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Sample records for metal nanocrystals simple

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-11-05

    Metal and semiconducting nanocrystals have received a great deal of attention from fundamental scientists and application-oriented researchers due to their physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of bulk materials. Nanocrystals are essential building blocks in the development of nanostructured devices for energy conversion. Colloidal metals and metal chalcogenides have been developed for use as nanocrystal inks to produce efficient solar cells with lower costs. All high-performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a major challenge for the inorganic semiconductor-based solar field. This dissertation, divided into two parts, addresses several aspects of these emerging challenges. The first portion of the thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystals of antimony sulfide, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, and examines their performance in photovoltaic devices. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. The structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using different deposition processes. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%. The second part of the thesis demonstrates a novel method for the in situ synthesis and patterning of nanocrystals via reactive inkjet printing. The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches for the synthesis of nanocrystals is critical for many applications, including photonics and electronics. In this work, a simple, low-cost method for the synthesis of nanocrystals with minimum size variation and waste using reactive inkjet printing is introduced. As a proof of concept, the

  2. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fereshteh, Zeinab [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered.

  3. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  4. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  5. Template Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals with Unusual Crystal Structures and Their Catalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2016-12-20

    Noble metal nanocrystals own high chemical stability, unique plasmonic and distinctive catalytic properties, making them outstanding in many applications. However, their practical applications are limited by their high cost and scarcity on the earth. One promising strategy to solve these problems is to boost their catalytic performance in order to reduce their usage amount. To realize this target, great research efforts have been devoted to the size-, composition-, shape- and/or architecture-controlled syntheses of noble metal nanocrystals during the past two decades. Impressively, recent experimental studies have revealed that the crystal structure of noble metal nanocrystals can also significantly affect their physicochemical properties, such as optical, magnetic, catalytic, mechanical, electrical and electronic properties. Therefore, besides the well-established size, composition, shape, and architecture control, the rise of crystal structure-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals will open up new opportunities to further improve their functional properties, and thus promote their potential applications in energy conversion, catalysis, biosensing, information storage, surface enhanced Raman scattering, waveguide, near-infrared photothermal therapy, controlled release, bioimaging, biomedicine, and so on. In this Account, we review the recent research progress on the crystal structure control of noble metal nanocrystals with a template synthetic approach and their crystal structure-dependent catalytic properties. We first describe the template synthetic methods, such as epitaxial growth and galvanic replacement reaction methods, in which a presynthesized noble metal nanocrystal with either new or common crystal structure is used as the template to direct the growth of unusual crystal structures of other noble metals. Significantly, the template synthetic strategy described here provides an efficient, simple and straightforward way to synthesize unusual

  6. Orientation dependence of the work function for metal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lingyuan; Souto-Casares, Jaime; Chelikowsky, James R.; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    Work function values measured at different surfaces of a metal are usually different. This raises an interesting question: What is the work function of a nano-size crystal, where differently oriented facets can be adjacent? Work functions of metallic nanocrystals are also of significant practical interest, especially in catalytic applications. Using real space pseudopotentials constructed within density functional theory, we compute the local work function of large aluminum and gold nanocrystals. We investigate how the local work function follows the change of the surface plane orientation around multifaceted nanocrystals, and we establish the importance of the orbital character near the Fermi level in determining work function differences between facets.

  7. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    UV-vis absorption spectra of the nanocrystals in water were recorded using a Perkin-Elmer UV-visible spectrometer. 3. Results and discussion. In figure 1a, we show a typical TEM image of 11 nm CuS nanocrystals obtained by reacting 1⋅25 mmolar solution,. Cu(ac)2, with 1⋅25 mmolar solution of thioacetamide. The.

  8. Model pseudopotential in simple metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, K.N.; Sharma, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The model potential proposed by Sharma and Srivastava has been used to study the various properties of simple metals. New core radii have also been reported corresponding to three dielectric functions. For most metals, the model potential successfully describes the atomic properties. (author)

  9. Architectural design of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals--principles and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Yao, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Heterogeneous metal nanocrystals (HMNCs) are a natural extension of simple metal nanocrystals (NCs), but as a research topic, they have been much less explored until recently. HMNCs are formed by integrating metal NCs of different compositions into a common entity, similar to the way atoms are bonded to form molecules. HMNCs can be built to exhibit an unprecedented architectural diversity and complexity by programming the arrangement of the NC building blocks ("unit NCs"). The architectural engineering of HMNCs involves the design and fabrication of the architecture-determining elements (ADEs), i.e., unit NCs with precise control of shape and size, and their relative positions in the design. Similar to molecular engineering, where structural diversity is used to create more property variations for application explorations, the architectural engineering of HMNCs can similarly increase the utility of metal NCs by offering a suite of properties to support multifunctionality in applications. The architectural engineering of HMNCs calls for processes and operations that can execute the design. Some enabling technologies already exist in the form of classical micro- and macroscale fabrication techniques, such as masking and etching. These processes, when used singly or in combination, are fully capable of fabricating nanoscopic objects. What is needed is a detailed understanding of the engineering control of ADEs and the translation of these principles into actual processes. For simplicity of execution, these processes should be integrated into a common reaction system and yet retain independence of control. The key to architectural diversity is therefore the independent controllability of each ADE in the design blueprint. The right chemical tools must be applied under the right circumstances in order to achieve the desired outcome. In this Account, after a short illustration of the infinite possibility of combining different ADEs to create HMNC design

  10. Simple approach to reinforce hydrogels with cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-05-01

    The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report a simple approach to fabricate tough, stretchable and hysteretic isotropic nanocomposite hydrogels, where rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are encapsulated by flexible polymer chains of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA). The CNC-PDMA colloidal clusters build a homogeneously cross-linked network and lead to significant reinforcing effect of the composites. Hierarchically structured CNC-PDMA clusters, from isolated particles to an interpenetrated network, are observed by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Dynamic shear oscillation measurements are applied to demystify the differences in network rheological behaviors, which were compared with network behaviors of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts. Tensile tests indicate that the hybrid hydrogels possess higher mechanical properties and a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism. In particular, with only 0.8 wt% of CNC loading, a 4.8-fold increase in Young's modulus, 9.2-fold increase in tensile strength, and 5.8-fold increase in fracture strain are achieved, which is ascribed to a combination of CNC reinforcement in the soft matrix and CNC-PDMA colloidal cluster conformational rearrangement under stretching. Physical interactions within networks serve as reversible sacrificial bonds that dissociate upon deformation, exhibiting large hysteresis as an energy dissipation mechanism via cluster mobility. This result contrasts with the case of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts where the stress relaxation is slow due to the permanent cross-links and low resistance against crack propagation within the covalent network.The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report

  11. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mental reactions in liquid ammonia (Haram et al 1996;. Henshaw et al 1997; Wang et al 2002). Sylvester and ... some extent. This is probably due to the drying artifact during the preparation of the grid for TEM imaging. ... TEM images of the CuS nanocrystals obtained by using a. 12⋅5 µmol of Cu(ac)2. (11 nm), b. 25 µmol of ...

  12. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  13. Nanocrystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Hans J [Stoneham, MA; Sundar, Vikram C [Stoneham, MA; Walsh, Michael E [Everett, MA; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Bawendi, Moungi G [Cambridge, MA; Smith, Henry I [Sudbury, MA

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  14. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Suresh, Vignesh [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Chan, Mei Yin [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Ma, Yu Wei [Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Lee, Pooi See [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar [Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Science et Analyse des Materiaux Unit (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41, rue du Brill, Belvaux, 4422 (Luxembourg); Srinivasan, M.P., E-mail: srinivasan.madapusi@rmit.edu.au [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Building 10, Level 11, Room 14, 376-392 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10{sup 4} s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  15. Enriching Silver Nanocrystals with a Second Noble Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiren; Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Yin; Li, Jumei; Zhang, Yun; Qin, Dong

    2017-07-18

    Noble-metal nanocrystals have received considerable interests owing to their fascinating properties and promising applications in areas including plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and medicine. As demonstrated by ample examples, the performance of nanocrystals in these and related applications can be augmented by switching from monometallic to bimetallic systems. The inclusion of a second metal can enhance the properties and greatly expand the application landscape by bringing in new capabilities. Seeded growth offers a powerful route to bimetallic nanocrystals. This approach is built upon the concept that preformed nanocrystals with uniform, well-controlled size, shape, and structure can serve as seeds to template and direct the deposition of metal atoms. Seeded growth is, however, limited by galvanic replacement when the deposited metal is less reactive than the seed. The involvement of galvanic replacement not only makes it difficult to control the outcome of seeded growth but also causes degradation to some properties. We have successfully addressed this issue by reducing the salt precursor(s) into atoms with essentially no galvanic replacement. In the absence of self-nucleation, the atoms are preferentially deposited onto the seeds to generate bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled structures. In this Account, we use Ag nanocubes as an example to demonstrate the fabrication of Ag@M and Ag@Ag-M (M = Au, Pd, or Pt) nanocubes with a core-frame or core-shell structure by controlling the deposition of M atoms. A typical synthesis involves the titration of M n+ (a precursor to M) ions into an aqueous suspension containing Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) under ambient conditions. In one approach, aqueous sodium hydroxide is introduced to increase the initial pH of the reaction system. At pH = 11.9, ascorbic acid is dominated by ascorbate monoanion, a much stronger reductant, to suppress the galvanic replacement between M n+ and Ag. In

  16. Contact Radius and the Insulator-Metal Transition in Films Comprised of Touching Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Deanna; Thimsen, Elijah

    2016-07-26

    Nanocrystal assemblies are being explored for a number of optoelectronic applications such as transparent conductors, photovoltaic solar cells, and electrochromic windows. Majority carrier transport is important for these applications, yet it remains relatively poorly understood in films comprised of touching nanocrystals. Specifically, the underlying structural parameters expected to determine the transport mechanism have not been fully elucidated. In this report, we demonstrate experimentally that the contact radius, between touching heavily doped ZnO nanocrystals, controls the electron transport mechanism. Spherical nanocrystals are considered, which are connected by a circular area. The radius of this circular area is the contact radius. For nanocrystals that have local majority carrier concentration above the Mott transition, there is a critical contact radius. If the contact radius between nanocrystals is less than the critical value, then the transport mechanism is variable range hopping. If the contact radius is greater than the critical value, the films display behavior consistent with metallic electron transport.

  17. Noble-Metal Nanocrystals with Controlled Facets for Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Wook; Kim, Yena; Kwon, Yongmin; Han, Sang Woo

    2016-08-19

    Noble-metal nanocrystals (NCs) show excellent catalytic performance for many important electrocatalysis reactions. The crystallographic properties of the facets by which the NCs are bound, closely associated with the shape of the NCs, have a profound influence on the electrocatalytic function of the NCs. To develop an efficient strategy for the synthesis of NCs with controlled facets as well as compositions, understanding of the growth mechanism of the NCs and their interaction with the chemical species involved in NC synthesis is quite important. Furthermore, understanding the facet-dependent catalytic properties of noble-metal NCs and the corresponding mechanisms for various electrocatalysis reactions will allow for the rational design of robust electrocatalysts. In this review, we summarize recently developed synthesis strategies for the preparation of mono- and bimetallic noble-metal NCs by classifying them by the type of facets through which they are enclosed and discuss the electrocatalytic applications of noble-metal NCs with controlled facets, especially for reactions associated with fuel-cell applications, such as the oxygen reduction reaction and fuel (methanol, ethanol, and formic acid) oxidation reactions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Metallization of some simple systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; McMahan, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss the metallization of Xe, Ar, He, I 2 , H 2 , and N 2 in terms of some recent theoretical work and shock-wave experiments. New shock-wave data on liquid hydrogen and deuterium leads to a predicted pressure above 3 Mbar for the appearance of a monatomic metal phase. We expect CsI to become metallic near 0.8 Mbar

  19. Autocatalytic surface reduction and its role in controlling seed-mediated growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tung-Han; Zhou, Shan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Xia, Younan

    2017-12-26

    The growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals typically involves an autocatalytic process, in which the salt precursor adsorbs onto the surface of a growing nanocrystal, followed by chemical reduction to atoms for their incorporation into the nanocrystal. Despite its universal role in the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals, it is still poorly understood and controlled in terms of kinetics. Through the use of well-defined nanocrystals as seeds, including those with different types of facets, sizes, and internal twin structure, here we quantitatively analyze the kinetics of autocatalytic surface reduction in an effort to control the evolution of nanocrystals into predictable shapes. Our kinetic measurements demonstrate that the activation energy barrier to autocatalytic surface reduction is highly dependent on both the type of facet and the presence of twin boundary, corresponding to distinctive growth patterns and products. Interestingly, the autocatalytic process is effective not only in eliminating homogeneous nucleation but also in activating and sustaining the growth of octahedral nanocrystals. This work represents a major step forward toward achieving a quantitative understanding and control of the autocatalytic process involved in the synthesis of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

  20. Cellulose Nanocrystals Obtained from Rice By-Products and Their Binding Potential to Metallic Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Albernaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to develop and optimize a method to obtain cellulose nanocrystals from the agricultural by-products rice husk and straw and to evaluate their electrostructural modifications in the presence of metallic ions. First, different particle formation conditions and routes were tested and analyzed by spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and Zeta potential measurements. Then, electrostructural effects of ions Na(I, Cd(II, and Al(III on the optimized nanoparticles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electrical conductivity (EC assessments. The produced cellulose nanocrystals adopted a rod-like shape. AFM height distribution and EC data indicated that the nanocrystals have more affinity in binding with Na(I > Al(III > Cd(II. These data suggest that the use of these cellulose nanocrystals in the bioremediation field is promising, both in metal sorption from wastewater and as an alternative for water desalination.

  1. Direct observation of shear–induced nanocrystal attachment and coalescence in CuZr-based metallic glasses: TEM investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajlaoui, K.; Alrasheedi, Nashmi H.; Yavari, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    In-situ tensile straining tests were performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to analyse the deformation processes in CuZr-based metallic glasses and to directly observe the phase transformation occurrence. We report evidence of shear induced coalescence of nanocrystals in the vicinity of deformed regions. Nanocrystals grow in shear bands, come into contact, being attached and progressively coalesce under applied shear stress. - Highlights: • In-situ tensile straining test in TEM was investigated on CuZr-Based metallic glass. • Strain induces nanocrystallization and subsequent attachment and coalescence of nanocrystals. • The coalescence of nanocrystals compensates strain softening in metallic glasses.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of transition-metal-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals for spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng

    Spintronics (spin transport electr onics), in which both spin and charge of carriers are utilized for information processing, is believed to challenge the current microelectronics and to become the next-generation electronics. Nanostructured spintronic materials and their synthetic methodologies are of paramount importance for manufacturing future nanoscale spintronic devices. This thesis aims at studying synthesis, characterization, and magnetism of transition-metal-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals---a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS)---for potential applications in future nano-spintronics. A simple bottom-up-based synthetic strategy named a solvothermal technique is introduced as the primary synthetic approach and its crystal growth mechanism is scrutinized. N-type cobalt-doped ZnO-based DMS nanocrystals are employed as a model system, and characterized by a broad spectrum of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. It is found that the self-orientation growth mechanism, imperfect oriented attachment, is intimately correlated with the high-temperature ferromagnetism via defects. The influence of processing on the magnetic properties, such as compositional variations, reaction conditions, and post-growth treatment, is also studied. In this way, an in-depth understanding of processing-structure-property interrelationships and origins of magnetism in DMS nanocrystals are obtained in light of the theoretical framework of a spin-split impurity band model. In addition, a nanoscale spinodal decomposition phase model is also briefly discussed. Following the similar synthetic route, copper- and manganese-doped ZnO nanocrystals have been synthesized and characterized. They both show high-temperature ferromagnetism in line with the aforementioned theoretical model(s). Moreover, they display interesting exchange biasing phenomena at low temperatures, revealing the complexity of magnetic phases therein. The crystal growth strategy demonstrated in this work

  3. Simple down conversion nano-crystal coatings for enhancing Silicon-solar cells efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Mittelman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing self-assembled nano-structured coatings on top of existing solar cells has thepotential to increase the total quantum efficiency of the cell using a simple and cheap process. In ourwork we have exploited the controlled absorption of nano-crystal with different band gaps to realizedown conversion artificial antennas that self-assembled on the device surface. The UV sun light isconverted to the visible light enhancing the solar cell performance in two complementary routes; a.protecting the solar cell and coatings from the UV illumination and therefore reducing the UVradiation damage. b. enhancing the total external quantum efficiency of the cell by one percent. Thisis achieved using a simple cheap process that can be adjusted to many different solar cells.

  4. A simple route to alloyed quaternary nanocrystals Ag-In-Zn-S with shape and size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Herbich, Jerzy; Golec, Barbara; Wielgus, Ireneusz; Pron, Adam

    2014-05-19

    A convenient method of the preparation of alloyed quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals is elaborated, in which a multicomponent mixture of simple and commercially available precursors, namely, silver nitrate, indium(III) chloride, zinc stearate, 1-dodecanethiol, and sulfur, is used with 1-octadecene as a solvent. The formation of quaternary nanocrystals necessitates the use of an auxiliary sulfur precursor, namely, elemental sulfur dissolved in oleylamine, in addition to 1-dodecanethiol. Without this additional precursor binary ZnS nanocrystals are formed. The optimum reaction temperature of 180 °C was also established. In these conditions shape, size, and composition of the resulting nanocrystals can be adjusted in a controlled manner by changing the molar ratio of the precursors in the reaction mixture. For low zinc stearate contents anisotropic rodlike (ca.3 nm x 10 nm) and In-rich nanocrystals are obtained. This is caused by a significantly higher reactivity of the indium precursor as compared to the zinc one. With increasing zinc precursor content the reactivities of both precursors become more balanced, and the resulting nanocrystals are smaller (1.5-4.0 nm) and become Zn-rich as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive spectrometry investigations. Simultaneous increases in the zinc and sulfur precursor content result in an enlargement of nanocrystals (2.5 to 5.0 nm) and further increase in the molar ZnS content (up to 0.76). The prepared nanoparticles show stable photoluminescence with the quantum yield up to 37% for In and Zn-rich nanocrystals. Their hydrodynamic diameter in toluene dispersion, determined by dynamic light scattering, is roughly twice larger than the diameter of their inorganic core.

  5. Unravelling the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals, the role of acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van den Broeck, Freya; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2014-07-09

    We synthesized HfO2 nanocrystals from HfCl4 using a surfactant-free solvothermal process in benzyl alcohol and found that the resulting nanocrystals could be transferred to nonpolar media using a mixture of carboxylic acids and amines. Using solution (1)H NMR, FTIR, and elemental analysis, we studied the details of the transfer reaction and the surface chemistry of the resulting sterically stabilized nanocrystals. As-synthesized nanocrystals are charge-stabilized by protons, with chloride acting as the counterion. Treatment with only carboxylic acids does not lead to any binding of ligands to the HfO2 surface. On the other hand, we find that the addition of amines provides the basic environment in which carboxylic acids can dissociate and replace chloride. This results in stable, aggregate-free dispersions of HfO2 nanocrystals, sterically stabilized by carboxylate ligands. Moreover, titrations with deuterated carboxylic acid show that the charge on the carboxylate ligands is balanced by coadsorbed protons. Hence, opposite from the X-type/nonstoichiometric nanocrystals picture prevailing in literature, one should look at HfO2/carboxylate nanocrystals as systems where carboxylic acids are dissociatively adsorbed to bind to the nanocrystals. Similar results were obtained with ZrO2 NCs. Since proton accommodation on the surface is most likely due to the high Brønsted basicity of oxygen, our model could be a more general picture for the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals with important consequences on the chemistry of ligand exchange reactions.

  6. Emergence of intrinsic half-metallicity in MoS2 nano-crystals : A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, S. C.; Chatterjee, S.; Taraphder, A.

    2017-05-01

    Using first principles density functional theory we investigate the electronic structure of MoS2 nano-crystals of diameter 1nm. Our calculations suggest that MoS2 nano-crystals are inherently half-metallic, the half-metallicity being robust with respect to the constitution as well as the morphology of the surface and also with respect to the length of the nano-crystal. Thus, MoS2 nano-crystals, may turn out to be very important for application in spintronics based solid state devices.

  7. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  8. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  9. Metal-Particle-Decorated ZnO Nanocrystals: Photocatalysis and Charge Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Hao; Chiu, Yi-Hsuan; Shao, Pao-Wen; Hsu, Yung-Jung

    2016-12-07

    Understanding of charge transfer processes is determinant to the performance optimization for semiconductor photocatalysts. As a representative model of composite photocatalysts, metal-particle-decorated ZnO has been widely employed for a great deal of photocatalytic applications; however, the dependence of charge carrier dynamics on the metal content and metal composition and their correlation with the photocatalytic properties have seldom been reported. Here, the interfacial charge dynamics for metal-decorated ZnO nanocrystals were investigated and their correspondence with the photocatalytic properties was evaluated. The samples were prepared with a delicate antisolvent approach, in which ZnO nanocrystals were grown along with metal particle decoration in a deep eutectic solvent. By modulating the experimental conditions, the metal content (from 0.6 to 2.3 at%) and metal composition (including Ag, Au, and Pd) in the resulting metal-decorated ZnO could be readily controlled. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectra showed that an optimal Au content of 1.3 at% could effectuate the largest electron transfer rate constant for Au-decorated ZnO nanocrystals, in conformity with the highest photocatalytic efficiency observed. The relevance of charge carrier dynamics to the metal composition was also inspected and realized in terms of the energy level difference between ZnO and metal. Among the three metal-decorated ZnO samples tested, ZnO-Pd displayed the highest photocatalytic activity, fundamentally according with the largest electron transfer rate constant deduced in carrier dynamics measurements. The current work was the first study to present the correlations among charge carrier dynamics, metal content, metal composition, and the resultant photocatalytic properties for semiconductor/metal heterostructures. The findings not only helped to resolve the standing issues regarding the mechanistic foundation of photocatalysis but also shed light on the intelligent design

  10. Decoration of size-tunable CuO nanodots on TiO2 nanocrystals for noble metal-free photocatalytic H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Geon Dae; Joo, Ji Bong; Lee, Ilkeun; Yin, Yadong

    2014-09-01

    We report a simple yet effective approach for the decoration of the TiO2 nanocrystal surface with size-tunable CuO nanodots for high-performance noble metal-free photocatalytic H2 production. Modification with polyacrylic acid enables the surface of TiO2 nanocrystals to be selectively deposited with Cu(OH)2 nanodots, which can be subsequently converted to CuO through dehydration without changing their morphologies. UV irradiation of the nanocomposite solution in the presence of a hole scavenger produces photogenerated electrons which reduce CuO to metallic Cu nanodots, making them effective co-catalysts in a role similar to Pt for promoting photocatalytic H2 production. Due to the considerably high work function of Cu, the formation of a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction induces efficient charge separation and transfer. As a result, the TiO2 nanocrystals decorated with an optimal amount of CuO nanodots (1.7 wt%) could reach ~50% of the photocatalytic activity achievable by the Pt-TiO2 counterparts (1 wt%), clearly demonstrating the great potential of such composite catalysts for efficient noble metal-free photocatalytic H2 production.We report a simple yet effective approach for the decoration of the TiO2 nanocrystal surface with size-tunable CuO nanodots for high-performance noble metal-free photocatalytic H2 production. Modification with polyacrylic acid enables the surface of TiO2 nanocrystals to be selectively deposited with Cu(OH)2 nanodots, which can be subsequently converted to CuO through dehydration without changing their morphologies. UV irradiation of the nanocomposite solution in the presence of a hole scavenger produces photogenerated electrons which reduce CuO to metallic Cu nanodots, making them effective co-catalysts in a role similar to Pt for promoting photocatalytic H2 production. Due to the considerably high work function of Cu, the formation of a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction induces efficient charge separation and transfer. As a

  11. The colloidal chemistry synthesis and electron microscopy characterization of shape-controlled metal and semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Adam J.

    Solution methods of materials synthesis have found application in a variety of fields due to the diversity of products accessible, facility of process scalability, and the ease of tuning their properties through prudent selection of reaction conditions. Control of experimental variables during the formation of colloidally stable nanoscale solids within a liquid matrix allows for tailoring of the particles' characteristics, including shape, size, composition, and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, I will discuss how the manipulation of reaction chemistries can be used to synthesize shape-controlled metal and semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals. Further, I will elaborate on the mechanisms by which these particles form from molecular precursors and describe how their properties can differ from their bulk analogues through extensive characterization, especially using transmission electron microscopy. These studies contribute to the continued development of chemical routes to nanocrystals and their application as functional materials. First, I will review recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of shape-controlled nanocrystals, as well as highlight their promising applicability in a number of emerging technologies. These principles will then be leveraged to the specific case of catalytically-active rhodium nanocrystals, which can be synthesized with morphological and dimensional control using a polyol solution-mediated strategy. I describe an innovative shape-controlled synthesis to monodisperse colloidal rhodium icosahedra, cubes, triangular plates, and octahedra using this route. Additionally, new insights into the important role of the polyol reducing solvent on the synthesis of these nanocrystals are revealed, and how these might be exploited to engender superior reaction control and novel products. Next, I will describe how a crystallization mechanism was established for the synthesis of numerous morphologies of noble metal nanocrystals. I

  12. Selective synthesis and characterization of sea urchin-like metallic nickel nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaohe [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)]. E-mail: liuxh@mail.csu.edu.cn; Liang Xudong [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang Ning [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Qiu Guanzhou [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yi Ran [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2006-08-15

    Sea urchin-like nanobelt-based and nanorod-based metallic nickel nanocrystals have been selective synthesized via a hydrothermal reduction route in which sodium hydroxide was used as alkaline reagent and aqueous hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O) was used as reducing agent. The morphology and structure of final products could be easily controlled by adjust process parameters such as hydrothermal time, reaction temperature and alkaline concentration. Surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was also important parameter influencing the morphology of the products. The morphology and phase structure of the final products have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The probable formation mechanism of the sea urchin-like metallic nickel nanocrystals was discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  13. Exploiting differential electrochemical stripping behaviors of Fe3O4 nanocrystals toward heavy metal ions by crystal cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xian-Zhi; Guo, Zheng; Yuan, Qing-Hong; Liu, Zhong-Gang; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2014-08-13

    This study attempts to understand the intrinsic impact of different morphologies of nanocrystals on their electrochemical stripping behaviors toward heavy metal ions. Two differently shaped Fe3O4 nanocrystals, i.e., (100)-bound cubic and (111)-bound octahedral, have been synthesized for the experiments. Electrochemical results indicate that Fe3O4 nanocrystals with different shapes show different stripping behaviors toward heavy metal ions. Octahedral Fe3O4 nanocrystals show better electrochemical sensing performances toward the investigated heavy metal ions such as Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II), in comparison with cubic ones. Specifically, Pb(II) is found to have the best stripping performance on both the (100) and (111) facets. To clarify these phenomena, adsorption abilities of as-prepared Fe3O4 nanocrystals have been investigated toward heavy metal ions. Most importantly, combined with theoretical calculations, their different electrochemical stripping behaviors in view of facet effects have been further studied and enclosed at the level of molecular/atom. Finally, as a trial to find a disposable platform completely free from noble metals, the potential application of the Fe3O4 nanocrystals for electrochemical detection of As(III) in drinking water is demonstrated.

  14. Fast and scalable synthesis of uniform zirconium-, hafnium-based metal-organic framework nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting; Xu, Xiaobin; Ni, Bing; Wang, Haiqing; Long, Yong; Hu, Wenping; Wang, Xun

    2017-12-14

    Metal-organic frameworks based on zirconium or hafnium possess tantalizing commercial prospects due to their high stability but require a long reaction time to form crystals. The fast synthesis of uniform Zr-, Hf-MOF nanocrystals at scale is of key importance in the potential commercial application of MOFs. In this work, we have developed a versatile strategy through controlling the hydrolysis and nucleation of metal salts in the presence of acetic acid and water; up to 24 grams of UiO-66-NH 2 nanocrystals with a uniform octahedron could be synthesized within 15 minutes using a one step method. The current synthetic strategy could be extended to other Zr-, Hf-MOF nanocrystals [UiO-66-Fast, UiO-66-(OH) 2 -Fast, UiO-66-2,6-NDC-Fast, UiO-67-Fast, BUT-12-Fast, PCN-222-Ni-Fast, PCN-222-Co-Fast, Hf-UiO-66-Fast, Hf-UiO-66-NH 2 -Fast, Hf-UiO-66-(OH) 2 -Fast, Hf-UiO-66-2,6-NDC-Fast and Hf-BUT-12-Fast]. Significantly, when noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) are introduced into MOF precursors, NPs encapsulated in MOFs with excellent dispersion have also been obtained and show outstanding performance in catalysis. This facile procedure is expected to pave the way to expand the commercial applications of MOFs.

  15. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    2016-01-01

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochem...

  16. Temperature-Dependent Physical and Memory Characteristics of Atomic-Layer-Deposited RuOx Metal Nanocrystal Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maikap

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and memory characteristics of the atomic-layer-deposited RuOx metal nanocrystal capacitors in an n-Si/SiO2/HfO2/RuOx/Al2O3/Pt structure with different postdeposition annealing temperatures from 850–1000°C have been investigated. The RuOx metal nanocrystals with an average diameter of 7 nm and a highdensity of 0.7 × 1012/cm2 are observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy after a postdeposition annealing temperature at 1000°C. The density of RuOx nanocrystal is decreased (slightly by increasing the annealing temperatures, due to agglomeration of multiple nanocrystals. The RuO3 nanocrystals and Hf-silicate layer at the SiO2/HfO2 interface are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For post-deposition annealing temperature of 1000°C, the memory capacitors with a small equivalent oxide thickness of ~9 nm possess a large hysteresis memory window of >5 V at a small sweeping gate voltage of ±5 V. A promising memory window under a small sweeping gate voltage of ~3 V is also observed due to charge trapping in the RuOx metal nanocrystals. The program/erase mechanism is modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N tunneling of the electrons and holes from Si substrate. The electrons and holes are trapped in the RuOx nanocrystals. Excellent program/erase endurance of 106 cycles and a large memory window of 4.3 V with a small charge loss of ~23% at 85°C are observed after 10 years of data retention time, due to the deep-level traps in the RuOx nanocrystals. The memory structure is very promising for future nanoscale nonvolatile memory applications.

  17. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-03-21

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  18. Growth and characterization of semiconducting nickel sulfide nanocrystals from air-stable single-source metal organic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three symmetrical and unsymmetrical nickel(II complexes [cis-(C3H72NC(SNC(OC6H3(3,5-NO22]2Ni(II, [cis-(C4H92NC(SNC(OC6H3(3,5-NO22]2Ni(II, and [cis-(Hex(Me2NC(SNC(O C6H3(3,5-NO22]2Ni(II were synthesized and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and mass spectrometry. These metal complexes have been used as single-source precursors for the preparation of semiconducting nickel sulfide nanocrystals. Rapid injection of metal complexes into oleylamine at 230°C, followed by immediate cooling, led to the formation of irregular-shaped 20–170-nm nickel sulfide nanocrystals. The deposited nickel sulfide nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Coordination ability determined transition metal ions substitution of Tb in Tb-Asp fluorescent nanocrystals and a facile ions-detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jiazhi; Ma, Baojin; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Shicai; Kong, Ying; Du, Min; Han, Lin; Wang, Jianjun; Sang, Yuanhua; Liu, Hong

    2018-04-11

    Although the synthesis and fluorescent properties of lanthanide-amino acid complex nanostructures have been investigated extensively, limited studies have been reported on metal ions' substitution ability for the lanthanide ions in the complex and their effect on the fluorescent property. In this study, taking biocompatible Tb-aspartic acid (Tb-Asp) complex nanocrystals as a model, the substitution mechanism of metal ions, particularly transition metals, for Tb ions in Tb-Asp nanocrystals and the change in the fluorescent property of the Tb-Asp nanocrystals after substitution were systematically investigated. The experimental results illustrated that metal ions with higher electronegativity, higher valence, and smaller radius possess stronger ability for Tb ions' substitution in Tb-Asp nanocrystals. Based on the effect of substituting ions' concentration on the fluorescent property of Tb-Asp, a facile method for copper ions detection with high sensitivity was proposed by measuring the fluorescent intensity of Tb-Asp nanocrystals' suspensions containing different concentrations of copper ions. The good biocompatibility, great convenience of synthesis and sensitive detection ability make Tb-Asp nanocrystals a very low cost and effective material for metal ions detection, which also opens a new door for practical applications of metal-Asp coordinated nanocrystals.

  20. From Metal Thiobenzoates to Metal Sulfide Nanocrystals: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenfang Yin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple preparation of metal sulfide nanoparticles via the decomposition of thiobenzoate precursors at room temperature is presented and discussed. Long chain alkylamines were found to mediate the breakdown of metal thiobenzoates, such as those containing Ag, Cu, In and Cd, to produce uniform Ag2S, Cu2−xS, In2S3 and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The long chain amines are assumed to play dual roles as the nucleophilic reagent and the capping agent. It was found that sizes of the nanoparticles can be controlled by changing the type of amine used, as well as the molar ratio between amine and the precursor. We performed DFT calculations on a proposed mechanism involving an initial nucleophilic addition of amine molecule onto the thiocarboxylates. The proposed reaction was also confirmed through the analysis of by-products via infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of this understanding, we propose to manipulate the stability of the precursors by coordination with suitable stabilizing groups, such that the reaction kinetics can be modified to generate different nanostructures of interest.

  1. From Metal Thiobenzoates to Metal Sulfide Nanocrystals: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihua; Lim, Wen Pei; Wong, Chiong Teck; Xu, Hairuo; Yin, Fenfang; Chin, Wee Shong

    2012-01-01

    A simple preparation of metal sulfide nanoparticles via the decomposition of thiobenzoate precursors at room temperature is presented and discussed. Long chain alkylamines were found to mediate the breakdown of metal thiobenzoates, such as those containing Ag, Cu, In and Cd, to produce uniform Ag2S, Cu2−xS, In2S3 and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The long chain amines are assumed to play dual roles as the nucleophilic reagent and the capping agent. It was found that sizes of the nanoparticles can be controlled by changing the type of amine used, as well as the molar ratio between amine and the precursor. We performed DFT calculations on a proposed mechanism involving an initial nucleophilic addition of amine molecule onto the thiocarboxylates. The proposed reaction was also confirmed through the analysis of by-products via infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of this understanding, we propose to manipulate the stability of the precursors by coordination with suitable stabilizing groups, such that the reaction kinetics can be modified to generate different nanostructures of interest. PMID:28348299

  2. X-Ray Absorption Studies of Vanadium-Containing Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohn, Keith, L.

    2006-01-09

    Metal oxide nanocrystals offer significant potential for use as catalysts or catalyst supports due to their high surface areas and unique chemical properties that result from the high number of exposed corners and edges. However, little is known about the catalytic activity of these materials, especially as oxidation catalysts. This research focused on the preparation, characterization and use of vanadium-containing nanocrystals as selective oxidation catalysts. Three vanadium-containing nanocrystals were prepared using a modified sol-gel procedure: V/MgO, V/SiO2, and vanadium phosphate (VPO). These represent active oxidation catalysts for a number of industrially relevant reactions. The catalysts were characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman, UV-VIS, infrared and x-ray absorption spectroscopies with the goal of determining the primary structural and chemical differences between nanocrystals and microcrystals. The catalytic activity of these catalysts was also studied in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and methanol oxidation to formaldehyde. V/MgO nanocrystals were investigated for activity in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and compared to conventional V/MgO catalysts. Characterization of V/MgO catalysts using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that both types of catalysts contained magnesium orthovanadate at vanadium loadings below 15 weight%, but above that loading, magnesium pyrovanadate may have been present. In general, MgO nanocrystals had roughly half the crystal size and double the surface area of the conventional MgO. In oxidative dehydrogenation of butane, nanocrystalline V/MgO gave higher selectivity to butene than conventional V/MgO at the same conversion. This difference was attributed to differences in vanadium domain size resulting from the higher surface areas of the nanocrystalline support, since characterization suggested that similar vanadium phases were present on both types of catalysts. Experiments in

  3. The spin lattice relaxation of 8Li in simple metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. D.; Saadaoui, H.; Parolin, T. J.; Song, Q.; Wang, D.; Smadella, M.; Chow, K. H.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2009-04-01

    We report the modification to the linear temperature dependence of the Korringa nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate of an implanted NMR probe in silver, as it makes a thermally activated site change. We develop a simple model of this phenomenon, which is found in a number of metals including Au and Nb.

  4. Designing Selectivity in Metal-Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Synthesis, Characterization, and Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlopoulos, Nicholas George

    This dissertation contains six chapters detailing recent advances that have been made in the synthesis and characterization of metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs), and the applications of these materials. Primarily focused on the synthesis of well-defined II-VI semiconductor nanorod (NR) and tetrapod (TP) based constructs of interest for photocatalytic and solar energy applications, the research described herein discusses progress towards the realization of key design rules for the synthesis of functional semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). As such, a blend of novel synthesis, advanced characterization, and direct application of heterostructured nanoparticles are presented. The first chapter is a review summarizing the design, synthesis, properties, and applications of multicomponent nanomaterials composed of disparate semiconductor and metal domains. By coupling two compositionally distinct materials onto a single nanocrystal, synergistic properties can arise that are not present in the isolated components, ranging from self-assembly to photocatalysis. For semiconductor nanomaterials, this was first realized in the ability to tune nanomaterial dimensions from 0-D quantum dot (QD) structures to cylindrical (NR) and branched (TP) structures by exploitation of advanced colloidal synthesis techniques and understandings of NC facet reactivities. The second chapter is focused on the synthesis and characterization of well-defined CdSe-seeded-CdS (CdSe CdS) NR systems synthesized by overcoating of wurtzite (W) CdSe quantum dots with W-CdS shells. 1-dimensional NRs have been interesting constructs for applications such as solar concentrators, optical gains, and photocatalysis. Through synthetic control over CdSe CdS NR systems, materials with small and large CdSe seeds were prepared, and for each seed size, multiple NR lengths were prepared. Through transient absorption studies, it was found that band alignment did not affect the efficiency of charge localization

  5. Broadband enhancement of photoluminance from colloidal metal halide perovskite nanocrystals on plasmonic nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Liang, Yuzhang; Jing, Qiang; Lu, Zhenda; Lu, Yanqing; Xu, Ting

    2017-11-07

    Metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) as a new kind of promising optoelectronic material have attracted wide attention due to their high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield, narrow emission linewidth and wideband color tunability. Since the PL intensity always has a direct influence on the performance of optoelectronic devices, it is of vital importance to improve the perovskite NCs' fluorescence emission efficiency. Here, we synthesize three inorganic perovskite NCs and experimentally demonstrate a broadband fluorescence enhancement of perovskite NCs by exploiting plasmonic nanostructured surface consisting of nanogrooves array. The strong near-field optical localization associated with surface plasmon polariton-coupled emission effect generated by the nanogrooves array can significantly boost the absorption of perovskite NCs and tailor the fluorescence emissions. As a result, the PL intensities of perovskite NCs are broadband enhanced with a maximum factor higher than 8-fold achieved in experimental demonstration. Moreover, the high efficiency PL of perovskite NCs embedded in the polymer matrix layer on the top of plasmonic nanostructured surface can be maintained for more than three weeks. These results imply that plasmonic nanostructured surface is a good candidate to stably broadband enhance the PL intensity of perovskite NCs and further promote their potentials in the application of visible-light-emitting devices.

  6. Preparation of glibenclamide nanocrystals by a simple laboratory scale ultra cryo-milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy); Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan [University of Tirana, Department of Pharmacy (Albania); Martino, Piera Di, E-mail: piera.dimartino@unicam.it [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability to reduce the particle size of glibenclamide (GBC) to the nanometric scale through a very simple and well-known laboratory scale method, the laboratory scale ultra cryo-milling. The effect of milling on GBC crystalline properties and dissolution behaviour was deliberately evaluated in the absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. The milling procedure consisted in adding particles to liquid nitrogen and milling them by hand in a mortar with a pestle for different time intervals (15, 30, 40 min). For comparison, the same milling procedure was also applied without liquid nitrogen. The particle size reduction was evaluated for the coarsest samples (>3 {mu}m) by measuring the particle Ferret's diameter through scanning electron microscopy, while for the smallest one (<3 {mu}m) by dynamic light scattering. A time grinding of 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen was revealed highly efficacious to obtain particles of nanodimensions, with a geometric mean particle size of 0.55 {+-} 0.23 {mu}m and more than the 80 % of particles lower than 1,000 nm. Interestingly, non-agglomerated particles were obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry allowed to assess that under mechanical treatment no polymorphic transitions were observed, while a decrease in crystallinity degree occurred depending on the milling procedure (presence or absence of liquid nitrogen) and the milling time (crystallinity decreases at increasing milling time from 15 to 40 min). A comparison of the intrinsic dissolution rate and the dissolution from particles revealed an interesting improvement of particle dissolution particularly for particles milled in the presence of liquid nitrogen due to an increase in particle surface area and concentration gradient, according to the Noyes-Whitney equation.

  7. Highly Efficient Light-Emitting Diodes of Colloidal Metal-Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals beyond Quantum Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Kim, Young-Tae; Cho, Himchan; Kwon, Woosung; Do, Sungan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Park, Chan Gyung; Rhee, Shi-Woo; Im, Sang Hyuk; Friend, Richard H; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2017-07-25

    Colloidal metal-halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with a dimension less than the exciton Bohr diameter D B (quantum size regime) emerged as promising light emitters due to their spectrally narrow light, facile color tuning, and high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE). However, their size-sensitive emission wavelength and color purity and low electroluminescence efficiency are still challenging aspects. Here, we demonstrate highly efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on the colloidal perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) in a dimension > D B (regime beyond quantum size) by using a multifunctional buffer hole injection layer (Buf-HIL). The perovskite NCs with a dimension greater than D B show a size-irrespective high color purity and PLQE by managing the recombination of excitons occurring at surface traps and inside the NCs. The Buf-HIL composed of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and perfluorinated ionomer induces uniform perovskite particle films with complete film coverage and prevents exciton quenching at the PEDOT:PSS/perovskite particle film interface. With these strategies, we achieved a very high PLQE (∼60.5%) in compact perovskite particle films without any complex post-treatments and multilayers and a high current efficiency of 15.5 cd/A in the LEDs of colloidal perovskite NCs, even in a simplified structure, which is the highest efficiency to date in green LEDs that use colloidal organic-inorganic metal-halide perovskite nanoparticles including perovskite QDs and NCs. These results can help to guide development of various light-emitting optoelectronic applications based on perovskite NCs.

  8. Simple Preparation of Novel Metal-Containing Mesoporous Starches †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Manuel; Budarin, Vitaliy; Shuttleworth, Peter S.; Clark, James H.; Pineda, Antonio; Balu, Alina M.; Romero, Antonio A.; Luque, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Metal-containing mesoporous starches have been synthesized using a simple and efficient microwave-assisted methodology followed by metal impregnation in the porous gel network. Final materials exhibited surface areas >60 m2 g−1, being essentially mesoporous with pore sizes in the 10–15 nm range with some developed inter-particular mesoporosity. These materials characterized by several techniques including XRD, SEM, TG/DTA and DRIFTs may find promising catalytic applications due to the presence of (hydr)oxides in their composition. PMID:28809249

  9. Surface core-level shifts for simple metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1994-01-01

    We have performed an ab initio study of the surface core-level binding energy shift (SCLS) for 11 of the simple metals by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method. Initial- and final-state effects are included within the concept of complete....... We furthermore conclude that the unexpected negative sign of the SCLS in beryllium is predominantly an initial-state effect and is caused by the high electron density in this metal....

  10. Assembling metal oxide nanocrystals into dense, hollow, porous nanoparticles for lithium-ion and lithium-oxygen battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jun; Wu, Yingqiang; Park, Jin-Bum; Lee, Joong Kee; Zhao, Fengyu; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2013-10-01

    New dense hollow porous (DHP) metal oxide nanoparticles that are smaller than 100 nm and composed of Co3O4, FeOx, NiO and MnOx were prepared by densely assembling metal oxide nanocrystals based on the hard-template method using a carbon colloid as a sacrificial core. These nanoparticles are quite different from the traditional particles as their hollow interior originates from the stacking of nanocrystals rather than a spherical shell. The DHP nanoparticles preserve the intriguing properties of nanocrystals and possess desirable surface area and pore volume that enhance the active surface, which ultimately benefits applications such as lithium-ion batteries. The DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles demonstrated an enhanced capacity of 1168 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1vs. 590 mA h g-1 of powders and stable cycling performance greater than 250 cycles when used as an anode material. Most importantly, the electrochemical performance of DHP Co3O4 nanoparticles in a lithium-O2 battery was also investigated for the first time. A low charge potential of ~4.0 V, a high discharge voltage near 2.74 V and a long cycle ability greater than 100 cycles at a delivered capacity of 2000 mA h g-1 (current density, 200 mA g-1) were observed. The performances were considerably improved compared to recent results of mesoporous Co3O4, Co3O4 nanoparticles and a composite of Co3O4/RGO and Co3O4/Pd. Therefore, it would be promising to investigate such properties of DHP nanoparticles or other hollow metal (oxide) particles for the popular lithium-air battery.New dense hollow porous (DHP) metal oxide nanoparticles that are smaller than 100 nm and composed of Co3O4, FeOx, NiO and MnOx were prepared by densely assembling metal oxide nanocrystals based on the hard-template method using a carbon colloid as a sacrificial core. These nanoparticles are quite different from the traditional particles as their hollow interior originates from the stacking of nanocrystals rather than a spherical shell. The DHP

  11. Metal complexes of alkyl-aryl dithiocarbamates: Structural studies, anticancer potentials and applications as precursors for semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Fartisincha P.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2018-03-01

    Dithiocarbamates are versatile ligands able to stabilize wide range of metal ions in their various oxidation states with the partial double bond character of Csbnd N and Csbnd S of thioureide moiety. Variation of the substituents attached to the nitrogen atom of dithiocarbamate moiety generates various intermolecular interactions, which lead to different structural arrangement in the solid state. The presence of bulky substituents on the N atom obviates the supramolecular aggregation via secondary Msbnd S interactions whereas smaller substituents encourage such aggregation that results in their wide properties and applications. Over the past decades, the synthesis and structural studies of metal complexes of dithiocarbamates have received considerable attention as potential anticancer agents with various degree of DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity and as single molecule precursors for the preparation of semiconductor nanocrystals. In this paper, we review the synthesis, structural studies, anticancer potency and the use of alkyl-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes as precursors for the preparation of semiconductor nanocrystals. The properties of these compounds and activities are ascribed to be due to either the dithiocarbamate moieties, the nature or type of the substituents around the dithiocarbamate backbone and the central metal ions or combination of these factors.

  12. Thermal Stability of Metal Nanocrystals: An Investigation of the Surface and Bulk Reconstructions of Pd Concave Icosahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Kyle D; Elnabawy, Ahmed O; Yang, Tung-Han; Roling, Luke T; Howe, Jane; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2017-06-14

    Despite the remarkable success in controlling the synthesis of metal nanocrystals, it still remains a grand challenge to stabilize and preserve the shapes or internal structures of metastable kinetic products. In this work, we address this issue by systematically investigating the surface and bulk reconstructions experienced by a Pd concave icosahedron when subjected to heating up to 600 °C in vacuum. We used in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to identify the equilibration pathways of this far-from-equilibrium structure. We were able to capture key structural transformations occurring during the thermal annealing process, which were mechanistically rationalized by implementing self-consistent plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Specifically, the concave icosahedron was found to evolve into a regular icosahedron via surface reconstruction in the range of 200-400 °C, and then transform into a pseudospherical crystalline structure through bulk reconstruction when further heated to 600 °C. The mechanistic understanding may lead to the development of strategies for enhancing the thermal stability of metal nanocrystals.

  13. Cellulose nanocrystal-derived hollow mesoporous carbon spheres and their application as a metal-free catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Lida; Mahmoud, Ahmed Y. F.; Purkait, Tapas K.; McDermott, Mark T.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this contribution, we demonstrate the fabrication of hollow mesoporous carbon spheres (HCSs) derived from cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The HCSs were prepared by templating CNCs onto sacrificial silica spheres followed by heat treatment. Mesoporous carbon spheres result from the removal of the silica spheres by etching. The walls of the HCSs are approximately 4 nm thick and are composed of amorphous and graphitic carbon. The catalytic activity of the HCSs was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The present investigation reveals the outstanding catalytic activity of these particles. The reaction rate followed pseudo-first order kinetics with k value of 4.72 × 10‑3 s‑1 and activity parameter of 52.2 s‑1 g‑1, which showed superior performance compared to that of metal nanoparticle and metal nanoparticle-carbon hybrid based catalysts.

  14. Chemical design of nanocrystal solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2013-01-01

    This account highlights our recent and present activities dedicated to chemical synthesis and applications of inorganic nanostructures. In particular, we discuss the potential of metal amides as precursors in the synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanocrystals. We show the importance of surface chemical functionalization for the emergence of collective electronic properties in nanocrystal solids. We also demonstrate a new kind of long-range ordered, crystalline matter comprising colloidal nanocrystals and atomically defined inorganic clusters. Finally, we point the reader's attention to the high potential benefits of size- and shape-tunability of nanocrystals for achieving higher performance of rechargeable Li-ion battery electrodes.

  15. Electrical characteristic of metal-oxide-semiconductor with NiSi2 nanocrystals embedded in oxide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jenn-Kai; Lo, Ikai; Gau, M. H.; Chen, Y. L.; Yeh, P. H.; Chang, T. C.

    2006-03-01

    The nano-structured electronic devices have received more attention recently. Metal-oxide-semiconductor structure with NiSi2 nanocrystals embedded in the oxide layer, HfO2/SiO2, has been fabricated. Comparing with conventional ones, it could be operated under lower voltage and faster program/erase speed and has better endurance and retention. We have measured the temperature-dependent tunneling V-I curve on these HfO2/SiO2 nano-structured devices for the temperature from 1.2K to 300K. The results show an abnormal electrical characteristic. The tunneling V-I characteristics appear a new threshold voltage in the low temperature region, from 30K to 100K, while applied a negative voltage. The abnormal threshold voltage disappears when the temperature higher than 150K or lower than 30K. We attribute the new threshold voltage to the discrete quantum states of NiSi2 nanocrystals in the oxide layer.

  16. Simple one-pot aqueous synthesis of CdHgTe nanocrystals using sodium tellurite as the Te source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zhitao [Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research in Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Luo, Chunhua [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Huang, Rong [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, School of Information Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Yiting [Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research in Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Peng, Hui, E-mail: hpeng@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, School of Information Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University (China); Polymer Electronic Research Centre, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Travas-sejdic, Jadranka [Polymer Electronic Research Centre, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we systematically investigated the one-pot aqueous synthesis conditions of CdHgTe nanocrystals (NCs) using sodium tellurite (Na{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}) as the Te source, and found that the added content of Hg{sup 2+} and the initial pH value of reaction solutions significantly affected the photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) of alloyed CdHgTe NCs. When the concentration of Cd was 1.0 mmol L{sup −1}, the mole ratio of Cd/Te/Hg/MPA was 1:0.5:0.05:2.4, and the initial pH value of the reaction solution was about 8.78, the PL QY of as-prepared CdHgTe NCs was up to 45%. Characterization by HRTEM and XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of CdHgTe NCs. Compared to other synthetic approaches of CdHgTe NCs, our experimental results indicate that Na{sub 2}TeO{sub 3} could be an attractive alternative Te source to directly synthesize CdHgTe NCs in aqueous media. - Highlights: • A one-pot method was developed for the synthesis of highly luminescent CdHgTe nanocrystals (NCs). • Sodium tellurite was used as the Te source. • The quantum yield reached up to 45%. • The experimental conditions were optimized and the prepared CdHgTe NCs were characterized.

  17. Design of gate stacks for improved program/erase speed, retention and process margin aiming next generation metal nanocrystal memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jaeman; Choi, Changmin; Min, Kyeong-Sik; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Jang-Sik; Lee, Jaegab

    2009-01-01

    In this work, gate stacks in metal nanocrystal (NC) memories, as promising next generation storage devices and their systems, are extensively investigated. A comparative analysis and characterization of the program/erase (P/E) speed, retention and the process margin of cobalt NC memories including high-k and bandgap engineering technologies are performed by using the technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation. It is shown that NC memory with high-k dielectric (HfO 2 ) has better performance in P/E speed and retention when the diameter of NC is below 5 nm. When the diameter is beyond 5 nm, on the other hand, the bandgap-engineered bottom oxide gate structure shows improved performance in P/E speed and retention. From the process margin perspective, as the permittivity of the dielectric gets larger, the limits of the diameter and the density of NCs allow the degree of freedom to become larger

  18. Functionalization of Cellulose Nanocrystals with PEG-Metal-Chelating Diblock Copolymers via Controlled Conjugation in Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Melinda

    The surface of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was successfully functionalized with metal chelating diblock copolymers via HyNic-4FB conjugation. Two types of PEG-metal-chelating block polymers with hydrazinonicotinate acetone hydrazine (HyNic) end groups were synthesized: mPEG-PGlu(DTPA) 18-HyNic and mPEG-PGlu(DTPA)25-HyNic. These two polymers both had a methoxy PEG (M ˜ 2000 Da) block that differed in the mean degree of polymerization of the metal-chelating block. They were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and gel-permeation chromatography (GPC). 4-Formylbenzamide (4FB) groups were introduced onto the surface of CNCs and quantified through their reaction with 2-hydrazinopyridine. The polymers were grafted onto the surface of CNCs via bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation, and the kinetics of this reaction was explored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The CNCs were also labeled with rhodamine and Alexa FluorRTM 488 dyes. Students in our collaborator's group in Pharmacy are examining applications of these materials as radiotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  19. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  20. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  1. Simple synthesis of PbSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into 2D ‘flakes’ and 1D ‘ribbons’ structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Torres, E.; Ortega-López, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • PbSe is obtained in a simple way by the co-precipitation method at low-temperature. • The structural, morphological and optical properties of PbSe were studied. • Adding NH 4 OH to the precursor solutions influences on the morphology. • 2D- and 1D-PbSe structures assemble by oriented attachment. • PbSe can be a potential candidate for thermoelectric applications. - Abstract: This work presents a simple and low-temperature method to prepare a variety of Lead selenide (PbSe) nanostructures, using aqueous solutions of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and NaHSe. Nanostructures with different morphology were obtained by varying the Pb:Se molar ratio, as well as the mixing sequence of NH 4 OH with either Pb(NO 3 ) 2 or NaHSe. Nanoparticles with different shapes (spherical and octahedral), and self-assembled structures (flakes and ribbons) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. X-ray results confirmed that the PbSe rock-salt crystalline structure was obtained for all of the prepared samples. The crystal size is in the order of 7.3 to 8.9 nm for single nanocrystals. The absorption spectra of the samples show exciton absorption bands at 1395 nm and 1660 nm. This material could be used to develop more advanced structures for thermoelectric generators.

  2. Simple synthesis of PbSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into 2D ‘flakes’ and 1D ‘ribbons’ structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Torres, E., E-mail: ediaz@cinvestav.mx [Programa de Doctorado en Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Ortega-López, M.; Matsumoto, Y. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica, Sección de Electrónica del Estado Sólido, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, J. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional, No. 2508, México D.F. C.P. 07360 (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • PbSe is obtained in a simple way by the co-precipitation method at low-temperature. • The structural, morphological and optical properties of PbSe were studied. • Adding NH{sub 4}OH to the precursor solutions influences on the morphology. • 2D- and 1D-PbSe structures assemble by oriented attachment. • PbSe can be a potential candidate for thermoelectric applications. - Abstract: This work presents a simple and low-temperature method to prepare a variety of Lead selenide (PbSe) nanostructures, using aqueous solutions of Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaHSe. Nanostructures with different morphology were obtained by varying the Pb:Se molar ratio, as well as the mixing sequence of NH{sub 4}OH with either Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or NaHSe. Nanoparticles with different shapes (spherical and octahedral), and self-assembled structures (flakes and ribbons) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. X-ray results confirmed that the PbSe rock-salt crystalline structure was obtained for all of the prepared samples. The crystal size is in the order of 7.3 to 8.9 nm for single nanocrystals. The absorption spectra of the samples show exciton absorption bands at 1395 nm and 1660 nm. This material could be used to develop more advanced structures for thermoelectric generators.

  3. 3D superlattices of uniform metal nanocrystals differing by their sizes called binary supracrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingjin; Yang, Zhijie; Pileni, Marie-Paule

    2017-08-01

    By mixing uniform large and small nanocrystals (NCs), three-dimensional (3D) crystalline structures referred to as supracrystals (SCs) are produced. The small NCs fill in the interstices of large NCS self-assembled in well-defined patterns. Various binary structures are produced, in specific conditions, as predicted by a hard-sphere model. It is demonstrated that the ligands used to stabilize NCs play the role of a key parameter in the final structure, as well as the crystalline structure of the NCs, called nanocrystallinity, with production of one-component SCs characterized by vicinal surfaces. Quasi-binary SCs are produced either by a ligand exchange process during the SC growth or through magnetic forces. Using magnetic NCs having two different diameters shows unexpected destructive magnetic property. Contribution to the Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  4. Iced photochemical reduction to synthesize atomically dispersed metals by suppressing nanocrystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hehe; Huang, Kai; Wang, Da; Zhang, Ruoyu; Ge, Binghui; Ma, Jingyuan; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Qunyang; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Cheng; Irawan, Joshua; Liu, Li-Min; Wu, Hui

    2017-11-14

    Photochemical solution-phase reactions have been widely applied for the syntheses of nanocrystals. In particular, tuning of the nucleation and growth of solids has been a major area of focus. Here we demonstrate a facile approach to generate atomically dispersed platinum via photochemical reduction of frozen chloroplatinic acid solution using ultraviolet light. Using this iced-photochemical reduction, the aggregation of atoms is prevented, and single atoms are successfully stabilized. The platinum atoms are deposited on various substrates, including mesoporous carbon, graphene, carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide nanoparticles, and zinc oxide nanowires. The atomically dispersed platinum on mesoporous carbon exhibits efficient catalytic activity for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction, with an overpotential of only 65 mV at a current density of 100 mA cm -2 and long-time durability (>10 h), superior to state-of-the-art platinum/carbon. This iced-photochemical reduction may be extended to other single atoms, for example gold and silver, as demonstrated in this study.

  5. In situ EC-AFM study of the effect of nanocrystals on the passivation and pit initiation in an Al-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.D.; Liu, Z.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wang, J.Q.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The nanoscale corrosion on Al-rich glass was characterised by in situ EC-AFM. • The nanocrystals were identified from amorphous matrix by tapping mode AFM. • The formation of corrosion products is associated with the galvanic coupling. • The nanocrystals changed the local structure and component of the passive film. - Abstract: The effect of nanocrystals on pit initiation in metallic glasses is an unresolved issue. The passive film formation and pit initiation in the Al–Ni–Ce metallic glass were investigated using in situ electrochemical atomic force microscope (EC-AFM). The α-Al nanophases were identified from the amorphous matrix based upon the phase imaging in the tapping mode AFM. In the early stage of the passive film formation, the corrosion products Al(OH) 3 formed on the α-Al nanoparticles due to the galvanic coupling. The corrosion products incorporated into the passive film changed the local structure and component of the passive film, lowering its stability

  6. A simple technique to assess bacterial attachment to metal surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    There are several methods to assess bacterial adhesion to metal surfaces. Although these methods are sensitive, they are time consuming and need expensive chemicals and instruments. Hence, their use in assessing bacterial adhesion is limited...

  7. Memory characteristics of Au nanocrystals embedded in metal-oxide-semiconductor structure by using atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 as control oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-C.; Chiou, Y.-K.; Chang, C.-H.; Tseng, J.-Y.; Wu, L.-J.; Chen, C.-Y.; Wu, T.-B.

    2007-01-01

    The nonvolatile memory characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures containing Au nanocrystals in the Al 2 O 3 /SiO 2 matrix were studied. In this work, we have demonstrated that the use of Al 2 O 3 as control oxide prepared by atomic-layer-deposition enhances the erase speed of the MOS capacitors. A giant capacitance-voltage hysteresis loop and a very short erase time which is lower than 1 ms can be obtained. Compared with the conventional floating-gate electrically erasable programmable read-only memories, the erase speed was promoted drastically. In addition, very low leakage current and large turn-around voltage resulting from electrons or holes stored in the Au nanocrystals were found in the current-voltage relation of the MOS capacitors

  8. Alkali metal complexes of 6-methyl-2-pyridone: simple formulae, but not so simple structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, William; Tooke, Duncan M

    2013-12-01

    Reaction of 6-methyl-2-pyridone (Hmhp) with Na or K metal, or with Rb or Cs 2-ethylhexoxide, in an appropriate single or mixed solvent, yields a series of solvated polymeric complexes with the empirical formulae M(mhp)(H2O)2 [(1), M = Na; (2), M = K], M(mhp)(H2O) [(3), M = Rb; (4), M = Cs] and Cs(mhp)(ROH) [(5), R = Me; (6), R = Et]. All of the products have been crystallographically characterized and show sheet polymeric structures, except for a double-chain structure for (2). In all of the structures, mhp(-) and solvent molecules function as bridging ligands; two metal ions are bridged (μ2) by each solvent molecule in (1), (5) and (6), while (2) contains both μ2 and μ3 triple bridges, and (3) and (4) display highly unusual μ4 quadruple bridging of metal ions by water molecules. The pyridonate O atom bridges two or three metal ions in each case. Nitrogen is also involved in coordination to the heavier metals; it bonds to a single ion in (3) and (4), but has an almost unprecedented bridging role in (5) and (6). As a result of the extensive bridging by ligands, coordination numbers between 6 and 8 are achieved for the metal ions. In each structure, all solvent OH groups form hydrogen bonds to pyridonate O and, in some cases, N atoms. With one exception, these are the first reported pyridonate complexes of the alkali metals Na-Cs that do not also include transition metals.

  9. Metal tube reducer is inexpensive and simple to operate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    Low-cost metal tube reducer accepts tubing up to 1 inch outer diameter and can reduce this diameter to less than 1/2 inch with controlled wall thickness. This device can reduce all of the tube without waste. It produces extremely good surface finishes.

  10. High Temperature AL-Nanocrystal Alloy Synthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perepezko, J

    2001-01-01

    Aluminum-rich metallic glasses containing transition metals and rare earth elements have been found to yield finely mixed microstructures of Al nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix and exhibit...

  11. Aggregation Kinetics of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals: Generation of Transparent CdSe(ZnS) Core(shell) Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korala, Lasantha; Brock, Stephanie L

    2012-08-16

    Transparent CdSe(ZnS) sol-gel materials have potential uses in optoelectronic applications such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) due to their strong luminescence properties and the potential for charge transport through the prewired nanocrystal (NC) network of the gel. However, typical syntheses of metal chalcogenide gels yield materials with poor transparency. In this work, the mechanism and kinetics of aggregation of two sizes of CdSe(ZnS) core(shell) NCs, initiated by removal of surface thiolate ligands using tetranitromethane (TNM) as an oxidant, were studied by means of time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TRDLS); the characteristics of the resultant gels were probed by optical absorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). At low concentrations of NCs (ca. 4 × 10(-7) M), the smaller, green-emitting NCs aggregate faster than the larger, orange-emitting NCs, for a specific oxidant concentration. The kinetics of aggregation have a significant impact on the macroscopic properties (i.e. transparency) of the resultant gels, with the transparency of the gels decreasing with the increase of oxidant concentration due the formation of larger clusters at the gel point and a shift away from a reaction limited cluster aggregation (RLCA) mechanism. This is further confirmed by the analyses of the gel structures by SAXS and TEM. Likewise, the larger orange-emitting particles also produce larger aggregates at the gel point, leading to lower transparency. The ability to control the transparency of chalcogenide gels will enable their properties to be tuned in order to address application-specific needs in optoelectronics.

  12. Interface traps contribution on transport mechanisms under illumination in metal-oxide-semiconductor structures based on silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatbouri, S.; Troudi, M.; Kalboussi, A.; Souifi, A.

    2018-02-01

    The transport phenomena in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures having silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) inside the dielectric layer have been investigated, in dark condition and under visible illumination. At first, using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), we find the presence of series electron traps having very close energy levels (comprised between 0.28 and 0.45 eV) for ours devices (with/without Si-NCs). And a single peak appears at low temperature only for MOS with Si-NCs related to Si-NCs DLTS response. In dark condition, the conduction mechanism is dominated by the thermionic fast emission/capture of charge carriers from the highly doped polysilicon layer to Si-substrate through interface trap states for MOS without Si-NCs. The tunneling of charge carriers from highly poly-Si to Si substrate trough the trapping/detrapping mechanism in the Si-NCs, at low temperature, contributed to the conduction mechanism for MOS with Si-NCs. The light effect on transport mechanisms has been investigated using current-voltage ( I- V), and high frequency capacitance-voltage ( C- V) methods. We have been marked the photoactive trap effect in inversion zone at room temperature in I- V characteristics, which confirm the contribution of photo-generated charge on the transport mechanisms from highly poly-Si to Si substrate trough the photo-trapping/detrapping mechanism in the Si-NCs and interfaces traps levels. These results have been confirmed by an increasing about 10 pF in capacity's values for the C- V characteristics of MOS with Si-NCs, in the inversion region for inverse high voltage applied under photoexcitation at low temperature. These results are helpful to understand the principle of charge transport in dark condition and under illumination, of MOS structures having Si-NCs in the SiO x = 1.5 oxide matrix.

  13. Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

    2014-12-16

    Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

  14. Symmetry breaking during seeded growth of nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2012-11-14

    Currently, most of the reported noble-metal nanocrystals are limited to a high level of symmetry, as constrained by the inherent, face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of these metals. In this paper, we report, for the first time, a facile and versatile approach (backed up by a clear mechanistic understanding) for breaking the symmetry of an fcc lattice and thus obtaining nanocrystals with highly unsymmetrical shapes. The key strategy is to induce and direct the growth of nanocrystal seeds into unsymmetrical modes by manipulating the reduction kinetics. With silver as an example, we demonstrated that the diversity of possible shapes taken by noble-metal nanocrystals could be greatly expanded by incorporating a series of new shapes drastically deviated from the fcc lattice. This work provides a new method to investigate shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystal.

  15. Many-body effects in simple metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Natschläger, S

    2001-01-01

    equations are used to describe the electromagnetic field of the photon, wherein the electron system enters via the material equations. Using Green's functions, the Schroedinger equation with the perturbing Hamiltonian describing the photon field is solved for the scattering amplitude for various angles of photon penetration and electron emission, yielding the probability that an electron leaves the system. The procedure is self consistent. Since most photoemission experiments use relatively thick films, the infinite half space is used here. weakest. As a surface-mode is strongly localized in the surface, whereas the bulk-mode is extended throughout the film, the type of plasmon can be determined from the shape of the induced density. This determination may become ambiguous in the vicinity of level crossing, and additional information can be obtained from the asymptotic current, the shape of which does not change, when one follows a particular dispersion. In the second part we use a simple classical approach i...

  16. Simple model for phonon dispersion of nonstoichiometric transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splettstoesser, B.

    1977-09-01

    The simple shell model for the acoustic dispersion curves of ideal and nonstoichiometric Niobium Carbide is presented. The main emphasis is put on a qualitative understanding of the rather sharp dips, observed in some of the branches, and, in particular, their extreme sensitivity to C-vacancies. For comparison the 'normal' acoustic dispersion curves of TiC - which can be described with the same model - and their weak stoichiometry dependence are investigated. For both materials the one phonon cross section of the defect crystal is calculated in various approximations. The obtained phonon shifts and broadenings are small for TiC, but large for NbC in the dip regions - in good agreement with experimental results. Both, the dip structure observed for TaC and the 'normal' acoustic dispersion curves of HfC, ZrC can be described with our model as well. (orig.) [de

  17. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation of Simple Alcohols by Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobse, Leon; Vink, Sebastiaan O; Wijngaarden, Sven; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2017-09-12

    The "exploding" flask demonstration presents a well-known illustration of heterogeneous catalyzed methanol oxidation. We find that for the same vapor pressure, the demonstration also works for all primary and secondary alcohols up to butanol but not for a tertiary alcohol. Also, we show that the demonstration works for a large range of transition metal catalysts. Hence, this demonstration, which is often applied for the repetitive explosions when methanol is used, may also be used to argue the requirement of initial dehydrogenation of the alcohol to an aldehyde in the catalytic reaction mechanism to support the general insensitivity to reactant molecules in heterogeneous catalysis in contrast to biological catalysis and to provide proof for activity trends as often depicted by volcano plots.

  18. Pulsed-Laser-Induced Simple Synthetic Route for Tb3Al5O12:Ce3+Colloidal Nanocrystals and Their Luminescent Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cerium-doped Tb3Al5O12(TAG:Ce3+ colloidal nanocrystals were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA in de-ionized water and lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid betain (LDA aqueous solution for luminescent bio-labeling application. The influence of LDA molecules on the crystallinity, crystal morphology, crystallite size, and luminescent properties of the prepared TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals was investigated in detail. When the LDA solution was used, smaller average crystallite size, narrower size distribution, and enhanced luminescence were observed. These characteristics were explained by the effective role of occupying the oxygen defects on the surface of TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystal because the amphoteric LDA molecules were attached by positively charged TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals. The blue-shifted phenomena found in luminescent spectra of the TAG:Ce3+colloidal nanocrystals could not be explained by previous crystal field theory. We discuss the 5d energy level of Ce3+with decreased crystal size with a phenomenological model that explains the relationship between bond distance with 5d energy level of Ce3+based on the concept of crystal field theory modified by covalency contribution.

  19. Silver enhancement of quantum dots resulting from (1) metabolism of toxic metals in animals and humans, (2) in vivo, in vitro and immersion created zinc-sulphur/zinc-selenium nanocrystals, (3) metal ions liberated from metal implants and particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2006-01-01

    Autometallographic (AMG) silver enhancement is a potent histochemical tool for tracing a variety of metal containing nanocrystals, e.g. pure gold and silver nanoclusters and quantum dots of silver, mercury, bismuth or zinc, with sulphur and/or selenium. These nanocrystals can be created in many different ways, e.g. (1) by manufacturing colloidal gold or silver particles, (2) by treating an organism in vivo with sulphide or selenide ions, (3) as the result of a metabolic decomposition of bismuth-, mercury- or silver-containing macromolecules in cell organelles, or (4) as the end product of histochemical processing of tissue sections. Such nano-sized AMG nanocrystals can then be silver-amplified several times of magnitude by being exposed to an AMG developer, i.e. a normal photographic developer enriched with silver ions. The present monograph attempts to provide a review of the autometallographic silver amplification techniques known today and their use in biology. After achieving a stronghold in histochemistry by Timm's introduction of the "silver-sulphide staining" in 1958, the AMG technique has evolved and expanded into several different areas of research, including immunocytochemistry, tracing of enzymes at LM and EM levels, blot staining, retrograde axonal tracing of zinc-enriched (ZEN) neurons, counterstaining of semithin sections, enhancement of histochemical reaction products, marking of phagocytotic cells, staining of myelin, tracing of gold ions released from gold implants, and visualization of capillaries. General technical comments, protocols for the current AMG methods and a summary of the most significant scientific results obtained by this wide variety of AMG histochemical approaches are included in the present article.

  20. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  1. a Simple Method to Prepare Nanoporous Sn:Pb Composite Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Majid; Amirhoseiny, Maryam; Mosayyebi, Abolghasem

    2015-03-01

    A novel and simple approach for preparing nanoporous binder free Sn:Pb composite metal foam has been demonstrated. The anodized metallic composite block was functionalized and also found a nanoporous structure. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the nanoflake-like arrangement has synthesized. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the nanoporous structure of the Sn/Pb foam after etching with 6 M NaOH. The prepared Sn:Pb metal foam is able to be used as a super capacitors electrode to offer large areal capacitance with regards to the synergic integration of Sn and Pb metals and the unique nanoporous structure.

  2. Removal of zinc by live, dead, and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. isolated from the abandoned-metal mine in South Korea and its perspective of producing nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Shim, Jaehong; You, Youngnam; Choi, Songho; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Kim, Hee Joung; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation is an innovative and alternative technology to remove heavy metal pollutants from aqueous solution using biomass from various microorganisms like algae, fungi and bacteria. In this study biosorption of zinc onto live, dead and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. was investigated as a function of initial zinc(II) concentration, pH, temperature, agitation and inoculum volume. It was observed that dried, dead and live biomass efficiently removed zinc at 60 min at an initial pH of 6.0 ± 0.3. Temperature of 40 deg. C was optimum at agitation speed of 150 or 200 rpm. The initial metal concentration (10-320 mg L -1 ) significantly influenced the biosorption of the fungi. Overall, biosorption was high with 30-60% by dried, live and dead biomass. In addition to this, the potential of Fusarium spp. to produce zinc nanocrystals was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which showed that dead biomass was not significantly involved in production of zinc nanocrystals.

  3. Removal of zinc by live, dead, and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. isolated from the abandoned-metal mine in South Korea and its perspective of producing nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Shim, Jaehong; You, Youngnam; Choi, Songho; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Joung [Institute of Environmental Research, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Taek, E-mail: btoh@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Bioremediation is an innovative and alternative technology to remove heavy metal pollutants from aqueous solution using biomass from various microorganisms like algae, fungi and bacteria. In this study biosorption of zinc onto live, dead and dried biomass of Fusarium spp. was investigated as a function of initial zinc(II) concentration, pH, temperature, agitation and inoculum volume. It was observed that dried, dead and live biomass efficiently removed zinc at 60 min at an initial pH of 6.0 {+-} 0.3. Temperature of 40 deg. C was optimum at agitation speed of 150 or 200 rpm. The initial metal concentration (10-320 mg L{sup -1}) significantly influenced the biosorption of the fungi. Overall, biosorption was high with 30-60% by dried, live and dead biomass. In addition to this, the potential of Fusarium spp. to produce zinc nanocrystals was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which showed that dead biomass was not significantly involved in production of zinc nanocrystals.

  4. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the scientific literature colloidal nanocrystals are presented as promising materials for multiple applications, in areas covering optoelectronics, photovoltaics, spintronics, catalysis, and bio-medicine. On the marked are, however, only a very limited number of examples found, indeed implementing colloidal nanocrystals. Thus the scope of this thesis was to modify nanocrystals and to tune their properties to fulfill specific demands. While some modifications could be achieved by post synthetic treatments, one key problem of colloidal nanocrystals, hampering there widespread application is the toxicity of their constituents. To develop nanocrystals from non-toxic materials has been a major goal of this thesis as well. Roughly, the results in this thesis could be subdivided into three parts: (i) the development of ion exchange methods to tailor the properties of metallic and metal-oxide based nanocrystal heterostructures, (ii), the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals from non-toxic materials, and (iii) the characterization of the nanocrystals by measurements of their morphology, chemical composition, magnetic-, optical-, and electronic properties. In detail, the thesis is subdivided into an introductory chapter, 4 chapters reporting on scientific results, a chapter reporting the used methods, and the conclusions. The 4 chapters devoted to the scientific results correspond to manuscripts, which are either currently in preparation, or have been published in highly ranked scientific journals such as NanoLetters (chapter 2), ACS Nano (chapter 4), or JACS (chapter 5). Thus, these chapters provide also an extra introduction and conclusion section, as well as separate reference lists. Chapter 2 describes a cation exchange process which is used to tune and improve the magnetic properties of different iron-oxide based colloidal nanocrystal-heterostructures. The superparamagnetic blocking temperature, magnetic remanence, and coercivity is tuned by replacing Fe2+ by Co2

  5. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, Alina M.; Campelo, Juan M.; Luque, Rafael; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Romero, Antonio A.

    2010-01-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  6. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  8. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  9. The spin lattice relaxation of {sup 8}Li in simple metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, M.D.; Saadaoui, H. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Song, Q.; Wang, D.; Smadella, M. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chow, K.H.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Kiefl, R.F. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Canadian Institute of Advanced Research (Canada); Kreitzman, S.R.; Levy, C.D.P.; Morris, G.D.; Pearson, M.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Salman, Z. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); MacFarlane, W.A., E-mail: wam@chem.ubc.c [Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    We report the modification to the linear temperature dependence of the Korringa nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate of an implanted NMR probe in silver, as it makes a thermally activated site change. We develop a simple model of this phenomenon, which is found in a number of metals including Au and Nb.

  10. Infrared studies of astronomically relevant metallic clusters and their interactions with simple molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis aims at: a) providing fundamental knowledge on the interactions of simple ligands with metal clusters relevant to astronomical and (bio-) catalytical processes, b) providing a benchmark that can be used to test current and future DFT methods developed to study these

  11. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    as the active sites, respectively, to produce acrolein, propylene oxide, and CO2. Ceria rods enclosed with the {110} and {100} crystal planes, ceria cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, and ceria octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent oxygen vacancy concentrations and structures that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Consequently, the metal-ceria interactions, structures, and catalytic performances of ceria-supported catalysts depend on the CeO2 morphology. Our results comprehensively reveal the morphology-dependent surface chemistry and catalysis of oxide nanocrystals that not only greatly deepen the fundamental understanding of oxide catalysis but also demonstrate a morphology-engineering strategy to optimize the catalytic performance of oxide catalysts. These results adequately exemplify the concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts for the fundamental investigations of oxide catalysis without the "materials gap" and "pressure gap". With the structure-catalytic property relationships learned from oxide nanocrystal model catalyst studies and the advancement of controlled-synthesis methods, it is promising to realize the structural design and controlled synthesis of novel efficient oxide catalysts in the future.

  12. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  13. Thermophysical properties of simple liquid metals: A brief review of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review the current theory of the thermophysical properties of simple liquid metals. The emphasis is on thermodynamic properties, but we also briefly discuss the nonequilibrium properties of liquid metals. We begin by defining a 'simple liquid metal' as one in which the valence electrons interact only weakly with the ionic cores, so that the interaction can be treated by perturbation theory. We then write down the equilibrium Hamiltonian of a liquid metal as a sum of five terms: the bare ion-ion interaction, the electron-electron interaction, the bare electron-ion interaction, and the kinetic energies of electrons and ions. Since the electron-ion interaction can be treated by perturbation, the electronic part contributes in two ways to the Helmholtz free energy: it gives a density-dependent term which is independent of the arrangement of ions, and it acts to screen the ion-ion interaction, giving rise to effective ion-ion pair potentials which are density-dependent, in general. After sketching the form of a typical pair potential, we briefly enumerate some methods for calculating the ionic distribution function and hence the Helmholtz free energy of the liquid: monte Carlo simulations, molecular dynamics simulations, and thermodynamic perturbation theory. The final result is a general expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the liquid metal. It can be used to calculate a wide range of thermodynamic properties of simple metal liquids, which we enumerate. They include not only a range of thermodynamic coefficients of both metals and alloys, but also many aspects of the phase diagram, including freezing curves of pure elements and phase diagrams of liquid alloys (including liquidus and solidus curves). We briefly mention some key discoveries resulting from previous applications of this method, and point out that the same methods work for other materials not normally considered to be liquid metals (such as colloidal suspensions, in which the

  14. Simple metal model for predicting uptake and chemical processes in sewage-fed aquaculture ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azanu, David; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Darko, Godfred

    2016-01-01

    % was the best, which is also in accordance to the fish growth. The ratio of fish food was also calibrated to be 70% due to a food chain in the water and 30% due to a food chain in the sediment. This gave the lowest uncertainty of the model. The simple metal model was working acceptably well for Pb, Cu and Cd...... regression with an R2 value of 0.9 indicating that a good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental measurements. The finding suggests that the simple metal model is an accurate and useful for predicting uptake and chemical processes in ecosystem.......This paper shows how a model can be used as an experimental tool to assess the processes in aqua chemistry that should be included in the model. The STELLA software was used to study the uptake of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu and Hg from sewage-fed aquaculture. Model calibration revealed that feeding rate of 15...

  15. Calculated distortions induced by metal-ion binding to simple oligonucleotide systems: Implications for toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.E.; Hingerty, B.E.; England, M.W.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously published detailed results of calculations of the binding of the metal ions, Cd{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, to the dinucleoside monophosphate GpC in water. These ions, which have the same charge and radius, differ enormously in their toxicity to man and other biological systems. Our calculations showed contrasting behavior in the binding of these two metal ions to GpC. We suggest the hypothesis that structural distortions calculated for metal ions binding to simple nucleic-acid systems might serve as a indicator of an ion's potential ability to alter molecular activity and hence to be toxic to an organism. Furthermore, the degree of distortion might be correlated with the degree of toxicity as measured by some suitable criteria. The present paper reports the results of binding calculations for a number of other metal ions, of different valence states, with several dinucleoside monophosphates in water. A general trend of distortion with the type of binding of the metal ions is found. We are seeking quantitative measures of distortion to correlate with indicators of acute toxicity that we have measured for 24 metal ions using mice, Drosophila, and CHO cells. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  16. A simple model for radial expansion reactivity in LMRs [liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Presented in this report is a simple analytical model developed for evaluating the radial expansion reactivity in small modular liquid metal reactors (LMRs). The present model is based on a non-leakage representation of the effective neutron multiplication factor. The resultant analytical expression for the radial expansion reactivity is simple and can be used directly in a system code for safety analyses. Applications of the present model to PRISM and SAFR resulted in a good agreement with the values reported by vendors. This agreement establishes that the large negative reactivity insertion resulting from LMR core radial expansion can be confirmed using a simple analytical approach, and thus is important in the current effort to evaluate the reactor inherent feedbacks for the PRISM and SAFR designs

  17. Pseudoclassical approach to electron and ion density correlations in simple liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vericat, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Pastore, G.

    1986-04-01

    Electron-electron and electron-ion structural correlations in simple liquid metals are treated by using effective pair potentials to incorporate quantal effects into a pseudoclassical description of the electron fluid. An effective pair potential between simultaneous electron density fluctuations is first constructed from known properties of the degenerate jellium model, which are the plasmon sum rule, the Kimball-Niklasson relation and Yasuhara's values of the electron pair distribution function at contact. An analytic expression is thereby obtained in the Debye-Hueckel approximation for the electronic structure factor in jellium over a range of density appropriate to metals, with results which compare favourably with those of fully quantal evaluations. A simple pseudoclassical model is then set up for a liquid metal: this involves a model of charged hard spheres for the ion-ion potential and an empty core model for the electron-ion potential, the Coulombic tails being scaled as required by the relation between the long-wavelength partial structure factors and the isothermal compressibility of the metal. The model is solved analytically by a pseudoclassical linear response treatment of the electron-ion coupling and numerical results are reported for partial structure factors in liquid sodium and liquid beryllium. Contact is made for the latter system with data on the electron-electron structure factor in the crystal from inelastic X-ray scattering experiments of Eisenberger, Marra and Brown. (author)

  18. Shaping Gold Nanocrystals in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Toward Trapezohedral and Bipyramidal Nanocrystals Enclosed by {311} Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenxin; Duan, Yukun; Qing, Zikun; Huang, Hejin; Lu, Xianmao

    2017-04-26

    The remarkable synthetically tunable structural, electronic, and optical properties of gold nanocrystals have attracted increasing interest and enabled multidisciplinary applications. Over the past decades, nearly all the possible fundamental shapes of faceted Au nanocrystals have been synthesized, except for only one missing-the trapezohedron enclosed by {hkk} facets. In this report, the unprecedented synthesis of trapezohedral Au nanocrystals with {311} crystal facets was realized. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was discovered as a solvent for shaping Au nanocrystals with {311} crystal facets for the first time. Mechanistic studies, together with previous DFT and STM studies, attribute the unique role of DMSO to its ambidentate nature, where both sulfur and oxygen of DMSO can coordinate to gold surface, endowing its unique role in stabilizing high-index {311} facets through a "two center bonding" mode. The DMSO-based synthesis provides a new synthetic tool toward the synthesis of a series of unreported Au nanocrystals with new structures. In particular, a new type of gold bipyramids, the octagonal bipyramids, was first synthesized with additional plasmonic tunability while simultaneously retaining their {311} facets. The application of these new Au nanocrystals in surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy was investigated, and their shape-dependent performances were demonstrated. These results highlight the tremendous potential of using ambidentate molecules as shape- and surface-directing agents for metal nanocrystals and offer the promise of enabling new synthetic tools toward atomically precise control of surface structures of metal nanocrystals.

  19. Single-ion and pair-interaction potentials near simple metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.N.; Barrera, R.G.; Cleveland, C.L.; Landman, U.

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a model for semi-infinite simple metals which does not require crystalline order or a single species, and thus is applicable to problems of defect energetics near the surface and random-alloy surfaces as well as ideal metal surfaces. The formulation is based on the use of ionic pseudopotentials and linear-response theory. An expression for the total energy is obtained which depends explicitly on ionic species and position. This expression is decomposed into a density-dependent term and single-ion and ionic pair-interaction potential terms. The single-ion potentials oscillate about a constant bulk value, with the magnitude of the oscillation decreasing rapidly away from the surface. The interaction between pairs of ions near the surface is shown to be a noncentral force interaction which differs significantly from the central-force bulk pair potential. The effect of quantum interference in the response of the semi-infinite electron gas to the ions is seen in both the single-ion and the pair-interaction potentials. Results are presented for the simple metals sodium, potassium, and rubidium

  20. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  1. On Phonons in Simple Metals II. Calculated Dispersion Curves In Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Westin, A. [Dept. of Theore tical Physics, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1969-07-15

    The real part of the dynamical matrix, derived earlier in a weak local potential ion-electron interaction model of the metal, is investigated in the case of aluminium. It is shown that the free electron, or Lindhard, dielectric function leads to a picture of the metal which is inconsistent with the dHvA observations of the Fermi surface. By adjusting one parameter, however, the experimental phonon frequencies are reproduced satisfactorily. Even some simple structure in the derivative d{omega}/dq can be reproduced in this way. Although corrections to the Lindhard dielectric matrix give no essential contributions to the dynamical matrix, the first order corrections, which are the most important, can explain the observed Fermi surface. Much of the observed structure in the phonon dispersion curves seems also to be due to these non-diagonal terms in the dielectric matrix.

  2. Silver(I)-directed growth of metal-organic complex nanocrystals with bidentate ligands of hydroquinine anthraquinone-1,4-diyl diethers as linkers at the water-chloroform interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Wang, Hui-Ting; Chen, Meng; Qian, Dong-Jin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2014-09-01

    Immiscible liquid-liquid interfaces provide unique double phase regions for the design and construction of nanoscale materials. Here, we reported Ag(I)-directed growth of metal-organic complex nanocrystals by using AgNO3 as a connector in the aqueous solution and bidentate ligand of 1,4-bis(9-O-dihydroquininyl)anthraquinone [(DHQ)2AQN] and its enantiomer of (DHQD)2AQN in the chloroform solutions as linkers. The Ag-(DHQ)2AQN and Ag-(DHQD)2AQN complex nanocrystals were formed at the liquid-liquid interfaces and characterized by using UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as by using scanning electron microscopy. Screw-like nanocrystals were formed at the initial 30 min after the interfacial coordination reaction started, then they grew into nanorods after several days, and finally became cubic microcrystals after 2 weeks. The pure ligand showed two emission bands centered at about 363 and 522 nm in the methanol solution, the second one of which was quenched and shifted to about 470 nm in the Ag-complex nanocrystals. Two couples of reversible redox waves were recorded for the Ag-complex nanocrystals; one centered at about -0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was designated to one electron transfer process of Ag - (DHQ)2AQN and Ag - (DHQ)2AQN+, and the other one centered at about 0.2 V was designated to one electron transfer process of Ag - (DHQ)2AQN and Ag+ - (DHQ)2AQN.

  3. General synthesis of noble metal (Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) nanocrystal modified MoS2 nanosheets and the enhanced catalytic activity of Pd-MoS2 for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Lihui; Xu, Fei; Xue, Bing; Luo, Zhimin; Zhang, Qi; Bao, Biqing; Su, Shao; Weng, Lixing; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lianhui

    2014-05-01

    A general and facile method for water-dispersed noble metal (Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) nanocrystal modified MoS2 nanosheets (NM-MoS2 NSs) has been developed. By using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as a stabilizer, well-dispersed NM-MoS2 NSs with homogeneously deposited noble metal nanocrystals (NM NCs) can be synthesized in aqueous solutions. Due to the transition from the semiconducting 2H phase to the metallic 1T phase, the chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) NSs have improved electrochemical activity. The partially metallic nature of the ce-MoS2 NSs and the catalytic activity of the NM NCs synergistically make NM-MoS2 NSs a potential electrochemical catalyst. For the first time, Pd-MoS2 NSs were used as an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline media. The results showed that Pd-MoS2 NSs have enhanced catalytic activity with 2.8-fold anodic peak current mass density compared to a commercial Pd/C catalyst, suggesting potential for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).A general and facile method for water-dispersed noble metal (Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) nanocrystal modified MoS2 nanosheets (NM-MoS2 NSs) has been developed. By using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as a stabilizer, well-dispersed NM-MoS2 NSs with homogeneously deposited noble metal nanocrystals (NM NCs) can be synthesized in aqueous solutions. Due to the transition from the semiconducting 2H phase to the metallic 1T phase, the chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) NSs have improved electrochemical activity. The partially metallic nature of the ce-MoS2 NSs and the catalytic activity of the NM NCs synergistically make NM-MoS2 NSs a potential electrochemical catalyst. For the first time, Pd-MoS2 NSs were used as an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline media. The results showed that Pd-MoS2 NSs have enhanced catalytic activity with 2.8-fold anodic peak current mass density compared to a commercial Pd/C catalyst, suggesting potential for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs

  4. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Samuel R. [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Ruberu, T. Purnima A. [Ames Laboratory; Tavasoli, Elham [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  5. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  6. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-04-07

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: Synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-03-01

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals.

  8. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  9. Influence of Nano-Crystal Metals on Texture and Biological Properties of Water Soluble Polysaccharides of Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilov, G.; Ivanycheva, J.; Kiryshin, V.

    2015-11-01

    When treating the plants seeds with nano-materials there are some quality and quantity changes of polysaccharides, the molecular mass increase and monosaccharides change that leads to the increase of physiological and pharmacological activity of carbohydrates got from medicinal plants. We have got water soluble polysaccharides and nano-metals combinations containing 0.000165-0.000017 mg/dm3 of the metal. In a case of induced anemia the blood composition has practically restored on the 10th day of the treatment with nanocomposites. The use of pectin polysaccharides (that are attributed to modifiers of biological respond) to get nano-structured materials seems to be actual relative to their physiological activity (radio nuclides persorption, heavy metals ions, bacteria cells and their toxins; lipids metabolism normalization; bowels secreting and motor functions activation and modulation of the endocrine system.

  10. A simple scheme to determine potential aquatic metal toxicity from mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, T.R.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A decision tree (mining waste decision tree) that uses simple physical and chemical tests has been developed to determine whether effluent from mine waste material poses a potential toxicity threat to the aquatic environment. For the chemical portion of the tree, leaching tests developed by the United States Geological Survey, the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (Denver, CO), and a modified 1311 toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test of the United States Environmental Protection Agency have been extensively used as a surrogate for readily available metals that can be released into the environment from mining wastes. To assist in the assessment, element concentration pattern graphs (ECPG) are produced that compare concentrations of selected groups of elements from the three leachates and any water associated with the mining waste. The MWDT makes a distinction between leachates or waters with pH less than or greater than 5. Generally, when the pH values are below 5, the ECPG of the solutions are quite similar, and potential aquatic toxicity from cationic metals, such as Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Al, is assumed. Below pH 5, these metals are mostly dissolved, generally are not complexed with organic or inorganic ligands, and hence are more bioavailable. Furthermore, there is virtually no carbonate alkalinity at pH less than 5. All of these factors promote metal toxicity to aquatic organisms. On the other hand, when the pH value of the water or the leachates is above 5, the ECPG from the solutions are variable, and inferred aquatic toxicity depends on factors in addition to the metals released from the leaching tests. Hence, leachates and waters with pH above 5 warrant further examination of their chemical composition. Physical ranking criteria provide additional information, particularly in areas where waste piles exhibit similar chemical rankings. Rankings from physical and chemical criteria generally are not correlated. Examples of how this

  11. Simple preparation of aminothiourea-modified chitosan as corrosion inhibitor and heavy metal ion adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manlin; Xu, Juan; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Dongen; Li, Tianbao; Yuan, Maosen; Wang, Jinyi

    2014-03-01

    By a simple and convenient method of using formaldehyde as linkages, two new chitosan (CS) derivatives modified respectively with thiosemicarbazide (TSFCS) and thiocarbohydrazide (TCFCS) were synthesized. The new compounds were characterized and studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermal gravity analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, and their surface morphologies were determined via scanning electron microscopy. These CS derivatives could form pH dependent gels. The behavior of 304 steel in 2% acetic acid containing different inhibitors or different concentrations of inhibitor had been studied by potentiodynamic polarization test. The preliminary results show that the new compound TCFCS can act as a mixed-type metal anticorrosion inhibitor in some extent; its inhibition efficiency is 92% when the concentration was 60 mg/L. The adsorption studies on a metal ion mixture aqueous solution show that two samples TSFCS and TCFCS can absorb As (V), Ni (II), Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) efficiently at pH 9 and 4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How simple is too simple? Computational perspective on importance of second-shell environment for metal-ion selectivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gutten, Ondrej; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 22 (2015), s. 14393-14404 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : metal-ion selectivity * metallopeptide * stability constants * theoretical calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c4cp04876h

  13. One-pot synthesis of CuInS2 nanocrystals using different anions to engineer their morphology and crystal phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Aiwei; Hu, Zunlan; Yin, Zhe; Ye, Haihang; Yang, Chunhe; Teng, Feng

    2015-05-21

    A simple one-pot colloidal method has been described to engineer ternary CuInS2 nanocrystals with different crystal phases and morphologies, in which dodecanethiol is chosen as the sulfur source and the capping ligands. By a careful choice of the anions in the metal precursors and manipulation of the reaction conditions including the reactant molar ratios and the reaction temperature, CuInS2 nanocrystals with chalcopyrite, zincblende and wurtzite phases have been successfully synthesized. The type of anion in the metal precursors has been found to be essential for determining the crystal phase and morphology of the as-obtained CuInS2 nanocrystals. In particular, the presence of Cl(-) ions plays an important role in the formation of CuInS2 nanoplates with a wurtzite-zincblende polytypism structure. In addition, the molar ratios of Cu to In precursors have a significant effect on the crystal phase and morphology, and the intermediate Cu2S-CuInS2 heteronanostructures are formed which are critical for the anisotropic growth of CuInS2 nanocrystals. Furthermore, the optical absorption results of the as-obtained CuInS2 nanocrystals exhibit a strong dependence on the crystal phase and size.

  14. Zinc oxide tetrapod nanocrystal diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Marcus Christian

    Advances in fabrication and analysis tools have allowed the synthesis and manipulation of functional materials with features comparable to fundamental physical length scales. Many interesting properties inherently due to quantum size effects have been observed in nanometre scale structures. It is hoped that these nanoscale structures will play a key role in future materials and devices that exploit their unique properties. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band-gap transparent and piezoelectric semiconductor material. It also has a large exciton binding energy which allows for stable ultraviolet light emission at room temperature. There are therefore foreseeable applications in optoelectronic devices which include ultraviolet photosensitive devices and light emitting diodes. Nanoscale structures formed from ZnO are interesting as they possess many of the properties inherent form the bulk but are also subject to various quantum size effects that may occur at the nanoscale. To date, the study of ZnO nanostructures is a relatively recent endeavour with the vast majority of reports being made within the last five years. ZnO is unique in that it forms a family of nanoscale structures. These structures include nanoscale wires, rods, hexagons, tetrapods, ribbons, rings, flowers and helixes. This work is focussed on the study of zinc oxide tetrapod crystalline nanoscale structures and their devices. We have synthesised ZnO tetrapods using chemical vapour transport techniques. Photoluminescence characterisation revealed the presence of optically active surface defects that could be quenched with a simple surface treatment. We have also for the first time observed resonant cavity modes in a single ZnO tetrapod nanocrystal. An ultraviolet sensitive Schottky diode was fabricated from a single ZnO tetrapod using focussed ion-beam assisted deposition techniques. The device characteristics observed were modelled and successfully shown to result from an illumination induced reduction in

  15. A simple solution-phase approach to synthesize high quality ternary AgInSe2 and band gap tunable quaternary AgIn(S1-xSe x)2 nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Tianyu

    2014-01-01

    A facile solution-phase route for the preparation of AgInSe2 nanocrystals was developed by using silver nitrate, indium stearate, and oleylamine-selenium (OAm-Se) as precursors. The evolution process of the AgInSe2 nanocrystals is discussed in detail and different reaction conditions all have a great impact on the growth and morphology of the nanocrystals. Alloyed AgIn(S1-xSex)2 nanocrystals with controlled composition across the entire range (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was also successfully prepared by modulating the S/Se reactant mole ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to confirm that the alloyed AgIn(S1-xSex)2 nanocrystals are homogeneous. The UV-vis absorption spectra revealed that the band gap energies of the alloyed AgIn(S1-xSex)2 nanocrystals could be continuously tuned by increasing the Se content. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  16. Manipulating the kinetics of seeded growth for edge-selective metal deposition and the formation of concave au nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Moitree; Zhong, Xiaolan; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2013-10-01

    By manipulating the kinetics of seeded growth through judicious control of reaction conditions, edge-selective metal deposition can be achieved to synthesize new Au nanostructures with face-centered concavities, referred to herein as Au overgrown trisoctahedra. These nanostructures display higher sensitivity to changes in refractive index compared to both Au traditional trisoctahedra and the Au nanocube seeds from which they are grown. Often, concave nanostructures are achieved by selective etching processes or corner-selective overgrowth and adopt a stellated profile rather than a profile with face-centered concavities. The presented results illustrate another strategy toward concave nanostructures and can facilitate the synthesis of new concave nanostructures for applications in catalysis and chemical sensing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interactions and Assemblies of Polymeric Materials and Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Teresa Elaine

    Our need to reduce global energy use is well known and without question, not just from an economic standpoint but also to decrease human impact on climate change. Emerging advances in this area result from the ability to tailor-make materials and energy-saving devices using solution-phase chemistry and deposition techniques. Colloidally synthesized nanocrystals, with their tunable size, shape, and composition, and unusual optical and electronic properties, are leading candidates in these efforts. Because of recent advances in colloidal chemistries, the inventory of monodisperse nanocrystals has expanded to now include metals, semiconductors, magnetic materials, and dielectric materials. For a variety of applications, an active layer composed of a thin film of randomly close-packed nanocrystals is not ideal for optimized device performance; here, the ability to arrange these nano building units into mesoporous (2 nm design rules that govern the interactions between ligand-stripped nanocrystals and polymeric materials, leading to their hierarchical assembly into colloidal nanocrystal frameworks. I also include the development of quantitative, and novel, characterization techniques, and the application of such frameworks in energy efficiency devices such as electrochromic windows. Understanding the local environment of nanocrystal surfaces and their interaction with surrounding media is vital to their controlled assembly into higher-order structures. Though work has continued in this field for over a decade, researchers have yet to provide a simple and straightforward procedure to scale across nanoscale material systems and applications allowing for synthetic and structural tunability and quantitative characterization. In this dissertation, I have synthesized a new class of amphiphilic block copolymer architecture-directing agents based upon poly(dimethylacrylamide)-b-poly( styrene) (PDMA-b-PS), which are strategically designed to enhance the interaction between the

  18. Low Cost Metal Carbide Nanocrystals as Binding and Electrocatalytic Sites for High Performance Li-S Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Li, Zheng; Luo, Xuan; Wu, Tong; Jiang, Bin; Lu, Lei-Lei; Yao, Hong-Bin; Antonietti, Markus; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-02-14

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries are considered as promising energy storage systems for the next generation of batteries due to their high theoretical energy densities and low cost. Much effort has been made to improve the practical energy densities and cycling stability of Li-S batteries via diverse designs of materials nanostructure. However, achieving simultaneously good rate capabilities and stable cycling of Li-S batteries is still challenging. Herein, we propose a strategy to utilize a dual effect of metal carbide nanoparticles decorated on carbon nanofibers (MC NPs-CNFs) to realize high rate performance, low hysteresis, and long cycling stability of Li-S batteries in one system. The adsorption experiments of lithium polysulfides (LiPS) to MC NPs and corresponding theoretical calculations demonstrate that LiPS are likely to be adsorbed and diffused on the surface of MC NPs because of their moderate chemical bonding. MC NPs turn out to have also an electrocatalytic role and accelerate electrochemical redox reactions of LiPS, as proven by cyclic voltammetry analysis. The fabricated Li-S batteries based on the W 2 C NPs-CNFs hybrid electrodes display not only high specific capacity of 1200 mAh/g at 0.2C but also excellent rate performance and cycling stability, for example, a model setup can be operated at 1C for 500 cycles maintaining a final specific capacity of 605 mAh/g with a degradation rate as low as 0.06%/cycle.

  19. Linearized self-consistent quasiparticle GW method: Application to semiconductors and simple metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutepov, A. L.; Oudovenko, V. S.; Kotliar, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present a code implementing the linearized quasiparticle self-consistent GW method (LQSGW) in the LAPW basis. Our approach is based on the linearization of the self-energy around zero frequency which differs it from the existing implementations of the QSGW method. The linearization allows us to use Matsubara frequencies instead of working on the real axis. This results in efficiency gains by switching to the imaginary time representation in the same way as in the space time method. The all electron LAPW basis set eliminates the need for pseudopotentials. We discuss the advantages of our approach, such as its N3 scaling with the system size N, as well as its shortcomings. We apply our approach to study the electronic properties of selected semiconductors, insulators, and simple metals and show that our code produces the results very close to the previously published QSGW data. Our implementation is a good platform for further many body diagrammatic resummations such as the vertex-corrected GW approach and the GW+DMFT method. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/cpchkfty4w.1 Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License Programming language: Fortran 90 External routines/libraries: BLAS, LAPACK, MPI (optional) Nature of problem: Direct implementation of the GW method scales as N4 with the system size, which quickly becomes prohibitively time consuming even in the modern computers. Solution method: We implemented the GW approach using a method that switches between real space and momentum space representations. Some operations are faster in real space, whereas others are more computationally efficient in the reciprocal space. This makes our approach scale as N3. Restrictions: The limiting factor is usually the memory available in a computer. Using 10 GB/core of memory allows us to study the systems up to 15 atoms per unit cell.

  20. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)

  1. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  2. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-16

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  3. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  4. Steroid nanocrystals prepared using the nano spray dryer B-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2013-01-25

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. In this study, the preparation of steroid nanocrystals using the Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle size was controlled by selecting the mesh aperture size. Submicrometer steroid particles in powder form were successfully obtained. These nanoparticles were confirmed to have a crystal structure using powder X-ray diffraction pattern analysis. Since drug nanocrystals have recently been considered as a novel type of drug formulation for drug delivery systems, this study will be useful for nano-medical applications.

  5. Diorganyl dichalcogenides as useful synthons for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutchey, Richard L

    2015-11-17

    The ability to synthesize colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in a well-controlled manner (i.e., with fine control over size, shape, size dispersion, and composition) has been mastered over the past 15 years. Much of this success stems from careful studies of precursor conversion and nanocrystal growth with respect to phosphine chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. Despite the high level of success that has been achieved with phosphine chalcogenides, there has been a longstanding interest in exploring alternate chalcogenide precursors because of issues associated with phosphine chalcogenide cost, purity, toxicity, etc. This has resulted in a large body of literature on the use of sulfur and selenium dissolved in octadecene or amines, thio- and selenoureas, and silyl chalcogenides as alternate chalcogenide precursors for metal chalcogenide nanocrystal synthesis. In this Account, emerging work on the use of diorganyl dichalcogenides (R-E-E-R, where E = S, Se, or Te and R = alkyl, allyl, benzyl, or aryl) as alternate chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is summarized. Among the benefits of these dichalcogenide synthons are the following: (i) they represent the first and only common precursor type that can function as chalcogen transfer reagents for each of the group VI elements (i.e., to make metal oxide, metal sulfide, metal selenide, and metal telluride nanocrystals); (ii) they possess relatively weak E-E bonds that can be readily cleaved under mild thermolytic or photolytic conditions; and (iii) the organic substituents can be tuned to affect the reactivity. These combined attributes have allowed dichalcogenide precursors to be employed for a wide range of metal chalcogenide nanocrystal syntheses, including those for In2S3, SnxGe1-xSe, SnTe, Cu2-xSySe1-y, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, MoSe2, WSe2, BiSe, and CuFeS2. Interestingly, a number of metastable phases of compositionally complex

  6. Galvanic Displacement of Gallium Arsenide Surface: A Simple and Low-Cost Method to Deposit Metal Nanoparticles and Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Duy Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report galvanic displacement of metal nanoparticles and films onto single-crystalline GaAs (100 substrates, a simple and cost-effective method to fabricate highly controlled metal/semiconductor interface. A time-resolved surface analysis of Au/GaAs system was conducted and microscopic mechanism of galvanic displacement was elucidated in detail. Quantitative temporal XPS measurements of the Au/GaAs interface showed that, initially, fast Au growth was slowed down as the deposition process proceeded. This was attributed to growing oxide layer blocking hole conduction and causing quenching of the deposition process. Addition of various inorganic acids, which function as oxide etchants, was found to enhance deposition rates by effectively removing surface oxide, with HF the most effective. Various precious metals, such as Pt and Ag, could be deposited onto GaAs through galvanic displacement, which demonstrates the versatility of the method.

  7. Atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering of platinum-gold alloy nanocrystals with high electrocatalytic performance for the formic acid oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Min; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Min; Zhai, Ya-Nan; Hu, Man-Cheng; Chen, Yu

    2018-03-15

    Bimetallic noble metal nanocrystals have been widely applied in many fields, which generally are synthesized by the wet-chemistry reduction method. This work presents a purposely designed atoms diffusion induced phase engineering of PtAu alloy nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (PtAu-on-Au nanostructures) through simple hydrothermal treatment. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of component and structure, PtAu-on-Au nanostructures remarkably enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and thus exhibit much higher FAOR activity and durability compared with Pt nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (Pt-on-Au nanostructures) and commercial Pd black due to an excellent stability of platy Au substrate and a high oxidation resistance of PtAu alloy nanocrystals. The atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering demonstrated in this work builds a bridge between the traditional metallurgy and modern nanotechnologies, which also provides some useful insights in developing noble metals based alloyed nanostructures for the energy and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ternary Silver Halide Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyweera, Sasitha C; Rasamani, Kowsalya D; Sun, Yugang

    2017-07-18

    Nanocrystalline silver halides (AgX) such as AgCl, AgBr, and AgI, a class of semiconductor materials with characteristics of both direct and indirect band gaps, represent the most crucial components in traditional photographic processing. The nanocrystal surfaces provide sensitivity specks that can turn into metallic silver, forming an invisible latent image, upon exposure to light. The photographic processing implies that the AgX nanoparticles possess unique properties. First, pristine AgX nanoparticles absorb light only at low efficiency to convert surface AgX into tiny clusters of silver atoms. Second, AgX nanoparticles represent an excellent class of materials to capture electrons efficiently. Third, small metallic silver clusters can catalyze the reduction of AgX nanoparticles to Ag nanoparticles in the presence of mild reducing reagents, known as self-catalytic reduction. These properties indicate that AgX nanoparticles can be partially converted to metallic silver with high precision, leading to the formation of hybrid AgX/Ag nanoparticles. The nanosized metallic Ag usually exhibit intense absorption bands in the visible spectral region due to their strong surface plasmon resonances, which make the AgX/Ag nanoparticles a class of promising visible-light-driven photocatalysts for environmental remediation and CO 2 reduction. Despite the less attention paid to their ability of capturing electrons, AgX nanoparticles might be a class of ideal electron shuttle materials to bridge light absorbers and catalysts on which electrons can drive chemical transformations. In this Account, we focus on ternary silver halide alloy (TSHA) nanoparticles, containing two types of halide ions, which increase the composition complexity of the silver halide nanoparticles. Interdiffusion of halide ions between two types of AgX at elevated temperatures has been developed for fabricating ternary silver halide alloy crystals, such as silver chlorobromide optical fibers for infrared

  9. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pattern, reflecting a corresponding peak in the pair distribution function at the characteristic typical nearest-neighbour interatomic distance. Therefore, it is rea- sonable to expect a compacted powder sample of nanocrystals to exhibit a peak in the XRD pattern at the appropriate angle corresponding to the typical nearest-.

  10. Simple and fast fabrication of superhydrophobic metal wire mesh for efficiently gravity-driven oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Botao

    2016-12-15

    Superhydrophobic metal wire mesh (SMWM) has frequently been applied for the selective and efficient separation of oil/water mixture due to its porous structure and special wettability. However, current methods for the modification of metal wire mesh to be superhydrophobic suffered from problems with respect to complex experimental procedures or time-consuming process. In this study, a very simple, time-saving and single-step electrospray method was proposed to fabricate SMWM and the whole procedure required about only 2min. The morphology, surface composition and wettability of the SMWM were all evaluated, and the oil/water separation ability was further investigated. In addition, a commercial available sponge covered with SMWM was fabricated as an oil adsorbent for the purpose of oil recovery. This study demonstrated a convenient and fast method to modify the metal wire mesh to be superhydrophobic and such simple method might find practical applications in the large-scale removal of oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simple Attenauation Models of Metallic Cables Suitable for G.fast Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lafata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new xDSL successor called G.fast, which can occupy frequencies up to 106 or 212~MHz, has been introduced in ITU-T G.9700 series of recommendations. Moreover, a new model of transmission characteristics suitable for various types of metallic cables has been designed and described as well. The model is based on 9 parameters specified for each type of metallic cable and can provide accurate estimations. However, its complexity together with the number of required parameters makes its practical application questionable, since the most important metallic cable characteristic, the attenuation, can be estimated using much simpler models. Therefore, two innovative attenuation models suitable for frequencies up to 250 MHz were designed and they will be introduced in this paper. The main motivation was to achieve an accurate approximation of attenuation character for various types of metallic cables, while maintaining low mathematical complexity and a number of necessary parameters. Both models were compared with attenuation characteristics measured for variety types of real metallic cables and also with other standard attenuation models. The results are included in this article as well.

  12. The use of molecular dynamics for the thermodynamic properties of simple and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1987-04-01

    The technique of computer simulation of the molecular dynamics in metallic systems to calculate thermodynamic properties is discussed. The nature of a metal as determined by its electronic structure is used to determine the total adiabatic potential. The effective screened ion-ion interaction can then be used in a molecular dynamics simulation. The method for the construction of a molecular dynamics ensemble, its relation to the canonical ensemble, and the definition of thermodynamic functions from the Helmholtz free energy is given. The method for the analysis of the molecular dynamics results from quasiharmonic lattice dynamics and the decomposition in terms of harmonic and anharmonic contributions is given for solids. For fluid phase metals, procedures for calculating the thermodynamics and determining the constant of entropy are presented. The solid-fluid phase boundary as a function of pressure and temperature is determined using the results of molecular dynamics. Throughout, examples and results for metallic sodium are used. The treatment of the transition metal electronic d-states in terms of an effective pair-wise interaction is also discussed and the phonon dispersion curves of Al, Ni, and Cu are calculated

  13. Simple mass transport model for metal uptake by marine macroalgae growing at different rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Although algae growing at different rates may exhibit different concentrations of a given metal, such differences in algal chemistry may or may not reflect actual effects of environmental growth factors on the kinetics of metal uptake. Published data on uptake of rubidium, cadmium, and manganese by the green seaweed Ulva fasciata Delile grown at different rates in open system sea water was interpreted using the model. Differences in exposure time to sea water of relatively old and relatively young thalli were responsible for significant decreases in algal rubidium and cadmium concentrations with increases in specific growth rate. The biomass-specific growth rates of uptake of these two metals did not vary with growth rate. Both algal concentrations and specific rates of uptake of manganese increase significantly with increasing growth rate, thus indicating a distinct link between the kinetics of manganese uptake and metabolic rate. Under some circumstances, seaweed bioassay coupled with an interpretive model may provide the only reasonable approach to the study of chemical uptake-growth phenomena. In practice, if the residence time of sea water in culture chambers is sufficiently low to preclude pseudo-closed system artifacts, differences in trace metal concentrations between input and output sea water may be difficult to detect. In the field and in situ experiments based on time-series monitoring of changes in the water chemistry would be technically difficult or perhaps impossible to perform. 13 references, 1 figure.

  14. Quantum size correction to the work function and centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payami, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different r s values (2≤ r s ≥ 7). For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes 2≤ N ≥100 in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model as well as simple jellium model with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere

  15. Comparison of Residual Stresses in Inconel 718 Simple Parts Made by Electron Beam Melting and Direct Laser Metal Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochalski-Kolbus, L. M.; Payzant, E. A.; Cornwell, P. A.; Watkins, T. R.; Babu, S. S.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lorenz, M.; Ovchinnikova, O.; Duty, C.

    2015-03-01

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting (EBM) and the other with direct laser metal sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by electrical discharge machining (EDM) equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacings from the EDM sectioned sample were compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill stress and moment balance. We have shown that applying stress and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melted parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintered parts most likely due to the powder preheating step in the EBM process.

  16. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee

    2002-01-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis

  17. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis.

  18. Determination of Lubricant Bulk Modulus in Metal Forming by Means of a Simple Laboratory Test and Inverse FEM Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafis, S. M.; Christiansen, P.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2016-01-01

    facilitates the lubricant entrainment, pressurization and possible escape by micro-plasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. In order to model these mechanisms an important lubricant propertyd esignated as the bulk modulus is needed for characterizing the compressibility of the lubricant. The present paper describes...... a simple, practical test to determine the bulk modulus. Combination of the experimental upsetting of an axisymmetric metal workpiece containing a truncated conical surface pocket with an inverse finite element analysis of the test allows determining the lubricant bulk modulus. The finite element analysis...

  19. Fully Parameter-Free Calculation of Optical Spectra for Insulators, Semiconductors, and Metals from a Simple Polarization Functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J A

    2015-09-25

    We present a fully parameter-free density-functional approach for the accurate description of optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors, and metals. We show that this can be achieved within time-dependent current-density-functional theory using a simple dynamical polarization functional. We derive this functional from physical principles that govern optical spectra. Our method is truly predictive because not a single parameter is used. In particular, we do not use an ad hoc material-dependent broadening parameter to compare theory to experiment as is usually done. Our approach is numerically efficient; the cost equals that of a calculation within the random-phase approximation.

  20. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 °C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species.

  1. Growth of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals induced by lysozyme protein in thin film conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowal, Ashim Chandra; Kundu, Sarathi, E-mail: sarathi.kundu@gmail.com

    2016-08-22

    Highlights: • Gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals form on thin film of lysozyme protein. • Nanocrystals formation is possible from mM concentration of HAuCl{sub 4}. • Both nanoclusters and nanocrystals follow Langmuir-like growth on protein surface. • Growth rate of nanocrystal is slower than nanocluster. • On protein surface nanocrystals take triangular, hexagonal and disc as shape. - Abstract: Structures and growth behavior of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals have been explored on thin films of globular protein lysozyme by using UV–vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A simple and one-step environment friendly method has been used to grow nanocrystals on protein surface from HAuCl{sub 4} solution. It has been found that if different interaction times are provided between lysozyme films and HAuCl{sub 4} solution, then initially formed tiny gold nanoclusters on protein surface transform into nanocrystals with the passage of time. XRD analysis shows the formation of faced-centered cubic lattice along (1 1 1) crystalline direction and AFM images confirm the presence of circular, rod-like, triangular and hexagonal crystal structures. Langmuir-like growth behavior has been identified for both the gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals formation induced by the lysozyme films, however, nanocrystal growth is relatively slower than nanocluster.

  2. Growth of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals induced by lysozyme protein in thin film conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowal, Ashim Chandra; Kundu, Sarathi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals form on thin film of lysozyme protein. • Nanocrystals formation is possible from mM concentration of HAuCl 4 . • Both nanoclusters and nanocrystals follow Langmuir-like growth on protein surface. • Growth rate of nanocrystal is slower than nanocluster. • On protein surface nanocrystals take triangular, hexagonal and disc as shape. - Abstract: Structures and growth behavior of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals have been explored on thin films of globular protein lysozyme by using UV–vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A simple and one-step environment friendly method has been used to grow nanocrystals on protein surface from HAuCl 4 solution. It has been found that if different interaction times are provided between lysozyme films and HAuCl 4 solution, then initially formed tiny gold nanoclusters on protein surface transform into nanocrystals with the passage of time. XRD analysis shows the formation of faced-centered cubic lattice along (1 1 1) crystalline direction and AFM images confirm the presence of circular, rod-like, triangular and hexagonal crystal structures. Langmuir-like growth behavior has been identified for both the gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals formation induced by the lysozyme films, however, nanocrystal growth is relatively slower than nanocluster.

  3. Equation of motion method in appearance potential spectra of simple metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text. The equation of motion method is applied to function Tk 1 K 2 K 3 K 4 which describes, the propagation of two particles in the presence of the core hole. Neglecting final state interactions and assuming constant matrix elements, X-ray yield and the associated appearance potential spectrum is found to depend on the convolution of the empty density of states above the Fermi level of the metal. (author)

  4. Plasmon-modulated light scattering from gold nanocrystal-decorated hollow mesoporous silica microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Manda; Chen, Huanjun; Ming, Tian; Shao, Lei; Wang, Jianfang

    2010-11-23

    Localized surface plasmon resonances of noble metal nanocrystals are powerful in enhancing a variety of linear and nonlinear optical signals and photorelated processes. Here we demonstrate the plasmonic enhancement of the light scattering from hollow mesoporous silica microspheres by attaching a dense layer of gold nanocrystals onto the outer surface of the microspheres. The attachment of gold nanocrystals induces both the shift and intensity increase in the resonant scattering peaks of the microspheres. The spectral region of the resonant scattering enhancement can be controlled by using gold nanocrystals with different plasmon resonance wavelengths. The spectral region of the enhancement is independent of the microsphere diameter. The scattering enhancement factor ranges from 20 to 130, depending on the plasmonic properties and surface coverage of the attached gold nanocrystals. The systematic evolution of the scattering spectra of the individual microspheres is also revealed by chemically etching away the attached gold nanocrystals gradually.

  5. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  6. The determination of oxygen in metals using an impulse heating furnace with a simple transfer lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, L.S.; de Jong, S.; Kelly, J.W.; Whittem, R.N.

    1975-05-01

    An impulse heating furnace has been constructed for the determination of low levels of oxygen down to 100 μg g -1 in metals. The furnace is equipped with a sample transfer lock which permits samples to be loaded into outgassed crucibles in a helium atmosphere. As a result, blank levels in the range 2 to 3 μg oxygen are obtained; the modification also results in shorter sample processing time. The apparatus is described, and its suitability for oxygen determinations at these levels has been verified by comparison of results obtained on reference and analysed materials. (author)

  7. Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals via ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, D.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Hansen, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents for the precipit......A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents...

  8. Synthesis, characterization and properties of nano-sized transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming

    2005-12-01

    Chapter 1. A General introduction to the emerging field of nanomaterials is presented highlighting the category of transition metal oxides. The wide variety of structures, properties, and phenomena of transition metal oxides are stressed. Nano-sized transition metal oxides are presented as systems for fundamental and application research. Examples of individual transition metal oxides are provided. Important developments in the synthesis and characterization of nano-sized transition metal oxides that have contributed to this work are reviewed. A novel synthesis (TDMA) is developed and successfully applied to the synthesis of transition metal oxide nanocrystals. Chapter 2. The synthesis of monodisperse cubic wuestite FexO nanocrystals is presented. The influence of reaction temperature and the molar ratio of surfactant to iron precursor was investigated, in order to further understand the ability to control particle size and monodispersity. In contrast to bulk material, it is also found that the nano-sized ligand-capped wuestite FexO particles were stable at room temperature. The procedure enable the collection of highly monodisperse nanocrystals of variable and uniform diameters as a function of time. Sharp Hancock analysis indicates that the reaction proceeds by a diffusion limited mechanism. Routes to control the size of gamma-Fe2O3 nanocrystals are also presented. gamma-Fe2O3 nanocrystals from 6 nm to 12 nm in diameter with uniform size, shape, consistent crystal structure were prepared. Chapter 3. A simple reaction to prepare monodisperse MnO nanocrystals is presented. MnO nanocrystals was prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese acetate in the presence of oleic acid at high temperature and by following annealing. Particles with different sizes and shapes were obtained by controlling annealing time. The morphology of MnO nanocrystals was studied based on their crystal structure and surface energy. SQUID measurement shows ferromagnetic magnetism at low

  9. Controllable synthesis of Co3O4 nanocrystals as efficient catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoying; Zhang, Yihe; Du, Ruifeng; Liu, Lei; Yu, Xuelian

    2018-03-01

    The electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has received great attention due to its importance in fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Here, we present a simple approach to prepare non-noble metal catalyst-Co3O4 nanocrystals (NCs). The particle size and shape were simply controlled by different types and concentrations of metal precursor. Furthermore, different sizes and shapes of Co3O4 NCs are explored as electrocatalysts for ORR, and it has been observed that particles with a similar shape, and smaller particle size led to greater catalytic current densities because of the greater surface area. For particles with a comparable size, the shape or crystalline structure governed the activity of the electrocatalytic reactions. Most importantly, the 9 nm-Co3O4 were demonstrated to act as low-cost catalysts for the ORR with a similar performance to that of Pt catalysts.

  10. Unconfined twist : a simple method to prepare ultrafine grained metallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y. (Yonghao); Liao, Xiaozhou; Zhu, Y. T. (Yuntian Theodore)

    2004-01-01

    A new simple method - unconfined twist was employed to prepare ultrafine grained (UFG) Fe,wire. A coarse grained (CG) Fe wire with a diameter of 0.85 mm was fixed at one end, and twisted at the other end. After maximum twist before fracture, in the cross-sectional plane, concentrically deformed layers with a width of several micrometers formed surrounding the center axis of the wire. The near-surface deformed layers consist of lamella grains with a width in submicrometer range. In the longitudinal plane, deformed bands (with a width of several micrometers) formed uniformly, which were composed of lamella crystallites (with a width in submicrometer range). The tensile yield strength and ultimate strength of the twisted Fe wire are increased by about 150% and 100% compared with the values of its CG counterpart.

  11. A Simple Approach to Enhance the Water Stability of a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yung-Han; Kuo, Yu-Ching; Lirio, Stephen; Wang, Kun-Yun; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2017-01-01

    A facile method to improve the feasibility of water-unstable metal-organic frameworks in an aqueous environment has been developed that involves imbedding in a polymer monolith. The effect of compartment type during polymerization plays a significant role in maintaining the crystalline structure and thermal stability of the MOFs, which was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The MOF-polymer composite prepared in a narrow compartment (column, ID 0.8 mm) has better thermal and chemical stability than that prepared in a broad compartment (vial, ID 7 mm). The developed MOF-polymer composite was applied as an adsorbent in solid-phase microextraction of nine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and could be used for extraction more than 30 times, demonstrating that the proposed approach has potential for industrial applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A simple route to diverse noble metal-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles for catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joan M.; Zaleski, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (knorm = 2 × 107 s-1 mol(Pd)-1 5 × 106 s-1 mol(Au)-1 5 × 105 s-1 mol(PtAg)-1 7 × 105 s-1 mol(Ag)-1). These rates are the highest reported for nano-sized comparables, and are competitive with mesoparticles of similar composition. Due to their magnetic response, the particles are also suitable for magnetic recovery and maintain >99% conversion for at least four cycles. Using this synthetic route, Fe3O4@SiO2-M particles show great promise for further development as a precursor to complicated anisotropic materials or for applications ranging from nanocatalysis to biomedical sensing.Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic

  13. A simple method for understanding the triangular growth patterns of transition metal dichalcogenide sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siya Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Triangular nanoflake growth patterns have been commonly observed in synthesis of transition metal dichalcogenide sheets and their hybrid structures. Triangular nanoflakes not only show exceptional properties, but also can serve as building blocks for two or three dimensional structures. In this study, taking the MoS2 system as a test case, we propose a Matrix method to understand the mechanism of such unique growth pattern. Nanoflakes with different edge types are mathematically described with configuration matrices, and the total formation energy is calculated as the sum of the edge formation energies and the chemical potentials of sulfur and molybdenum. Based on energetics, we find that three triangular patterns with the different edge configurations are energetically more favorable in different ranges of the chemical potential of sulfur, which are in good agreement with experimental observations. Our algorithm has high efficiency and can deal with nanoflakes in microns which are beyond the ability of ab-initio method. This study not only elucidates the mechanism of triangular nanoflake growth patterns in experiment, but also provides a clue to control the geometric configurations in synthesis.

  14. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  15. FeNi{sub 3} alloy nanocrystals grown on graphene: Controllable synthesis, in-depth characterization and enhanced electromagnetic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Teng; Yuan, Mengwei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials and College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Islam, Saiful M. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Li, Huifeng [Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials and College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Shulan, E-mail: mashulan@bnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials and College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Genban, E-mail: gbsun@bnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials and College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Xiaojing [Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials and College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-09-05

    FeNi{sub 3} nanocrystals as an ideal candidate for EM-wave-absorption material have a great advantage due to their excellent magnetic properties. However, its large permittivity and poor chemical stability confine its application. A strategy to improve electromagnetic performance of FeNi{sub 3}via phase-controlled synthesis of FeNi{sub 3} nanostructures grown on graphene networks has been employed in this work. The phases, structures, sizes and morphologies of FeNi{sub 3} nanocomposites were in-depth characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopy. The results of electromagnetic performance tests for the as-synthesized FeNi{sub 3} nanocomposites showed excellent microwave absorbability in comparison with the corresponding FeNi{sub 3} nanocrystals, especially in the low (2–6 GHz) and middle (6–12 GHz) frequencies. The one-pot method we utilized is simple and effective, and because of its versatility, it may be extended to prepare some magnetic metal or alloy materials via this route. - Highlights: • Monodispersed FeNi{sub 3} alloy nanocrystals have been successfully assembled on 2D graphene via a one-pot strategy. • The process ensures different crystal phase and controlled morphology and size in the monodispersed particles. • The nanocomposites exhibit excellent microwave absorbability, which is stronger than the corresponding alloy monomer.

  16. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of hard magnetic Co{sub x}C (x=2, 3) nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yajing; Chaubey, Girija S.; Rong Chuanbing [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Ding Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Poudyal, Narayan; Tsai Poching; Zhang Qiming [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Liu, J. Ping, E-mail: pliu@uta.ed [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report our recent results in synthesis and characterization of cobalt carbide (Co{sub 3}C and Co{sub 2}C) nanoparticles and nanowires. The synthesis methods were based on a simple one-pot tetraethylene glycol reduction process. By changing the synthesis parameters, the nanocrystal morphology can be adjusted from nanoparticles with different size to nanowires. The magnetic properties of the nanostructure and their correlation to the crystalline structures and the nanoscale morphology have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is revealed that the properties are related to both the crystal structures and the morphology. - Research highlights: A facile polyol reduction procedure has been developed for preparation of cobalt carbide nanoparticles and nanowires. The formation mechanism of the nanoparticles and nanowires has been discussed. The crystal structure and their magnetic properties are investigated via both experimental and theoretical studies. The highest coercivity of the obtained cobalt nanocrystals is 3.1 kOe at room temperature. This polyol reduction may be extended to preparation of nanocrystals of other pure transition metals and their carbides.

  17. Insights into the microstructural and physical properties of colloidal Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Jiang, Linhai; Zhang, Xingquan [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We present a facile and environmentally friendly protocol to fabricate Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals. • The microstructural and physical properties of Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated. • The current synthesis is dramatically simple and highly reproducible, it will facilitate the commercial scale synthesis of highly luminescent water-soluble nanocrystals with surface functionality in the near future. - Abstract: Here, we present a facile and environmentally friendly synthetic protocol to fabricate highly luminescent and water-soluble Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals in aqueous solution at low temperature. The microstructure and various physical properties (e.g., crystal structure, interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, crystalline size, lattice microstrain, intrinsic stress, X-ray density, specific surface area, dislocation density, porosity, agglomeration number) of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction. The particle size and morphology of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties (e.g., absorption and photoluminescence) of the fabricated nanocrystals were explored using ultraviolet–visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies, respectively. The surface functionalization of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals by mercaptoacetic acid ligand was evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. To confirm the elementary composition of the obtained nanocrystals, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was performed. To further shed light upon elemental distribution of the resulting nanocrystals, elemental mapping measurements were conducted. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms were also elucidated. As a consequence, the current investigation not only provides a deep insight into exploring the physical properties of doped nanocrystals, but also demonstrates a useful synthetic strategy for producing water-soluble and highly fluorescent doped

  18. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Tuomela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed.

  19. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  20. Purification technologies for colloidal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Gee, Megan Y; Greytak, A B

    2017-01-10

    Almost all applications of colloidal nanocrystals require some type of purification or surface modification process following nanocrystal growth. Nanocrystal purification - the separation of nanocrystals from undesired solution components - can perturb the surface chemistry and thereby the physical properties of colloidal nanocrystals due to changes in solvent, solute concentrations, and exposure of the nanocrystal surface to oxidation or hydrolysis. For example, nanocrystal quantum dots frequently exhibit decreased photoluminescence brightness after precipitation from the growth solvent and subsequent redissolution. Consequently, purification is an integral part of the synthetic chemistry of colloidal nanocrystals, and the effect of purification methods must be considered in order to accurately compare and predict the behavior of otherwise similar nanocrystal samples. In this Feature Article we examine established and emerging approaches to the purification of colloidal nanoparticles from a nanocrystal surface chemistry viewpoint. Purification is generally achieved by exploiting differences in properties between the impurities and the nanoparticles. Three distinct properties are typically manipulated: polarity (relative solubility), electrophoretic mobility, and size. We discuss precipitation, extraction, electrophoretic methods, and size-based methods including ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, diafiltration, and size-exclusion chromatography. The susceptibility of quantum dots to changes in surface chemistry, with changes in photoluminescence decay associated with surface chemical changes, extends even into the case of core/shell structures. Accordingly, the goal of a more complete description of quantum dot surface chemistry has been a driver of innovation in colloidal nanocrystal purification methods. We specifically examine the effect of purification on surface chemistry and photoluminescence in quantum dots as an example of the challenges associated with

  1. Growth of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals induced by lysozyme protein in thin film conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowal, Ashim Chandra; Kundu, Sarathi

    2016-08-01

    Structures and growth behavior of gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals have been explored on thin films of globular protein lysozyme by using UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A simple and one-step environment friendly method has been used to grow nanocrystals on protein surface from HAuCl4 solution. It has been found that if different interaction times are provided between lysozyme films and HAuCl4 solution, then initially formed tiny gold nanoclusters on protein surface transform into nanocrystals with the passage of time. XRD analysis shows the formation of faced-centered cubic lattice along (1 1 1) crystalline direction and AFM images confirm the presence of circular, rod-like, triangular and hexagonal crystal structures. Langmuir-like growth behavior has been identified for both the gold nanoclusters and nanocrystals formation induced by the lysozyme films, however, nanocrystal growth is relatively slower than nanocluster.

  2. Formation mechanisms of uniform nanocrystals via hot-injection and heat-up methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2011-10-04

    Synthesis of uniform nanocrystals is very important because the size uniformity of an ensemble of nanocrystals is directly related to the homogeneity of their chemical and physical properties. Classical theory suggests that burst nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth are the most important factors for the control of the size distribution in colloidal synthesis. In the last two decades, the numerous reports on the synthesis of uniform nanocrystals have popularized two major synthetic methods, namely, hot-injection and heat-up, to obtain uniform nanocrystals of various materials including metals, semiconductors, and oxides. Mechanistic studies on how such uniform nanocrystals are obtained in those two methods are reviewed and theoretical explanations are provided in the current review. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Calpain inhibitor nanocrystals prepared using Nano Spray Dryer B-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-08-04

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. Among attractive drugs, calpain inhibitor that inhibits programmed cell death 'apoptosis' is a candidate for curing apoptosis-mediated intractable diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In this study, the preparation of calpain inhibitor nanocrystals using Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle sizes were controlled by means of selecting mesh aperture sizes. The obtained average particle sizes were in the range of around 300 nm to submicron meter.

  4. Hot-injection synthesis of Ni-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals with tunable magnetic properties and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Deqian; Qiu, Yulong; Chen, Yuanzhi, E-mail: yuanzhi@xmu.edu.cn; Zhang, Qinfu; Liu, Xiang; Peng, Dong-Liang, E-mail: dlpeng@xmu.edu.cn [Xiamen University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Genome, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, College of Materials (China)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals containing ferromagnetic Ni and semiconductor ZnO have been prepared via a hot-injection route. The Ni-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals have a flower-like morphology that consists of Ni inner cores and ZnO petal shells. In spite of their large lattice mismatch, ZnO nanocrystals can still grow on faceted Ni nanocrystals to form stable interfaces. The composition of Ni-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals is readily controlled, and the average size of Ni core is tunable from 25 to 50 nm. Room temperature ferromagnetic properties are observed in these hybrid nanocrystals, and tunable magnetic properties also can be achieved by varying the size of Ni core. The as-prepared Ni-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals exhibit enhanced photocatalytic performance under ultraviolet light illumination as compared to pure ZnO nanocrystals. Furthermore, the superior reusability of hybrid nanocrystals for photocatalytic application is achieved by virtue of their magnetic properties. The facile and efficient seed-mediate strategy is particularly attractive to construct hybrid magnetic-semiconducting heterostructures. The as-obtained Ni-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals offer great potential for various applications due to their combined magnetic and semiconducting properties and low-cost earth-abundant availability.

  5. Noninjection Synthesis of CdS and Alloyed CdSxSe1−xNanocrystals Without Nucleation Initiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CdS and alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals were prepared by a simple noninjection method without nucleation initiators. Oleic acid (OA was used to stabilize the growth of the CdS nanocrystals. The size of the CdS nanocrystals can be tuned by changing the OA/Cd molar ratios. On the basis of the successful synthesis of CdS nanocrystals, alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals can also be prepared by simply replacing certain amount of S precursor with equal amount of Se precursor, verified by TEM, XRD, EDX as well as UV–Vis absorption analysis. The optical properties of the alloyed CdSxSe1−x nanocrystals can be tuned by adjusting the S/Se feed molar ratios. This synthetic approach developed is highly reproducible and can be readily scaled up for potential industrial production.

  6. Selectivity on Etching: Creation of High-Energy Facets on Copper Nanocrystals for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenni; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jin, Mingshang; Yin, Yadong

    2016-04-26

    Creating high-energy facets on the surface of catalyst nanocrystals represents a promising method for enhancing their catalytic activity. Herein we show that crystal etching as the reverse process of crystal growth can directly endow nanocrystal surfaces with high-energy facets. The key is to avoid significant modification of the surface energies of the nanocrystal facets by capping effects from solvents, ions, and ligands. Using Cu nanocubes as the starting material, we have successfully demonstrated the creation of high-energy facets in metal nanocrystals by controlled chemical etching. The etched Cu nanocrystals with enriched high-energy {110} facets showed significantly enhanced activity toward CO2 reduction. We believe the etching-based strategy could be extended to the synthesis of nanocrystals of many other catalysts with more active high-energy facets.

  7. One dimensional CuO nanocrystals synthesis by electrical explosion: A study on structural, optical and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Shutesh, E-mail: shutesh.k@onsemi.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ON Semiconductor Package Innovation and Development Center, 70450 Seremban (Malaysia); Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Johan, Mohd Rafie [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • One-dimensional CuO nanoflakes were synthesized by novel wire explosion technique. • A physical synthesis method capable of producing high aspect ratio (1:16) nanocrystals. • Most energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis of low-dimensional transition metal oxide nanocrystals. -- Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) copper oxide (CuO) nanocrystals were synthesized using a novel wire explosion in de-ionized (DI) water without any chemical additives. Highly crystalline 1D CuO nanocrystals with 1:16 aspect ratio were successfully synthesized using this technique. The chemical nature and physical structure of the nanocrystals were controlled by simply modulating the exploding medium temperature. The results showed that nanocrystals produced at explosion temperatures 65 °C and 95 °C are pure CuO with optical band-gap energy of 2.38 eV. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope analysis (HRTEM) indicates that the CuO nanocrystals are with growth in [1{sup ¯}11] and [1 1 1] directions. The epitaxial crystal growth kinetics of the 1D nanostructure by aggregation was discussed. The incorporation of microstructural features like edge dislocations and porosity in the growth mechanism was examined. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates the formation of high purity CuO nanocrystals with valence state +2. This study provides an energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis method of 1D transition metal oxide nanocrystals for electronic applications.

  8. Two simple methods for calculating the penetration time of a longitudinal magnetic field through the wall of a metallic tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Colunga S, S.; Lopez C, R.; Melendez L, L.; Ramos S, J.; Cabral P, A.; Gonzalez T, L.; Chavez A, E.; Valencia A, R.

    1991-06-01

    Two simple and fast methods to calculate the penetration time of a longitudinal magnetic field through the wall of a long metallic tube of circular cross section are presented. The first method is based upon the proposition of an 'effective penetration thickness' given by the polar angle average of all possible straight-line transverse penetration paths of field lines through the tube wall. This method provides a quick calculation that yields a remarkably good approximation to experimental and reported values of the penetration time. In the second method the tube is considered as a RL circuit. Thus the penetration time is given by the ratio L T /R T where L T is the inductance of the tube considered as a one turn coil, and R T is the tube resistance. This method is faster to apply than the previous one but the values obtained provide only a rough approximation to the penetration time. Applications of the two methods are given for the tokamak chambers of the Japanese 'HYBTOK', the Brazilian 'TBR' and the Mexican 'Novillo'. The resulting values of the penetration time approximate very well to the reported ones in the first two cases and to the experimental one in the last. The methods are also applied to calculate the penetration time in two long tubes, one of aluminum and other of copper. Calculated values approximate very well to measured values. (Author)

  9. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  10. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor L.; Petruska, Melissa A.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention is directed to a process for preparing a solid composite having colloidal nanocrystals dispersed within a sol-gel matrix, the process including admixing colloidal nanocrystals with an amphiphilic polymer including hydrophilic groups selected from the group consisting of --COOH, --OH, --SO.sub.3H, --NH.sub.2, and --PO.sub.3H.sub.2 within a solvent to form an alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex, admixing the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex and a sol-gel precursor material, and, forming the solid composite from the admixture. The present invention is also directed to the resultant solid composites and to the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complexes.

  11. Oxygen reduction electrocatalyst based on strongly coupled cobalt oxide nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang; Diao, Peng; Chang, Wesley; Hong, Guosong; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Liming; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom Z; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-09-26

    Electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is crucial for a variety of renewable energy applications and energy-intensive industries. The design and synthesis of highly active ORR catalysts with strong durability at low cost is extremely desirable but remains challenging. Here, we used a simple two-step method to synthesize cobalt oxide/carbon nanotube (CNT) strongly coupled hybrid as efficient ORR catalyst by directly growing nanocrystals on oxidized multiwalled CNTs. The mildly oxidized CNTs provided functional groups on the outer walls to nucleate and anchor nanocrystals, while retaining intact inner walls for highly conducting network. Cobalt oxide was in the form of CoO due to a gas-phase annealing step in NH(3). The resulting CoO/nitrogen-doped CNT (NCNT) hybrid showed high ORR current density that outperformed Co(3)O(4)/graphene hybrid and commercial Pt/C catalyst at medium overpotential, mainly through a 4e reduction pathway. The metal oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid was found to be advantageous over the graphene counterpart in terms of active sites and charge transport. Last, the CoO/NCNT hybrid showed high ORR activity and stability under a highly corrosive condition of 10 M NaOH at 80 °C, demonstrating the potential of strongly coupled inorganic/nanocarbon hybrid as a novel catalyst system in oxygen depolarized cathode for chlor-alkali electrolysis.

  12. Labelling of silica microspheres with fluorescent lanthanide-doped LaF3 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Lu Meihua

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent microspheres have been demonstrated to be useful in a variety of biological applications. Fluorescent silica or polymer microspheres have been produced by incorporation of chromophores into the microspheres, which usually produces microspheres with nonuniform sizes and reduced fluorescence. Here we present a simple and straightforward method to produce silica microspheres with fluorescent lanthanide-doped LaF 3 nanocrystals grown on the surface. LaF 3 nanocrystals are in situ grown on silica microspheres of different sizes to form a raspberry-like structure. The microspheres exhibit strong fluorescence and the colour could be altered by changing the lanthanide ions doped in LaF 3 nanocrystals

  13. The growth of high density network of MOF nano-crystals across macroporous metal substrates - Solvothermal synthesis versus rapid thermal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, James W.; Gonzalo, Cristina Pozo; Merenda, Andrea; Kong, Lingxue; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of metal organic framework (MOF) films and membranes across macro-porous metal substrates is extremely challenging, due to the large pore sizes across the substrates, poor wettability, and the lack of sufficient reactive functional groups on the surface, which prevent high density nucleation of MOF crystals. Herein, macroporous stainless steel substrates (pore size 44 × 40 μm) are functionalized with amine functional groups, and the growth of ZIF-8 crystals investigated through both solvothermal synthesis and rapid thermal deposition (RTD), to assess the role of synthesis routes in the resultant membranes microstructure, and subsequently their performance. Although a high density of well interconnected MOF crystals was observed across the modified substrates following both techniques, RTD was found to be a much more efficient route, yielding high quality membranes under 1 h, as opposed to the 24 h required for solvothermal synthesis. The RTD membranes also exhibited high gas permeance, with He permeance of up to 2.954 ± 0.119 × 10-6 mol m-2 s-1 Pa-1, and Knudsen selectivities for He/N2, Ar/N2 and CO2/N2, suggesting the membranes were almost defect free. This work opens up route for efficient fabrication of MOF films and membranes across macro-porous metal supports, with potential application in electrically mediated separation applications.

  14. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  15. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    OpenAIRE

    TANG Jin; HU Jin-feng; GUO Wei-chun; YU Ling; ZHAO Sheng-hao

    2013-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months) and the the...

  16. Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Various Quantum Mechanical Concepts for Confinements in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Jayakrishna Khatei Karuna Kar Nanda. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 771-776 ...

  17. Hydrothermal preparation of high saturation magnetization and coercivity cobalt ferrite nanocrystals without subsequent calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, S.C.; Chia, C.H.; Zakaria, S.; Yusoff, M.; Haw, C.Y.; Ahmadi, Sh.; Huang, N.M.; Lim, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals with high saturation magnetization (M s ) and high coercivity (H c ) have been fabricated via a simple hydrothermal method and without subsequent calcination. The resulting CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results indicate that CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals are single crystal and the average crystallite size is increasing with the hydrothermal temperature. The electron micrographs show that the nanocrystals are well-dispersed and possess uniform size. The shape of CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals is transformed from spherical into rod by increasing the hydrothermal temperature. The nanocrystals show relatively high M s of 74.8 emu g -1 and H c of 2216 Oe, as compared to previous reported results. The obtained results reveal the applicability of this method for efficiently producing well crystallized and relatively high magnetic properties CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals as compared to other methods. More importantly, it does not require further calcination processes.

  18. Ion beam assisted synthesis of nano-crystals in glasses (silver and lead chalcogenides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espiau de Lamaestre, R.

    2005-04-01

    This work deals with the interest in ion beams for controlling nano-crystals synthesis in glasses. We show two different ways to reach this aim, insisting on importance of redox phenomena induced by the penetration and implantation of ions in glasses. We first show that we can use the great energy density deposited by the ions to tailor reducing conditions, favorable to metallic nano-crystal precipitation. In particular, we show that microscopic mechanism of radiation induced silver precipitation in glasses are analogous to the ones of classical photography. Ion beams can also be used to overcome supersaturation of elements in a given matrix. In this work, we synthesized lead chalcogenide nano-crystals (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) whose optical properties are interesting for telecommunication applications. We demonstrate the influence of complex chalcogenide chemistry in oxide glasses, and its relationship with the observed loss of growth control when nano-crystals are synthesized by sequential implantation of Pb and S in pure silica. As a consequence of this understanding, we demonstrate a novel and controlled synthesis of PbS nano-crystals, consisting in implanting sulfur into a Pb-containing glass, before annealing. Choice of glass composition provides a better control of precipitation physico-chemistry, whereas the use of implantation allows high nano-crystal volume fractions to be reached. Our study of IR emission properties of these nano-crystals shows a very high excitation cross section, and evidence for a 'dark exciton' emitting level. (author)

  19. Facile fabrication and electrochemical behaviors of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli, E-mail: yuanlyl@foxmail.com [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Liu, Haifeng; Guo, Baogang [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Here, we demonstrate the rational design and synthesis of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals with adjustable doping concentrations utilizing a facile, cost effective, and environmentally benign chemical protocol. These nanostructures were investigated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Compared with pristine ZnS nanocrystals, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystals exhibit significantly improved electrochemical performances in terms of specific capacity and cycling performance. The Mn:ZnS nanocrystal sample with doping concentration of 1 at% displays second discharge capacity of 789.9 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 24 mA g{sup −1}, about 2.39 times higher than that of the pure ZnS nanocrystal. Furthermore, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal electrodes represent much better capacity retention than that of the undoped one. The greatly improved electrochemical performances of the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal samples could be attributed to the following factors. The large specific surface area can significantly enhance structural integrity by acting as mechanical buffer, effectively alleviating the volume changes generated during the lithiation/delithiation process. The incorporation of Mn into the lattice of ZnS improves charge transfer kinetics and results in a faster Li{sup +} diffusion rate during the charge–discharge process. It is of great significance to incorporate guest metal ions into nanostructured materials to display especial electrochemical characteristics triggering an effective approach to improve the electrochemical properties.

  20. Effects of aqueous stable fullerene nanocrystal (nC60) on copper (trace necessary nutrient metal): Enhanced toxicity and accumulation of copper in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xianji; He, Yiliang; Fortner, John D; Chen, Yongsheng; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-08-01

    Our focus herein is to evaluate the potential interaction between nC60 and copper, a trace necessary metal, in light of the impact on toxicity. The non-observable effects concentration (NOEC) of nC60 was confirmed as 100μgL(-1) before. When Daphnia magna was exposed to the mixture of copper solution and nC60 suspension (100μgL(-1)), LC50 of 48h was lower than that when they were exposed to copper solution alone. This result clearly showed the decrease in NOEC of copper at the presence of nC60. Cu(2+)-ATPase activity was enhanced at the presence of nC60, indicating that copper transport involved with the uptake, distribution and depuration in body was increased. We further conducted experiments on accumulation of copper in D. magna. The observed equilibrium copper concentration in D. magna in the mixture of 100μgL(-1) nC60 and 1μgL(-1) copper solution reached 131μg (kg wet weight)(-1), which was more than twice that in copper solution only: 60μg (kg wet weight)(-1). This result demonstrated that the accumulation of copper in D. magna was significantly enhanced at the presence of even low nC60 concentration. Experiments also showed that copper was quickly adsorbed onto nC60. The absorption of copper onto D. magna was statistically correlated to the absorption of nC60 onto D. magna; this might be caused by nC60 facilitating the transfer of copper into D. magna. The absorption and desorption of copper to nC60 (pH=5.0) reached equilibrium quickly, which may be involved with the co-bioaccumulation and decrease in NOEC of Cu(2+) and nC60. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuning the formation and functionalities of ultrafine CoFe2O4 nanocrystals via interfacial coherent strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Kuo, Ho-Hung; Liao, Sheng-Chieh; Liu, Heng-Jui; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Lai, Chih-Huang; Zhan, Qian; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2013-06-01

    Complex oxide nanocrystals with a spinel structure show their remarkable optical, electronic, mechanical, thermal, and magnetic properties. In this study, we present a simple yet versatile strategy to grow self-assembled epitaxial CoFe2O4 nanocrystals with well-controlled size (less than 10 nm) and single orientation. CoFe2O4 nanocrystals were fabricated via phase separation in a BiFeO3-CoF2O4 ultrathin film by pulsed laser deposition. The coherent strain at the BiFeO3-CoF2O4 interface suppressed the growth of the nanocrystals regardless of substrate temperatures. This strain also resulted in the ferromagnetic anisotropy and interesting conducting behaviors of ultrafine CFO nanocrystals.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal CZTS Nanocrystals by a Hot-Injection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Méndez-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the synthesis of colloidal Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS nanocrystals (average size ~4–9 nm by a simple and low cost hot-injection method. These nanocrystals form larger particles with sizes around 40 nm. Oleylamine (OLA was used as both the solvent and the nanocrystal stabilizer. The effect of the synthesis time on the structural, compositional, morphological, and optical properties was studied. As revealed by XRD, Raman, and TEM measurements all the prepared samples are comprised of both kesterite and wurtzite CZTS nanocrystals. The wurtzite phase contribution reduces as the reaction time is increased. The “bandgap” of the obtained nanoparticles tends to 1.52 eV for the larger synthesis times (24 h which is suitable for an absorber layer in thin films solar cells.

  3. Nanocrystal thin film fabrication methods and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Kim, David K.; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lai, Yuming

    2018-01-09

    Nanocrystal thin film devices and methods for fabricating nanocrystal thin film devices are disclosed. The nanocrystal thin films are diffused with a dopant such as Indium, Potassium, Tin, etc. to reduce surface states. The thin film devices may be exposed to air during a portion of the fabrication. This enables fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices using a wider range of techniques such as photolithography and photolithographic patterning in an air environment.

  4. A GREENER SYNTHESIS OF CORE (FE, CU)-SHELL (AU, PT, PD AND AG) NANOCRYSTALS USING AQUEOUS VITAMIN C

    Science.gov (United States)

    A greener method to fabricate the novel core (Fe and Cu)-shell (noble metals) metal nanocrystals using aqueous ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is described. Transition metal salts such as Cu and Fe were reduced using ascorbic acid, a benign naturally available antioxidant, and then add...

  5. A Radiation-Tolerant, Low-Power Non-Volatile Memory Based on Silicon Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. D.; Boer, E. A.; Ostraat, M. L.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.; deBlauwe, J.; Green, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystal nonvolatile floating-gate memories are a good candidate for space applications - initial results suggest they are fast, more reliable and consume less power than conventional floating gate memories. In the nanocrystal based NVM device, charge is not stored on a continuous polysilicon layer (so-called floating gate), but instead on a layer of discrete nanocrystals. Charge injection and storage in dense arrays of silicon nanocrystals in SiO2 is a critical aspect of the performance of potential nanocrystal flash memory structures. The ultimate goal for this class of devices is few- or single-electron storage in a small number of nanocrystal elements. In addition, the nanocrystal layer fabrication technique should be simple, 8-inch wafer compatible and well controlled in program/erase threshold voltage swing was seen during 100,000 program and erase cycles. Additional near-term goals for this project include extensive testing for radiation hardness and the development of artificial layered tunnel barrier heterostructures which have the potential for large speed enhancements for read/write of nanocrystal memory elements, compared with conventional flash devices. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  7. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  8. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  9. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  10. Near-Monodisperse Ni-Cu Bimetallic Nanocrystals of Variable Composition: Controlled Synthesis and Catalytic Activity for H2 Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yawen; Huang, Wenyu; Habas, Susan E.; Kuhn, John N.; Grass, Michael E.; Yamada, Yusuke; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-22

    Near-monodisperse Ni{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.2-0.8) bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized by a one-pot thermolysis approach in oleylamine/1-octadecene, using metal acetylacetonates as precursors. The nanocrystals form large-area 2D superlattices, and display a catalytic synergistic effect in the hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} to generate H{sub 2} at x = 0.5 in a strongly basic medium. The Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} nanocrystals show the lowest activation energy, and also exhibit the highest H{sub 2} generation rate at 298 K.

  11. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  12. [Cr(N)(acac)2]: A simple chromium nitride complex and its reactivity towards late transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Erik Donovan; Schau-Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ......A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ...

  13. The role of electron-electron repulsion in the problem of epitaxial graphene on a metal: Simple estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    For single-layer graphene placed on a metal substrate, the influence of intra- and interatomic Coulomb repulsion of electrons ( U and G, respectively) on its phase diagram is considered in the framework of an extended Hartree-Fock theory. The general solution of the problem is presented, on the basis of which special cases allowing for analytical consideration are analyzed: free and epitaxial graphene with and without regard for the energy of the electron transition between neighboring atoms of graphene. Three regions of the phase diagram are considered: spin and charge density waves (SDW and CDW, respectively) and the semimetal (SM) state uniform in the spin and charge. The main attention is paid to undoped graphene. It is shown that the allowance for the interaction with a metal substrate expands the SM existence domain. However, in all the considered cases, the boundary between the SDW and CDW states is described by the equation U = zG, where z = 3 is the number of nearest neighbors in graphene. The widening of the SM state region also results from the doping of graphene, and the effect is independent of the sign of free carriers introduced into epitaxial graphene by the substrate. According to estimates made, the only state possible in the buffer layer is the metal-type SM state, whereas, in epitaxial graphene, the CDW state is possible. The influence of temperature on the phase diagram of epitaxial graphene is discussed.

  14. Polysulfide ligand exchange on zinc sulfide nanocrystal surfaces for improved film formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Steven M.; Lawal, Qudus O.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-12-01

    The physical and chemical properties of nanocrystals can be modified by changing the ligands attached at their surfaces. A ligand exchange procedure with ammonium polysulfides has been developed to replace the native ligands on cubic zinc sulfide nanocrystals. Several mixtures of polysulfides in formamide and other solvents were prepared with different average chain lengths and used to achieve high yield ligand exchange, as confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that polysulfide content can be increased with longer surface ligands and that the exchange process yields compositionally pure surfaces before and after high temperature anneals. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that, when annealed in nitrogen at 525 °C, polysulfide ligands lead to average crystal sizes 2-3 times larger than in the un-exchanged control sample. The ligand exchange procedure itself does not alter nanocrystal size. Nanocrystal inks prepared from the exchanged samples form thin films that exhibit superior grain growth, morphology, mass retention, and composition compared to the un-exchanged material. Overall, polysulfide species are demonstrated as alternative ligands for the surfaces of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals which, when incorporated in an efficient ligand-exchange procedure, can improve the quality of ZnS nanocrystal inks.

  15. Charging effect of aluminum nitride thin films containing Al nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Chen, T P; Ding, L; Wong, J I; Yang, M; Liu, Z; Li, Y B; Zhang, S

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the Al-rich AIN thin film is deposited on Si substrate by radio frequency (RF) sputtering to form a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure. Al nanocrystals (nc-Al) are formed and embedded in the AIN thin film. Charge trapping/detrapping in the nc-Al leads to a shift in the flat-band voltage (VFB) of the MIS structure. The charge storage ability of the AIN thin films containing Al nanocrystals provides the possibility of memory applications. On the other hand, charge trapping in nc-Al reduces the current conduction because of the breaking of some tunneling paths due to Coulomb blockade effect and the current conduction evolves with a trend towards one-dimensional transport.

  16. Polysulfide ligand exchange on zinc sulfide nanocrystal surfaces for improved film formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herron, Steven M. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lawal, Qudus O. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bent, Stacey F., E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ammonium polysulfides are prepared in aprotic solvents. • Native ligands on surfaces of colloidal ZnS nanocrystals are efficiently exchanged with polysulfides. • Ligand exchange improves crystallinity and composition in annealed ZnS thin films. • Polysulfide nanocrystal inks increase mass retention from 62% to 88%. - Abstract: The physical and chemical properties of nanocrystals can be modified by changing the ligands attached at their surfaces. A ligand exchange procedure with ammonium polysulfides has been developed to replace the native ligands on cubic zinc sulfide nanocrystals. Several mixtures of polysulfides in formamide and other solvents were prepared with different average chain lengths and used to achieve high yield ligand exchange, as confirmed by UV–vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that polysulfide content can be increased with longer surface ligands and that the exchange process yields compositionally pure surfaces before and after high temperature anneals. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that, when annealed in nitrogen at 525 °C, polysulfide ligands lead to average crystal sizes 2–3 times larger than in the un-exchanged control sample. The ligand exchange procedure itself does not alter nanocrystal size. Nanocrystal inks prepared from the exchanged samples form thin films that exhibit superior grain growth, morphology, mass retention, and composition compared to the un-exchanged material. Overall, polysulfide species are demonstrated as alternative ligands for the surfaces of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals which, when incorporated in an efficient ligand-exchange procedure, can improve the quality of ZnS nanocrystal inks.

  17. Carrier multiplication in germanium nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.; de Weerd, C.; Stallinga, P.; Spoor, F.C.M.; Houtepen, A.J.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Carrier multiplication is demonstrated in a solid-state dispersion of germanium nanocrystals in a silicon-dioxide matrix. This is performed by comparing ultrafast photo-induced absorption transients at different pump photon energies below and above the threshold energy for this process. The average

  18. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months and the therapeutic effect was evaluated ac-cording to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Soci-ety clinical rating systems. Results: In absorbable screw group, we obtained excel-lent and good results in 62 cases (96.88%; in steel screw group, 61 cases (93.85% achieved excellent and good results. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of malleolus fracture, absorbable screw can achieve the same result compared with metal screw fixation. Absorbable screw is preferred due to its advantages of safety, cleanliness and avoiding the removal procedure associated with metallic implants. Key words: Ankle; Bone screws; Fractures, bone

  19. Modeling of the electrostatic coupling between nanocrystals of a disordered nanocrystal floating gate memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armeanu, Dumitru; Leroy, Yann; Cordan, Anne-Sophie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a realistic model that explicitly takes into account the electrostatic coupling between the nanocrystals of a disordered layer constituting the floating gate of a non-volatile memory. A statistical study of the neighborhood of a given nanocrystal is carried out, leading to the mean number of neighboring nanocrystals as a function of the radius of the central nanocrystal. We show that the empty neighborhood of every nanocrystal can be represented by an equivalent torus ring in the previous model of a single nanocrystal. Then the effects of charged nanocrystals are taken into account by an appropriate rigid shift of the energy levels of the central nanocrystal. The proposed model is validated by statistical comparisons with exact 3D computations, and the influence of the electrostatic coupling is analyzed and discussed. (paper)

  20. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Yu

    Full Text Available The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET. In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P, the hazard index (HI and the cancer risk index (RI were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As > cadmium (Cd > lead (Pb > copper (Cu > chromium (Cr, in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3 and 1.05 × 10(-3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1 and 2.80 × 10(-1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  1. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-01-01

    The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P), the hazard index (HI) and the cancer risk index (RI) were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As) > cadmium (Cd) > lead (Pb) > copper (Cu) > chromium (Cr), in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3) and 1.05 × 10(-3), respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ) of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1) and 2.80 × 10(-1), respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  2. Evaluation of the bioaccessible gastric and intestinal fractions of heavy metals in contaminated soils by means of a simple bioaccessibility extraction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Mendoza, C; Tatiana Garrido, R; Cristian Quilodrán, R; Matías Segovia, C; José Parada, A

    2017-06-01

    A study is made to evaluate the bioaccessibility of heavy metals in contaminated soils through a simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET), applied to the analysis of both the gastric and intestinal phases. Soils with high metal content of the Mapocho, Cachapoal, and Rancagua series were studied; they are located in suburban areas of large cities in the central valley of Chile. The bioaccessible concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were related to the main physicochemical characteristics of the soils and to the chemical forms obtained by sequential extraction. The elements Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn are distributed in the soils between the exchangeable fractions, bound to oxides, to organic matter, and in the residual fraction. On the other hand, Cr and Pb are found mainly in the fractions bound to organic matter and in the residual fraction. The three soils have a high Cu content, (640-2060 mg/kg), in the order Cachapoal > Rancagua > Mapocho. The SBET test allowed establishing a different bioaccessibility for the elements in the soil. Cu was notoriously bioaccessible in both the gastric and intestinal phases in the three soils, reaching more than 50% in the Cachapoal and Rancagua soils. The other elements, regardless of the soil, were bioaccessible only in one of the phases, more frequently in the gastric phase. The multiple correlation study indicates that the metal forms have a higher incidence than the soil's physicochemical factors on the extractability to evaluate the human oral bioaccessibility of the metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of

  4. Cu2Se and Cu Nanocrystals as Local Sources of Copper in Thermally Activated In Situ Cation Exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2016-01-27

    Among the different synthesis approaches to colloidal nanocrystals a recently developed toolkit is represented by cation exchange reactions, where the use of template nanocrystals gives access to materials that would be hardly attainable via direct synthesis. Besides, post-synthetic treatments, such as thermally activated solid state reactions, represent a further flourishing route to promote finely controlled cation exchange. Here, we report that, upon in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, Cu2Se nanocrystals deposited on an amorphous solid substrate undergo partial loss of Cu atoms, which are then engaged in local cation exchange reactions with Cu “acceptors” phases represented by rod- and wire- shaped CdSe nanocrystals. This thermal treatment slowly transforms the initial CdSe nanocrystals into Cu2-xSe nanocrystals, through the complete sublimation of Cd and the partial sublimation of Se atoms. Both Cu “donor” and “acceptor” particles were not always in direct contact with each other, hence the gradual transfer of Cu species from Cu2Se or metallic Cu to CdSe nanocrystals was mediated by the substrate and depended on the distance between the donor and acceptor nanostructures. Differently from what happens in the comparably faster cation exchange reactions performed in liquid solution, this study shows that slow cation exchange reactions can be performed at the solid state, and helps to shed light on the intermediate steps involved in such reactions.

  5. Rapid synthesis of CdSe nanocrystals in aqueous solution at room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Water-soluble thioglycolic acid-capped CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) were prepared in aqueous solu- ... quality CdSe NCs is nonaqueous technique, which origi- ... room temperature. In this paper, a rapid and simple method was reported for synthesizing water-soluble thioglycolic acid-capped. CdSe NCs at room temperature.

  6. Embedded silicon nanocrystal interface structure and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry; Hegde, G. M.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2018-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystal-matrix interface and strain in embedded nanocrystals are studied using large-scale atomistic simulations, with the examples of Si nanocrystal embedded in amorphous matrix of SiO2. Photoluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix like SiO2 and Si3N4 are promising for Si-based optical devices. The nanocrystal-matrix interface plays a crucial role in understanding its optical and electrical properties. Nanocrystals with diameters varying from 2.17 to 4.56 nm are studied. A detailed quantitative analysis of the variation of Si/SiO2 interface structure and strain distribution with nanocrystal diameter is reported. A linear variation of the interface width with nanocrystal diameter is observed with thinner interfaces for larger nanocrystals. Local deformation analysis reveals that the smaller nanocrystals are highly strained, whereas the strain in the larger ones shifts to the interface. This is in accordance with observed increase in total percentage of defect states in the interface from 39 to 70 % for diameter increasing from 2.17 to 4.56 nm. Moreover, based on the atomic arrangements at the interface, optically active defects like Pb centres, E centres and non-bridging oxygen centres are identified and a dominance of Pb centres is observed for all the nanocrystals. The detailed structural characterization-related investigations using the proposed simulation approach will find useful application in designing system-level response of embedded nanocrystals and also to correlate various experimental observations.

  7. In Situ PDF Study of the Nucleation and Growth of Intermetallic PtPb Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saha, Dipankar; Bojesen, Espen D.; Mamakhel, Mohammad Aref Hasen

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of Pt and PtPb nanocrystal formation under supercritical ethanol conditions has been investigated by means of in situ X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. The metal complex structures of two different platinum precursor solutions, chloroplatinic acid...

  8. Direct synthesis and inkjetting of silver nanocrystals toward printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong Lee, Kwi; Jun, Byung Ho; Kim, Tae Hoon; Joung, Jaewoo

    2006-05-01

    Monolayer-protected silver nanoparticles were directly synthesized in a highly concentrated organic phase (>2 M) and then printed into conductive lines on polyimide by a drop-on-demand inkjet printer. The fully organic phase system contains silver nitrate as a silver precursor, n-butylamine as a media dissolving silver salt, dodecanoic acid as a capping molecule, toluene as a solvent, and sodium borohydride as a reducing reagent. Even using only generic chemicals, monodispersed silver nanocrystals with size of 7 nm were easily synthesized at the 100 g scale in a 1 litre reactor. Hydrocarbon monolayer-protected silver nanocrystal showed excellent dispersion stability even at metal content >70 wt%. The silver ink with metal content of 33 wt% had a viscosity of 5.4 cP and surface tension of 25 dyn cm-1. The silver ink was successfully inkjetted on variable substrates and then metallized at 250 °C. The metallized silver patterns exhibited very low specific electrical resistance (6 µΩ cm)

  9. Low-temperature synthesis of hexagonal transition metal ion doped ZnS nanoparticles by a simple colloidal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liping; Huang, Shungang; Sun, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    A general route to synthesize transition metal ions doped ZnS nanoparticles with hexagonal phase by means of a conventional reverse micelle at a low temperature is developed. The synthesis involves N,N-dimethylformamide, Zn(AC) 2 solution, thiourea, ammonia, mercaptoacetic acid, as oil phase, water phase, sulfide source, pH regulator, and surfactant, respectively. Thiourea, ammonia and mercaptoacetic acid are demonstrated crucial factors, whose effects have been studied in detail. In addition, the FT-IR spectra suggest that mercaptoacetic acid may form complex chelates with Zn 2+ in the preparation. In the case of Cu 2+ as a doped ion, hexagonal ZnS:Cu 2+ nanoparticles were synthesized at 95 °C for the first time. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements show that the ZnS:Cu 2+ nanoparticles are polycrystalline and possess uniform particle size. The possible formation mechanism of the hexagonal doped ZnS is discussed.

  10. Realizing NiO nanocrystals from a simple chemical method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanomaterials have become the caption of the activity now a days in the area of material science. Magnetism of nano- materials has become a significant concern in nanoscience due to the expected spectacular properties for its wide applications in diverse fields such as high density recording media, spin valves, magnetic ...

  11. Realizing NiO nanocrystals from a simple chemical method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    means of vacuum evaporation of Ni on NH2-terminated PEO film. Zheng and Zhang (2007) reported a molten-salt ... surface morphology of the prepared sample was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Philips .... surface area is much larger and hence makes a large contribution to the magnetization. The two ...

  12. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  13. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  14. A simple robust method for synthesis of metallic copper nanoparticles of high antibacterial potency against E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Aich, Pulakesh; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas; Sarkar, Raj Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Asoke Prasun

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparation of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) was developed by simple reduction of CuCl 2 in the presence of gelatin as a stabilizer and without applying stringent conditions like purging with nitrogen. The NPs were characterized by spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The particles were about 50–60 nm in size and highly stable. The antibacterial activity of this Cu-NP on Gram-negative Escherichia coli was demonstrated by the methods of agar plating, flow cytometry and phase contrast microscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentration (3.0 µg ml −1 ), minimum bactericidal concentration (7.5 µg ml −1 ) and susceptibility constant (0.92) showed that this Cu-NP is highly effective against E. coli at a much lower concentration than that reported previously. Treatment with Cu-NPs made E. coli cells filamentous. The higher the concentration of Cu-NPs, the greater the population of filamentous cells; average filament size varied from 7 to 20 µm compared to the normal cell size of ∼2.5 µm. Both filamentation and killing of cells by Cu-NPs (7.5 µg ml −1 ) also occurred in an E. coli strain resistant to multiple antibiotics. Moreover, an antibacterial effect of Cu-NPs was also observed in Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, for which the values of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were close to that for E. coli. (paper)

  15. Simple, Fast and Selective Detection of Adenosine Triphosphate at Physiological pH Using Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes and Metal Ions as Cross-Linkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Pang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes.

  16. Optical gain in silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelant, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 3 (2011), s. 625-630 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : experimental approach * luminescence * nanocrystals * optical gain * silicon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2011

  17. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals biofunctionalized with chitosan and aminoacids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajimol Augustine, M.; Anas, Abdulaziz; Das, Ani V.; Sreekanth, S.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2015-02-01

    Highly luminescent, manganese doped, zinc sulphide (ZnS:Mn) nanocrystals biofunctionalized with chitosan and various aminoacids such as L-citrulline, L-lysine, L-arginine, L-serine, L-histidine and glycine were synthesized by chemical capping co-precipitation method at room temperature, which is a simple and cost effective technique. The synthesized nanocrystals were structurally characterized by TEM, XRD, EDXS and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. They possess high colloidal stability with strong orange red photoluminescence emission at 598 nm. The intensity of orange red emission has been observed to be maximum in L-citrulline capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals in which the emission at 420 nm is effectively quenched by surface passivation due to capping. Taking into consideration the prospects of these highly luminescent, bio-compatible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals in bio-imaging applications, cytotoxicity studies were conducted to identify the capping combination which would accomplish minimum toxic effects. ZnS:Mn nanocrystals biofunctionalized with chitosan, L-citrulline, glycine, L-artginine, L-serine and L-histidine showed least toxicity up to 10 nM concentrations in mouse fibroblast L929 cells, which further confirms their cytocompatibility. Also the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals biofunctionalized with L-arginine showed maximum uptake in in vitro studies carried out in human embryonic kidney cells, HEK-293T, which shows the significant role of this particular amino acid in fetoplacental nutrition. The present study highlights the suitability of aminoacid conjugated ZnS:Mn nanocrystals, as promising candidates for biomedical applications.

  18. Growth of monodisperse nanocrystals of cerium oxide during synthesis and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Swapankumar; Divya, Damodaran; Remani, Kottayilpadi C.; Sreeremya, Thadathil S.

    2010-01-01

    Monodisperse cerium oxide nanocrystals have been successfully synthesised using simple ammonia precipitation technique from cerium(III) nitrate solution at different temperatures in the range 35-80 o C. The activation energy for growth of CeO 2 nanocrystals during the precipitation is calculated as 11.54 kJ/mol using Arrhenius plot. Average crystal diameter was obtained from XRD analysis, HR-TEM and light scattering (PCS). The analysis of size data from HR-TEM images and PCS clearly indicated the formation of highly crystalline CeO 2 particles in narrow size range. CeO 2 nanocrystals precipitated at 35 o C were further annealed at temperatures in the range 300-700 o C. The activation energy for crystal growth during annealing is also calculated and is close to the reported values. An effort is made to predict the mechanism of crystal growth during the precipitation and annealing.

  19. Facile one-step synthesis and transformation of Cu(I)-doped zinc sulfide nanocrystals to Cu(1.94)S-ZnS heterostructured nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Haihang; Tang, Aiwei; Huang, Liming; Wang, Yu; Yang, Chunhe; Hou, Yanbing; Peng, Hongshang; Zhang, Fujun; Teng, Feng

    2013-07-09

    A facile one-pot heating process without any injection has been developed to synthesize different Cu-Zn-S-based nanocrystals. The composition of the products evolves from Cu(I)-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu(I)) nanocrystals into heterostructured nanocrystals consisting of monoclinic Cu1.94S and wurtzite ZnS just by controlling the molar ratios of zinc acetylacetonate (Zn(acac)2) to copper acetylacetonate (Cu(acac)2) in the mixture of n-dodecanethiol (DDT) and 1-octadecene (ODE). Accompanying the composition transformation, the crystal phase of ZnS is changed from cubic zinc blende to hexagonal wurtzite. Depending on the synthetic parameters including the reaction time, temperature, and the feeding ratios of Zn/Cu precursors, the morphology of the as-obtained heterostructured nanocrystals can be controlled in the forms of taper-like, matchstick-like, tadpole-like, or rod-like. Interestingly, when the molar ratio of Cu(acac)2 to Zn(acac)2 is increased to 9:1, the crystal phase of the products is transformed from monoclinic Cu1.94S to the mixed phase composed of cubic Cu1.8S and tetragonal Cu1.81S as the reaction time is further prolonged. The crystal-phase transformation results in the morphological change from quasi-spherical to rice shape due to the incorporation of Zn ions into the Cu1.94S matrix. This method provides a simple but highly reproducible approach for synthesis of Cu(I)-doped nanocrystals and heterostructured nanocrystals, which are potentially useful in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  20. Tin dioxide dodecahedral nanocrystals anchored on graphene sheets with enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Daoping; Yang, Ting; Wang, Dandan; Duan, Xiaochuan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lingling; Liu, Yuan; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The nanocomposite of SnO 2 dodecahedral nanocrystals (DNCs) anchored on graphene sheets (GS) exhibits excellent electrochemical performance for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). - Highlights: • SnO 2 dodecahedral nanocrystals (DNCs) anchored on graphene sheets (GS) have been synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. • The SnO 2 DNCs-GS nanocomposite exhibits significant enhanced Li-battery performance compared with the pure SnO 2 DNCs. • This work indicates the importance of rational synthesis of graphene-based materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries (LIBs). - Abstract: Combination of transition metal oxides and graphene sheets (GS) is an effective strategy to improve the electrochemical performance of transition metal oxides. In the present work, we report a facile and simple hydrothermal method to synthesize the nanocomposite of SnO 2 dodecahedral nanocrystals (DNCs) anchored on GS as an advanced anode material for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Benefiting from the unique properties of graphene, the SnO 2 DNCs-GS nanocomposite exhibits significant enhanced Li-battery performance compared with the pure SnO 2 DNCs. The initial discharge and charge capacities of the SnO 2 DNC-GS electrode are 1653.2 and 1085.6 mA h g −1 , respectively. After 50 cycles, it still exhibits a high discharge capacity of 783.9 mA h g −1 at the current density of 200 mA g −1 . Remarkably, the discharge capacity of the SnO 2 DNCs-GS can still retain as high as 730.3 mA h g −1 at a high rate of 5 A g −1 , indicating good rate capability. The electrochemical results suggest the SnO 2 DNCs-GS nanocomposite would be a promising candidate as anode material in energy storage applications for high-performance LIBs. Our study also highlights the importance of rational design and synthesis of graphene-based materials for high-performance LIBs

  1. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of MgO nanocrystals for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongji [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Qiu, Guojun [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Cuiping; Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • MgO nanocrystals were prepared using DC arc plasma jet CVD method. • The growth time does not exceed 10 min in process of the synthesis. • The samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets. • Nanocrystals contain contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. • The samples exhibited excellent electrochemical biosensing properties. - Abstract: MgO nanocrystals were prepared using a simple direct current arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition method. Magnesium nitrate was used as source material and Mo film was used as a substrate and catalyst. The high-temperature plasma produced ensured rapid synthesis of the MgO nanocrystals. The as-prepared nanocrystals were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence measurements. The as-synthesized samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets with large surface areas and low coordination oxide ions, and contained numerous contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. The nanostructures exhibited excellent electrochemical sensing properties with high-sensing sensitivity toward ascorbic acid. Their high electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the effect of defects and the surface electron transfer ability of the one-dimensional MgO nanobelts.

  3. Formation and growth of semiconductor PbTe nanocrystals in a borosilicate glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.; Alves, O.L.; Barbosa, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Pb- and Te-doped borosilicate glasses are transformed by appropriate heat treatment into a composite material consisting of a vitreous matrix in which semiconductor PbTe nanocrystals are embedded. This composite exhibits interesting non-linear optical properties in the infrared region, in the range 10-20000 A. The shape and size distribution of the nanocrystals and the kinetics of their growth were studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during in situ isothermal treatment at 923 K. The experimental results indicate that nanocrystals are nearly spherical and have an average radius increasing from 16 to 33 A after 2 h at 923 K, the relative size dispersion being time-invariant and approximately equal to 8%. This investigation demonstrates that the kinetics of nanocrystal growth are governed by the classic mechanism of atomic diffusion. The radius of nanocrystals, deduced by applying the simple Efros and Efros (1982) model using the energy values corresponding to the exciton peaks of optical absorption spectra, does not agree with the average radius determined by SAXS. (orig.)

  4. Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals in the Research Spotlight: Stability and Defect Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Perspective outlines basic structural and optical properties of lead halide perovskite colloidal nanocrystals, highlighting differences and similarities between them and conventional II–VI and III–V semiconductor quantum dots. A detailed insight into two important issues inherent to lead halide perovskite nanocrystals then follows, namely, the advantages of defect tolerance and the necessity to improve their stability in environmental conditions. The defect tolerance of lead halide perovskites offers an impetus to search for similar attributes in other related heavy metal-free compounds. We discuss the origins of the significantly blue-shifted emission from CsPbBr3 nanocrystals and the synthetic strategies toward fabrication of stable perovskite nanocrystal materials with emission in the red and infrared parts of the optical spectrum, which are related to fabrication of mixed cation compounds guided by Goldschmidt tolerance factor considerations. We conclude with the view on perspectives of use of the colloidal perovskite nanocrystals for applications in backlighting of liquid-crystal TV displays. PMID:28920080

  5. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  6. Giant negative thermal expansion in magnetic nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X G; Kubozono, H; Yamada, H; Kato, K; Ishiwata, Y; Xu, C N

    2008-12-01

    Most solids expand when they are heated, but a property known as negative thermal expansion has been observed in a number of materials, including the oxide ZrW2O8 (ref. 1) and the framework material ZnxCd1-x(CN)2 (refs 2,3). This unusual behaviour can be understood in terms of low-energy phonons, while the colossal values of both positive and negative thermal expansion recently observed in another framework material, Ag3[Co(CN)6], have been explained in terms of the geometric flexibility of its metal-cyanide-metal linkages. Thermal expansion can also be stopped in some magnetic transition metal alloys below their magnetic ordering temperature, a phenomenon known as the Invar effect, and the possibility of exploiting materials with tuneable positive or negative thermal expansion in industrial applications has led to intense interest in both the Invar effect and negative thermal expansion. Here we report the results of thermal expansion experiments on three magnetic nanocrystals-CuO, MnF2 and NiO-and find evidence for negative thermal expansion in both CuO and MnF2 below their magnetic ordering temperatures, but not in NiO. Larger particles of CuO and MnF2 also show prominent magnetostriction (that is, they change shape in response to an applied magnetic field), which results in significantly reduced thermal expansion below their magnetic ordering temperatures; this behaviour is not observed in NiO. We propose that the negative thermal expansion effect in CuO (which is four times larger than that observed in ZrW2O8) and MnF2 is a general property of nanoparticles in which there is strong coupling between magnetism and the crystal lattice.

  7. Co nanocrystals engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaiña-Troitiño, N.; Ciuculescu-Pradines, D.; Correa-Duarte, M. A.; Salgueiriño, V.; Amiens, C.

    2017-06-01

    Organometallic chemistry plays an increasing role in the synthesis of nanoparticles, as it provides a reliable access to metal nanoparticles with efficient control over their morphology, organization and surface chemistry. In case of magnetic nanoparticles, the synthetic tools provided by organometallic chemistry allow access to nanomaterials of high magnetization, meaning that no dead surface magnetic layer is observed. These objects are thus good candidates to be used as building blocks in composite materials of high added value. This paper reports on the organometallic synthesis of composites made of cobalt nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes. TEM investigations show that attachment of cobalt spheres and rods along the carbon nanotubes is achieved, the rods and tube long axis being aligned parallel to one another. Invited talk at 8th Int. Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (Ha Long City, Vietnam, 8-12 November 2016).

  8. Effect of transition metal dopants on the optical and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... This review discusses the recent developments in doped semiconductor nanocrystals with a special emphasis on the effect of dopant on the electronic structure of the host nanocrystals. The review focusses on 3 transition metal dopants with unique electronic structure making them receptive for dramatic ...

  9. Nanocrystals-based Macroporous Materials Synthesized by Freeze-drying Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ruiqiang; Chen, Yu; Lin, Ye; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel freeze-drying combustion method for synthesis of macroporous powders with nano-network, using Sm 0.2 Ce 0.8 O 1.9 (SDC) as an example. The metal nitrate salt solution mixed with glycine is frozen to form homogeneous nitrate/glycine mixture and then freeze-dried through sublimation of ice crystals. Upon combustion of the freeze-dried mixture, SDC powders with macroporous microstructure consisting of 10–20 nm nanocrystals, high surface area and excellent sinterability are achieved. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis indicates that nanodomains due to aggregation/segregation of dopants in the SDC powders obtained from freeze-drying combustion are much smaller than those in the SDC powders synthesized by the conventional nitrate solution combustion approach, demonstrating better elemental homogeneity and improved conductivity. Using low cost precursors and simple processing conditions, freeze-drying combustion can be a versatile method to synthesize nanocrystalline powders with excellent composition homogeneity for broad applications.

  10. Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hongseok [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kim, Jungkwun; Allen, Mark G. [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Paik, Taejong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Meng, Lingyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Jo, Pil Sung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Complex Assemblies of Soft Matter, CNRS-SOLVAY-PENN UMI 3254, Bristol, Pennsylvania 19007-3624 (United States); Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kagan, Cherie R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Murray, Christopher B., E-mail: cbmurray@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the ac magnetic behavior of solution processable, non-stoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals with a series of sizes and zinc concentrations. Nearly monodisperse Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (x = 0–0.25) with an average size ranging from 7.4 nm to 13.8 nm are synthesized by using a solvothermal method. All the nanocrystals are in a superparamagnetic state at 300 K, which is confirmed by Superconductive Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. Due to the doping of non-magnetic Zn{sup 2+} into A site of ferrite, the saturation magnetization of nanocrystals increases as the size and Zn concentration increases. The ac magnetic permeability measurements at radio frequencies reveal that the real part of the magnetic permeability of similarly sized ferrite nanocrystals can be enhanced by almost twofold as the Zn{sup 2+} doping level increases from 0 to 0.25. The integration of 12.3 nm Zn{sub 0.25}Fe{sub 2.75}O{sub 4} nanocrystals into a toroidal inductor and a solenoid inductor prepared via a simple solution cast process yields a higher quality factors than air core inductors with the same geometries up to 5 MHz and 9 MHz, respectively, which is in the regime of the switching frequencies for the advanced integrated power converters.

  11. Controlling upconversion nanocrystals for emerging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Shi, Bingyang; Jin, Dayong; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals enable anti-Stokes emission with pump intensities several orders of magnitude lower than required by conventional nonlinear optical techniques. Their exceptional properties, namely large anti-Stokes shifts, sharp emission spectra and long excited-state lifetimes, have led to a diversity of applications. Here, we review upconversion nanocrystals from the perspective of fundamental concepts and examine the technical challenges in relation to emission colour tuning and luminescence enhancement. In particular, we highlight the advances in functionalization strategies that enable the broad utility of upconversion nanocrystals for multimodal imaging, cancer therapy, volumetric displays and photonics.

  12. Multiexciton fluorescence from semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Brent; Caruge, Jean-Michel; Chan, Y.-T.; Halpert, Jonathan; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2005-01-01

    We use transient photoluminescence to spectrally resolve the emission from 1, 2, and 3 electron-hole pairs states in CdSe colloidal nanocrystals with radii ranging between 2.3 and 5.2 nm. Temporally and spectrally resolved multiexciton emission from single NCs is also observed. The observation of multiexciton emission enables new experiments and potential applications at both the single NC level and using ensembles of NCs. First we discuss the use of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) colloidal NCs (spheres and rods) to generate triggered photon pair emission at room temperature, with specific ordering of the pair's constituent photons. Second, we incorporate CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals into a TiO 2 host matrix and observe simultaneous two-state amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from both multiexcitonic transitions (1S 3/2 -1S e and 1P 3/2 -1P e ) in a surface-emitting distributed feedback CdSe NC laser. From our data we deduce radiative lifetimes, quantum yields, stimulated emission gain, and power dependencies for the multiexciton transitions

  13. Synthesis of nanocrystals with variable high-index Pd facets through the controlled heteroepitaxial growth of trisoctahedral Au templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Liu, Bo; Lee, Jim Yang

    2010-12-29

    The shape-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals (NCs) bounded by high-index facets is a current research interest because the products have the potential of significantly improving the catalytic performance of NCs in industrially important reactions. This study reports a versatile method for synthesizing polyhedral NCs enclosed by a variety of high-index Pd facets. The method is based on the heteroepitaxial growth of Pd layers on concave trisoctahedral (TOH) gold NC seeds under careful control of the growth kinetics. Polyhedral Au@Pd NCs with three different classes of high-index facets, including concave TOH NCs with {hhl} facets, concave hexoctahedral (HOH) NCs with {hkl} facets, and tetrahexahedral (THH) NCs with {hk0} facets, can be formed in high yield. The Miller indices of NCs are also modifiable, and we have used the THH NCs as a demonstrative example. The catalytic activities of these NCs were evaluated by the structure-sensitive reaction of formic acid electro-oxidation. The results showed that the high-index facets are generally more active than the low-index facets. In summary, a seeded growth process based on concave high-index faceted monometallic TOH NC templates and careful control of the growth kinetics is a simple and effective strategy for the synthesis of noble metal NCs with high-index facets. It also offers tailorability of the surface structure in shape-controlled synthesis.

  14. Theory of the thermodynamic influence of solution-phase additives in shape-controlled nanocrystal synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Fichthorn, Kristen A

    2017-10-19

    Though many experimental studies have documented that certain solution-phase additives can play a key role in the shape-selective synthesis of metal nanocrystals, the origins and mechanisms of this shape selectivity are still unclear. One possible role of such molecules is to thermodynamically induce the equilibrium shape of a nanocrystal by altering the interfacial free energies of the facets. Using a multi-scheme thermodynamic integration method that we recently developed [J. Chem. Phys., 2016, 145, 194108], we calculate the solid-liquid interfacial free energies γ sl and investigate the propensity to achieve equilibrium shapes in such syntheses. We first apply this method to Ag(100) and Ag(111) facets in ethylene glycol solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), to mimic the environment in polyol synthesis of Ag nanocrystals. We find that although PVP has a preferred binding to Ag(100), its selectivity is not sufficient to induce a thermodynamic preference for {100}-faceted nanocubes, as has been observed experimentally. This indicates that PVP promotes Ag nanocube formation kinetically rather than thermodynamically. We further quantify the thermodynamic influence of adsorbed solution-phase additives for generic molecules, by building a γ sl ratio/nanocrystal shape map as a function of zero-temperature binding energies. This map can be used to gauge the efficacy of candidate additive molecules for producing targeted thermodynamic nanocrystal shapes. The results indicate that only additives with a strong facet selectivity can impart significant thermodynamic-shape change. Therefore, many of the nanocrystals observed in experiments are likely kinetic products.

  15. Nanocrystals embedded in hafnium dioxide-based dielectrics as charge storage nodes of nano-floating gate memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pui Fai

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystals (NC) embedded in dielectrics have attracted a great deal of attention recently because they can potentially be applied in nonvolatile, high-speed, high-density and low-power memory devices. This device benefits from a relatively low operating voltage, high endurance, fast write-erase speeds and better immunity to soft errors. The nanocrystal materials suitable for such an application can be either metals or semiconductors. Recent studies have shown that high-k dielectrics, instead of SiO2 , for the tunneling layer in nanocrystal floating gate memory can improve the trade-off between data retention and program efficiency due to the unique band alignment of high-k dielectrics in the programming and retention modes. In this project, HfAlO has been selected as the high- k dielectric for the nanocrystal floating gate memory structure. The trilayer structure (HfAlO/Ge-NC/HfAlO) on Si was fabricated by PLD. Results revealed that relatively low substrate temperature and growth rate are favourable for the formation of smaller-size Ge nanocrystals. Effects of size/density of the Ge nanocrystal, the tunneling and control oxide layer thicknesses and the oxygen partial pressure during their growth on the charge storage and charge retention characteristics have also been studied. The island structure of the Ge nanocrystal suggests that the growth is based on the Volmer-Webber mode. The self-organized Ge nanocrystals so formed were uniform in size (5--20 nm diameter) and distribution with a density approaching 1012--1013cm-2. Flat-band voltage shift (DeltaVFB) of about 3.6 V and good retention property have been achieved. By varying aggregation distance, sputtering gas pressure and ionization power of the nanocluster source, nanoclusters of Ge with different sizes can be formed. The memory effect of the trilayer structure so formed with 10 nm Ge nanoclusters are manifested by the counter-clockwise hysteresis loop in the C-V curves and a maximum flat-band voltage

  16. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  17. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, K; Gruduls, A; Jankovica, D; Liepins, J; Gavare, M; Patmalnieks, A

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO 2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO 2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO 2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  18. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  19. Simple machines

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Just how simple are simple machines? With our ready-to-use resource, they are simple to teach and easy to learn! Chocked full of information and activities, we begin with a look at force, motion and work, and examples of simple machines in daily life are given. With this background, we move on to different kinds of simple machines including: Levers, Inclined Planes, Wedges, Screws, Pulleys, and Wheels and Axles. An exploration of some compound machines follows, such as the can opener. Our resource is a real time-saver as all the reading passages, student activities are provided. Presented in s

  20. Bone bonding bioactivity of Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys with Ca ions incorporated on their surfaces by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Yamaguchi, S; Kizuki, T; Matsushita, T; Niinomi, M; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-03-01

    Ti15Zr4Nb4Ta and Ti29Nb13Ta4.6Zr, which do not contain the potentially cytotoxic elements V and Al, represent a new generation of alloys with improved corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility. Recently it has become possible for the apatite forming ability of these alloys to be ascertained by treatment with alkali, CaCl2, heat, and water (ACaHW). In order to confirm the actual in vivo bioactivity of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and these alloys after subjecting them to ACaHW treatment at different temperatures, the bone bonding strength of implants made from these materials was evaluated. The failure load between implant and bone was measured for treated and untreated plates at 4, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation in rabbit tibia. The untreated implants showed almost no bonding, whereas all treated implants showed successful bonding by 4 weeks, and the failure load subsequently increased with time. This suggests that a simple and economical ACaHW treatment could successfully be used to impart bone bonding bioactivity to Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys in vivo. In particular, implants heat treated at 700 °C exhibited significantly greater bone bonding strength, as well as augmented in vitro apatite formation, in comparison with those treated at 600 °C. Thus, with this improved bioactive treatment process these advantageous Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New self-assembled nanocrystal micelles for biolabels and biosensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallant, David Robert; Wilson, Michael C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Leve, Erik W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Gabaldon, John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Scullin, Chessa (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-12-01

    The ability of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to display multiple (size-specific) colors simultaneously during a single, long term excitation holds great promise for their use in fluorescent bio-imaging. The main challenges of using nanocrystals as biolabels are achieving biocompatibility, low non-specific adsorption, and no aggregation. In addition, functional groups that can be used to further couple and conjugate with biospecies (proteins, DNAs, antibodies, etc.) are required. In this project, we invented a new route to the synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible NCs. Our approach is to encapsulate as-synthesized, monosized, hydrophobic NCs within the hydrophobic cores of micelles composed of a mixture of surfactants and phospholipids containing head groups functionalized with polyethylene glycol (-PEG), -COOH, and NH{sub 2} groups. PEG provided biocompatibility and the other groups were used for further biofunctionalization. The resulting water-soluble metal and semiconductor NC-micelles preserve the optical properties of the original hydrophobic NCs. Semiconductor NCs emit the same color; they exhibit equal photoluminescence (PL) intensity under long-time laser irradiation (one week) ; and they exhibit the same PL lifetime (30-ns). The results from transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescent imaging indicate that water-soluble semiconductor NC-micelles are biocompatible and exhibit no aggregation in cells. We have extended the surfactant/lipid encapsulation techniques to synthesize water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles. Transmission electron microscopy results suggest that water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles exhibit no aggregation. The resulting NC-micelles preserve the magnetic properties of the original hydrophobic magnetic NCs. Viability studies conducted using yeast cells suggest that the magnetic nanocrystal-micelles are biocompatible. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that using external oscillating magnetic fields to manipulate

  2. Fluorescence intermittency in single cadmium selenide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, M.; Dabbousi, B. O.; Bawendi, M. G.; Macklin, J. J.; Trautman, J. K.; Harris, T. D.; Brus, L. E.

    1996-10-01

    SEMICONDUCTOR nanocrystals offer the opportunity to study the evolution of bulk materials properties as the size of a system increases from the molecular scale1,2. In addition, their strongly size-dependent optical properties render them attractive candidates as tunable light absorbers and emitters in optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes3,4 and quantum-dot lasers5,6, and as optical probes of biological systems7. Here we show that light emission from single fluorescing nanocrystals of cadmium selenide under continuous excitation turns on and off intermittently with a characteristic timescale of about 0.5 seconds. This intermittency is not apparent from ensemble measurements on many nanocrystals. The dependence on excitation intensity and the change in on/off times when a passivating, high-bandgap shell of zinc sulphide encapsulates the nanocrystal8,9 suggests that the abrupt turning off of luminescence is caused by photo-ionization of the nanocrystal. Thus spectroscopic measurements on single nanocrystals can reveal hitherto unknown aspects of their photophysics.

  3. Bright trions in direct-bandgap silicon nanocrystals revealed bylow-temperature single-nanocrystal spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2015), e336 ISSN 2047-7538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy * luminescing trions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.600, year: 2015

  4. Lanthanide-doped nanocrystals: synthesis, optical-magnetic properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofeng; Peng, Qing; Li, Yadong

    2011-05-17

    . These binary nanoparticles can be hybridized with a third DNA (target DNA) molecule and separated with the assistance of a magnetic field. In addition, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method for nonenzymatic glucose determination has been developed by using the glucose-modified LaF(3):Ce(3+)/Tb(3+) nanocrystals. By using bioconjugated NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanoparticles as the energy donor and bioconjugated gold nanoparticles as the energy acceptor, we successfully developed a simple and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor for avidin. Meanwhile, we also carried out preliminary studies to investigate possible applications of lanthanide-doped nanocrystals in catalysis and in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  5. Grafted SiC nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Isha; Sharma, Annu; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    ), raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy was used to study optical properties such as optical energy gap (Eg), Urbach's energy (Eu), refractive index (n), real (ε1) and imaginary (ε2) parts of dielectric constant of PVA as well as PVA-g-SiC/PVA......) were determined. Microhardness measurements performed at an applied load of 9.8 mN showed an increase in the Knoop microhardness number (KHN) of PVA containing 0.015 wt% PVA-g-SiC nanocrystals. Detailed analysis of current-voltage data indicates that the conduction mechanism responsible for increase...... in conductivity of PVA-g-SiC/PVA nanocomposite film is voltage dependent and Schottky mechanism is the dominant conduction mechanism at medium and high voltage regions....

  6. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  7. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerung, Henry [Albuquerque, NM; Boyle, Timothy J [Kensington, MD; Bunge, Scott D [Cuyahoga Falls, OH

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  8. Interconversion between KSc2F7:Yb/Er and K2NaScF6:Yb/Er nanocrystals: the role of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangbo; Yang, Bingxiao; Chen, Kun; Zhou, Enlong; Zhang, Qinghua; Yin, Lisha; Xie, Xiaoji; Gu, Lin; Huang, Ling

    2018-04-03

    Scandium (Sc) sits at a unique position in the periodic table, i.e., the junction of the top of the rare earth column and the beginning of the transition metal row. Studies have shown that Sc-based nanomaterials are very sensitive to the surrounding chemical environment. A simple adjustment of the chemical reaction conditions such as temperature, surfactant molecules, and solvents (e.g., oleic acid (OA) or 1-octadecene (OD)) can easily lead to different products in terms of chemical composition and phase structure. Herein, under purposely adjusted reaction conditions, we have investigated the interconversion process between two representative Sc-based nanomaterials, that is, nanocrystals of orthorhombic KSc2F7:Yb/Er and cubic K2NaScF6:Yb/Er, both of which have characteristic red upconversion luminescence and high similarity in chemical composition and phase structure. Experimental results have indicated that conversion from KSc2F7:Yb/Er to K2NaScF6:Yb/Er may start from the edge of the nanocrystal where K+ in KSc2F7:Yb/Er was gradually substituted by the post-introduced Na+ in the solution and finally KSc2F7:Yb/Er nanorods were broken and K2NaScF6:Yb/Er nanocubes were formed. On the other hand, a simple variation of the OA : OD ratio facilitates the dissolution of K2NaScF6:Yb/Er and subsequent crystallization of KSc2F7:Yb/Er during the opposite conversion process. Possible chemical reaction mechanisms were further developed to elucidate the interconversion details. Meanwhile, the variation of the upconversion luminescence such as emission intensity, red to green ratio, and lifetime is interpreted to monitor the conversion progress at corresponding stages, which is highly consistent with the scenario discussed above.

  9. Light Scattering Spectroscopies of Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Grat; Nozaki, Shinji; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    We review the study of nanocrystals or quantum dots using inelastic light scattering spectroscopies. In particular recent calculations of the phonon density of states and low frequency Raman spectra in Ge nanocrystals are presented for comparison with experimental results

  10. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  11. Assembling a Lasing Hybrid Material With Supramolecular Polymers and Nanocrystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Leiming

    2003-01-01

    .... In the system containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid material forming an ultraviolet lasing medium with a lower threshold relative to pure ZnO nanocrystals.

  12. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  13. TRUSSPOLE - Trussed Metallic Pole. Results of its application in 69 kV TL - simple circuit; Trusspole: poste metalico trelicado. Resultados da aplicacao em LT 69kV - circuito simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Paulo Ricardo Ralo Liberato da; Mello, Reynaldo Castriota de; Ferreira, Sirio Jose; Cadete, Marcia Augusta de Moura [MJMS - Mendes Junior Montagens e Servicos Ltda., Santa Luzia, MG (Brazil); Souza, Mauro Dias de [EGEL - Engenharia e Construcoes Ltda. (Brazil); Dantas, Roberto Pires [PLT - Projetos de Linhas de Transmissao Ltda. (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the origin, the development and the results of the TRUSSPOLE(Trussed Metallic Post) application in electric power transmission systems. It concerns a spatial trussed structure with a single metallic basis, similar to the concrete or wood pole, able to associate the technical and economical advantages of the trussed structures and the tubular or solid thick poles. The results obtained in the project, in load experiments of a study initial prototype and in the construction of a 69 kV Cs transmission line, with a 53.2 Km extension, using this type of structural solution, are shown 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Conjugated polymers/semiconductor nanocrystals hybrid materials--preparation, electrical transport properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Peter; Couderc, Elsa; De Girolamo, Julia; Pron, Adam

    2011-02-01

    This critical review discusses specific preparation and characterization methods applied to hybrid materials consisting of π-conjugated polymers (or oligomers) and semiconductor nanocrystals. These materials are of great importance in the quickly growing field of hybrid organic/inorganic electronics since they can serve as active components of photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, photodetectors and other devices. The electronic energy levels of the organic and inorganic components of the hybrid can be tuned individually and thin hybrid films can be processed using low cost solution based techniques. However, the interface between the hybrid components and the morphology of the hybrid directly influences the generation, separation and transport of charge carriers and those parameters are not easy to control. Therefore a large variety of different approaches for assembling the building blocks--conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanocrystals--has been developed. They range from their simple blending through various grafting procedures to methods exploiting specific non-covalent interactions between both components, induced by their tailor-made functionalization. In the first part of this review, we discuss the preparation of the building blocks (nanocrystals and polymers) and the strategies for their assembly into hybrid materials' thin films. In the second part, we focus on the charge carriers' generation and their transport within the hybrids. Finally, we summarize the performances of solar cells using conjugated polymer/semiconductor nanocrystals hybrids and give perspectives for future developments.

  15. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Maaza, M., E-mail: likmaaz@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO{sub 3)} is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO{sub 3} fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO{sub 3} NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm.

  16. Electron retention in InAs-nanocrystals embedded in SiO2/Si for non-volatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocevar, M.; Regreny, P.; Gendry, M.; Poncet, A.; Souifi, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the electrical characterization of an InAs nanocrystal based metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. The fabricated device behaves as a memory since the charges injected in the InAs through the SiO 2 tunnel layer (holes or electrons) have a long retention time in or by the nanocrystals. A discharging model based on direct tunnelling through a dielectric barrier has been used in order to calculate electron discharging kinetics. The results show that InAs-nanocrystals are of real interest for electron storage in non-volatile memories with an improvement of data retention for electron. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Multiexciton absorption in CdSe nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yong

    2009-03-01

    Efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG) has been recently reported in semiconductor nanocrystals. In this process, a single absorbed photon generates two or more electron-hole pairs. The MEG efficiency has so far been evaluated assuming that the change (bleaching) of the absorption spectrum due to MEG is linearly proportional to the number of excitons (NX) that are present in the nanocrystal. We have examined this assumption using atomistic pseudopotential calculations for colloidal CdSe nanocrystals ranging in size from 3 to 4.6 nm. We found that the bleaching of the first absorption peak, δα1S, depends non-linearly on NX, due to carrier-carrier interactions. When a single exciton is present in the nanocrystal, the 1S exciton peak is already 65-75% bleached. This non-linearity mandates an upper bound of 1.5 to the value of the normalized bleaching that can be attributed to MEG, significantly smaller than the limit of 2.0 predicted by the linear scaling assumption. Thus, measured values of the normalized bleaching in excess of 1.5 in CdSe nanocrystals cannot be due entirely to MEG, but must originate in part from other mechanisms.

  18. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  19. Direct femtosecond observation of charge carrier recombination in ternary semiconductor nanocrystals: The effect of composition and shelling

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2015-02-12

    Heavy-metal free ternary semiconductor nanocrystals are emerging as key materials in photoactive applications. However, the relative abundance of intra-bandgap defect states and lack of understanding of their origins within this class of nanocrystals are major factors limiting their applicability. To remove these undesirable defect states which considerably shorten the lifetimes of photogenerated excited carriers, a detailed understanding about their origin and nature is required. In this report, we monitor the ultrafast charge carrier dynamics of CuInS2 (CIS), CuInSSe (CISSe), and CuInSe2 (CISe) nanocrystals, before and after ZnS shelling, using state-of-the-art time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrate the presence of both electron and hole trapping intra-bandgap states in the nanocrystals which can be removed significantly by ZnS shelling, and the carrier dynamics is slowed down. Another important observation remains the reduction of carrier lifetime in the presence of Se, and the shelling strategy is observed to be less effective at suppressing trap states. This study provides quantitative physical insights into the role of anion composition and shelling on the charge carrier dynamics in ternary CIS, CISSe, and CISe nanocrystals which are essential to improve their applicability for photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  20. Simple prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Han M, Partin AW. Simple prostatectomy: open and robot-assisted laparoscopic approaches. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  1. Simple unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, W.A.; Zepeda, A.

    1987-08-01

    We present the results obtained from our systematic search of a simple Lie group that unifies weak and electromagnetic interactions in a single truly unified theory. We work with fractionally charged quarks, and allow for particles and antiparticles to belong to the same irreducible representation. We found that models based on SU(6), SU(7), SU(8) and SU(10) are viable candidates for simple unification. (author). 23 refs

  2. Simplistic Attachment and Multispectral Imaging with Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara G. Becker-Catania

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in spectral deconvolution technologies are rapidly enabling researchers to replace or enhance traditional epifluorescence microscopes with instruments capable of detecting numerous markers simultaneously in a multiplexed fashion. While significantly expediting sample throughput and elucidating sample information, this technology is limited by the spectral width of common fluorescence reporters. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC’s are very bright, narrow band fluorescence emitters with great potential for multiplexed fluorescence detection, however the availability of NC’s with facile attachment chemistries to targeting molecules has been a severe limitation to the advancement of NC technology in applications such as immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Here we report the development of simple, yet novel attachment chemistries for antibodies onto NC’s and demonstrate how spectral deconvolution technology enables the multiplexed detection of 5 distinct NC-antibody conjugates with fluorescence emission wavelengths separated by as little as 20 nm.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of tungsten doped tin dioxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cailong; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yiwen; Lin, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten doped tin dioxide (WTO) nanocrystals were synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structure, composition and morphology of WTO nanocrystals were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, zeta potential analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the as-prepared WTO nanocrystals were rutile-type structure with the size near 13 nm. Compared with the undoped tin dioxide nanocrystals, the WTO nanocrystals possessed better dispersity in ethanol phase and formed transparent sol.

  4. Toughening by nano-scaled twin boundaries in nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Haofei; Qu, Shaoxing; Yang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Joint enhancement on strength and toughness provides a cutting-edge research frontier for metals and alloys. Conventional strengthening methods typically lead to suppressed ductility and fracture toughness. In this study, large-scale atomic simulation on the fracture process is performed featuring nanocrystals embedded with nano-scaled twin boundaries (TBs). Four toughening mechanisms by nano-scaled TBs are identified: (i) crack blunting through dislocation accommodation along the nano-scaled TBs; (ii) crack deflection in a manner of intragranular propagation; (iii) daughter crack formation along the nano-scaled TBs that further enhances the toughness and (iv) curved TB planes owing to an excessive pileup of geometrically necessary dislocations. These toughening mechanisms jointly dictate the mechanical behavior of nano-structured materials, and provide insights into the application of nano-scaled TBs with an aim to simultaneously obtain enhanced strength and toughness. New approaches to introduce these coherent internal defects into the nanostructure of crystalline materials are also proposed

  5. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanocrystals and Their Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra in a Spinning Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Dmitry

    This thesis describes new aspects of the synthesis and ultrafast spectroscopy of PbS nanocrystals. The first part of the thesis investigates two aspects of PbS nanocrystal synthesis: the identity and composition of oleylamine reagent and the nature of sulfur species in sulfur solutions in long-chain amines. Oleylamine, formally cis-9-octadecyl-1-amine, is a solvent, a reactant, and a ligand in the synthesis of high-quality PbS nanocrystals and other nanomaterials. It is shown that commercial oleylamine samples contain elaidylamine, trans-9-octadecen-1-amine. Sulfur solutions in long-chain amines (n-octylamine and oleylamine) are common precursors in metal sulfide nanomaterial synthesis. Resonance Raman experiments on sulfur-amine solutions established the presence of various polysulfide anions, which slowly equilibrate on the timescale of days, causing a change in reactivity of the sulfur precursor. This aging of sulfur-amine solutions is shown to be strongly correlated with irreproducibility in PbS nanocrystal syntheses. The second part of the thesis deals with non-linear optical experiments on sensitive samples, where vibrational stability, repetitive excitation, and sensitivity to air and moisture constitute a set of challenges often preventing an experiment without photoproduct contamination. As a solution to this problem, we designed, constructed and characterized a compact spinning sample cell suitable for liquid and thin film samples. The spinning sample cell, enclosed in a copper gasket sealed enclosure, enables complete sample exchange in optical experiments with up to 100 kHz repetition rates while maintaining an oxygen and water free environment at the 1 ppm level for over a month. The spinning sample cell was successfully used in a two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiment on PbS nanocrystals in solution, eliminating the buildup of the long-lived photoproducts and reducing trap emission in the spinning sample.

  6. Phase Stability and Transformations in Vanadium Oxide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerud, Amy Jo

    Vanadium oxides are both fascinating and complex, due in part to the many compounds and phases that can be stabilized as well as the phase transformations which occur between them. The metal to insulator transitions (MITs) that take place in vanadium oxides are particularly interesting for both fundamental and applied study as they can be induced by a variety of stimuli ( i.e., temperature, pressure, doping) and utilized in many applications (i.e., smart windows, sensors, phase change memory). Nanocrystals also tend to demonstrate interesting phase behavior, due in part to the enhanced influence of surface energy on material thermodynamics. Vanadium oxide nanocrystals are thus expected to demonstrate very interesting properties in regard to phase stability and phase transformations, although synthesizing vanadium oxides in nanocrystal form remains a challenge. Vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) is an example of a material that undergoes a MIT. For decades, the low temperature monoclinic phase and high temperature corundum phase were the only known crystal structures of V2O3. However, in 2011, a new metastable polymorph of V2O3 was reported with a cubic, bixbyite crystal structure. In Chapter 2, a colloidal route to bixbyite V2O 3 nanocrystals is presented. In addition to being one of the first reported observations of the bixbyite phase in V2O3, it is also one of the first successful colloidal syntheses of any of the vanadium oxides. The nanocrystals possess a flower-like morphology, the size and shape of which are dependent on synthesis time and temperature, respectively. An aminolysis reaction mechanism is determined from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data and the bixbyite crystal structure is confirmed by Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Phase stability is assessed in both air and inert environments, confirming the metastable nature of the material. Upon heating in an inert atmosphere above 700°C, the nanocrystals irreversibly transform

  7. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  8. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  9. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  10. Plasmonic Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals Doped with Boron and Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas J; Schramke, Katelyn S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-08-12

    Degenerately doped silicon nanocrystals are appealing plasmonic materials due to silicon's low cost and low toxicity. While surface plasmonic resonances of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals were recently observed, there currently is poor understanding of the effect of surface conditions on their plasmonic behavior. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit a plasmon resonance immediately after their synthesis but may lose their plasmonic response with oxidation. In contrast, boron-doped nanocrystals initially do not exhibit plasmonic response but become plasmonically active through postsynthesis oxidation or annealing. We interpret these results in terms of substitutional doping being the dominant doping mechanism for phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals, with oxidation-induced defects trapping free electrons. The behavior of boron-doped silicon nanocrystals is more consistent with a strong contribution of surface doping. Importantly, boron-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit air-stable plasmonic behavior over periods of more than a year.

  11. Metal decoration of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) for fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, In-Hwan

    The synthesis and characterization of metal particles at nanometer length scale has been the object of much research in modern nanotechnology due to their great impact on new nanoscale scientific and technological applications. Nanoscale metal particles possess unique optical, thermal, electronic, magnetic properties and chemical reactivity since the size of the resulting materials is on the same order as the fundamental interaction distances that give rise to physical properties and thus shows the quantum size effect which is not observed in their bulky status. Therefore, an effective synthetic method is required to obtain uniform small metal powders with controlled size and a narrow size distribution and also to produce nanocomposites consisting of either metals or metal oxides supported on carbons or metals dispersed on metal oxides for a variety of applications in chemical industries, automobiles, energy and power generating devices, hydrogen economy as well as for sensors. On the other hand, although their excellent mechanical, thermal and electrical conductivity, excellent corrosion and oxidation resistance, and low impurity levels which are required as a breakthrough material to increase performance of next generation energy devices, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) has not been studied as deeply as recent new nano structured carbon materials such as single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), carbon nanohorn (CNH), graphite nanofiber (GNF), and fullerenes. In addition, xGnP is much cost-effective compared to other carbon nanostructures. Hence, it is interesting to evaluate the applicability of xGnP as a support material for fuel cell which is one of promising energy devices for the future. In this research, a new simple, efficient and economic way is presented for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles such as Pt, Ru, Pd, etc and their deposition on various carbon supports and metal oxides via microwave heating in the

  12. Host–guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host–guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs. PMID:26647828

  13. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-12-09

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 10(11) Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  14. Memory characteristics of cobalt-silicide nanocrystals embedded in HfO2 gate oxide for nonvolatile nanocrystal flash devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JooHyung; Yang, JungYup; Lee, JunSeok; Hong, JinPyo

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt-silicide (CoSi2) nanocrystals (NCs) were investigated for use in charge storage for metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices with thin HfO2 tunneling and control oxide layers. CoSi2 NCs were synthesized by exposure of Co /Si/HfO2 tunneling oxide/Si stacks to an external UV laser. Observations from transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clearly confirm the formation of CoSi2 NCs and the values of Co-Si bonding energies that are shifted 0.3eV from original values, respectively. The CoSi2 NCs in MOS devices exhibited a large memory window of 3.4V as well as efficient programming/erasing speeds, good retention, and endurance times.

  15. Spectroscopy of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Limpens, Rens; Chung, Nguyen Xuan; Schall, Peter; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2016-02-08

    Carrier multiplication in nanostructures promises great improvements in a number of widely used technologies, among others photodetectors and solar cells. The decade since its discovery was ridden with fierce discussions about its true existence, magnitude, and mechanism. Here, we introduce a novel, purely spectroscopic approach for investigation of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals. Applying this method to silicon nanocrystals in an oxide matrix, we obtain an unambiguous spectral signature of the carrier multiplication process and reveal details of its size-dependent characteristics-energy threshold and efficiency. The proposed method is generally applicable and suitable for both solid state and colloidal samples, as well as for a great variety of different materials.

  16. Preparation of nanocrystals and nanocomposites of nanocrystal-conjugated polymer, and their photophysical properties in confined geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductors nanocrystals (NCs), also called quantum dots (QDs), have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade in the fields of physics, chemistry, and engineering. Due to the quantum-confined nature of QDs, the variation of particle size provides continuous and predictable changes in fluorescence emission. On the other hand, conjugated polymers (CPs) have been extensively studied for two decades due to their semiconductor-like optical and electronic properties. The electron and energy transfer between NCs and CPs occur in solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs), respectively. Placing CPs in direct contact with a NC (i.e., preparing NC-CP nanocomposites) carries advantage over cases where NC aggregation dominates. Such NC-CP nanocomposites possess a well-defined interface that significantly promotes the charge or energy transfer between these two components. However, very few studies have centered on such direct integration. We prepared NCs and NC-CP nanocomposites based on heck coupling and investigated the energy and charge transfer between semiconductor NCs (i.e., CdSe QDs), CPs (i.e., poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)) in the nanocomposites in confined geometries. Two novel strategies were used to confine NC and/or NC-CP nanocomposites: (a) directly immobilizing nanohybrids, QDs and nanorods in nanoscopic porous alumina membrane (PAM) , and (b) confining the QDs and CPs in sphere-on-flat geometry to induce self-assembly. While investigating the confinement effect, gradient concentric ring patterns of high regularity form spontaneously simply by allowing a droplet of solution containing either conjugated polymer or semiconductor nanocrystal in a consecutive stick-slip mothion in a confined geometry. Such constrained evaporation can be utilized as a simple, cheap, and robust strategy for self-assembling various materials with easily tailored optical and electronic properties into spatially ordered, two-dimensional patterns. These self

  17. Photo-thermoelectric properties of SnS nanocrystals with orthorhombic layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Cheol-Min; Choi, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Ji-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    The photo-thermoelectric properties of SnS nanocrystals, two-dimensional materials with an orthorhombic symmetry, were investigated using a focused laser scanning method. The SnS nanocrystals were synthesized by a vapor transport method, and their fundamental material and electrical properties were investigated. Upon shining a laser onto the SnS channel region under a positive source-drain bias, a positive photocurrent was observed due to photo-excited electron-hole pairs. On the other hand, when this external electric field was not applied, a strong photocurrent was observed within the metal electrode region rather than at the metal-semiconductor interface, which indicated that the major mechanism for the photocurrent under zero external bias was a photo-induced thermoelectric effect rather than a photovoltaic effect. Moreover, the Seebeck coefficient of the SnS nanocrystal device was approximately 1735 μV/K, which is 3.5 times larger than that of its bulk counterpart.

  18. Simple Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and international public. The exhibition Simple Interactions. Sound Art from Japan presents works by 9 Japanese artists at the Museum of Contemporary Art Roskilde. The exhibition mixes installations, performances and documentations, all of which examine how simple interactions can create complex systems...... and patterns. Works and performances by the following artists are presented: Yuji DOGANE - Yukio FUJIMOTO - Atsuhiro ITO - Soichiro MIHARA - Atsushi NISHIJIMA - Jio SHIMIZU - Toshiya TSUNODA - Tetsuya UMEDA - Miki YUI The book presents texts by Minoru HATANAKa; Takashi KOJIMA, Rune SØCHTING and the editors...

  19. Facile synthesis of monodisperse ZnS capped CdS nanocrystals exhibiting efficient blue emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiss Peter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA new method for the capping of colloidal CdS nanocrystals with ZnS shells is presented. A combination of the monomolecular precursor zinc ethylxanthate (Zn(ex2 and zinc stearate was used to replace hazardous organometallic reagents usually applied in this procedure, i.e. bis(trimethylsilyl sulfide and diethylzinc. Its simple preparation, air-stability and low decomposition temperature of 150 °C make Zn(ex2a very suitable source for the ZnS shell growth. With this precursor, highly luminescent CdS/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (Q.Y. 35–45%, exhibiting narrow emission linewidths of 15–18 nm (FWHM in the blue spectral region, can reproducibly be obtained.

  20. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy of 25MgH (X2Σ+) and (67)ZnH (X2Σ+): bonding in simple metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchino, Matthew P; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2013-10-03

    Pure rotational spectra of (25)MgH (X(2)Σ(+)) and (67)ZnH (X(2)Σ(+)) were recorded using direct absorption techniques. These free radicals were synthesized by the reaction of metal vapor, generated in a Broida-type oven, with H2 in a dc discharge. The N = 0 → 1 and N = 1 → 2 transitions were recorded for both species in the frequency range 342-789 GHz. Spin-rotation and metal and proton hyperfine interactions were resolved in the spectra. From these data, rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine constants were determined, including the Fermi contact, dipolar, and electric quadrupole parameters of the (25)Mg and (67)Zn nuclei. Comparison of the metal and proton hyperfine terms suggests that the unpaired electron resides in a σ molecular orbital that has significant s contributions from both the metal and the hydrogen atoms. The dipolar terms for both metals are relatively large, in contrast to those of the proton, and indicate spσ and possibly sdσ (zinc only) orbital hybridization. The quadrupole constants arise principally from the p/d orbital character of the unpaired electron, although there is a non-negligible polarization contribution. These results suggest significant covalent character in both MgH and ZnH, in contrast to their fluoride analogs.

  2. High-efficiency plasmon-enhanced and graphene-supported semiconductor/metal core-satellite hetero-nanocrystal photocatalysts for visible-light dye photodegradation and H2 production from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ping; Sun, Jian; Jin, Yongdong

    2014-11-26

    Solar-driven photocatalytic process based on electron-hole pair production in semiconductors is a long sought-after solution to a green and renewable energy and has attracted a renaissance of interest recently. The relatively low photocatalytic efficiency, however, is a main obstacle to their practical applications. A promising attempt to solve this problem is by combined use of metal nanoparticles, by taking advantage of strong and localized plasmonic near-field to enhance solar absorption and to increase the electron-hole pair generation rate at the surface of semiconductor. Here, we report a semiconductor/metal visible-light photocatalyst based on CdSe/CdS-Au (QD-Au) core-satellite heteronanocrystals, and assemble them on graphene nanosheets for better photocatalytic reaction. The as-synthesized photocatalyst exhibits excellent plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic activities toward both photodegradation of organic dye and visible-light H2 generation from water. The H2 evolution rate achieves a maximum of 3113 μmol h(-1) g(-1) for the heteronanocrystal-graphene composites, which is about 155% enhancement compared to nonplasmonic QD-G sample and 340% enhancement compared to control QD-Au-G sample, and the apparent quantum efficiency (QE) reaches to 25.4% at wavelength of 450 nm.

  3. Controlling the morphology of TiO2 nanocrystals with different capping agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Calatayud

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides direct evidence to support the role of capping agents in controlling the evolution of TiO2 seeds into nanocrystals with a specific shape. Starting with Ti(OBut4 and using oleid acid, oleylamine, dioleamide, 11-aminoundecanoic acid, arginine, trifluroacetic acid or HF as capping agents, mainly TiO2 truncated octahedrons enclosed by {1 0 1} and {0 0 1} facets were obtained. We could also selectively obtain square, rods and rounded rhombic-shaped nanoparticles by growing of {0 1 0} facets by adding oleic acid and oleylamine in ratio 6:4, respectively, while all other parameters were kept the same. This research not only offers new insights into the role played by a capping agent in shape-controlled synthesis but also provides, a versatile approach to controlling the shape of metal oxide nanocrystals.

  4. Preparation and magnetic properties of CoWO{sub 4} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jiwei; Zhang, Endi; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Taihong [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha (China); Chang, Liao [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton (United Kingdom); Wang, Ping [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Cobalt tungstate (CoWO{sub 4}) nanocrystals with an average size of 20-50 nm were synthesized via a template- or surfactant-free hydrothermal route. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized CoWO{sub 4} sample were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements on the as-synthesized CoWO{sub 4} nanocrystals indicate a Neel temperature (T{sub N}) of {proportional_to}40 K. This lower T{sub N} may be a result of the nanostructured particles that reduce the exchange coupling. The new synthetic route presented in this paper has potential applications to fabricate other metal tungstates (MWO{sub 4}) materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Effects of crystal size, structure and quenching on the photoluminescence emission intensity, lifetime and quantum yield of ZrO2:Eu3+ nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetei, Sanoujam Dhiren; Singh, Shougaijam Dorendrajit

    2014-01-01

    Properties of crystalline materials which depend on crystal size are of fundamental issues in the present advancement of nanocrystals. Understanding effects of crystal size on the materials' properties needs knowledge of the effects of associated parameters which give rise to the particular size. In this work, various crystal size of Eu 3+ doped ZrO 2 nanocrystals are synthesized by polyol, hydrothermal and simple-precipitation techniques. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence emission intensity, lifetime and quantum yield of ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystals are studied exhaustively. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis of x-ray of the samples are also reported. Effects of crystal size and its associated parameters viz. crystal structure and luminescence quenching on emission intensity, lifetime and quantum yield of ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystals are studied at length. Effect of crystal structure dominates over quenching at large crystal size while, quenching dominates over the effect of crystal structure at smaller crystal size. Fundamental importance to study the effects of crystal size, structure and quenching on photoluminescence of a doped nanocrystal is elucidated. Quantum yield of 27.72% from ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystal (7 nm) is also reported. -- Highlights: • PL intensity, lifetime and quantum yield of nanocrystal varies with crystal size. • Variation of crystal size results in variation of crystal structure and quenching. • Effect of crystal structure dominates over quenching at large crystal size. • Quenching dominates over the effect of crystal structure at smaller crystal size. • Quantum yield of 27.72% can be obtained from ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystal of 7 nm

  6. Crystalline Control of {111} Bounded Pt3Cu Nanocrystals: Multiply-Twinned Pt3Cu Icosahedra with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuhui; Jiang, Kezhu; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Shaojun; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-07-28

    Despite that different facets have distinct catalytic behavior, the important role of twin defects on enhancing the catalytic performance of metallic nanocrystals is largely unrevealed. The key challenge in demonstrating the importance of twin defects for catalysis is the extreme difficulties in creating nanostructures with the same exposed facets but tunable twin defects that are suitable for catalytic investigations. Herein, we show an efficient synthetic strategy to selectively synthesize {111}-terminated Pt3Cu nanocrystals with controllable crystalline features. Two distinct {111}-bounded shapes, namely, multiply-twinned Pt3Cu icosahedra and single-crystalline Pt3Cu octahedra, are successfully prepared by simply changing the types of Cu precursors with the other growth parameters unchanged. Electrocatalytic studies show that the {111}-terminated Pt3Cu nanocrystals exhibit the very interesting crystalline nature-dependent electrocatalytic activities toward both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) with multiply-twinned Pt3Cu icosahedra demonstrating enhanced electrocatalytic activities compared to the single-crystalline Pt3Cu octahedra due to their additional yet important effect of twin defect. As a result, under the multiple tuning conditions (alloy, shape, and twin effects), the multiply-twinned Pt3Cu icosahedra exhibit much enhanced electrocatalytic activities in both ORR and MOR with respect to the Pt black. The present work highlights the importance of twin defects in enhancing electrocatalytic activities of metallic nanocrystals.

  7. Active optical fibers doped with ceramic nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jan; Kašík, Ivan; Procházková, L.; Čuba, V.; Aubrecht, Jan; Cajzl, Jakub; Podrazký, Ondřej; Peterka, Pavel; Nikl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2014), s. 567-574 ISSN 1336-1376 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100761202 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Erbium * Nanocrystals * Special optical fiber Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D)

  8. Biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals -PVA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rohani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals-poly vinyl alcohol nanocomposites were investigated. Nanocomposite films with different filler loading levels (3, 6, 9 and 12% by wt were developed by solvent casting method. The effect of cellulose nanocrystals on the biodegradation behaviors of nanocomposite films was studied. Water absorption and water solubility tests were performed by immersing specimens into distilled water. The characteristic parameter of diffusion coefficient and maximum moisture content were determined from the obtained water absorption curves. The water absorption behavior of the nanocomposites was found to follow a Fickian behavior. The maximum water absorption and diffusion coefficients were decreased by increasing the cellulose nanocrystals contents, however the water solubility decrease. The biodegradability of the films was investigated by immersing specimens into cellulase enzymatic solution as well as by burial in soil. The results showed that adding cellulose nanocrystals increase the weight loss of specimens in enzymatic solution but decrease it in soil media. The limited biodegradability of specimens in soil media attributed to development of strong interactions with solid substrates that inhibit the accessibility of functional groups. Specimens with the low degree of hydrolysis underwent extensive biodegradation in both enzymatic and soil media, whilst specimens with the high degree of hydrolysis showed recalcitrance to biodegradation under those conditions.

  9. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  10. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  11. Synthesis, simulation & spectroscopy: physical chemistry of nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on nanocrystalline semiconductors form a wide and rapidly expanding field of research. This chapter concentrates on two very different topics within this field. In the first part, pair formation of dopant ions in nanocrystals is discussed. After a general introduction on the influence

  12. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  13. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of CZTS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumasiya, Ajay; Shah, N. M.

    2017-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising thin film absorber material for low cost solar cell applications. CZTS nanoparticle ink synthesized using solvothermal route is an attractive option to deposit absorber layer using screen printing or spin coating method in CZTS thin film solar cell. In this study we have synthesized CZTS nanocrystals using solvothermal method from aqueous solution of Copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2], Zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2], tin chloride [SnCl4] and thiourea with varying concentration of Cu(NO3)2 (viz 0.82 mmol,1.4 mmol, 1.7 mmol) keeping concentrations of rest of solutions constant. As synthesized CZTS nanocrystals are characterized using Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX) to verify stoichiometry of elements. Analysis of EDAX data suggests that CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole is near stoichiometric. X-ray diffraction analysis study of CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole reveals the preferred orientation of the grains in (112), (220) and (312) direction confirming Kesterite structure of CZTS.

  14. Heterostructures Prepared by Surface Modification of Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) have drawn the attention from many researchers due to their promising potentials for next generation technologies, from photovoltaics to biological applications. Various types of NCs have become available by synthetic protocols developed in the last two decades. In addition, multicomponent hybrid NCs which can be…

  15. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.; Berends, A.C.; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as

  16. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  17. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-01-01

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild

  18. Biocompatibility of bio based calcium carbonate nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently, there has been extensive research interest for inorganic nanocrystals such as calcium phosphate, iron oxide, silicone, carbon nanotube and layered double hydroxide as a drug delivery system especially in cancer therapy. However, toxicological screening of such particles is paramount importance ...

  19. Ligand-passivated Eu:Y2O3 nanocrystals as a phosphor for white light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qilin; Foley, Megan E; Breshike, Christopher J; Lita, Adrian; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2011-10-05

    Eu(III)-doped Y(2)O(3) nanocrystals are prepared by microwave synthetic methods as spherical 6.4 ± 1.5 nm nanocrystals with a cubic crystal structure. The surface of the nanocrystal is passivated by acetylacetonate (acac) and HDA on the Y exposed facet of the nanocrystal. The presence of acac on the nanocrystal surface gives rise to a strong S(0) → S(1) (π → π*, acac) and acac → Ln(3+) ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) transitions at 270 and 370 nm, respectively, in the Eu:Y(2)O(3) nanocrystal. Excitation into the S(0) → S(1) (π → π*) or acac → Ln(3+) LMCT transition leads to the production of white light emission arising from efficient intramolecular energy transfer to the Y(2)O(3) oxygen vacancies and the Eu(III) Judd-Ofelt f-f transitions. The acac passivant is thermally stable below 400 °C, and its presence is evidenced by UV-vis absorption, FT-IR, and NMR measurements. The presence of the low-lying acac levels allows UV LED pumping of the solid phosphor, leading to high quantum efficiency (∼19%) when pumped at 370 nm, high-quality white light color rendering (CIE coordinates 0.33 and 0.35), a high scotopic-to-photopic ratio (S/P = 2.21), and thermal stability. In a LED lighting package luminosities of 100 lm W(-1) were obtained, which are competitive with current commercial lighting technology. The use of the passivant to funnel energy to the lanthanide emitter via a molecular antenna effect represents a new paradigm for designing phosphors for LED-pumped white light.

  20. A SIMPLE EVOLUTIONAL MODEL OF THE UV HABITABLE ZONE AND THE POSSIBILITY OF PERSISTENT LIFE EXISTENCE: THE EFFECTS OF MASS AND METALLICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Midori; Kamaya, Hideyuki [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Applied Sciences, National Defense Academy of Japan Yokosuka, 239-8686 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    In addition to the habitable zone (HZ), the UV habitable zone (UV-HZ) is important when considering the existence of persistent life in the universe. The UV-HZ is defined as the area where the UV radiation field from a host star is moderate for persistent life existence. This is because UV is necessary for the synthesis of biochemical compounds. The UV-HZ must overlap the HZ when life appears and evolves. In this paper, following our previous study of the HZ, we examine the UV-HZ in cases with a stellar mass range from 0.08 to 4.00 M {sub ☉} with various metallicities during the main sequence phase. This mass range was chosen because we are interested in an environment similar to that of Earth. The effect of metallicity is reflected in the spectrum of the host stars, and we reexamine it in the context of the UV-HZ. The present work shows the effect of metallicity when that in the UV-HZ is less than that in the HZ. Furthermore, we find that the chance of persistent life existence declines as the metallicity decreases, as long as the UV radiation is not protected and/or boosted by any mechanisms. This is because the overlapped region of a persistent HZ and UV-HZ decreases. We find that the most appropriate stellar mass for the persistence of life existence is from 1.0 to 1.5 M {sub ☉} with metallicity Z  = 0.02, and only about 1.2 M {sub ☉} with Z  = 0.002. When Z  = 0.0002, the chance of persistent life existence is very low, assuming that the ocean does not protect the life from UV radiation.

  1. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy are used to examine crystallinity and morphology. Chapter 3. By investigating the self-assembly of cadmium selenide-gold (CdSe-Au) nanoparticle mixtures by transmission electron microscopy after solvent evaporation, the effect of solvents in the formation process of CdSe-Au binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) was studied. 1-dodecanethiol was found to be critical in generating conditions necessary for superlattice formation, prior to the other factors that likely determine structure, highlighting the dual role of this organic polar molecule as both ligand and high boiling point/crystallization solvent. The influence of thiol was investigated under various concentrations (and also

  2. Laser refrigeration of hydrothermal nanocrystals in physiological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Paden B; Smith, Bennett E; Zhou, Xuezhe; Crane, Matthew J; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2015-12-08

    Coherent laser radiation has enabled many scientific and technological breakthroughs including Bose-Einstein condensates, ultrafast spectroscopy, superresolution optical microscopy, photothermal therapy, and long-distance telecommunications. However, it has remained a challenge to refrigerate liquid media (including physiological buffers) during laser illumination due to significant background solvent absorption and the rapid (∼ ps) nonradiative vibrational relaxation of molecular electronic excited states. Here we demonstrate that single-beam laser trapping can be used to induce and quantify the local refrigeration of physiological media by >10 °C following the emission of photoluminescence from upconverting yttrium lithium fluoride (YLF) nanocrystals. A simple, low-cost hydrothermal approach is used to synthesize polycrystalline particles with sizes ranging from 1 μm. A tunable, near-infrared continuous-wave laser is used to optically trap individual YLF crystals with an irradiance on the order of 1 MW/cm(2). Heat is transported out of the crystal lattice (across the solid-liquid interface) by anti-Stokes (blue-shifted) photons following upconversion of Yb(3+) electronic excited states mediated by the absorption of optical phonons. Temperatures are quantified through analysis of the cold Brownian dynamics of individual nanocrystals in an inhomogeneous temperature field via forward light scattering in the back focal plane. The cold Brownian motion (CBM) analysis of individual YLF crystals indicates local cooling by >21 °C below ambient conditions in D2O, suggesting a range of potential future applications including single-molecule biophysics and integrated photonic, electronic, and microfluidic devices.

  3. Systematic Identification of Promoters for Methane Oxidation Catalysts Using Size- and Composition-Controlled Pd-Based Bimetallic Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Joshua J; Goodman, Emmett D; Wu, Liheng; Riscoe, Andrew R; Martins, Pedro; Tassone, Christopher J; Cargnello, Matteo

    2017-08-30

    Promoters enhance the performance of catalytic active phases by increasing rates, stability, and/or selectivity. The process of identifying promoters is in most cases empirical and relies on testing a broad range of catalysts prepared with the random deposition of active and promoter phases, typically with no fine control over their localization. This issue is particularly relevant in supported bimetallic systems, where two metals are codeposited onto high-surface area materials. We here report the use of colloidal bimetallic nanocrystals to produce catalysts where the active and promoter phases are colocalized to a fine extent. This strategy enables a systematic approach to study the promotional effects of several transition metals on palladium catalysts for methane oxidation. In order to achieve these goals, we demonstrate a single synthetic protocol to obtain uniform palladium-based bimetallic nanocrystals (PdM, M = V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Sn, and potentially extendable to other metal combinations) with a wide variety of compositions and sizes based on high-temperature thermal decomposition of readily available precursors. Once the nanocrystals are supported onto oxide materials, thermal treatments in air cause segregation of the base metal oxide phase in close proximity to the Pd phase. We demonstrate that some metals (Fe, Co, and Sn) inhibit the sintering of the active Pd metal phase, while others (Ni and Zn) increase its intrinsic activity compared to a monometallic Pd catalyst. This procedure can be generalized to systematically investigate the promotional effects of metal and metal oxide phases for a variety of active metal-promoter combinations and catalytic reactions.

  4. Using Nanowires To Extract Excitons from a Nanocrystal Solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, August; Strasfeld, David B.; Harris, Daniel K.; Han, Hee-Sun; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2011-11-22

    Synthetic methods yielding highly uniform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes are now available for many materials. These methods have enabled geometrical control of optical properties, which are difficult or impossible to achieve in conventional bulk solids. However, incorporating nanocrystals efficiently into photodetectors remains challenging because of the low charge carrier mobilities typical of nanocrystal solids. Here we present an approach based on exciton energy transfer from CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals to embedded CdSe nanowires. By combining the wide electronic tunability of nanocrystals with the excellent one-dimensional charge transport characteristics obtainable in nanowires, we are able to increase photocurrent extraction from a nanocrystal solid by 2–3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we correlate local device morphology with optoelectronic functionality by measuring the local photocurrent response in a scanning confocal microscope. We also discuss how nancocrystal/nanowire hybrid devices could be used in particle detector systems.

  5. Silicon nanocrystals: from bio-imager to erbium sensitizer

    OpenAIRE

    Prtljaga, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been centred on the light emitting properties of silicon nanocrystals and the possible applications of this particular material platform to various topics ranging from bio-imaging to erbium ion sensitization. Silicon nanocrystals as bio-imaging agent have been investigated by employing colloidal dispersion of individual silicon nanocrystals where surface properties could be controlled to a great extent. By using a suitable functionalization scheme, high quality hyd...

  6. Organization of silicon nanocrystals by localized electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayari-Kanoun, Asma; Drouin, Dominique; Beauvais, Jacques; Lysenko, Vladimir; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    An approach to form a monolayer of organized silicon nanocrystals on a monocrystalline Si wafer is reported. Ordered arrays of nanoholes in a silicon nitride layer were obtained by combining electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Then, a short electrochemical etching current pulse led to formation of a single Si nanocrystal per each nanohole. As a result, high quality silicon nanocrystal arrays were formed with well controlled and reproducible morphologies. In future, this approach can be used to fabricate single electron devices.

  7. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  8. Ferrimagnetic nanocrystal assemblies as versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellari, D; Brintakis, K; Kostopoulou, A; Myrovali, E; Simeonidis, K; Lappas, A; Angelakeris, M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystal assemblies (nanoclusters), consisting of 13 nm iron oxide nanocrystals, were synthesized in various sizes (45-98 nm), and were investigated as heating mediators for magnetic particle hyperthermia. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters show enhanced heating efficiency in comparison with their constituent primary iron oxide nanocrystals due to collective magnetic features. The fine tuning of intra-cluster magnetic interactions results to the domination of the hysteresis losses mechanism over the relaxation loss heating contributions and eventually to a versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediator. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Acetone sensors based on TiO2 nanocrystals modified with tungsten oxide species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epifani, Mauro; Comini, Elisabetta; Díaz, Raül; Genç, Aziz; Andreu, Teresa; Siciliano, Pietro; Morante, Joan R.

    2016-01-01

    TiO 2 nanocrystals were prepared by sol–gel/solvothermal processing and modified by the addition of W precursor before the solvothermal step. The W: Ti nominal atomic ratio (R W ) was fixed to 0.16 and 0.64. Surface modification of TiO 2 occurred for R W = 0.16 while for R W = 0.64 nanocomposites with WO 3 nanocrystals were obtained after heat-treatment at 500 °C. Pure TiO 2 proved to be very poorly performing in acetone sensing in all the operating conditions. Instead, the addition of both W concentrations largely enhanced the sensor response. It ranged over two orders of magnitude of conductance variation for all the tested concentrations at as low as 200 °C operating temperature. The results showed that it is possible to enhance the performance of an otherwise almost inactive oxide like TiO 2 by proper combination with another more active oxide like WO 3 . - Highlights: • Sensing architecture are synthesized, combining WO 3 and of TiO 2 nanocrystals. • Surface layers of W oxides or heterojunctions of TiO 2 and WO 3 are obtained. • Simple TiO 2 surface modification by W oxides boosts the TiO 2 acetone response. • High responses even at 200 °C show catalytic effect of WO 3 addition.

  10. Nanocrystals and amorphous matrix phase studies of Finemet-like alloys containing Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya, J.A., E-mail: jmoya.fi.uba@gmail.co [IESIING, Facultad de Ingenieria e Informatica, UCASAL, A4402FYP Salta (Argentina); Lab. Solidos Amorfos, Facultad de Ingenieria, INTECIN, UBA-CONICET (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina)

    2010-07-15

    Two simple models were developed in order to determine the chemical composition of both nanocrystals and intergranular amorphous phases in nanocrystallized Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1} containing Ge using data from X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy techniques. Saturation magnetization of the amorphous intergranular matrix (M{sub s}{sup am}) was calculated considering the contribution of the alpha-Fe(Si,Ge) nanocrystals and saturation magnetization of the alloys. The behavior of M{sub s}{sup am} with the iron content of the matrix was obtained and discussed. The exchange stiffness constant for the nanograins and for the amorphous phases was determined. The increment in the coercive field (H{sub c}) with increasing Ge content was evaluated using two theoretical models for the random magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (). Results show that the magnetic hardening observed could not be attributed to an increase in but mainly to an important increment of the magnetostriction constant of the alpha-Fe(Si,Ge) nanocrystals (lambda{sub s}{sup cr}). Values for lambda{sub s}{sup cr} are proposed.

  11. Control over the branched structures of platinum nanocrystals for electrocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Chengming; Gong, Ming; Liao, Lingwen; Long, Ran; Wang, Jinguo; Wu, Di; Zhong, Wei; Kim, Moon J; Chen, Yanxia; Xie, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2012-11-27

    Structural control of branched nanocrystals allows tuning two parameters that are critical to their catalytic activity--the surface-to-volume ratio, and the number of atomic steps, ledges, and kinks on surface. In this work, we have developed a simple synthetic system that allows tailoring the numbers of branches in Pt nanocrystals by tuning the concentration of additional HCl. In the synthesis, HCl plays triple functions in tuning branched structures via oxidative etching: (i) the crystallinity of seeds and nanocrystals; (ii) the number of {111} or {100} faces provided for growth sites; (iii) the supply kinetics of freshly formed Pt atoms in solution. As a result, tunable Pt branched structures--tripods, tetrapods, hexapods, and octopods with identical chemical environment--can be rationally synthesized in a single system by simply altering the etching strength. The controllability in branched structures enables to reveal that their electrocatalytic performance can be optimized by constructing complex structures. Among various branched structures, Pt octopods exhibit particularly high activity in formic acid oxidation as compared with their counterparts and commercial Pt/C catalysts. It is anticipated that this work will open a door to design more complex nanostructures and to achieve specific functions for various applications.

  12. Influence of preparation and storage conditions on photoluminescence of porous silicon powder with embedded Si nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychto, Leszek; Balaguer, Maria; Pastor, Ester; Chirvony, Vladimir; Matveeva, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    The time changes of photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of porous silicon (porSi) powder during storing in different ambients have been reported. A porous silicon material with embedded Si nanocrystals of size of few nanometers was prepared by an electrochemical method from 10 to 20 Ωcm p-type Si wafers, and both constant and pulse current anodization regimes were used. A powder with a submicron average particle size was obtained by simple mechanical lift-off of the porous layer followed by additional manual milling. The air, hexane, and water as storage media were used, and modification by a nonionic surfactant (undecylenic acid) of the porSi surface was applied in the latter case. Dependence of PL characteristics on preparation and storage conditions was then studied. A remarkable blue shift of a position of PL maximum was observed in time for porSi powders in each storage media. In water suspension a many-fold build-up (10-30) of PL intensity in a time scale of few days was accompanied by an observed blue shift. Photoluminescence time behavior of porSi powders was described by a known mechanism of the change of porSi PL from free exciton emission of Si nanocrystals to luminescence of localized oxidized states on the Si nanocrystal surface.

  13. Influence of preparation and storage conditions on photoluminescence of porous silicon powder with embedded Si nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychto, Leszek, E-mail: leszek.bychto@tu.koszalin.pl; Balaguer, Maria; Pastor, Ester; Chirvony, Vladimir; Matveeva, Eugenia, E-mail: eumat@upvnet.upv.e [Technical University of Valencia, Nanophotonics Technology Center (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    The time changes of photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of porous silicon (porSi) powder during storing in different ambients have been reported. A porous silicon material with embedded Si nanocrystals of size of few nanometers was prepared by an electrochemical method from 10 to 20 {Omega}cm p-type Si wafers, and both constant and pulse current anodization regimes were used. A powder with a submicron average particle size was obtained by simple mechanical lift-off of the porous layer followed by additional manual milling. The air, hexane, and water as storage media were used, and modification by a nonionic surfactant (undecylenic acid) of the porSi surface was applied in the latter case. Dependence of PL characteristics on preparation and storage conditions was then studied. A remarkable blue shift of a position of PL maximum was observed in time for porSi powders in each storage media. In water suspension a many-fold build-up (10-30) of PL intensity in a time scale of few days was accompanied by an observed blue shift. Photoluminescence time behavior of porSi powders was described by a known mechanism of the change of porSi PL from free exciton emission of Si nanocrystals to luminescence of localized oxidized states on the Si nanocrystal surface.

  14. Influence of preparation and storage conditions on photoluminescence of porous silicon powder with embedded Si nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychto, Leszek; Balaguer, Maria; Pastor, Ester; Chirvony, Vladimir; Matveeva, Eugenia

    2008-12-01

    The time changes of photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of porous silicon (porSi) powder during storing in different ambients have been reported. A porous silicon material with embedded Si nanocrystals of size of few nanometers was prepared by an electrochemical method from 10 to 20 Ωcm p-type Si wafers, and both constant and pulse current anodization regimes were used. A powder with a submicron average particle size was obtained by simple mechanical lift-off of the porous layer followed by additional manual milling. The air, hexane, and water as storage media were used, and modification by a nonionic surfactant (undecylenic acid) of the porSi surface was applied in the latter case. Dependence of PL characteristics on preparation and storage conditions was then studied. A remarkable blue shift of a position of PL maximum was observed in time for porSi powders in each storage media. In water suspension a many-fold build-up (10-30) of PL intensity in a time scale of few days was accompanied by an observed blue shift. Photoluminescence time behavior of porSi powders was described by a known mechanism of the change of porSi PL from free exciton emission of Si nanocrystals to luminescence of localized oxidized states on the Si nanocrystal surface.

  15. Targeted labeling of cancer cells using biotin tagged avidin functionalized biocompatible fluorescent nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy, J; Jahnavi, S; Krishna, R; Manzoor, K; Nair, Shantikumar; Menon, Deepthy

    2011-09-01

    The present study details the development of biotin tagged avidin functionalized Zinc Sulphide [ZnS] nanocrystals through a simple aqueous chemistry route at room temperature for targeted imaging applications. Surface functionalization of Manganese doped ZnS nanocrystals with L-cysteine provided functional groups that facilitated its conjugation to avidin. Further biotinylation of these particles through the strong non-covalent interaction between biotin and avidin enabled highly specific labeling of the biotin receptors on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The nanobioconjugates thus developed exhibited stable and brilliant fluorescence upon labeling the biotin receptors on cells as observed through fluorescence microscopy. Characterization studies using X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the bioconjugated particles to be appropriately functionalized and stable, with size ranging from 50 to 80 nm. Cytotoxicity of this material system evaluated using MTT, LDH leakage and apoptosis assay revealed its non-toxic nature even for high concentrations extending upto 250 microM and 48 hours of incubation. Our results confirmed that biotinylated ZnS nanocrystals offer great potential for highly specific labeling and targeted imaging of cancer cells.

  16. Growth of monodisperse nanocrystals of cerium oxide during synthesis and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Swapankumar, E-mail: swapankumar.ghosh2@mail.dcu.ie; Divya, Damodaran [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) (India); Remani, Kottayilpadi C. [Sree Neelakanda Government Sanskrit College, Department of Chemistry (India); Sreeremya, Thadathil S. [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) (India)

    2010-06-15

    Monodisperse cerium oxide nanocrystals have been successfully synthesised using simple ammonia precipitation technique from cerium(III) nitrate solution at different temperatures in the range 35-80 {sup o}C. The activation energy for growth of CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals during the precipitation is calculated as 11.54 kJ/mol using Arrhenius plot. Average crystal diameter was obtained from XRD analysis, HR-TEM and light scattering (PCS). The analysis of size data from HR-TEM images and PCS clearly indicated the formation of highly crystalline CeO{sub 2} particles in narrow size range. CeO{sub 2} nanocrystals precipitated at 35 {sup o}C were further annealed at temperatures in the range 300-700 {sup o}C. The activation energy for crystal growth during annealing is also calculated and is close to the reported values. An effort is made to predict the mechanism of crystal growth during the precipitation and annealing.

  17. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  18. Plasmon-assisted photoluminescence enhancement of SiC nanocrystals by proximal silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, N.; Dai, D.J.; Fan, J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied metal surface plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence in SiC nanocrystals. ► The integrated emission intensity can be enhanced by 17 times. ► The coupling between SiC emission and Ag plasmon oscillation induces the enhancement. ► The enhancement is tunable with varied spacing thickness of electrolytes. - Abstract: Plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence has wide application potential in many areas, whereas the underlying mechanism is still in debate. We report the photoluminescence enhancement in SiC nanocrystal–Ag nanoparticle coupled system spaced by the poly(styrene sulfonic acid) sodium salt/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) polyelectrolyte bilayers. The integrated luminescence intensity can be improved by up to 17 times. Our analysis indicates that the strong coupling between the SiC nanocrystals and the surface plasmon oscillation of the silver nanoparticles is the major cause of the luminescence enhancement. These findings will help to understand the photoluminescence enhancement mechanism as well as widen the applications of the SiC nanocrystals in photonics and life sciences.

  19. Influence of dopant concentration on spectroscopic properties of Sr2CeO4:Yb nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, M.; Kędziorski, A.; Hreniak, D.; Strek, W.

    2017-12-01

    Optical properties of Sr2CeO4:Yb nanocrystals synthesized via Pechini's method are reported. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction data measurements. The unit cell parameters were determined using Rietveld refinement. It was found that they decreased with increasing amount of Yb ions. The absorption, excitation, emission spectra and luminescence decay profiles of the Sr2CeO4:Yb nanocrystals were investigated. It was observed that optical properties were strongly dependent on Yb concentration. It was found that Yb3+-O2- charge transfer transitions have great influence on the absorption spectra. It can be seen in the emission spectra that in addition to standard bands/lines corresponding to Ce-O metal-to-ligand charge transfer of Sr2CeO4 and f-f transitions of Yb3+, there is emission band centered at 744 nm. Its intensity depends on the concentration of the dopant. Recorded decay times become shorter with increasing dopant concentration due to the Yb3+ concentration quenching. Excitation spectra indicate the energy transfer from Ce-O charge transfer states to Yb3+2F5/2 state. The issue of appearance of down-conversion process in Sr2CeO4:Yb nanocrystals is considered.

  20. Synthetic Strategies for Semiconductor Nanocrystals Expressing Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niezgoda, J Scott; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-03-03

    The field of semiconductor plasmonics has grown rapidly since its outset, only roughly six years ago, and now includes many crystalline substances ranging from GeTe to wide-bandgap transition-metal oxides. One byproduct of this proliferation is the sea of differing synthetic methods to realize localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) based on the studied material. Strategies vary widely from material to material, but all have the common goal of introducing extremely high carrier densities to the semiconductor system. This doping results in tunable, size-quantized, and on/off-switchable LSPR modes, which are a complete departure from traditional metal-nanoparticle-based plasmon resonances. This Minireview will provide an overview of the current state of nanocrystal and quantum-dot plasmonics and the physical basis thereof, however its main purpose is to summarize the methods for realizing LSPRs in the various syntheses and systems that have been reported to date. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Active Optical Fibers Doped with Ceramic Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mrazek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped active optical fiber was successfully prepared by incorporation of ceramic nanocrystals inside a core of optical fiber. Modified chemical vapor deposition was combined with solution-doping approach to preparing preform. Instead of inorganic salts erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium garnet nanocrystals were used in the solution-doping process. Prepared preform was drawn into single-mode optical fiber with a numerical aperture 0.167. Optical and luminescence properties of the fiber were analyzed. Lasing ability of prepared fiber was proofed in a fiber-ring set-up. Optimal laser properties were achieved for a fiber length of 20~m. The slope efficiency of the fiber-laser was about 15%. Presented method can be simply extended to the deposition of other ceramic nanomaterials.

  2. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  3. Quasicrystalline nanocrystal superlattice with partial matching rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingchen; Chen, Jun; Eric Irrgang, M.; Engel, Michael; Dong, Angang; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2017-02-01

    Expanding the library of self-assembled superstructures provides insight into the behaviour of atomic crystals and supports the development of materials with mesoscale order. Here we build on recent findings of soft matter quasicrystals and report a quasicrystalline binary nanocrystal superlattice that exhibits correlations in the form of partial matching rules reducing tiling disorder. We determine a three-dimensional structure model through electron tomography and direct imaging of surface topography. The 12-fold rotational symmetry of the quasicrystal is broken in sublayers, forming a random tiling of rectangles, large triangles and small triangles with 6-fold symmetry. We analyse the geometry of the experimental tiling and discuss factors relevant for the stabilization of the quasicrystal. Our joint experimental-computational study demonstrates the power of nanocrystal superlattice engineering and further narrows the gap between the richness of crystal structures found with atoms and in soft matter assemblies.

  4. Cellulose nanocrystal properties and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahdi jonoobi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to provide an overview of recent research in the area of cellulose nonmaterials production from different sources. Due to their abundance, their renewability, high strength and stiffness, being eco-friendly, and low weight; numerous studies have been reported on the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials from different cellulosic sources and their use in high performance applications. This work covers an introduction into the nano cellulose definition as well as used methods for isolation of nanomaterials (nanocrystals from various sources. The rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNC can be isolated from sources like wood, plant fibers, agriculture and industrial bio residues, tunicates, and bacterial cellulose using acid hydrolysis process. Following this, the paper focused on characterization methods, materials properties and structure. The current review is a comprehensive literature regarding the nano cellulose isolation and demonstrates the potential of cellulose nanomaterials to be used in a wide range of high-tech applications.

  5. Selected-control hydrothermal synthesis and formation mechanism of monazite- and zircon-type LaVO(4) nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weiliu; Song, Xinyu; Bu, Yuxiang; Sun, Sixiu; Zhao, Xian

    2006-11-23

    Selective-controlled structure and shape of LaVO(4) nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method without the presence of catalysts or templates. It was found that tuning the pH of the growth solution was a crucial step for the control of the structure transformation, that is, from monoclinic (m-) to tetragonal (t-) phase, and morphology evolution of LaVO(4) nanocrystals. Further studies demonstrated that the morphology of the product had a strong dependence on the initial lanthanum sources. In the La(NO(3))(3) or LaCl(3) reaction system, pure t-LaVO(4) nanorods with uniform diameters about 10 nm could be obtained. But when using La(2)(SO(4))(3) as the lanthanum source, we can get t-LaVO(4) nanowiskers with broomlike morphology. The detailed systematic study had shown that a special dissolution-recrystallization transformation mechanism as well as an Ostwald ripening process was responsible for the phase control and anisotropic morphology evolution of the LaVO(4) nanocrystals. As a result, the controlled synthesis of m- and t-LaVO(4) not only has great theoretical significance in studying the polymorph control and selective synthesis of inorganic materials but also benefits the potential applications based on LaVO(4) nanocrystals owing to the unusual luminescent properties induced by structural transformation.

  6. FABRICATION AND EVALUATION OF SMART NANOCRYSTALS OF ARTEMISININ FOR ANTIMALARIAL AND ANTIBACTERIAL EFFICACY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Muhammad Hassan; Ullah, Farhat; Khan, Shahzeb; Shah, Syed Muhammad Mukarram; Isreb, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nanocrystals have the potential to substantially increase dissolution rate, solubility with subsequent enhanced bioavailability via the oral route of a range of poor water soluble drugs. Regardless of other issues, scale up of the batch size is the main issue associated with bottom up approach. Material and Methods: Smart nanocrystals of artemisinin (ARM) was produced relatively at large batch sizes (100, 200, 300 and 400ml) compared to our previously reported study by (Shah, et al., 2016). ARM nanosuspensions/nanocrystals were characterised using zeta sizer, SEM, TEM, DSC, PXRD and RP-HPLC. The nanosuspensions were finally subjected to in vitro antimalarial and antimicrobial activity. Results: The average particle size (PS) for 400 ml batches was 126.5 ±1.02 nm, and the polydispersity index (PI) was 0.194 ± 0.04. The saturation solubility of the ARM nanocrystals was substantially increased to (725.4± 2.0 μg/ml) compared to the raw ARM in water 177.4± 1.3 μg/ml and stabilizer solution (385.3± 2.0 μg/ml). The IC50 value of ARM nanosuspension against P. vivax was 65 and 21 folds lower than micronized 19.5 ng/mL and unprocessed drug (6.4 ng/mL) respectively. The ARM nanosuspension was found highly effective compared to unprocessed drug against all the tested microorganism except E. coli, Shigella and C. albican. Conclusion: The simple precipitation-ultrasonication approach was efficiently employed for fabrication of ARM nanosuspension to scale up the batch size. Similarly, the solubility, antimalarial potential and antimicrobial efficacy of ARM in the form of nanosuspension were significantly enhanced. Findings from this study can persuade research interest for further comprehensive studies using animals model. PMID:28480403

  7. Seed-mediated synthesis of silver nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes in droplet microreactors separated by air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yi; Tong, Limin; Xia, Younan

    2013-12-17

    Silver nanocrystals with uniform sizes were synthesized in droplet microreactors through seed-mediated growth. The key to the success of this synthesis is the use of air as a carrier phase to generate the droplets. The air not only separates the reaction solution into droplets but also provides O2 for the generation of reducing agent (glycolaldehyde). It also serves as a buffer space for the diffusion of NO, which is formed in situ due to the oxidative etching of Ag nanocrystals with twin defects. For the first time, we were able to generate Ag nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes in continuous production by using droplet microreactors. For Ag nanocubes, their edge lengths could be readily controlled in the range of 30-100 nm by varying the reaction time, the amount of seeds, and the concentration of AgNO3 in the droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrated the synthesis of Ag octahedra in the droplet microreactors. We believe that the air-driven droplet generation device can be extended to other noble metals for the production of nanocrystals with controlled sizes and shapes.

  8. Large-scale and green synthesis of octahedral flower-like cupric oxide nanocrystals with enhanced photochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Pan, Yu-Yi; Wu, Mi; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a large-scale and green method is reported for the facile synthesis of octahedral flower-like CuO nanocrystals via a coordination-deposition route by using Fehling regents. Not any harmful organic chemicals were used during the reaction period. The obtained hierarchical nanostructure can be rationally tailored by varying the concentration of tartrate ions and reaction time. The typical flower-like CuO nanocrystals in the range of 200-250 nm are consisted of numerous small crystalline whiskers, which present a porous surface with a specific surface area of 32.12 m2/g and a narrow band gap of 1.5 eV. Importantly, the flower-like CuO nanocrystals show an enhanced photocatalytic activity toward decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. The degradation rate is about 87.9% in 40 min under visible light irradiation, which is about 2.5 times for the commercial CuO powers (35.2%). Moreover, the uniform flower-like monolayered CuO film exhibits an excellent photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance with a maximum photocurrent density of 58.8 μA/cm2, which is nearly five times higher than the commercial CuO film. This novel synthesis approach provides a large-scale and green protocol for synthesizing hierarchical metal oxide nanocrystals that are useful for photocatalysis, PEC water splitting and photovoltaic device.

  9. One dimensional well-aligned CdO nanocrystal by solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaviyarasu, K.; Manikandan, E.; Paulraj, P.; Mohamed, S.B.; Kennedy, J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cadmium oxide (CdO) emerged as one of the important semiconducting materials. • Iodine concentration increases intensity of the peak around 300 cm −1 becomes stronger. • Surface morphology of these crystals has been modified by varying complexing agent. • Nanofibers structure like CdO crystals first time achieved. • The diameters of these nanofibers range mostly between 40 nm and 70 nm. - Abstract: Cadmium oxide (CdO) is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. CdO nanocrystal was successfully synthesized by a virtue of a single source precursor method at mild reaction conditions between cadmium oxide, and element iodine by a solvothermal route. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet spectroscopy studies (UV–vis), Fourier Transform Infrared analysis (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), μ-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammogram (CV) were used to characterize the CdO nanocrystals. The ultra-violet visible absorption peaks of CdO exhibited a large blue shift and the luminescent spectra had a strong and broad emission band centered at 228 nm. The various functional groups present in the CdO nanocrystals were identified by FTIR analysis. Intense PL was also observed with some spectral tuning possibly giving a range of emission photon energies approximately spanning from 2.5 to 3.4 eV. Scanning electron microscopy and μ-Raman microscopy images indicated that the morphology of the product is spherical nanoparticles with an average particle size of 46 nm with standard deviation. The electrochemical response of CdO which is proved the nano-cadmium has high functionality due to the small size and it has higher electrochemical activity without any modifications. The above studies demonstrate the potential for the utilization of cadmium nitrite nanocrystal in visible

  10. Colloidal Magnetic Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Asymmetric Topologies: Seeded-Growth Synthetic Routes and Formation Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Scarfiello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals, free-standing crystalline nanostructures generated and processed in solution phase, represent an important class of advanced nanoscale materials owing to the flexibility with which their physical–chemical properties can be controlled through synthetic tailoring of their compositional, structural and geometric features and the versatility with which they can be integrated in technological fields as diverse as optoelectronics, energy storage/ conversion/production, catalysis and biomedicine. In recent years, building upon mechanistic knowledge acquired on the thermodynamic and kinetic processes that underlie nanocrystal evolution in liquid media, synthetic nanochemistry research has made impressive advances, opening new possibilities for the design, creation and mastering of increasingly complex colloidal molecules, in which nanocrystal modules of different materials are clustered together via solid-state bonding interfaces into free-standing, easily processable multifunctional nanocomposite systems. This Review will provide a glimpse into this fast-growing research field by illustrating progress achieved in the wet-chemical development of last-generation breeds of all-inorganic heterostructured nanocrystals (HNCs in asymmetric non-onionlike geometries, inorganic analogues of polyfunctional organic molecules, in which distinct nanoscale crystalline modules are interconnected in hetero-dimer, hetero-oligomer and anisotropic multidomain architectures via epitaxial heterointerfaces of limited extension. The focus will be on modular HNCs entailing at least one magnetic material component combined with semiconductors and/or metals, which hold potential for generating enhanced or unconventional magnetic properties, while offering diversified or even new chemical-physical properties and functional capabilities. The available toolkit of synthetic strategies, all based on the manipulation of seeded-growth techniques

  11. One dimensional well-aligned CdO nanocrystal by solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, St. Xavier’s College, Tirunelveli (India); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nano Research Centre, Department of Physics, B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai (India); UNESCO–UNISA AFNET in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS–National Research Foundation (NRF) (South Africa); Paulraj, P. [Department of Chemistry, B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai (India); Mohamed, S.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai (India); Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cadmium oxide (CdO) emerged as one of the important semiconducting materials. • Iodine concentration increases intensity of the peak around 300 cm{sup −1} becomes stronger. • Surface morphology of these crystals has been modified by varying complexing agent. • Nanofibers structure like CdO crystals first time achieved. • The diameters of these nanofibers range mostly between 40 nm and 70 nm. - Abstract: Cadmium oxide (CdO) is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. CdO nanocrystal was successfully synthesized by a virtue of a single source precursor method at mild reaction conditions between cadmium oxide, and element iodine by a solvothermal route. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet spectroscopy studies (UV–vis), Fourier Transform Infrared analysis (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), μ-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammogram (CV) were used to characterize the CdO nanocrystals. The ultra-violet visible absorption peaks of CdO exhibited a large blue shift and the luminescent spectra had a strong and broad emission band centered at 228 nm. The various functional groups present in the CdO nanocrystals were identified by FTIR analysis. Intense PL was also observed with some spectral tuning possibly giving a range of emission photon energies approximately spanning from 2.5 to 3.4 eV. Scanning electron microscopy and μ-Raman microscopy images indicated that the morphology of the product is spherical nanoparticles with an average particle size of 46 nm with standard deviation. The electrochemical response of CdO which is proved the nano-cadmium has high functionality due to the small size and it has higher electrochemical activity without any modifications. The above studies demonstrate the potential for the utilization of cadmium nitrite nanocrystal in

  12. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  13. Systematic synthesis of lanthanide phosphate nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ziyang; Chen, Chen; Chu, Deren; Li, Haohang; Li, Yadong

    2007-01-01

    Uniform LnPO(4).x H(2)O (Ln=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Lu) nanocrystals that have controllable 0D (spherelike), 1D (rodlike), and 2D (polygonlike) structures have been systematically synthesized by means of a hydrothermal method by using a mixed solvent of water and ethanol. Transmission electron microscopy images and SEAD (selected area electron diffraction) patterns revealed that the products are highly crystalline and have structurally uniform shapes. IR, Raman, and electron energy loss spectroscopies gave spectra that indicated that an amount of oleic acid molecules were presented at the surface of individual nanocrystals. These nanocrystals have hydrophobic surfaces and could be easily dispersed in nonpolar solvents. Moreover, a creditable synthetic mechanism for nucleation, growth, and shape evolution has been proposed. Eu(3+) doped products were also prepared by using the same synthetic process. The Eu(3+) doped products exhibited an orange-red luminescence that is ascribed to an electron transition within the 4f shell. Analysis of the photoluminescent spectra revealed that the optical properties are strongly dependent on their morphologies.

  14. Spontaneous emission enhancement of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhili; Waks, Edo

    Halide perovskite semiconductors have emerged as prominent photovoltaic materials since their high conversion efficiency and promising light emitting materials in optoelectronics. In particular, easy-to-fabricated colloidal perovskite nanocrystals based on CsPbX3 quantum dots has been intensively investigated recently. Their luminescent wavelength could be tuned precisely by their chemical composition and size of growth. This opens new applications including light-emitting diodes, optical amplifiers and lasing since their promising performance as emitters. However, this potentially high-efficient emitter and gain material has not been fully investigated and realized in integrated photonic structures. Here we demonstrate Purcell enhancement effect of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals by coupling to an optimized photonic crystal nanobeam cavity as a first crucial step towards realization of integrated on-chip coherent light source with low energy consumption. We show clearly highly-enhanced photoluminescent spectrum and an averaged Purcell enhancement factor of 2.9 is achieved when they are coupled to nanobeam photonic crystal cavities compared to the ones on unpatterned surface in our lifetime measurement. Our success in enhancement of emission from CsPbX3 perovskite nanocrystals paves the way towards the realization of efficient light sources for integrated optoelectronic devices with low energy consumption.

  15. Luminophores of tunable colors from ternary Ag-In-S and quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals covering the visible to near-infrared spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2017-01-04

    Ternary Ag-In-S or quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals were prepared from simple precursors (silver nitrate, indium(iii) chloride, zinc stearate in a mixture of DDT and ODE) by injecting a solution of elemental sulfur into OLA. Ternary nanocrystals were modified by depositing either a ZnS or a CdS shell, yielding type I and type II core/shell systems exhibiting photoluminescence QY in the range of 12-16%. Careful optimization of the reaction conditions allowed alloyed quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals exhibiting tunable photoluminescence in the spectral range of 520-720 nm with a QY of 48% and 59% for green and red radiations, respectively, to be obtained. 1 H NMR analysis of the nanocrystal organic shell, after dissolution of its inorganic core, indicated that surfacial sulfur atoms were covalently bonded to aliphatic chains whereas surfacial cations were coordinated by amines and carboxylate anions. No thiol-type ligands were detected. Transfer of the prepared nanocrystals to water could be achieved in one step by exchanging the initial ligands for 11-mercaptoundecanoic ones resulting in a QY value of 31%. A new Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystal preparation method was elaborated in which indium and zinc salts of fatty acids were used as cation precursors and DDT was replaced by thioacetamide. This original DDT-free method enabled similar tuning of the photoluminescence properties of the nanocrystals as in the previous method; however the measured photoluminescence QYs were three times lower. Hence, further optimization of the new method is required.

  16. Photodegradation of Acid Black 1 and Removing Heavy Metals from the Water by an Inorganic Nanocomposite Synthesized via Simple Co-Precipitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Mohammadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this experimental work, PbS/ZnS/ZnO nanocomposite was synthesized via a simple co-precipitation method. The effect of Zn2+/Pb2+ mole ratio was investigated on the product size and morphology. The products were characterized via scanning electron microscopy to obtain product size and morphology. The optical properties of the nanocomposites were studied by ultra violet-visible spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity of the product was examine by decomposition of acid black 1 as dye. To investigation of the effect of as synthesized nanocomposite on the water treatment, the influences of the nanocomposite to remove heavy ions was studied by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the synthesized nanocomposite has well optical properties, photocatalytic and water treatment activities.

  17. Simple metal-free organic D-pi-A dyes with alkoxy- or fluorine substitutions: application in dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharam, M; Chiranjeevi, B; Gupta, K S V; Singh, Surya Prakash; Islam, A; Han, L; Kantam, M Lakshmi

    2012-06-01

    Two new metal-free organic sensitizers with simplest structural variations have been synthesized for application in nanocrystalline TiO2 sensitized solar cells. The donor-pi-bridge-acceptor (D-pi-A) structure dyes, Y2 and Y3 each designed with three parts, an electron donor unit (substituted phenyl), a linker unit (thiophene), and an anchor unit (cyanoacrylic acid) showed maximal monochromatic incident photon to current conversion efficiencies (IPCE) in a device reaching upto 67% and 82% respectively. The organic sensitizers with 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl (Y3) as donor moieties obtained better solar light to electrical energy conversion efficiencies of 3.30% where as the organic sensitizer with 2,4-difluoro phenyl as donor (Y2) showed comparatively lower efficiency of 1.02%. The efficiency obtained with the reference sensitizer N719 under similar fabrication and evaluation conditions was 5.84%.

  18. Surface modification of g-C3N4 by hydrazine: Simple way for noble-metal free hydrogen evolution catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2015-11-02

    The graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) usually is thought to be an inert material and it’s difficult to have the surface terminated NH2 groups functionalized. By modifying the g-C3N4 surface with hydrazine, the diazanyl group was successfully introduced onto the g-C3N4 surface, which allows the introduction with many other function groups. Here we illustrated that by reaction of surface hydrazine group modified g-C3N4 with CS2 under basic condition, a water electrolysis active group C(=S)SNi can be implanted on the g-C3N4 surface, and leads to a noble metal free hydrogen evolution catalyst. This catalyst has 40% hydrogen evolution efficiency compare to the 3 wt% Pt photo precipitated g-C3N4, with only less than 0.2 wt% nickel.

  19. A simple solvothermal process for fabrication of a metal-organic framework with an iron oxide enclosure for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Jiao, Zhe; Yao, Weixuan

    2014-12-05

    An active magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid material was prepared using a novel in situ solvothermal method in the presence of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, that holds much promise for large-scale synthesis. MIL-101(Fe), an iron terephthalate with pore structure and high resistance to water and common solvents, was functionalized as a model with superparamagnetic qualities, using Fe3O4. The electrostatic interaction between Fe3O4 and metal ions was thereby used to chemically stabilize magnetic nanoparticles, and thus MOF crystals were uniformly enclosed by Fe3O4 to form a homogeneous magnetic product identified as a Fe3O4/MIL-101 composite. This hybrid material with magnetic susceptibility but with the lowest possible loading amount of Fe3O4 was examined, and its potential application for magnetic solid-phase extraction of six organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from human hair and urine samples, followed by gas chromatography analysis, was assessed. The main effect parameters including solution ionic strength, desorption solvent, extraction time and desorption time were investigated in sequence. Under optimized conditions, this method showed low detection limits (0.21-2.28 ng/mL), wide linearity, and good precision (1.8-8.7% for intra-day, 2.9-9.4% for inter-day). The matrix interference produced by hair or urine could be effectively eliminated using this method, and satisfactory recoveries of the spiked samples were 76.8-94.5% and 74.9-92.1%, respectively, indicating that the Fe3O4/MIL-101 sorbents are feasible for the analysis of trace analytes from biological samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. All-in-One Cellulose Nanocrystals for 3D Printing of Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieping; Chiappone, Annalisa; Roppolo, Ignazio; Shao, Feng; Fantino, Erika; Lorusso, Massimo; Rentsch, Daniel; Dietliker, Kurt; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2018-02-23

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with >2000 photoactive groups on each can act as highly efficient initiators for radical polymerizations, cross-linkers, as well as covalently embedded nanofillers for nanocomposite hydrogels. This is achieved by a simple and reliable method for surface modification of CNCs with a photoactive bis(acyl)phosphane oxide derivative. Shape-persistent and free-standing 3D structured objects were printed with a mono-functional methacrylate, showing a superior swelling capacity and improved mechanical properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Bond length contraction in Au nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into thin SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giraud, V.; Cheung, A.; Glover, C.J.; Azevedo, G. de M; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and annealing were investigated by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A bond length contraction was observed and can be explained by surface tension effects in a simple liquid-drop model. Such results are consistent with previous reports on nonembedded NCs implying a negligible influence of the SiO 2 matrix. Cumulant analysis of the EXAFS data suggests surface reconstruction or relaxation involving a further shortened bond length. A deviation from the octahedral closed shell structure is apparent for NCs of size 25 A

  2. Observation of spin-selective tunneling in SiGe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaros, G; Golovach, V N; Spathis, P; Ares, N; Stoffel, M; Fournel, F; Schmidt, O G; Glazman, L I; De Franceschi, S

    2011-12-09

    Spin-selective tunneling of holes in SiGe nanocrystals contacted by normal-metal leads is reported. The spin selectivity arises from an interplay of the orbital effect of the magnetic field with the strong spin-orbit interaction present in the valence band of the semiconductor. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that spin-selective tunneling in semiconductor nanostructures can be achieved without the use of ferromagnetic contacts. The reported effect, which relies on mixing the light and heavy holes, should be observable in a broad class of quantum-dot systems formed in semiconductors with a degenerate valence band.

  3. Spinel ferrite nanocrystals embedded inside ZnO: magnetic, electronic andmagneto-transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Potzger, K.; Xu, Qingyu; Kuepper, K.; Talut, G.; Marko, D.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-08-21

    In this paper we show that spinel ferrite nanocrystals (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) can be texturally embedded inside a ZnO matrix by ion implantation and post-annealing. The two kinds of ferrites show different magnetic properties, e.g. coercivity and magnetization. Anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance have been observed. Our study suggests a ferrimagnet/semiconductor hybrid system for potential applications in magneto-electronics. This hybrid system can be tuned by selecting different transition metal ions (from Mn to Zn) to obtain various magnetic and electronic properties.

  4. Cu-Doping Effects in CdI(2) Nanocrystals: The Role of Cu-Agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2008-11-22

    Cu-doping effects in CdI(2) nanocrystals are studied experimentally. We use the photostimulated second harmonic generation (PSSHG) as a tool to investigate the effects. It is found that the PSSHG increases with increasing Cu content up to 0.6% and then decreases due to the formation of the Cu-agglomerates. The PSSHG for the crystal with Cu content higher than 1% reduces to that for the undoped CdI(2) crystal. The results suggest that a crucial role of the Cu-metallic agglomerates is involved in the processes as responsible for the observed effects.

  5. Cu-Doping Effects in CdI2Nanocrystals: The Role of Cu-Agglomerates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cu-doping effects in CdI2nanocrystals are studied experimentally. We use the photostimulated second harmonic generation (PSSHG as a tool to investigate the effects. It is found that the PSSHG increases with increasing Cu content up to 0.6% and then decreases due to the formation of the Cu-agglomerates. The PSSHG for the crystal with Cu content higher than 1% reduces to that for the undoped CdI2crystal. The results suggest that a crucial role of the Cu-metallic agglomerates is involved in the processes as responsible for the observed effects.

  6. Plasmonic doped semiconductor nanocrystals: Properties, fabrication, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-01

    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are of recent interest to the NC community due to their tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near infrared (NIR). The high level of doping in such materials with carrier densities in the range of 1021cm-3 leads to degeneracy of the doping levels and intense plasmonic absorption in the NIR. The lower carrier density in degenerately doped semiconductor NCs compared to noble metals enables LSPR tuning over a wide spectral range, since even a minor change of the carrier density strongly affects the spectral position of the LSPR. Two classes of degenerate semiconductors are most relevant in this respect: impurity doped semiconductors, such as metal oxides, and vacancy doped semiconductors, such as copper chalcogenides. In the latter it is the density of copper vacancies that controls the carrier concentration, while in the former the introduction of impurity atoms adds carriers to the system. LSPR tuning in vacancy doped semiconductor NCs such as copper chalcogenides occurs by chemically controlling the copper vacancy density. This goes in hand with complex structural modifications of the copper chalcogenide crystal lattice. In contrast the LSPR of degenerately doped metal oxide NCs is modified by varying the doping concentration or by the choice of host and dopant atoms, but also through the addition of capacitive charge carriers to the conduction band of the metal oxide upon post-synthetic treatments, such as by electrochemical- or photodoping. The NIR LSPRs and the option of their spectral fine-tuning make accessible important new features, such as the controlled coupling of the LSPR to other physical signatures or the enhancement of optical signals in the NIR, sensing application by LSPR tracking, energy production from the NIR plasmon resonance or bio-medical applications in the biological window. In this review we highlight the recent advances in the synthesis of various different plasmonic

  7. One-step synthesis of hybrid nanocrystals with rational tuning of the morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Wei; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Youcheng; Li, Xu; Zhao, Xu; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J G

    2014-11-12

    Metal-sulfide hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs) have been of great interest for their distinguished interfacial effect, which gives rise to unique catalytic properties. However, most of the reported metal-sulfide HNCs were synthesized via two-step approaches and few were fabricated based on the one-step strategies. Herein, we report a facile one-pot synthesis of CuPt-Cu2S, Pt-Cu2S HNCs, and CuPt nanocubes by simply changing the Pt precursor types. 1-Hexadecanethiol (HDT) was employed in this system to mediate the reduction of metal precursors and also as capping agent and sulfur source. Moreover, CuPd-Cu2S and Au-Cu2S HNCs were successfully prepared by using this one-step method. The catalytic properties of the obtained three nanocrystals were investigated in hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. Results show that CuPt-Cu2S HNCs exhibited the highest conversion rate and the highest selectivity toward hydrocinnamaldehyde while 3-phenyl-1-propanol was the only product over Pt-Cu2S HNCs.

  8. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of colloidal nanocrystals of ternary chalcogenide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazing, D. S.; Shul'ga, A. I.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals of CuInS2 and CuInSe2 were synthesized in an apolar noncoordinating medium using 1-dodecanethiol as a ligand. A semiconductor shell of ZnS was formed for CuInS2 nanocrystals obtained by the injection method. The obtained samples were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence.

  10. Morphology-controlled Pd nanocrystals as catalysts in tandem ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MIRIAM NAVLANI-GARCÍA

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... A facile synthetic protocol was used to prepare morphology controlled Pd nanocrystals with spherical and cubic ... nanocrystals and their catalytic ability in a tandem dehydrogenation/hydrogenation reaction composed by the dehydrogenation of ...... reaction J. Power Sources 302 343. 34. Jin M, Liu H, ...

  11. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  12. Extraordinary Interfacial Stitching between Single All-Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, Leyre; Lin, Junhao; De Weerd, Chris; Poirier, Lucas; Boehme, Simon C.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2018-01-01

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals are extensively studied because of their outstanding optoelectronic properties. Being of a cubic shape and typically featuring a narrow size distribution, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystals are the ideal starting material for the

  13. Preparation and photo-induced charge transfer of the composites based on 3D structural CdS nanocrystals and MEH-PPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dan; Shi, Minmin; Chen, Fei; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hongzheng [Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization of Ministry of Education, State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2010-05-15

    We report the synthesis of 3D structural CdS nanocrystals by a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal process. The CdS nanocrystals are composed of many branched nanorods with the diameter of about 50 nm, and the length of about 250 nm. The phase and crystallographic properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The composites based on CdS nanocrystals and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (MEH-PPV) have been prepared by spin-coating of the mixture in the common solvent. The optical properties of the composites are investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. A significant fluorescence quenching of MEH-PPV in the composites is observed at high CdS nanocrystals/MEH-PPV ratios, indicating that the photo-induced charge transfer occurred due to the energy level offset between the donor MEH-PPV and the acceptor CdS nanocrystals. The obvious photovoltaic behavior of the solar cell made from this composite further demonstrates the mentioned photo-induced charge transfer process. (author)

  14. Influence of TiO2 Nanocrystals Fabricating Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell on the Absorption Spectra of N719 Sensitizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhong Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption spectra of N719 sensitizer anchored on the films prepared by TiO2 nanocrystals with different morphology and size were investigated for improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. We find that the morphology and size of TiO2 nanocrystals can affect the UV-vis and FT-IR spectra of the sensitizer anchored on their surfaces. In particular, the low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions (MLCT band in the visible absorption spectra of N719 is strongly affected, and locations of these MLCT bands revealed larger differences. The results indicate that there is a red shift of MLCT band in the spectra obtained by using TiO2 nanocrystals with long morphology and large size compared to that in solution. And it produced a larger red-shift on the MLCT band after TiO2 nanocrystals with small size mixed with some long nanocrystals. Accordingly, the utilization rate to visible light is increased. This is a reason why the DSC prepared by using such film as a photoelectrode has better performance than before mixing.

  15. Physical-chemical characterization and biological assessment of simple and lithium-doped biological-derived hydroxyapatite thin films for a new generation of metallic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, A. C.; Florian, P. E.; Stan, G. E.; Popescu-Pelin, G.; Zgura, I.; Enculescu, M.; Oktar, F. N.; Trusca, R.; Sima, L. E.; Roseanu, A.; Duta, L.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the synthesis by PLD of simple and lithium-doped biological-origin hydroxyapatite (HA) films. The role of doping reagents (Li2CO3, Li3PO4) on the morphology, structure, chemical composition, bonding strength and cytocompatibility of the films was investigated. SEM investigations of the films evidenced a surface morphology consisting of particles with mean diameters of (5-7) μm. GIXRD analyses demonstrated that the synthesized structures consisted of HA phase only, with different degrees of crystallinity, mainly influenced by the doping reagent type. After only three days of immersion in simulated body fluid, FTIR spectra showed a remarkable growth of a biomimetic apatitic film, indicative of a high biomineralization capacity of the coatings. EDS analyses revealed a quasi-stoichiometric target-to-substrate transfer, the values inferred for the Ca/P ratio corresponding to a biological apatite. All synthesized structures displayed a hydrophilic behavior, suitable for attachment of osteoblast cells. In vitro cell viability tests showed that the presence of Li2CO3 and Li3PO4 as doping reagents promoted the hMSC growth on film surfaces. Taking into consideration these enhanced characteristics, corroborated with a low fabrication cost generated by sustainable resources, one should consider the lithium-doped biological-derived materials as promising prospective solutions for a next generation of coated implants with rapid osteointegration.

  16. Photoluminescence from Si nanocrystals in silica: The effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheylan, S.; Elliman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of H passivation on the PL emission of Si nanocrystals produced in silica by ion-implantion and annealing is shown to depend on the implant fluence. At low fluences, where the nanocrystals are small, passivation causes an enhancement of the emission intensity that is uniform over the full spectral range and therefore appears to be independent of nanocrystal size. For higher fluences, where the average size and size distribution of the nanocrystals are larger, the enhancement occurs preferentially at longer wavelengths, giving rise to a red-shift in the emission spectra. Both the enhancement and the red-shift increase monotonically with increasing fluence. These data are shown to be consistent with a model in which the probability to contain a non-radiative defect increases with nanocrystal size

  17. Facile synthesis of water-soluble curcumin nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Zoran M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, facile synthesis of water soluble curcumin nanocrystals is reported. Solvent exchange method was applied to synthesize curcumin nanocrystals. Different techniques were used to characterize the structural and photophysical properties of curcumin nanocrystals. We found that nanocurcumin prepared by this method had good chemical and physical stability, could be stored in the powder form at room temperature, and was freely dispersible in water. It was established that the size of curcumin nanocrystals was varied in the range of 20-500 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis analyses showed the presence of tetrahydrofuran inside the curcumin nanocrystals. Also, it was found that nanocurcumin emitted photoluminescencewith yellow-green colour. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172003

  18. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  19. Z-Contrast STEM Imaging and EELS of CdSe Nanocrystals: Towards the Analysis of Individual Nanocrystal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erwin, M.; Kadavanich, A.V.; Kippeny, T.; Pennycook, S.J.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have applied Atomic Number Contract Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-Contrast STEM) and STEM/EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) towards the study of colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in MEH-PPV polymer films. Unlike the case of conventional phase-contrast High Resolution TEM, Z-Contrast images are direct projections of the atomic structure. Hence they can be interpreted without the need for sophisticated image simulation and the image intensity is a direct measure of the thickness of a nanocrystal. Our thickness measurements are in agreement with the predicted faceted shape of these nanocrystals. Our unique 1.3A resolution STEM has successfully resolve3d the sublattice structure of these CdSe nanocrystals. In [010] projection (the polar axis in the image plane) we can distinguish Se atom columns from Cd columns. Consequently we can study the effects of lattice polarity on the nanocrystal morphology. Furthermore, since the STEM technique does not rely on diffraction, it is superbly suited to the study of non-periodic detail, such as the surface structure of the nanocrystals. EELS measurements on individual nanocrystals indicate a significant amount (equivalet to 0.5-1 surface monolayers) of oxygen on the nanocrystals, despite processing in an inert atmosphere. Spatially resolved measurements at 7A resolution suggest a surface oxide layer. However, the uncertainty in the measurement precludes definitive assignment at this time. The source of the oxygen is under investigation as well

  20. Tracking Energy Relaxation Within Plasmonic Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    within it. We have also investigated how bandgap photoexcitation can be used to manipulate the plasmon resonance of WO3-x NCs. Adding additional...structure, and the spatial location of dopants within it. We have also investigated how bandgap photoexcitation can be used to manipulate the plasmon...positive, photo - induced absorption signal that appears to the high-energy side of this resonance. Taken together, these spectral signatures suggest

  1. A Surprisingly Simple Electrostatic Model Explains Bent Versus Linear Structures in M(+)-RG2 Species (M = Group 1 Metal, Li-Fr; RG = Rare Gas, He-Rn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejeva, Anna; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2015-11-05

    It is found that a simple electrostatic model involving competition between the attractive dispersive interaction and induced-dipole repulsion between the two RG atoms performs extremely well in rationalizing the M(+)-RG2 geometries, where M = group 1 metal and RG = rare gas. The Li(+)-RG2 and Na(+)-RG2 complexes have previously been found to exhibit quasilinear or linear minimum-energy geometries, with the Na(+)-RG2 complexes having an additional bent local minimum [A. Andrejeva, A. M. Gardner, J. B. Graneek, R. J. Plowright, W. H. Breckenridge, T. G. Wright, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 13578]. In the present work, the geometries for M = K-Fr are found to be bent. A simple electrostatic model explains these conclusions and is able to account almost quantitatively for the binding energy of the second RG atom, as well as the form of the angular potential, for all 36 titular species. Additionally, results of population analyses are presented together with orbital contour plots; combined with the success of the electrostatic model, the expectation that these complexes are all physically bound is confirmed.

  2. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D., E-mail: dravishankaran@hotmail.com

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton. - Highlights: • Cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were synthesized from industrial waste cotton by controlled acid and basic hydrolysis. • Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were synthesized from CMCs by controlled acid hydrolysis. • The synthesis process is simple and the CNCs possess liquid crystalline character, biocompatibility and sustainability. • The morphology of the CNCs were studied by AFM and TEM analysis. The average width is 10 ± 1 nm and length is 180 ± 60 nm. - Abstract: We aimed to develop a simple and low-cost method for the production of high-performance cellulose nanomaterials from renewable and sustainable resources. Here, cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were prepared by controlled acidic and basic hydrolysis of cotton from textile industry wastes. The resulted CMCs were further converted into cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with high crystallinity by acidic hydrolysis. The physicochemical characteristics and morphological feature of CMCs and CNCs were studied by various analytical techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The isolated CNCs possess a needle-like morphological structure with the longitudinal and lateral dimensions of 180 ± 60 nm, 10 ± 1 nm, respectively. The AFM result reveals that the CNCs have a high aspect ratio of 40 ± 14 nm and the average thickness of 6.5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicate that the synthesized CNCs possess face-centered cubic crystal structure. Preliminary experiments were carried out to fabricate CNCs incorporated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The results suggest that the concept of waste to wealth could be well

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis and white light emission of cubic ZrO2:Eu3+ nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetei, Sanoujam Dhiren; Singh, Shougaijam Dorendrajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • White light emitting cubic ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystal is synthesized by hydrothermal technique. • Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase and to get red counterpart of the white light. • Defect emission and Eu 3+ emission combined to give white light. • The white light emitted from this nanocrystal resembles vertical daylight of the Sun. • Lifetime corresponding to red counterpart of the sample is far longer than conventional white light emitters. -- Abstract: Production of white light has been a promising area of luminescence studies. In this work, white light emitting nanocrystals of cubic zirconia doped with Eu 3+ are synthesized by hydrothermal technique. The dopant Eu 3+ is used to stabilize crystalline phase to cubic and at the same time to get red counterpart of the white light. The synthesis procedure is simple and precursor required no further annealing for crystallization. X-ray diffraction patterns show the crystalline phase of ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ to be cubic and it is confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. From transmission electron microscopy images, size of the crystals is found to be ∼5 nm. Photoluminescence emission spectrum of the sample, on monitoring excitation at O 2− –Eu 3+ charge transfer state shows broad peak due to O 2− of the zirconia and that of Eu 3+ emission. Commission Internationale de l’éclairage co-ordinate of this nanocrystal (0.32, 0.34) is closed to that of the ideal white light (0.33, 0.33). Correlated color temperature of the white light (5894 K) is within the range of vertical daylight. Lifetime (1.32 ms) corresponding to 5 D 0 energy level of the Eu 3+ is found to be far longer than conventional red counterparts of white light emitters. It suggests that the ZrO 2 :Eu 3+ nanocrystals synthesized by hydrothermal technique may find applications in simulating the vertical daylight of the Sun

  4. Performance-improved nonvolatile memory with aluminum nanocrystals embedded in Al2O3 for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Huo, Zongliang; Zhu, Chenxin; Cui, Yanxiang; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Zhiwei; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yumei; Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ming

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a charge trapping memory with aluminum nanocrystals (Al- NCs) embedded in Al2O3 high-k dielectric. Compared to metal/Al2O3/SiO2/Si structure, this device exhibits a larger memory window (6.7 V at ±12 V), faster program/erase speed and good endurance. In particular, data retention is improved greatly both at room temperature and in high-temperature (up to 150 °C). The results indicate that the device with the embedding Al-NCs in Al2O3 film has a strong potential for future high-performance nonvolatile memory application.

  5. Engineered pigments based on iridescent cellulose nanocrystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Raphael; Roussel, Francine; Coindeau, Stéphane; Belgacem, Naceur; Bras, Julien

    2015-05-20

    A simple method to produce biobased iridescent pigments from cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films is reported. The process consists of forming nanostructured films from a CNC liquid-crystalline suspension and an appropriate dry grinding. The features of the iridescent pigments are described; they have a flake-like morphology with a thickness of 25 μm. However, because of the presence of sulfate groups, thermal degradation and high redispersion in water occur, which affect the iridescent property of these biobased pigments. To overcome such limitations, two post-treatments are proposed. The sulfate ester groups are removed from the iridescent pigments with vacuum overdrying. The mass loss of iridescent pigment in water is reduced with an increase of the ionic strength in the aqueous medium by NaCl addition. These post-treatments have proven to be efficient and engineered pigments based on CNC films can be used to add anticounterfeiting features to packaging manufactured by classical paper techniques or extrusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  7. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  8. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H; Bustamante, Jorge; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. (1) The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  9. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, James Henry [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  10. Flame synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson, E-mail: wmerchan-merchan@ou.edu [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Farahani, Moien Farmahini [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a single-step flame method for the synthesis of Zn oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diverse flame positions lead to a variation of Zn oxide nanocrystal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized crystals have polyhedral, pipet- and needle-like shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High length-to-diameter aspect-ratio crystals appear in a higher temperature flame. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal growth mechanism corresponds to vapor-to-solid conversion. - Abstract: Distinctive zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals were synthesized on the surface of Zn probes using a counter-flow flame medium formed by methane/acetylene and oxygen-enriched air streams. The source material, a zinc wire with a purity of {approx}99.99% and diameter of 1 mm, was introduced through a sleeve into the oxygen rich region of the flame. The position of the probe/sleeve was varied within the flame medium resulting in growth variation of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of the probe. The shape and structural parameters of the grown crystals strongly depend on the flame position. Structural variations of the synthesized crystals include single-crystalline ZnO nanorods and microprisms (ZMPs) (the ZMPs have less than a few micrometers in length and several hundred nanometers in cross section) with a large number of facets and complex axial symmetry with a nanorod protruding from their tips. The protruding rods are less than 100 nm in diameter and lengths are less than 1 {mu}m. The protruding nanorods can be elongated several times by increasing the residence time of the probe/sleeve inside the oxygen-rich flame or by varying the flame position. At different flame heights, nanorods having higher length-to-diameter aspect-ratio can be synthesized. A lattice spacing of {approx}0.26 nm was measured for the synthesized nanorods, which can be closely correlated with the (0 0 2) interplanar spacing of hexagonal ZnO (Wurtzite) cells

  11. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  12. STM/STS and BEES study of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jianfei

    This work investigates the electronic properties of very small gold and semiconductor particles using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). Complementary theoretical works were also performed. The first theoretical work was to calculate the quantized states in the CdS/HgS/CdS quantum-well-quantum-dot nanocrystals using eight-band envelope method. Measured spectroscopy data on gold nanocrystals have rich features. In order to understand and relate these features to the electronic properties of the nanocrystals, we developed a tunneling model. This model includes the effect of excited states which have electron-hole pairs. The relaxation between discrete energy levels can also be included in this model. We also considered how the nanocrystals affect the BEES current. In this work an ultra-high vacuum and low-temperature STM was re-designed and re-built. The BEEM/BEES capabilities were incorporated into the STM. We used this STM to image gold nanocrystals and semiconductor nanocrystals. STS and BEES spectra of gold nanocrystals were collected and compared with calculations.

  13. Structural and morphological evaluation of Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xianfeng [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lin, Rui; Ofoli, Robert Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Mei, Zhi, E-mail: zmei@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Jackson, James E., E-mail: jackson@chemistry.msu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals are successfully synthesized via a facile polyol co-reduction method. The resulting nanocrystals show spheres, triangular nanoplates, decahedra, nanorods, and irregular shapes. A combination of Pd{sup II} and Ru{sup III} precursors tends to yield Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals of higher shape monodispersity than those from Pd{sup II} and Ru{sup II} precursors. The mole ratio between Ru and Pd components in the precursor solution also plays a key role in determining the size/shape distribution of the nanocrystals, with higher Pd/Ru ratios generating products of more uniform size. Elemental analyses and electron microscopy studies suggest that the obtained nanocrystals have alloyed structures over the full composition space and that they form through either monomer addition or coalescence mechanisms. - Highlights: • 1. Polyol reduction method generates well-controlled Ru–Pd alloy nanocrystals. • Ru precursor types play a significant role in tuning particle morphology and structures. • Pd to Ru precursor molar ratio controls final particle size and composition. • Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals display alloyed structures over full composition space.

  14. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  15. Chalcogenide nanocrystal assembly: Controlling heterogeneity and modulating heterointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica

    This dissertation work is focused on developing methods to facilitate charge transport in heterostructured materials that comprise a nanoscale component. Multicomponent semiconductor materials were prepared by (1) spin coating of discrete nanomaterials onto porous silicon (pSi) or (2) self-assembly. Spin-coating of colloidal quantum dot (QD) PbS solutions was employed to create prototype PbS QD based radiation detection devices using porous silicon (pSi) as an n-type support and charge transport material. These devices were initially tested as a photodetector to ascertain the possibility of their use in high energy radiation detection. Short chain thiolate ligands (4-fluorothiophenolate) and anion passivation at the particle interface were evaluated to augment interparticle transport. However, the samples showed minimum interaction with the light source possibly due to poor infiltration into the pSi. The second project was also driven by the potential synergistic properties that can be achieved in multicomponent metal chalcogenide nanostructures, potentially useful in optoelectronic devices. Working with well-established methods for single component metal chalcogenide (MQ) particle gels this dissertation research sought to develop practical methods for co-gelation of different component particles with complimentary functionalities. By monitoring the kinetics of aggregation using time resolved dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy the kinetics of aggregation of the two most common crystal structures for CdQ nanocrystals was studied and it was determined that the hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure aggregated faster than the cubic (zinc blende) crystal structure. For gel coupling of nanoparticles with differing Q (Q=S, Se and Te), once we accounted for the crystal structure effects, it was determined that the relative redox characteristics of Q govern the reaction rate. The oxidative sol-gel assembly routes were also employed to fabricate metal

  16. Comparison of discrete-storage nonvolatile memories: advantage of hybrid method for fabrication of Au nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Jia Rui; Guan Weihua; Li Weilong; Liu Qi; Hu Yuan; Long Shibing; Chen Baoqin; Liu Ming; Ye Tianchun; Lu Wensheng; Jiang Long

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the memory characteristics of two kinds of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors embedded with Au nanocrytals are investigated: hybrid MOS with nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by chemical syntheses and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) MOS with NCs fabricated by RTA. For both kinds of devices, the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) curves clearly indicate the charge storage in the NCs. The hybrid MOS, however, shows a larger memory window, as compared with RTA MOS. The retention characteristics of the two MOS devices are also investigated. The capacitance versus time (C-t) measurement shows that the hybrid MOS capacitor embedded with Au nanocrystals has a longer retention time. The mechanism of longer retention time for hybrid MOS capacitor is qualitatively discussed

  17. Controlled Synthesis of Uniform Cobalt Phosphide Hyperbranched Nanocrystals Using Tri- n -octylphosphine Oxide as a Phosphorus Source

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Haitao

    2011-01-12

    A new method to produce hyperbranched Co 2P nanocrystals that are uniform in size, shape, and symmetry was developed. In this reaction tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) was used as both a solvent and a phosphorus source. The reaction exhibits a novel monomer-saturation-dependent tunability between Co metal nanoparticle (NP) and Co 2P NP products. The morphology of Co 2P can be controlled from sheaflike structures to hexagonal symmetric structures by varying the concentration of the surfactant. This unique product differs significantly from other reported hyperbranched nanocrystals in that the highly anisotropic shapes can be stabilized as the majority shape (>84%). This is the first known use of TOPO as a reagent as well as a coordinating background solvent in NP synthesis. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of the Atomic Structure of Nanocrystals: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (ALP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of standard methods of elaboration of powder diffraction data for determination of the structure of nano-size crystallites is analysed. Based on our theoretical calculations of powder diffraction data we show, that the assumption of the infinite crystal lattice for nanocrystals smaller than 20 nm in size is not justified. Application of conventional tools developed for elaboration of powder diffraction data, like the Rietveld method, may lead to erroneous interpretation of the experimental results. An alternate evaluation of diffraction data of nanoparticles, based on the so-called 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) is introduced. We assume a model of nanocrystal having a grain core with well-defined crystal structure, surrounded by a surface shell with the atomic structure similar to that of the core but being under a strain (compressive or tensile). The two structural components, the core and the shell, form essentially a composite crystal with interfering, inseparable diffraction properties. Because the structure of such a nanocrystal is not uniform, it defies the basic definitions of an unambiguous crystallographic phase. Consequently, a set of lattice parameters used for characterization of simple crystal phases is insufficient for a proper description of the complex structure of nanocrystals. We developed a method of evaluation of powder diffraction data of nanocrystals, which refers to a core-shell model and is based on the 'apparent lattice parameter' methodology. For a given diffraction pattem, the alp values are calculated for every individual Bragg reflection. For nanocrystals the alp values depend on the diffraction vector Q. By modeling different a0tomic structures of nanocrystals and calculating theoretically corresponding diffraction patterns using the Debye functions we showed, that alp-Q plots show characteristic shapes which can be used for evaluation of the atomic structure of the core-shell system. We show, that using a simple

  19. Facile synthesis of inverse spinel NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and their superparamagnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinel NiFe2O4 nanocrystals have been obtained by means of a novel composite-hydroxide-salt-mediated approach, which is based on a reaction between metallic salt and metallic oxide in the solution of composite-hydroxide-salt eutectic at ~225 ºC and normal atmosphere without any organic dispersant or capping agent. The obtained products are characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD, a transmission electron microscopy (TEM and an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM. The formation process of NiFe2O4 nanosheet is proposed to begin with a ‘‘dissolution-recrystallization’’ which is followed by an ‘‘Ostwald ripening’’ mechanism. The NiFe2O4 nano-octahedrons can be obtained through adjusting the reaction water content in the hydroxide melts at constant temperature. At 300 K, magnetic hysteresis loops at an applied field of 15 kOe show zero coercivity, indicating the superparamagnetic behavior of the as-prepared NiFe2O4 nanocrystals.

  20. Facile synthesis of inverse spinel NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and their superparamagnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinel NiFe2O4 nanocrystals have been obtained by means of a novel composite-hydroxide-salt-mediated approach, which is based on a reaction between metallic salt and metallic oxide in the solution of composite-hydroxide-salt eutectic at ~225 ºC and normal atmosphere without any organic dispersant or capping agent. The obtained products are characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD, a transmission electron microscopy (TEM and an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM. The formation process of NiFe2O4 nanosheet is proposed to begin with a ‘‘dissolution-recrystallization’’ which is followed by an ‘‘Ostwald ripening’’ mechanism. The NiFe2O4 nano-octahedrons can be obtained through adjusting the reaction water content in the hydroxide melts at constant temperature. At 300 K, magnetic hysteresis loops at an applied field of 15 kOe show zero coercivity, indicating the superparamagnetic behavior of the as-prepared NiFe2O4 nanocrystals.

  1. Microwave-Assisted Size Control of Colloidal Nickel Nanocrystals for Colloidal Nanocrystals-Based Non-volatile Memory Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj; Velampati, Ravi Shankar R.; Mandal, D.; Sharma, Rohit

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal synthesis and size control of nickel (Ni) nanocrystals (NCs) below 10 nm are reported using a microwave synthesis method. The synthesised colloidal NCs have been characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). XRD analysis highlights the face centred cubic crystal structure of synthesised NCs. The size of NCs observed using TEM and DLS have a distribution between 2.6 nm and 10 nm. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy analysis of spin-coated NCs over a silicon dioxide surface has been carried out to identify an optimum spin condition that can be used for the fabrication of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) non-volatile memory (NVM) capacitor. Subsequently, the fabrication of a MOS NVM capacitor is reported to demonstrate the potential application of colloidal synthesized Ni NCs in NVM devices. We also report the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-time (C-t) response of the fabricated MOS NVM capacitor. The C-V and C-t characteristics depict a large flat band voltage shift (V FB) and high retention time, respectively, which indicate that colloidal Ni NCs are excellent candidates for applications in next-generation NVM devices.

  2. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Jesse H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Surendranath, Yogesh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Alivisatos, Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  3. Gas-phase synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rajib

    Luminescent nanomaterials is a newly emerging field that provides challenges not only to fundamental research but also to innovative technology in several areas such as electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, display, lighting, biomedical engineering and environmental control. These nanomaterials come in various forms, shapes and comprises of semiconductors, metals, oxides, and inorganic and organic polymers. Most importantly, these luminescent nanomaterials can have different properties owing to their size as compared to their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the use of plasmas in synthesis, modification, and deposition of semiconductor nanomaterials for luminescence applications. Nanocrystalline silicon is widely known as an efficient and tunable optical emitter and is attracting great interest for applications in several areas. To date, however, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (NCs) have been used exclusively in traditional rigid devices. For the field to advance towards new and versatile applications for nanocrystal-based devices, there is a need to investigate whether these NCs can be used in flexible and stretchable devices. We show how the optical and structural/morphological properties of plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) change when they are deposited on stretchable substrates made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Synthesis of these NCs was performed in a nonthermal, low-pressure gas phase plasma reactor. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct deposition of NCs onto stretchable substrates. Additionally, in order to prevent oxidation and enhance the luminescence properties, a silicon nitride shell was grown around Si NCs. We have demonstrated surface nitridation of Si NCs in a single step process using non?thermal plasma in several schemes including a novel dual-plasma synthesis/shell growth process. These coated NCs exhibit SiNx shells with composition depending on process parameters. While measurements including

  4. Nanocrystal clusters in combination with spectral imaging to improve sensitivity in antibody labeling applications of fluorescent nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, John S.; Panza, Janice L.; Bootman, Matt

    2007-02-01

    Composition-tunable nanocrystals are fluorescent nanoparticles with a uniform particle size and with adjustable optical characteristics. When used for optical labeling of biomolecular targets these and other nanotechnology solutions have enabled new approaches which are possible because of the high optical output, narrow spectral signal, consistent quantum efficiency across a broad emission range and long lived fluorescent behavior of the nanocrystals. When coupled with spectral imaging the full potential of multiplexing multiple probes in a complex matrix can be realized. Spectral imaging can be used to improve sensitivity of narrowband fluorophores through application of chemometric image processing techniques used to reduce the influence of autofluorescence background. Composition-tunable nanocrystals can be complexed together to form nanoclusters which have the advantage of significantly stronger signal and therefore a higher sensitivity. These nanoclusters can be targeted in biomolecular systems using standard live-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry based techniques. Composition-tunable nanocrystals and nanoclusters have comparable mass and brightness across a wide emission range. This enables the production of nanocrystal-based probes that have comparable reactivity and sensitivity over a large color range. We present spectral imaging results of antibody targeted nanocrystal cluster labeling of target proteins in cultured cells and a Western blot experiment. The combination of spectral imaging with the use of clusters of nanocrystals further improves the sensitivity over either of the approaches independently.

  5. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-08-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  6. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteberg S-41296 (Sweden); Tanaka, Junzo, E-mail: tikoma@ceram.titech.ac.j [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  7. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Tagaya, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobutaka Hanagata, Dinko Chakarov, Bengt Kasemo and Junzo Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM, (ii ultraviolet light (UV, (iii UV/APM, (iv APM/UV and (v sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  8. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  9. Radiative and Nonradiative Recombination in CuInS2 Nanocrystals and CuInS2-Based Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263986; Rabouw, F.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413318036; Spoor, Frank; Bladt, Eva; Grozema, Ferdinand; Houtepen, Arjan; Siebbeles, Laurens; de Mello-Donega, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent copper indium sulfide (CIS) nanocrystals are a potential solution to the toxicity issues associated with Cd- and Pb-based nanocrystals. However, the development of high-quality CIS nanocrystals has been complicated by insufficient knowledge of the electronic structure and of the factors

  10. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Mohammad L.; Moorefield, Charles M.; Elbatal, Hany S.; Newkome, George R.; Modarelli, David A.; Romano, Natalie C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. ► Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. ► Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via Ru III /Ru II reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-Ru II -terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13 C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-Ru II -PeryTP was possible via repeating the Ru III /Ru II reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP-Ru II -AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via “Click” chemistry reaction.

  11. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh, E-mail: shailesh@nplindia.org; Singh, Son

    2014-11-15

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (E{sub g})∼1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (∼250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Without resorting to any post-selenization process and using the colligative properties of the mixture comprising of volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene to manoeuvre the growth conditions to promote Ostwald ripening, a single phase, monodispersive and nearly stoichiometric ternary CISe nanocrystals are formed by wet-synthesis route. - Highlights: • Wet-route synthesis of CISe nanocrystals reported without post-selenization process. • Single-phase, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals formed. • Novel combination of capping agents: volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene. • Higher growth temperature attained using the colligative properties of the mixture. • Metallic salts presence explains exp. and theoretical boiling point difference.

  12. Strain-dependent photoluminescence behavior in three geometries of CdSe/CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L; Koski, Kristie J; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2009-05-26

    In recent years, a new generation of quantum confined colloidal semiconductor structures has emerged, with more complex shapes than simple quantum dots1, 2. These include nanorods3 and tetrapods4. Beyond shape, it is also now possible to spatially vary the electron and hole potentials within these nanoparticles by varying the composition. Examples of these new structures include seeded dots, rods, and tetrapods, which contain a CdSe core embedded within a CdS shell5, 6. These structures may have many uses beyond those envisioned for simple quantum dots, which are frequently employed in luminescent applications7. This paper is concerned with changes in the optoelectronic properties of tetrapods when the arms are bent. We demonstrate that seeded tetrapods can serve as an optical strain gauge, capable of measuring forces on the order of nanonewtons. We anticipate that a nanocrystal strain gauge with optical readout will be useful for applications ranging from sensitive optomechanical devices to biological force investigations.

  13. Uranium oxide nanocrystals by microwave-assisted thermal decomposition. Electronic and structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, Jennifer; Mathur, Sanjay; Pacold, Joseph I.; Shuh, David K.; Dong, Chung-Li

    2018-01-01

    Uranium oxides have attracted much attention not only in the context of nuclear energy generation but also for their application as pristine catalysts or as supports for other (transition metal) oxides and (precious) metals. Their propensity to adopt high coordination numbers and manifest multiple oxidation states (from +II to +VI) makes them attractive candidates for catalyzed transformation reactions. Herein, we report a new synthesis route to phase-pure, crystalline UO 2 nanoparticles via microwave-assisted decomposition of a molecular uranium(IV) precursor. The electronic structure and optical absorption properties of these nanocrystals were investigated using spectroscopic methods to evaluate their suitability for photo(electro)catalytic applications. (copyright 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Uranium oxide nanocrystals by microwave-assisted thermal decomposition. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leduc, Jennifer; Mathur, Sanjay [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cologne (Germany); Pacold, Joseph I.; Shuh, David K. [Chemical Sciences Division, The Glenn T. Seaborg Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dong, Chung-Li [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan (China)

    2018-01-17

    Uranium oxides have attracted much attention not only in the context of nuclear energy generation but also for their application as pristine catalysts or as supports for other (transition metal) oxides and (precious) metals. Their propensity to adopt high coordination numbers and manifest multiple oxidation states (from +II to +VI) makes them attractive candidates for catalyzed transformation reactions. Herein, we report a new synthesis route to phase-pure, crystalline UO{sub 2} nanoparticles via microwave-assisted decomposition of a molecular uranium(IV) precursor. The electronic structure and optical absorption properties of these nanocrystals were investigated using spectroscopic methods to evaluate their suitability for photo(electro)catalytic applications. (copyright 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Rapid thermal synthesis of GaN nanocrystals and nanodisks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Huber, Š.; Šimek, P.; Šaněk, F.; Jankovský, O.; Gregorová, E.; Fiala, R.; Matějková, Stanislava; Mikulics, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2013), 1411/1-1411/7 ISSN 1388-0764 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : gallium nitride * thermal ammonolysis * nanodisks * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2013

  16. Embedded tin nanocrystals in silicon—an electrical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, L.; Haastrup, M. J.; Roesgaard, S.; Hansen, J. L.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Julsgaard, B.

    2018-02-01

    Tin nanocrystals embedded in a SiSn layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy on n-type Si are investigated by means of deep level transient spectroscopy. Two Sn related deep traps are observed, depending on the annealing temperature of the samples. A deep level at {E}{{C}}-0.62 {eV} (Sn1) is observed for annealing temperatures up to 650{}\\circ C, whereas a level at {E}{{C}}-0.53 {eV} (Sn2) appears for annealing temperatures above 600{}\\circ C. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of Sn nanocrystals at 600{}\\circ C, which coincides with the appearance of Sn2. Sn1 is tentatively assigned to a Sn related precursor defect, which transforms upon annealing into either Sn nanocrystals or an interface defect located at the nanocrystal surface.

  17. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non......-radiative energy transfer from the primary LED to the nanocrystals. LED structures with sub-10 nm separation the between quantum well and the surface and patterned standard bright LEDs are considered for the hybrid devices, which require close proximity of the nanocrystals to the quantum well. The development...

  18. Creating ligand-free silicon germanium alloy nanocrystal inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Liu, Tianhang; Ramadurai, Nithin; Tuccarione, Phillip; Lai, Larry; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-10-25

    Particle size is widely used to tune the electronic, optical, and catalytic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. This contrasts with bulk semiconductors, where properties are tuned based on composition, either through doping or through band gap engineering of alloys. Ideally, one would like to control both size and composition of semiconductor nanocrystals. Here, we demonstrate production of silicon-germanium alloy nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis of silane and germane. We have used FTIR, TEM, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TOF-SIMS to conclusively determine their structure and composition. Moreover, we show that upon extended sonication in selected solvents, these bare nanocrystals can be stably dispersed without ligands, thereby providing the possibility of using them as an ink to make patterned films, free of organic surfactants, for device fabrication. The engineering of these SiGe alloy inks is an important step toward the low-cost fabrication of group IV nanocrystal optoelectronic, thermoelectric, and photovoltaic devices.

  19. Nanocrystal quantum dot electronics and nanofabrication by electron beam ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Michael D.

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are nanometer-scale structures with size-dependent electronic and optical properties that make them interesting for novel technological applications and for fundamental physics research. In this thesis, electronic properties of several types of semi-conductor nanocrystals are studied by integrating arrays of them into electrode-gap devices and measuring their conductivities with current-voltage characterization and charge-imaging. Additionally, novel nano-fabrication techniques were developed to assist in the studies of nanocrystals and nanostructures in general. Central to ail of this work has been the compatibility of electronic measurements and high-resolution imaging. This has allowed for greater insight into the nature of electron motion in nanocrystal arrays and also has been the enabling factor for realizing the nano-fabrication techniques.

  20. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ren; Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting; Sze, S.M.; Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H.; Yeh, Fon-Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  1. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng, E-mail: scchen0213@gmail.co [Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang [Department of Physics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Ren [Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Sze, S.M. [Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H. [ProMOS Technologies, No. 19 Li Hsin Rd., Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Yeh, Fon-Shan [Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  2. Influence of dimensionality on phase transition in VO2 nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermally synthesized one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanocrystals of VO2 undergo phase transition around 65°C, where temperature and mechanism of phase transition are dependent on dimensionality of nanocrystals. Both nanocrystalline samples exhibit depression of phase transition temperature compared to the bulk material, the magnitude of which depends on the dimensionality of the nanocrystal. One-dimensional nanoribbons exhibit lower phase transition temperature and higher values of apparent activation energy than two-dimensional nanosheets. The phase transition exhibits as a complex process with somewhat lower value of enthalpy than the phase transition in the bulk, probably due to higher proportion of surface atoms in the nanocrystals. High values of apparent activation energy indicate that individual steps of the phase transition involve simultaneous movement of large groups of atoms, as expected for single-domain nanocrystalline materials. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 142015

  3. Solubilisation of dye-loaded zeolite L nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devaux, A.; Popović, Z.; Bossart, O.; De Cola, L.; Kunzmann, A.; Calzaferri, G.

    2006-01-01

    Solubilisation of zeolite L nanocrystals in different solvents is reported. Grafting alkoxysilane derivatives with a hydrophobic part leads to transparent suspensions in non-polar solvents while modification with a positively charged complex leads to solubilisation in water.

  4. Processing of ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusatti, M.; Speckhahn, R.; Silva, L.A.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we report the synthesis of high quality ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique. This synthetic strategy has been shown to have advantages over other methods of producing nanostructures in terms of low cost, efficiency, simplicity and uniformity of crystal structure. Zinc chloride solution at room temperature was mixed with sodium hydroxide solution at 50°C to produce ZnO nanocrystals. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the ZnO nanocrystals obtained. The structure of ZnO was refined by the Rietveld Method from X-ray diffraction data. These methods showed that the product consisted of pure ZnO nanocrystals and has, predominantly, a rod-like morphology. (author)

  5. Room-temperature synthetic pathways to barium titanate nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Christopher W; Cuevas, Marie A; Brutchey, Richard L

    2008-12-01

    Novel room-temperature pathways to BaTiO(3) nanocrystals have been recently developed, which stand in contrast to traditional high-temperature methods. Peptide-assisted, bio-facilitated routes have been developed for low-temperature nanocrystal growth, in addition to two low-temperature routes completely independent of biomolecules. These innovative methods lay the groundwork for the facile production of nanoscale BaTiO(3) in economical and energy-efficient ways.

  6. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, S.

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  7. 3C-SiC nanocrystal growth on 10° miscut Si(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deokar, Geetanjali, E-mail: gitudeo@gmail.com [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); D' Angelo, Marie; Demaille, Dominique [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Cavellin, Catherine Deville [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Faculté des Sciences et Technologie UPEC, 61 av. De Gaulle, Créteil F-94010 (France)

    2014-04-01

    The growth of 3C-SiC nano-crystal (NC) on 10° miscut Si(001) substrate by CO{sub 2} thermal treatment is investigated by scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. The vicinal Si(001) surface was thermally oxidized prior to the annealing at 1100 °C under CO{sub 2} atmosphere. The influence of the atomic steps at the vicinal SiO{sub 2}/Si interface on the SiC NC growth is studied by comparison with the results obtained for fundamental Si(001) substrates in the same conditions. For Si miscut substrate, a substantial enhancement in the density of the SiC NCs and a tendency of preferential alignment of them along the atomic step edges is observed. The SiC/Si interface is abrupt, without any steps and epitaxial growth with full relaxation of 3C-SiC occurs by domain matching epitaxy. The CO{sub 2} pressure and annealing time effect on NC growth is analyzed. The as-prepared SiC NCs can be engineered further for potential application in optoelectronic devices and/or as a seed for homoepitaxial SiC or heteroepitaxial GaN film growth. - Highlights: • Synthesis of 3C-SiC nanocrystals epitaxied on miscut-Si using a simple technique • Evidence of domain matching epitaxy at the SiC/Si interface • SiC growth proceeds along the (001) plane of host Si. • Substantial enhancement of the SiC nanocrystal density due to the miscut • Effect of the process parameters (CO{sub 2} pressure and annealing duration)

  8. Grain boundaries at the surface of consolidated MgO nanocrystals and acid-base functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingurt, Dima; Fuks, David; Landau, Miron V; Vidruk, Roxana; Herskowitz, Moti

    2013-09-21

    The increase of the surface basicity-acidity of MgO material by factors of 1.8-3.0 due to consolidation of its nanocrystals was demonstrated by the indicator titration. It was shown that the parallel increase of surface acidity and basicity is attributed to the formation of grain boundaries (GB) after MgO aerogel densification. A simple model predicting the increase of surface acidity-basicity of MgO that correlates with the results of direct measurements was proposed. The model is based on the study of the fine atomic structure at GB surface areas in consolidated MgO nanocrystals in the framework of Density Functional Theory. It is found that the displacements of coordinatively unsaturated surface ions near the GB are significant at the distances ~3-4 atomic layers from the geometrical contact plane between nanocrystals. The detailed analysis of atomic positions inside GB demonstrated the coordination deficiency of surface atoms at the GB areas leading to the formation of stretched bonds and to creation of low coordinated surface ions due to splitting of coordination numbers of surface atoms belonging to GB areas. Density of states for electrons shows the existence of additional states in the band gap close to the bottom of the conduction band. The adsorption energy of CO2 molecules atop oxygen atoms exposed at surface GB areas is of the same order of magnitude as that reported for oxygen atoms at crystallographic edges and corners of MgO crystals. It provides additional options for bonding of molecules at the surface of nanocrystalline MgO increasing the adsorption capacity and catalytic activity.

  9. Simple method for coating Si (1 0 0) surfaces with ferritin monolayers-Iron oxide quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Anetakis, Constantine; Gravalidis, Christoforos; Kassavetis, Spiros; Vouroutzis, Nikolaos; Frangis, Nikolaos; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2011-01-01

    With the goal to develop iron oxide quantum dots we developed a simple method to spread horse spleen ferritin monolayers on a Si (1 0 0) surface. Application of atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry showed the existence of regions with dense ferritin monolayers. Application of transmission electron microscopy identified the core of the spread ferritin as FeO nanocrystals.

  10. Observation of Si Nanocrystal Distrubition by Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serincan, U.

    2004-01-01

    The observation of Photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconductor nanocrystals embedded into the Si0 2 matrix has drawn much attention in recent years because of its promising solution for the fabrication of Si-based light emitting diodes (LEDs), Recently, we have observed that Si implanted and post annealed samples show a broad PL band near 850 nm. The broadness of the PL spectra is attributed to the nanocrystal size distribution in the annealed films. The size distribution of the nanocrystals shows a Gaussian distribution as determined by TRIM calculations. it is shown in this study that, nanocrystals with different sizes can selectively be excited with a conroBed etch of SiO 2 layer. Hence, by conducting an etch-measure experiment, the PL spectrum has been shown to correlate with Si nanocrystal distribution in the Si0 2 . The red and blue shifts observed during this measurement has evidenced that the observed light emission is a size dependent phenomenon resulted from the Si nanocrystals

  11. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  12. First Principles Study of Core-Shell Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Igor

    2011-03-01

    Core-shell nanocrystals composed of two different semiconductors have recently attracted considerable attention. These structures provide enhanced functionality and possess more degrees of freedom than single-component semiconductor nanocrystals and quantum dots. I present the results of ab initio density functional calculations for the structures, electronic densities of states, and optical absorption gaps of core-shell nanocrystals composed of group II-VI semiconductors, such as CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, and ZnTe. The outer surfaces of the nanocrystals are passivated using partially charged hydrogen atoms. The calculations are performed for ``traditional'' core-shell nanocrystals, in which a core a narrow gap semiconductor is covered with a shell of a wide gap material, and ``inverted'' core-shell nanocrystals, in which a wide-gap core is enclosed in a narrow-gap shell. Supported by the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund under Grant No. PRF-48556-AC10 and by the U. S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG36-08GO88008.

  13. Cellulose nanocrystals from acacia bark-Influence of solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taflick, Ticiane; Schwendler, Luana A; Rosa, Simone M L; Bica, Clara I D; Nachtigall, Sônia M B

    2017-08-01

    The isolation of cellulose nanocrystals from different lignocellulosic materials has shown increased interest in academic and technological research. These materials have excellent mechanical properties and can be used as nanofillers for polymer composites as well as transparent films for various applications. In this work, cellulose isolation was performed following an environmental friendly procedure without chlorine. Cellulose nanocrystals were isolated from the exhausted acacia bark (after the industrial process of extracting tannin) with the objective of evaluating the effect of the solvent extraction steps on the characteristics of cellulose and cellulose nanocrystals. It was also assessed the effect of acid hydrolysis time on the thermal stability, morphology and size of the nanocrystals, through TGA, TEM and light scattering analyses. It was concluded that the extraction step with solvents was important in the isolation of cellulose, but irrelevant in the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Light scattering experiments indicated that 30min of hydrolysis was long enough for the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simple Flame Test Techniques Using Cotton Swabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2004-07-01

    This article describes three new methods for performing simple flame tests using cotton swabs. The first method uses a Bunsen burner and solid metal salts; the second method uses a Bunsen burner and 1 M aqueous solutions of metal salts; and the third method uses candles, rubbing alcohol, and solid metal salts. These methods have the advantage of being easy to perform, require inexpensive and easily-obtained materials, and have easy cleanup and disposal methods. See the Discussion on this Tested Demonstation .

  15. Aceclofenac nanocrystals with enhanced in vitro, in vivo performance: formulation optimization, characterization, analgesic and acute toxicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Haroon Rahim,1 Abdul Sadiq,1 Shahzeb Khan,1 Mir Azam Khan,1 Syed Muhammad Hassan Shah,2 Zahid Hussain,3 Riaz Ullah,4 Abdelaaty Abdelaziz Shahat,4,5 Khalid Ibrahim6 1Department of Pharmacy, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 2Department of Pharmacy, Sarhad University of Science and Information Technology Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics, Universiti Teknologi, Mara, Selangor, Malaysia; 4Department of Pharmacognosy and Medicinal, Aromatic and Poisonous Plants Research Center, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Phytochemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Giza, Egypt; 6Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Al-Muzahmeiah Branch, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: This study was aimed to enhance the dissolution rate, oral bioavailability and analgesic potential of the aceclofenac (AC in the form of nanosuspension using cost-effective simple precipitation–ultrasonication approach. The nanocrystals were produced using the optimum conditions investigated for AC. The minimum particle size (PS and polydispersity index was found to be 112±2.01 nm and 0.165, respectively, using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (1%, w/w, polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (1%, w/w and sodium lauryl sulfate (0.12%, w/w. The characterization of AC was performed using zeta sizer, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The saturation solubility of the AC nanocrystals was substantially increased 2.6- and 4.5-fold compared to its unprocessed active pharmaceutical ingredient in stabilizer solution and unprocessed drug. Similarly, the dissolution rate of the AC nanocrystals was substantially enhanced compared to its other counterpart. The results showed that >88% of AC nanocrystals were dissolved in first 10 min compared to unprocessed AC (8.38%, microsuspension (66

  16. Photoluminescence and electrical impedance measurements on alloyed Zn{sub (1-x)}Cd{sub x}S nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, R. Sakthi Sudar, E-mail: rsakthiss@yahoo.com [Physics Research Centre, S.T. Hindu College, Nagercoil 629 002 (India); Mahadevan, C.K. [Physics Research Centre, S.T. Hindu College, Nagercoil 629 002 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High yield synthesis of Zn-Cd-S QDs. is achieved by solvothermal-microwave heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples are highly crystalline and the average particle size is {approx}3.5 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High luminescent quantum yield and narrow emission spectral widths are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High conduction activation energy is observed in the case of Zn-Cd coexisting QDs. - Abstract: A series of wurtzite Zn{sub (1-x)}Cd{sub x}S (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) nanocrystals with average crystallite size of 1.98, 1.82, 1.80, 2.04 and 2.51 nm, respectively, have been synthesized by simple solvothermal microwave heating method. The photoluminescence yield is found to be higher in the case of alloyed nanocrystals (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) as compared to ZnS (x = 0) and CdS (x = 1). The optical emission is tuned from blue (440 nm) to orange (575 nm) with the increase of Cd composition in Zn{sub (1-x)}Cd{sub x}S nanocrystal. The impedance analysis for Zn{sub (1-x)}Cd{sub x}S nanocrystals has been measured as a function of frequency and temperature. The real and imaginary part of complex impedance plots exhibit semicircle behavior in the complex plane. The AC activation energies of ZnS, Zn{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25}S, Zn{sub 0.5}Cd{sub 0.5}S, Zn{sub 0.25}Cd{sub 0.75}S and CdS nanocrystals were calculated from electrical conductivity analysis and are found to be 0.188, 0.378, 0.456, 0.284 and 0.255 eV, respectively. The conductivity of the alloyed nanocrystals was higher than that of ZnS and CdS.

  17. Low temperature in situ synthesis and the formation mechanism of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals by the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Fan, Chunhua; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Junhua; Lu, Zepeng; Ren, Jiayuan; Yu, Shuaiqin; Dong, Lihua; Li, Wenge

    2016-02-01

    The core-shell nanostructures have the advantages of combining distinctive properties of varied materials and improved properties over their single-component counterparts. Synthesis approaches for this class of nanostructures have been intensively explored, generally involving multiple steps. Here, a general and convenient strategy is developed for one-step in situ synthesis of various carbon-encapsulated nanocrystals with a core-shell structure via a solid-state reaction of metallocene complexes with (NH4)2S2O8 in an autoclave at 200 °C. A variety of near-spherical and equiaxed nanocrystals with a small median size ranging from 6.5 to 50.6 nm are prepared as inner cores, including Fe7S8, Ni3S4 and NiS, CoS, TiO2, TiO2 and S8, ZrO2, (NH4)3V(SO4)3 and VO2, Fe7S8 and Fe3O4, MoS2 and MoO2. The worm-like carbon shell provides exclusive room for hundreds of nanocrystals separated from each other, preventing nanocrystal aggregation. The synergistic effect of ammonium and a strong oxidizing anion on the electrophilic oxidation of metallocene complexes containing a metal-ligand π bond contributes to the carbon formation at low temperature. It is considered that the cyclopentadienyl ligand in a metallocene complex will decompose into highly reactive straight chain olefinic pieces and the metal-olefin π interaction enables an ordered self-assembly of olefinic pieces on nanocrystals to partially form graphitizable carbon and a core-shell structure. The high capacity, good cycling behavior and rate capability of Fe7S8@C and Ni3S4 and NiS@C electrodes are attributed to the good protection and electrical conductivity of the carbon shell.

  18. Making sense of nanocrystal lattice fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Qin Wentao; Moeck, Peter; Mandell, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The orientation dependence of thin-crystal lattice fringes can be gracefully quantified using fringe-visibility maps, a direct-space analog of Kikuchi maps [Nishikawa and Kikuchi, Nature (London) 121, 1019 (1928)]. As in navigation of reciprocal space with the aid of Kikuchi lines, fringe-visibility maps facilitate acquisition of crystallographic information from lattice images. In particular, these maps can help researchers to determine the three-dimensional lattice of individual nanocrystals, to 'fringe-fingerprint' collections of randomly oriented particles, and to measure local specimen thickness with only a modest tilt. Since the number of fringes in an image increases with maximum spatial-frequency squared, these strategies (with help from more precise goniometers) will be more useful as aberration correction moves resolutions into the subangstrom range

  19. 2011 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2011-07-29

    Small particles have been at the heart of nanoscience since the birth of the field and now stand ready to make significant contributions to the big challenges of energy, health and sustainability. Atomic clusters show exquisite size-dependent electronic and magnetic properties and offer a new level of control in catalyses, sensors and biochips; functionalised nanocrystals offer remarkable optical properties and diverse applications in electronic devices, solar energy, and therapy. Both areas are complemented by a raft of recent advances in fabrication, characterization, and performance of a diversity of nanomaterials from the single atom level to nanowires, nanodevices, and biologically-inspired nanosystems. The goal of the 2011 Gordon Conference is thus to continue and enhance the interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, fundamental scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. A single conference covering all aspects of nanoscience from fundamental issues to applications has the potential to create new ideas and stimulate cross fertilization. The meeting will therefore provide a balance among the three sub-components of the conference, true to its title, with a selection of new topics added to reflect rapid advances in the field. The open atmosphere of a Gordon conference, emphasizing the presentation of unpublished results and extensive discussions, is an ideal home for this rapidly developing field and will allow all participants to enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Historically, this Gordon conference has been oversubscribed, so we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Given the

  20. Hybrid Drug Delivery Patches Based on Spherical Cellulose Nanocrystals and Colloid Titania—Synthesis and Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga L. Evdokimova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Spherical cellulose nanocrystal-based hybrids grafted with titania nanoparticles were successfully produced for topical drug delivery. The conventional analytical filter paper was used as a precursor material for cellulose nanocrystals (CNC production. Cellulose nanocrystals were extracted via a simple and quick two-step process based on first the complexation with Cu(II solution in aqueous ammonia followed by acid hydrolysis with diluted H2SO4. Triclosan was selected as a model drug for complexation with titania and further introduction into the nanocellulose based composite. Obtained materials were characterized by a broad variety of microscopic, spectroscopic, and thermal analysis methods. The drug release studies showed long-term release profiles of triclosan from the titania based nanocomposite that agreed with Higuchi model. The bacterial susceptibility tests demonstrated that released triclosan retained its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. It was found that a small amount of titania significantly improved the antibacterial activity of obtained nanocomposites, even without immobilization of model drug. Thus, the developed hybrid patches are highly promising candidates for potential application as antibacterial agents.

  1. Improved electronic coupling in hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposites employing thiol-functionalized P3HT and bismuth sulfide nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L; Higuchi, S; MacLachlan, A J; Stavrinadis, A; Miller, N C; Diedenhofen, S L; Bernechea, M; Sweetnam, S; Nelson, J; Haque, S A; Tajima, K; Konstantatos, G

    2014-09-07

    In this study, we employ a thiol-functionalized polymer (P3HT-SH) as a leverage to tailor the nanomorphology and electronic coupling in polymer-nanocrystal composites for hybrid solar cells. The presence of the thiol functional group allows for a highly crystalline semiconducting polymer film at low thiol content and allows for improved nanomorphologies in hybrid organic-inorganic systems when employing non-toxic bismuth sulfide nanocrystals. The exciton dissociation efficiency and carrier dynamics at this hybrid heterojunction are investigated through photoluminescence quenching and transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, revealing a larger degree of polaron formation when P3HT-SH is employed, suggesting an increased electronic interaction between the metal chalcogenide nanocrystals and the thiol-functionalized P3HT. The fabricated photovoltaic devices show 15% higher power conversion efficiencies as a result of the improved nanomorphology and better charge transfer mechanism together with the higher open circuit voltages arising from the deeper energy levels of P3HT-SH.

  2. Understanding the Property-Activity Relationships of Polyhedral Cuprous Oxide Nanocrystals in Terms of Reactive Crystallographic Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanlin; Chang, Yun; Sun, Xiujuan; Liu, Ning; Cheng, Yan; Feng, Yuqing; Zhang, Haiyuan; Li, Xi

    2017-04-01

    The property-activity relationship is usually established to understand the toxicity mechanism of nanomaterials. In the present study, different morphological Cu2O nanocrystals, octahedrons, truncated octahedrons, cuboctahedrons, and cubes, were synthesized to precisely tuning the {100} and {111} facet percentages in purpose of systematically investigating the toxicity role of crystallographic facets in BEAS-2B and RAW 264.7 cells. It was found that the toxicity of polyhedral Cu2O nanocrystals was highly dependent on the exposed {100} surface after short-term exposure because {100} facets could produce more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than {111} facets; however, after long-term exposure, their toxicity showed again the correlation with total surface property because toxic copper ions were largely released from the whole nanocrystal surface irrespective of {100} or {111} facet and this copper dissolution caused the collapse of surface crystals and the vanishing of ROS. This study reveals the potential hazard of crystallographic facets based on ROS and metal dissolution mechanism at the different exposure time. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Cu-Fe-S Nanocrystals Exhibiting Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in the Visible to NIR Spectral Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Tomaszewski, Waldemar; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2016-07-05

    Cu-Fe-S nanocrystals exhibiting a strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect were synthesized for the first time. The elaborated reproducible preparation procedure involved copper(II) oleate, iron(III) stearate, and sulfur powder dissolved in oleylamine (OLA) as precursors. The wavelength of the plasmonic resonance maximum could be tuned by changing the Cu/Fe ratio in the resulting nanocrystals, being the most energetic for the 1:1 ratio (486 nm) and undergoing a bathochromic shift to ca. 1200 nm with an increase to 6:1. LSPR could also be observed in nanocrystals prepared from the same metal precursors and sulfur powder dissolved in 1-octadecene (ODE), provided that the sulfur precursor was taken in excess. Detailed analysis of the reaction mixture by chromatographic techniques, supplemented by mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy enabled the identification of the true chemical nature of the sulfur precursor in S/OLA, namely, (C18H35NH3(+))(C18H35NH-S8(-)), a reactive product of the reduction of elemental sulfur by the amine groups of OLA. In the case of the S/ODE precursor, the true precursors are much less reactive primary or secondary thioethers and dialkyl polysulfides.

  4. SnS thin films realized from colloidal nanocrystal inks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kergommeaux, Antoine de, E-mail: antoine@dekergommeaux.com [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); INES, CEA-DRT/LITEN/DTS/LMPV, Institut National de l' Energie Solaire, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Faure-Vincent, Jérôme [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Pron, Adam [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, Warsaw (Poland); Bettignies, Rémi de [INES, CEA-DRT/LITEN/DTS/LMPV, Institut National de l' Energie Solaire, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Reiss, Peter, E-mail: peter.reiss@cea.fr [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS), having a direct band gap of 1.3 eV, is a promising absorber material for solar energy conversion. We synthesized colloidal SnS nanocrystals with a size tuneable from 5 to 20 nm and low size dispersion. These nanocrystals can be processed as thin films using low-cost solution phase methods. They also offer the possibility of controlling the crystalline phase before deposition. With the goal to obtain dense and crack-free films of high conductivity, we used a layer-by-layer deposition technique. In the first step, the substrate was dipped in the nanocrystal colloidal solution (“ink”). Next, exchange of the nanocrystal surface ligands (oleylamine, trioctylphosphine, oleic acid) was carried out by dipping the substrate into a solution of small cross-linking molecules (1,4-benzenedithiol). This exchange enhances the electronic coupling and charge carrier mobilities by reducing the interparticle distance. At the same time it assures the immobilization of the nanocrystals to avoid their removal during subsequent depositions. The thickness of the nanocrystal thin films was controlled in a range of 100–250 nm by varying the number of the alternating nanocrystal deposition and ligand exchange steps. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations show that the obtained films are dense and homogeneous with a surface roughness as low as 3 to 4 nm root mean square. Using an inverted structure, the heterojunction of a SnS nanocrystals film with n-type ZnO nanocrystals shows a strongly increased current density under white light irradiation with respect to the dark. - Highlights: ► We synthesized 5–20 nm diameter SnS colloidal nanocrystals. ► Thin films of 100–250 nm can be obtained with layer-by-layer deposition method. ► Ligand exchange procedure is performed to enhance the conductivity. ► Electrical measurements under light exhibit an increase of the current density.

  5. Toxicity and Bio-Safety Evaluation of Magnetic Nanocrystals Designed for Nano-Medical Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheon, Jinwoo

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanocrystals exhibit unique superparamagnetic behaviors. When they get into bio-medical systems, these magnetic nanocrystals have the potential to be utilized as probes and vectors for next-generation diagnosis and therapy...

  6. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai, E-mail: wangyancai1999@163.com [Qilu University of Technology, School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  7. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai

    2016-01-01

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  8. Shape control and associated magnetic properties of spinel cobalt ferrite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Zhang, Z John

    2004-05-19

    By combining nonhydrolytic reaction with seed-mediated growth, high-quality and monodisperse spinel cobalt ferrite, CoFe(2)O(4), nanocrystals can be synthesized with a highly controllable shape of nearly spherical or almost perfectly cubic. The shape of the nanocrystals can also be reversibly interchanged between spherical and cubic morphology through controlling nanocrystal growth rate. Furthermore, the magnetic studies show that the blocking temperature, saturation, and remanent magnetization of nanocrystals are solely determined by the size regardless the spherical or cubic shape. However, the shape of the nanocrystals is a dominating factor for the coercivity of nanocrystals due to the effect of surface anisotropy. Such magnetic nanocrystals with distinct shapes possess tremendous potentials in fundamental understanding of magnetism and in technological applications of magnetic nanocrystals for high-density information storage.

  9. Mechanical, barrier and morphological properties of starch nanocrystals-reinforced pea starch films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Qiu, Chao; Ji, Na; Sun, Cuixia; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-05

    To characterize the pea starch films reinforced with waxy maize starch nanocrystals, the mechanical, water vapor barrier and morphological properties of the composite films were investigated. The addition of starch nanocrystals increased the tensile strength of the composite films, and the value of tensile strength of the composite films was highest when starch nanocrystals content was 5% (w/w). The moisture content (%), water vapor permeability, and water-vapor transmission rate of the composite films significantly decreased as starch nanocrystals content increased. When their starch nanocrystals content was 1-5%, the starch nanocrystals dispersed homogeneously in the composite films, resulting in a relatively smooth and compact film surface and better thermal stability. However, when starch nanocrystals content was more than 7%, the starch nanocrystals began to aggregate, which resulted in the surface of the composite films developing a longitudinal fibrous structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasmon-Enhanced Energy Transfer in Photosensitive Nanocrystal Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Shahab; Akgul, Mehmet Zafer; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2017-06-27

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interacted with localized surface plasmon (LSP) gives us the ability to overcome inadequate transfer of energy between donor and acceptor nanocrystals (NCs). In this paper, we show LSP-enhanced FRET in colloidal photosensors of NCs in operation, resulting in substantially enhanced photosensitivity. The proposed photosensitive device is a layered self-assembled colloidal platform consisting of separated monolayers of the donor and the acceptor colloidal NCs with an intermediate metal nanoparticle (MNP) layer made of gold interspaced by polyelectrolyte layers. Using LBL assembly, we fabricated and comparatively studied seven types of such NC-monolayer devices (containing only donor, only acceptor, Au MNP-donor, Au MNP-acceptor, donor-acceptor bilayer, donor-Au MNP-acceptor trilayer, and acceptor-Au MNP-donor reverse trilayer). In these structures, we revealed the effect of LSP-enhanced FRET and exciton interactions from the donor NCs layer to the acceptor NCs layer. Compared to a single acceptor NC device, we observed a significant extension in operating wavelength range and a substantial photosensitivity enhancement (2.91-fold) around the LSP resonance peak of Au MNPs in the LSP-enhanced FRET trilayer structure. Moreover, we present a theoretical model for the intercoupled donor-Au MNP-acceptor structure subject to the plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer. The obtained numerical results are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental studies done in our work. The potential to modify the energy transfer through mastering the exciton-plasmon interactions and its implication in devices make them attractive for applications in nanophotonic devices and sensors.

  11. Plasmonic gold nanocrystals coupled with photonic crystal seamlessly on TiO2 nanotube photoelectrodes for efficient visible light photoelectrochemical water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhonghai

    2013-01-09

    A visible light responsive plasmonic photocatalytic composite material is designed by rationally selecting Au nanocrystals and assembling them with the TiO2-based photonic crystal substrate. The selection of the Au nanocrystals is so that their surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) wavelength matches the photonic band gap of the photonic crystal and thus that the SPR of the Au receives remarkable assistance from the photonic crystal substrate. The design of the composite material is expected to significantly increase the Au SPR intensity and consequently boost the hot electron injection from the Au nanocrystals into the conduction band of TiO2, leading to a considerably enhanced water splitting performance of the material under visible light. A proof-of-concept example is provided by assembling 20 nm Au nanocrystals, with a SPR peak at 556 nm, onto the photonic crystal which is seamlessly connected on TiO2 nanotube array. Under visible light illumination (>420 nm), the designed material produced a photocurrent density of ∼150 μA cm-2, which is the highest value ever reported in any plasmonic Au/TiO2 system under visible light irradiation due to the photonic crystal-assisted SPR. This work contributes to the rational design of the visible light responsive plasmonic photocatalytic composite material based on wide band gap metal oxides for photoelectrochemical applications. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Chitosan nanoparticles/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites as a carrier system for the controlled release of repaglinide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Elseoud, Wafaa S; Hassan, Mohammad L; Sabaa, Magdy W; Basha, Mona; Hassan, Enas A; Fadel, Shaimaa M

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the use of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and chitosan nanoparticles (CHNP) for developing controlled-release drug delivery system of the anti-hyperglycemic drug Repaglinide (RPG). CNC was isolated from palm fruit stalks by sulfuric acid hydrolysis; the dimensions of the isolated nanocrystals were 86-237 nm in length and 5-7 nm in width. Simple and economic method was used for the fabrication of controlled release drug delivery system from CNC and CHNP loaded with RPG drug via ionic gelation of chitosan in the presence of CNC and RPG. The prepared systems showed high drug encapsulation efficiency of about ~98%. Chemical modification of CNC by oxidation to introduce carboxylic groups on their surface (OXCNC) was also carried out for further controlling of RPG release. Particles size analysis showed that the average size of CHNP was about 197 nm while CHNP/CNC/RPG or CHNP/OXCNC/RPG nanoparticles showed average size of 215-310 nm. Compatibility studies by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no chemical reaction between RPG and the system's components used. By studying the drug release kinetic, all the prepared RPG formulations followed Higuchi model, indicating that the drug released by diffusion through the nanoparticles polymeric matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of different precursors in the chemical synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusatti, M.; Barroso, G.S.; Souza, D.A.R.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Silva, L.A.; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the effect of ZnCl 2 and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O precursors in the synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals. The materials were obtained at a temperature of 90 deg C by a simple solochemical route. The resulting samples were characterized with respect to the determination of the formed phases, particle size and morphology, using the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterization techniques confirmed that the sample obtained with Zn(NO 3 ) 2. 6H 2 O has hexagonal crystal structure of ZnO and dimensions in the nanoscale. However, the material formed with ZnCl 2 was composed of a mixture of the ZnO phase and another correspondent to the Zn 5 (OH) 8 Cl 2 .H 2 O phase. For both precursors, the predominant morphology of the obtained ZnO nanocrystals is rod- like structure.(author)

  14. Effect of different precursors in the chemical synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusatti, M.; Barroso, G.S.; Souza, D.A.R.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Silva, L.A.; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DEQA/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e de Alimentos; Campos, C.E.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DF/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    This work aims to evaluate the effect of ZnCl{sub 2} and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O precursors in the synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals. The materials were obtained at a temperature of 90 deg C by a simple solochemical route. The resulting samples were characterized with respect to the determination of the formed phases, particle size and morphology, using the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterization techniques confirmed that the sample obtained with Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2.}6H{sub 2}O has hexagonal crystal structure of ZnO and dimensions in the nanoscale. However, the material formed with ZnCl{sub 2} was composed of a mixture of the ZnO phase and another correspondent to the Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O phase. For both precursors, the predominant morphology of the obtained ZnO nanocrystals is rod- like structure.(author)

  15. Strongly emissive perovskite nanocrystal inks for high-voltage solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Quinten A.; Gandini, Marina; di Stasio, Francesco; Rastogi, Prachi; Palazon, Francisco; Bertoni, Giovanni; Ball, James M.; Prato, Mirko; Petrozza, Annamaria; Manna, Liberato

    2016-12-01

    Lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently gained wide interest following their successful embodiment in solid-state photovoltaic devices with impressive power-conversion efficiencies, while offering a relatively simple and low-cost processability. Although the primary optoelectronic properties of these materials have already met the requirement for high-efficiency optoelectronic technologies, industrial scale-up requires more robust processing methods, as well as solvents that are less toxic than the ones that have been commonly used so successfully on the lab-scale. Here we report a fast, room-temperature synthesis of inks based on CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals using short, low-boiling-point ligands and environmentally friendly solvents. Requiring no lengthy post-synthesis treatments, the inks are directly used to fabricate films of high optoelectronic quality, exhibiting photoluminescence quantum yields higher than 30% and an amplified spontaneous emission threshold as low as 1.5 μJ cm-2. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of perovskite nanocrystal-based solar cells, with open-circuit voltages as high as 1.5 V.

  16. Surfactant-controlled composition and crystal structure of manganese(II sulfide nanocrystals prepared by solvothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Capetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the outcome of the solvothermal synthesis of manganese(II sulfide (MnS nanocrystals (NCs is affected by the type and amount of long chain surfactant present in the reaction mixture. Prompted by a previous observation that a larger than stoichiometric amount of sulfur is required [Puglisi, A.; Mondini, S.; Cenedese, S.; Ferretti, A. M.; Santo, N.; Ponti A. Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 2804–2813], we carried out a wide set of reactions using Mn(II carboxylates and Mn2(CO10 as precursors with varying amounts of sulfur and carboxylic acid. MnS NCs were obtained provided that the S/Mn ratio was larger than the L/Mn ratio, otherwise MnO NCs were produced. Since MnS can crystallize in three distinct phases (rock salt α-MnS, zincblende β-MnS, and wurtzite γ-MnS, we also investigated whether the surfactant affected the NC polymorphism. We found that MnS polymorphism can be controlled by appropriate selection of the surfactant. γ-MnS nanocrystals formed when a 1:2 mixture of long chain carboxylic acid and amine was used, irrespective of the presence of carboxylic acid as a free surfactant or ligand in the metal precursor. When we used a single surfactant (carboxylic acid, alcohol, thiol, amine, α-MnS nanocrystals were obtained. The peculiar role of the amine seems to be related to its basicity. The nanocrystals were characterized by TEM and electron diffraction; ATR-FTIR spectroscopy provided information about the surfactants adsorbed on the NCs.

  17. Effect of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals functionalized with lactoferrin in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Iafisco, Michele; Adamiano, Alessio; Tampieri, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a bioactive glycoprotein that became recently interesting in the field of bone regeneration for its modulatory effect on bone cells. On the basis of this evidence this work aims to functionalize biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals with LF to study their effect on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The orientation of LF on the HA surface was analyzed by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Three samples with different amounts of LF attached to HA nanocrystals were tested in vitro. The combined effect of HA and LF on MSC proliferation and morphology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene expression were evaluated at different time points. The sample with the lowest LF amount showed the best bioactivity probably due to the formation of a single layer of protein with a better molecular orientation. Coupling of HA-LF did not affect cell proliferation and morphology, while analysis of HA-LF on ALP activity and messenger RNA expression of the selected genes, demonstrated the role of HA-LF in the induction of osteogenic markers. HA-LF represents a promising system to be used to manufacture bioactive functional materials in tissue engineering (as scaffolds, injectable cements, or coatings for metallic implants) with enhanced anabolic activity to treat bone diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Capobianco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR excitation (in the biological window have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs, are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb3+ ion that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er3+, Ho3+ or Tm3+, that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to "in vitro" and "in vivo" cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review.

  19. In-Situ Growth and Characterization of Indium Tin Oxide Nanocrystal Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO nanocrystal rods were synthesized in-situ by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method and electron beam evaporation technique. When the electron-beam gun bombarded indium oxide (In2O3 and tin oxide (SnO2 mixed sources, indium and tin droplets appeared and acted as catalysts. The nanocrystal rods were in-situ grown on the basis of the metal catalyst point. The nanorods have a single crystal structure. Its structure was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The surface morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. During the evaporation, a chemical process was happened and an In2O3 and SnO2 solid solution was formed. The percentage of doped tin oxide was calculated by Vegard’s law to be 3.18%, which was in agreement with the mixture ratio of the experimental data. The single crystal rod had good semiconductor switch property and its threshold voltage of single rod was approximately 2.5 V which can be used as a micro switch device. The transmission rate of crystalline nanorods ITO film was over 90% in visible band and it was up to 95% in the blue green band as a result of the oxygen vacancy recombination luminescence.

  20. Magnetically separable nanocatalyst with Fe3O4 core and polydopamine-sandwiched-Au-nanocrystals shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Fang, Qunling; Duan, Jinyu; Xu, Hongmei; Xu, Hua-Jian; Xuan, Shouhu

    2018-03-16

    This work reports a novel Fe3O4@polydopamine-Au-polydopamine core/shell nanocomposite towards magnetically separable nanocatalyst. Because the polydopamine (PDA) layers sandwiched Au nanocrystals were prepared by a layer-by-layer method, the content of Au could be controlled by varying the Au shell number (such as burger-like Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA/Au/PDA). The Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA exhibited excellent catalytic activity on reducing the p-Nitrophenol since the substrate could penetrate the PDA shell. Owing to the protection of PDA shell, the Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA presented higher cyclability than the Fe3O4@PDA/Au. The activity of Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA maintained 95% after 7 cycles, while Fe3O4@PDA/Au was only 61%. The detailed cycling catalytic mechanism was investigated and it was found that the catalytic rate of Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA/Au/PDA was faster than Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA due to the higher Au content. Interestingly, this method could be extended for other magnetic nanocomposites with two different kinds of noble metal nanocrystals integrated within one particle, such as Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA/Ag/PDA and Fe3O4@PDA/Au/PDA/Pd/PDA.

  1. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naccache, Rafik; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Bogdan, Nicoleta [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, Montreal H4B 1R6 (Canada); Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Cruz, Maria del Carmen Iglesias de la [Departamento de Fisiología. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28029 (Spain); Fuente, Ángeles Juarranz de la [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Vetrone, Fiorenzo [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, Université du Québec, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García, E-mail: jose.garcia_sole@uam.es [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Capobianco, John A., E-mail: jose.garcia_sole@uam.es [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, Montreal H4B 1R6 (Canada)

    2012-10-22

    During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR) excitation (in the biological window) have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs), are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide) ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb{sup 3+} ion) that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}), that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared) radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to “in vitro” and “in vivo” cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review.

  2. Amperometric Formaldehyde Sensor Based on a Pd Nanocrystal Modified C/Co2P Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine Pd nanocrystals were grown on the cobalt phosphide (Co2P decorated Vulcan XC-72 carbon (C/Co2P, which is realized by first implementing the corresponding metal precursor and then the further chemical reduction process. The as-synthesized C/Co2P/Pd composite was further constructed to form a gas permeable electrode. This electrode can be applied for formaldehyde (HCHO detection. The results demonstrate that the Co2P nanocrystal can significantly improve the sensing performance of the C/Co2P/Pd electrode for catalytic oxidation of HCHO, which is considered to be attributed to the effective electron transfer from Co2P to Pd in the C/Co2P/Pd composites. Furthermore, the assembled C/Co2P/Pd sensor exhibits high sensitivity of 617 nA/ppm and good selectivity toward various interfering gases such as NO2, NO, SO2, CO2, and CO. It also shows the excellent linear response that the correlation coefficient is 0.994 in the concentration range of 1–10 ppm. Therefore, the proposed cost-effective C/Co2P/Pd nanocomposite, which owns advantages such as high activity and good stability, has the potential to be applied as an effective electrocatalyst for amperometric HCHO detection.

  3. Out- versus in-plane magnetic anisotropy of free Fe and Co nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dongzhe; Barreteau, Cyrille; Castell, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    We report tight-binding and density functional theory calculations of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of free Fe (body-centered-cubic) and Co (face-centered-cubic) slabs and nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are truncated square pyramids which can be grown experimentally by deposition of ...... reversal mechanism of the nanocrystals. Indeed, the very high uniaxial anisotropy of Fe nanocrystals makes them a much better potential candidate for magnetic storage devices....

  4. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  5. Ion beam assisted synthesis of nano-crystals in glasses (silver and lead chalcogenides); Synthese assistee par faisceau d'ions d'agregats dans les verres (argent et chalcogenures de plomb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espiau de Lamaestre, R

    2005-04-15

    This work deals with the interest in ion beams for controlling nano-crystals synthesis in glasses. We show two different ways to reach this aim, insisting on importance of redox phenomena induced by the penetration and implantation of ions in glasses. We first show that we can use the great energy density deposited by the ions to tailor reducing conditions, favorable to metallic nano-crystal precipitation. In particular, we show that microscopic mechanism of radiation induced silver precipitation in glasses are analogous to the ones of classical photography. Ion beams can also be used to overcome supersaturation of elements in a given matrix. In this work, we synthesized lead chalcogenide nano-crystals (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) whose optical properties are interesting for telecommunication applications. We demonstrate the influence of complex chalcogenide chemistry in oxide glasses, and its relationship with the observed loss of growth control when nano-crystals are synthesized by sequential implantation of Pb and S in pure silica. As a consequence of this understanding, we demonstrate a novel and controlled synthesis of PbS nano-crystals, consisting in implanting sulfur into a Pb-containing glass, before annealing. Choice of glass composition provides a better control of precipitation physico-chemistry, whereas the use of implantation allows high nano-crystal volume fractions to be reached. Our study of IR emission properties of these nano-crystals shows a very high excitation cross section, and evidence for a 'dark exciton' emitting level. (author)

  6. Depleted Nanocrystal-Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506, United States Abstract. CdSe-based nanocrystal quantum wells (QWs...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal - Oxide Heterojunctions for High...reviewed journals: Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal -Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection Report Title

  7. Infrared Emitting and Photoconducting Colloidal Silver Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Quantum Dots from a Silylamide-Promoted Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T.; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Guenter; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hesser, Günter

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region,

  8. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  9. Writing on Nanocrystals: Patterning Colloidal Inorganic Nanocrystal Films through Irradiation-Induced Chemical Transformations of Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, Francisco; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2017-09-27

    In the past couple of decades, colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and, more specifically, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as crucial materials for the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, with applications in very diverse areas such as optoelectronics and biotechnology. Films made of inorganic NCs deposited on a substrate can be patterned by e-beam lithography, altering the structure of their capping ligands and thus allowing exposed areas to remain on the substrate while non-exposed areas are redispersed in a solvent, as in a standard lift-off process. This methodology can be described as a "direct" lithography process, since the exposure is performed directly on the material of interest, in contrast with conventional lithography which uses a polymeric resist as a mask for subsequent material deposition (or etching). A few reports from the late 1990s and early 2000s used such direct lithography to fabricate electrical wires from metallic NCs. However, the poor conductivity obtained through this process hindered the widespread use of the technique. In the early 2010s, the same method was used to define fluorescent patterns on QD films, allowing for further applications in biosensing. For the past 2-3 years, direct lithography on NC films with e-beams and X-rays has gone through an important development as it has been demonstrated that it can tune further transformations on the NCs, leading to more complex patternings and opening a whole new set of possible applications. This Perspective summarizes the findings of the past 20 years on direct lithography on NC films with a focus on the latest developments on QDs from 2014 and provides different potential future outcomes of this promising technique.

  10. Facile Phosphine-Free Synthesis of CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals Without Precursor Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Chang-Qing; Wang Peng; Wang Xin; Li Yan

    2008-01-01

    AbstractA new simple method for synthesis of core/shell CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) is present. By adapting the use of cadmium stearate, oleylamine, and paraffin liquid to a non-injection synthesis and by applying a subsequent ZnS shelling procedure to CdSe NCs cores using Zinc acetate dihydrate and sulfur powder, luminescent CdSe/ZnS NCs with quantum yields of up to 36% (FWHM 42–43 nm) were obtained. A seeding-growth technique was first applied to the controlled synthesis of ZnS shell....

  11. Self-assembly of Fe3O4 nanocrystal-clusters into cauliflower-like architectures: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Luping; Liao Guihong; Bing Naici; Wang Linlin; Xie Hongyong

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale cauliflower-like Fe 3 O 4 architectures consist of well-assembled magnetite nanocrystal clusters have been synthesized by a simple solvothermal process. The as-synthesized Fe 3 O 4 samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM, TEM, etc. The results show that the samples exhibit cauliflower-like hierarchical microstructures. The influences of synthesis parameters on the morphology of the samples were experimentally investigated. Magnetic properties of the Fe 3 O 4 cauliflower-like hierarchical microstructures have been detected by VSM at room temperature, showing a relatively low saturation magnetization of 65 emu/g and an enhanced coercive force of 247 Oe. - Graphical Abstract: Cauliflower-like Fe 3 O 4 architectures consist of well-assembled magnetite nanocrystal clusters have been synthesized by a simple solvothermal process, using FeCl 3 .6H 2 O and EDA as the starting materials. Highlights: → Cauliflower-like Fe 3 O 4 architectures were successfully prepared by a simple solvothermal route. → The cauliflower-like Fe 3 O 4 architectures have a size in the range of 200-300 nm. → They show a low saturation magnetization of 65 emu/g and an enhanced coercive force of 247 Oe. → These Fe 3 O 4 architectures may have potential applications in catalysis and biological fields.

  12. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Joseph Robert [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and 13C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution 1H and 13C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 Å. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10-8 s-1. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring 14N-1H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T1 and T2 experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in 13C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  13. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  14. Strain-induced optical absorption properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai; Luo, Sheng; Ouyang, Gang; Yang, Guowei

    2013-06-28

    As comparable to the spherical nanocrystals, the nanocrystals with non-spherical shape have fascinating properties induced by a large fraction of under-coordinated atoms located at end parts, including edges, vertexes, and side facets. Herein, taking into account the shell-core configuration of semiconductor nanospheres, nanocubes, and nanorods, we investigate the self-equilibrium strain on optical absorption properties from the perspective of atomistic origin. It has been found that the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a pronounced blueshift compared with that of the bulk counterpart, and further shown that the band gap of nanospheres is different from that of naoncubes and nanorods. Moreover, we demonstrate that the shape effects have weak influences on the absorption coefficient when the crystal size approaches to a threshold value that is much smaller than the exciton Bohr radius at short wavelengths. Remarkably, the nanocubes have the largest deformation potential compared to the nanorods and nanospheres at fixed strain. The physical origin can be ascribed to the self-equilibrium strain induced by end effects that changes the bonding identifies, which leads to the variations of cohesive energy and entire Hamiltonian of nanocrystals. Our theoretical predictions not only are consistent with the experimental measurements and simulations, but also indicate the possible method on tunable optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  15. Performance Parameters and Characterizations of Nanocrystals: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi M. Chogale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies for such drugs. One such novel approach is formulation of the drugs as “Nanocrystals”. Nanocrystals are primarily comprised of drug and surfactants/stabilizers and are manufactured by “top-down” or “bottom-up” methods. Nanocrystals aid the clinical efficacy of drugs by various means such as enhancement of bioavailability, lowering of dose requirement, and facilitating sustained release of the drug. This effect is dependent on the various characteristics of nanocrystals (particle size, saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, which have an impact on the improved performance of the nanocrystals. Various sophisticated techniques have been developed to evaluate these characteristics. This article describes in detail the various characterization techniques along with a brief review of the significance of the various parameters on the performance of nanocrystals.

  16. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations.

  17. Micro- and nanocrystals of organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongjin; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2010-04-20

    Organic semiconductors have attracted wide attention in recent decades, resulting in the rapid development of organic electronics. For example, the solution processibility of organic semiconductors allows researchers to use unconventional deposition methods (such as inkjet printing and stamping) to fabricate large area devices at low cost. The mechanical properties of organic semiconductors also allow for flexible electronics. However, the most distinguishing feature of organic semiconductors is their chemical versatility, which permits the incorporation of functionalities through molecular design. However, key scientific challenges remain before organic electronics technology can advance further, including both the materials' low charge carrier mobility and researchers' limited knowledge of structure-property relationships in organic semiconductors. We expect that high-quality organic single crystals could overcome these challenges: their purity and long-range ordered molecular packing ensure high device performance and facilitate the study of structure-property relationships. Micro- and nanoscale organic crystals could offer practical advantages compared with their larger counterparts. First, growing small crystals conserves materials and saves time. Second, devices based on the smaller crystals could maintain the functional advantages of larger organic single crystals but would avoid the growth of large crystals, leading to the more efficient characterization of organic semiconductors. Third, the effective use of small crystals could allow researchers to integrate these materials into micro- and nanoelectronic devices using a "bottom-up" approach. Finally, unique properties of crystals at micro- and nanometer scale lead to new applications, such as flexible electronics. In this Account, we focus on organic micro- and nanocrystals, including their design, the controllable growth of crystals, and structure-property studies. We have also fabricated devices and

  18. Synthesis of octahedral, truncated octahedral, and cubic Rh2Ni nanocrystals and their structure-activity relationship for the decomposition of hydrazine in aqueous solution to hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Wang, Tao; Chu, Wei; Wu, Ping; Tong, Dong Ge

    2016-03-01

    We developed a co-reduction method to synthesize octahedral, truncated octahedral, and cubic Rh2Ni nanocrystals. The shape/size distribution, structural characteristics, and composition of the Rh2Ni nanocrystals are investigated, and their possible formation mechanism at high temperatures in margaric acid/1-aminoheptadecane solution in the presence of tetraethylgermanium and borane trimethylamine complexes is proposed. A preliminary probing of the structure-activity dependence of the surface ``clean'' Rh2Ni nanocrystals supported on carbon towards hydrazine (N2H4) in aqueous solution dehydrogenation revealed that the higher the percentage of {111} facets, the higher is the activity and H2 selectivity of the nanocrystals. This result was attributed to the {111} facets not only introducing more basic sites, but also weakening the interaction between the produced adspecies (including H2 and NHx) and surface metal atoms in comparison with those of {100} facets. Furthermore, the as-prepared Rh2Ni nanooctahedra exhibited 100% H2 selectivity and high activity at room temperature for H2 generation via N2H4 decomposition. The activation energy of the Rh2Ni nanooctahedra was 41.6 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1. The Rh2Ni nanooctahedra were stable catalysts for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of N2H4, providing 27 723 total turnovers in 30 h. Our work provides a new perspective concerning the possibility of constructing hydrogen-producing systems based on N2H4 and surface ``clean'' Rh2Ni nanocrystal catalysts with defined shapes supported on carbon that possess a competitive performance in comparison with NaBH4 and NH3BH3 hydrogen-producing systems for fuel cell applications.We developed a co-reduction method to synthesize octahedral, truncated octahedral, and cubic Rh2Ni nanocrystals. The shape/size distribution, structural characteristics, and composition of the Rh2Ni nanocrystals are investigated, and their possible formation mechanism at high temperatures in margaric acid/1

  19. Graphene oxide supported rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Taotao; Chen, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xiuwen; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Haining; Qi, Yu; Hong, Chenglin

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a simple electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals-graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (rCu2O-GO-AuNPs). GO as the template and surfactant resulting in rCu2O exhibit improved rhombic dodecahedral structure uniformity and excellent electrochemical performance. Moreover, GO was found to be able to effectively improve the long stability of rCu2O on the electrode response. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a low limit of detection (0.004 ng ml(-1)) and a large linear range (0.01-120 ng ml(-1)). This work presents a potential alternative for the diagnostic applications of GO-supported special morphology materials in biomedicine and biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Hematite Nanocrystals and Their Optical, Magnetic and Electrochemical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bangquan; Sun, Qian; Fan, Hongsheng; Cheng, Ming; Shan, Aixian; Cui, Yimin; Wang, Rongming

    2018-01-01

    A series of α-Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs) with fascinating morphologies, such as hollow nanoolives, nanotubes, nanospindles, and nanoplates, were prepared through a simple template-free hydrothermal synthesis process. The results showed that the morphologies could be easily controlled by SO42− and H2PO4−. Physical property analysis showed that the α-Fe2O3 NCs exhibited shape- and size-dependent ferromagnetic and optical behaviors. The absorption band peak of the α-Fe2O3 NCs could be tuned from 320 to 610 nm. Furthermore, when applied as electrode material for supercapacitor, the hollow olive-structure exhibited the highest capacitance (285.9 F·g−1) and an excellent long-term cycling stability (93% after 3000 cycles), indicating that it could serve as a candidate electrode material for a supercapacitor. PMID:29342929

  1. Enhanced red photoluminescence of quartz by silicon nanocrystals thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, A.; Pourgolestani, M.; Taheri, M.; Mansour, N.

    2018-03-01

    The room-temperature photoluminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) thin film on a quartz substrate were investigated, which presents the red emission enhancement of quartz. We show that the photoluminescence intensity of quartz, in the wavelength range of 640-700 nm, can be enhanced as much as 15-fold in the presence of the SiNCs thin film. Our results reveal that the defect states at the SiNCs/SiO2 interface can be excited more efficiently by indirect excitation via the SiNCs, leading to the prominent red photoluminescence enhancement under the photo-excitation in the range of 440-470 nm. This work suggests a simple pathway to improve silicon-based light emitting devices for photonic applications.

  2. Controlled synthesis of quantum confined CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals under ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huimei; Tang, Bing; Ma, Ying

    2018-02-01

    Room temperature recrystallization is a simple and convenient method for synthesis of all-inorganic perovskite nanomaterials with excellent luminescent properties. However, the fast crystallization usually brings the colloidal stability and uncontrollable synthesis issues in the formation of all-inorganic perovskite. In the present study, we present a new strategy to prepare the quantum confined CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with controlled morphology under ambient condition. With the assist of fatty acid-capped precursor, the crystallization and the following growth rate can be retarded. Thanks to the retarded reaction, the morphology can be varied from nanowires to nanoplates and the thickness can be controlled from 5-7 monolayers by simply adjusting the amount of octylammonium cations and oleic acid. The nanoplates exhibit a higher photoluminescence quantum yield than the nanowires possibly due to fewer defects in the nanoplates.

  3. Controlled Synthesis of Quantum Confined CsPbBr3 perovskite Nanocrystals under Ambient Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huimei; Tang, Bing; Ma, Ying

    2017-11-21

    Room temperature recrystallization is a simple and convenient method for synthesis of all-inorganic perovskite nanomaterials with excellent luminescent properties. However, the fast crystallization usually brings the colloidal stability and uncontrollable synthesis issues in the formation of all-inorganic perovskite. In the present study, we present a new strategy to prepare the quantum confined CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with controlled morphology under ambient condition. With the assist of fatty acid-capped precursor, the crystallization and the following growth rate can be retarded. Thanks to the retarded reaction, the morphology can be varied from nanowires to nanoplates and the thickness can be controlled from 5 to 7 monolayers by simply adjusting the amount of octylammonium cations and oleic acid. The nanoplates exhibit a higher photoluminescence quantum yield than the nanowires possibly due to fewer defects in the nanoplates. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Energy relaxation in CdSe nanocrystals: the effects of morphology and film preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Bryan T; Chen, Liangliang; Ruan, Xiulin; Xu, Xianfan

    2013-01-14

    Ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate exciton dynamics in CdSe nanocrystal films. The effects of morphology, quantum-dot versus quantum-rod, and preparation of nanocrystals in a thin film form are investigated. The measurements revealed longer intraband exciton relaxation in quantum-rods than in quantum-dots. The slowed relaxation in quantum-rods is due to mitigation of the Auger-relaxation mechanism from elongating the nanocrystal. In addition, the nanocrystal thin film showed long-lived confined acoustic phonons corresponding to the ellipsoidal breathing mode, contrary to others work on colloidal systems of CdSe nanocrystals.

  5. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  6. Role of the inversion layer on the charge injection in silicon nanocrystal multilayered light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondini, S. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Pucker, G. [Advanced Photonics and Photovoltaics Group, Bruno Kessler Foundation, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pavesi, L. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-07

    The role of the inversion layer on injection and recombination phenomena in light emitting diodes (LEDs) is here studied on a multilayer (ML) structure of silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in SiO{sub 2}. Two Si-NC LEDs, which are similar for the active material but different in the fabrication process, elucidate the role of the non-radiative recombination rates at the ML/substrate interface. By studying current- and capacitance-voltage characteristics as well as electroluminescence spectra and time-resolved electroluminescence under pulsed and alternating bias pumping scheme in both the devices, we are able to ascribe the different experimental results to an efficient or inefficient minority carrier (electron) supply by the p-type substrate in the metal oxide semiconductor LEDs.

  7. The possibility of optical excitations at the smallest gap of Cu-delafossite nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Muhammad N; Yan, Yanfa; Turner, John A; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M

    2014-01-01

    Even though the quantum size effect on the electronic gap of nano-structures is well-understood, its implication on the optical absorption near band gap energies is still a challenging question, especially for metal-oxides. A unique class of highly stable, self-saturated and self-charge-compensated delafossite nanocrystals has been identified in this paper. The structural and electronic properties of these nanocrystalline Cu-based delafossites have been studied using density functional theory (DFT). To better estimate the electronic excitation energies, and consequently the optical gap, a time-dependent DFT has also been employed. The goal here is to study whether a nano-phase can enhance the optical absorption of near band gap energies of delafossite nano-structures compared to their bulk state to enable their application as a photocatalyst. (paper)

  8. Highly efficient solid-state synthesis of carbon-encapsulated ultrafine MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals as high rate lithium-ion battery anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Boyang, E-mail: byliu@shmtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Maritime University, College of Ocean Science and Engineering (China); Shao, Yingfeng, E-mail: shaoyf@lnm.imech.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics (China); Zhang, Yuliang, E-mail: ylzhang@shmtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Fuhua, E-mail: fhzhang@shmtu.edu.cn; Zhong, Ning, E-mail: ningzhong@shmtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Maritime University, College of Ocean Science and Engineering (China); Li, Wenge, E-mail: wgli@shmtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Maritime University, Merchant Marine College (China)

    2016-12-15

    A simple and highly efficient method is developed for the one-step in situ preparation of carbon-encapsulated MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals (MoO{sub 2}@C) with core-shell structure for high-performance lithium-ion battery anode. The synthesis is depending on the solid-state reaction of cyclopentadienylmolybdenum tricarbonyl dimer with ammonium persulfate in an autoclave at 200 °C for 30 min. The large amount of heat generated during the explosive reaction cleaves the cyclopentadiene ligands into small carbon fragments, which form carbon shell after oxidative dehydrogenation coating on the MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals, resulting in the formation of core-shell structure. The MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals have an equiaxial morphology with an ultrafine diameter of 2–8 nm, and the median size is 4.9 nm. Hundreds of MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals are encapsulated together by the worm-like carbon shell, which is amorphous and about 3–5 nm in thickness. The content of MoO{sub 2} nanocrystals in the nanocomposite is about 69.3 wt.%. The MoO{sub 2}@C anode shows stable cyclability and retains a high reversible capacity of 443 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles at a current density of 3 A g{sup −1}, owing to the effective protection of carbon shell.

  9. Simultaneously Tailoring Surface Energies and Thermal Stabilities of Cellulose Nanocrystals Using Ion Exchange: Effects on Polymer Composite Properties for Transportation, Infrastructure, and Renewable Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Douglas M; Rodriguez, Rebeca S; Devilbiss, Mackenzie N; Woodcock, Jeremiah; Davis, Chelsea S; Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan; Gilman, Jeffrey W

    2016-10-12

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) have great potential as sustainable reinforcing materials for polymers, but there are a number of obstacles to commercialization that must first be overcome. High levels of water absorption, low thermal stabilities, poor miscibility with nonpolar polymers, and irreversible aggregation of the dried CNCs are among the greatest challenges to producing cellulose nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites. A simple, scalable technique to modify sulfated cellulose nanocrystals (Na-CNCs) has been developed to address all of these issues. By using an ion exchange process to replace Na + with imidazolium or phosphonium cations, the surface energy is altered, the thermal stability is increased, and the miscibility of dried CNCs with a nonpolar polymer (epoxy and polystyrene) is enhanced. Characterization of the resulting ion exchanged CNCs (IE-CNCs) using potentiometry, inverse gas chromatography, dynamic vapor sorption, and laser scanning confocal microscopy reveals that the IE-CNCs have lower surface energies, adsorb less water, and have thermal stabilities of up to 100 °C higher than those of prepared protonated cellulose nanocrystals (H-CNCs) and 40 °C higher than that of neutralized Na-CNC. Methyl(triphenyl)phosphonium exchanged cellulose nanocrystals (MePh 3 P-CNC) adsorbed 30% less water than Na-CNC, retained less water during desorption, and were used to prepare well-dispersed epoxy composites without the aid of a solvent and well-dispersed polystyrene nanocomposites using a melt blending technique at 195 °C. Predictions of dispersion quality and glass transition temperatures from molecular modeling experiments match experimental observations. These fiber-reinforced polymers can be used as lightweight composites in transportation, infrastructure, and renewable energy applications.

  10. Properties of Nanocrystals-formulated Aluminosilicate Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Conciauro

    2015-10-01

    insulating and/or mechanical properties. The nanocrystals- modified refractories showed variations in properties, with respect to the untreated aluminosilicate reference in heat- insulating performances (thermal diffusivities were measured by the “hot disk” technique. In general, they also showed improvements in mechanical compression resist‐ ance for all of the samples at 2 wt. %. The best heat insula‐ tion was obtained with the addition of nano-aluminium hydroxide at 2 wt. %, while the highest mechanical compres‐ sion breaking resistance was found with nano-CaCO3 at 2 wt. %. These outcomes were investigated with complemen‐ tary techniques, like mercury porosimetry for porosity, and Archimedes methods to measure physical properties like the bulk and apparent densities, apparent porosities and water absorption. The results show that the nano-alumini‐ um hydroxide modified bricks were the most porous, which could explain the best heat-insulating performances. There is a less straightforward explanation for the mechanical resistance results, as they may have relations with the characteristics of the pores. Furthermore, the nanoparti‐ cles may have possible reactions with the matrix during the heat treatments.

  11. PbSe Nanocrystal Excitonic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2009-11-11

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of colloidal PbSe nanocrystal (NC)-based photovoltaic test structures that exhibit an excitonic solar cell mechanism. Charge extraction from the NC active layer is driven by a photoinduced chemical potential energy gradient at the nanostructured heterojunction. By minimizing perturbation to PbSe NC energy levels and thereby gaining insight into the "intrinsic" photovoltaic properties and charge transfer mechanism of PbSe NC, we show a direct correlation between interfacial energy level offsets and photovoltaic device performance. Size dependent PbSe NC energy levels were determined by cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy and correlated to photovoltaic measurements. Photovoltaic test structures were fabricated from PbSe NC films sandwiched between layers of ZnO nanoparticles and PEDOT:PSS as electron and hole transporting elements, respectively. The device current-voltage characteristics suggest a charge separation mechanism that Is distinct from previously reported Schottky devices and consistent with signatures of excitonic solar cells. Remarkably, despite the limitation of planar junction structure, and without film thickness optimization, the best performing device shows a 1-sun power conversion efficiency of 3.4%, ranking among the highest performing NC-based solar cells reported to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. Recent Developments in Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Moran, Christine H; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    This feature article introduces our recent work on understanding the roles played by citrate and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as capping agents in seed-mediated syntheses of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes. We have demonstrated that citrate and PVP selectively bind to Ag(111) and Ag(100) surfaces, respectively, and thus favor the formation of Ag nanocrystals enclosed preferentially by {111} or {100} facets. In addition, we have quantified the coverage density of PVP adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanocubes. Based on the mechanistic understanding, a series of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes have been successfully synthesized by using different combinations of seeds and capping agents: single-crystal spherical/cubic seeds with citrate for cuboctahedrons and octahedrons or with PVP for cubes and bars; and plate-like seeds with citrate for enlarged thin plates or with PVP for thickened plates.

  13. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M. [School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 {sup o}C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 {sup o}C to 500 {sup o}C. The N{sub 2} adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  14. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.J.; Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 o C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 o C to 500 o C. The N 2 adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals, nanofibers, and their composites as renewable smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Zhai, Lindong; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Yun, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is one of abundant renewable biomaterials in the world. Over 1.5 trillion tons of cellulose is produced per year in nature by biosynthesis, forming microfibrils which in turn aggregate to form cellulose fibers. Using new effective methods these microfibrils can be disintegrated from the fibers to nanosized materials, so called cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and cellulose nanofiber (CNF). The CNC and CNF have extremely good strength properties, dimensional stability, thermal stability and good optical properties on top of their renewable behavior, which can be a building block of new materials. This paper represents recent advancement of cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibers, followed by their possibility for smart materials. Natural behaviors, extraction, modification of cellulose nanocrystals and fibers are explained and their synthesis with nanomaterials is introduced, which is necessary to meet the technological requirements for smart materials. Also, its challenges are addressed.

  16. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  17. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Networks of ultra-fine Ag nanocrystals in a Teflon AF (registered) matrix by vapour phase e-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, A; Bayer, I S; Marken, B; Pounds, T D; Norton, M G

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated nanocomposite thin films comprising silver (Ag) nanoparticles dispersed in a Teflon AF (registered) polymer matrix using electron-beam-assisted physical vapour deposition. Four different Ag nanoparticle volume fillings (20%, 35%, 70% and 75%) were achieved by varying the relative metal-polymer evaporation rates with the formation of highly crystalline Ag nanoparticles regardless of the filling ratio. The present fabrication technique allowed full control over dispersion uniformity of nanoparticles in the polymer network. At 20% and 35% metal volume fillings, the nanocomposite film morphology consists of a uniformly dispersed assembly of equiaxed isolated Ag nanoparticles. At higher metal volume fractions the nanocomposite structures displayed two different and unique Ag nanoparticle arrangements within the polymer matrix. In particular, at 70% metal filling, the formation of irregularly shaped clusters of individually assembled nanocrystals was observed. At a slightly higher volume filling (75%), larger irregularly shaped Ag nanocrystals that appeared to be the result of coalescence and grain growth were observed. Finally, a composite theory developed by Tandon and Weng was used to estimate various elastic properties of the nanocomposite films. At high metal filling, the reinforcing effect of the Ag nanoparticles was reflected as approximately a sixfold increase in the elastic modulus compared to the virgin polymer film. Possible applications of such ultra-fine metal nanoparticles networks are discussed

  19. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  20. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  1. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  2. Microfluidic Fabrication of Hydrocortisone Nanocrystals Coated with Polymeric Stabilisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Odetade

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone (HC nanocrystals intended for parenteral administration of HC were produced by anti-solvent crystallisation within coaxial assemblies of pulled borosilicate glass capillaries using either co-current flow of aqueous and organic phases or counter-current flow focusing. The organic phase was composed of 7 mg/mL of HC in a 60:40 (v/v mixture of ethanol and water and the anti-solvent was milli-Q water. The microfluidic mixers were fabricated with an orifice diameter of the inner capillary ranging from 50 µm to 400 µm and operated at the aqueous to organic phase flow rate ratio ranging from 5 to 25. The size of the nanocrystals decreased with increasing aqueous to organic flow rate ratio. The counter-current flow microfluidic mixers provided smaller nanocrystals than the co-current flow devices under the same conditions and for the same geometry, due to smaller diameter of the organic phase stream in the mixing zone. The Z-average particle size of the drug nanocrystals increased from 210–280 nm to 320–400 nm after coating the nanocrystals with 0.2 wt % aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC in a stirred vial. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD analyses carried out on the dried nanocrystals stabilized with HPMC, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS were investigated and reported. The degree of crystallinity for the processed sample was lowest for the sample stabilised with HPMC and the highest for the raw HC powder.

  3. MEGACELL: A nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroppa, Daniel G.; Righetto, Ricardo D.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. -- Highlights: → A software to support the HRTEM image simulation of nanocrystals in actual size. → MEGACELL allows the construction of complex nanocrystals models for multislice image simulation. → Some examples of improved nanocrystalline system characterization are presented, including the analysis of 3D morphology and growth behavior.

  4. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  5. Processing of Polymer Nanocomposites Reinforced with Polysaccharide Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous suspensions of polysaccharide (cellulose, chitin or starch nanocrystals can be prepared by acid hydrolysis of biomass. The main problem with their practical use is related to the homogeneous dispersion of these nanoparticles within a polymeric matrix. Water is the preferred processing medium. A new and interesting way for the processing of polysaccharide nanocrystals-based nanocomposites is their transformation into a co-continuous material through long chain surface chemical modification. It involves the surface chemical modification of the nanoparticles based on the use of grafting agents bearing a reactive end group and a long compatibilizing tail.

  6. Improved reliability of Mo nanocrystal memory with ammonia plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Tu, C.-H.; Chen, W.-R.; Hu, C.-W.; Sze, Simon M.; Tseng, T.-Y.; Chang, T.-C.; Chen, S.-C.; Lin, J.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated ammonia plasma treatment influence on the nonvolatile memory characteristics of the charge storage layer composed of Mo nanocrystals embedded in nonstoichiometry oxide (SiO x ). X-ray photoelectron spectra analyses revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into the charge storage layer. Electric analyses indicated that the memory window was reduced and the retention and the endurance improved after the treatment. The reduction in the memory window and the improvement in retention were interpreted in terms of the nitrogen passivation of traps in the oxide around Mo nanocrystals. The robust endurance characteristic was attributed the improvement of the quality of the surrounding oxide by nitrogen passivation

  7. The detection and subsequent volume optimization of biological nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Luft

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and then optimizing initial crystallization conditions is a prerequisite for macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. Improved technologies enable data collection on crystals that are difficult if not impossible to detect using visible imaging. The application of second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals and ultraviolet two-photon excited fluorescence detection is shown to be applicable in a high-throughput manner to rapidly verify the presence of nanocrystals in crystallization screening conditions. It is noted that the nanocrystals are rarely seen without also producing microcrystals from other chemical conditions. A crystal volume optimization method is described and associated with a phase diagram for crystallization.

  8. Confined Growth of ZIF-8 Nanocrystals with Tunable Structural Colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Bingdong; Yang, Yuanqing; Jansen, Henri

    2018-01-01

    -8 synthesis, and the dispersion of gold nanoparticles as inhibitors for the following crystallization transformation of ZIF-8 crystals. By choosing the concentration of gold nanoparticles, the density of ZIF-8 nanocrystals can be controlled and the sizes of individual ZIF-8 crystals can be scaled......Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF-8) have promising applications as sensors or catalysts due to their highly porous crystalline structures. While most of the previous studies are based on ZIF-8 crystals either in isolated particles in aqueous environments or in a compact colloidal form, here...... nanocrystals empowered with tunable optical properties paves a new way to explore the promising applications in nanophotonics and bionanotechnology....

  9. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  10. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-05-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  11. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D' Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo, E-mail: nikolap@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-27

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  12. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2010-05-12

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Elucidating the Potential Biological Impact of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Camarero-Espinosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanocrystals exhibit an interesting combination of mechanical properties and physical characteristics, which make them potentially useful for a wide range of consumer applications. However, as the usage of these bio-based nanofibers increases, a greater understanding of human exposure addressing their potential health issues should be gained. The aim of this perspective is to highlight how knowledge obtained from studying the biological impact of other nanomaterials can provide a basis for future research strategies to deduce the possible human health risks posed by cellulose nanocrystals.

  14. Synthesis and measurements of the optical bandgap of single crystalline complex metal oxide BaCuV2O7 nanowires by UV–VIS absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, Imran; Shahid, Muhammad; Aboud, Mohamed F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of single crystalline complex metal oxides BaCuV 2 O 7 nanowires. • Surfactant free, economically favorable chemical solution deposition method. • Complex metal oxides nanowires with controlled stoichiometry. • Simply controlling the temperature and thickness of the coated film, we can easily obtain high quality BaCuV 2 O 7 nanowires. - Abstract: The synthesis of single crystalline complex metal oxides BaCuV 2 O 7 nanowires were attained by using surfactant free, economically favorable chemical solution deposition method. A thin layer of BaCuV 2 O 7 nanocrystals is formed by the decomposition of complex metal oxide solution at 150 °C to provide nucleation sites for the growth of nanowires. The synthesized nanowires were typically 1–5 μm long with diameter from 50 to 150 nm. We showed that by simply controlling the temperature and thickness of the coated film, we can easily obtain high quality BaCuV 2 O 7 nanowires. The UV–VIS absorption spectra show indirect bandgap of 2.65 ± 0.05 eV of nanowires. The temperature-dependent resistances of BaCuV 2 O 7 nanowires agree with the exponential correlation, supporting that the conducting carriers are the quasi-free electrons. We believe that our methodology will provides a simple and convenient route for the synthesis of variety of complex metal oxides nanowires with controlled stoichiometry

  15. Physical and electrical characterization of atomic-layer-deposited Ru nanocrystals embedded into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min; Chen Wei; Ding Shijin; Liu Zhiying; Huang Yue; Liao Zhongwei; Zhang, David Wei [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, School of Microelectronics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2008-02-07

    Growth of uniformly distributed Ru nanocrystals on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is demonstrated via atomic layer deposition using bis(cyclopentadienyl)-ruthenium and oxygen precursors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses reveal that metallic Ru nanocrystals were formed in this experiment, and the RuO{sub 2} surface is due to oxidation of Ru when exposed to air. The metal-oxide-silicon capacitors with Ru nanocrystals embedded into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are electrically measured, exhibiting obvious memory effects such as a large hysteresis memory window of 3.4 V for the sweeping gate voltage of -2.5/ + 8 V and a significant flat-band voltage shift of 3.2 V under the programming of 10 V/1 ms, i.e. an effective electron injection rate as fast as 1.78 x 10{sup -6} C cm{sup -2} ms{sup -1}. This relates to the program mechanism of direct tunnelling and a large potential well depth. (fast track communication)

  16. Solution-Processed Efficient Nanocrystal Solar Cells Based on CdTe and CdS Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals solar cells have attracted much attention due to their low cost, low material consumption, and potential for roll-to-roll production. Among all kinds of semiconductor materials, CdS exhibits the lowest lattice mismatch with CdTe, which permits high junction quality and high device performance. In this study, high quality CdS nanocrystals were prepared by a non-injection technique with tetraethylthiuram disufide and 2,2′-dithiobisbenzothiazole as the stabilizers. Based on the CdTe and CdS nanocrystals, devices with the architecture of ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/MoOx/Au were fabricated successfully by a solution process under ambient condition. The effects of annealing conditions, film thickness, and detailed device structure on the CdTe/CdS nanocrystal solar cells were investigated and discussed in detail. We demonstrate that high junction quality can be obtained by using CdS nanocrystal thin film compared to traditional CdS film via chemical bath deposition (CBD. The best device had short circuit current density (Jsc, open circuit voltage (Voc and fill factor (FF of 17.26 mA/cm2, 0.56 V, and 52.84%, respectively, resulting in a power conversion efficiency (PCE of 5.14%, which is significantly higher than that reported using CBD CdS as the window layer. This work provides important suggestions for the further improvement of efficiency in CdTe nanocrystal solar cells.

  17. Simple model of stacking-fault energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Jacobsen, Lærke Wedel

    1993-01-01

    A simple model for the energetics of stacking faults in fcc metals is constructed. The model contains third-nearest-neighbor pairwise interactions and a term involving the fourth moment of the electronic density of states. The model is in excellent agreement with recently published local-density ......A simple model for the energetics of stacking faults in fcc metals is constructed. The model contains third-nearest-neighbor pairwise interactions and a term involving the fourth moment of the electronic density of states. The model is in excellent agreement with recently published local...

  18. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  19. Green synthesis of core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals dispersed on graphene with enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; Li, Shan-Shan; Ma, Xiaohong; Chen, Fang-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Well-defined core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals (AuPd@Pd) are facilely prepared by a simple and green wet-chemical method at 25 °C. A Good's buffer, 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), is used as a reducing agent and a shape-directing agent, while there is no template, seed, organic solvent, or surfactant involved. The AuPd@Pd nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on graphene nanosheets by ultrasonication, resulting in the formation of graphene supported AuPd@Pd (G-AuPd@Pd). The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit the improved catalytic activity, good tolerance, and better stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline media, compared with the G-Pd and commercial Pd black catalysts. The as-developed method may provide a promising pathway for large-scale fabrication of AuPd-based catalysts.

  20. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.