via manipulation of MMOI remains unclear, due primarily to the ambiguous nature of MMOI. Herein, we develop a Pt/NbOx/C system with tunable structural and electronic properties via a modified arc plasma deposition method. We unravel the nature of MMOI by characterizing this system under reactive conditions utilizing combined electrochemical, microscopy, and in situ spectroscopy. We show that Pt interacts with the Nb in unsaturated NbOx owing to the oxygen deficiency in the MMO interface, whereas Pt interacts with the O in nearly saturated NbOx, and further interacts with Nb when the oxygen atoms penetrate into the Pt cluster at elevated potentials. While the Pt–Nb interactions do not benefit the inherent activity of Pt toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the Pt–O interactions improve the ORR activity by shortening the Pt–Pt bond distance. Pt donates electrons to NbOx in both Pt–Nb and Pt–O cases. The resultant electron efficiency stabilizes low-coordinated Pt sites, hereby stabilizing small Pt particles. This determines the two characteristic features of MMO systems: dispersion of small metal particles and high catalytic durability. These findings contribute to our understandings of MMO catalytic systems.

  15. Magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus for formation and deposition of size-selected metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The experimental setup utilizing a DC magnetron sputtering source for production of metal clusters, their size (mass) selection and following deposition in high vacuum is described. The source is capable to form clusters of various metals, for example, copper, silver, gold etc. Cluster size selec...... capability in formation of supported size-selected metal nanoparticles with controllable coverage for various practical applications.......The experimental setup utilizing a DC magnetron sputtering source for production of metal clusters, their size (mass) selection and following deposition in high vacuum is described. The source is capable to form clusters of various metals, for example, copper, silver, gold etc. Cluster size...

  16. Immersion of low-energy deposited metal clusters into poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popok, V. N.; Hanif, M.; Ceynowa, F. A.; Fojan, P.

    2017-10-01

    Immersion of size-selected metal clusters deposited on thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films is studied. Clusters are produced by magnetron sputtering and soft-landed on the polymer substrates. It is found that thermal annealing at temperatures above the polymer glass transition point facilitates embedment of the deposited nanoparticles (NPs) into PMMA. The immersion degree can be controlled by the annealing time. Together with the control of cluster coverage by tuning the deposition time, the described approach represents an efficient method for the formation of thin polymer composite layers with embedded size-selected metal NPs. In the case of silver, the composite films demonstrate excellent plasmonic properties. However, the thermal annealing is found to quench the plasmon resonance of copper NPs. It is suggested that oxidation under elevated temperatures is the most probable mechanism destroying the plasmonic properties of the copper NPs. A simple treatment method by ozone is proposed to form an oxide shell around the metal core, thus, protecting the core against environmental factors causing degradation of the plasmonic properties.

  17. Molecular metal clusters synthetized by a radiolytic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remita, H.; Derai, R.; Delcourt, M.O.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic reduction of metal ions in alcohols has been achieved under CO atmosphere. Under such conditions, metal reduction, ligation and aggregation processes compete, leading to metal complexes and molecular clusters. These products are interesting for catalytic purposes. We report here the radiolytic synthesis of compounds of Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Ir, Rh, Pt, Cu, Ag, and of some intermetallic compounds. These synthesis are carried out under very mild temperature and pressure conditions (i.e., room temperature and at most I atmosphere of CO). Factors favoring a high nuclearity are the concentration, the high atomic number, a weak ligand/metal ratio. It is shown that chloride ions are inhibitors of complete reduction [fr

  18. Electronic structures and water reactivity of mixed metal sulfide cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structures and chemical reactivity of the mixed metal sulfide cluster anion (MoWS4(-)) have been investigated with density functional theory. Our study reveals the presence of two almost isoenergetic structural isomers, both containing two bridging sulfur atoms in a quartet state. However, the arrangement of the terminal sulfur atoms is different in the two isomers. In one isomer, the two metals are in the same oxidation state (each attached to one terminal S). In the second isomer, the two metals are in different oxidation states (with W in the higher oxidation state attached to both terminal S). The reactivity of water with the two lowest energy isomers has also been studied, with an emphasis on pathways leading to H2 release. The reactive behavior of the two isomers is different though the overall barriers in both systems are small. The origin of the differences are analyzed and discussed. The reaction pathways and barriers are compared with the corresponding behavior of monometallic sulfides (Mo2S4(-) and W2S4(-)) as well as mixed metal oxides (MoWO4(-)).

  19. Magnetic Interactions in Transition-Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Solovyev, I. V.

    2003-01-01

    This a review article, which presents a general framework for the analysis of interatomic magnetic interactions in the spin-density-functional theory, which is based on the magnetic force theorem, make a link with the models for transition-metal oxides, and gives several examples of how this strategy can be used for the analysis of magnetic properties of colossal-magnetoresistive perovskite manganites, double perovskite and pyrochlore compounds.

  20. Catalysed electrolytic metal oxide dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical processes designed for recovering valuable metals from mineral ores as well as industrial wastes usually require preliminary dissolution of inorganic compounds in aqueous media before extraction and purification steps. Unfortunately, most of the minerals concerned hardly or slowly dissolve in acidic or basic solutions. Metallic oxides, sulfides and silicates are among the materials most difficult to dissolve in aqueous solutions. They are also among the main minerals containing valuable metals. The redox properties of such materials sometimes permit to improve their dissolution by adding oxidizing or reducing species to the leaching solution, which leads to an increase in the dissolution rate. Moreover, limited amounts of redox promoters are required if the redox agent is regenerated continuously thanks to an electrochemical device. Nuclear applications of such concepts have been suggested since the dissolution of many actinide compounds (e.g., UO 2 , AmO 2 , PuC, PuN,...) is mainly based on redox reactions. In the 1980s, improvements of the plutonium dioxide dissolution process have been proposed on the basis of oxidation-reduction principles, which led a few years later to the design of industrial facilities (e.g., at Marcoule or at the french reprocessing plant of La Hague). General concepts and well-established results obtained in France at the Atomic Energy Commission (''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'') will be presented and will illustrate applications to industrial as well as analytical problems. (author)

  1. Distribution of interatomic distances in large metallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glossman, M.D.; Iniguez, M.P.; Alonso, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Spherically averaged pseudopotential (SAPS) calculations have been done for Mg n clusters, with n up to 250 within the framework of density functional theory. The electronic structure is computed resorting to the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Weizsaecker (TFDW) approximation for the kinetic energy. The equilibrium geometries have been obtained by minimizing the total cluster energy with respect to the atomic positions using the steepest-descent method. The ground state geometries obtained in this way are formed by spherical atomic shells, the number of them increasing with cluster size, up to a number of four for the biggest sizes considered here. An analysis of the distribution of the interatomic distances shows that the more internal is the shell, the more contracted are the interatomic distances. This effect diminishes progressively with increasing cluster size. For the purpose of comparison, similar calculations have been done with Cs n clusters in the same size range, allowing us to reproduce previous results obtained using a more elaborated density functional technique (Kohn-Sham method). The inhomogeneous contraction of interatomic distances then appears as a general fact for simple metallic clusters and not only for alkaline ones. (orig.)

  2. Conductometric gas sensors based on metal oxides modified with gold nanoparticles: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotcenkov, Ghenadii; Cho, Beong K.; Brinzari, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This review (with 170 refs.) discusses approaches towards surface functionalizaton of metal oxides by gold nanoparticles, and the application of the resulting nanomaterials in resistive gas sensors. The articles is subdivided into sections on (a) methods for modification of metal oxides with gold nanoparticles; (b) the response of gold nanoparticle-modified metal oxide sensors to gaseous species, (c) a discussion of the limitations of such sensors, and (d) a discussion on future tasks and trends along with an outlook. It is shown that, in order to achieve significant improvements in sensor parameters, it is necessary to warrant a good control the size and density of gold nanoparticles on the surface of metal oxide crystallites, the state of gold in the cluster, and the properties of the metal oxide support. Current challenges include an improved reproducibility of sensor preparation, better long-term stabilities, and a better resistance to sintering and poisoning of gold clusters during operation. Additional research focused on better understanding the role of gold clusters and nanoparticles in gas-sensing effects is also required. (author)

  3. Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

  4. Metallicities of young massive clusters in NGC 5236 (M83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Svea; Larsen, Søren; Trager, Scott; Kaper, Lex; Groot, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present integrated-light (IL) spectra of eight young massive clusters (YMCs) in the metal-rich spiral galaxy NGC 5236 (M83). The observations were taken with the X-Shooter spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope. Through the use of theoretical isochrones and synthetic IL spectra, we derive metallicities and study the radial metallicity gradient observed through these young populations. For the inner regions of the galaxy, we observe a relatively shallow metallicity gradient of -0.37 ± 0.29 dex R_{25}^{-1}, agreeing with chemical evolution models with an absence of infall material and a relatively low mass-loss due to winds in the inner parts of the disc. We estimate a central metallicity of [Z] = +0.17 ± 0.12 dex, finding excellent agreement with that obtained via other methods (e.g. blue supergiants and J band). We infer a metallicity of 12+log(O/H) = 8.75 ± 0.08 dex at R/R25 = 0.4, which fits the stellar mass-metallicity relation compilation of blue supergiants and IL studies.

  5. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyzed by Noble Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenghua Tang; Wen Wu; Kai Wang

    2018-01-01

    Highly-efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been extensively investigated for the development of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts suffer from high price, limited accessibility of Pt, sluggish reaction kinetics, as well as undesirable long-term durability. Engineering ultra-small noble metal clusters with high surface-to-volume ratios and robust stabilities for ORR represents a new avenue. After a simple introduction ...

  6. Synthesis and Properties of Metal Clusters in Polymeric Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, E.

    1986-06-01

    A one-step plasma deposition process is described which allows the uniform dispersion of small metal clusters throughout a thin film polymer matrix. Plasma parameters and plasma gas phase diagnostics relevant to the control of film composition and structure are discussed. Chemical and structural analytical techniques such as I.R. absorption spectroscopy, E.S.C.A., Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray and electron diffraction and microscopy are used to characterize the cluster containing films. Changes in cluster size and shape as a function of volume fraction and as a result of post deposition annealing are described. Optical and electrical properties are presented below and above the onset of percolation and are evaluated in terms of contemporary effective medium theories.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of metal sulfide clusters for toxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, L C; Bell, Russell A; Ernste, Michael J; Kramer, James R; Manolopoulos, Helen; Ogden, Nancy

    2002-04-01

    Zinc sulfide clusters were synthesized and characterized at low micromolar concentrations to assess the effect of metal-sulfide ligands on metal toxicity to aquatic organisms in oxic environments. Recommended preparation times are greater than 2 h initial reaction of equimolar sodium sulfide and zinc nitrate, followed by oxic aeration for 3 d. Ionic strength, pH, and anoxic stabilization time were found to be relatively unimportant in controlling the final yield. Adsorptive losses of zinc sulfide (ZnS) clusters to surfaces, however, were significant for a variety of vessel materials and membrane filters. Ionic strength and pH were found to be important factors controlling the extent of adsorptive losses with minimal loss for pHs greater than 9 and for soft waters. The Ag(I), Cu(II), and Hg(II) as metal sulfides completely suppress the analysis of sulfide, whereas Pb(II), Mn(II), and Co(II) partially suppress the analysis of sulfide by the methylene blue technique. Ultraviolet and fluorescence spectra are shown for synthesized ZnS clusters.

  8. Indium tin oxide surface smoothing by gas cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Song, J H; Choi, W K

    2002-01-01

    CO sub 2 cluster ions are irradiated at the acceleration voltage of 25 kV to remove hillocks on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces and thus to attain highly smooth surfaces. CO sub 2 monomer ions are also bombarded on the ITO surfaces at the same acceleration voltage to compare sputtering phenomena. From the atomic force microscope results, the irradiation of monomer ions makes the hillocks sharper and the surfaces rougher from 1.31 to 1.6 nm in roughness. On the other hand, the irradiation of CO sub 2 cluster ions reduces the height of hillocks and planarize the ITO surfaces as smooth as 0.92 nm in roughness. This discrepancy could be explained by large lateral sputtering yield of the cluster ions and re-deposition of sputtered particles by the impact of the cluster ions on surfaces.

  9. Oxidation of tin clusters: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Suman Kalyan; Nigam, Sandeep; Sarkar, Pranab; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2011-12-01

    Here we report the interaction of an oxygen molecule with small tin clusters (Snn, n = 2-6, and 10) using plane wave based pseudo-potential method followed by the LCAO-MO approach. The interaction of oxygen with small Sn clusters undergoes through dissociative adsorption process. The Sn2 shows the highest binding with oxygen by releasing 7.13 eV energy. The higher stability of the Sn2O2 cluster was further verified by sharp increase in the energy gap between the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and very high ionization potential value. After oxidation of Sn clusters, the O atoms are attached to small number of Sn atoms, which is in line with the previous experiments.

  10. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David William

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including cobalt antimonate and vanadium antimonate. Reactivity measurements were made using a continuous flow microreactor, which was used in conjunction with a variety of characterisation techniques to determine relationships between the catalytic behaviour and the properties of the materials. The ratio of Fe/Sb in the iron antimonate catalyst affects the reactivity of the system under steady state conditions, with additional iron beyond the stoichiometric value being detrimental to the acrolein selectivity, while extra antimony provides a means of enhancing the selectivity by decreasing acrolein combustion. Studies on the single antimony oxides of iron antimonate have shown a similarity between the reactivity of 'Sb 2 O 5 ' and FeSbO 4 , and a significant difference between these and the Sb 2 O 3 and Sb 2 O 4 phases, implying that the mixed oxide catalyst has a surface mainly comprised of Sb 5+ . The lack of reactivity of Sb 2 O 4 implies a similarity of the surface with

  11. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  12. Molecular modeling of organic corrosion inhibitors: why bare metal cations are not appropriate models of oxidized metal surfaces and solvated metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of various models of oxidized metal surfaces - bare metal cations, clusters of various size, and extended (periodic) slabs - that are used in the field of quantum-chemical modeling of corrosion inhibitors is examined and discussed. As representative model systems imidazole inhibitor, MgO surface, and solvated Mg(2+) ion are considered by means of density-functional-theory calculations. Although the results of cluster models are prone to cluster size and shape effects, the clusters of moderate size seem useful at least for qualitative purposes. In contrast, the bare metal cations are useless not only as models of oxidized surfaces but also as models of solvated cations, because they bind molecules several times stronger than the more appropriate models. In particular, bare Mg(2+) binds imidazole by 5.9 eV, while the slab model of MgO(001) by only 0.35 eV. Such binding is even stronger for 3+ cations, e.g., bare Al(3+) binds imidazole by 17.9 eV. The reasons for these fantastically strong binding energies are discussed and it is shown that the strong bonding is predominantly due to electron charge transfer from molecule to metal cation, which stems from differences between molecular and metal ionization potentials.

  13. Electrochromic device containing metal oxide nanoparticles and ultraviolet blocking material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Guillermo; Koo, Bonil; Gregoratto, Ivano; Basu, Sourav; Rosen, Evelyn; Holt, Jason; Thomsen, Scott

    2017-10-17

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant. The electrochromic device also includes nanoparticles containing one or more transparent conducting oxide (TCO), a solid state electrolyte, a counter electrode, and at least one protective layer to prevent degradation of the one or more nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) and visible radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  14. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z ∼ M 0.30±0.05 . No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  15. Self-assembled monolayers on metal oxides : applications in nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, O.

    2010-01-01

    The thesis describes the use of phosph(on)ate-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify and pattern metal oxides. Metal oxides have interesting electronic and magnetic properties such as insulating, semiconducting, metallic, ferromagnetic etc. and SAMs can tailor the surface properties. FePt

  16. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachecka, Malgorzata; Lee, Christopher James; Sturm, J.M.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show

  17. Growth and sacrificial oxidation of transition metal nanolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsarfati,; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, R.; F. Bijkerk,

    2009-01-01

    Growth and oxidation of Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu, Ru, Ni and Co layers of 0.3-4.3 nm thickness on Mo have been investigated with ARPES and AFM. Co and Ni layers oxidize while the Mo remains metallic. For nobler metals, the on top O and oxidation state of subsurface Mo increase, suggesting sacrificial e(-)

  18. Growth and sacrificial oxidation of transition metal nanolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsarfati, T.; Tsarfati, Tim; Zoethout, E.; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    Growth and oxidation of Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu, Ru, Ni and Co layers of 0.3–4.3 nm thickness on Mo have been investigated with ARPES and AFM. Co and Ni layers oxidize while the Mo remains metallic. For nobler metals, the on top O and oxidation state of subsurface Mo increase, suggesting sacrificial e−

  19. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  20. Metallic oxide switches using thick film technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, D. N.; Williams, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic oxide thick film switches were processed on alumina substrates using thick film technology. Vanadium pentoxide in powder form was mixed with other oxides e.g., barium, strontium copper and glass frit, ground to a fine powder. Pastes and screen printable inks were made using commercial conductive vehicles and appropriate thinners. Some switching devices were processed by conventional screen printing and firing of the inks and commercial cermet conductor terminals on 96% alumina substrates while others were made by applying small beads or dots of the pastes between platinum wires. Static, and dynamic volt-ampere, and pulse tests indicate that the switching and self-oscillatory characteristics of these devices could make them useful in memory element, oscillator, and automatic control applications.

  1. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  2. Magnetic correlations in doped transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors review recent reactor- and spallation-source-based neutron scattering experiments on the magnetic fluctuations and order in a variety of doped transition metal oxides. In particular, data are shown for the NiO chain compound, Y 2-x Ca x BaNiO 5 , the two-dimensional cuprate superconductors La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x , and the classical three-dimensional ''Mott-Hubbard'' system V 2-y O 3

  3. An age difference of two billion years between a metal-rich and a metal-poor globular cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B M S; Kalirai, J S; Anderson, J; Dotter, A; Richer, H B; Rich, R M; Shara, M M; Fahlman, G G; Hurley, J R; King, I R; Reitzel, D; Stetson, P B

    2013-08-01

    Globular clusters trace the formation history of the spheroidal components of our Galaxy and other galaxies, which represent the bulk of star formation over the history of the Universe. The clusters exhibit a range of metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium), with metal-poor clusters dominating the stellar halo of the Galaxy, and higher-metallicity clusters found within the inner Galaxy, associated with the stellar bulge, or the thick disk. Age differences between these clusters can indicate the sequence in which the components of the Galaxy formed, and in particular which clusters were formed outside the Galaxy and were later engulfed along with their original host galaxies, and which were formed within it. Here we report an absolute age of 9.9 ± 0.7 billion years (at 95 per cent confidence) for the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tucanae, determined by modelling the properties of the cluster's white-dwarf cooling sequence. This is about two billion years younger than has been inferred for the metal-poor cluster NGC 6397 from the same models, and provides quantitative evidence that metal-rich clusters like 47 Tucanae formed later than metal-poor halo clusters like NGC 6397.

  4. Large amplitude femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Daligault, J

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical model that allows us to study linear and non-linear aspects of the femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters. The theoretical approach consists in the classical limit of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The electrons are described by a phase-space distribution function which satisfies a Vlasov-like equation while the ions are treated classically. This allows simulations for clusters containing several hundreds of atoms and extending up to several hundreds of femtoseconds during which the description conserves the fermionic character of the electron distribution. This semi-quantal approach compares very well with the purely quantal treatment. As an application of this approach, we show the prominent role of the electron dynamics during and after the interaction with an intense femtosecond laser pulse.

  5. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides

  6. Nanotoxicity: oxidative stress mediated toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Sil, Parames Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are often used as industrial catalysts or to improve product's functional properties. Recent advanced nanotechnology have been expected to be used in various fields, ranging from sensors, environmental remediation to biomedicine, medical biology and imaging, etc. However, the growing use of nanoparticles has led to their release into environment and increased levels of these particles at nearby sites or the surroundings of their manufacturing factories become obvious. The toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles on humans, animals, and certainly to the environment has become a major concern to our community. However, controversies still remain with respect to the toxic effects and the mechanisms of these nanoparticles. The scientific community now feels that an understanding of the toxic effects is necessary to handle these nanoparticles and their use. A new discipline, named nanotoxicology, has therefore been developed that basically refers to the study of the interactions of nanoparticles with biological systems and also measures the toxicity level related to human health. Nanoparticles usually generate reactive oxygen species to a greater extent than micro-sized particles resulting in increased pro-inflammatory reactions and oxidative stress via intracellular signaling pathways. In this review, we mainly focus on the routes of exposure of some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles and how these nanoparticles affect us or broadly the cells of our organs. We would also like to discuss the responsible mechanism(s) of the nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species mediated organ pathophysiology. A brief introduction of the characterization and application of these nanoparticles has also been included in the article.

  7. Oxidation of vanadium metal in oxygen plasma and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindar Kumar Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the role of oxygen plasma on oxidation of vanadium (V metal and the volatilization of its oxides has been studied as a function of source (V metal strip temperature (Tss and oxygen partial pressure (PO2. The presence of O2-plasma not only enhances the oxidation rate but also ficilitates in transport of oxide molecules from metal to substrate, as confirmed by the simultanous deposition of oxide film onto substrate. Both the oxidized metal strips and oxide films deposited on substrates are characterized separately. The structural and vibrational results evidence the presence of two different oxide phases (i.e. orthorhombic V2O5 and monocilinic V O2 in oxide layers formed on V metal strips, whereas the oxide films deposited on substrates exhibit only orthorhombic phase (i.e. V2O5. The decrease in peak intensities recorded from heated V metal strips on increasing Tss points out the increment in the rate of oxide volatilization, which also confirms by the oxide layer thickness measurements. The SEM results show the noticeable surface changes on V-strips as the function of Tss and PO2 and their optimum values are recorded to be 500   ˚ C and 7.5 × 10−2 Torr, respectively to deposit maximum thick oxide film on substrate. The formation of microcracks on oxidized V-strips, those responsible to countinue oxidation is also confirmed by SEM results. The compositional study of oxide layers formed on V-strips, corroborates their pureness and further assures about the existence of mixed oxide phases. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on oxidation of V-metal has also been discussed in the present report. All the results are well in agreement to each other.

  8. Oxidation of vanadium metal in oxygen plasma and their characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rabindar Kumar; Singh, Megha; Kumar, Prabhat; Reddy, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, the role of oxygen plasma on oxidation of vanadium (V) metal and the volatilization of its oxides has been studied as a function of source (V metal strip) temperature (Tss) and oxygen partial pressure (PO2). The presence of O2-plasma not only enhances the oxidation rate but also ficilitates in transport of oxide molecules from metal to substrate, as confirmed by the simultanous deposition of oxide film onto substrate. Both the oxidized metal strips and oxide films deposited on substrates are characterized separately. The structural and vibrational results evidence the presence of two different oxide phases (i.e. orthorhombic V2O5 and monocilinic V O2) in oxide layers formed on V metal strips, whereas the oxide films deposited on substrates exhibit only orthorhombic phase (i.e. V2O5). The decrease in peak intensities recorded from heated V metal strips on increasing Tss points out the increment in the rate of oxide volatilization, which also confirms by the oxide layer thickness measurements. The SEM results show the noticeable surface changes on V-strips as the function of Tss and PO2 and their optimum values are recorded to be 500 ˚ C and 7.5 × 10-2 Torr, respectively to deposit maximum thick oxide film on substrate. The formation of microcracks on oxidized V-strips, those responsible to countinue oxidation is also confirmed by SEM results. The compositional study of oxide layers formed on V-strips, corroborates their pureness and further assures about the existence of mixed oxide phases. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on oxidation of V-metal has also been discussed in the present report. All the results are well in agreement to each other.

  9. An improved method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns an improved method of preparation of nanoparticular vanadium oxide/anatase titania catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular vanadium oxide/anatase titania catalyst precursors comprising...... combustible crystallization seeds upon which the catalyst metal oxide is coprecipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step....

  10. Sol-Gel/Hydrothermal Synthesis of Mixed Metal Oxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed metal oxides of titanium and zinc nanocomposites were prepared through sol-gel method under hydrothermal condition ... Keywords: Nanocomposites, Titanium dioxide, Zinc oxide, Particle sizes, Optical property, X-Ray Diffraction. ABSTRACT. 321 ... doping with other semiconductors like zinc oxide, aluminium oxide ...

  11. Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Multi-Component Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts FINAL Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    The focus of the project was on developing an atomic-level understanding of how transition metal oxide catalysts function. Over the course of several renewals the specific emphases shifted from understanding how local structure and oxidation state affect how molecules adsorb and react on the surfaces of binary oxide crystals to more complex systems where interactions between different transition metal oxide cations in an oxide catalyst can affect reactivity, and finally to the impact of cluster size on oxide stability and reactivity. Hallmarks of the work were the use of epitaxial growth methods to create surfaces relevant to catalysis yet tractable for fundamental surface science approaches, and the use of scanning tunneling microscopy to follow structural changes induced by reactions and to pinpoint adsorption sites. Key early findings included the identification of oxidation and reduction mechanisms on a tungsten oxide catalyst surface that determine the sites available for reaction, identification of C-O bond cleavage as the rate limiting step in alcohol dehydration reactions on the tungsten oxide surface, and demonstration that reduction does not change the favored reaction pathway but rather eases C-O bond cleavage and thus reduces the reaction barrier. Subsequently, a new reconstruction on the anatase phase of TiO2 relevant to catalysis was discovered and shown to create sites with distinct reactivity compared to other TiO2 surfaces. Building on this work on anatase, the mechanism by which TiO2 enhances the reactivity of vanadium oxide layers was characterized and it was found that the TiO2 substrate can force thin vanadia layers to adopt structures they would not ordinarily form in the bulk which in turn creates differences in reactivity between supported layers and bulk samples. From there, the work progressed to studying well-defined ternary oxides where synergistic effects between the two cations can induce

  12. Open Cluster Metallicity Scale and the Metallicity Gradient in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylskaya, O.; Wiebe, D.

    We analyse the available data on the open cluster metallicity and compare them with those from Lynga (1987) and Gratton (2000). On the base of linear fitting, we find relations between the published studies of the open cluster metallicity (where data on several objects are available) with [Fe/H] data compiled by Lynga (1987) and calculated by Twarog et al. (1997). This allowed to build a quasi-homogeneous metallicity scale for 140 open clusters, more than in any other similar study before (Pylskaya & Wiebe 1993). These data coupled with the distance scale by Barkhatova & Pylskaya (1983) are used to investigate gradients of the Galactic disc chemical composition. Our unified metallicity scales are consistent with the presence of the metallicity gradient in the Galaxy of order of -0.1 dex kpc-1, somewhat steeper that found in other studies. The vertical gradient is less pronounced. The upper envelope on the Z-[Fe/H] diagram has a slope of -0.32 dex kpc-1 for the Lynga-based scale and even steeper slope of -0.48 dex kpc-1 for the scale based on Twarog et al. data. These results are discussed in the context of the Galaxy chemical evolution and the processes that drive the gradient formation. This work is part of the OCL investigations based on the Supplements to Alter-Ruprecht open cluster catalogue (CSCA) that are being prepared in the Urals State University since 1988 (Pylskaya 1997). DW work is supported by the RFBR grants 99-02-16037 and 01-02-06080.

  13. Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Photoresists for EUV Patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    © 2014SPST. Previous studies of methacrylate based nanoparticle have demonstrated the excellent pattern forming capability of these hybrid materials when used as photoresists under 13.5 nm EUV exposure. HfO2 and ZrO2 methacrylate resists have achieved high resolution (∼22 nm) at a very high EUV sensitivity (4.2 mJ/cm2). Further investigations into the patterning process suggests a ligand displacement mechanism, wherein, any combination of a metal oxide with the correct ligand could generate patterns in the presence of the suitable photoactive compound. The current investigation extends this study by developing new nanoparticle compositions with transdimethylacrylic acid and o-toluic acid ligands. This study describes their synthesis and patterning performance under 248 nm KrF laser (DUV) and also under 13.5 nm EUV exposures (dimethylacrylate nanoparticles) for the new resist compositions.

  14. Sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Caffau, E.

    2011-10-01

    Sulphur (S) is a non-refractory α-element that is not locked into dust grains in the interstellar medium. Thus no correction to the measured, interstellar sulphur abundance is needed and it can be readily compared to the S content in stellar photospheres. Here we present the first measurement of sulphur in the metal poor globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397, as detected in a MIKE/Magellan high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectrum of one red giant star. While abundance ratios of sulphur are available for a larger number of Galactic stars down to an [Fe/H] of ~ -3.5 dex, no measurements in globular clusters more metal poor than -1.5 dex have been reported so far. We find aNLTE, 3-D abundance ratio of [S/Fe] = +0.52 ± 0.20 (stat.) ± 0.08 (sys.), based on theS I, Multiplet 1 line at 9212.8 Å. This value is consistent with a Galactic halo plateau as typical of other α-elements in GCs and field stars, but we cannot rule out its membership with a second branch of increasing [S/Fe] with decreasing [Fe/H], claimed in the literature, which leads to a large scatter at metallicities around - 2 dex. The [S/Mg] and [S/Ca] ratios in this star are compatible with a Solar value to within the (large) uncertainties. Despite the very large scatter in these ratios across Galactic stars between literature samples, this indicates that sulphur traces the chemical imprints of the other α-elements in metal poor GCs. Combined with its moderate sodium abundance ([S/Na]NLTE = 0.48), the [S/Fe] ratio in this GC extends a global, positive S-Na correlation that is not seen in field stars and might indicate that proton-capture reactions contributed to the production of sulphur in the (metal poor) early GC environments. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanorod brushes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ducing chromium ions during the synthesis of alumina rods. Keywords. Metal oxide nanorods; nanorod brushes; alumina nanorods; MoO3 nanorods; ZnO nanorods; ruby nanorods. 1. Introduction. Synthesis of one-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures is getting enormous attention in recent years due to their potential ...

  16. Recent Development in Metal Oxides and Related Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Recent Development in Metal Oxides and. Related Materials. FOREWORD. This special issue of the Journal of Chemical Sciences contains a col- lection of articles contributed by the participants of Recent Development in Metal Oxides ... energy transfer, nano particle synthesis, magnetic transport properties of rare earth ...

  17. A novel parameter estimation method for metal oxide surge arrester ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with experimental results. Keywords. Metal oxide surge arrester models; PSO; ACO; parameter estimation;. EMTP. 1. Introduction. Metal oxide (MO) surge arresters are widely used as protective devices against switching and lightning over-voltages in power systems. The proper nonlinear voltage-current characteristics,. ∗.

  18. Structure and Mobility of Metal Clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd Clusters in MOF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walton, Krista S.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal–organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density...... functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au8, Pd8, and Au4Pd4 we find that the organic part of the MOF...... is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster...

  19. Stabilization of electrocatalytic metal nanoparticles at metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junction points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Park, Sehkyu; Aksay, Ilhan A; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2011-03-02

    Carbon-supported precious metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and enhancement of catalyst dispersion and stability by controlling the interfacial structure is highly desired. Here we report a new method to deposit metal oxides and metal nanoparticles on graphene and form stable metal-metal oxide-graphene triple junctions for electrocatalysis applications. We first synthesize indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals directly on functionalized graphene sheets, forming an ITO-graphene hybrid. Platinum nanoparticles are then deposited, forming a unique triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Our experimental work and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are more stable at the Pt-ITO-graphene triple junctions. Furthermore, DFT calculations suggest that the defects and functional groups on graphene also play an important role in stabilizing the catalysts. These new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity.

  20. Laboratory studies of refractory metal oxide smokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuth, J.A.; Nelson, R.N.; Donn, B.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the properties of refractory metal oxide smokes condensed from a gas containing various combinations of SiH4, Fe(CO)5, Al(CH3)3, TiCl4, O2 and N2O in a hydrogen carrier stream at 500 K greater than T greater than 1500 K were performed. Ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectra of pure, amorphous SiO(x), FeO(x), AlO(x) and TiO(x) smokes are discussed, as well as the spectra of various co-condensed amorphous oxides, such as FE(x)SiO(y) or Fe(x)AlO(y). Preliminary studies of the changes induced in the infrared spectra of iron-containing oxide smokes by vacuum thermal annealing suggest that such materials become increasingly opaque in the near infrared with increased processing: hydration may have the opposite effect. More work on the processing of these materials is required to confirm such a trend: this work is currently in progress. Preliminary studies of the ultraviolet spectra of amorphous Si2O3 and MgSiO(x) smokes revealed no interesting features in the region from 200 to 300 nm. Studies of the ultraviolet spectra of both amorphous, hydrated and annealed SiO(x), TiO(x), AlO(x) and FeO(x) smokes are currently in progress. Finally, data on the oxygen isotopic composition of the smokes produced in the experiments are presented, which indicate that the oxygen becomes isotopically fractionated during grain condensation. Oxygen in the grains is as much as 3 percent per amu lighter than the oxygen in the original gas stream. The authors are currently conducting experiments to understand the mechanism by which fractionation occurs

  1. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-01-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals

  2. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

    2004-07-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  3. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  4. Miscibility and oxidation rate of the simulated metallic spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, K. S.; Joo, J. S.; Shin, Y. J.; Oh, S. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    The simulated metallic spent fuel was fabricated by using Uranium, Neodymium and Palladium in order to study the miscibility of Neodymium and Palladium with Uranium. For analysis of long-term safty on the metallized spent fuel, the simulated metallic spent fuel was oxidized under pure oxygen environment at 183{approx}250 deg C. From the results, the oxidation rate correlation and activation energy were obtained.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Ultrafast Dynamics of Metal, Metal Oxide, and Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Damon Andreas

    2013-01-01

    SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND ULTRAFAST DYNAMICS OF METAL, METAL OXIDE, AND SEMICONDUCTOR NANOMATERIALSABSTRACTThe optical properties of each of the three main classes of inorganic nanomaterials, metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors differ greatly due to the intrinsically different nature of the materials. These optical properties are among the most fascinating and useful aspects of nanomaterials with applications spanning cancer treatment, sensors, lasers, and solar cells. One techn...

  6. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  7. Preparation and characterization of several transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, A.; Dwight, K.

    1989-01-01

    The structure-property relationships of several conducting transition metal oxides, as well as their preparative methods, are presented in this paper. The importance of preparing homogeneous phases with precisely known stoichiometry is emphasized. A comparison is also made of the various techniques used to prepare both polycrystalline and single crystal samples. For transition metal oxides, the metallic properties are discussed either in terms of metal-metal distances which are short enough to result in metallic behavior, or in terms of the formation of a π* conduction band resulting from covalent metal-oxygen interactions. Metallic behavior is observed when the conduction bands are populated with either electrons or holes. The concentration of these carriers can be affected by either cation or anion substitutions. The discussion in this presentation will be limited to the elements Re, Ti, V, Cr, Mo, and Cu

  8. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  9. Electroless deposition of metal nanoparticle clusters: Effect of pattern distance

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco

    2014-04-03

    Electroless plating is a deposition technique in which metal ions are reduced as atoms on specific patterned sites of a silicon surface to form metal nanoparticles (NPs) aggregates with the desired characteristics. Those NPs, in turn, can be used as constituents of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates, which are devices where the electromagnetic field and effects thereof are giantly amplified. Here, the electroless formation of nanostructures was studied as a function of the geometry of the substrate. High resolution, electron beam lithography techniques were used to obtain nonperiodic arrays of circular patterns, in which the spacing of patterns was varied over a significant range. In depositing silver atoms in those circuits, the authors found that the characteristics of the aggregates vary with the pattern distance. When the patterns are in close proximity, the interference of different groups of adjacent aggregates cannot be disregarded and the overall growth is reduced. Differently from this, when the patterns are sufficiently distant, the formation of metal clusters of NPs is independent on the spacing of the patterns. For the particular subset of parameters used here, this critical correlation distance is about three times the pattern diameter. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation model, which is a simulation method that can decipher the formation of nanoaggregates at an atomic level. In the discussion, the authors showed how this concept can be used to fabricate ordered arrays of silver nanospheres, where the size of those spheres may be regulated on varying the pattern distance, for applications in biosensing and single molecule detection.

  10. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Byers, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  11. Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects: Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammen, Nisha [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India; Spanu, Leonardo [Shell Technology Center, Shell India Markets Private Limited, -560048 Bangalore India; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Yang, Bing [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 60637 Chicago IL USA; Narasimhan, Shobhana [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India

    2017-12-22

    Having the ability to tune the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles is essential for their utility as catalysts. The degree of oxidation that maximizes product yield and selectivity is known to vary, depending on the particular reaction. Using first principles calculations and XANES measurements, we show that for subnanometer sizes in the gas phase, smaller Cu clusters are more resistant to oxidation. However, this trend is reversed upon deposition on an alumina support. We are able to explain this result in terms of strong cluster-support interactions, which differ significantly for the oxidized and elemental clusters. The stable cluster phases also feature novel oxygen stoichiometries. Our results suggest that one can tune the degree of oxidation of Cu catalysts by optimizing not just their size, but also the support they are deposited on.

  12. Photocatalysis of Modified Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzill, Matthias

    2018-02-28

    The goal of this project has been to establish a cause-effect relationship for photocatalytic activity variations of different structures of the same material; and furthermore gain fundamental understanding on modification of photocatalysts by compositional or surface modifications. The reasoning is that gaining atomic scale understanding of how surface and bulk modifications alter the photo reactivity will lead to design principles for next generation photocatalysts. As a prototypical photocatalyst the research focused on TiO2 synthesized in well-defined single crystalline form to enable fundamental characterizations.We have obtained results in the following areas: (a) Preparation of epitaxial anataseTiO2 samples by pulsed laser deposition. (b) Comparison of hydrogen diffusion on different crystallographic surface. (c) Determining the stability of the TiO2(011)-2x1 reconstruction upon interactions with adsorbates. (d) Characterization of adsorption and (thermal and photo) reaction of molecules with nitro-endgroups, (e) Exploring the possibility of modifying planar model photocatalyst surfaces with graphene to enable fundamental studies on reported enhanced photocatalytic activities of graphene modified transition metal oxides, (f) gained fundamental understanding on the role of crystallographic polymorphs of the same material for their photocatalytic activities.

  13. Effect of CO on surface oxidation of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Fu, Y.; Xie, R.

    1997-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 25 and 200 deg C have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS);respectively. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the surface layer of uranium metal leads to partial reduction of surface oxide and results in U4f photoelectron peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the surface oxide is decreased and O1s/O4f ratio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide. The investigation indicates the surface layer of uranium metal has resistance to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. (author)

  14. Fabrication of Arrays of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes by Shadow Evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickey, Michael D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Smythe, Elizabeth J.; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The

  15. Systematic study of metal-insulator-metal diodes with a native oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Donchev, E.

    2014-10-07

    © 2014 SPIE. In this paper, a systematic analysis of native oxides within a Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) diode is carried out, with the goal of determining their practicality for incorporation into a nanoscale Rectenna (Rectifying Antenna). The requirement of having a sub-10nm oxide scale is met by using the native oxide, which forms on most metals exposed to an oxygen containing environment. This, therefore, provides a simplified MIM fabrication process as the complex, controlled oxide deposition step is omitted. We shall present the results of an investigation into the current-voltage characteristics of various MIM combinations that incorporate a native oxide, in order to establish whether the native oxide is of sufficient quality for good diode operation. The thin native oxide layers are formed by room temperature oxidation of the first metal layer, deposited by magnetron sputtering. This is done in-situ, within the deposition chamber before depositing the second metal electrode. Using these structures, we study the established trend where the bigger the difference in metal workfunctions, the better the rectification properties of MIM structures, and hence the selection of the second metal is key to controlling the device\\'s rectifying properties. We show how leakage current paths through the non-optimised native oxide control the net current-voltage response of the MIM devices. Furthermore, we will present the so-called diode figures of merit (asymmetry, non-linearity and responsivity) for each of the best performing structures.

  16. Metal-core@metal oxide-shell nanomaterials for gas-sensing applications: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, A.; Janghorban, K.; Hashemi, B.; Neri, G.

    2015-01-01

    With an ever-increasing number of applications in many advanced fields, gas sensors are becoming indispensable devices in our daily life. Among different types of gas sensors, conductometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors are found to be the most appealing for advanced applications in the automotive, biomedical, environmental, and safety sectors because of the their high sensitivity, reduced size, and low cost. To improve their sensing characteristics, new metal oxide-based nanostructures have thus been proposed in recent years as sensing materials. In this review, we extensively review gas-sensing properties of core@ shell nanocomposites in which metals as the core and metal oxides as the shell structure, both of nanometer sizes, are assembled into a single metal@metal oxide core–shell. These nanostructures not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Up-dated achievements in the synthesis and characterization of metal@metal oxide core–shell nanostructures as well as their use in MOS sensors are here reported with the main objective of providing an overview about their gas-sensing properties

  17. Metal-core@metal oxide-shell nanomaterials for gas-sensing applications: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, A.; Janghorban, K.; Hashemi, B.; Neri, G.

    2015-09-01

    With an ever-increasing number of applications in many advanced fields, gas sensors are becoming indispensable devices in our daily life. Among different types of gas sensors, conductometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors are found to be the most appealing for advanced applications in the automotive, biomedical, environmental, and safety sectors because of the their high sensitivity, reduced size, and low cost. To improve their sensing characteristics, new metal oxide-based nanostructures have thus been proposed in recent years as sensing materials. In this review, we extensively review gas-sensing properties of core@ shell nanocomposites in which metals as the core and metal oxides as the shell structure, both of nanometer sizes, are assembled into a single metal@metal oxide core-shell. These nanostructures not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Up-dated achievements in the synthesis and characterization of metal@metal oxide core-shell nanostructures as well as their use in MOS sensors are here reported with the main objective of providing an overview about their gas-sensing properties.

  18. submitter Elemental composition and clustering behaviour of α-pinene oxidation products for different oxidation conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Praplan, A P; Bianchi, F; Rissanen, M P; Ehn, M; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H; Adamov, A; Amorim, A; Dommen, J; Duplissy, J; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Heinritzi, M; Kangasluoma, J; Kirkby, J; Krapf, M; Kürten, A; Lehtipalo, K; Riccobono, F; Rondo, L; Sarnela, N; Simon, M; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Ye, P; Curtius, J; Baltensperger, U; Donahue, N M; Kulmala, M; Worsnop, D R

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the difference between oxidised organic compounds formed by α-pinene oxidation under various conditions in the CLOUD environmental chamber: (1) pure ozonolysis (in the presence of hydrogen as hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenger) and (2) OH oxidation (initiated by nitrous acid (HONO) photolysis by ultraviolet light) in the absence of ozone. We discuss results from three Atmospheric Pressure interface Time-of-Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers measuring simultaneously the composition of naturally charged as well as neutral species (via chemical ionisation with nitrate). Natural chemical ionisation takes place in the CLOUD chamber and organic oxidised compounds form clusters with nitrate, bisulfate, bisulfate/sulfuric acid clusters, ammonium, and dimethylaminium, or get protonated. The results from this study show that this process is selective for various oxidised organic compounds with low molar mass and ions, so that in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the elemental composition o...

  19. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  20. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao

    2012-04-26

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Chiral structures and tunable magnetic moments in 3d transition metal doped Pt6 clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiu-Rong; Yang Xing; Ding Xun-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition metal doped platinum clusters MPt 6 (M=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) are systematically studied by using the relativistic all-electron density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Most of the doped clusters show larger binding energies than the pure Pt 7 cluster, which indicates that the doping of the transition metal atom can stabilize the pure platinum cluster. The results of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)—lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps suggest that the doped clusters can have higher chemical activities than the pure Pt 7 cluster. The magnetism calculations demonstrate that the variation range of the magnetic moments of the MPt 6 clusters is from 0 μ B to 7 μ B , revealing that the MPt 6 clusters have potential utility in designing new spintronic nanomaterials with tunable magnetic properties

  2. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pachecka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show that Sn adsorbs rather weakly to a non-oxidized Sc surface, and is etched relatively easily by atomic hydrogen. In contrast, the presence of native oxide on Sc allows Sn to adsorb more strongly to the surface, slowing the etching. Furthermore, thinner layers of scandium oxide result in weaker Sn adsorption, indicating that the layer beneath the oxide plays a significant role in determining the adsorption strength. Unexpectedly, for Sn on Sc2O3, and, to a lesser extent, for Sn on Sc, the etch rate shows a variation over time, which is explained by surface restructuring, temperature change, and hydrogen adsorption saturation.

  3. Displacement method and apparatus for reducing passivated metal powders and metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell,; Jonathan S. , Ripley; Edward, B [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-05

    A method of reducing target metal oxides and passivated metals to their metallic state. A reduction reaction is used, often combined with a flux agent to enhance separation of the reaction products. Thermal energy in the form of conventional furnace, infrared, or microwave heating may be applied in combination with the reduction reaction.

  4. Aging of trivalent metal hydroxide/oxide gels in divalent metal salt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Aging of trivalent metal hydroxide/oxide gels in divalent metal salt solutions: Mechanism of formation of layered double hydroxides (LDHs). A V RADHA and P ..... This situation promotes coprecipitation of the two metal hydroxides, by virtue of which the titrations yield the. Zn–Al LDH. The LDHs isolated before and after ...

  5. Thermal Methane Conversion to Syngas Mediated by Rh1-Doped Aluminum Oxide Cluster Cations RhAl3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ke; Yuan, Zhen; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Chongyang; Liu, Qing-Yu; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-10-05

    Laser ablation generated RhAl 3 O 4 + heteronuclear metal oxide cluster cations have been mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and reacted with CH 4 or CD 4 in a linear ion trap reactor under thermal collision conditions. The reactions have been characterized by state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry calculations. The RhAl 3 O 4 + cluster can activate four C-H bonds of a methane molecule and convert methane to syngas, an important intermediate product in methane conversion to value-added chemicals. The Rh atom is the active site for activation of the C-H bonds of methane. The high electron-withdrawing capability of Rh atom is the driving force to promote the conversion of methane to syngas. The polarity of Rh oxidation state is changed from positive to negative after the reaction. This study has provided the first example of methane conversion to syngas by heteronuclear metal oxide clusters under thermal collision conditions. Furthermore, the molecular level origin has been revealed for the condensed-phase experimental observation that trace amounts of Rh can promote the participation of lattice oxygen of chemically very inert support (Al 2 O 3 ) to oxidize methane to carbon monoxide.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of metal oxide nanowire sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guozhen

    2008-01-01

    Trace detection of chemicals and biological species like industrial gases, proteins, drug molecules, and chemical warfare agents, is an important issue to human health and safety. Central to this issue is the development of high sensitivity, high selectivity, high stability and rapid detection chemical and bio-sensors. With special geometry and chemical and physical properties, one-dimensional (1-D) metal oxide nanostructures have become the promising candidates for chemical and biosensing applications in recent years. Here, we intend to provide an overview on this interesting and important field. In the first part, the patents for rational synthesis of 1-D metal oxide nanostructures on a large scale will be introduced. The patents on chemical and biosensors built on 1-D metal oxide nanostructures are then introduced in the second part. Finally, we provide a review of the recent development of electronic nose systems using 1-D metal oxide nanostructures, which show great potential for the improvement of sensing abilities.

  7. Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ''Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.''

  8. Heavy metal removal from water/wastewater by nanosized metal oxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Zhang, Shujuan; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Quanxing

    2012-04-15

    Nanosized metal oxides (NMOs), including nanosized ferric oxides, manganese oxides, aluminum oxides, titanium oxides, magnesium oxides and cerium oxides, provide high surface area and specific affinity for heavy metal adsorption from aqueous systems. To date, it has become a hot topic to develop new technologies to synthesize NMOs, to evaluate their removal of heavy metals under varying experimental conditions, to reveal the underlying mechanism responsible for metal removal based on modern analytical techniques (XAS, ATR-FT-IR, NMR, etc.) or mathematical models, and to develop metal oxide-based materials of better applicability for practical use (such as granular oxides or composite materials). The present review mainly focuses on NMOs' preparation, their physicochemical properties, adsorption characteristics and mechanism, as well as their application in heavy metal removal. In addition, porous host supported NMOs are particularly concerned because of their great advantages for practical application as compared to the original NMOs. Also, some magnetic NMOs were included due to their unique separation performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  10. Density functional study of structural and catalytic properties of free and supported metal nano cluster; Dichtefunktionalstudie der strukturellen und katalytischen Eigenschaften freier und getraegerter Metallnanocluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, B.

    2007-04-11

    The structural and catalytic properties of metal clusters were determined in the framework of density functional theory. The first part of this work investigates the electronic and geometrical structure of sodium clusters with up to 309 atoms. The ground-state structures of the clusters are determined and the corresponding electronic density of states is compared to experimental photoelectron spectras. The excellent agreement to the experimental results indicates that the correct growth motive of the sodium clusters was found. Small clusters from Na{sup -}{sub 20} to Na{sup -}{sub 42} prefer pentagonal and icosahedral structures with anti-Mackay overlayers, while clusters larger than Na{sup -}{sub 50} prefer icosahedral structures with Mackay overlayers. Clusters between the closed-shell Mackay Clusters often exhibit a twist deformation with respect to the regular Mackay positions. The second part of this work investigates the catalytic properties of free and supported palladium clusters. For both cases the oxidation of small Pd{sub N} clusters (N {<=} 9) was studied. It turned out that MgO supported Pd-clusters dissociate oxygen with a significant lower reaction energy than free clusters or supported systems with particles consisting of several thousands of atoms. The reaction with oxygen transforms the non-crystalline Pd-clusters into crystalline Pd{sub x}O{sub y} nano-oxide clusters that are in epitaxy with the underlying support. Simulations of the CO oxidation on the Pd{sub x}O{sub y} cluster predict a low-temperature reaction mechanism. By calculating the electronic density of states and CO stretch frequencies, different ways of verifying the results experimentally are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Metallization of uranium oxide powders by lithium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. S.; Seo, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments on the reduction of uranium oxide powders into metal by lithium were performed in order to determine the equipment setup and optimum operation conditions. The method of filtration using the porous magnesia filter was introduced to recover uranium metal powders produced. Based on the laboratory scale experimental results, mock-up scale (20 kg U/batch) metallizer was designed and made. The applicability to the metallization process was estimated with respect to the thermal stability of the porous magnesia filter in the high temperature molten salt, the filtration of the fine uranium metal powders, and the operability of the equipment

  12. Photodegradation of phenanthrene on metal oxides and fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesten, H.; Bozicevic, Z.; Klasinc, L.

    1984-10-01

    The photodegradation of phenanthrene adsorbed on the surface of metal oxides, sea sand and fly ashes is investigated in a rotating bed photoreactor emitting simulated solar light. Metal oxides (SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SnO/sub 2/, MgO), which do not absorb the simulated solar light, give rise to a very slow photodegradation of the adsorbed phenanthrene. Metal oxides (TiO/sub 2/, ZnO, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/), which exhibit semiconduction properties, induce a very rapid photodegradation. The two modifications of TiO/sub 2/, rutile and anatase, show different activities in causing the photodegradation of phenanthrene. While in the class of non-solar light absorbing metal oxides the adsorbed phenanthrene is degraded only by direct excitation to its electronic states, photons of band-gap energy in semiconducting metal oxides excite electron-hole pairs at the surface. The quantum yield of the photodegradation of phenanthrene adsorbed on a fly ash of the mullite-quartz of glass type lies between the quantum yields of the two classes of metal oxides investigated. Surprisingly, however, phenanthrene and the very photolabile anthracene are extremely resistant to photodegradation when adsorbed on a fly ash of the spinel type with pig iron content and magnetic properties.

  13. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas sensor applications are introduced. The advantages of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides are also presented, taking into account the crystallinity and ordered/disordered porous structures. Second, the synthesis methods of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides including the soft-template, hard-template, and temple-free methods are introduced, in which the advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are figured out. Third, the applications of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides as gas sensors are presented. The gas nanosensors are designed based on meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for effective detection of toxic gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the meso-/nanoporous gas nanosensors are also discussed. Finally, some conclusions and an outlook are presented.

  14. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  15. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Abstract. The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. Significant inhibition and stimulation of chloride induced corrosion have been observed. Basicity and acidity of the relevant metal ions, and their ability to form complexes are ...

  16. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. ... Basicity and acidity of the relevant metal ions, and their ability to form complexes are considered as the main factors of the .... niobium, tantalum, protactinium, and uranium. However,.

  17. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  18. Preparation of novel polymer–metal oxide nanocomposites with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This article deals with preparation of nanocomposite which comprised of nanophase separated structure of polymer chains and metal oxide. By grafting poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA) on the surface of titanium which is covered by passive titanium oxide by atom transfer radical polymerization.

  19. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  20. vbyCaHbeta CCD Photometry of Clusters. VI. The Metal-Deficient Open Cluster NGC 2420

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Tanner, Delora; Cracraft, Misty; Twarog, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    CCD photometry on the intermediate-band vbyCaHbeta system is presented for the metal-deficient open cluster, NGC 2420. Restricting the data to probable single members of the cluster using the CMD and the photometric indices alone generates a sample of 106 stars at the cluster turnoff. The average E(b-y) = 0.03 +/- 0.003 (s.e.m.) or E(B-V) = 0.050 +/- 0.004 (s.e.m.), where the errors refer to internal errors alone. With this reddening, [Fe/H] is derived from both m1 and hk, using b-y and Hbeta...

  1. Magnetic behavior of clusters of ferromagnetic transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanna, S. N.; Linderoth, Søren

    1991-01-01

    The effective magnetic moments of small iron and cobalt clusters have been calculated by assuming that the clusters undergo superparamagnetic relaxation. The effective moments per atom are found to be much below the bulk values, even at low temperatures (100 K). They increase with particle size a...... moments in small clusters compared to bulk as being due to melting of surface spins....

  2. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  3. Trends in Metal Oxide Stability for Nanorods, Nanotubes, and Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Vallejo, Federico Calle

    2011-01-01

    ,2) nanorods, (3,3) nanotubes, and the (110) and (100) surfaces. These formation energies can be described semiquantitatively (mean absolute error ≈ 0.12 eV) by the fraction of metal−oxygen bonds broken and the metal d-band and p-band centers in the bulk metal oxide.......The formation energies of nanostructures play an important role in determining their properties, including their catalytic activity. For the case of 15 different rutile and 8 different perovskite metal oxides, we used density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of (2...

  4. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janoš, Pavel; Skoumal, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxides have very important applications in many areas of chemistry, physics and materials science; their properties are dependent on the method of preparation, the morphology and texture. Nanostructured metal oxides can exhibit unique characteristics unlike those of the bulk form depending on their morphology, with a high density of edges, corners and defect surfaces. In recent years, methods have been developed for the preparation of metal oxide powders with tunable control of the primary particle size as well as of a secondary particle size: the size of agglomerates of crystallites. One of the many ways to take advantage of unique properties of nanostructured oxide materials is stoichiometric degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) pollutants on their surfaces.

  5. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  6. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  7. Shape-controlled syntheses of metal oxide nanoparticles by the introduction of rare-earth metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyo-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Ji-Eun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Hickey, Robert J; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, So-Jung

    2017-02-23

    Here, we report the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles through the introduction of rare-earth metals. The addition of gadolinium oleate in the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles induced sphere-to-cube shape changes of nanoparticles and generated iron oxide nanocubes coated with gadolinium. Based on experimental investigations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the shape change to the facet-selective binding of undecomposed gadolinium oleates. While many previous studies on the shape-controlled syntheses of nanoparticles rely on the stabilization of specific crystal facets by anionic surfactants or their decomposition products, this study shows that the interaction between growing transition metal oxide nanoparticles and rare-earth metal complexes can be used as a robust new mechanism for shape-controlled syntheses. Indeed, we demonstrated that this approach was applicable to other transition metal oxide nanoparticles (i.e., manganese oxide and manganese ferrite) and rare earth metals (i.e., gadolinium, europium, and cerium). This study also demonstrates that the nature of metal-ligand bonding can play an important role in the shape control of nanoparticles.

  8. Self-Assembly of Silver Metal Clusters of Small Atomicity on Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerva, Miguel; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Montenegro, Javier; Granja, Juan R

    2015-11-24

    Subnanometric noble metal clusters, composed by only a few atoms, behave like molecular entities and display magnetic, luminescent and catalytic activities. However, noncovalent interactions of molecular metal clusters, lacking of any ligand or surfactant, have not been seen at work. Theoretically attractive and experimentally discernible, van der Waals forces and noncovalent interactions at the metal/organic interfaces will be crucial to understand and develop the next generation of hybrid nanomaterials. Here, we present experimental and theoretical evidence of noncovalent interactions between subnanometric metal (0) silver clusters and aromatic rings and their application in the preparation of 1D self-assembled hybrid architectures with ditopic peptide nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence experiments, circular dichroism and computational simulations verified the occurrence of these interactions in the clean and mild formation of a novel peptide nanotube and metal cluster hybrid material. The findings reported here confirmed the sensitivity of silver metal clusters of small atomicity toward noncovalent interactions, a concept that could find multiple applications in nanotechnology. We conclude that induced supramolecular forces are optimal candidates for the precise spatial positioning and properties modulation of molecular metal clusters. The reported results herein outline and generalize the possibilities that noncovalent interactions will have in this emerging field.

  9. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  10. Gas phase deposition of oxide and metal-oxide coatings on fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patokin, A.P.; Khrebtov, V.L.; Shirokov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Production processes and properties of oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) and metal-oxide (Mo-Al 2 O 3 , Mo-ZrO 2 , W-Al 2 O 3 , W-ZrO 2 ) coatings on molybdenum substrates and uranium dioxide fuel particles were investigated. It is shown that the main factors that have an effect on the deposition rate, density, microstructure and other properties of coatings are the deposition temperature, the ratio of H 2 and CO 2 flow rates, the total reactor pressure and the ratio of partial pressures of corresponding metal chlorides during formation of metal-oxide coatings

  11. Comparison between XAS, AWAXS and DAFS applied to nanometer scale supported metallic clusters. Pt.1; monometallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, D.C.; Sayers, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The structural information found using three techniques related to synchrotron radiation are compared. XAS (X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy), AWAXS (Anomalous Wide Angle X-ray Scattering) and DAFS (Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure) are applied to nanometer scale metallic clusters. (author)

  12. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  13. The influence of nanoscale morphology on the resistivity of cluster-assembled nanostructured metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barborini, E; Bertolini, G; Repetto, P; Leccardi, M; Vinati, S; Corbelli, G; Milani, P

    2010-01-01

    We have studied in situ the evolution of the electrical resistivity of Fe, Pd, Nb, W and Mo cluster-assembled films during their growth by supersonic cluster beam deposition. We observed resistivity of cluster-assembled films several orders of magnitude larger than the bulk, as well as an increase in resistivity by increasing the film thickness in contrast to what was observed for atom-assembled metallic films. This suggests that the nanoscale morphological features typical of ballistic films growth, such as the minimal cluster-cluster interconnection and the evolution of surface roughness with thickness, are responsible for the observed behaviour.

  14. Mass spectrometric probes of metal cluster distributions and metastable ion decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Liu, K.; Cole, S.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of metal clusters has provided both an opportunity and a challenge to the application of mass spectrometry. These days the most often-used technique for cluster generation - laser vaporization - leads to extensive distributions of cluster sizes, from one to perhaps thousands of atoms, and most studies reported to date use excimer laser ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for cluster detection. Our apparatus is a simple one-stage TOF design employing Wiley-McLauren spatial focusing and a one-meter drift tube. In a second apparatus employing a pulsed valve in the cluster source, we see asymmetric broadening of niobium cluster mass peaks under multiphoton ionization conditions, indicating metastable decay of parent cluster ions. Other studies of niobium clusters have shown no such asymmetric peaks. 2 figs

  15. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  16. Metal Acetylacetonates as General Precursors for the Synthesis of Early Transition Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Amanda L.; Chen, Zhuoying; He, Jiaqing; Zhu, Yimei; Turro, Nicholas J.; O'Brien, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A versatile, convenient, and nontoxic solvothermal method for the synthesis of nanocrystalline iron, chromium, and manganese oxides is described. This method employs the reactions of metal acetylacetonate precursors and oxygen-containing solvents in a reaction to prepare metal oxide nanoparticles. Characterization of these nanocrystalline materials was carried out employing transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and elemental analysis.

  17. Metal Acetylacetonates as General Precursors for the Synthesis of Early Transition Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Willis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A versatile, convenient, and nontoxic solvothermal method for the synthesis of nanocrystalline iron, chromium, and manganese oxides is described. This method employs the reactions of metal acetylacetonate precursors and oxygen-containing solvents in a reaction to prepare metal oxide nanoparticles. Characterization of these nanocrystalline materials was carried out employing transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution TEM (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and elemental analysis.

  18. Chemistry of layered d-metal pnictide oxides and their potential as candidates for new superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Tadashi C; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Layered d-metal pnictide oxides are a unique class of compounds which consist of characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers. More than 100 of these layered compounds, including the recently discovered Fe-based superconducting pnictide oxides, can be classified into nine structure types. These structure types and the chemical and physical properties of the characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers of the layered d-metal pnictide oxides are reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, possible approaches to design new superconductors based on these layered d-metal pnictide oxides are proposed. (topical review)

  19. Van der Waals coefficients for alkali metal clusters and their size ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . 1000 atoms) easily, thereby allowing us to study the evolution of van der Waals coefficients with the size of the clusters. For details of the ETF method and its application to study alkali–metal cluster, we refer the reader to [9,10,27–29]. In the.

  20. Van der Waals coefficients for alkali metal clusters and their size

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we employ the hydrodynamic formulation of time-dependent density functional theory to obtain the van der Waals coefficients 6 and 8 of alkali metal clusters of various sizes including very large clusters. Such calculations become computationally very demanding in the orbital-based Kohn-Sham formalism, ...

  1. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  2. A comparison in activity between transition-metal oxides and transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Transition-metal oxides are widely used materials in catalysis as substrates and promoters, but also as the active catalyst materials themselves. We compare the reactivity of transition-metal oxides with the one of transition metals. The comparison is exemplified for the ammonia synthesis reaction. First we show that there exist characteristic Brønsted-Evans Polanyi (BEP) relations (linear relations between transition state and dissociation energies) for dissociation of molecules on transition-metal oxides in the rutile and perovskite structure. It is well-known that the (211) metal surface is several orders of magnitude more reactive than the (111) metal surface due to the lower BEP line for the 211 facet. We find that both rutiles and perovskites follow BEP relations that are lower than the one of the 211 facet. Second we utilize the established BEP relations together with calculated adsorption energetics in a micro-kinetic model to obtain a volcano plot for the catalytic activity. We find that oxides have a higher turn over frequency as compared with metals. Hence, oxides intrinsically have a great advantage in terms of catalytic activity which opens up for catalyst design.

  3. CO-oxidation catalysts: Low-temperature CO oxidation over Noble-Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of CO to CO2 is an important reaction technologically and environmentally and a complex and interesting reaction scientifically. In most cases, the reaction is carried out in order to remove CO as an environmental hazard. A major application of heterogeneous catalysts is catalytic oxidation of CO in the exhaust of combustion devices. The reaction over catalysts in exhaust gas is fast and often mass-transfer-limited since exhaust gases are hot and O2/CO ratios are high. The main challenges to catalyst designers are to control thermal sintering and chemical poisoning of the active materials. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form unique catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  4. The chemistry of nitrogen oxides on small size-selected cobalt clusters, Con+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Marie L.; Lacz, Agnieszka; Drewello, Thomas; Derrick, Peter J.; Woodruff, D. Phil; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2009-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has been employed to study the reactions of gas-phase cationic cobalt clusters, Co n + (n=4-30), with nitric oxide, NO, and nitrous oxide, N 2 O, under single collision conditions. Isolation of the initial cluster permits detailed investigation of fragmentation channels which characterize the reactions of all but the largest clusters studied. In reaction with N 2 O, most clusters generate the monoxides Co n O + without fragmentation, cobalt atom loss accompanying only subsequent reactions. By contrast, chemisorption of even a single NO molecule is accompanied by fragmentation of the cluster. The measured rate coefficients for the Co n + +N 2 O reaction as a function of cluster size are significantly smaller than those calculated using the surface charge capture model, while for NO the rates are comparable. The reactions have been studied under high coverage conditions by storing clusters for extended periods to permit multiple reactions to occur. This leads to interesting chemistry on the surface of the cluster resulting in the formation of stable oxide clusters and/or the decomposition of nitric oxide on the cluster with the resulting loss of molecular nitrogen.

  5. Low pressure bottom-up synthesis of metal@oxide and oxide nanoparticles: control of structure and functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Addato, Sergio; Chiara Spadaro, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Experimental activity on core@shell, metal@oxide, and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) grown with physical synthesis, and more specifically by low pressure gas aggregation sources (LPGAS) is reviewed, through a selection of examples encompassing some potential applications in nanotechnology. After an introduction to the applications of NPs, a brief description of the main characteristics of the growth process of clusters and NPs in LPGAS is given. Thereafter, some relevant case studies are reported: • Formation of native oxide shells around the metal cores in core@shell NPs. • Experimental efforts to obtain magnetic stabilization in magnetic core@shell NPs by controlling their structure and morphology. • Recent advancements in NP source design and new techniques of co-deposition, with relevant results in the realization of NPs with a greater variety of functionalities. • Recent results on reducible oxide NPs, with potentialities in nanocatalysis, energy storage, and other applications. Although this list is far from being exhaustive, the aim of the authors is to provide the reader a descriptive glimpse into the physics behind the growth and studies of low pressure gas-phase synthesized NPs, with their ever-growing potentialities for the rational design of new functional materials.

  6. Polymer-supported metals and metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Guibal, E.; Quignard, F.; SenGupta, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles exhibit unique properties in regard to sorption behaviors, magnetic activity, chemical reduction, ligand sequestration among others. To this end, attempts are being continuously made to take advantage of them in multitude of applications including separation, catalysis, environmental remediation, sensing, biomedical applications and others. However, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles lack chemical stability and mechanical strength. They exhibit extremely high pressure drop or head loss in fixed-bed column operation and are not suitable for any flow-through systems. Also, nanoparticles tend to aggregate; this phenomenon reduces their high surface area to volume ratio and subsequently reduces effectiveness. By appropriately dispersing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles into synthetic and naturally occurring polymers, many of the shortcomings can be overcome without compromising the parent properties of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the appropriate choice of the polymer host with specific functional groups may even lead to the enhancement of the properties of nanoparticles. The synthesis of hybrid materials involves two broad pathways: dispersing the nanoparticles (i) within pre-formed or commercially available polymers; and (ii) during the polymerization process. This review presents a broad coverage of nanoparticles and polymeric/biopolymeric host materials and the resulting properties of the hybrid composites. In addition, the review discusses the role of the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host functionalized polymer in harnessing the desirable properties of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for intended applications.

  7. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-01-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nano...

  8. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  9. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  10. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp∗AlnH-, n = 1-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H.; Gill, Ann F.; Kandalam, Anil K.; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-01

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH-, n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm-, and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters.

  11. Designing porous metallic glass compact enclosed with surface iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Young; Park, Hae Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung [Hybrid Materials Center (HMC), Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yongho [Graphene Research Institute (GRI) & HMC, Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Man, E-mail: jinman_park@hotmail.com [Global Technology Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, 129 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Buem, E-mail: kbkim@sejong.ac.kr [Hybrid Materials Center (HMC), Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • Porous metallic glass compact was developed using electro-discharge sintering process. • Uniform PMGC can only be achieved when low electrical input energy was applied. • Functional iron-oxides were formed on the surface of PMGCs by hydrothermal technique. - Abstract: Porous metallic glass compact (PMGC) using electro-discharge sintering (EDS) process of gas atomized Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} metallic glass powder was developed. The formation of uniform PMGC can only be achieved when low electrical input energy was applied. Functional iron-oxides were formed on the surface of PMGCs by hydrothermal technique. This finding suggests that PMGC can be applied in the new area such as catalyst via hydrothermal technique and offer a promising guideline for using the metallic glasses as a potential functional application.

  12. Metal nitride cluster as a template to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang

    2013-10-16

    } from δ{sup para} was achieved by the primary {sup 13}C and {sup 45}Sc NMR analysis of LnSc{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80} (I). The good linear fitting (R{sup 2}= 0.99) was obtained by considering the encapsulating LnSc{sub 2}N cluster (Ln= Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Lu) inside C{sub 80}:I{sub h} cage which indicated the fantastic nature of magnetic anisotropy of lanthanide metals. The Ce{sub x}Y{sub 3-x}N rate at C{sub 2n} (x= 1,2; 2n= 80-88) MMNCFs were synthesized by ''selective organic solid'' route. The isolated samples were characterized by LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UVvis- NIR, NMR spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The electrochemical oxidation behaviors of CeM{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80} (M= Sc, Lu and Y) were interpreted as the strain-driven endohedral redox couple Ce{sup IV}/Ce{sup III} in CeM{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80} which supported by {sup 13}C and/or {sup 45}Sc NMR study of [CeM{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80}]{sup +} and DFT calculations. As far as we know, this work is the first discovery of (a) the (para)magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes can be tuned by the second diamagnetic metal with different metal ionic radius and (b) electrochemical properties of Ce-based endohedral fullerenes can be tuned by the strain-driven between the encaged cluster and carbon cage.

  13. Metal nitride cluster as a template to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    good linear fitting (R 2 = 0.99) was obtained by considering the encapsulating LnSc 2 N cluster (Ln= Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Lu) inside C 80 :I h cage which indicated the fantastic nature of magnetic anisotropy of lanthanide metals. The Ce x Y 3-x N rate at C 2n (x= 1,2; 2n= 80-88) MMNCFs were synthesized by ''selective organic solid'' route. The isolated samples were characterized by LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UVvis- NIR, NMR spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The electrochemical oxidation behaviors of CeM 2 N rate at C 80 (M= Sc, Lu and Y) were interpreted as the strain-driven endohedral redox couple Ce IV /Ce III in CeM 2 N rate at C 80 which supported by 13 C and/or 45 Sc NMR study of [CeM 2 N rate at C 80 ] + and DFT calculations. As far as we know, this work is the first discovery of (a) the (para)magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes can be tuned by the second diamagnetic metal with different metal ionic radius and (b) electrochemical properties of Ce-based endohedral fullerenes can be tuned by the strain-driven between the encaged cluster and carbon cage.

  14. The mechanism of electroforming of metal oxide memristive switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua Yang, J.; Miao, Feng; Pickett, Matthew D.; Ohlberg, Douglas A. A.; Stewart, Duncan R.; Lau, Chun Ning; Williams, R. Stanley

    2009-05-01

    Metal and semiconductor oxides are ubiquitous electronic materials. Normally insulating, oxides can change behavior under high electric fields—through 'electroforming' or 'breakdown'—critically affecting CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) logic, DRAM (dynamic random access memory) and flash memory, and tunnel barrier oxides. An initial irreversible electroforming process has been invariably required for obtaining metal oxide resistance switches, which may open urgently needed new avenues for advanced computer memory and logic circuits including ultra-dense non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) and adaptive neuromorphic logic circuits. This electrical switching arises from the coupled motion of electrons and ions within the oxide material, as one of the first recognized examples of a memristor (memory-resistor) device, the fourth fundamental passive circuit element originally predicted in 1971 by Chua. A lack of device repeatability has limited technological implementation of oxide switches, however. Here we explain the nature of the oxide electroforming as an electro-reduction and vacancy creation process caused by high electric fields and enhanced by electrical Joule heating with direct experimental evidence. Oxygen vacancies are created and drift towards the cathode, forming localized conducting channels in the oxide. Simultaneously, O2- ions drift towards the anode where they evolve O2 gas, causing physical deformation of the junction. The problematic gas eruption and physical deformation are mitigated by shrinking to the nanoscale and controlling the electroforming voltage polarity. Better yet, electroforming problems can be largely eliminated by engineering the device structure to remove 'bulk' oxide effects in favor of interface-controlled electronic switching.

  15. Large Lateral Photovoltaic Effect in Metal-(Oxide-Semiconductor Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongqi Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE can be used in position-sensitive detectors to detect very small displacements due to its output of lateral photovoltage changing linearly with light spot position. In this review, we will summarize some of our recent works regarding LPE in metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, and give a theoretical model of LPE in these two structures.

  16. Large lateral photovoltaic effect in metal-(oxide-) semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chongqi; Wang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) can be used in position-sensitive detectors to detect very small displacements due to its output of lateral photovoltage changing linearly with light spot position. In this review, we will summarize some of our recent works regarding LPE in metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, and give a theoretical model of LPE in these two structures.

  17. Combustion Kinetics of Metal Oxide and Halide Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-04

    often not obeyed. Particularly for exothermic and slightly endothermic reactions, order of magnitude errors can be made by extrap - 1olations based on the...schematic of the HTFFR, high-temperature fast-flow reactor , method we are using to generate the metallic radicals and measure their oxidation kinetics...TEMPERATURE INTERVALS. TECHNIQUE High-Temperature Fast-Flow Reactor FURNACE REACTION LENGTH-REACTION TIME SNA- LASER FLUORESCENCE OXIDANTIo CO2 METAL IN

  18. New Digital Metal-Oxide (MOx) Sensor Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüffer, Daniel; Hoehne, Felix; Bühler, Johannes

    2018-03-31

    The application of metal oxide gas sensors in Internet of Things (IoT) devices and mobile platforms like wearables and mobile phones offers new opportunities for sensing applications. Metal-oxide (MOx) sensors are promising candidates for such applications, thanks to the scientific progresses achieved in recent years. For the widespread application of MOx sensors, viable commercial offerings are required. In this publication, the authors show that with the new Sensirion Gas Platform (SGP) a milestone in the commercial application of MOx technology has been reached. The architecture of the new platform and its performance in selected applications are presented.

  19. Metal Oxide Nano structures: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L. H.; Patil, D. S.; Yang, J.; Xiao, J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nano structured materials have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties, which make these materials potentially suitable for applications in electronics, optics, photonics, and sensors. Some metal oxides show a wide variety of morphologies such as nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes, nano rings, and nano belts. Synthesis and investigation of these metal-oxide nano structures are beneficial not only for understanding the fundamental phenomena in low dimensional systems, but also for developing new-generation nano devices with high performance.

  20. Microwave-assisted route for synthesis of nanosized metal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar Lagashetty et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted route for the synthesis of nanomaterials has gained importance in the field of synthetic technology because of its faster, cleaner and cost effectiveness than the other conventional and wet chemical methods for the preparation of metal oxide nanoparticles. In the present work, synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles viz., γ-Fe2O3, NiO, ZnO, CuO and Co-γ-Fe2O3 were carried out by microwave-assisted route through the thermal decomposition of their respective metal oxalate precursors employing polyvinyl alcohol as a fuel. The metal oxide nanoparticles are then characterized for their size and γ to α (in γ-Fe2O3 transition and structure by employing powder X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD pattern and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectral studies. The morphology of the samples ranged from nanorods to irregular-shaped particles for different metal oxide samples on the basis of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Frequency-dependent dielectric study of the ferrite samples (γ-Fe2O3 and Co-Fe2O3 showed a similar behaviour, where the dielectric constant decreased rapidly with increase in frequency. Possible explanation for this behaviour is given.

  1. Global DNA methylation and oxidative stress biomarkers in workers exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wu, Wei-Te; Liao, Hui-Yi [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chao-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Jung, Wei-Ting [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling, E-mail: huilinglee3573@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • Global methylation and oxidative DNA damage levels in nanomaterial handling workers were assessed. • 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate of workers exposed to nanoparticles was higher. • 8-OHdG was negatively correlated with global methylation. • Exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles may lead to global methylation and DNA oxidative damage. - Abstract: This is the first study to assess global methylation, oxidative DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation in workers with occupational exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs). Urinary and white blood cell (WBC) 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) 8-isoprostane were measured as oxidative stress biomarkers. WBC global methylation was measured as an epigenetic alteration. Exposure to TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2,} and indium tin oxide (ITO) resulted in significantly higher oxidative biomarkers such as urinary 8-OHdG and EBC 8-isoprostane. However, significantly higher WBC 8-OHdG and lower global methylation were only observed in ITO handling workers. Significant positive correlations were noted between WBC and urinary 8-OHdG (Spearman correlation r = 0.256, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between WBC 8-OHdG and global methylation (r = −0.272, p = 0.002). These results suggest that exposure to metal oxide NMs may lead to global methylation, DNA oxidative damage, and lipid peroxidation.

  2. Metal Phosphate-Supported Pt Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoshuang; Qin, Hongmei; Meng, Tao; Lin, Yi; Ma, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Oxides (such as SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CeO2) have often been used to prepare supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation and other reactions, whereas metal phosphate-supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation were rarely reported. Metal phosphates are a family of metal salts with high thermal stability and acid-base properties. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, denoted as Ca-P-O here) also has rich hydroxyls. Here we report a series of metal phosphate-supported Pt (Pt/M-P-O, M = Mg, Al, Ca, Fe, Co, Zn, La) catalysts for CO oxidation. Pt/Ca-P-O shows the highest activity. Relevant characterization was conducted using N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR). This work furnishes a new catalyst system for CO oxidation and other possible reactions. PMID:28788293

  3. Sonochemical water splitting in the presence of powdered metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosini, Vincent; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of hydrogen formation was explored as a new chemical dosimeter allowing probing the sonochemical activity of argon-saturated water in the presence of micro- and nano-sized metal oxide particles exhibiting catalytic properties (ThO2, ZrO2, and TiO2). It was shown that the conventional sonochemical dosimeter based on H2O2 formation is hardly applicable in such systems due to catalytic degradation of H2O2 at oxide surface. The study of H2 generation revealed that at low-frequency ultrasound (20 kHz) the sonochemical water splitting is greatly improved for all studied metal oxides. The highest efficiency is observed for relatively large micrometric particles of ThO2 which is assigned to ultrasonically-driven particle fragmentation accompanied by mechanochemical water molecule splitting. The nanosized metal oxides do not exhibit particle size reduction under ultrasonic treatment but nevertheless yield higher quantities of H2. The enhancement of sonochemical water splitting in this case is most probably resulting from better bubble nucleation in heterogeneous systems. At high-frequency ultrasound (362 kHz), the effect of metal oxide particles results in a combination of nucleation and ultrasound attenuation. In contrast to 20 kHz, micrometric particles slowdown the sonolysis of water at 362 kHz due to stronger attenuation of ultrasonic waves while smaller particles show a relatively weak and various directional effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Metal Phosphate-Supported Pt Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang Qian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxides (such as SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CeO2 have often been used to prepare supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation and other reactions, whereas metal phosphate-supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation were rarely reported. Metal phosphates are a family of metal salts with high thermal stability and acid-base properties. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO46(OH2, denoted as Ca-P-O here also has rich hydroxyls. Here we report a series of metal phosphate-supported Pt (Pt/M-P-O, M = Mg, Al, Ca, Fe, Co, Zn, La catalysts for CO oxidation. Pt/Ca-P-O shows the highest activity. Relevant characterization was conducted using N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma (ICP atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR. This work furnishes a new catalyst system for CO oxidation and other possible reactions.

  5. Oxygen partial pressure: a key to alloying and discovery in metal oxide--metal eutectic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, J.D.; Clark, G.W.; Oliver, B.F.

    1978-01-01

    Control of oxygen partial pressure is essential in the directional solidification of oxide--metal eutectic composites by techniques involving gas-solid and gas-liquid interactions. The existence of end components in the eutectic composite is Po 2 sensitive as are melt stoichiometry, solid phase compositions, and vapor losses due to oxidation-volatilization. Simple criteria are postulated which can aid the experimentalist in selecting the proper gas mixture for oxide--metal eutectic composite growth. The Cr 2 O 3 --Mo--Cr systems was used to verify certain aspects of the proposed criteria

  6. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO2, SnO2, NbO2, ZrO2, SiO2, Ta2O5 and Nb2O5) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in ...

  7. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Wehmas, Leah C.; Anders, Catherine; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, Alex; Pereira, Cliff B.; Greenwood, Juliet A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized tha...

  8. Improved adhesion of metal oxide layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide layer, which method comprises the steps of: a) mixing zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in water or methanol and b) filtering out solids; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in aqueous or m...

  9. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (figure 7). We have also been able to bond Al2O3 to graphene by using AlCl3 as the reactant. The oxide film was amor- phous after calcination at 600. ◦. C. We have prepared chemically bonded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles to graphene by functionalizing Fe3O4 by amine, then reacting it with graphene functionalized with.

  10. Theoretical Studies of Catalysis on Supported Metal Clusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metiu, Horia

    2005-01-01

    ... catalytic chemistry than large ones. In addition they used advanced quantum chemistry method to test whether density functional theory is capable of providing accurate results for adsorption of oxygen, hydrogen, and propene on gold clusters...

  11. Application of metal oxide refractories for melting and casting reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessen, N.C. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Townsend, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive investigations have been conducted to develop metal oxide refractories for containment of molten uranium and uranium alloys. Since uranium and uranium alloys are readily susceptable to the formation of complex oxides, carbides, nitrides, intermetallic compounds, and suboxide reactions, severe problems exist for the production of quality castings. These contamination reactions are dependent on temperature, pressure, and molten metal interfacial reactions. The need for high purity metals to meet specification repeatedly has resulted in the development of improved metal oxide refractories and sophisticated furnace controls. Applications of Y 2 O 3 for use as a crucible and mold coating, precision molds and cores, and high temperature castable ceramics are discussed. Experimental results on melt impurity levels, thermal controls during melting, surface interactions and casting quality are presented

  12. Flexible Metal Oxide/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Neuromorphic Devices on Flexible Conducting Graphene Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Chang Jin; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Li Qiang; Liu, Yang Hui; Feng, Ping; Liu, Zhao Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Flexible metal oxide/graphene oxide hybrid multi-gate neuron transistors were fabricated on flexible graphene substrates. Dendritic integrations in both spatial and temporal modes were successfully emulated, and spatiotemporal correlated logics were obtained. A proof-of-principle visual system model for emulating lobula giant motion detector neuron was investigated. Our results are of great interest for flexible neuromorphic cognitive systems.

  13. Magnetism in clusters of 4d transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salcido A, F.; Villasenor G, P.; Dorantes D, J.

    1999-01-01

    The magnetic properties of ruthenium (Ru N ), rhodium (Rh N ) and palladium (Pd N ) clusters are determined as function of the cluster size N (N=4, 6, 13 and 19). For N=4 and 6 we take the tetrahedral and pentagonal pyramid geometric structures respectively. For N=13 and 19 we consider fcc-like structures. We use a tight binding Hamiltonian for s, p and d electrons in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. For the considered cluster, we obtain magnetic moments non-vanishing local, with the exception of Rh 4 . Ru N and Rh N present a maximum in the average magnetic moment when the size of the cluster is N=13 and in all the elements we found that the average magnetic moment decreases strongly at N=19. As expected, the local magnetic moments at the atoms of the surface of the cluster are larger than those at inner atoms, except for Ru 19 . We find strong oscillations of the magnetic moment as function of N an are less important in the Pd N clusters. (Author)

  14. Visible light sensitive cupric oxide metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, P. V.; Bhat, J. S.; Deshpande, N. G.

    2018-01-01

    The visible light response of Ag-CuO-Ag metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector is presented. Electron beam deposited CuO thin films consisted of tightly packed nanocrystallites in monoclinic phase. The observed red-shifts in indirect band-gap from 1.09 eV to 0.99 eV and direct band-gap from 2.92 eV to 2.87 eV, with annealing temperature, is attributed to the weak quantum confinement effect. CuO thin films annealed at 500 °C have a p-type conductivity of 4.33 × 10-2 (ohm-cm)-1 and mobility of 13.2 cm2/V-s. Significant responsivities of 0.33 mA/W and 0.59 mA/W for blue and red lights, respectively, in Ag-CuO-Ag photodetector are illustrative for using it as visible light sensor.

  15. All-alkoxide synthesis of strontium-containing metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making strontium-containing metal-oxide ceramic thin films from a precursor liquid by mixing a strontium neo-pentoxide dissolved in an amine solvent and at least one metal alkoxide dissolved in a solvent, said at least one metal alkoxide selected from the group consisting of alkoxides of calcium, barium, bismuth, cadmium, lead, titanium, tantalum, hafnium, tungsten, niobium, zirconium, yttrium, lanthanum, antimony, chromium and thallium, depositing a thin film of the precursor liquid on a substrate, and heating the thin film in the presence of oxygen at between 550 and 700.degree. C.

  16. Tracing the Chemical Evolution of Metal-rich Galactic Bulge Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Gonzalez, Cesar; Saviane, Ivo; Geisler, Doug; Villanova, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    We present in this poster the metallicity characterization of the four metal rich Bulge Galactic Gobular Clusters, which have controversial metallicities. We analyzed our high-resolution spectra (using UVES-580nm and GIRAFFE-HR13 setups) for a large sample of RGB/AGB targets in each cluster in order to measure their metallicity and prove or discard the iron spread hypothesis. We have also characterized chemically stars with potentially different iron content by measuring light (O, Na, Mg, Al), alpha (Si, Ca, Ti), iron–peak (V, Cr, Ni, Mn) and s and r process (Y, Zr, Ba, Eu) elements. We have identified possible channels responsible for the chemical heterogeneity of the cluster populations, like AGB or massive fast-rotating stars contamination, or SN explosion. Also, we have analyzed the origin and evolution of these bulge GCs and their connection with the bulge itself.

  17. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  18. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  19. Single sheet metal oxides and hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lizhi

    The synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) provides a relatively easy and traditional way to build versatile chemical compounds with a rough control of the bulk structure. The delamination of LDHs to form their single host layers (2D nanosheets) and the capability to reassemble them offer ......) Delamination of the LDHs structure (oxGRC12) with the formation of single sheet iron (hydr)oxide (SSI). (3) Assembly of the new 2D nanosheets layer by layer to achieve desired functionalities....

  20. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  1. Oxidation of limonene catalyzed by Metal(Salen) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, L. F.; Corraza, M. L.; Cardozo-Filho, L.; Márquez-Alvarez, H.; Antunes, O. A. C.

    2006-01-01

    The compound R-(+)limonene is available and cheap than its oxidized products. Consequently, the selective oxidation of R(+)limonene has attracted attention as a promising process for the production of compounds with a higher market value, such as cis/trans-1,2-limoneneoxide, cis/trans-carveol and/or carvone. One of the these processes, described in the recent literature, is submission of R-(+)limonene to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by neutral or cationic Metal(Salen) complexes, in the pre...

  2. Aerobic oxidation of alcohols in visible light on Pd-grafted Ti cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The titanium cluster with the reduced band gap has been synthesized having the palladium nanoparticles over the surface, which not only binds to the atmospheric oxygen but also catalyzes the oxidation of alcohols under visible light.

  3. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  4. RH and H2 production in reactions between ROH and small molybdenum oxide cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Sarah E; Jarrold, Caroline C

    2014-09-18

    To test recent computational studies on the mechanism of metal oxide cluster anion reactions with water [Ramabhadran, R. O.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 3066; Ramabhadran, R. O.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 17039], the reactivity of molybdenum oxo–cluster anions, Mo(x)O(y)(–) (x = 1 – 4; y ≤ 3x) toward both methanol (MeOH) and ethanol (EtOH) has been studied using mass spectrometric analysis of products formed in a high-pressure, fast-flow reactor. The size-dependent product distributions are compared to previous Mo(x)O(y)(–) + H2O/D2O reactivity studies, with particular emphasis on the Mo2O(y)(–) and Mo3O(y)(–) series. In general, sequential oxidation, Mo(x)O(y)(–) + ROH → Mo(x)O(y+1)(–) + RH, and addition reactions, Mo(x)O(y)(–) + ROH → Mo(x)O(y+1)RH(–), largely corresponded with previously studied Mo(x)O(y)(–) + H2O/D2O reactions [Rothgeb, D. W., Mann, J. E., and Jarrold, C. C. J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 054305], though with much lower rate constants than those determined for Mo(x)O(y)(–) + H2O/D2O reactions. This finding is consistent with the computational studies that suggested that −H mobility on the cluster–water complex was an important feature in the overall reactivity. There were several notable differences between cluster–ROH and cluster–water reactions associated with lower R–OH bond dissociation energies relative to the HO–H dissociation energy.

  5. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alloys and Steels Volume 25 Issue 5 October 2002 pp 371-373 ... The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. ... Institute of Construction and Architecture of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 842 20 Bratislava, Slovak Republic ...

  6. Metal Oxides as Efficient Charge Transporters in Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, Mohammed

    2017-07-10

    Over the past few years, hybrid halide perovskites have emerged as a highly promising class of materials for photovoltaic technology, and the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has accelerated at an unprecedented pace, reaching a record value of over 22%. In the context of PSC research, wide-bandgap semiconducting metal oxides have been extensively studied because of their exceptional performance for injection and extraction of photo-generated carriers. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the synthesis and applications of metal oxides as electron and hole transporters in efficient PSCs with both mesoporous and planar architectures. Metal oxides and their doped variants with proper energy band alignment with halide perovskites, in the form of nanostructured layers and compact thin films, can not only assist with charge transport but also improve the stability of PSCs under ambient conditions. Strategies for the implementation of metal oxides with tailored compositions and structures, and for the engineering of their interfaces with perovskites will be critical for the future development and commercialization of PSCs.

  7. Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Wagner, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

  8. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using guanidinium nitrate or nitro urea in the presence of silica sulfuric acid. Arash Ghorbani-Choghamarani Mohsen Nikoorazm Hamid Goudarziafshar Alireza Shokr Hosein Almasi. Volume 123 Issue 4 ...

  9. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janos, P.; Skoumal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 236, č. 2016 (2016), s. 239-258 ISSN 0179-5953 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1116 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : chemical warfare agent * metal nanoparticle * unique surface-chemistry * mesoporous manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.930, year: 2016

  10. A novel parameter estimation method for metal oxide surge arrester ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Accurate modelling and exact determination of Metal Oxide (MO) surge arrester parameters are very important for arrester allocation, insulation coordination studies and systems reliability calculations. In this paper, a new technique, which is the combination of Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) and Ant Colony ...

  11. Metal oxide blended ZSM-5 nanocomposites as ethanol sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nano-ZSM-5 is synthesized without organic template via microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. The synthesized nano-ZSM-5 zeolite is blended with metal oxides (ZnO and TiO 2 ) to have novel composites as ethanol sensors. The composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared ...

  12. Anti-Oxidative, Metal Chelating and Radical Scavenging Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate protein hydrolysates and membrane ultrafiltration fractions of blue-spotted stingray for metal chelating and radical scavenging activities, as well as protection against oxidative protein damage. Methods: Stingray protein isolates were hydrolysed with alcalase, papain and trypsin for 3 h. Alcalase.

  13. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image

  14. A review of liquid metal anode solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIYA TOLEUOVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC variant that uses liquid metal electrodes (anodes with the advantage of greater fuel tolerance and the ability to operate on solid fuel. Key features of the approach are discussed along with the technological and research challenges that need to be overcome for scale-up and commercialisation.

  15. Metal oxide blended ZSM-5 nanocomposites as ethanol sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ges quality monitoring, environmental monitoring, indoor air quality and breath analysis [16]. It is due to the great demand in diverse fields, that the search for new ethanol sensor mate- rials is still needed. Literature survey reveals the sparseness in research based on metal oxide blended zeolite gas sensors. Hence in this ...

  16. Oxidation of ligand-protected aluminum clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    We report Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of the oxidation of ligand-protected aluminum clusters that form a prototypical cluster-assembled material. These clusters contain a small aluminum core surrounded by a monolayer of organic ligand. The aromatic cyclopentadienyl ligands form a strong bond with surface Al atoms, giving rise to an organometallic cluster that crystallizes into a low-symmetry solid and is briefly stable in air before oxidizing. Our calculations of isolated aluminum/cyclopentadienyl clusters reacting with oxygen show minimal reaction between the ligand and O 2 molecules at simulation temperatures of 500 and 1000 K. In all cases, the reaction pathway involves O 2 diffusing through the ligand barrier, splitting into atomic oxygen upon contact with the aluminum, and forming an oxide cluster with aluminum/ligand bonds still largely intact. Loss of individual aluminum-ligand units, as expected from unimolecular decomposition calculations, is not observed except following significant oxidation. These calculations highlight the role of the ligand in providing a steric barrier against oxidizers and in maintaining the large aluminum surface area of the solid-state cluster material

  17. Actinomycetes-mediated biogenic synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, M; Kannabiran, K

    2017-06-01

    Actinomycetes-mediated biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activities are well documented. Actinomycetes facilitate both intracellular and extracellular metal nanoparticles synthesis and are efficient candidates for the production of polydispersed, stable and ultra-small size metal nanoparticles. Secondary metabolites and new chemical entities derived from Actinomycetes have not been extensively studied for the synthesis of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles. The present review focuses on biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles from Actinomycetes and the scope for exploring Actinomycetes-derived compounds (enzymes, organics acids and bioactive compounds) as metal and metal oxide reducing agents for the synthesis of desired nanoparticles. This review also focuses on challenges faced in the applications of nanoparticles and the methods to synthesize biogenic metal nanoparticles with desired physiochemical properties such as ultra-small size, large surface to mass ratio, high reactivity etc. Methods to evade their toxicity and unique interactions with biological systems to improve their chance as an alternative therapeutic agent in medical and pharmaceutical industry are also discussed. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Luisa; Münzenrieder, Niko; Vogt, Christian; Faber, Hendrik; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Tröster, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In particular

  19. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Luisa; Vogt, Christian; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Tröster, Gerhard [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Münzenrieder, Niko [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Sensor Technology Research Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Faber, Hendrik; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In

  20. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripković, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-03-07

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO(2), SnO(2), NbO(2), ZrO(2), SiO(2), Ta(2)O(5) and Nb(2)O(5)) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtO(x) (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO(2) might be a good support for platinum redispersion at PEMFC cathodes.

  1. Binding of noble metal clusters with rare gas atoms: theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Zahra; Far, Maryam Fakhraei; Maghari, Ali

    2012-12-27

    Binding of noble metal clusters (M(n), M = Cu, Ag, and Au; n = 2-4) with rare gas atoms (Rg = Kr, Xe, and Rn) has been investigated at the density functional (CAM-B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2) levels of theory. The calculation shows significant affinity of neutral metal clusters for interaction with rare gas atoms. The binding energies indicate that gold clusters have the highest and silver clusters have the lowest affinity for interaction with rare gas atoms, and for the same metal clusters, there is a continuous increase in E(b) from Kr to Rn. The M-Rg bonding mechanism have been interpreted by means of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO), and energy decomposition analysis (EDA). According to these theories, the M-Rg bonds are found to be partially electrostatic and partially covalent. EDA results identify that these bonds have less than 40% covalent character and more than 60% electrostatic, and also NBO calculations predict the amount of charge transfer from the lone pair of rare gas to σ* and n*orbitals of metal clusters.

  2. Adhesive, abrasive and oxidative wear in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is increasingly being used to provide wear resistance in metals and cemented tungsten carbides. Field trials and laboratory tests indicate that the best performance is achieved in mild abrasive wear. This can be understood in terms of the classification of wear modes (adhesive, abrasive, oxidative etc.) introduced by Burwell. Surface hardening and work hardenability are the major properties to be enhanced by ion implantation. The implantation of nitrogen or dual implants of metallic and interstitial species are effective. Recently developed techniques of ion-beam-enhanced deposition of coatings can further improve wear resistance by lessening adhesion and oxidation. In order to support such hard coatings, ion implantation of nitrogen can be used as a preliminary treatment. There is thus emerging a versatile group of related hard vacuum treatments involving intense beams of nitrogen ions for the purpose of tailoring metal surfaces to resist wear. (Auth.)

  3. Electrocatalytic Applications of Graphene–Metal Oxide Nanohybrid Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei; Chi, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    of cutting-edge developments in graphene–metal oxide nanohybrid materials, with the recently reported results from worldwide research groups. This chapter is presented first with an introduction, followed by synthetic meth‐ ods and structural characterization of nanocomposites, an emphasis......Development of state-of-the-art electrocatalysts using commercially available precursors with low cost is an essential step in the advancement of next-generation electrochemical energy storage/conversion systems. In this regard, noble metal-free and graphene-sup‐ ported nanocomposites...... of graphenebased composite materials, graphene–metal oxide nanohybrids hold great promise to‐ ward engineering efficient electrocatalysts and have attracted increasing interest in both scientific communities and industrial partners around the world. The goal of this chapter is primarily set on an overview...

  4. Suppression of globular cluster formation in metal-poor gas clouds by Lyman α radiation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Yajima, Hidenobu

    2018-03-01

    We study the impact of Ly α radiation feedback on globular cluster (GC) formation. In this Letter, we analytically derive the relation between star formation efficiency (SFE) and metallicity in spherical clouds with the Ly α radiation feedback. Our models show that the SFE becomes small as the metallicity decreases. In metal-poor gas clouds, Ly α photons are trapped for a long time and exert strong radiation force to the gas, resulting in the suppression of star formation. We find that bound star clusters (SFE ≳ 0.5) form only for the metallicity higher than ˜ 10- 2.5 Z⊙ in the case with the initial cloud mass 105 M⊙ and the radius 5 pc. Our models successfully reproduce the lower bound of observed metallicity of GCs. Thus, we suggest that the Ly α radiation feedback can be essential in understanding the formation of GCs.

  5. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Sanjubala; Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM 13 (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM 13 clusters, Co 13 is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe 13 and Ni 13 clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters

  6. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, Jeffrey D. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion 160-C Casilla, Concepcion (Chile); Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Maderak, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Twarog, Bruce, E-mail: jcummings@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: maderak@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu, E-mail: btwarog@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    High-resolution CTIO 4 m/HYDRA spectroscopy of the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 ([Fe/H] = +0.43 {+-} 0.01) has been used to study the stellar lithium (Li) abundances near the cluster's turnoff. NGC 6253 greatly expands the range of [Fe/H] for clusters that have a Li abundance analysis. This is important for studying the complicated effects of, and potential correlations with, stellar Fe abundance on surface Li abundance. Comparisons to the younger and less-metal-rich Hyades and to the similarly aged but solar-metallicity M67 show that NGC 6253's Li abundances are qualitatively consistent with the prediction, from Standard Stellar Evolution Theory, that higher-metallicity stars have a greater Li depletion. Comparison with M67 provides evidence that the more-metal-rich NGC 6253 had a higher initial Li, which is consistent with expectations from models of Galactic Li production. NGC 6253 is also compared to the intermediate-aged NGC 3680, NGC 752, and IC 4651 open clusters. Comparison of the Li-gap positions in all six clusters shows that (1) the gap's position in T{sub eff} is independent of metallicity, but (2) higher-metallicity clusters have their gaps in higher-mass stars. In addition, the Li gap's position is shown not to evolve with age, which provides an important constraint for the non-standard depletion mechanisms that may create the Li gap.

  7. Metal cluster fission: jellium model and Molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2004-01-01

    Fission of doubly charged sodium clusters is studied using the open-shell two-center deformed jellium model approximation and it ab initio molecular dynamic approach accounting for all electrons in the system. Results of calculations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ + Na_3^+ and Na_18...

  8. Computer simulations of small semiconductor and metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, W.

    1991-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of recent simulations of small clusters, made with both ab-initio and classical approaches, with particular emphasis on the application of the Car-Parrinello method. The discussion mainly focusses on the structural properties of a variety of materials and on the effects of temperature. (orig.)

  9. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    as precursor and 2-methoxy ethanol. (C3H8O2, 99⋅90% purity) as solvent. A weighed quantity of the precursor was added to 2-methoxy ethanol, this solution was then filtered and heated to 50°C. The gel .... cle and Vi its volume, K the anisotropy energy per unit volume and J the strength of the exchange interaction.

  10. Volatile organometallic complexes suitable for use in chemical vapor depositions on metal oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giolando, Dean M.

    2003-09-30

    Novel ligated compounds of tin, titanium, and zinc are useful as metal oxide CVD precursor compounds without the detriments of extreme reactivity yet maintaining the ability to produce high quality metal oxide coating by contact with heated substrates.

  11. POLYMER COMPOSITE FILMS WITH SIZE-SELECTED METAL NANOPARTICLES FABRICATED BY CLUSTER BEAM TECHNIQUE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Popok, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Formation of polymer films with size-selected silver and copper nanoparticles (NPs) is studied. Polymers are prepared by spin coating while NPs are fabricated and deposited utilizing a magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus. The particle embedding into the films is provided by thermal annealing...... after the deposition. The degree of immersion can be controlled by the annealing temperature and time. Together with control of cluster coverage the described approach represents an efficient method for the synthesis of thin polymer composite layers with either partially or fully embedded metal NPs....... Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition and thermal annealing allows to form ordered arrays of metal NPs on polymer films. Plasticity and flexibility of polymer host and specific properties added by coinage metal NPs open a way for different applications of such composite materials...

  12. Comparison of nano-sized Mn oxides with the Mn cluster of photosystem II as catalysts for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Haghighi, Behzad; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2015-02-01

    "Back to Nature" is a promising way to solve the problems that we face today, such as air pollution and shortage of energy supply based on conventional fossil fuels. A Mn cluster inside photosystem II catalyzes light-induced water-splitting leading to the generation of protons, electrons and oxygen in photosynthetic organisms, and has been considered as a good model for the synthesis of new artificial water-oxidizing catalysts. Herein, we surveyed the structural and functional details of this cluster and its surrounding environment. Then, we review the mechanistic findings concerning the cluster and compare this biological catalyst with nano-sized Mn oxides, which are among the best artificial Mn-based water-oxidizing catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  14. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  15. CO adsorption on transition metal clusters: Trends from density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D.; Cooksy, Andrew L.; Efstathiou, Angelos M.

    2008-05-01

    This work reports for the first time the trends for carbon monoxide (CO) chemisorption on transition metal clusters present in supported metal catalysts. In particular, the energetic, structural and infrared adsorption characteristics of linearly (atop) CO adsorbed on transition metal nano-clusters of less than 10 Å in size were explored. Spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to explore the trends of CO adsorption energy (AM-CO) and C-O vibrational frequency (νCO) for clusters composed of Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt and Au. The effects of the transition metal electronic structure onto the adsorption energy of CO and the vibrational stretching frequency of C-O, and how these chemical parameters can be correlated to the catalytic activity of transition supported metal catalysts that involve the adsorption, surface diffusion, and C-O bond dissociation elementary steps in heterogeneous catalytic surface reactions, are discussed. Our findings show that an increase of the electronic d-shell occupancy and the principal quantum number (n) in transition metals causes an increase in the vibrational stretching frequency of the C-O bond. This trend is inconsistent with the classical Blyholder model for the metal-carbonyl bond.

  16. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.

    1990-01-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs

  17. Insertion compounds of transition-metal and uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chippindale, A.M.; Dickens, P.G.; Powell, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Several transition-metal and actinide oxides, in which the metal occurs in a high oxidation state, have open covalent structures and are capable of incorporating alkali and other electropositive metals under mild conditions to form insertion compounds A x MO n . These are solids which have several features in common: Over a range of compositions, A x MO n exists as one or more stable or metastable phases in which the structure of the parent oxide MO n is largely retained and the insertion element A is accommodated interstitially. Insertion is accompanied by a redox process A=A i . + e - M in which M is reduced and the electronic properties of the parent oxide change to those typical of a mixed-valence compound. The insertion process xA + MO n = A x MO n can be reversed, at least to some extent, by chemical or electrochemical reaction, with retention of structure (topotactic reaction). This review concentrates on methods of synthesis, characterisation, crystal structure and thermochemistry of these insertion compounds. It updates and extends previous work. (author)

  18. Quintuple super bonding between the superatoms of metallic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Cheng, Longjiu

    2017-09-14

    The synthesis of a stable compound with Cr-Cr quintuple bonding (σ, 2π, 2δ) opened the door to a new field of chemistry (T. Nguyen, A. D. Sutton, M. Brynda, J. C. Fettinger, G. J. Long and P. P. Power, Science, 2005, 310, 844). Looking back to the mass experiments on sodium clusters (W. D. Knight, K. Clemenger, W. A. de Heer, W. A. Saunders, M. Y. Chou and M. L. Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1984, 52, 2141), this work tells some new stories about the experimentally viewed magic numbers 26e and 30e. By unbiased global search, the 26e Li 20 Mg 3 cluster has a perfect double-icosahedral motif with a large HOMO-LUMO energy gap (1.44 eV). We theoretically found that each icosahedron is an independent superatom and molecule-like electronic shell-closure is achieved via quintuple super bonding between two superatoms: [8e](1D2S) 5 -(1D2S) 5 [8e]. Similar quintuple bonding also exists in the 30e double-icosahedral Li 18 Mg 3 Al 2 cluster: [8e](1D2S) 7 -(1D2S) 7 [8e]. The 26e/30e quintuple bonding was verified by the beautiful analogies in molecular orbital diagrams and chemical bonding patterns with V 2 /Re 2 molecules. Such a quintuple super bonding makes a bridge between the jellium model and chemical bonding, which further expands the community of chemical bonds.

  19. Chemically synthesized metal-oxide-metal segmented nanowires with high ferroelectric response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herderick, Edward D; Padture, Nitin P [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Emergent Materials, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Polomoff, Nicholas A; Huey, Bryan D, E-mail: padture.1@osu.edu [Department of Chemical, Materials, and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    A chemical synthesis method is presented for the fabrication of high-definition segmented metal-oxide-metal (MOM) nanowires in two different ferroelectric oxide systems: Au-BaTiO{sub 3}-Au and Au-PbTiO{sub 3}-Au. This method entails electrodeposition of segmented nanowires of Au-TiO{sub 2}-Au inside anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, followed by topotactic hydrothermal conversion of the TiO{sub 2} segments into BaTiO{sub 3} or PbTiO{sub 3} segments. Two-terminal devices from individual MOM nanowires are fabricated, and their ferroelectric properties are measured directly, without the aid of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) methods. The MOM nanowire architecture provides high-quality end-on electrical contacts to the oxide segments, and allows direct measurement of properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxide segments. Unusually high ferroelectric responses, for chemically synthesized oxides, in these MOM nanowires are reported, and are attributed to the lack of residual strain in the oxides. The ability to measure directly the active properties of nanoscale volume, strain-free oxides afforded by the MOM nanowire architecture has important implications for fundamental studies of not only ferroelectric nanostructures but also nanostructures in the emerging field of multiferroics.

  20. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. Conductive transition metal oxide nanostructured electrochromic material and optical switching devices constructed thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Koo, Bonil; Garcia, Guillermo; Milliron, Delia J.; Trizio, Luca De; Dahlman, Clayton

    2017-10-10

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant, a solid state electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and visible spectrum radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  2. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD... Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT...of both Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions and Boron Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions with Oxygen: Anionic Products The anionic products of reactions

  3. Room Temperature Detection of Benzene Vapours by Tin Oxide Nano Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. PANCHAL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of tin oxide with nano clusters were deposited using Chemical Vapour Transport technique. The annealed films were used as sensor to detect benzene vapours at room temperature. The response was studied for the concentration range 300-1000 ppm. A comparative study of the response of the nano clustered films to benzene vapours in this range with the response of thin films of Indium tin oxide and tin oxide deposited by the physical vapour deposition method was taken up.

  4. The nature of transition-metal-oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, V. E.

    The surfaces of the 3d-transition-metal oxides form a rich and important system in which to study the effects of atomic geometry, ligand coordination and d-orbital population on surface electronic structure and chemisorption. This article considers the properties of those surfaces in terms of the types of surface structures that can exist, including steps and point defects, and their relation to the experimental data that is available for well characterized, single-crystal surfaces. The electronic structure of nearly perfect surfaces is very similar to that of the bulk for many of the oxides that have been studied; atoms at step sites also appear to have properties similar to those of atoms on terraces. Point defects are often associated with surfaces 0 vacancies and attendant transfer of electrons to adjacent metal cations. Those cations are poorly screened from each other, and the excess charge is presumably shared between two or more cations having reduced ligand coordination. Point defects are generally more active for chemisorption than are perfect surfaces, however for Ti 2O 3 and V 2O 3, whose cations have 3d 1 and 3d 2 electronic configurations respectively, the cleaved (047) surface is more active than are surfaces having a high density of defects. The chemisorption behavior of both nearly perfect and defect surfaces of 3d-transition-metal oxides varies widely from one material to another, and it is suggestive to correlate this with cation d-orbital population. However, too few oxides have yet been studied to draw any firm conclusions. Additional theoretical work on perfect surfaces, defects and chemisorption is also necessary in order to gain a more complete understanding of transition-metal-oxide surfaces.

  5. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  6. A study of rotating globular clusters. The case of the old, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 4372

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 4372 is a poorly studied old, very metal-poor globular cluster (GC) located in the inner Milky Way halo. Aims: We present the first in-depth study of the kinematic properties and derive the structural parameters of NGC 4372 based on the fit of a Plummer profile and a rotating, physical model. We explore the link between internal rotation to different cluster properties and together with similar studies of more GCs, we put these in the context of globular cluster formation and evolution. Methods: We present radial velocities for 131 cluster member stars measured from high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations. Their membership to the GC is additionally confirmed from precise metallicity estimates. We build a velocity dispersion profile and a systemic rotation curve using this kinematic data set. Additionally, we obtain an elliptical number density profile of NGC 4372 based on optical images using a Markov chain Monte Carlo fitting algorithm. From this, we derive the cluster's half-light radius and ellipticity as rh = 3.44' ± 0.04' and ɛ = 0.08 ± 0.01. Finally, we give a physical interpretation of the observed morphological and kinematic properties of this GC by fitting an axisymmetric, differentially rotating, dynamical model. Results: Our results show that NGC 4372 has an unusually high ratio of rotation amplitude to velocity dispersion (1.2 vs. 4.5 km s-1) for its metallicity. This puts it in line, however, with two other exceptional, very metal-poor GCs: M 15 and NGC 4590. We also find a mild flattening of NGC 4372 in the direction of its rotation. Given its old age, this suggests that the flattening is indeed caused by the systemic rotation rather than tidal interactions with the Galaxy. Additionally, we estimate the dynamical mass of the GC Mdyn = 2.0 ± 0.5 × 105M⊙ based on the dynamical model, which constrains the mass-to-light ratio of NGC 4372 between 1.4 and 2.3 M⊙/L⊙, representative of an old, purely stellar population. Based on

  7. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-01-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N 2 O) n O − (n = 1–12) and (N 2 O) n − (n = 7–15) in the region 800–1600 cm −1 . The charge carriers in these ions are NNO 2 − and O − for (N 2 O) n O − clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N 2 O − for (N 2 O) n − clusters. The N–N and N–O stretching vibrations of N 2 O − (solvated by N 2 O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm −1 and (894 ± 5) cm −1 , respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory.

  8. Graphene nucleation and growth on the transition metal surfaces: the role of pentagon, metal step and magic carbon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun; Ding, Feng

    2012-02-01

    The nucleation behavior of graphene on transition metal surfaces, either on a terrace or near a step edge, is systematically explored using density functional theory calculations. The supported carbon clusters, CN (N=1˜24), on the Ni(111) surface are carefully optimized [1,2]. A structural transformation from a C chain to a sp^2 C network at C12 and the most stable structures of sp^2 graphene islands contain one to three pentagons. In agreement with experimental observations, our calculations show that graphene nucleation near a metal step edge is superior to that on a terrace. Besides, ground state structures of supported CN (N = 16˜26), clusters on four selected transition metal surfaces: (Rh(111), Ru(0001), Ni(111) and Cu(111)) are explored [3]. A core-shell structured of C21 stands out as a magic cluster, which is one of the dominating carbon precursors in graphene CVD growth and has been observed in experimental STM images. The energy barrier of two C21 clusters' coalescence is computed to illustrate their influence on the kinetics of graphene CVD growth at different temperatures. [4pt] [1] J. Gao, et al,. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 5009 (2011). [0pt] [2] J. Gao, et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 17695 (2011). [0pt] [3] Q. Yuan, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. (accepted).

  9. PHENOL OXIDATION USING NATURAL ZEOLITE SUPPORTED METAL ION CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wardhani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenol which contained in waste water has to be reduced and it could be done by oxygen oxidation.  In order to increase the rate of reaction it was needed a catalyst. In this research the capability of various catalysts, namely zeolite-Zn(II, zeolite-Cu(II and zeolite-Co(IIin oxidation of phenol has been investigated. The aim of this research was to study the type of metal ion catalyst towards the percentage of oxidated phenol. The oxidation process were carried out in an aqueous phenol of 100 ppm with oxygen flow rate of 200 mL/min. in the presence of catalysts with 0.2M of initial impregnation concentration. The capabilities of catalysts were performed by calculating the activation energy and it was done at two different temperatures, i.e. 70 and 90 oC. The percentage of oxidated phenol was determinated by measuring its concentration using UV-VIS spectrophotometer. In addition, the impregnated metal was calculated by measuring the ion concentration remains in the filtrate solution and it was determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed that metal ion types affected the catalytic activity. The order of phenol oxidationactivity decreased as Co(II > Cu(II > Zn(II. The surface characteristics of catalysts were supported by pore volume and pore diameter i.e 0.009 cm3/g and 16.59 Å for Zn(II whereas specific surface area was 10.32 m2/g for Zn(II, 0.004 cm3/g and 24.37 Å for Cu(II whereas specific surface area was 3.57 m2/g for Cu(II, 0.001 cm3/g and 19.63 Å for Co(II whereas specific surface area was 10.26m2/g for Co(II.   Keywords: phenol,natural zeolite, catalyst, oxidation

  10. Proofs of cluster formation and transitions in liquid metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Calculational and experimental proofs are presented indicating to existence of clusters in liquid metals and alloys. Systems of liquid alloys both on the base of ferrous metals and non-ferrous metals (Fe-C, Ni-C, Co-C, Fe-Ni, Ni-Mo, Co-Cr, Co-V as well as In-Sn, Bi-Sn, Si-Ge and others) are studied experimentally. It is shown that the general feature of the systems studied is sensitivity of a volume to change in structure, to replacement fcc structure on bcc or to initiation-dissociation of intermetallic compounds AxBy. It is shown that both in pure liquid metals and in their.alloys there are clusters as ordered aggregate of atoms

  11. Ceria doped mixed metal oxide nanoparticles as oxidation catalysts: Synthesis and their characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, S.S.P.; Kishore, D.H.V.; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Khan, Mujeeb; Alwarthan, Abdulrahman; Prasad, K.R.S.; Labis, Joselito P.; Adil, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed metal nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted significant attention as catalysts for various organic transformations. In this study, we have demonstrated the preparation of nickel–manganese mixed metal oxide NPs doped with X% nano cerium oxide (X = 1, 3, 5 mol%) by a facile co-precipitation technique using surfactant and surfactant free methodologies. The as-synthesized materials were calcined at different temperatures (300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C), and were characterized using various spectr...

  12. Atomic structures and covalent-to-metallic transition of lead clusters Pbn (n=2-22)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baolin; Zhao Jijun; Chen Xiaoshuang; Shi Daning; Wang Guanghou

    2005-01-01

    The lowest-energy structures and electronic properties of the lead clusters are studied by density-functional-theory calculations with Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr gradient correction. The lowest-energy structures of Pb n (n=2-22) clusters are determined from a number of structural isomers, which are generated from empirical genetic algorithm simulations. The competition between atom-centered compact structures and layered stacking structures leads to the alternative appearance of the two types of structures as global minimum. The size evolution of geometric and electronic properties from covalent bonding towards bulk metallic behavior in Pb clusters is discussed

  13. Stability and mobility of defect clusters and dislocation loops in metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osetsky, Y.N.; Bacon, D.J.; Serra, A.

    2000-01-01

    about the structure and properties of glissile clusters of self-interstitial atoms that are formed directly in the cascade volume. It has been found that such clusters consist of sets of crowdions and are highly mobile in the crowdion direction. Very recently, one-dimensional glide of similar character...... loops are reviewed, and the dynamics of glissile clusters assessed. The relevance and importance of these results in establishing a better understanding of the observed differences in the damage accumulation behaviour between bcc and fee metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions are pointed out...

  14. Ball lightning from atmospheric discharges via metal nanosphere oxidation: from soils, wood or metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, John

    2002-01-15

    The slow (diffusion-limited) oxidation of metal nanoparticles has previously been proposed as the mechanism for ball lightning energy release, and argued to be the result of a normal lightning strike on soil. Here this basic model of networked nanoparticles is detailed further, and extended to lightning strikes on metal structures, and also to the action of other storm-related discharges or man-made discharges. The basic model predicted the important properties of "average" observed ball lightning, and the extension in this paper also covers high-energy examples of ball lightning. Laboratory checks of the theory are described, and predictions given of what conditions are necessary for observing ball lightning in the laboratory. Key requirements of the model are a sheltered region near the strike foot and starting materials which can generate a metal vapour under intensive heating, including soil, wood or a metal structure. The evolution of hydrocarbons (often plastics) along with metal vapour can ensure the local survival of the metal vapour even in an oxidizing atmosphere. Subsequent condensation of this vapour to metallic nanoparticles in networks provides the coherence of a ball structure, which also releases light over an extended time. Also discussed is the passage of ball lightning through a sheet of building material, including glass, and its occasional charring of flesh on close contact.

  15. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  16. Transport phenomena of aluminium oxide in metal halide lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S; Markus, T [Institute for Energy Research, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Niemann, U [Philips GmbH, Research Laboratories, PO Box 500145, Aachen, D-52085 (Germany)], E-mail: s.fischer@fz-juelich.de

    2008-07-21

    A better understanding of the transport phenomena observed in metal halide lamps can be achieved using computer-based model calculations. The chemical transport of aluminium oxide in advanced high-pressure discharge vessels was calculated as a function of temperature and composition of the salt mixture relevant to the lamp. Below 1773 K chemical transport is the prevailing process; above this temperature the vaporization and condensation of the envelope material-aluminium oxide-become more important. The results of the calculations show that the amount of transported alumina increases linearly with the number of iteration cycles and exponentially with the temperature gradient.

  17. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  18. Metal-oxide based nanoobjects: reactivity, building blocks for polymeric structures and structural variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.; Roy, S.

    2002-01-01

    The latest achievements in the new field of nanochemistry, i.e. investigation of reactions proceeding at selected sites of well-characterized metal-oxide based nanoobjects are reviewed. It is demonstrated that from the unique library of molybdenum-oxide based building blocks/fragments under reducing conditions in aqueous solution a huge variety of nanoobjects can be generated. Examples include the well-known molecular big-wheel of the type { Mo 176 } and big-ball of the type { Mo 132 } including their derivatives which are considered here. In addition, the by far largest structurally well-characterized cluster having 368 molybdenum atoms with the shape of a lemon is outlines and discussed [ru

  19. Adsorption of Atoms of 3 d Metals on the Surfaces of Aluminum and Magnesium Oxide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Kibizov, D. D.; Kozyrev, E. N.; Zaalishvili, V. B.; Grigorkina, G. S.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption and formation of submonolayer structures of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu on the surfaces of aluminum and magnesium oxide films formed on Mo(110) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions are studied via X-ray, ultraviolet photo-, and Auger electron spectroscopy (XPS, UVES, AES); spectroscopy of energy losses of high-resolution electrons (SELHRE); spectroscopy of the backscattering of low-energy ions (SBSLEI); infrared absorption spectroscopy (IAS); and the diffraction of slow electrons (DSE). Individual atoms and small clusters of all the investigated metals deposited on oxides acquire a positive charge, due presumably to interaction with surface defects. As the concentration of adatoms increases when the adsorption centers caused by defects are filled, charge transfer from adatoms to substrates is reduced. This is accompanied by further depolarization caused by the lateral interaction of adatoms.

  20. The most metal-poor Galactic globular cluster: the first spectroscopic observations of ESO280-SC06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jeffrey D.

    2018-04-01

    We present the first spectroscopic observations of the very metal-poor Milky Way globular cluster ESO280-SC06. Using spectra acquired with the 2dF/AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have identified 13 members of the cluster, and estimate from their infrared calcium triplet lines that the cluster has a metallicity of [Fe/H]={-2.48}^{+0.06}_{-0.11}. This would make it the most metal-poor globular cluster known in the Milky Way. This result was verified with comparisons to three other metal-poor globular clusters that had been observed and analyzed in the same manner. We also present new photometry of the cluster from EFOSC2 and SkyMapper and confirm that the cluster is located 22.9 ± 2.1 kpc from the Sun and 15.2 ± 2.1 kpc from the Galactic centre, and has a radial velocity of 92.5 + 2.4-1.6 km s-1. These new data finds the cluster to have a radius about half that previously estimated, and we find that the cluster has a dynamical mass of the cluster of (12 ± 2) × 103 M⊙. Unfortunately, we lack reliable proper motions to fully characterize its orbit about the Galaxy. Intriguingly, the photometry suggests that the cluster lacks a well-populated horizontal branch, something that has not been observed in a cluster so ancient or metal-poor.

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Ti-6Al-4V Metal Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy materials are commonly used in joint replacements, due to the high strength of the materials. Pathogenic microorganisms can easily adhere to the surface of the metal implant, leading to an increased potential for implant failure. The surface of a titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) metal oxide implant material was functionalized to deliver an small antibacterial molecule, nitric oxide. S-nitroso-penicillamine, a S-nitrosothiol nitric oxide donor, was covalently immobilized on the metal oxide surface using self-assembled monolayers. Infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the attachment of the S-nitrosothiol donor to the Ti-Al-4V surface. Attachment of S-nitroso-penicillamine resulted in a nitric oxide (NO) release of 89.6 ± 4.8 nmol/cm2 under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis growth by 41.5 ± 1.2% and 25.3 ± 0.6%, respectively. Combining the S-nitrosothiol releasing Ti-6Al-4V with tetracycline, a commonly-prescribed antibiotic, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 35.4 ± 1.3%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used. A synergistic effect of ampicillin with S-nitroso-penicillamine-modified Ti-6Al-4V against S. epidermidis was not observed. The functionalized Ti-6Al-4V surface was not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts. PMID:28635681

  2. Pulse laser-induced generation of cluster codes from metal nanoparticles for immunoassay applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yin Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have developed an assay for the detection of proteins by functionalized nanomaterials coupled with laser-induced desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS by monitoring the generation of metal cluster ions. We achieved selective detection of three proteins [thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB] by modifying nanoparticles (NPs of three different metals (Au, Ag, and Pt with the corresponding aptamer or antibody in one assay. The Au, Ag, and Pt acted as metal bio-codes for the analysis of thrombin, VEGF-A165, and PDGF-BB, respectively, and a microporous cellulose acetate membrane (CAM served as a medium for an in situ separation of target protein-bound and -unbound NPs. The functionalized metal nanoparticles bound to their specific proteins were subjected to LDI-MS on the CAM. The functional nanoparticles/CAM system can function as a signal transducer and amplifier by transforming the protein concentration into an intense metal cluster ion signal during LDI-MS analysis. This system can selectively detect proteins at picomolar concentrations. Most importantly, the system has great potential for the detection of multiple proteins without any pre-concentration, separation, or purification process because LDI-MS coupled with CAM effectively removes all signals except for those from the metal cluster ions.

  3. Efficient photocarrier injection in a transition metal oxide heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Muraoka, Y; Ueda, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2002-01-01

    An efficient method for doping a transition metal oxide (TMO) with hole carriers is presented: photocarrier injection (PCI) in an oxide heterostructure. It is shown that an insulating vanadium dioxide (VO sub 2) film is rendered metallic under light irradiation by PCI from an n-type titanium dioxide (TiO sub 2) substrate doped with Nb. Consequently, a large photoconductivity, which is exceptional for TMOs, is found in the VO sub 2 /TiO sub 2 :Nb heterostructure. We propose an electronic band structure where photoinduced holes created in TiO sub 2 :Nb can be transferred into the filled V 3d band via the low-lying O 2p band of VO sub 2. (letter to the editor)

  4. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  5. The uniformity and time-invariance of the intra-cluster metal distribution in galaxy clusters from the IllustrisTNG simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Marinacci, Federico; Torrey, Paul; Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Weinberger, Rainer; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Hernquist, Lars; Naiman, Jill; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan

    2018-02-01

    The distribution of metals in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) encodes important information about the enrichment history and formation of galaxy clusters. Here, we explore the metal content of clusters in IllustrisTNG - a new suite of galaxy formation simulations building on the Illustris project. Our cluster sample contains 20 objects in TNG100 - a ˜(100 Mpc)3 volume simulation with 2 × 18203 resolution elements, and 370 objects in TNG300 - a ˜(300 Mpc)3 volume simulation with 2 × 25003 resolution elements. The z = 0 metallicity profiles agree with observations, and the enrichment history is consistent with observational data going beyond z ˜ 1, showing nearly no metallicity evolution. The abundance profiles vary only minimally within the cluster samples, especially in the outskirts with a relative scatter of ˜ 15 per cent. The average metallicity profile flattens towards the centre, where we find a logarithmic slope of -0.1 compared to -0.5 in the outskirts. Cool core clusters have more centrally peaked metallicity profiles (˜0.8 solar) compared to non-cool core systems (˜0.5 solar), similar to observational trends. Si/Fe and O/Fe radial profiles follow positive gradients. The outer abundance profiles do not evolve below z ˜ 2, whereas the inner profiles flatten towards z = 0. More than ˜ 80 per cent of the metals in the ICM have been accreted from the proto-cluster environment, which has been enriched to ˜0.1 solar already at z ˜ 2. We conclude that the intra-cluster metal distribution is uniform among our cluster sample, nearly time-invariant in the outskirts for more than 10 Gyr, and forms through a universal enrichment history.

  6. High voltage measurements on metal-oxide surge arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yli-Aeyhoe, S. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). High Voltage Laboratory

    2000-07-01

    Metal-oxide surge arresters (MOA) are used to prevent damages caused by overvoltages and currents. Because of the function of MOAs they have to be tested with high voltage and with high current. The aim of this seminar paper is to give some information how MOAs can be tested in laboratory circumstances and on- site. Few new test methods are introduced as well. (orig.)

  7. Methanol Oxidation on Model Elemental and Bimetallic Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Rossmeisl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are a key enabling technology for clean energy conversion. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the methanol oxidation reaction on model electrodes. We discuss trends in reactivity for a set of monometallic and bimetallic transition metal surfaces, flat...... sites on the surface and to screen for novel bimetallic surfaces of enhanced activity. We suggest platinum copper surfaces as promising anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells....

  8. Metal oxide-encapsulated dye-sensitized photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Son, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-12

    Dye-sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films for photoanodes, photoanodes incorporating the films and DSCs incorporating the photoanodes are provided. Also provided are methods for making the dye sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films. The methods of making the films are based on the deposition of an encapsulating layer of a semiconducting metal oxide around the molecular anchoring groups of photosensitizing dye molecules adsorbed to a porous film of the semiconducting metal oxide. The encapsulating layer of semiconducting metal oxide is formed in such a way that it is not coated over the chromophores of the adsorbed dye molecules and, therefore, allows the dye molecules to remain electrochemically addressable.

  9. Directional dependence of the threshold displacement energies in metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Benjamin J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the directional dependence and the values of the threshold energies (TDEs) for the displacements of the oxygen and metal atoms and for producing stable Frenkel pairs in five metal oxides of Cr2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and MgO. The TDEs for the Frenkel pairs and atoms displacement are calculated in 66 crystallographic directions, on both the anion and cation sublattices. The performed simulations are for metal and oxygen PKA energies up to 350 and 400 eV, respectively. The calculated probability distributions for the atoms displacement and average number of Frenkel pairs produced in the different oxides are compared. The results revealed unique symmetrical patterns of the TDEs for the displacement of the atoms and the formation of stable Frenkel pairs, confirming the strong dependence on the direction and the crystalline structure of the oxides. Results also showed that the formation of stable Frenkel pairs is associated with the displacements of the PKAs and/or of the SKAs. The probabilities of the TDEs for the displacement of the oxygen and metal PKAs are consistently lower than those of the atoms in the crystal. In SiO2, TDEs for the displacement of oxygen and metal atoms and those for the formation of stable Frenkel pairs are the lowest, while those in TiO2 are among the highest. The results for Cr2O3 and Al2O3, which have the same crystal structure, are similar. The calculated TDEs for MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2 are generally in good agreement with the experimental values and the probability distributions of the TDEs for the PKAs in TiO2 are in good agreement with reported MD simulation results.

  10. High performance supercapacitors using metal oxide anchored graphene nanosheet electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2011-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles were chemically anchored onto graphene nanosheets (GNs) and the resultant composites - SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs (58% of GNs loading) - coated over conductive carbon fabric substrates were successfully used as supercapacitor electrodes. The results showed that the incorporation of metal oxide nanoparticles improved the capacitive performance of GNs due to a combination of the effect of spacers and redox reactions. The specific capacitance values (with respect to the composite mass) obtained for SnO2/GNs (195 F g-1) and RuO 2/GNs (365 F g-1) composites at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the present study are the best ones reported to date for a two electrode configuration. The resultant supercapacitors also exhibited high values for maximum energy (27.6, 33.1 and 50.6 W h kg-1) and power densities (15.9, 20.4 and 31.2 kW kg-1) for SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs respectively. These findings demonstrate the importance and great potential of metal oxide/GNs based composite coated carbon fabric in the development of high-performance energy-storage systems. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Size characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial sunscreen products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Fong, Andrew; Linder, Sean W.

    2017-07-01

    There is an increase in the usage of engineered metal oxide (TiO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens due to their pleasing esthetics and greater sun protection efficiency. A number of studies have been done concerning the safety of nanoparticles in sunscreen products. In order to do the safety assessment, it is pertinent to develop novel analytical techniques to analyze these nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens. This study is focused on developing analytical techniques that can efficiently determine particle size of metal oxides present in the commercial sunscreens. To isolate the mineral UV filters from the organic matrices, specific procedures such as solvent extraction were identified. In addition, several solvents (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, and tetrahydrofuran) have been investigated. The solvent extraction using tetrahydrofuran worked well for all the samples investigated. The isolated nanoparticles were characterized by using several different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential centrifugal sedimentation, and x-ray diffraction. Elemental analysis mapping studies were performed to obtain individual chemical and morphological identities of the nanoparticles. Results from the electron microscopy techniques were compared against the bulk particle sizing techniques. All of the sunscreen products tested in this study were found to contain nanosized (≤100 nm) metal oxide particles with varied shapes and aspect ratios, and four among the 11 products were showed to have anatase TiO2.

  12. Metal inhibition on the reactivity of manganese dioxide toward organic contaminant oxidation in relation to metal adsorption and ionic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wang, Zhuopu; Chen, Yang; He, Anfei; Li, Jianliang; Sheng, G Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Coexisting metal ions may significantly inhibit the oxidative reactivity of manganese oxides toward organic contaminants in metal-organic multi-pollutant waters. While the metal inhibition on the oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxides has previously been reported, the extent of the inhibition in relation to metal properties has not been established. Six alkali, alkaline, and transition metals, as well as two testing metals were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit the reactivity of birnessite. Regardless of the pathways of phenol and diuron oxidation (polymerization vs. breakdown), the extent of metal inhibition depended mainly on the metal itself and its concentration. The observed metal inhibition efficiency followed the order of Mn 2+  > Co 2+  > Cu 2+  > Al 3+  > Mg 2+  > K + , consistent with metal adsorption on birnessite. The first-order organic oxidation rate constant (k obs ) was linearly negatively correlated with metal adsorption (q e ) on birnessite. These observations demonstrated that the metal inhibition efficiency was determined by metal adsorption on birnessite. The slopes of the k obs -q e varied among metals and followed the order of K +  > Ca 2+  > Mg 2+  > Mn 2+  > Cd 2+  > Co 2+  > Cu 2+  > Al 3+ . These slopes defined intrinsic inhibitory abilities of metals. As metals were adsorbed hydrated on birnessite, the intrinsic inhibitory ability was significantly linearly correlated with ionic potentials of metals, leading to a single straight line. Metals with multiple d electrons in the outermost orbit with polarizing energy that promotes hydrolysis sat slightly below the line, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance of metal and oxide fuels during accidents in a large liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.; Wigeland, R.; Friedel, G.; Kussmaul, G.; Royl, P.; Moreau, J.; Perks, M.

    1990-01-01

    In a cooperative effort among European and US analysts, an assessment of the comparative safety performance of metal and oxide fuels during accidents in a large (3500 MWt), pool-type, liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) was performed. The study focused on three accident initiators with failure to scram: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF), the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP), and the unprotected loss-of-heat-sink (ULOHS). Emphasis was placed on identification of design features that provide passive, self-limiting responses to upset conditions, and quantification of relative safety margins. The analyses show that in ULOF and ULOHS sequences, metal-fueled LMRs with pool-type primary systems provide larger temperature margins to coolant boiling than oxide-fueled reactors of the same design. 3 refs., 4 figs

  14. Old Metal-rich Globular Cluster Populations: Peak Color and Peak Metallicity Trends with Mass of Host Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Kravtsov, Valery V.

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of the factors contributing to a peak color trend of old metal-rich globular cluster (MRGC) populations with mass of their hosts, early-type galaxies and spheroidal subsystems of spiral ones (spheroids). The color-mass trend is often converted to a metallicity-mass trend under the assumption that age effects are small or negligible. While direct estimates of the ages of MRGC populations neither can rule out nor reliably support the populations' age trend, key data on ti...

  15. Magic pairs and structural transitions in binary metallic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cune, Liviu-Cristian

    2012-06-04

    Structures and binding energies for bimetallic clusters consisting of a large variety of atomic species are obtained for all atomic sizes N≤40 and all concentrations, using an interatomic potential derived within a quasi-classical description. It is found that increasing the difference between the two types of atoms leads to a gradual disappearance of the well-known homo-atomic geometric magic numbers and the appearance of magic pairs corresponding to the number of atoms of each atomic species in binary nanostructures with higher stability. This change is accompanied by structural transitions and ground-state↔isomer inversions, induced by changes in composition or concentration. There is a clear tendency towards phase separation, the core-shell radial segregation being predominant (energetically favored) in this model. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. NEAR-IR PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF HB, MSTO, AND SGB FOR METAL POOR GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-W. Kim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We report photometric features of the HB, MSTO, and SGB for a set of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters on the near-IR CMDs. The magnitude and color of the MSTO and SGB are measured on the fiducial normal points of the CMDs by applying a polynomial fit. The near-IR luminosity functions of horizontal branch stars in the classical second parameter pair M3 and M13 indicate that HB stars in M13 are dominated by hot stars that are rotatively faint in the infrared, whereas HB stars in M3 are brighter than those in M13. The luminosity functions of HB stars in the observed bulge clusters, except for NGC 6717, show a trend that the fainter hot HB stars are dominated in the relatively metal-poor clusters while the relatively metal-rich clusters contain the brighter HB stars. It is suggestive that NGC 6717 would be an extreme example of the second-parameter phenomenon for the bulge globular clusters.

  17. Metal Cluster Models for Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Matrix-Isolation Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Olaf; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2018-02-19

    Metal cluster models are of high relevance for establishing new mechanistic concepts for heterogeneous catalysis. The high reactivity and particular selectivity of metal clusters is caused by the wealth of low-lying electronically excited states that are often thermally populated. Thereby the metal clusters are flexible with regard to their electronic structure and can adjust their states to be appropriate for the reaction with a particular substrate. The matrix isolation technique is ideally suited for studying excited state reactivity. The low matrix temperatures (generally 4-40 K) of the noble gas matrix host guarantee that all clusters are in their electronic ground-state (with only a very few exceptions). Electronically excited states can then be selectively populated and their reactivity probed. Unfortunately, a systematic research in this direction has not been made up to date. The purpose of this review is to provide the grounds for a directed approach to understand cluster reactivity through matrix-isolation studies combined with quantum chemical calculations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Oxidation of limonene catalyzed by Metal(Salen complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Lima

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The compound R-(+limonene is available and cheap than its oxidized products. Consequently, the selective oxidation of R(+limonene has attracted attention as a promising process for the production of compounds with a higher market value, such as cis/trans-1,2-limoneneoxide, cis/trans-carveol and/or carvone. One of the these processes, described in the recent literature, is submission of R-(+limonene to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by neutral or cationic Metal(Salen complexes, in the presence of effective terminal oxidants such as NaOCl or PhIO. These reactions are commonly carried out in organic solvents (dichromethane, ethyl acetate, acetonitrile or acetone. Thus, the main objective of the present work was to study the effect of several factors (type of oxidant, catalyst, solvent and time on reaction selectivity for the high-priced compounds referred to above. For this purposes, experimental statistical multivariate analysis was used in conjunction with a complete experimental design. From the results it was observed that for the three targeted products (1,2-limoneneoxide, carveol or carvone some factors, including the nature of the terminal oxidant and the catalyst, were significant for product selectivity (with a confidence level of 95%. Therefore, this statistical analysis proved to be suitable for choosing of the best reaction conditions for a specific desired product.

  19. Infrared studies of astronomically relevant metallic clusters and their interactions with simple molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis aims at: a) providing fundamental knowledge on the interactions of simple ligands with metal clusters relevant to astronomical and (bio-) catalytical processes, b) providing a benchmark that can be used to test current and future DFT methods developed to study these

  20. Metal-halide systems: From molecular clusters to liquid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario P. Tosi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available I present a short review of the relationship between quantum-mechanical calculations on small molecular clusters of some metal-ion halides and studies of the microscopic structure in the condensed liquid phases of these compounds. The review is dedicated to the memory of Professor Vincenzo Grasso.

  1. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    1996-12-01

    A method is described for cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn and Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  2. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of transition metal based water oxidation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oversteeg, Christina H M; Doan, Hoang Q; de Groot, Frank M F; Cuk, Tanja

    2017-01-03

    X-ray absorption studies of the geometric and electronic structure of primarily heterogeneous Co, Ni, and Mn based water oxidation catalysts are reviewed. The X-ray absorption near edge and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the metal K-edge, characterize the metal oxidation state, metal-oxygen bond distance, metal-metal distance, and degree of disorder of the catalysts. These properties guide the coordination environment of the transition metal oxide radical that localizes surface holes and is required to oxidize water. The catalysts are investigated both as-prepared, in their native state, and under reaction conditions, while transition metal oxide radicals are generated. The findings of many experiments are summarized in tables. The advantages of future X-ray experiments on water oxidation catalysts, which include the limited data available of the oxygen K-edge, metal L-edge, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering, are discussed.

  3. Structural insights into the light-driven auto-assembly process of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5-cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Bommer, Martin; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hussein, Rana; Yano, Junko; Dau, Holger; Kern, Jan; Dobbek, Holger; Zouni, Athina

    2017-07-18

    In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven splitting of water at a protein-bound Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster, the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). In the photosynthetic organisms, the light-driven formation of the WOC from dissolved metal ions is a key process because it is essential in both initial activation and continuous repair of PSII. Structural information is required for understanding of this chaperone-free metal-cluster assembly. For the first time, we obtained a structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus without the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. Surprisingly, cluster-removal leaves the positions of all coordinating amino acid residues and most nearby water molecules largely unaffected, resulting in a pre-organized ligand shell for kinetically competent and error-free photo-assembly of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. First experiments initiating (i) partial disassembly and (ii) partial re-assembly after complete depletion of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster agree with a specific bi-manganese cluster, likely a di-µ-oxo bridged pair of Mn(III) ions, as an assembly intermediate.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of some metal oxide-zirconia systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1989-01-01

    Metal oxide-zirconia systems are a potential class of materials for use as structural materials at temperatures above 1900 K. These materials must have no destructive phase changes and low vapor pressures. Both alkaline earth oxide (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO)-zirconia and some rare earth oxide (Y2O3, Sc2O3, La2O3, CeO2, Sm2O3, Gd2O3, Yb2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, and Er2O3)-zirconia system are examined. For each system, the phase diagram is discussed and the vapor pressure for each vapor species is calculated via a free energy minimization procedure. The available thermodynamic literature on each system is also surveyed. Some of the systems look promising for high temperature structural materials.

  5. Ceria doped mixed metal oxide nanoparticles as oxidation catalysts: Synthesis and their characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.P. Sultana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mixed metal nanoparticles (NPs have attracted significant attention as catalysts for various organic transformations. In this study, we have demonstrated the preparation of nickel–manganese mixed metal oxide NPs doped with X% nano cerium oxide (X = 1, 3, 5 mol% by a facile co-precipitation technique using surfactant and surfactant free methodologies. The as-synthesized materials were calcined at different temperatures (300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C, and were characterized using various spectroscopic techniques, including, FTIR and XRD. SEM analysis, TEM analysis and TGA were employed to evaluate the structural properties of the as-prepared catalyst. These were evaluated for their catalytic behaviour towards the conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, which was used as a model reaction with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Furthermore, the effect of the variation of the percentage of nano ceria doping and the calcination temperature on the performance of as-prepared mixed metal catalysts was also evaluated. The kinetic studies of the reactions performed employing gas chromatographic technique have revealed that the mixed metal oxide catalyst doped with 5% nano ceria displayed excellent catalytc activity, among various catalysts synthesized.

  6. Mixed-Metal Oxo Clusters Structurally Derived from Ti6O4(OR)8(OOCR')8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artner, Christine; Koyun, Ayse; Czakler, Matthias; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    The mixed-metal oxo clusters FeTi 5 O 4 (O i Pr) 4 (OMc) 10 (OMc = methacrylate), Zn 2 Ti 4 O 4 (O i Pr) 2 (OMc) 10 , Cd 4 Ti 2 O 2 (OAc) 2 (OMc) 10 (HO i Pr) 2 , [Ca 2 Ti 4 O 4 (OAc) 2 (OMc) 10 ] n , and [Sr 2 Ti 4 O 4 (OMc) 12 (HOMc) 2 ] n were obtained from the reaction of titanium alkoxides with the corresponding metal acetates and methacrylic acid. Their structures are derived from Ti clusters with the composition Ti 6 O 4 (OR) 8 (OOCR') 8 . The Ca and Sr derivatives consist of chains of condensed clusters.

  7. Mixed-Metal Oxo Clusters Structurally Derived from Ti6O4(OR)8(OOCR′)8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artner, Christine; Koyun, Ayse; Czakler, Matthias; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The mixed-metal oxo clusters FeTi5O4(OiPr)4(OMc)10 (OMc = methacrylate), Zn2Ti4O4(OiPr)2(OMc)10, Cd4Ti2O2(OAc)2(OMc)10(HOiPr)2, [Ca2Ti4O4(OAc)2(OMc)10]n, and [Sr2Ti4O4(OMc)12(HOMc)2]n were obtained from the reaction of titanium alkoxides with the corresponding metal acetates and methacrylic acid. Their structures are derived from Ti clusters with the composition Ti6O4(OR)8(OOCR′)8. The Ca and Sr derivatives consist of chains of condensed clusters. PMID:25814833

  8. Enhanced sun protection of nano-sized metal oxide particles over conventional metal oxide particles: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Nanda, A

    2014-06-01

    A systematic and detailed study has been designed and conducted, taking into account some of the proposed benefits such as increased efficiency, transparency, unique texture, protection of active ingredient and higher consumer compliance of cosmetics containing nano-sized metal oxides. This study also presents an in vitro method to determine sun protection factor of the investigational sunscreen cream samples containing zinc oxide and titanium dioxide with a varied range of particle size. Finally, a comparative study has been conducted between metal oxide particles, conventional as well as nanoparticles. All the skin cosmetics formulated were thermally stable with a pH ranging from 7.9 to 8.2. Moreover, the fatty acid substance content and residue were found to be analogous to the standard values in each skin cosmetic. The skin cosmetics containing the titanium or zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to have improved spreadability as compared to skin cosmetics containing conventional titanium or zinc oxide particles, respectively. All skin cosmetics were found to have uniform distribution of the particles. The sunscreen creams containing zinc oxide nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found to have higher in vitro sun protection factor (SPF of 3.65 for ZnO nanoparticles and 4.93 for TiO2 nanoparticles) as compared to that of sunscreen creams containing conventional zinc oxide particles (SPF = 2.90) and conventional titanium dioxide (SPF = 1.29), clearly indicating the effect of reduction in particles size, from micro to nano, on the sun protection factor. Good texture, better spreadability and enhanced in vitro SPF proved the advantageous role of nanoparticles in cosmetics. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Metal oxides modified NiO catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2014-06-01

    The sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of Zr, Ti, Mo, W, and V modified NiO based catalysts for the ethane oxidative dehydrogenation reaction. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, SEM and TPR techniques. The results showed that the doping metals could be highly dispersed into NiO domains without the formation of large amount of other bulk metal oxide. The modified NiO materials have small particle size, larger surface area, and higher reduction temperature in contrast to pure NiO. The introduction of group IV, V and VI transition metals into NiO decreases the catalytic activity in ethane ODH. However, the ethylene selectivity is enhanced with the highest level for the Ni-W-O and Ni-Ti-O catalysts. As a result, these two catalysts show improved efficiency of ethylene production in the ethane ODH reaction. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A General Route for Growing Metal Sulfides onto Graphene Oxide and Exfoliated Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana L; Estrada, Ana C; Fateixa, Sara; Ferro, Marta; Trindade, Tito

    2017-08-31

    Graphene-based materials are elective materials for a number of technologies due to their unique properties. Also, semiconductor nanocrystals have been extensively explored due to their size-dependent properties that make them useful for several applications. By coupling both types of materials, new applications are envisaged that explore the synergistic properties in such hybrid nanostructures. This research reports a general wet chemistry method to prepare graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with nanophases of semiconductor metal sulfides. This method allows the in situ growth of metal sulfides onto GO by using metal dialkyldithiocarbamate complexes as single-molecule precursors. In particular, the role of GO as heterogeneous substrate for the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals was investigated by using Raman spectroscopic and imaging methods. The method was further extended to other graphene-based materials, which are easily prepared in a larger scale, such as exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO).

  11. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  12. Metal/metal oxide doped oxide catalysts having high deNOx selectivity for lean NOx exhaust aftertreatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Paul W.

    2004-03-16

    A lean NOx catalyst and method of preparing the same is disclosed. The lean NOx catalyst includes a ceramic substrate, an oxide support material, preferably .gamma.-alumina, deposited on the substrate and a metal promoter or dopant introduced into the oxide support material. The metal promoters or dopants are selected from the group consisting of indium, gallium, tin, silver, germanium, gold, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, cerium, vanadium, oxides thereof, and combinations thereof. The .gamma.-alumina preferably has a pore volume of from about 0.5 to about 2.0 cc/g; a surface area of between about 80 to 350 m.sup.2 /g; an average pore size diameter of between about 3 to 30 nm; and an impurity level of less than or equal to 0.2 weight percent. In a preferred embodiment the .gamma.-alumina is prepared by a sol-gel method, with the metal doping of the .gamma.-alumina preferably accomplished using an incipient wetness impregnation technique.

  13. Extending the Compositional Range of Nanocasting in the Oxozirconium Cluster-based Metal-Organic Framework NU-1000 – A Comparative Structural Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wenyang; Wang, Zhao; Malonzo, Camille D.; Webber, Thomas E.; Platero-Prats, Ana E.; Sotomayor, Francisco; Vermeulen, Nicolaas; Wang, Timothy C.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Penn, R. Lee; Chapman, Karena W.; Thommes, Matthias; Stein, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    The process of nanocasting in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is a versatile approach to modify these porous materials by introducing supporting scaffolds. The nanocast scaffolds can stabilize metal-oxo clusters in MOFs at high temperatures and modulate their chemical environments. Here we demonstrate a range of nanocasting approaches in the MOF NU-1000, which contains hexanuclear oxozirconium clusters (denoted as Zr6 clusters) that are suitable for modification with other metals. We developed methods for introducing SiO2, TiO2, polymeric, and carbon scaffolds into the NU-1000 structure. The responses of NU-1000 towards different scaffold precursors were studied, including the effects on morphology, precursor distribution, and porosity after nanocasting. Upon removal of organic linkers in the MOF by calcination/pyrolysis at 500 °C or above, the Zr6 clusters remained accessible and maintained their Lewis acidity in SiO2 nanocast samples, whereas additional treatment was necessary for Zr6 clusters to become accessible in carbon nanocast samples. Aggregation of Zr6 clusters was largely prevented with SiO2 or carbon scaffolds even after thermal treatment at 500 °C or above. In the case of titania nanocasting, NU- 1000 crystals underwent a pseudomorphic transformation, in which Zr6 clusters reacted with titania to form small oxaggregates of a Zr/Ti mixed oxide with a local structure resembling that of ZrTi2O6. The ability to maintain high densities of discrete Lewis acidic Zr6 clusters on SiO2 or carbon supports at high temperatures provides a starting point for designing new thermally stable catalysts.

  14. The crystal chemistry of inorganic metal borohydrides and their relation to metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Radovan; Schouwink, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of inorganic homoleptic metal borohydrides are analysed with respect to their structural prototypes found amongst metal oxides in the inorganic databases such as Pearson's Crystal Data [Villars & Cenzual (2015). Pearson's Crystal Data. Crystal Structure Database for Inorganic Compounds, Release 2014/2015, ASM International, Materials Park, Ohio, USA]. The coordination polyhedra around the cations and the borohydride anion are determined, and constitute the basis of the structural systematics underlying metal borohydride chemistry in various frameworks and variants of ionic packing, including complex anions and the packing of neutral molecules in the crystal. Underlying nets are determined by topology analysis using the program TOPOS [Blatov (2006). IUCr CompComm. Newsl. 7, 4-38]. It is found that the Pauling rules for ionic crystals apply to all non-molecular borohydride crystal structures, and that the latter can often be derived by simple deformation of the close-packed anionic lattices c.c.p. and h.c.p., by partially removing anions and filling tetrahedral or octahedral sites. The deviation from an ideal close packing is facilitated in metal borohydrides with respect to the oxide due to geometrical and electronic considerations of the BH4(-) anion (tetrahedral shape, polarizability). This review on crystal chemistry of borohydrides and their similarity to oxides is a contribution which should serve materials engineers as a roadmap to design new materials, synthetic chemists in their search for promising compounds to be prepared, and materials scientists in understanding the properties of novel materials.

  15. Medium-induced change of the optical response of metal clusters in rare-gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Fengyuan; Guet, Claude

    2017-10-01

    Interaction with the surrounding medium modifies the optical response of embedded metal clusters. For clusters from about ten to a few hundreds of silver atoms, embedded in rare-gas matrices, we study the environment effect within the matrix random phase approximation with exact exchange (RPAE) quantum approach, which has proved successful for free silver clusters. The polarizable surrounding medium screens the residual two-body RPAE interaction, adds a polarization term to the one-body potential, and shifts the vacuum energy of the active delocalized valence electrons. Within this model, we calculate the dipole oscillator strength distribution for Ag clusters embedded in helium droplets, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon matrices. The main contribution to the dipole surface plasmon red shift originates from the rare-gas polarization screening of the two-body interaction. The large size limit of the dipole surface plasmon agrees well with the classical prediction.

  16. New semiconducting silicides assembled from transition-metal-encapsulating Si clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Noriyuki, E-mail: nori-uchida@aist.go.jp [Nanodevice Innovation Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan); Miyazaki, Takehide [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Matsushita, Yusuke; Sameshima, Kenichiro; Kanayama, Toshihiko [Nanodevice Innovation Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

    2011-10-03

    We synthesized amorphous films composed of transition-metal-encapsulating Si clusters (MSi{sub n}: M = Zr, Nb, Mo and W) by deposition of hydrogenated MSi{sub n}H{sub x} clusters onto solid substrates followed by annealing at 400-500 deg. C for dehydrogenation. The MSi{sub n} (n = 7-20) cluster films are amorphous semiconductors with an optical gap > 0.4 eV and have larger electron and hole mobility than that of the hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) film. In these films, while Si atoms form amorphous networks similar to those in a-Si:H films, the thermal stability is enhanced and the electronic disorder is reduced by the use of MSi{sub n} clusters as the unit structures. Structure modeling by ab initio calculations for MSi{sub n} films suggests that the encapsulated M atom works as a terminator of dangling bonds of the Si network.

  17. Probing the Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on Transition Metal Clusters Using IR Action Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapoutre, Vivike J. F.; Oomens, Jos; Bakker, Joost M.

    2012-06-01

    The discovery of enhanced catalytic activity of small gold clusters has led to a great interest in size-dependent catalytic properties of metal clusters. To obtain a better understanding of the catalytic mechanisms it is essential to know the structures of these clusters and the nature of their interaction with reactant molecules. We have studied the structure of gas-phase niobium clusters with a carbon monoxide adsorbed using IR action spectroscopy. We present size-selective IR spectra obtained via IR multiple photon spectroscopy monitoring either photodetachment or photodissociation depending on the charge state. The combination of these spectra with DFT calculations allows for the structural determination of the adsorption product. M. Haruta et al., Journal of Catalysis 115 301-309 (1989). M. Haertelt et al., The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 2 1720-1724 (2011)

  18. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...

  19. The emergence of nonbulk properties in supported metal clusters: negative thermal expansion and atomic disorder in Pt nanoclusters supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Bram, Ariella; Kang, Joo H; Small, Matthew W; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2009-05-27

    The structural dynamics-cluster size and adsorbate-dependent thermal behaviors of the metal-metal (M-M) bond distances and interatomic order-of Pt nanoclusters supported on a gamma-Al(2)O(3) are described. Data from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies reveal that these materials possess a dramatically nonbulklike nature. Under an inert atmosphere small, subnanometer Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3) clusters exhibit marked relaxations of the M-M bond distances, negative thermal expansion (NTE) with an average linear thermal expansion coefficient alpha = (-2.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(-5) K(-1), large static disorder and dynamical bond (interatomic) disorder that is poorly modeled within the constraints of classical theory. The data further demonstrate a significant temperature-dependence to the electronic structure of the Pt clusters, thereby suggesting the necessity of an active model to describe the cluster/support interactions mediating the cluster's dynamical structure. The quantitative dependences of these nonbulklike behaviors on cluster size (0.9 to 2.9 nm), ambient atmosphere (He, 4% H(2) in He or 20% O(2) in He) and support identity (gamma-Al(2)O(3) or carbon black) are systematically investigated. We show that the nonbulk structural, electronic and dynamical perturbations are most dramatically evidenced for the smallest clusters. The adsorption of hydrogen on the clusters leads to an increase of the Pt-Pt bondlengths (due to a lifting of the surface relaxation) and significant attenuation of the disorder present in the system. Oxidation of these same clusters has the opposite effect, leading to an increase in Pt-Pt bond strain and subsequent enhancement in nonbulklike thermal properties. The structural and electronic properties of Pt nanoclusters supported on carbon black contrast markedly with those of the Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3) samples in that neither NTE nor comparable levels of atomic disorder are observed. The Pt

  20. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. [Synthesis and characterization of mixed metal oxide pigments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Yue, Shi-juan; Liu, Cui-ge; Wei, Yong-ju; Meng, Tao; Jiang, Han-jie; Shi, Yong-zheng; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jin-guang

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, aluminum chloride and various soluble salts of doping ions were dissolved in water. In addition, urea and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) were also dissolved in the above aqueous solution under supersonic treatments. Then the solutions were heated to induce the hydrolysis of urea so that soluble aluminum and doping ions convert into insoluble hydroxide or carbonate gels. After calcinations, the obtained gels change to mixed metal oxide pigments whose color is related to type and concentrations of the doping ions. XRD characterization demonstrates that the diffraction patterns of the products are the same as that of alpha-alumina. Diffuse reflectance spectra of samples of the samples in UV-Vis regions show that the absorption bands for d-d transitions of the doping ions undergo considerable change as the coordinate environments change. In addition, L*, a* and b* values of the pigments were measured by using UV-Vis densitometer. SEM results indicate that the size of the pigment powders is in the range 200-300 nm. The pigments are quite stable since no evidence of dissolution was observed after the synthesized pigment is soaked for 24 hours. ICP test shows that very little amount of doped metal occurs in the corresponding filtrate. The above results suggest that these new kinds of mixed metal oxide pigments are stable, non-toxic, environmental friendly and they may be applicable in molten spinning process and provide a new chance for non-aqueous printing and dyeing industry.

  2. Metal oxide multilayer hard mask system for 3D nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhongmei; Salmi, Emma; Vehkamäki, Marko; Leskelä, Markku; Ritala, Mikko

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the preparation and exploitation of multilayer metal oxide hard masks for lithography and 3D nanofabrication. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) technologies are applied for mask deposition and mask patterning, respectively. A combination of ALD and FIB was used and a patterning procedure was developed to avoid the ion beam defects commonly met when using FIB alone for microfabrication. ALD grown Al2O3/Ta2O5/Al2O3 thin film stacks were FIB milled with 30 keV gallium ions and chemically etched in 5% tetramethylammonium hydroxide at 50 °C. With metal evaporation, multilayers consisting of amorphous oxides Al2O3 and Ta2O5 can be tailored for use in 2D lift-off processing, in preparation of embedded sub-100 nm metal lines and for multilevel electrical contacts. Good pattern transfer was achieved by lift-off process from the 2D hard mask for micro- and nano-scaled fabrication. As a demonstration of the applicability of this method to 3D structures, self-supporting 3D Ta2O5 masks were made from a film stack on gold particles. Finally, thin film resistors were fabricated by utilizing controlled stiction of suspended Ta2O5 structures.

  3. Process for producing metal oxide kernels and kernels so obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelievre, Bernard; Feugier, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    The process desbribed is for producing fissile or fertile metal oxide kernels used in the fabrication of fuels for high temperature nuclear reactors. This process consists in adding to an aqueous solution of at least one metallic salt, particularly actinide nitrates, at least one chemical compound capable of releasing ammonia, in dispersing drop by drop the solution thus obtained into a hot organic phase to gel the drops and transform them into solid particles. These particles are then washed, dried and treated to turn them into oxide kernels. The organic phase used for the gel reaction is formed of a mixture composed of two organic liquids, one acting as solvent and the other being a product capable of extracting the anions from the metallic salt of the drop at the time of gelling. Preferably an amine is used as product capable of extracting the anions. Additionally, an alcohol that causes a part dehydration of the drops can be employed as solvent, thus helping to increase the resistance of the particles [fr

  4. Metal oxide films on glass and steel substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Sohi, A M

    1987-01-01

    in the pH8 electrolyte supports the view that the rate limiting reduction reaction is possibly oxygen (or water) reduction although some contribution from an organic 'impurity' cannot be ruled out. Coatings of Fe sub 3 O sub 4 on mild steel have been prepared by CVD using pneumatic spraying techniques and the corrosion behaviour of coated electrodes in organic-phosphate electrolyte (pH8) has been examined. A variety of thin (10-1000nm) metal oxide films have been deposited on flat glass substrates by the pyrolysis of an aerosol of metal acetylacetonates in a suitable carrier. The optical characteristics and thickness of the films have been measured and particular interest has centered on the use of a novel pin on disc apparatus to measure the physical durability of such thin films. Characteristic friction/penetration force traces have been established for 1st Series transition metal oxide films and some ranking in terms of 'hardness' established. The use of SnO sub 2 - coated glass for electrodes in a light m...

  5. Vanadium removal by metal (hydr)oxide adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, A; Westerhoff, P; Mustafa, S

    2007-04-01

    Vanadium is listed on the United States Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) candidate contaminant list # 2 (CCL2), and regulatory guidelines for vanadium exist in some US states. The USEPA requires treatability studies before making regulatory decisions on CCL2 contaminants. Previous studies have examined vanadium adsorption onto some metal hydroxides but not onto commercially available adsorbents. This paper briefly summarizes known vanadium occurrence in North American groundwater and assesses vanadium removal by three commercially available metal oxide adsorbents with different mineralogies. GTO (Dow) is TiO2 based and E-33 (Seven Trents) and GFH (US Filter) are iron based. Preliminary vanadate adsorption kinetics onto GFH, E-33 and GTO has been studied and the homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) is used to describe the adsorption kinetics data. The effects of pH, vanadium concentration, and volume/mass ratio are assessed. Vanadium adsorption decreases with increasing pH, with maximum adsorption capacities achieved in at pH 3-4. Results indicate that all adsorbents remove vanadium; GFH has the highest adsorption capacity, followed by GTO and E-33. Data are best fit with the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich isotherms. Both the sorption maxima (Xm) and binding energy constant (b) follow the trend GFH>GTO>E-33. Naturally occurring vanadium is also removed from Arizona ground water in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). Metal oxide adsorption technologies currently used for arsenic removal may also remove vanadium but not always with the same effectiveness.

  6. Study on uranium metallization yield of spent Pressurized Water Reactor fuels and oxidation behavior of fission products in uranium metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ke Chon; Lee, Chang Heon; Kim, Won Ho

    2003-01-01

    Metallization yield of uranium oxide to uranium metal from lithium reduction process of spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuels was measured using thermogravimetric analyzer. A reduced metal produced in the process was divided into a solid and a powder part, and each metallization yield was measured. Metallization yield of the solid part was 90.7∼95.9 wt%, and the powder being 77.8∼71.5 wt% individually. Oxidation behaviour of the quarternary alloy was investigated to take data on the thermal oxidation stability necessary for the study on dry storage of the reduced metal. At 600∼700 .deg. C, weight increments of allow of No, Ru, Rh and Pd was 0.40∼0.55 wt%. Phase change on the surface of the allow was started at 750 .deg. C. In particular, Mo was rapidly oxidized and then the alloy lost 0.76∼25.22 wt% in weight

  7. A DNA-Encapsulated and Fluorescent Ag 10 6+ Cluster with a Distinct Metal-Like Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, Jeffrey T.; Ganguly, Mainak; Rankine, Ian J.; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Zhang, Peng (Dalhousie U.); (Furman)

    2017-06-29

    Silver cluster–DNA complexes are optical chromophores, and pairs of these conjugates can be toggled from fluorescently dim to bright states using DNA hybridization. This paper highlights spectral and structural differences for a specific cluster pair. We have previously characterized a cluster with low emission and violet absorption that forms a compact structure with single-stranded oligonucleotides. We now consider its counterpart with blue absorption and strong green emission. This cluster develops with a single-stranded/duplex DNA construct and is favored by low silver concentrations with ≲8 Ag+:DNA, an oxygen atmosphere, and neutral pH. The resulting cluster displays key signatures of a molecular metal with well-defined absorption/emission bands at 490/550 nm, and with a fluorescence quantum yield of 15% and lifetime of 2.4 ns. The molecular cluster conjugates with the larger DNA host because it chromatographically elutes with the DNA and it exhibits circular dichroism. The silver cluster is identified as Ag106+ using two modes of mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Our key finding is that it adopts a low-dimensional shape, as determined from a Ag K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The Ag0 in this oxidized cluster segregates from the Ag+ via a sparse number of metal-like bonds and a denser network of silver–DNA bonds. This structure contrasts with the compact, octahedral-like shape of the violet counterpart to the blue cluster, which is also a Ag106+ species. We consider that the blue- and violet-absorbing clusters may be isomers with shapes that are controlled by the secondary structures of their DNA templates.

  8. Preparation of glasses and glass ceramics of heavy metal oxides containing silver: optical, structural and electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregadiolli, Bruna A.; Souza, Ernesto R.; Sigoli, Fernando A.; Caiut, Jose M.A.; Alencar, Monica A.S.; Benedetti, Assis V.; Nalin, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Silver containing heavy metal oxide glasses and glass ceramics of the system WO 3 -SbPO 4 -PbO-AgCl with different AgCl contents have been prepared and their thermal, structural and optical properties characterized. Glass ceramics containing metallic silver nanoparticles have been prepared by annealing glass samples at temperatures above the glass transition and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The presence of the metallic clusters has been also confirmed by the observation of a surface plasmon resonance band in the visible range. Cyclic voltammetric measurements indicated the presence of metallic silver into the glasses, even before to perform the thermal treatment. (author)

  9. Preparation of glasses and glass ceramics of heavy metal oxides containing silver: optical, structural and electrochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna A. Bregadiolli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver containing heavy metal oxide glasses and glass ceramics of the system WO3-SbPO4-PbO-AgCl with different AgCl contents have been prepared and their thermal, structural and optical properties characterized. Glass ceramics containing metallic silver nanoparticles have been prepared by annealing glass samples at temperatures above the glass transition and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The presence of the metallic clusters has been also confirmed by the observation of a surface plasmon resonance band in the visible range. Cyclic voltammetric measurements indicated the presence of metallic silver into the glasses, even before to perform the thermal treatment.

  10. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au{sub 3} was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH{sub 2} could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH{sub 2} back to Au and H{sub 2}. We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}{sup +} etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the

  11. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au 3 was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH 2 could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH 2 back to Au and H 2 . We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf 3 , Nb 2 + etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the environmental management of high

  12. Pure and multi metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, antibacterial and cytotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankic, Slavica; Suman, Sneha; Haque, Francia; Vidic, Jasmina

    2016-10-24

    Th antibacterial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles has received marked global attention as they can be specifically synthesized to exhibit significant toxicity to bacteria. The importance of their application as antibacterial agents is evident keeping in mind the limited range and effectiveness of antibiotics, on one hand, and the plethora of metal oxides, on the other, along with the propensity of nanoparticles to induce resistance being much lower than that of antibiotics. Effective inhibition against a wide range of bacteria is well known for several nano oxides consisting of one metal (Fe 3 O 4 , TiO 2 , CuO, ZnO), whereas, research in the field of multi-metal oxides still demands extensive exploration. This is understandable given that the relationship between physicochemical properties and biological activity seems to be complex and difficult to generalize even for metal oxide nanoparticles consisting of only one metal component. Also, despite the broad scope that metal oxide nanoparticles have as antibacterial agents, there arise problems in practical applications taking into account the cytotoxic effects. In this respect, the consideration of polymetallic oxides for biological applications becomes even greater since these can provide synergetic effects and unify the best physicochemical properties of their components. For instance, strong antibacterial efficiency specific of one metal oxide can be complemented by non-cytotoxicity of another. This review presents the main methods and technological advances in fabrication of nanostructured metal oxides with a particular emphasis to multi-metal oxide nanoparticles, their antibacterial effects and cytotoxicity.

  13. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, M Cihan; Çalışkan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Özbay, Ekmel

    2016-09-29

    Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption-dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  14. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cihan Çakır

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  15. Role of carboxylate ion and metal oxidation state on the morphology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These precursors are an excellent source for the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles. Cubes of (edge length ∼ 150 nm) Fe3O4 and elongated particles of Fe2O3 (∼ diameter of 200 nm) were obtained. The role of oxidation state of the metal ion in controlling the morphology of the nanostructured dicarboxylates ...

  16. The effect of metals and metal oxides on biodiesel oxidative stability from promotion to inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, usually the methyl esters of plant oils or other triacylglycerol-containing materials, has become an established alternative to conventional, petroleum-derived diesel fuel. Several technical problems persist when using biodiesel, one of which is oxidation stability upon exposure to oxygen...

  17. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  18. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO 2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li 2 O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  19. Magnetic moments and metallic behavior of two-dimensional Ni clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez L, J.L.; Aguilera G, F.; Vega, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated the average magnetic moments per atom μ - of two-dimensional nickel clusters (Ni N ) with different geometrical shapes and two different sizes (N=7 and 19). The spin-polarized electronic structure has been calculated with a self-consistent tight-binding method considering the 3d, 4s and 4p valence electrons. We discuss the dependence of the s, p, and d contribution of the magnetic moment on the geometrical shape and the average coordination number. We also study the nonmetal-metal transition of the two-dimensional clusters using Kubo's criterion. (Author)

  20. Biofouling of various metal oxides in marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougo, T.; Kuroda, D.; Wada, N.; Ikegai, H.; Kanematsu, H.

    2012-03-01

    Biofouling has induced serious problems in various industrial fields such as marine structures, bio materials, microbially induced corrosion (MIC) etc. The effects of various metals on biofouling have been investigated so far and the mechanism has been clarified to some extent(1,2), and we proposed that Fe ion attracted lots of bacteria and formed biofilm very easily(3). In this study, we investigated the possibility for biofouling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on various metal oxides such as Fe2O3, TiO2, WO3, AgO, Cr2O3 etc. And in addition of such a model experiment on laboratory scale, they were immersed into actual sea water as well as artificial sea water. As for the preparation of metal oxides, commercial oxide powders were used as starting material and those whose particle sizes were under 100 micrometers were formed into pellets by a press. Some of them were heated to 700 °C and sintered for 10 hours at the temperatures. After the calcinations, they were immersed into the culture of P. aeruginosa at 35 °C in about one week. After the immersion, they were taken out of the culture and the biofouling behaviors were observed by optical microscopy, low pressure scanning electron microscopy (low pressure SEM) etc. Biofouling is generally classified into several steps. Firstly, conditioning films composed of organic matters were formed on specimens. Then bacterial were attached to the specimen's surfaces, seeking for conditioning films as nutrition. Then bacteria formed biofilm on the specimens. In marine environment, more larger living matters such as shells etc would be attached to biofilms. However, in the culture media, only biofilms were formed.

  1. Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D; Weiss, Emily A; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Chiechi, Ryan C; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The evaporating material enters the porous openings of the AAO membrane and deposits onto the walls of the pores. The membrane is tilted with respect to the column of evaporating material, so the shadows cast by the openings of the pores onto the inside walls of the pores define the geometry of the tubes. Rotation of the membrane during evaporation ensures uniform deposition inside the pores. After evaporation, dissolution of the AAO in base easily removes the template to yield an array of nanotubes connected by a thin backing of the same metal or metal oxide. The diameter of the pores dictates the diameter of the tubes, and the incident angle of evaporation determines the height of the tubes. Tubes up to approximately 1.5 mum in height and 20-200 nm in diameter were fabricated. This method is adaptable to any material that can be vapor-deposited, including indium-tin oxide (ITO), a conductive, transparent material that is useful for many opto-electronic applications. An array of gold nanotubes produced by this technique served as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: the Raman signal (per molecule) from a monolayer of benzenethiolate was a factor of approximately 5 x 10(5) greater than that obtained using bulk liquid benzenethiol.

  2. Metal ions, not metal-catalyzed oxidative stress, cause clay leachate antibacterial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C Otto

    Full Text Available Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4-5, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions.

  3. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  4. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Dreher, Kevin

    Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize NMs for comprehens......Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize NMs...... particles induced similar increases in HO-1 mRNA levels at 6hr and 24hr post-exposure, respectively. The pattern of HO-1 gene induction was inconsistent with a role of oxidative stress in metal oxide induced BEAS2B cytokine gene expression. Pretreatment of BEAS2B cells with IKK inhibitor III BMS-345541...

  5. Electrically Induced Multiple Metal-Insulator Transitions in Oxide Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Javier; Kalcheim, Yoav; Trastoy, Juan; Charnukha, Aliaksei; Basov, Dimitri N.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2017-11-01

    We show that electrical resistive switching can trigger the appearance of multiple metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in VO2 and V2O3 planar nanodevices. We have fabricated planar devices to electrically induce oxygen vacancy drift and filament formation. We show that oxygen migration can create ordered vanadium-oxide phases of varying stoichiometry with an intrinsic MIT, resulting in well-defined hysteresis loops in the R vs T characteristics of the device. We also show that oxygen migration induces oxide phases displaying correlated behaviors. Our results open up the possibility to electrically control the MIT, enabling alternative functionalities in memristive devices and allowing for alternative paradigms in neuromorphic computing or memory applications.

  6. Biomedical application of hierarchically built structures based on metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, the use of hierarchically built structures in biology and medicine arouses much interest. The aim of this work is to review and summarize the available literature data about hierarchically organized structures in biomedical application. Nanoparticles can serve as an example of such structures. Medicine holds a special place among various application methods of similar systems. Special attention is paid to inorganic nanoparticles based on different metal oxides and hydroxides, such as iron, zinc, copper, and aluminum. Our investigations show that low-dimensional nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides have an inhibitory effect on tumor cells and possess an antimicrobial activity. At the same time, it is obvious that the large-scale use of nanoparticles by humans needs to thoroughly study their properties. Special attention should be paid to the study of nanoparticle interaction with living biological objects. The numerous data show that there is no clear understanding of interaction mechanisms between nanoparticles and various cell types.

  7. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  8. Metal (Hydr)oxides@Polymer Core-Shell Strategy to Metal Single-Atom Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Maolin; Wang, Yang-Gang; Chen, Wenxing; Dong, Juncai; Zheng, Lirong; Luo, Jun; Wan, Jiawei; Tian, Shubo; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2017-08-16

    Preparing metal single-atom materials is currently attracting tremendous attention and remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report a novel core-shell strategy to synthesize single-atom materials. In this strategy, metal hydroxides or oxides are coated with polymers, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and acid leaching, metal single atoms are anchored on the inner wall of hollow nitrogen-doped carbon (CN) materials. By changing metal precursors or polymers, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of different metal single atoms dispersed on CN materials (SA-M/CN, M = Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, FeCo, FeNi, etc.). Interestingly, the obtained SA-Fe/CN exhibits much higher catalytic activity for hydroxylation of benzene to phenol than Fe nanoparticles/CN (45% vs 5% benzene conversion). First-principle calculations further reveal that the high reactivity originates from the easier formation of activated oxygen species at the single Fe site. Our methodology provides a convenient route to prepare a variety of metal single-atom materials representing a new class of catalysts.

  9. Atomic resolution study of reversible conversion reaction in metal oxide electrodes for lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Xu, Junming; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2014-11-25

    Electrode materials based on conversion reactions with lithium ions have shown much higher energy density than those based on intercalation reactions. Here, nanocubes of a typical metal oxide (Co3O4) were grown on few-layer graphene, and their electrochemical lithiation and delithiation were investigated at atomic resolution by in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal the mechanism of the reversible conversion reaction. During lithiation, a lithium-inserted Co3O4 phase and a phase consisting of nanosized Co-Li-O clusters are identified as the intermediate products prior to the subsequent formation of Li2O crystals. In delithiation, the reduced metal nanoparticles form a network and breakdown into even smaller clusters that act as catalysts to prompt reduction of Li2O, and CoO nanoparticles are identified as the product of the deconversion reaction. Such direct real-space, real-time atomic-scale observations shed light on the phenomena and mechanisms in reaction-based electrochemical energy conversion and provide impetus for further development in electrochemical charge storage devices.

  10. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides and oxides for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of hydrogen evolution by basal planes of 2D metal dichalcogenides and oxides in the 2H and 1T class of structures using the hydrogen binding energy as a computational activity descriptor. For some groups of systems like the Ti, Zr, and Hf dichalcogenides the hydrogen...... bonding to the 2H structure is stronger than that to the 1T structure, while for the Cr, Mo, and W dichalcogenides the behavior is opposite. This is rationalized by investigating shifts in the chalcogenide p levels comparing the two structures. We find that usually for a given material only at most one...

  11. Nanostructured metal oxides as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Konstantin; Wang, Guoxiu; Lao, Zhuo Jin; Liu, Hua Kun; Devers, T

    2009-02-01

    In this study, nanostructured transition metal oxides, such as Co3O4, NiO and MnO2 were comprehensively studied and reported as promising electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors. The materials have been obtained by solution or spray solution techniques, which are cost-effective and promising for industry application. All materials feature a large specific surface area, which can reach up to 270 m2/g. The high surface area is a compulsory condition for high capacitance. The best MnO2 materials yielded up to 406 F/g.

  12. Synthesis of Mesoporous Metal Oxides by Structure Replication: Thermal Analysis of Metal Nitrates in Porous Carbon Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Weinberger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of metal nitrates were filled into the pores of an ordered mesoporous CMK-3 carbon matrix by solution-based impregnation. Thermal conversion of the metal nitrates into the respective metal oxides, and subsequent removal of the carbon matrix by thermal combustion, provides a versatile means to prepare mesoporous metal oxides (so-called nanocasting. This study aims to monitor the thermally induced processes by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, coupled with mass ion detection (MS. The highly dispersed metal nitrates in the pores of the carbon matrix tend to react to the respective metal oxides at lower temperature than reported in the literature for pure, i.e., carbon-free, metal nitrates. The subsequent thermal combustion of the CMK-3 carbon matrix also occurs at lower temperature, which is explained by a catalytic effect of the metal oxides present in the pores. This catalytic effect is particularly strong for oxides of redox active metals, such as transition group VII and VIII metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ce.

  13. Energy level alignment in metal/oxide/semiconductor and organic dye/oxide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch, Eric

    The alignment between the energy levels of the constituent materials of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's) and dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC's) is a key property that is critical to the functions of these devices. We have measured the energy level alignment (band offsets) for metal/oxide/semiconductor (MOS) systems with high-kappa gate oxides and metal gates, and for organic dye/oxide systems. The combination of UV photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPS) in the same vacuum system was used to measure both the occupied and unoccupied density of states (DOS), respectively, of these materials systems. Additional soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SXPS) measurements were made of both the valence bands and core levels of the high-kappa systems. The combination of the UPS, IPS and SXPS measurements were used to determine the band offsets between the high-kappa oxides and the Si substrates of thin film oxide/Si samples. To find the metal-oxide band offsets, thin metal layers were sequentially deposited on the oxide surfaces, followed by spectroscopic measurements. These measurements, combined with the measurements from the clean oxide surfaces, were used to find the metal-oxide band offsets. Metal-oxide band offset values were also calculated by the Interface Gap State (IGS) model. We compared the experimental metal-oxide conduction band offset (CBO) values with those calculated using the IGS model, and found that they tended to agree well for Ru/oxide and Ti/oxide systems, but not as well for Al/oxide systems. Through core level spectroscopy, we correlated observations of the composition of the metallic layers with the trends in agreement between the experimental and IGS CBO values, which led to the conclusion that the IGS model gives accurate values for the CBO for systems with chemically abrupt interfaces. Core level spectroscopy of the MOS systems also showed that Al and Ti overlayers reduced the

  14. Neutron radiation effects on metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Amir, Haider F. [School of Science and Technology, University Malaysia Sabah, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)], E-mail: haider@ums.edu.my; Chik, Abdulah [School of Science and Technology, University Malaysia Sabah, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2009-09-15

    The main purpose of this study is to provide the knowledge and data on Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion neutron induced damage in MOS devices. Silicon metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are currently the cornerstone of the modern microelectronics industry. However, when a MOS device is exposed to a flux of energetic radiation or particles, the resulting effects from this radiation can cause several degradation of the device performance and of its operating life. The part of MOS structure (metal oxide semiconductor) most sensitive to neutron radiation is the oxide insulating layer (SiO{sub 2}). When ionizing radiation passes through the oxide, the energy deposited creates electron-hole pairs. These electron-hole pairs have been seriously hazardous to the performance of these electronic components. The degradation of the current gain of the dual n-channel depletion mode MOS caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain of the current is about 35 mA, and the change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence. The total fusion neutron displacement damage was found to be 4.8 x 10{sup -21} dpa per n/cm{sup 2}, while the average fraction of damage in the crystal of silicon was found to be 1.24 x 10{sup -12}. All the MOS devices tested were found to be controllable after neutron irradiation and no permanent damage was caused by neutron fluence irradiation below 10{sup 10}n/cm{sup 2}. The calculation results shows that (n,{alpha}) reaction induced soft-error cross-section about 8.7 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}, and for recoil atoms about 2.9 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  15. Neutron radiation effects on metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Amir, Haider F.; Chik, Abdulah

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to provide the knowledge and data on Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion neutron induced damage in MOS devices. Silicon metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are currently the cornerstone of the modern microelectronics industry. However, when a MOS device is exposed to a flux of energetic radiation or particles, the resulting effects from this radiation can cause several degradation of the device performance and of its operating life. The part of MOS structure (metal oxide semiconductor) most sensitive to neutron radiation is the oxide insulating layer (SiO 2 ). When ionizing radiation passes through the oxide, the energy deposited creates electron-hole pairs. These electron-hole pairs have been seriously hazardous to the performance of these electronic components. The degradation of the current gain of the dual n-channel depletion mode MOS caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain of the current is about 35 mA, and the change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence. The total fusion neutron displacement damage was found to be 4.8 x 10 -21 dpa per n/cm 2 , while the average fraction of damage in the crystal of silicon was found to be 1.24 x 10 -12 . All the MOS devices tested were found to be controllable after neutron irradiation and no permanent damage was caused by neutron fluence irradiation below 10 10 n/cm 2 . The calculation results shows that (n,α) reaction induced soft-error cross-section about 8.7 x 10 -14 cm 2 , and for recoil atoms about 2.9 x 10 -15 cm 2 , respectively.

  16. Cobalt(III)-oxo cubane clusters as catalysts for oxidation of organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion of p-xylene has been found to yield both p-toluic acid and terephthalic acid. It is also ... benzoic acid.5. Since cobalt-oxo clusters of different nuclearities may form under a given oxidative synthetic condition, it appeared important for us to identify the complex species that ..... 30 bar) in the presence of halide ion promoter.

  17. Cluster-based bulk metallic glass formation in Fe-Si-B-Nb alloy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, C L; Wang, Q; Li, F W; Li, Y H; Wang, Y M; Dong, C [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, W; Inoue, A, E-mail: dong@dlut.edu.c [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass formations have been explored in Fe-B-Si-Nb alloy system using the so-called atomic cluster line approach in combination with minor alloying guideline. The atomic cluster line refers to a straight line linking binary cluster to the third element in a ternary system. The basic ternary compositions in Fe-B-Si system are determined by the inetersection points of two cluster lines, namely Fe-B cluster to Si and Fe-Si cluster to B, and then further alloyed with 3-5 at. % Nb for enhancing glass forming abilities. BMG rods with a diameter of 3 mm are formed under the case of minor Nb alloying the basic intersecting compositions of Fe{sub 8}B{sub 3}-Si with Fe{sub 12}Si-B and Fe{sub 8}B{sub 2}-Si with Fe{sub 9}Si-B. The BMGs also exhibit high Vickers hardness (H{sub v}) of 1130-1164 and high Young's modulous (E) of 170-180 GPa

  18. The Correlations between the Intrinsic Colors and Spectroscopic Metallicities of M31 Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zhou; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Zhaoji

    2010-01-01

    We present the correlations between the spectroscopic metallicities and ninety-three different intrinsic colors of M31 globular clusters, including seventy-eight BATC colors and fifteen SDSS and near infrared ugrizK colors. The BATC colors were derived from the archival images of thirteen filters (from c to p), which were taken by Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey with a 60/90 cm f/3 Schmidt telescope. The spectroscopic metallicities adopted in our work were from...

  19. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  20. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  1. Linear and nonlinear surface spectroscopy of supported size selected metal clusters and organic adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaemer, Martin Georg

    2012-03-08

    The spectroscopic investigation of supported size selected metal clusters over a wide wavelength range plays an important role for understanding their outstanding catalytic properties. The challenge which must be overcome to perform such measurements is the difficult detection of the weak spectroscopic signals from these samples. As a consequence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are applied, such as surface Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and surface Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic apparatus developed is shown to have a sensitivity which is high enough to detect sub-monolayer coverages of adsorbates on surfaces. In the measured spectra of small supported silver clusters of the sizes Ag{sub 4}2, Ag{sub 2}1, Ag{sub 9}, and Ag atoms a stepwise transition from particles with purely metallic character to particles with molecule-like properties can be observed within this size range.

  2. The electronic structure and metal-insulator transitions in vanadium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossanek, Rodrigo Jose Ochekoski

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and metal-insulator transitions in vanadium oxides (SrVO 3 , CaVO 3 , LaVO 3 and YVO 3 ) are studied here. The purpose is to show a new interpretation to the spectra which is coherent with the changes across the metal-insulator transition. The main experimental techniques are the X-ray photoemission (PES) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The spectra are interpreted with cluster model, band structure and atomic multiplet calculations. The presence of charge-transfer satellites in the core-level PES spectra showed that these vanadium oxides cannot be classified in the Mott-Hubbard regime. Further, the valence band and core-level spectra presented a similar behavior across the metal insulator transition. In fact, the structures in the spectra and their changes are determined by the different screening channels present in the metallic or insulating phases. The calculated spectral weight showed that the coherent fluctuations dominate the spectra at the Fermi level and give the metallic character to the SrVO 3 and CaVO 3 compounds. The vanishing of this charge fluctuation and the replacement by the Mott-Hubbard screening in the LaVO 3 and YVO 3 systems is ultimately responsible for the opening of a band gap and the insulating character. Further, the correlation effects are, indeed, important to the occupied electronic structure (coherent and incoherent peaks). On the other hand, the unoccupied electronic structure is dominated by exchange and crystal field effects (t2g and eg sub-bands of majority and minority spins). The optical conductivity spectrum was obtained by convoluting the removal and addition states. It showed that the oxygen states, as well as the crystal field and exchange effects are necessary to correctly compare and interpret the experimental results. Further, a correlation at the charge-transfer region of the core-level and valence band optical spectra was observed, which could be extended to other transition metal

  3. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Nicholas B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  4. Electronic relaxation dynamics of a metal atom deposited on argon cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awali, Slim

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a study on the interaction between electronically excited atomic states and a non-reactive environment. We have theoretically and experimentally studied situations where a metal atom (Ba or K) is placed in a finite size environment (argon cluster). The presence of the medium affects the electronic levels of the atom. On the other side, the excitation of the atom induces a relaxation dynamics of the electronic energy through the deformation of the cluster. The experimental part of this work focuses on two aspects: the spectroscopy and the dynamics. In both cases a first laser electronically excites the metal atom and the second ionizes the excited system. The observable is the photoelectron spectrum recorded after photoionization and possibly information on the photoion which are also produced. This pump/probe technique, with also two lasers, provide the ultrafast dynamic when the lasers pulses used are of ultrashort (60 fs). The use of nanosecond lasers leads to resonance spectroscopic measurement, unresolved temporally, which give information on the position of the energy levels of the studied system. From a theoretical point-of-view, the excited states of M-Ar n were calculated at the ab initio level, using large core pseudo-potential to limit the active electrons of the metal to valence electrons. The study of alkali metals (potassium) is especially well adapted to this method since only one electron is active. The ab-initio calculation and a Monte-Carlo simulation where coupled to optimize the geometry of the KAr n (n = 1-10) cluster when K is in the ground state of the neutral and the ion, or excited in the 4p or 5s state. Calculations were also conducted in collaboration with B. Gervais (CIMAP, Caen) on KAr n clusters having several tens of argon atoms. Absorption spectra were also calculated. From an experimental point-of-view, we were able to characterize the excited states of potassium and barium perturbed by the clusters. In both cases a

  5. Bimetallic Ag-Pt Sub-nanometer Supported Clusters as Highly Efficient and Robust Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negreiros, Fabio R. [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Yin, Chunrong [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Singh, Akansha [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Barcaro, Giovanni [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Sementa, Luca [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Bartling, Stephan [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, Rostock Germany; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Sen, Prasenjit [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Chhatnag Road Jhunsi Allahabad 211019 India; Nigam, Sandeep [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay Mumbai- 400 085 India; Fukui, Nobuyuki [East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc., Ichikawa Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Yasumatsu, Hisato [Cluster Research Laboratory, Toyota Technological Institute: in, East Tokyo Laboratory, Genesis Research Institute, Inc. Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 Japan; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL USA; Fortunelli, Alessandro [CNR-ICCOM & IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa Italy; Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA USA

    2017-12-29

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of Ag-Pt sub-nanometer clusters as heterogeneous catalysts in the CO -> CO2 reaction (COox) is presented. Ag9Pt2 and Ag9Pt3 clusters are size-selected in the gas phase, deposited on an ultrathin amorphous alumina support, and tested as catalysts experimentally under realistic conditions and by first-principles simulations at realistic coverage. Insitu GISAXS/TPRx demonstrates that the clusters do not sinter or deactivate even after prolonged exposure to reactants at high temperature, and present comparable, extremely high COox catalytic efficiency. Such high activity and stability are ascribed to a synergic role of Ag and Pt in ultranano-aggregates, in which Pt anchors the clusters to the support and binds and activates two CO molecules, while Ag binds and activates O-2, and Ag/Pt surface proximity disfavors poisoning by CO or oxidized species.

  6. Where Water is Oxidized to Dioxygen: Structure of thePhotosynthetic Mn4Ca Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Sauer, Kenneth; Latimer, Matthew J.; Pushkar, Yulia; Biesiadka, Jacek; Loll, Bernhard; Saenger, Wolfram; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2006-05-31

    Oxidation of water to dioxygen is catalyzed withinphotosystem II (PSII) by a Mn4Ca cluster, the structure of which remainselusive. Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)measurements on PSII single crystals constrain the Mn4Ca cluster geometryto a set of three similar high-resolution structures. Combining polarizedEXAFS and X-ray diffraction data, the cluster was placed within PSIItaking into account the overall trend of the electron density of themetal site and the putative ligands. The structure of the cluster fromthe present study is unlike either the 3.0 or 3.5 Angstrom resolutionX-ray structures, and other previously proposed models.

  7. THE SLUGGS SURVEY: NGC 3115, A CRITICAL TEST CASE FOR METALLICITY BIMODALITY IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Strader, Jay, E-mail: brodie@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Due to its proximity (9 Mpc) and the strongly bimodal color distribution of its spectroscopically well-sampled globular cluster (GC) system, the early-type galaxy NGC 3115 provides one of the best available tests of whether the color bimodality widely observed in GC systems generally reflects a true metallicity bimodality. Color bimodality has alternatively been attributed to a strongly nonlinear color-metallicity relation reflecting the influence of hot horizontal-branch stars. Here, we couple Subaru Suprime-Cam gi photometry with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to accurately measure GC colors and a CaT index that measures the Ca II triplet. We find the NGC 3115 GC system to be unambiguously bimodal in both color and the CaT index. Using simple stellar population models, we show that the CaT index is essentially unaffected by variations in horizontal-branch morphology over the range of metallicities relevant to GC systems (and is thus a robust indicator of metallicity) and confirm bimodality in the metallicity distribution. We assess the existing evidence for and against multiple metallicity subpopulations in early- and late-type galaxies and conclude that metallicity bi/multimodality is common. We briefly discuss how this fundamental characteristic links directly to the star formation and assembly histories of galaxies.

  8. Ab initio GW quasiparticle calculation of small alkali-metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, S; Louie, S G; Ohno, K

    2001-01-01

    Quasiparticle energies of small alkali-metal clusters are evaluated from first principles by means of the GW approximation with the generalized plasmon-pole model. An all-electron mixed-basis approach, in which wave function is represented as a linear combination of both plane waves and atomic orbitals, is adopted in the calculation. Obtained quasiparticle energies (ionization potential and electron affinity) are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Characteristics and possibilities of software tool for metal-oxide surge arresters selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a procedure for the selection of metal-oxide surge arresters based on the instructions given in the Siemens and ABB catalogues, respecting their differences and the characteristics and possibilities of the software tool. The software tool was developed during the preparation of a Master's thesis titled, 'Automation of Metal-Oxide Surge Arresters Selection'. An example is presented of the selection of metal-oxide surge arresters using the developed software tool.

  10. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XXVI. The Issues of Photometric Age and Metallicity Estimates for Globular Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane; Duc, Pierre-Alain [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Zhang, Hongxin [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Peng, Eric W. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Roediger, Joel; Gwyn, S. D. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Durrell, Patrick R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH (United States); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu,Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hudelot, Patrick, E-mail: mathieu.powalka@astro.unistra.fr [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); and others

    2017-08-01

    Large samples of globular clusters (GC) with precise multi-wavelength photometry are becoming increasingly available and can be used to constrain the formation history of galaxies. We present the results of an analysis of Milky Way (MW) and Virgo core GCs based on 5 optical-near-infrared colors and 10 synthetic stellar population models. For the MW GCs, the models tend to agree on photometric ages and metallicities, with values similar to those obtained with previous studies. When used with Virgo core GCs, for which photometry is provided by the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), the same models generically return younger ages. This is a consequence of the systematic differences observed between the locus occupied by Virgo core GCs and models in panchromatic color space. Only extreme fine-tuning of the adjustable parameters available to us can make the majority of the best-fit ages old. Although we cannot exclude that the formation history of the Virgo core may lead to more conspicuous populations of relatively young GCs than in other environments, we emphasize that the intrinsic properties of the Virgo GCs are likely to differ systematically from those assumed in the models. Thus, the large wavelength coverage and photometric quality of modern GC samples, such as those used here, is not by itself sufficient to better constrain the GC formation histories. Models matching the environment-dependent characteristics of GCs in multi-dimensional color space are needed to improve the situation.

  11. Laser-induced cluster-ions from thin foils of metals and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerstenau, N.; Hillenkamp, F.

    1981-01-01

    Interaction of focused, very high-energy pulses of UV laser light of some 10 8 W cm -2 with thin foils of metals and semiconductors induces solid-gas phase-transitions and ionization of microvolumes of the target material. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the microplasma reveals singly ionized cluster-ions as final products of the interaction processes. Cluster-ion distributions are measured and compared with those obtained in thermal evaporation, high-frequency spark and SIMS experiments. The distributions are shown to be characteristic of the investigated material. While some of their features can be understood in terms of theories of cluster stability, other qualities, also observed in SIMS and evaporation experiments, are thought to be due to the partially non-equilibrium character of the solid-gas phase-transition. Furthermore, estimations concerning parameters of the laser-induced microplasma can be drawn from the distributions. (orig.)

  12. Giant metal sputtering yields induced by 20-5000 keV/atom gold clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, H.H.; Brunelle, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Depauw, J.; Jacquet, D.; Le Beyec, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Very large non-linear effects have been found in cluster-induced metal sputtering over a broad projectile energy interval for the first time. Recently available cluster beams from tandem accelerators have allowed sputtering yield measurements to be made with Au 1 to Au 5 from 20 keV/atom to 5 MeV/atom. The cluster-sputtering yield maxima were found at the same total energy but not at the same energy/atom as expected. For Au 5 a yield as high as 3000 was reached at 150 keV/atom while the Au 1 yield was only 55 at the same velocity. The Sigmund-Claussen thermal spike theory, which fits published data at low energy, cannot reproduce our extended new data set. (author)

  13. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R Fe ∝ P 0.42 jet , with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10 9 M sun .

  14. A High-precision Trigonometric Parallax to an Ancient Metal-poor Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. M.; Casertano, S.; Strader, J.; Riess, A.; VandenBerg, D. A.; Soderblom, D. R.; Kalirai, J.; Salinas, R.

    2018-03-01

    Using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have obtained a direct trigonometric parallax for the nearest metal-poor globular cluster, NGC 6397. Although trigonometric parallaxes have been previously measured for many nearby open clusters, this is the first parallax for an ancient metal-poor population—one that is used as a fundamental template in many stellar population studies. This high-precision measurement was enabled by the HST/WFC3 spatial-scanning mode, providing hundreds of astrometric measurements for dozens of stars in the cluster and also for Galactic field stars along the same sightline. We find a parallax of 0.418 ± 0.013 ± 0.018 mas (statistical, systematic), corresponding to a true distance modulus of 11.89 ± 0.07 ± 0.09 mag (2.39 ± 0.07 ± 0.10 kpc). The V luminosity at the stellar main-sequence turnoff implies an absolute cluster age of 13.4 ± 0.7 ± 1.2 Gyr. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs GO-13817, GO-14336, and GO-14773.

  15. Polymer derived non-oxide ceramics modified with late transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Muhammad; Schmalz, Thomas; Motz, Günter; Kempe, Rhett

    2012-08-07

    This tutorial review highlights the methods for the preparation of metal modified precursor derived ceramics (PDCs) and concentrates on the rare non-oxide systems enhanced with late transition metals. In addition to the main synthetic strategies for modified SiC and SiCN ceramics, an overview of the morphologies, structures and compositions of both, ceramic materials and metal (nano) particles, is presented. Potential magnetic and catalytic applications have been discussed for the so manufactured metal containing non-oxide ceramics.

  16. Pulsed-laser-induced nanoscale island formation in thin metal-on-oxide films

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, SJ; Carey, JD; Silva, SRP

    2005-01-01

    he mechanisms controlling the nanostructuring of thin metal-on-oxide films by nanosecond pulsed excimer lasers are investigated. When permitted by the interfacial energetics, the breakup of the metal film into nanoscale islands is observed. A range of metals (Au, Ag, Mo, Ni, Ti, and Zn) with differing physical and thermodynamic properties, and differing tendencies for oxide formation, are investigated. The nature of the interfacial metal-substrate interaction, the thermal conductivity of the ...

  17. Metal Oxide-Carbon Nanocomposites for Aqueous and Nonaqueous Supercapacitors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort focuses on development of novel metal-oxide-carbon nanocomposites for application in pseudocapacitive...

  18. Optical and electrical experiments at some transition-metal oxide foil-electrolyte interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, S.O.; Ahlgren, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Metal-oxide layers formed from transition-metal foils oxidized by heating in air have been examined for their photoelectrolytic response. The metals examined are Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, and Pt. Weak photoeffects are observed for oxide layers of all of these metals. Sizable light-dependent oxygen gas evolution rates are found in Ti and also in W oxides. The spectral dependence of the oxygen response in these compounds is investigated, and interpretation is given of these experiments

  19. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio; Sneden, Christopher; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.

    2014-01-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions

  20. Atmospheric parameters and metallicities for 2191 stars in the globular cluster M4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malavolta, Luca; Piotto, Giampaolo; Nascimbeni, Valerio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milone, Antonino P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bedin, Luigi R., E-mail: luca.malavolta@unipd.it, E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it, E-mail: valerio.nascimbeni@unipd.it, E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V ≤ 14.7, we obtain a nearly constant metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = –1.07 (σ = 0.02). No difference in the metallicity at the level of 0.01 dex is observed between the two RGB sequences identified by Monelli et al. For 1869 subgiant and main-sequence stars with V > 14.7, we obtain ([Fe/H]) = –1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  1. Plasmonic nanostructured metal-oxide-semiconductor reflection modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Anthony; Chen, Chengkun; Hassan, Sa'ad; Lisicka-Skrzek, Ewa; Tait, R Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2015-04-08

    We propose a plasmonic surface that produces an electrically controlled reflectance as a high-speed intensity modulator. The device is conceived as a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor on silicon with its metal structured as a thin patch bearing a contiguous nanoscale grating. The metal structure serves multiple functions as a driving electrode and as a grating coupler for perpendicularly incident p-polarized light to surface plasmons supported by the patch. Modulation is produced by charging and discharging the capacitor and exploiting the carrier refraction effect in silicon along with the high sensitivity of strongly confined surface plasmons to index perturbations. The area of the modulator is set by the area of the incident beam, leading to a very compact device for a strongly focused beam (∼2.5 μm in diameter). Theoretically, the modulator can operate over a broad electrical bandwidth (tens of gigahertz) with a modulation depth of 3 to 6%, a loss of 3 to 4 dB, and an optical bandwidth of about 50 nm. About 1000 modulators can be integrated over a 50 mm(2) area producing an aggregate electro-optic modulation rate in excess of 1 Tb/s. We demonstrate experimentally modulators operating at telecommunications wavelengths, fabricated as nanostructured Au/HfO2/p-Si capacitors. The modulators break conceptually from waveguide-based devices and belong to the same class of devices as surface photodetectors and vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers.

  2. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  3. Electrosprayed Metal Oxide Semiconductor Films for Sensitive and Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghimbeu, C.M.; Lumbreras, M.; Schoonman, J.; Siadat, M.

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor metal oxide films of copper-doped tin oxide (Cu-SnO2), tungsten oxide (WO3) and indium oxide (In2O3) were deposited on a platinum coated alumina substrate employing the electrostatic spray deposition technique (ESD). The morphology studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and

  4. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  5. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  6. Membership and lithium in the old, metal-poor open cluster Berkeley 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randich, S.; Pace, G.; Pastori, L.; Bragaglia, A.

    2009-03-01

    Context: Measurements of lithium (Li) abundances in open clusters provide a unique tool for following the evolution of this element with age, metallicity, and stellar mass. In spite of the plethora of Li data already available, the behavior of Li in solar-type stars has so far been poorly understood. Aims: Using FLAMES/Giraffe on the VLT, we obtained spectra of 157 candidate members of the old, metal-poor cluster Berkeley 32, to determine membership and to study the Li behavior of confirmed members. Methods: Radial velocities were measured, allowing us to derive both the cluster velocity and membership information for the sample stars. The Li abundances were obtained from the equivalent width of the Li i 670.8 nm feature, using curves of growth. Results: We obtained an average radial velocity of 105.2 ± 0.86 km s-1, and 53% of the stars have a radial velocity consistent with membership. The Li - T_eff distribution of unevolved members matches the upper envelope of M 67, as well as that of the slightly older and more metal-rich NGC 188. No major dispersion in Li is detected. When considering the Li distribution as a function of mass, however, Be 32 members with solar-like temperature are less massive and less Li-depleted than their counterparts in the other clusters. The mean Li of stars in the temperature interval 5750 ≤ T_eff ≤ 6050 K is log n(Li) = 2.47±0.16, less than a factor of two below the average Li of the 600 Myr old Hyades, and slightly above the average of intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) clusters, the upper envelope of M 67, and NGC 188. This value is comparable to or slightly higher than the plateau of Pop. ii stars. The similarity of the average Li abundance of clusters of different age and metallicity, along with its closeness to the halo dwarf plateau, is very intriguing and suggests that, whatever the initial Li abundance and the Li depletion histories, old stars converge to almost the same final Li abundance. Based on observations collected at ESO

  7. U(IV) chalcogenolates synthesized via oxidation of uranium metal by dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Andrew J; Scott, Brian L; Neu, Mary P

    2006-09-04

    Treatment of uranium metal with dichalcogenides in the presence of a catalytic amount of iodine in pyridine affords molecular U(IV) chalcogenolates that do not require stabilizing ancillary ligands. Oxidation of U(0) by PhEEPh yields monomeric seven-coordinate U(EPh)4(py)3 (E = S(1), Se(2)). The dimeric eight-coordinate complexes [U(EPh)2(mu2-EPh)2(CH3CN)2]2 (E = S(3), Se(4)) are obtained by crystallization from solutions of 1 and 2 dissolved in acetonitrile. Oxidation of U(0) by pySSpy and crystallization from thf yields nine-coordinate U(Spy)4(thf) (5). Incorporation of elemental selenium into the oxidation of U(0) by PhSeSePh results in the isolation of [U(py)2(SePh)(mu3-Se)(mu2-SePh)]4.4py (6), a tetrameric cluster in which each U(IV) ion is eight-coordinate and the U4Se4 core forms a distorted cube. The compounds were analyzed spectroscopically and the single-crystal X-ray structures of 1 and 3-6 were determined. The isolation of 1-6 represents six new examples of actinide chalcogenolates and allows insight into the nature of "hard" actinide ion-"soft" chalcogen donor interactions.

  8. Redefining the metal/charge-transfer insulator paradigm in transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hung; Ai, Xinyuan; Marianetti, Chris; Millis, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The universality of the phase diagram in the variables of interaction strength and d-occupancy, shown for late transition metal oxides in Ref.[1], is examined for two series of early transition metal oxides: (SrVO3, SrCrO3, SrMnO3) and (LaTiO3, LaVO3, LaCrO3) using density functional theory (DFT), DFT+U and DFT+dynamical mean field theory methods. The interaction required to drive the metal-insulator transition is found to depend sensitively on the d-occupancy Nd, and beyond a threshold value of the d-occupancy an insulating state cannot be achieved for any practical value of the interaction. The critical Nd values are determined and compared to ab initio and experimental estimates where available. Additionally, the minimal model for the transition is determined and the crucial role played by the Hunds coupling is demonstrated. [4pt] [1] Xin Wang, M. J. Han, Luca de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and Andrew J. Millis (2011). arXiv:1110.2782

  9. Stable structures and potential energy surface of the metallic clusters: Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Sun, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Metallic clusters have been widely studied due to their special electrical, optical, and catalytic properties. The many-body Gupta potential is applied to describe the interatomic interaction of Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt clusters, and their global minimal structures within 100 atoms are optimized using dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method. The configurational distribution of global minima is analyzed, and the geometrical difference among these clusters is demonstrated. Results show that the dominant motif of Ni and Cu clusters is the icosahedron, and in Ag and Au clusters the number of decahedra is slightly larger than that of the icosahedra. However, more face-centered cubic (fcc), stacking fault fcc, and amorphous structures are formed in Au clusters than in Ag clusters. Furthermore, the main motif of Pd and Pt clusters is the decahedron. In particular, Ni98 adopts a Leary tetrahedral motif, and Pt54 is a central vacant icosahedron. The difference related to the potential parameters of these metallic clusters is further investigated by energy analysis. Moreover, the potential energy surfaces (PES) of 38-atom metallic clusters is characterized in terms of conformational analysis. It was found that the sequence of the number of local minima on the PES from large to low is Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, Pd, and Au.

  10. Orbitals in inorganic chemistry: metal rings and clusters, hydronitrogens, and heterocyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    A chemical orbital theory is useful in inorganic chemistry. Some applications are described for understanding and designing of inorganic molecules. Among the topics included are: (1) valence electron rules to predict stabilities of three- and four-membered ring metals and for those of regular octahedral M(6) metal clusters solely by counting the number of valence electrons; (2) pentagon stability (stability of five- relative to six-membered rings in some classes of molecules), predicted and applied for understanding and designing saturated molecules of group XV elements; (3) properties of unsaturated hydronitrogens N( m )H( n ) in contrast to those of hydrocarbons C( m )H( n ); (4) unusually short nonbonded distances between metal atoms in cyclic molecules.

  11. Metal-Organic Framework of Lanthanoid Dinuclear Clusters Undergoes Slow Magnetic Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru Iwami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanoid metal-organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs can adopt a variety of new structures due to the large coordination numbers of Ln metal ions, and Ln-MOFs are expected to show new luminescence and magnetic properties due to the localized f electrons. In particular, some Ln metal ions, such as Dy(III and Tb(III ions, work as isolated quantum magnets when they have magnetic anisotropy. In this work, using 4,4′,4″-s-triazine-2,4,6-triyl-tribenzoic acid (H3TATB as a ligand, two new Ln-MOFs, [Dy(TATB(DMF2] (1 and [Tb(TATB(DMF2] (2, were obtained. The Ln-MOFs contain Ln dinuclear clusters as secondary building units, and 1 underwent slow magnetic relaxation similar to single-molecule magnets.

  12. GRAPHENE BASED METAL AND METAL OXIDE NANOCOMPOSITES: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mujeeb

    2015-06-11

    Graphene, an atomically thin two-dimensional carbonaceous material, has attracted tremendous attention in the scientific community, due to its exceptional electronic, electrical, and mechanical properties. Indeed, with the recent explosion of methods for a large-scale synthesis of graphene, the number of publications related to graphene and other graphene based materials have increased exponentially. Particularly the easy preparation of graphene like materials, such as, highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) via reduction of graphite oxide (GO), offers a wide range of possibilities for the preparation of graphene based inorganic nanocomposites by the incorporation of various functional nanomaterials for a variety of applications. In this review, we discuss the current development of graphene based metal and metal oxide nanocomposites, with a detailed account of their synthesis and properties. Specifically, much attention has been given to their wide range of applications in various fields, including, electronics, electrochemical and electrical fields. Overall, by the inclusion of various references, this review covers in detail aspects of the graphene-based inorganic nanocomposites.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of hierarchically porous metal, metal oxide, and carbon monoliths with highly ordered nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Amy Janine

    Hierarchically porous materials are of great interest in such applications as catalysis, separations, fuel cells, and advanced batteries. One such way of producing these materials is through the process of nanocasting, in which a sacrificial template is replicated and then removed to form a monolithic replica. This replica consists of mesopores, which can be ordered or disordered, and bicontinuous macropores, which allow flow throughout the length of the monolith. Hierarchically porous metal oxide and carbon monoliths with an ordered mesopores system are synthesized for the first time via nanocasting. These replicas were used as supports for the deposition of silver particles and the catalytic efficiency was evaluated. The ordered silica template used in producing these monoliths was also used for an in-situ TEM study involving metal nanocasting, and an observation of the destruction of the silica template during nanocasting made. Two new methods of removing the silica template were developed and applied to the synthesis of copper, nickel oxide, and zinc oxide monoliths. Finally, hollow fiber membrane monoliths were examined via x-ray tomography in an attempt to establish the presence of this structure throughout the monolith.

  14. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Spectra of globular clusters in the Sombrero galaxy: evidence for spectroscopic metallicity bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Brito, Alan; Hau, George K. T.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Spitler, Lee R.; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2011-11-01

    We present a large sample of over 200 integrated-light spectra of confirmed globular clusters (GCs) associated with the Sombrero (M104) galaxy taken with the Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) instrument on the Keck telescope. A significant fraction of the spectra have signal-to-noise ratio levels high enough to allow measurements of GC metallicities using the method of Brodie & Huchra. We find a distribution of spectroscopic metallicities in the range -2.2 < [Fe/H] < +0.1 that is bimodal, with peaks at [Fe/H]˜-1.4 and -0.6. Thus, the GC system of the Sombrero galaxy, like a few other galaxies now studied in detail, reveals a bimodal spectroscopic metallicity distribution supporting the long-held belief that colour bimodality reflects two metallicity subpopulations. This further suggests that the transformation from optical colour to metallicity for old stellar populations, such as GCs, is not strongly non-linear. We also explore the radial and magnitude distribution with metallicity for GC subpopulations but small number statistics prevent any clear trends in these distributions. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Sustainable synthesis, characterization, and applications of metal oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda Lyn

    Nanomaterials have attracted significant research focus due to their advantageous and unique properties (i.e. electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical) as compared with the bulk. Metal oxide nanostructures are of particular interest, as they are very robust and display high chemical and thermal stability, while offering a diverse array of fascinating properties. By reliably controlling the size, morphology, composition, and crystallinity of these nanostructures, their properties can be tuned for a specific purpose. These advantageous tailorable properties render them as ideal candidates for many applications such as catalysis, sensing, electronics, optoelectronics, energy storage, and even medicine. Driven by their increased popularity and potential applications, efforts to synthesize nanomaterials have moved toward environmentally-friendly methodologies, such as wet-chemical, molten-salt, hydrothermal, and sol-gel methods. We will discuss the green synthesis of strontium ruthenate (SrRuO 3), the yttrium manganese oxides (YMnO3 and YMn2O 5), and the magnetic spinel ferrites (MFe2O4 where 'M' is Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) and our ability to reliably tune their properties for various applications. The effects of the molten salt parameters on the resulting particle size and morphology were explored for SrRuO 3 and the yttrium manganese oxides. For example, rapid cooling rates and the use of surfactants allowed us to produced faceted octahedra of SrRuO 3, which resulted in a 4-fold enhancement of their activity towards methanol oxidation with respect to smooth rounded particles. Similarly, using the hydrothermal method, we generated ferrite nanoparticles of different compositions and sizes. We investigated their potential as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as photocatalysts, and observed significant differences as a function of both size and composition. Similarly, we will also examine surface and structural effects upon the electronic

  17. Morphology evolution and nanostructure of chemical looping transition metal oxide materials upon redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Lang; Cheng, Zhuo; Guo, Mengqing; Fan, Jonathan A.; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal are heavily used in chemical looping technologies because of their high oxygen carrying capacity and high thermal reactivity. These oxygen activities result in the oxide formation and oxygen vacancy formation that affect the nanoscale crystal phase and morphology within these materials and their subsequent bulk chemical behavior. In this study, two selected earlier transition metals manganese and cobalt as well as two selected later transition metals copper and nickel that are important to chemical looping reactions are investigated when they undergo cyclic redox reactions. We found Co microparticles exhibited increased CoO impurity presence when oxidized to Co 3 O 4 upon cyclic oxidation; CuO redox cycles prefer to be limited to a reduced form of Cu 2 O and an oxidized form of CuO; Mn microparticles were oxidized to a mixed phases of MnO and Mn 3 O 4 , which causes delamination during oxidation. For Ni microparticles, a dense surface were observed during the redox reaction. The atomistic thermodynamics methods and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to elucidate the effect of oxygen dissociation and migration on the morphological evolution of nanostructures during the redox processes. Our results indicate that the earlier transition metals (Mn and Co) tend to have stronger interaction with O 2 than the later transition metals (Ni and Cu). Also, our modified Brønsted−Evans−Polanyi (BEP) relationship for reaction energies and total reaction barriers reveals that reactions of earlier transition metals are more exergonic and have lower oxygen dissociation barriers than those of later transition metals. In addition, it was found that for these transition metal oxides the oxygen vacancy formation energies increase with the depth. The oxide in the higher oxidation state of transition metal has lower vacancy formation energy, which can facilitate forming the defective nanostructures. The fundamental understanding of these

  18. Effect of Element Diffusion Through Metallic Networks During Oxidation of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Cai, Z.; Gosztola, D.; Cook, R.; Hiller, J.

    2014-04-01

    A detailed study was conducted on localized oxidation on Type 321 stainless steel (321ss) using synchrotron x-ray nanobeam analysis along with Raman microscopy. The results showed the presence of metallic nanonetworks in the oxide scales, which plays an important role in the continued oxidation of the alloy at 750 °C. A mechanism is proposed to explain the rapid oxidation of 321ss in complex gaseous environments at elevated temperature. Neutral metal atoms could diffuse outward, and carbon atoms could diffuse inward through the metallic nanonetworks in oxide layers. Alternately, diffusion tunnels can dramatically affect the phase composition of the oxide scales. Since the diffusion rate of neutral metal and carbon atoms through the metallic nanonetworks can be much faster than the diffusion of cations through Cr2O3, the metallic nanonetwork provides a path through the protective Cr2O3 layer for the rapid outward diffusion of metallic chromium and iron atoms to the nonprotective spinel layer. This diffusion process affects the solid-state reaction near the alloy-oxide boundary, and a dense Cr2O3 protective layer does not form. The classic stable structure of the oxide scales, with a dense Cr2O3 layer at the bottom, is damaged by the rapid diffusion through the tunnel at the reaction front, resulting in locally accelerated oxidation. This process can subsequently lead to "breakaway" oxidation and catastrophic failure of the alloy.

  19. Transformations of highly enriched uranium into metal or oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nollet, P.; Sarrat, P.

    1964-01-01

    The enriched uranium workshops in Cadarache have a double purpose on the one hand to convert uranium hexafluoride into metal or oxide, and on the other hand to recover the uranium contained in scrap materials produced in the different metallurgical transformations. The principles that have been adopted for the design and safety of these workshops are reported. The nuclear safety is based on the geometrical limitations of the processing vessels. To establish the processes and the technology of these workshops, many studies have been made since 1960, some of which have led to original achievements. The uranium hexafluoride of high isotopic enrichment is converted either by injection of the gas into ammonia or by an original process of direct hydrogen reduction to uranium tetrafluoride. The uranium contained m uranium-zirconium metal scrap can be recovered by combustion with hydrogen chloride followed treatment of the uranium chloride by fluorine in order to obtain the uranium in the hexafluoride state. Recovery of the uranium contained m various scrap materials is obtained by a conventional refining process combustion of metallic scrap, nitric acid dissolution of the oxide, solvent purification by tributyl phosphate, ammonium diuranate precipitation, calcining, reduction and hydro fluorination into uranium tetrafluoride, bomb reduction by calcium and slag treatment. Two separate workshops operate along these lines one takes care of the uranium with an isotopic enrichment of up to 3 p. 100, the other handles the high enrichments. The handling of each step of this process, bearing in mind the necessity for nuclear safety, has raised some special technological problems and has led to the conception of new apparatus, in particular the roasting furnace for metal turnings, the nitric acid dissolution unit, the continuous precipitator and ever safe filter and dryer for ammonium diuranate, the reduction and hydro fluorination furnace and the slag recovery apparatus These are

  20. Absorbed dose assessment in particle-beam irradiated metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose was estimated after Monte Carlo simulation of proton and ion beam irradiation on metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors. A memristive device comprises two electrodes, each of a nanoscale width, and a double-layer active region disposed between and in electrical contact with electrodes. Following materials were considered for the active region: titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, hafnium dioxide, strontium titanium trioxide and galium nitride. Obtained results show that significant amount of oxygen ion - oxygen and nonmetal ion - nonmetal vacancy pairs is to be generated. The loss of such vacancies from the device is believed to deteriorate the device performance over time. Estimated absorbed dose values in the memristor for different constituting materials are of the same order of magnitude because of the close values of treshold displacement energies for the investigated materials.

  1. Passivation ability of graphene oxide demonstrated by two-different-metal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Tzu; Tsai, Zong-Sian; Chen, Liang-Chun; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Mei-Hsin; Song, Jenn-Ming; Lin, Chu-Hsuan

    2014-12-01

    The study on graphene oxide (GO) grows rapidly in recent years. We find that graphene oxide could act as the passivation material in photovoltaic applications. Graphene oxide has been applied on Si two-different-metal solar cells. The suitable introduction of graphene oxide could result in obvious enhancement on the efficiency. The simple chemical process to deposit graphene oxide makes low thermal budget, large-area deposition, and fast production of surface passivation possible. The different procedures to incorporate graphene oxide in Si two-different-metal solar cells are compared, and 21% enhancement on the efficiency is possible with a suitable deposition method.

  2. Nature of the chemical bond between metal atoms and oxide surfaces: new evidences from spin density studies of K atoms on alkaline earth oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Mario; Giamello, Elio; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Sojka, Zbigniew; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2005-12-07

    We have studied the interaction of K atoms with the surface of polycrystalline alkaline-earth metal oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO) by means of CW- and Pulsed-EPR, UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopies and DFT cluster model calculations. The K adsorption site is proposed to be an anionic reverse corner formed at the intersection of two steps, where K binds by more than 1 eV, resulting in thermally stable species up to about 400 K. The bonding has small covalent and large polarization contributions, and the K atom remains neutral, with one unpaired electron in the valence shell. The interaction results in strong modifications of the K electronic wave function which are directly reflected by the hyperfine coupling constant, (K)a(iso). This is found to be a very efficient "probe" to measure the degree of metal-oxide interaction which directly depends on the substrate basicity. These results provide an original and general model of the early stages of the metal-support interaction in the case of ionic oxides.

  3. METALLICITY EFFECT ON LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY FORMATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Fragos, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ivanova, N.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Jordan, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Voss, R. [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-10

    We present comprehensive observational results of the metallicity effect on the fraction of globular clusters (GCs) that contain low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB), by utilizing all available data obtained with Chandra for LMXBs and Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) for GCs. Our primary sample consists of old elliptical galaxies selected from the ACS Virgo and Fornax surveys. To improve statistics at both the lowest and highest X-ray luminosity, we also use previously reported results from other galaxies. It is well known that the fraction of GCs hosting LMXBs is considerably higher in red, metal-rich, GCs than in blue, metal-poor GCs. In this paper, we test whether this metallicity effect is X-ray luminosity-dependent and find that the effect holds uniformly in a wide luminosity range. This result is statistically significant (at {>=}3{sigma}) in LMXBs with luminosities in the range L {sub X} = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, where the ratio of GC-LMXB fractions in metal-rich to metal-poor GCs is R = 3.4 {+-} 0.5. A similar ratio is also found at lower (down to 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) and higher luminosities (up to the ULX regime), but with less significance ({approx}2{sigma} confidence). Because different types of LMXBs dominate in different luminosities, our finding requires a new explanation for the metallicity effect in dynamically-formed LMXBs. We confirm that the metallicity effect is not affected by other factors such as stellar age, GC mass, stellar encounter rate, and galacto-centric distance.

  4. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rathnait D.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN) surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  5. Oxidation catalysts comprising metal exchanged hexaaluminate wherein the metal is Sr, Pd, La, and/or Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David [Boulder, CO; Cook, Ronald [Lakewood, CO

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides metal-exchanged hexaaluminate catalysts that exhibit good catalytic activity and/or stability at high temperatures for extended periods with retention of activity as combustion catalysts, and more generally as oxidation catalysts, that make them eminently suitable for use in methane combustion, particularly for use in natural gas fired gas turbines. The hexaaluminate catalysts of this invention are of particular interest for methane combustion processes for minimization of the generation of undesired levels (less than about 10 ppm) of NOx species. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are also useful for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly hydrocarbons. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are further useful for partial oxidation, particularly at high temperatures, of reduced species, particularly hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes).

  6. Charge transient spectroscopy measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Markus; Fechner, Axel; Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Chemnitz University of Technology, Semiconductor Physics, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) is an electrical measurement technique related to deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Using QTS it is possible to measure fast charge reloading processes even in the absence of depletion regions as a function of time and temperature with different pulse voltages and pulse widths. As a result, one can determine the number, the energetic position, the capture cross section, and the density of the electrically active traps. Here QTS measurements of Al/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor structures are presented revealing the influence of manganese implantation into p- and n-doped silicon on the charge carrier transport and trapping properties. The QTS results are compared to I-V, C-V and DLTS measurements on the same samples and the differences are discussed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation of Simple Alcohols by Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobse, Leon; Vink, Sebastiaan O; Wijngaarden, Sven; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2017-09-12

    The "exploding" flask demonstration presents a well-known illustration of heterogeneous catalyzed methanol oxidation. We find that for the same vapor pressure, the demonstration also works for all primary and secondary alcohols up to butanol but not for a tertiary alcohol. Also, we show that the demonstration works for a large range of transition metal catalysts. Hence, this demonstration, which is often applied for the repetitive explosions when methanol is used, may also be used to argue the requirement of initial dehydrogenation of the alcohol to an aldehyde in the catalytic reaction mechanism to support the general insensitivity to reactant molecules in heterogeneous catalysis in contrast to biological catalysis and to provide proof for activity trends as often depicted by volcano plots.

  8. Energetic Surface Smoothing of Complex Metal-Oxide Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmott, P.R.; Herger, R.; Schlepuetz, C.M.; Martoccia, D.; Patterson, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    A novel energetic smoothing mechanism in the growth of complex metal-oxide thin films is reported from in situ kinetic studies of pulsed laser deposition of La 1-x Sr x MnO 3 on SrTiO 3 , using x-ray reflectivity. Below 50% monolayer coverage, prompt insertion of energetic impinging species into small-diameter islands causes them to break up to form daughter islands. This smoothing mechanism therefore inhibits the formation of large-diameter 2D islands and the seeding of 3D growth. Above 50% coverage, islands begin to coalesce and their breakup is thereby suppressed. The energy of the incident flux is instead rechanneled into enhanced surface diffusion, which leads to an increase in the effective surface temperature of ΔT≅500 K. These results have important implications on optimal conditions for nanoscale device fabrication using these materials

  9. Low oxidation state aluminum-containing cluster anions: Cp(∗)AlnH(-), n = 1-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan; Mayo, Dennis; Sawyer, William H; Gill, Ann F; Kandalam, Anil K; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-21

    Three new, low oxidation state, aluminum-containing cluster anions, Cp*AlnH(-), n = 1-3, were prepared via reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions, AlnHm (-), and Cp*H ligands. These were characterized by mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory based calculations. Agreement between the experimentally and theoretically determined vertical detachment energies and adiabatic detachment energies validated the computed geometrical structures. Reactions between aluminum hydride cluster anions and ligands provide a new avenue for discovering low oxidation state, ligated aluminum clusters.

  10. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  11. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of transition metal based water oxidation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oversteeg, Christina H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413490483; Doan, Hoang Q; de Groot, Frank M F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Cuk, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of the geometric and electronic structure of primarily heterogeneous Co, Ni, and Mn based water oxidation catalysts are reviewed. The X-ray absorption near edge and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the metal K-edge, characterize the metal oxidation state,

  12. High resolution electron microscopy of misfit dislocations at metal-oxide interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, HB; Kooi, BJ; Vellinga, WP; De Hosson, JTM; Lejcek, P; Paidar,

    1999-01-01

    Misfit dislocations at metal-oxide interfaces are studied using HRTEM. By observing misfit dislocations the bonding across the metal-oxide interface can be studied. This is done for two cases, a parallel Cu-MgO {111} interface and tilted interfaces in Pd-ZnO and Ag-ZnO. From the Cu-MgO micrographs

  13. A new class of homogeneous visible-light photocatalysts: molecular cerium vanadium oxide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliverstov, Andrey; Streb, Carsten

    2014-07-28

    The first systematic access to molecular cerium vanadium oxides is presented. A family of structurally related, di-cerium-functionalized vanadium oxide clusters and their use as visible-light-driven photooxidation catalysts is reported. Comparative analyses show that photocatalytic activity is controlled by the cluster architecture. Increased photoreactivity of the cerium vanadium oxides in the visible range compared with nonfunctionalized vanadates is observed. Based on the recent discovery of the first molecular cerium vanadate cluster, (nBu4 N)2 [(Ce(dmso)3 )2 V12 O33 Cl]⋅2 DMSO (1), two new di-cerium-containing vanadium oxide clusters [(Ce(dmso)4 )2 V11 O30 Cl]⋅DMSO (2) and [(Ce(nmp)4 )2 V12 O32 Cl]⋅NMP⋅Me2 CO (3; NMP=N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone) were obtained by using a novel fragmentation and reassembly route. Pentagonal building units {(V)M5 } (M=V, Ce) reminiscent of "Müller-type" pentagons are observed in 2 and 3. Compounds 1-3 feature high visible-light photooxidative activity, and quantum efficiencies >10 % for indigo photooxidation are observed. Photocatalytic performance increases in the order 1<3<2. Mechanistic studies show that the irradiation wavelength and the presence of oxygen strongly affect photoreactivity. Initial findings suggest that the photooxidation mechanism proceeds by intermediate formation of hydroxyl radicals. The findings open new avenues for the bottom-up design of sunlight-driven photocatalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS IN A METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, Dennis; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    We present analyses of variability in the red giant stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6397, based on data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We use a nonstandard data reduction approach to turn a 23 day observing run originally aimed at imaging the white dwarf population, into time-series photometry of the cluster's highly saturated red giant stars. With this technique we obtain noise levels in the final power spectra down to 50 parts per million, which allows us to search for low-amplitude solar-like oscillations. We compare the observed excess power seen in the power spectra with estimates of the typical frequency range, frequency spacing, and amplitude from scaling the solar oscillations. We see evidence that the detected variability is consistent with solar-like oscillations in at least one and perhaps up to four stars. With metallicities 2 orders of magnitude lower than those of the Sun, these stars present so far the best evidence of solar-like oscillations in such a low-metallicity environment.

  15. Noble metal nanoparticle@metal oxide core/yolk-shell nanostructures as catalysts: recent progress and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guodong; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-21

    Controllable integration of noble metals (e.g., Au, Ag, Pt, and Pd) and metal oxides (e.g., TiO₂, CeO₂, and ZrO₂) into single nanostructures has attracted immense research interest in heterogeneous catalysis, because they not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique collective and synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Among many strategies recently developed, one of the most efficient ways is to encapsulate and protect individual noble metal nanoparticles by a metal oxide shell of a certain thickness to generate the core-shell or yolk-shell structure, which exhibits enhanced catalytic performance compared with conventional supported catalysts. In this review article, we summarize the state-of-the art progress in synthesis and catalytic application of noble metal nanoparticle@metal oxide core/yolk-shell nanostructures. We hope that this review will help the readers to obtain better insight into the design and application of well-defined nanocomposites in both the energy and environmental fields.

  16. Hydrogen chemisorption and oxidation of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethin, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the catalytic activity of WC, focusing on the possible influence of point defects. The chemisorption of H on WC and titanium oxycarbides was studied with differential scanning calorimetry. The catalytic activity of these materials for oxidation of H was determined by potentiostatic steady-state and potentiodynamic measurements in acid electrolyte. Compositions of WC surfaces were determined by x-ray photoemission and related to the catalytic behavior. Titanium oxycarbide surfaces were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Of the carbides tested only one WC preparation was able to chemisorb H. Both WC powders investigated catalyzed H oxidation with similar specific activities. Spectroscopic studies showed that the active surface of WC was a mixture of WO 3 and a carbon-deficient WC phase. This result indicates that carbon vacancies are the active sites in tungsten carbide. Theoretical models of a carbon vacancy surrounded by metal atoms suggested by calculations by other workers support this assignment and identify the important role of the W6s level. The measured value of the heat of chemisorption is consistent with the proposed model

  17. Novel metal oxides prepared by ingenious synthetic routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, C.N.R.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Vidyasagar, K.; Ganguli, A.K.; Ramanan, A.; Ganapathi, L.

    1986-01-01

    Several novel oxides have been prepared by the decomposition of carbonate precursors of calcite structure of the general formulas Mn/sub 1-x/M/sub x/CO 3 (M = Mg,Co,Cd), Ca/sub 1-x/M/sup prime//sub x/CO 3 , and Ca/sub 1-x/-yM/sup //sub x/M/sup double-prime//sub y/CO 3 (M',M'' = Mn,Fe,Co). Typical of the oxides synthesized are a variety of monoxides, Mn/sub 1-x/M/sub x/O, of rocksalt structure and perovskite-related oxides such as Ca 2 FeCoO 5 , Ca 2 Co 2 O 5 , and Ca 3 Fe 2 MnO 8 , many of them exhibiting novel anion-vacancy-ordered superstructures. An interesting series of oxides prepared by the topotactic reduction of Ca 2 Fe/sub 2-x/Mn/sub x/O/sub 6-y/ (synthesized by the decomposition of the corresponding carbonate precursors) is Ca 2 Fe/sub 2-x/Mn/sub x/O 5 where three different coordination polyhedra (octahedra, tetrahedra, and square pyramids) of the transition metals coexist. Topotactic reduction of LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 yields new oxides, La 2 Co 2 O 5 and La 2 Ni 2 O 5 , possessing anion-vacancy-ordered superstructures. While La 2 Co 2 O 5 adopts the brownmillerite structure, La 2 Ni 2 O 5 exhibits a new type of vacancy ordering with octahedral and square-planar coordination of Ni 2+ . Slightly reduced LaNiO 3 seem to exhibit crystallographic shear (CS) planes similar to WO/sub 3-x/. Topotactic dehydration of isostructural Mo/sub 1-x/W/sub x/O 3 x H 2 O provides a convenient route for the synthesis of Mo/sub 1-x/W/sub x/O 3 (0 3 -related structure

  18. Application of Iron Oxide Nano materials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, P.N.; Chopda, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nana particles based nano materials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  19. Visible light photooxidative performance of a high-nuclearity molecular bismuth vanadium oxide cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Tucher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The visible light photooxidative performance of a new high-nuclearity molecular bismuth vanadium oxide cluster, H3[{Bi(dmso3}4V13O40], is reported. Photocatalytic activity studies show faster reaction kinetics under anaerobic conditions, suggesting an oxygen-dependent quenching of the photoexcited cluster species. Further mechanistic analysis shows that the reaction proceeds via the intermediate formation of hydroxyl radicals which act as oxidant. Trapping experiments using ethanol as a hydroxyl radical scavenger show significantly decreased photocatalytic substrate oxidation in the presence of EtOH. Photocatalytic performance analyses using monochromatic visible light irradiation show that the quantum efficiency Φ for indigo photooxidation is strongly dependent on the irradiation wavelength, with higher quantum efficiencies being observed at shorter wavelengths (Φ395nm ca. 15%. Recycling tests show that the compound can be employed as homogeneous photooxidation catalyst multiple times without loss of catalytic activity. High turnover numbers (TON ca. 1200 and turnover frequencies up to TOF ca. 3.44 min−1 are observed, illustrating the practical applicability of the cluster species.

  20. Metallicity effect on stellar granulation detected from oscillating red giants in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, E.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Gaulme, P.; Pinsonneault, M.; Stassun, K.; Stello, D.; Tayar, J.; Trampedach, R.; Jiang, C.; Nitschelm, C.; Salabert, D.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars, and hence on the convective motions in general, is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-Kepler catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's Kepler mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. Aims: We aim to determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] ≃ - 0.09 to 0.32. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their frequency of maximum oscillation power, νmax, are studied while taking into account different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. Methods: We adopted the Bayesian code Diamonds for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Results: Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. Conclusions: A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward

  1. Chemical study of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 5927

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura-Guzmán, A.; Villanova, S.; Muñoz, C.; Tang, B.

    2018-03-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are natural laboratories where stellar and chemical evolution can be studied in detail. In addition, their chemical patterns and kinematics can tell us to which Galactic structure (disc, bulge, halo or extragalactic) the cluster belongs to. NGC 5927 is one of most metal-rich GCs in the Galaxy and its kinematics links it to the thick disc. We present abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of seven giant stars. The data were obtained using Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph/Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectrograph mounted on UT2 telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The principal objective of this work is to perform a wide and detailed chemical abundance analysis of the cluster and look for possible Multiple Populations (MPs). We determined stellar parameters and measured 22 elements corresponding to light (Na, Al), alpha (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak (Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), and heavy elements (Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu). We found a mean iron content of [Fe/H] = -0.47 ± 0.02 (error on the mean). We confirm the existence of MPs in this GC with an O-Na anti-correlation, and moderate spread in Al abundances. We estimate a mean [α/Fe] = 0.25 ± 0.08. Iron-peak elements show no significant spread. The [Ba/Eu] ratios indicate a predominant contribution from SNeII for the formation of the cluster.

  2. Enhanced metal recovery through oxidation in liquid and/or supercritical carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Blanco, Mario

    2017-08-24

    Process for enhanced metal recovery from, for example, metal-containing feedstock using liquid and/or supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and a source of oxidation. The oxidation agent can be free of complexing agent. The metal-containing feedstock can be a mineral such as a refractory mineral. The mineral can be an ore with high sulfide content or an ore rich in carbonaceous material. Waste can also be used as the metal-containing feedstock. The metal-containing feedstock can be used which is not subjected to ultrafine grinding. Relatively low temperatures and pressures can be used. The metal-containing feedstock can be fed into the reactor at a temperature below the critical temperature of the carbon dioxide, and an exotherm from the oxidation reaction can provide the supercritical temperature. The oxidant can be added to the reactor at a rate to maintain isothermal conditions in the reactor. Minimal amounts of water can be used as an extractive medium.

  3. Catalytic role of transition metals supported on niobium oxide in O2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, Akbar

    2018-03-01

    Metal particles supported on metal oxides (MMO) are promising materials with versatile applications such as catalyst in fuel cell technologies. As one of the transition metal oxides, niobium oxide (NbO) demonstrates a wide interesting properties that make it a potentially applicable in MMO materials. Here, the catalytic activity for the O2 activation of transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au) supported on the NbO has been studied theoretically using density functional theory (DFT). The activation of O2 molecule and yielding two separated O atoms is an essential step for the oxygen reduction reaction. Our study demonstrates that the transition metals supported on the NbO can act as driving force for O2 dissociation. Consistent with the prediction of reactivity descriptors, the maximum catalytic activity toward O2 activation is related to the Pt-supported on the NbO metal oxide.

  4. Sputter fabricated Nb-oxide-Nb josephson junctions incorporating post-oxidation noble metal layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, R.J.P.; Donaldson, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    We present an extension, involving other metals, of the work of Hawkins and Clarke, who found that a thin layer of copper prevented the formation of the superconductive shorts which are an inevitable consequence of sputtering niobium counter-electrodes directly on top of niobium oxide. We find gold to be the most satisfactory, and that 0.3 nm is sufficient to guarantee short-free junctions of excellent electrical and mechanical stability, though high excess conductance means they are best suited to shunted-junction applications, as in SQUIDs. We present results for critical current dependence on oxide thickness and on gold thickness. Our data shows that thermal oxide growth is described by the Cabrera-Mott mechanism. We show that the protective effect of the gold layer can be understood in terms of the electro-chemistry of the Nb-oxide-Au structure, and that the reduced quasi-particle resistance of the junctions relative to goldfree junctions with evaporated counterelectrodes can be explained in terms of barrier shape modification, and not by proximity effect mechanisms. The performance of a DC SQUID based on these junctions is described

  5. Carbon and nitrogen abundances in giant stars of the metal-poor globular cluster M92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon, D.F.; Langer, G.E.; Butler, D.; Kraft, R.P.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Kemper, E.; Trefzger, C.F.; Romanishin, W.

    1982-01-01

    Zinn in 1973 and 1977 and Norris and Zinn in 1977 showed that in M92 and several other metal-poor globular clusters the G bands (mostly due to CH) in the spectra of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are systematically weaker than those found in the less highly evolved subgiant branch (SGB) stars. If carbon is depleted in the atmospheres of evolved stars because material at the base of the envelope, processed through the CN cycle, has been mixed with the material above, then the atmospheric nitrogen abundance should be correspondingly increased. In this paper we test the hypothesis that C and N abundances in M92 giants are negatively correlated as the evolutionary state becomes more advanced. We find that this simple hypothesis is not adequate to describe the complex behavior of C and N in the cluster giants

  6. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Testino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR, has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1−xNixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO42 nanoparticles (NPs can be obtained with a production rate of about 1–10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  7. The Biomechanisms of Metal and Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles’ Interactions with Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondra S. Teske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are increasingly exposed to nanoparticles (NPs in medicine and in industrial settings, where significant concentrations of NPs are common. However, NP interactions with and effects on biomolecules and organisms have only recently been addressed. Within we review the literature regarding proposed modes of action for metal and metal-oxide NPs, two of the most prevalent types manufactured. Iron-oxide NPs, for instance, are used as tracers for magnetic resonance imaging of oncological tumors and as vehicles for therapeutic drug delivery. Factors and theories that determine the physicochemical and biokinetic behaviors of NPs are discussed, along with the observed toxicological effects of NPs on cells. Key thermodynamic and kinetic models that explain the sources of energy transfer from NPs to biological targets are summarized, in addition to quantitative structural activity relationship (QSAR modeling efforts. Future challenges for nanotoxicological research are discussed. We conclude that NP studies based on cell culture are often inconsistent and underestimate the toxicity of NPs. Thus, the effect of NPs needs to be examined in whole animal systems.

  8. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Andrea; Pilger, Frank; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Stähli, Christoph; Bowen, Paul

    2015-06-08

    Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR), has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1-x)NixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape) and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO4)2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be obtained with a production rate of about 1-10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  9. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  10. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Mitra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause(s of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases.

  11. New perspectives on oxidized genome damage and repair inhibition by pro-oxidant metals in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N; Hegde, Pavana M; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2014-07-17

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases.

  12. Minimization of Ion-Solvent Clusters in Gel Electrolytes Containing Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Hsu, Shih-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Hsien; Yeh, Te-Fu; Hou, Sheng-Shu; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lee, Yuh-Lang; Teng, Hsisheng

    2018-02-13

    This study uses graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) to enhance the Li + -ion mobility of a gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The GPE comprises a framework of poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinylacetate) blended with poly(methyl methacrylate) and a salt LiPF 6 solvated in carbonate solvents. The GOQDs, which function as acceptors, are small (3-11 nm) and well dispersed in the polymer framework. The GOQDs suppress the formation of ion-solvent clusters and immobilize PF6- anions, affording the GPE a high ionic conductivity and a high Li + -ion transference number (0.77). When assembled into Li|electrolyte|LiFePO 4 batteries, the GPEs containing GOQDs preserve the battery capacity at high rates (up to 20 C) and exhibit 100% capacity retention after 500 charge-discharge cycles. Smaller GOQDs are more effective in GPE performance enhancement because of the higher dispersion of QDs. The minimization of both the ion-solvent clusters and degree of Li + -ion solvation in the GPEs with GOQDs results in even plating and stripping of the Li-metal anode; therefore, Li dendrite formation is suppressed during battery operation. This study demonstrates a strategy of using small GOQDs with tunable properties to effectively modulate ion-solvent coordination in GPEs and thus improve the performance and lifespan of LIBs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Comprehensive Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Metal-Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Saleh Ahammad, A. J.; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened new and exhilarating opportunities for exploring glucose biosensing applications of the newly prepared nanostructured materials. Nanostructured metal-oxides have been extensively explored to develop biosensors with high sensitivity, fast response times, and stability for the determination of glucose by electrochemical oxidation. This article concentrates mainly on the development of different nanostructured metal-oxide [such as ZnO, Cu(I)/(II) oxides, MnO2, TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, ZrO2, and other metal-oxides] based glucose biosensors. Additionally, we devote our attention to the operating principles (i.e., potentiometric, amperometric, impedimetric and conductometric) of these nanostructured metal-oxide based glucose sensors. Finally, this review concludes with a personal prospective and some challenges of these nanoscaled sensors. PMID:22399911

  14. The crystallographic structure of the air-grown oxide on depleted uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher P.; Petherbridge, James R.; Davis, Sean A.; Jones, Jonathon A.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of depleted uranium coupons under ambient conditions and 150 °C. • Oxide characterised using SEM, TEM and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, • Layer comprises of UO 2 crystallites 12 nm in diameter. • Preferred [110] growth direction normal to the surface of the metal. • Oxide growth direction is independent of the underlying crystal orientation. - Abstract: Oxide formation on depleted uranium metal was investigated using a combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterisation. Diffraction analysis of the oxide revealed an FCC crystalline formation of UO 2 crystallites whilst TEM data indicated an average grain size of 12 nm with a standard deviation of 3.8 nm. EBSD analysis revealed a preferential texture of [110] normal to the surface of the metal. This data implied that lattice matching between the oxide and the underlying metal did not occur, therefore, the observed preferential growth direction is independent of the underlying crystal orientation.

  15. Atmospheric Parameters and Metallicities for 2191 Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Luca; Sneden, Christopher; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino P.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Nascimbeni, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    We report new metallicities for stars of Galactic globular cluster M4 using the largest number of stars ever observed at high spectral resolution in any cluster. We analyzed 7250 spectra for 2771 cluster stars gathered with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES+GIRAFFE spectrograph at VLT. These medium-resolution spectra cover a small wavelength range, and often have very low signal-to-noise ratios. We approached this data set by reconsidering the whole method of abundance analysis of large stellar samples from beginning to end. We developed a new algorithm that automatically determines the atmospheric parameters of a star. Nearly all of the data preparation steps for spectroscopic analyses are processed on the syntheses, not the observed spectra. For 322 red giant branch (RGB) stars with V 14.7, we obtain lang[Fe/H]rang = -1.16 (σ = 0.09) after fixing the microturbulent velocity. These values are consistent with previous studies that have performed detailed analyses of brighter RGB stars at higher spectroscopic resolution and wavelength coverage. It is not clear if the small mean metallicity difference between brighter and fainter M4 members is real or is the result of the low signal-to-noise characteristics of the fainter stars. The strength of our approach is shown by recovering a metallicity close to a single value for more than 2000 stars, using a data set that is non-optimal for atmospheric analyses. This technique is particularly suitable for noisy data taken in difficult observing conditions.

  16. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN NGC 5053: A VERY METAL-POOR AND DYNAMICALLY COMPLEX GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO–Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ∼ 75–90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of −2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na–O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  17. Chemical Abundances in NGC 5053: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Complex Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2015-05-01

    NGC 5053 provides a rich environment to test our understanding of the complex evolution of globular clusters (GCs). Recent studies have found that this cluster has interesting morphological features beyond the typical spherical distribution of GCs, suggesting that external tidal effects have played an important role in its evolution and current properties. Additionally, simulations have shown that NGC 5053 could be a likely candidate to belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr dSph) stream. Using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO-Hydra multi-object spectrograph, we have collected high quality (signal-to-noise ratio ˜ 75-90), medium-resolution spectra for red giant branch stars in NGC 5053. Using these spectra we have measured the Fe, Ca, Ti, Ni, Ba, Na, and O abundances in the cluster. We measure an average cluster [Fe/H] abundance of -2.45 with a standard deviation of 0.04 dex, making NGC 5053 one of the most metal-poor GCs in the Milky Way (MW). The [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] we measure are consistent with the abundances of MW halo stars at a similar metallicity, with alpha-enhanced ratios and slightly depleted [Ba/Fe]. The Na and O abundances show the Na-O anti-correlation found in most GCs. From our abundance analysis it appears that NGC 5053 is at least chemically similar to other GCs found in the MW. This does not, however, rule out NGC 5053 being associated with the Sgr dSph stream.

  18. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  19. The 1s x-ray absorption pre-edge structures in transition metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Vanko, Gyoergy; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We develop a general procedure to analyse the pre-edges in 1s x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of transition metal oxides and coordination complexes. Transition metal coordination complexes can be described from a local model with one metal ion. The 1s 3d quadrupole transitions are

  20. Facile solid-state synthesis of oxidation-resistant metal nanoparticles at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Hyung; Jung, Hyuk Joon; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Kyungtae; Lee, Byeongno; Nam, Dohyun; Kim, Chung Man; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Hur, Nam Hwi

    2018-05-01

    A simple and scalable method for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles in the solid-state was developed, which can produce nanoparticles in the absence of solvents. Nanoparticles of coinage metals were synthesized by grinding solid hydrazine and the metal precursors in their acetates and oxides at 25 °C. The silver and gold acetates converted completely within 6 min into Ag and Au nanoparticles, respectively, while complete conversion of the copper acetate to the Cu sub-micrometer particles took about 2 h. Metal oxide precursors were also converted into metal nanoparticles by grinding alone. The resulting particles exhibit distinctive crystalline lattice fringes, indicating the formation of highly crystalline phases. The Cu sub-micrometer particles are better resistant to oxidation and exhibit higher conductivity compared to conventional Cu nanoparticles. This solid-state method was also applied for the synthesis of platinum group metals and intermetallic Cu3Au, which can be further extended to synthesize other metal nanoparticles.

  1. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  2. Spectra of matrix isolated metal atoms and clusters. [In rare gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, B.

    1977-09-30

    The matrix isolation spectra of all of the 40 presently known atomic metal species show strong matrix effects. The transition energies are increased, and the bands are broad and exhibit splitting of sublevels which are degenerate in the gas phase. Several models have been proposed for splitting of levels, but basic effects are not yet understood, and spectra cannot be predicted, yet it is possible to correlate gas phase and matrix in many of the systems. Selective production of diatomics and clusters via thermal and optical annealing of atomic species can be monitored by optical spectra, but yields spectroscopically complex systems which, however, especially in the case of transition metals, can be used as precursors in novel chemical reactions. A combination of absorption, emission, ir, Raman, ESR, and other methods is now quickly yielding data which will help correlate the increasing wealth of existing data. 55 references, 6 figures.

  3. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with

  4. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... while CuCoNO, Co3NO, Cu3CoNO, Cu2Co3NO, Cu3Co3NO and Cu6CoNO clusters display stronger chemical stability. Magnetic and electronic properties are also discussed. The magnetic moment is affected by charge transfer and the spd hybridization. Keywords. CumConNO (m + n = 2–7) clusters; ...

  5. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, Shyama Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  6. Band edge electronic structure of transition metal/rare earth oxide dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucovsky, Gerald

    2006-10-01

    This article addresses band edge electronic structure of transition metal/rare earth (TM/RE) non-crystalline and nano-crystalline elemental and complex oxide high- k dielectrics for advanced semiconductor devices. Experimental approaches include X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from TM, RE and oxygen core states, photoconductivity (PC), and visible/vacuum ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) combined with ab initio theory is applied to small clusters. These measurements are complemented by Fourier transform infra-red absorption (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two issues are highlighted: Jahn-Teller term splittings that remove d-state degeneracies of states at the bottom of the conduction band, and chemical phase separation and crystallinity in Zr and Hf silicates and ternary (Zr(Hf)O 2) x(Si 3N 4) y(SiO 2) 1- x- y alloys. Engineering solutions for optimization of both classes of high- k dielectric films, including limits imposed on the continued and ultimate scaling of the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are addressed.

  7. Nanoarchitectures in dye-sensitized solar cells: metal oxides, oxide perovskites and carbon-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Jasmin S; Shaikh, Navajsharif S; Mali, Sawanta S; Patil, Jyoti V; Pawar, Krishna K; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Hong, Chang Kook; Kim, J H; Patil, Pramod S

    2018-03-15

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have aroused great interest and been regarded as a potential renewable energy resource among the third-generation solar cell technologies to fulfill the 21 st century global energy demand. DSSCs have notable advantages such as low cost, easy fabrication process and being eco-friendly in nature. The progress of DSSCs over the last 20 years has been nearly constant due to some limitations, like poor long-term stability, narrow absorption spectrum, charge carrier transportation and collection losses and poor charge transfer mechanism for regeneration of dye molecules. The main challenge for the scientific community is to improve the performance of DSSCs by using different approaches, like finding new electrode materials with suitable nanoarchitectures, dyes in composition with promising semiconductors and metal quantum dot fluorescent dyes, and cost-effective hole transporting materials (HTMs). This review focuses on DSSC photo-physics, which includes charge separation, effective transportation, collection and recombination processes. Different nanostructured materials, including metal oxides, oxide perovskites and carbon-based composites, have been studied for photoanodes, and counter electrodes, which are crucial to achieve DSSC devices with higher efficiency and better stability.

  8. On the behavior of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations for transition metal oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Vallejo, Federico Calle; Guo, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Versatile Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site, and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP...

  9. Oxidation in ceria infiltrated metal supported SOFCs – A TEM investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of the Fe–Cr alloy backbone structure of metal supported solid oxide fuel cells is significantly improved when infiltrated with gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) particles. The mechanism for the improved oxidation behaviour is elucidated using various analytical transmission e...

  10. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  11. Clustering of magnetic nanoparticles using a double hydrophilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondjaja, Ronny [Singapore-MIT Alliance, 4 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Alan Hatton, T. [Singapore-MIT Alliance, 4 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)], E-mail: tahatton@mit.edu; Tam, Michael K.C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: mkctam@cape.uwaterloo.ca

    2009-08-15

    The use of a double hydrophilic block copolymer (DHBC), poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-b-PAA) to prepare magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clusters was investigated. In this one-pot synthesis method, the DHBC controlled the particle growth and served as both stabilizer and clustering agent. Depending on the iron-to-polymer ratio, the synthesized particles can be in the form of colonies of small iron oxide particles or clusters of these particles with size larger than 100 nm. Compared to the previous reported result using random copolymers, the clusters prepared with DHBC were more compact and homogeneous. The yield of clusters increased when the amount of polymer added was limiting. Insufficient amounts of polymer resulted in the formation of bare patches on the magnetite surface, and the strong van der Waals attraction induced cluster formation.

  12. Azide groups in higher oxidation state manganese cluster chemistry: from structural aesthetics to single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Christou, George

    2009-04-20

    This Forum Article overviews the recent amalgamation of two long-established areas, manganese/oxo coordination cluster chemistry involving the higher Mn(II)/Mn(IV) oxidation states and transition-metal azide (N(3)(-)) chemistry. The combination of azide and alkoxide- or carboxylate-containing ligands in Mn chemistry has led to a variety of new polynuclear clusters, high-spin molecules, and single-molecule magnets, with metal nuclearities ranging from Mn(4) to Mn(32) and with ground-state spin values as large as S = 83/2. The organic bridging/chelating ligands are discussed separately as follows: (i) pyridyl alkoxides [the anions of 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine (hmpH), 2,6-pyridinedimethanol (pdmH(2)), and the gem-diol form of di-2-pyridyl ketone (dpkdH(2))]; (ii) non-pyridyl alkoxides [the anions of 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)ethane (thmeH(3)), triethanolamine (teaH(3)), and N-methyldiethanolamine (mdaH(2))]; (iii) other alcohols [the anions of 2,6-dihydroxymethyl-4-methylphenol (LH(3)) and Schiff bases]; (iv) pyridyl monoximes/dioximes [the anions of methyl-2-pyridyl ketone oxime (mpkoH), phenyl-2-pyridyl ketone oxime (ppkoH), and 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime (dapdoH(2))]; (v) non-pyridyl oximes [the anions of salicylaldoxime (saoH(2)) and its derivatives R-saoH(2)]. The large structural diversity of the resulting complexes stems from the combined ability of the azide and organic ligands to adopt a variety of ligation and bridging modes. The combined work demonstrates the synthetic novelty that arises when azide is used in conjunction with alcohol-based chelates, the aesthetic beauty of the resulting molecules, and the often fascinating magnetic properties that these compounds possess. This continues to emphasize the extensive and remarkable ability of Mn chemistry to satisfy a variety of different tastes.

  13. Synthesis of graphene oxide-intercalated alpha-hydroxides by metathesis and their decomposition to graphene/metal oxide composites

    OpenAIRE

    Nethravathi, C; Rajamathi, Michael; Ravishankar, N; Basit, Lubna; Felser, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Graphene oxide-intercalated alpha-metal hydroxides were prepared using layers from the delaminated colloidal dispersions of cetyltrimethylammonium-intercalated graphene oxide and dodecylsulfate-intercalated alpha-hydroxide of nickel/cobalt as precursors. The reaction of the two dispersions leads to de-intercalation of the interlayer ions from both the layered solids and the intercalation of the negatively charged graphene oxide sheets between the positively charged layers of the alpha-hydroxi...

  14. Noble-metal-based catalysts supported on zeolites and macro-mesoporous metal oxide supports for the total oxidation of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Tarek; Rooke, Joanna C; Tidahy, Haingomalala Lucette; Hosseini, Mahsa; Cousin, Renaud; Lamonier, Jean-François; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; De Weireld, Guy; Su, Bao-Lian; Siffert, Stéphane

    2011-10-17

    The use of porous materials to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has proven very effective towards achieving sustainability and environmental protection goals. The activity of zeolites and macro-mesoporous metal-oxide supports in the total oxidation of VOCs has been investigated, with and without noble-metal deposition, to develop highly active catalyst systems where the formation of by-products was minimal. The first catalysts employed were zeolites, which offered a good activity in the oxidation of VOCs, but were rapidly deactivated by coke deposition. The effects of the acido-basicity and ionic exchange of these zeolites showed that a higher basicity was related to exchanged ions with lower electronegativities, resulting in better catalytic performances in the elimination of VOCs. Following on from this work, noble metals were deposited onto macro-mesoporous metal-oxide supports to form mono and bimetallic catalysts. These were then tested in the oxidation of toluene to study their catalytic performance and their deactivation process. PdAu/TiO(2) and PdAu/TiO(2) -ZrO(2) 80/20 catalysts demonstrated the best activity and life span in the oxidation of toluene and propene and offered the lowest temperatures for a 50 % conversion of VOCs and the lowest coke content after catalytic testing. Different characterization techniques were employed to explain the changes occurring in catalyst structure during the oxidation of toluene and propene. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A new method for measuring metallicities of young super star clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazak, J. Zachary; Kudritzki, Rolf; Bresolin, Fabio; Davies, Ben; Bastian, Nate; Bergemann, Maria; Plez, Bertrand; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee; Schinnerer, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how the metallicities of young super star clusters (SSC) can be measured using novel spectroscopic techniques in the J-band. The near-infrared flux of SSCs older than ∼6 Myr is dominated by tens to hundreds of red supergiant stars. Our technique is designed to harness the integrated light of that population and produces accurate metallicities for new observations in galaxies above (M83) and below (NGC 6946) solar metallicity. In M83 we find [Z] = +0.28 ± 0.14 dex using a moderate resolution (R ∼ 3500) J-band spectrum and in NGC 6496 we report [Z] = -0.32 ± 0.20 dex from a low resolution spectrum of R ∼ 1800. Recently commissioned low resolution multiplexed spectrographs on the Very Large Telescope (KMOS) and Keck (MOSFIRE) will allow accurate measurements of SSC metallicities across the disks of star-forming galaxies up to distances of 70 Mpc with single night observation campaigns using the method presented in this paper.

  16. Bulk oxide traps and border traps in metal endash oxide endash semiconductor capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Riewe, L.C.; Reber, R.A. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Thermally stimulated current (TSC) and capacitance endash voltage measurements are combined via a newly developed analysis technique to estimate positive and negative oxide-trap charge densities for metal endash oxide endash semiconductor (MOS) capacitors exposed to ionizing radiation or subjected to high-field stress. Significantly greater hole trapping than electron trapping is observed in 3% borosilicate glass (BSG) insulators. Two prominent TSC peaks are observed in these BSG films. A high-temperature peak near 250 degree C is attributed to the E γ ' defect, which is a trivalent Si center in SiO 2 associated with an O vacancy. A lower temperature positive charge center near 100 degree C in these films is likely to be impurity related. The higher temperature E γ ' peak is also observed in 10, 17, and 98 nm thermal oxides. A much weaker secondary peak is observed near ∼60 degree C in some devices, which likely is due to metastably trapped holes in the bulk of the SiO 2 . Negative charge densities in these thermal oxides are primarily associated with electrons in border traps, which do not contribute to TSC, as opposed to bulk electron traps, which can contribute to TSC. Ratios of electron to hole trap densities in the thermal oxides range from ∼30% for radiation exposure to greater than 80% for high-field stress. It is suggested that the large densities of border traps associated with trapped holes in these devices may be due to high space-charge induced electric fields near the Si/SiO 2 interface. In some instances, border traps can reduce near-interfacial electric fields by local compensation of trapped positive charge. This may provide a natural explanation for the large densities of border traps often observed in irradiated or electrically stressed MOS capacitors. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  17. Electrochemical behaviour of metal hexacyanoferrate converted to metal hydroxide films immobilized on indium tin oxide electrodes-Catalytic ability towards alcohol oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, V.; Latha Maheswari, D.; Berchmans, Sheela

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to modify indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes in order to perform electro-catalytic oxidation of alcohols in alkaline medium. Metal hexacyanoferrate (MHCF) films such as nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) and copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) were successfully immobilized on ITO electrodes using an electrochemical method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the structural and morphological aspects of MHCF films. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study the redox properties and to determine the surface coverage of these films on ITO electrodes. Electrochemical potential cycling was carried out in alkaline medium in order to alter the chemical structure of these films and convert to their corresponding metal hydroxide films. SEM and XPS were performed to analyze the structure and morphology of metal hydroxide modified electrodes. Electro-catalytic oxidation ability of these films towards methanol and ethanol in alkaline medium was investigated using CV. From these studies we found that metal hydroxide modified electrodes show a better catalytic performance and good stability for methanol oxidation along with the alleviation of CO poisoning effect. We have obtained an anodic oxidation current density of ∼82 mA cm -2 for methanol oxidation, which is at least 10 fold higher than that of any metal hydroxide modified electrodes reported till date. The onset potential for methanol oxidation is lowered by ∼200 mV compared to other chemically modified electrodes reported. A plausible mechanism was proposed for the alcohol oxidation based on the redox properties of these modified electrodes. The methodology adapted in this work does not contain costlier noble metals like platinum and ruthenium and is economically viable.

  18. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang, E-mail: sgyang@nju.edu.cn

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  19. Next Generation Energetic Materials: New Cluster Hydrides and Metastable Alloys of Aluminum in Very Low Oxidation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    aluminum clusters, energetic materials, cluster compounds, low oxidation Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified SAR 38 Allen Dalton 703...dialumane supported by pyrazolate ligands”, Snyder, C. J.; Zavalij, P.; Bowen, K. H.; Schnöckel, H.; Eichhorn, B. W. Dalton Transactions. 44, 2956–2958...elementary steps, we additionally per- formed density functional theory calculations. The results show that for both even- and odd-numbered clusters the

  20. Structural properties of transition-metal clusters via force-biased Monte Carlo and ab initio calculations: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Dil K.; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Drabold, David A.; Elliott, Stephen R.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2017-11-01

    We present a force-biased Monte Carlo (FMC) method for structural modeling of the transition-metal clusters of Fe, Ni, and Cu with sizes of 13, 30, and 55 atoms. By employing the Finnis-Sinclair potential for Fe and the Sutton-Chen potential for Ni and Cu, the total energy of the clusters is minimized using the local gradient of the potentials in Monte Carlo simulations. The structural configurations of the clusters, obtained from the biased Monte Carlo approach, are analyzed and compared with the same configurations from the Cambridge Cluster Database (CCD) upon relaxation of the clusters using the first-principles density-functional code nwchem. The results show that the total-energy value and the structure of the FMC clusters are essentially identical to the corresponding value and the structure of the CCD clusters. A comparison of the nwchem-relax FMC and CCD structures is presented by computing the pair-correlation function, the bond-angle distribution, the coordination number of the first-coordination shell, and the Steinhardt bond-orientational order parameter, which provide information about the two- and three-body correlation functions, the local bonding environment of the atoms, and the geometry of the clusters. An atom-by-atom comparison of the FMC and CCD clusters is also provided by superposing one set of clusters onto another, and the electronic properties of the clusters are addressed by computing the density of electronic states.